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Sample records for extremity tld system

  1. Microprocessor controlled portable TLD system.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Feher, I

    1996-01-01

    An up-to-date microprocessor controlled thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) system for environmental and space dose measurements has been developed. The earlier version of the portable TLD system, Pille, was successfully used on Soviet orbital stations as well as on the US Space Shuttle, and for environmental monitoring. The new portable TLD system, Pille'95, consists of a reader and TL bulb dosemeters, and each dosemeter is provided with an EEPROM chip for automatic identification. The glow curve data are digitised and analysed by the program of the reader. The measured data and the identification number appear on the LED display of the reader. Up to several thousand measured data together with the glow curves can be stored on a removable flash memory card. The whole system is supplied either from built-in rechargeable batteries or from the mains of the space station. PMID:11540052

  2. Microprocessor controlled portable TLD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apathy, I.; Deme, S.; Feher, I.

    1996-01-01

    An up-to-date microprocessor controlled thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) system for environmental and space dose measurements has been developed. The earlier version of the portable TLD system, Pille, was successfully used on Soviet orbital stations as well as on the US Space Shuttle, and for environmental monitoring. The new portable TLD system, Pille'95, consists of a reader and TL bulb dosemeters, and each dosemeter is provided with an EEPROM chip for automatic identification. The glow curve data are digitised and analysed by the program of the reader. The measured data and the identification number appear on the LED display of the reader. Up to several thousand measured data together with the glow curves can be stored on a removable flash memory card. The whole system is supplied either from built-in rechargeable batteries or from the mains of the space station.

  3. Implementing a new TLD system

    SciTech Connect

    Rhea, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems will soon be issuing new personnel dosimeters at four of their five Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, The Piketon, Ohio uranium enrichment facility is not included in this dosimetry upgrade program. This talk will focus on the ORNL perspective of this program, especially the new beta-gamma dosimeter. Neutron dosimetry will be discussed briefly. The objective of this upgrade is to put in place a state-of-the-art personnel dosimetry system and to meet the recent DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program performance criteria. Processing such a large number of dosimeters will require stringent quality controls. Approximately 18,000 beta-gamma dosimeters are scheduled for issue in January 1989. 15 figs.

  4. Positional glow curve simulation for thermoluminescent detector (TLD) system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, C. J.; Kearfott, K. J.

    1999-02-01

    Multi- and thin element dosimeters, variable heating rate schemes, and glow-curve analysis have been employed to improve environmental and personnel dosimetry using thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). Detailed analysis of the effects of errors and optimization of techniques would be highly desirable. However, an understanding of the relationship between TL light production, light attenuation, and precise heating schemes is made difficult because of experimental challenges involved in measuring positional TL light production and temperature variations as a function of time. This work reports the development of a general-purpose computer code, thermoluminescent detector simulator, TLD-SIM, to simulate the heating of any TLD type using a variety of conventional and experimental heating methods including pulsed focused or unfocused lasers with Gaussian or uniform cross sections, planchet, hot gas, hot finger, optical, infrared, or electrical heating. TLD-SIM has been used to study the impact on the TL light production of varying the input parameters which include: detector composition, heat capacity, heat conductivity, physical size, and density; trapped electron density, the frequency factor of oscillation of electrons in the traps, and trap-conduction band potential energy difference; heating scheme source terms and heat transfer boundary conditions; and TL light scatter and attenuation coefficients. Temperature profiles and glow curves as a function of position time, as well as the corresponding temporally and/or spatially integrated glow values, may be plotted while varying any of the input parameters. Examples illustrating TLD system functions, including glow curve variability, will be presented. The flexible capabilities of TLD-SIM promises to enable improved TLD system design.

  5. Dose measurements in space by the Hungarian Pille TLD system.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Feher, I; Akatov, Y A; Reitz, G; Arkhanguelski, V V

    2002-10-01

    Exposure of crew, equipment, and experiments to the ambient space radiation environment in low Earth orbit poses one of the most significant problems to long-term space habitation. Accurate dose measurement has become increasingly important during the assembly (extravehicular activity (EVA)) and operation of space stations such as on Space Station Mir. Passive integrating detector systems such as thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are commonly used for dosimetry mapping and personal dosimetry on space vehicles. The well-known advantages of passive detector systems are their independence of power supply, small dimensions, high sensitivity, good stability, wide measuring range, resistance to environmental effects, and relatively low cost. Nevertheless, they have the general disadvantage that for evaluation purposes they need a laboratory or large--in mass and power consumption--terrestrial equipment, and consequently they cannot provide time-resolved dose data during long-term space flights. KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (KFKI AEKI) has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescent dosemeter systems for measuring cosmic radiation doses in the 10 microGy to 10 Gy range, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a compact, self-contained, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system, highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A detailed description of the system is given and the comprehensive results of these measurements are summarised. PMID:12440428

  6. The automated/computerized TLD-personnel monitoring system in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duftschmid, K. E.

    1980-09-01

    The paper discusses the layout and operation details of the automated TLD system used in Austria for several years to monitor some 13000 radiation workers per month. Dosimetric properties, handling and computer software are described.

  7. Evaluation of Effective Sources in Uncertainty Measurements of Personal Dosimetry by a Harshaw TLD System

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Pooya, SM; Orouji, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: The accurate results of the individual doses in personal dosimety which are reported by the service providers in personal dosimetry are very important. There are national / international criteria for acceptable dosimetry system performance. Objective: In this research, the sources of uncertainties are identified, measured and calculated in a personal dosimetry system by TLD. Method: These sources are included; inhomogeneity of TLDs sensitivity, variability of TLD readings due to limited sensitivity and background, energy dependence, directional dependence, non-linearity of the response, fading, dependent on ambient temperature / humidity and calibration errors, which may affect on the dose responses. Some parameters which influence on the above sources of uncertainty are studied for Harshaw TLD-100 cards dosimeters as well as the hot gas Harshaw 6600 TLD reader system. Results: The individual uncertainties of each sources was measured less than 6.7% in 68% confidence level. The total uncertainty was calculated 17.5% with 95% confidence level. Conclusion: The TLD-100 personal dosimeters as well as the Harshaw TLD-100 reader 6600 system show the total uncertainty value which is less than that of admissible value of 42% for personal dosimetry services. PMID:25505769

  8. The study of new calibration features in the Harshaw TLD system.

    PubMed

    Luo, L Z

    2007-01-01

    The Harshaw TLD system has three key calibration procedures: the Reader, the Dosemeter and the Algorithm. These functions must be properly calibrated for the system to achieve the optimum results. For the conventional reader and dosemeter calibration, Harshaw TLD recommends a pre-fade and a post-fade of 24-48 h when calibrating the system for LiF:Mg,Ti type dosemeter. It is also recommended that keeping the fade time consistent is important to maintain the quality of the system performance. In recent years, new calibration features have been introduced into the Harshaw TLD models 6600 and 8800 operating systems. These new features are Auto Calibration, Auto QC and Auto Blank, and they give the user the ability to set up the clear-expose-read process to be performed automatically in a sequence for each dosemeter. This saves processing time and keeps the fade time the same. However, since the fade time is near zero, will it affect the TLD system calibration factors? What should the user expect? This paper presents a study of the effect of Auto Calibration/Auto QC to the TLD operation. PMID:17223631

  9. Implementation of the Panasonic TLD (Thermoluminescent Dosimeter) system for personnel monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarre, M.; Teasdale, C.L.; Sygitowicz, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    In January 1987, the dosimetry system at the Nevada Test Site changed from a film badge dosimetry program to the Panasonic Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) system to monitor external radiation exposure to personnel working at the Nevada Test Site. In order to implement the Panasonic TLD system, a combination dosimeter and security credential badge holder had to be developed, a computer processing system developed, a dose processing algorithm developed and enough Panasonic UD802AS2 TLDs purchased to support a large quarterly exchange. Problems that had to be resolved during the first year of operation were: processing approximately 15,000 dosimeters per quarter; multiple exchange of the same dosimeter in the same quarter due to incoming visitors and vendors; late returns due to the unique user community at the Nevada Test Site; TLD damage experience and unusual TLD anomalies. The experience from the original planning stages for conversion to the TLD system to the reality of the implementation of this system will be discussed.

  10. An on-board TLD system for dose monitoring on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Bodnar, L; Csoke, A; Hejja, I

    1999-01-01

    This institute has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) systems for spacecraft, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a small, compact, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A new implementation of the system will be placed on several segments of the ISS as the contribution of Hungary to this intemational enterprise. The well proven CaSO4:Dy dosemeters will be used for routine dosimetry of the astronauts and in biological experiments. The mean LET value will be measured by LiF dosemeters while doses caused by neutrons are planned to be determined by 6LiF/7LiF dosemeter pairs and moderators. A detailed description of the system is given. PMID:11542233

  11. Study of minimum detection limit of TLD personnel monitoring system in India.

    PubMed

    Sneha, C; Pradhan, S M; Adtani, M M

    2010-09-01

    Personnel monitoring of radiation workers in India is carried out using a thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) system based on CaSO(4):Dy Teflon TLD disc. The dose due to occupational exposure for a majority of radiation workers is very small and hence is reported as zero. In view of this the detection of low levels of occupational dose over and above a variable background assumes great importance. The present values of reporting levels are based on the standard deviations of annealed dosemeters and therefore are fixed irrespective of period of use and background radiation levels. The validity of these levels is investigated under laboratory conditions. The laboratory values of standard deviations cannot be used as an indication of the imprecision that occurs during service. Therefore, the validity of the reporting levels is also investigated for control dosemeters used in routine service. PMID:20511403

  12. Unfolding neutron spectra obtained from BS-TLD system using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A L; Silva, E R; Ferreira, T A E; Vilela, E C

    2012-12-01

    Due to the variability of neutron spectrum within the same environment, it is essential that the spectral distribution as a function of energy should be characterized. The precise information allows radiological quantities establishment related to that spectrum, but it is necessary that a spectrometric system covers a large interval of energy and an unfolding process is appropriate. This paper proposes use of a technique of Artificial Intelligence (AI) called genetic algorithm (GA), which uses bio-inspired mathematical models with the implementation of a specific matrix to unfolding data obtained from a combination of TLDs embedded in a BS system to characterize the neutron spectrum as a function of energy. The results obtained with this method were in accordance with reference spectra, thus enabling this technique to unfold neutron spectra with the BS-TLD system. PMID:22963980

  13. A whole-body dosimetry system for personal monitoring based on hot-pressed thin layer TLD.

    PubMed

    Busch, F; Engelhardt, J; Martini, E; Lesz, J

    2011-03-01

    We are introducing a new high-capacity thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) system to measure the whole body values of H(p)(10) and H(p)(0.07) from photons for use in individual monitoring services. Small and light-weight badges allow a convenient application in a wide variety of workplaces with photon radiation from 20 keV to at least 7 MeV. The main advantage of this system will be the large capacity of ∼ 100,000 dosemeters per month at costs equivalent to the current film monitoring. The hot-pressed thin-layer TL detector (LiF:Mg,Ti) is welded onto an aluminium substrate and provided with a data matrix code for automatic processing. The detector holder has been optimised, that no additional filter is necessary. The new designed TLD reader with readout times <10 s will allow a large throughput and a considerable degree of automation. PMID:21227958

  14. Performance testing of the environmental TLD system for the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station.

    PubMed

    Toke, L F; Carson, B H; Baker, G G; McBride, M H; Plato, P A; Miklos, J A

    1984-05-01

    Panasonic UD-801 thermoluminescent dosimeters ( TLDs ) containing two calcium sulfate phosphors were tested under Performance Specification 3.1 established by the American National Standard Institute ( ANSI75 ) and in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 4.13 ( NRC77 ). The specific qualifying tests included TLD uniformity, reproducibility, energy dependence and directional dependence. The overall measurement uncertainties and associated confidence levels are within the prescribed guidelines defined in the qualifying requirements for environmental TLDs . PMID:6724910

  15. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Tsai, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  16. Doses due to the South Atlantic Anomaly during the Euromir'95 mission measured by an on-board TLD system.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Reitz, G; Apathy, I; Hejja, I; Lang, E; Feher, I

    1999-01-01

    During the Euromir'95 mission, a specially designed microprocessor-controlled thermoluminescent detector (TLD) system, called the 'Pille'95', was used by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter to measure the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir space station. One of the experiment's objectives was to determine the dose fraction on Mir due to the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) on an orbit inclined at 51.6 degrees and at an altitude of about 400 km. Using an hourly measuring period for 170 h in automatic mode, dose components both of galactic (independent of SAA) and SAA origin were determined. It was found that the maximum dose due to crossing the SAA was equal to 55 microGy. Averaging all the measurements it was calculated that the mean dose rate inside the Mir was 12-14 microGy h-1 and that half of this value was caused by the SAA. PMID:11542232

  17. A robotic manipulator for handling TLD badges.

    PubMed

    Levinson, S; Weinstein, M; Abraham, A; German, U; Gorelik, V; Rozenfeld, R; Hillel, S; Rodnay, G

    2008-11-01

    A prototype system for automatic handling of Harshaw/Bicron (now ThermoFisher Scientific) thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges, which is based on a robotic arm, was designed and built. The robot performs the loading and unloading of the TLD cards in the badges and transports them between the loading/unloading station and magazine stations. For quality assurance, a sticker containing the worker's details printed in barcode format was added to the badge. Automatic on-line identification is performed for checking the correlation between the badge and the TLD card number. PMID:18849713

  18. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Hejja, I.; Lang, E.; Feher, I.

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET.

  19. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Apathy, I; Hejja, I; Lang, E; Feher, I

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET. PMID:11542227

  20. Comparative performance testing of Harshaw 8800 and KDT-02M TLD systems.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V; Volosky, V; Chernyshov, G; Dmitrienko, A; Sukhoruchkin, A; Rozumny, V

    2002-01-01

    The Soviet-produced KDT-02M system, which is still widely used for dosimetric monitoring in countries of the former Soviet Union, was compared with the Harshaw 8800 system. The comparison consisted of two stages. In the first stage workplace radiation fields were simulated in the framework of the IAEA intercomparison. In the second stage the two systems were compared when used in parallel by the personnel of Chernobyl Object 'Shelter'. Although in the first stage the Harshaw 8800 demonstrated better performance for various irradiation conditions, an obsolete KDT-02M also proved compliance with the basic requirements to the accuracy of individual dosimetric monitoring. In the second stage, more than 1200 paired measurements were performed, revealing good (r = 0.95) correlation between readouts of both systems. Deviation of the slope of the regression line may be adjusted by proper calibration. Although the KDT-02M system demonstrated adequate results for measurement of deep dose equivalent, its inability to determine shallow dose equivalent calls for its replacement with modem thermoluminesence dosemeters possessing this feature. PMID:12382819

  1. Intensity variation study of the radiation field in a mammographic system using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD-900 (CaSO4:Dy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, E. L.; Silva, J. O.; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M. P. A.; Daros, K. A. C.; Medeiros, R. B.

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the results of the intensity variation of the radiation field in a mammographic system using the thermoluminescent dosimeter TLD-900 (CaSO4:Dy). These TLDs were calibrated and characterized in an industrial X-ray system used for instruments calibration, in the energy range used in mammography. They were distributed in a matrix of 19 lines and five columns, covering an area of 18 cm×8 cm in the center of the radiation field on the clinical equipment. The results showed a variation of the intensity probably explained by the non-uniformity of the field due to the heel effect.

  2. Route to extreme events in excitable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnatak, Rajat; Ansmann, Gerrit; Feudel, Ulrike; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2014-08-01

    Systems of FitzHugh-Nagumo units with different coupling topologies are capable of self-generating and -terminating strong deviations from their regular dynamics that can be regarded as extreme events due to their rareness and recurrent occurrence. Here we demonstrate the crucial role of an interior crisis in the emergence of extreme events. In parameter space we identify this interior crisis as the organizing center of the dynamics by employing concepts of mixed-mode oscillations and of leaking chaotic systems. We find that extreme events occur in certain regions in parameter space, and we show the robustness of this phenomenon with respect to the system size.

  3. Thermal quenching of thermoluminescence in TLD-200, TLD-300 and TLD-400 after β-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafadar, Vural E.

    2011-02-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of many TL materials are influenced by changes in location, size and shape of the glow curves due to changes in the heating rate. In this study, the effect of heating rate on the integrated peak areas of CaF 2:Dy (TLD-200), CaF 2:Tm (TLD-300) and CaF 2:Mn (TLD-400) crystals have been investigated after β-irradiation. It was observed that the peak temperatures of all peaks shifted to the high temperature sides and the integrated peak areas decrease as the heating rate increases due to thermal quenching, whose efficiency increases as temperature increases.

  4. Extreme-UV lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Replogle, William C.; Sweatt, William C.

    2001-01-01

    A photolithography system that employs a condenser that includes a series of aspheric mirrors on one side of a small, incoherent source of radiation producing a series of beams is provided. Each aspheric mirror images the quasi point source into a curved line segment. A relatively small arc of the ring image is needed by the camera; all of the beams are so manipulated that they all fall onto this same arc needed by the camera. Also, all of the beams are aimed through the camera's virtual entrance pupil. The condenser includes a correcting mirror for reshaping a beam segment which improves the overall system efficiency. The condenser efficiently fills the larger radius ringfield created by today's advanced camera designs. The system further includes (i) means for adjusting the intensity profile at the camera's entrance pupil or (ii) means for partially shielding the illumination imaging onto the mask or wafer. The adjusting means can, for example, change at least one of: (i) partial coherence of the photolithography system, (ii) mask image illumination uniformity on the wafer or (iii) centroid position of the illumination flux in the entrance pupil. A particularly preferred adjusting means includes at least one vignetting mask that covers at least a portion of the at least two substantially equal radial segments of the parent aspheric mirror.

  5. Passive TLD based system for characterisation of spectral and angular properties of high dose rate workplace fields.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V; Bakhanova, E; Shylo, S; Volosky, V; Chernyshov, G

    2002-01-01

    In order to address the problem of characterisation of high dose rate workplace fields, unique techniques and devices have been developed and tested. The kit of devices comprises a passive spectrometric system and six-vector collimator with thermoluminiscent detectors (TLDs) inside, allowing determination of the anisotropy of the radiation field, both horizontal and vertical. The passive spectrometric system makes use of simultaneous exposure of several TLDs placed inside spherical attenuators. Deconvolution of gamma spectra is performed by solving a system of simultaneous linear equations. The problem of solving ill-defined systems of simultaneous equations was addressed by a system regularisation method. The energy resolution of the system is not high (seven to ten energy bins can be distinguished), yet is sufficient for practical needs. After several benchmark tests, the discussed experimental set-up was extensively tested in various locations within Object 'Shelter'. Results of both energy spectrum and exposure geometry characterisation demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:12382818

  6. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  7. Observations of an extreme planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, Stefanie; Schmidt, Tobias O. B.; Briceno, Cesar; Neuhäuser, Ralph

    2015-12-01

    Almost 500 planet host stars are already known to be surrounded by more than one planet. Most of them (except HR8799) are old and all planets were found with the same or similar detection method.We present an unique planetary system. For the first time, a close in transiting and a wide directly imaged planet are found to orbit a common host star which is a low mass member of a young open cluster. The inner candidate is the first possible young transiting planet orbiting a previously known weak-lined T-Tauri star and was detected in our international monitoring campaign of young stellar clusters. The transit shape is changing between different observations and the transit even disappears and reappears. This unusual transit behaviour can be explained by a precessing planet transiting a gravity-darkened star.The outer candidate was discovered in the course of our direct imaging survey with NACO at ESO/VLT. Both objects are consistent with a <5 Jupiter mass planet. With ~2.4 Myrs it is among the youngest exoplanet systems. Both planets orbit its star in very extreme conditions. The inner planet is very close to its Roche limiting orbital radius while the outer planet is far away from its host star at a distance of ~660 au. The detailed analysis will provide important constraints on planet formation and migration time-scales and their relation to protoplanetary disc lifetimes. Furthermore, this system with two planets on such extreme orbits gives us the opportunity to study the possible outcome of planet-planet scattering theories for the first time by observations.I will report on our monitoring and photometric follow-up observations as well as on the direct detection and the integral field spectroscopy of this extreme planetary system.

  8. Development of an algorithm for evaluating personal doses due to photon fields in terms of operational quantities for TLD badge system in India.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S M; Sneha, C; Chourasiya, G; Adtani, M M; Tripathi, S M; Singh, S K

    2009-09-01

    In order to evaluate and report the personal doses in terms of personal dose equivalent, the performance of the CaSO(4):Dy based thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) badge used for countrywide personnel monitoring in India is investigated using monoenergetic and narrow spectrum radiation qualities equivalent to those given in ISO standards. Algorithms suitable for evaluating H(p)(10) and H(p)(0.07) within +/- 30 % are developed from the responses of dosemeter elements/discs under different filters for normal as well as angular irradiation conditions using these beams. The algorithm is tested for TLD badges irradiated to mixtures of low- and high-energy ((137)Cs) beams in various proportions. The paper concludes with the results of test of algorithm by evaluation of badges used in the IAEA/RCA intercomparison studies and discussion on inherent limitations. PMID:19755432

  9. SU-E-T-87: Comparison Study of Dose Reconstruction From Cylindrical Diode Array Measurements, with TLD Measurements and Treatment Planning System Calculations in Anthropomorphic Head and Neck and Lung Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Benhabib, S; Cardan, R; Huang, M; Brezovich, I; Popple, R; Faught, A; Followill, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess dose calculated by the 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear Systems, Melbourne, FL) against TLD measurements and treatment planning system calculations in anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The IROC Houston (RPC) head and neck (HN) and lung phantoms were scanned and plans were generated using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA) following IROC Houston procedures. For the H and N phantom, 6 MV VMAT and 9-field dynamic MLC (DMLC) plans were created. For the lung phantom 6 MV VMAT and 15 MV 9-field dynamic MLC (DMLC) plans were created. The plans were delivered to the phantoms and to an ArcCHECK (Sun Nuclear Systems, Melbourne, FL). The head and neck phantom contained 8 TLDs located at PTV1 (4), PTV2 (2), and OAR Cord (2). The lung phantom contained 4 TLDs, 2 in the PTV, 1 in the cord, and 1 in the heart. Daily outputs were recorded before each measurement for correction. 3DVH dose reconstruction software was used to project the calculated dose to patient anatomy. Results: For the HN phantom, the maximum difference between 3DVH and TLDs was -3.4% and between 3DVH and Eclipse was 1.2%. For the lung plan the maximum difference between 3DVH and TLDs was 4.3%, except for the spinal cord for which 3DVH overestimated the TLD dose by 12%. The maximum difference between 3DVH and Eclipse was 0.3%. 3DVH agreed well with Eclipse because the dose reconstruction algorithm uses the diode measurements to perturb the dose calculated by the treatment planning system; therefore, if there is a problem in the modeling or heterogeneity correction, it will be carried through to 3DVH. Conclusion: 3DVH agreed well with Eclipse and TLD measurements. Comparison of 3DVH with film measurements is ongoing. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA81647 (NCI, DHHS)

  10. A TLD-based ten channel system for the spectrometry of bremsstrahlung generated by laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Felix; Fehrenbacher, Georg; Radon, Torsten; Kozlova, Ekaterina; Rosmej, Olga; Czarnecki, Damian; Schrenk, Oliver; Breckow, Joachim; Zink, Klemens

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a thermoluminescence dosimetry based method for the measurement of bremsstrahlung spectra in the energy range from 30 keV to 100 MeV, resolved in ten different energy intervals and for the photon ambient dosimetry in ultrashort pulsed radiation fields as e.g. generated during operation of the PHELIX laser at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. The method is a routine-oriented development by application of a multi-filter technique. The data analysis takes around 1 h. The spectral information is obtained by the unfolding of the response of ten thermoluminescence dosimeters with absorbers of different materials and thicknesses arranged as a stack each with a different response function to photon radiation. These response functions were simulated by the use of the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. An algorithm was developed to unfold bremsstrahlung spectra from the readings of the ten dosimeters. The method has been validated by measurements at a clinical electron linear accelerator (6 MV and 18 MV bremsstrahlung). First measurements at the PHELIX laser system were carried out in December 2013 and January 2014. Spectra with photon energies up to 10 MeV and mean energies up to 420 keV were observed at laser-intensities around 1019 W /cm2 on a titanium foil target. The measurement results imply that the steel walls of the target chamber might be an additional bright x-ray source.

  11. Instrumentation for automated acquisition and analysis of TLD glow curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, I. J.; Kennett, T. J.; Harvey, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    Instrumentation for the automated and complete acquisition of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) data from a Panasonic UD-702E TLD reader is reported. The system that has been developed consists of both hardware and software components and is designed to operate with an IBM-type personal computer. Acquisition of glow curve, timing, and heating data has been integrated with elementary numerical analysis to permit real-time validity and diagnostic assessments to be made. This allows the optimization of critical parameters such as duration of the heating cycles and the time window for the integration of the dosimetry peak. The form of the Li 2B 4O 7:Cu TLD glow curve has been studied and a mathematical representation devised to assist in the implementation of automated analysis. Differences in the shape of the curve can be used to identify dosimetry peaks due to artifacts or to identify failing components. Examples of the use of this system for quality assurance in the TLD monitoring program at McMaster University are presented.

  12. TLD linearity vs. beam energy and modality

    SciTech Connect

    Troncalli, Andrew J.; Chapman, Jane

    2002-12-31

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) is considered to be a valuable dosimetric tool in determining patient dose. Lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (TLD-100) is widely used, as it does not display widely divergent energy dependence. For many years, we have known that TLD-100 shows supralinearity to dose. In a radiotherapy clinic, there are multiple energies and modality beams. This work investigates whether individual linearity corrections must be used for each beam or whether a single correction can be applied to all beams. The response of TLD as a function of dose was measured from 25 cGy to 1000 cGy on both electrons and photons from 6 to 18 MeV. This work shows that, within our measurement uncertainty, TLD-100 exhibits supralinearity at all megavoltage energies and modalities.

  13. Measurement of dose given by Co-60 in radiotherapy with TLD-500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanır, Güneş; Cengiz, Ferhat; Hicabi Bölükdemir, M.

    2012-04-01

    The uses of dosimeters based on optically stimulated luminescence technique have become widespread in clinical applications. In the present study, the dose values given by Cobalt-60 radiotherapy machine were measured with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique using TLD-500 and compared with those of commonly used ionization chamber dosimeter system. The percentage depth dose (DD%) values and graphs were formed. OSL system with TLD-500 can be reliably used as medical and personal dosimeter.

  14. Nonlinear multimodal model for TLD of irregular tank geometry and small fluid depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. S.; Tait, M. J.

    2013-11-01

    Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) utilize sloshing fluid to absorb and dissipate structural vibrational energy. TLDs of irregular or complex tank geometry may be required in practice to avoid tank interference with fixed structural or mechanical components. The literature offers few analytical models to predict the response of this type of TLD, particularly when the fluid depth is small. In this paper, a multimodal model is developed utilizing a Boussinesq-type modal theory which is valid for small TLD fluid depths. The Bateman-Luke variational principle is employed to develop a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations which describe the fluid response when the tank is subjected to base excitation. Energy dissipation is incorporated into the model from the inclusion of damping screens. The fluid model is used to describe the response of a 2D structure-TLD system when the structure is subjected to external loading and the TLD tank geometry is irregular.

  15. TLD response to non-radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, A. )

    1985-10-01

    A study was performed at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) to evaluate the response of personnel TLD badges to non-radiation sources commonly encountered at the station. The TLD normally used at SONGS is the four-element Panasonic Model UD802-AS2 shown on the next page. This paper reports that the non-radiation sources employed in the study consisted of two different cleaning agents, sunlight, and electric arc welding.

  16. Design of an advanced TLD-based fixed nuclear accident dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Mei, G.T.

    1993-08-01

    A new system has been designed for use as a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter based upon the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) system used for personnel dosimetry at US Department of Energy facilities managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The system is made up of a small phantom consisting of two main parts measuring 20 x 20 x 5 cm and made from polymethylmethacrylate. A neutron-sensitive TLD card is placed in the center between the two pieces. Also, TLD cards in standard holders are mounted on the front and back of the phantom. A derivation is made of a linear combination of the responses from the TLD elements which results in calculation of the neutron fluence, absorbed dose, and dose equivalent. By using the right linear combinations, a crude spectrum can be estimated, which allows further calculation of the average fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion factor. The response of the system was tested and found to be applicable for the evaluation of typical nuclear accident spectra, although considerable improvement can be made by the addition of a sulfur pellet. The system was also tested for angular dependence. In order to move the development of this system from the proof-of-principle to full application, the calculation of the TLD resonse curves must be improved, additional measurements must be made, and the system must be tested in a simulated accident neutron field. The advantages of the new fixed dosimeter system are its simplicity, easy maintenance, and lower operational cost. The system uses standard TLD cards that are already in place throughout Energy Systems facilities. The TLD process personnel are famliiar with evaluating doses from TLDs and can provide information necessary to ensure timely and accurate assessment of exposures that may result from riticality accidents. Most of the quality control requirements are part of the existing personnel dosimetry system.

  17. Design and Manufacturing of Extremely Low Mass Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Extremely small flight systems pose some unusual design and manufacturing challenges. The small size of the components that make up the system generally must be built with extremely tight tolerances to maintain the functionality of the assembled item. Additionally, the total mass of the system is extremely sensitive to what would be considered small perturbations in a larger flight system. The MUSES C mission, designed, built, and operated by Japan, has a small rover provided by NASA that falls into this small flight system category. This NASA-provided rover is used as a case study of an extremely small flight system design. The issues that were encountered with the rover portion of the MUSES C program are discussed and conclusions about the recommended mass margins at different stages of a small flight system project are presented.

  18. On-board TLD measurements on MIR and ISS.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Apáthy, I; Pázmándi, T; Benton, E R; Reitz, G; Akatov, Y

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results from dosimetric measurements made aboard the Mir space station and the International Space Station (ISS) using the Pille portable thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) system. This paper includes the dosimetry mapping and automatic readout (trapped and untrapped components) results from Mir and ISS. The mean dose rate in 2001-2003 was 7 microGy h(-1). Using the hourly measuring period in automatic mode, doses from both galactic (independent of South Atlantic Anomaly--SAA) and SAA components were determined during Euromir'95 experiment. The mean total dose rate was 12.5 microGy h(-1), while the SAA contribution was 6.2 microGy h(-1). A similar measurement was performed on ISS in 2001 and in 2003. Both the manual and automatic measurements show a significant decrease in dose rate in 2001 in comparison to 1995-1997 due to the change in solar activity. For determination of the high linear energy transfer contribution from the radiation field during the ISS mapping experiment, three CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were co-located with each TL detector. Analysis of the combined TLD and PNTD measurements showed a typical mean TLD efficiency of 84%, a dose contribution <10 keV microm(-1) of 17%, and an average quality factor of 1.95. PMID:16709717

  19. Calibration of an automatic TLD irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, J.C.; Pasciak, W.J. )

    1987-07-01

    The Panasonic UD-801 TLDs used in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's environmental monitoring program are calibrated using the Williston Elin Model 2001 Irradiator. This article describes the procedure used to calibrate this irradiator for the delivery of exposures in the range of 40 to 1200 mR. A select group of TLDs, another source, and an NBS-calibrated ion chamber were used to perform a secondary calibration of the WE-2001. Extraneous exposure contributions (background radiation from the irradiator's source and exposure occurring during TLD travel into and out of the irradiation chamber) were measured and evaluated. The WE-2001 TLD Irradiator was calibrated to a total uncertainty of {plus minus}3.2%; however, TLD travel time exposures were found to be quite significant for the short irradiation times typically used in environmental applications.

  20. Spectrometer system for diffuse extreme ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labov, Simon E.

    1989-01-01

    A unique grazing incidence spectrometer system has been designed to study diffuse line emission between 80 and 650 A with 10-30 A resolution. The minimum detectable emission line strength during a 5-min observation ranges from 100-2000 ph/sq cm sec str. The instrument uses mechanically ruled reflection gratings placed in front of a linear array of mirrors. These mirrors focus the spectral image on microchannel plate detectors located behind thin filters. The field of view is 40 min of arc by 15 deg, and there is no spatial imaging. This instrument has been fabricated, calibrated, and successfully flown on a sounding rocket to observe the astronomical background radiation.

  1. Weather in an extremely nearby substellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenzli, Esther; Marley, Mark; Apai, Daniel; Biller, Beth; Crossfield, Ian; Radigan, Jacqueline

    2015-12-01

    At a distance of only 2 pc, the brown dwarf binary WISE J104915.57-531906.1, also known as Luhman 16AB, is the third closest system from the Sun. As the closest substellar objects outside of the solar system, their unusual brightness makes these brown dwarfs of late-L and early-T spectral type a unique laboratory for the study of ultracool atmospheres. Their effective temperatures are very similar to those of directly imaged planets such as the HR8799 planets, and they share many atmospheric properties. Without a bright host star, the brown dwarf atmospheres can be studied in much greater detail. In particular, time-resolved spectroscopic observations have recently started to be used to provide new insights into heterogeneities in the cloud structure of brown dwarfs. Luhman 16B was the first brown dwarf to be mapped with Doppler Imaging, which resulted in a surface map with darker and brighter spots that may relate to different cloud features. We have now obtained spectroscopic time series with HST/WFC3 that allow us to measure the absolute flux changes over a broad wavelength range (0.8 - 1.7 microns) and cover several molecular and atomic absorption features, including for the first time the FeH feature that has been thought to be a good tracer of cloud holes. Because we detect significant variability in both Luhman 16A and B, effectively observing weather on these nearby worlds, we can for the first time directly characterize and compare the heterogeneous cloud structure in a co-eval L/T transition binary. The observations provide important insight into how clouds evolve and disappear across the L/T transition at ~1200 K, and the results are also very relevant for the interpretation of spectra of young directly imaged giant planets.

  2. Cutaneous Markers of Systemic Disease in the Lower Extremity.

    PubMed

    Vella, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    The skin of the lower extremity can be a helpful diagnostic tool for systemic disease. Diabetes, renal disease, genetic disorders, and even cancer can have cutaneous manifestations in the legs and feet; moreover, proper diagnosis can facilitate earlier treatment of these diseases and not only clear up the skin symptoms but also bring about resolution of the systemic disease causing them. Although not comprehensive, this article discusses many of these disorders presenting with integumentary manifestations in the lower extremities. Where appropriate, it also enumerates the treatments involved, both systemic and localized. PMID:27215161

  3. Surface dose measurement using TLD powder extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapley, P. . E-mail: rapleyp@tbh.net

    2006-10-01

    Surface/near-surface dose measurements in therapeutic x-ray beams are important in determining the dose to the dermal and epidermal skin layers during radiation treatment. Accurate determination of the surface dose is a difficult but important task for proper treatment of patients. A new method of measuring surface dose in phantom through extrapolation of readings from various thicknesses of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) powder has been developed and investigated. A device was designed, built, and tested that provides TLD powder thickness variation to a minimum thickness of 0.125 mm. Variations of the technique have been evaluated to optimize precision with consideration of procedural ease. Results of this study indicate that dose measurements (relative to D{sub max}) in regions of steep dose gradient in the beam axis direction are possible with a precision (2 standard deviations [SDs]) as good as {+-} 1.2% using the technique. The dosimeter was developed and evaluated using variation to the experimental method. A clinically practical procedure was determined, resulting in measured surface dose of 20.4 {+-} 2% of the D{sub max} dose for a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 80-cm source-to-surface distance (SSD), Theratron 780 Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}C) beam. Results obtained with TLD powder extrapolation compare favorably to other methods presented in the literature. The TLD powder extrapolation tool has been used clinically at the Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NWORCC) to measure surface dose effects under a number of conditions. Results from these measurements are reported. The method appears to be a simple and economical tool for surface dose measurement, particularly for facilities with TLD powder measurement capabilities.

  4. Comparison of environmental TLD (thermoluminescent dosimeter) results obtained using glow curve deconvolution and region of interest analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    We tested a Harshaw Model 4000 TLD Reader in the Sandia Environmental TLD Program. An extra set of LiF TLD-700 chips were prepared for each field location and calibration level. At the end of quarter one, half of the TLDs were read on the Model 4000 and the other half were read on our standard Harshaw Model 2000. This presentation compares the results of the two systems. The Model 4000 results are reported for two regions of interest and for background subtraction using Harshaw Glow Curve Deconvolution Software.

  5. AN EXTREMELY CARBON-RICH, EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STAR IN THE SEGUE 1 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Frebel, Anna

    2010-10-10

    We report the analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio, spectra of an extremely metal-poor, extremely C-rich red giant, Seg 1-7, in Segue 1-described in the literature alternatively as an unusually extended globular cluster or an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. The radial velocity of Seg 1-7 coincides precisely with the systemic velocity of Segue 1, and its chemical abundance signature of [Fe/H] = -3.52, [C/Fe] = +2.3, [N/Fe] = +0.8, [Na/Fe] = +0.53, [Mg/Fe] = +0.94, [Al/Fe] = +0.23, and [Ba/Fe] < -1.0 is similar to that of the rare and enigmatic class of Galactic halo objects designated CEMP-no (carbon-rich, extremely metal-poor with no enhancement (over solar ratios) of heavy neutron-capture elements). This is the first star in a Milky Way 'satellite' that unambiguously lies on the metal-poor, C-rich branch of the Aoki et al. bimodal distribution of field halo stars in the ([C/Fe], [Fe/H])-plane. Available data permit us only to identify Seg 1-7 as a member of an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy or as debris from the Sgr dwarf spheroidal galaxy. In either case, this demonstrates that at extremely low abundance, [Fe/H ] <-3.0, star formation and associated chemical evolution proceeded similarly in the progenitors of both the field halo and satellite systems. By extension, this is consistent with other recent suggestions that the most metal-poor dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint dwarf satellites were the building blocks of the Galaxy's outer halo.

  6. Neutron/gamma dose characterization for use with TLD

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, J.C.; Magee, L.; Hefley, T.

    1991-01-01

    The work described in this paper was performed in preparation for establishing a thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system for workers exposed to spontaneous fission neutrons from mixed plutonium isotopes, {sup 232}Th, and depleted uranium at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pantex facility. The method proposed uses a neutron-insensitive thermoluminescent dosimeter to measure the gamma dose and apply a neutron dose/gamma dose ratio to calculate the neutron dose equivalent. This approach, while requiring multibadge dosimetry for each individual, provides a more accurate neutron dose calculation than was previously in use and reduces the maximum missed dose and falsely reported dose.

  7. Robust neighboring extremal guidance for the advanced launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, John; Speyer, Jason L.

    1993-01-01

    With the availability of modern flight computers, realtime neighboring extremal guidance seems feasible. To overcome sensitivity to unknown system parameters and environmental uncertainties, a robust neighboring extremal guidance scheme is proposed. About the optimal trajectory, the accessory problem in the calculus of variations is formed, generating a quadratic cost criterion in the perturbed states and controls. By formulating a disturbance attenuation problem based upon the second variation cost criterion, a differential game is formulated. The game theoretic cost criterion is minimized with respect to the perturbed control but maximized with respect to the unknown parameters in the linearized dynamics. The resulting differential game problem gives rise to a two-point boundary-value problem solved using the sweep method. The sweep method solution provides a linear robust neighboring extremal guidance scheme that is applied to the Advanced Launch System.

  8. Response of Simple, Model Systems to Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2015-07-30

    The focus of the research was on the application of high-pressure/high-temperature techniques, together with intense energetic ion beams, to the study of the behavior of simple oxide systems (e.g., SiO2, GeO2, CeO2, TiO2, HfO2, SnO2, ZnO and ZrO2) under extreme conditions. These simple stoichiometries provide unique model systems for the analysis of structural responses to pressure up to and above 1 Mbar, temperatures of up to several thousands of kelvin, and the extreme energy density generated by energetic heavy ions (tens of keV/atom). The investigations included systematic studies of radiation- and pressure-induced amorphization of high P-T polymorphs. By studying the response of simple stoichiometries that have multiple structural “outcomes”, we have established the basic knowledge required for the prediction of the response of more complex structures to extreme conditions. We especially focused on the amorphous state and characterized the different non-crystalline structure-types that result from the interplay of radiation and pressure. For such experiments, we made use of recent technological developments, such as the perforated diamond-anvil cell and in situ investigation using synchrotron x-ray sources. We have been particularly interested in using extreme pressures to alter the electronic structure of a solid prior to irradiation. We expected that the effects of modified band structure would be evident in the track structure and morphology, information which is much needed to describe theoretically the fundamental physics of track-formation. Finally, we investigated the behavior of different simple-oxide, composite nanomaterials (e.g., uncoated nanoparticles vs. core/shell systems) under coupled, extreme conditions. This provided insight into surface and boundary effects on phase stability under extreme conditions.

  9. Terrestrial Applications of Extreme Environment Stirling Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger. W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been developing power systems capable of long-term operation in extreme environments such as the surface of Venus. This technology can use any external heat source to efficiently provide electrical power and cooling; and it is designed to be extremely efficient and reliable for extended space missions. Terrestrial applications include: use in electric hybrid vehicles; distributed home co-generation/cooling; and quiet recreational vehicle power generation. This technology can reduce environmental emissions, petroleum consumption, and noise while eliminating maintenance and environmental damage from automotive fluids such as oil lubricants and air conditioning coolant. This report will provide an overview of this new technology and its applications.

  10. Multivariate analysis of TLD orientation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, B.R.; Bushong, S.C.; Thornby, J.I.

    1980-07-01

    The effect of orientation on extruded thermoluminescent dosimeters has been investigated. TLD's placed on the surface and within a phantom were exposed separately to five diagnostic beam qualities and to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. The resulting data were subjected to analysis of variance and examined for significant correlations. The response of dosimeters on the phantom surface varied with orientation and was energy dependent. In the phantom and with /sup 60/Co, no orientation effects were observed.

  11. Improvement of Accuracy in Environmental Dosimetry by TLD Cards Using Three-dimensional Calibration Method

    PubMed Central

    HosseiniAliabadi, S. J.; Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Afarideh, H.; Mianji, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The angular dependency of response for TLD cards may cause deviation from its true value on the results of environmental dosimetry, since TLDs may be exposed to radiation at different angles of incidence from the surrounding area. Objective A 3D setting of TLD cards has been calibrated isotropically in a standard radiation field to evaluate the improvement of the accuracy of measurement for environmental dosimetry. Method Three personal TLD cards were rectangularly placed in a cylindrical holder, and calibrated using 1D and 3D calibration methods. Then, the dosimeter has been used simultaneously with a reference instrument in a real radiation field measuring the accumulated dose within a time interval. Result The results show that the accuracy of measurement has been improved by 6.5% using 3D calibration factor in comparison with that of normal 1D calibration method. Conclusion This system can be utilized in large scale environmental monitoring with a higher accuracy. PMID:26157729

  12. SU-E-T-308: Systematic Characterization of the Energy Response of Different LiF TLD Crystals for Dosimetry Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, E; Caprile, P; Sanchez-Nieto, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The thermoluminiscense dosimeters (TLDs) are widely used in personal and clinical dosimetry due to its small size, good sensitivity and tissue equivalence, among other advantages. This study presents the characterization of Lithium Fluoride based TLDs, in terms of their absorbed dose response to successive irradiation cycles in a broad range of beam energies, measured under reference conditions. Methods: Four types of Harshaw TLD chips were used: TLD-100, TLD-600 TLD-700 and 100-H. They were irradiated with 10 photon beams of different energy spectrums, from 28 kVp to 18MV (in 30 consecutive cycles for 6 and 18 MV). Results: It was found that the response of the dosimetric system was stabilized (less than ±3%) after 10 cycles for TLD-600 and TLD-700. In the case of TLD-100 and TLD-100H this dependence was not observed. A decreased response to increasing beam energy in terms of absorbed dose to water was observed, as expected, except for TLD-100H which showed the opposite behavior. The less energy dependent detector was the TLD-100H exhibiting a maximum deviation of 12%. The highest variation observed was 33% for TLD-100. The study allowed the determination of calibration factors in absorbed dose for a wide range of energies and materials for different dosimetric applications, such as in-vivo dosimetry during imaging and radiotherapy. Conclusion: The study allowed the determination of calibration factors in absorbed dose for a wide range of energies and materials for different dosimetric applications, such as in-vivo dosimetry during imaging and radiotherapy.

  13. In vivo TLD dose measurements in catheter-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Adlienė, Diana; Jakštas, Karolis; Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis

    2015-07-01

    Routine in vivo dosimetry is well established in external beam radiotherapy; however, it is restricted mainly to detection of gross errors in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy due to complicated measurements in the field of steep dose gradients in the vicinity of radioactive source and high uncertainties. The results of in vivo dose measurements using TLD 100 mini rods and TLD 'pin worms' in catheter-based HDR brachytherapy are provided in this paper alongside with their comparison with corresponding dose values obtained using calculation algorithm of the treatment planning system. Possibility to perform independent verification of treatment delivery in HDR brachytherapy using TLDs is discussed. PMID:25809111

  14. Organ radiation exposure with EOS: GATE simulations versus TLD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, A. H.; Thevenard-Berger, P.; Verdun, F. R.; Létang, J. M.; Darbon, A.

    2016-03-01

    EOS® is an innovative X-ray imaging system allowing the acquisition of two simultaneous images of a patient in the standing position, during the vertical scan of two orthogonal fan beams. This study aimed to compute organs radiation exposure to a patient, in the particular geometry of this system. Two different positions of the patient in the machine were studied, corresponding to postero-anterior plus left lateral projections (PA-LLAT) and antero-posterior plus right lateral projections (AP-RLAT). To achieve this goal, a Monte-Carlo simulation was developed based on a GATE environment. To model the physical properties of the patient, a computational phantom was produced based on computed tomography scan data of an anthropomorphic phantom. The simulations provided several organs doses, which were compared to previously published dose results measured with Thermo Luminescent Detectors (TLD) in the same conditions and with the same phantom. The simulation results showed a good agreement with measured doses at the TLD locations, for both AP-RLAT and PA-LLAT projections. This study also showed that the organ dose assessed only from a sample of locations, rather than considering the whole organ, introduced significant bias, depending on organs and projections.

  15. A TLD dose algorithm using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Moscovitch, M.; Rotunda, J.E.; Tawil, R.A.; Rathbone, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    An artificial neural network was designed and used to develop a dose algorithm for a multi-element thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). The neural network architecture is based on the concept of functional links network (FLN). Neural network is an information processing method inspired by the biological nervous system. A dose algorithm based on neural networks is fundamentally different as compared to conventional algorithms, as it has the capability to learn from its own experience. The neural network algorithm is shown the expected dose values (output) associated with given responses of a multi-element dosimeter (input) many times. The algorithm, being trained that way, eventually is capable to produce its own unique solution to similar (but not exactly the same) dose calculation problems. For personal dosimetry, the output consists of the desired dose components: deep dose, shallow dose and eye dose. The input consists of the TL data obtained from the readout of a multi-element dosimeter. The neural network approach was applied to the Harshaw Type 8825 TLD, and was shown to significantly improve the performance of this dosimeter, well within the U.S. accreditation requirements for personnel dosimeters.

  16. Extreme event statistics of daily rainfall: dynamical systems approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigdem Yalcin, G.; Rabassa, Pau; Beck, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We analyse the probability densities of daily rainfall amounts at a variety of locations on Earth. The observed distributions of the amount of rainfall fit well to a q-exponential distribution with exponent q close to q≈ 1.3. We discuss possible reasons for the emergence of this power law. In contrast, the waiting time distribution between rainy days is observed to follow a near-exponential distribution. A careful investigation shows that a q-exponential with q≈ 1.05 yields the best fit of the data. A Poisson process where the rate fluctuates slightly in a superstatistical way is discussed as a possible model for this. We discuss the extreme value statistics for extreme daily rainfall, which can potentially lead to flooding. This is described by Fréchet distributions as the corresponding distributions of the amount of daily rainfall decay with a power law. Looking at extreme event statistics of waiting times between rainy days (leading to droughts for very long dry periods) we obtain from the observed near-exponential decay of waiting times extreme event statistics close to Gumbel distributions. We discuss superstatistical dynamical systems as simple models in this context.

  17. High numerical aperture projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2000-01-01

    An optical system is described that is compatible with extreme ultraviolet radiation and comprises five reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex, and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field, step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion. The present invention allows for higher device density because the optical system has improved resolution that results from the high numerical aperture, which is at least 0.14.

  18. A combined TLD/emulsion method of sampling dosimetry applied to Apollo missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    A system which simplifies the complex monitoring methods used to measure the astronaut's radiation exposure in space is proposed. The excess dose equivalents of trapped protons and secondary neutrons, protons, and alpha particles from local nuclear interactions are determined and a combined thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)/nuclear emulsion method which measures the absorbed dose with thermoluminescent dosimeter chips is presented.

  19. High latitude equivalent current systems during extremely quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, G.; Chen, A. J.; Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Kawasaki, K.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic perturbation patterns in the polar cap and auroral zone regions are obtained for extremely quiet days using two different techniques. It is shown that the form of the equivalent current flow pattern is extremely sensitive to the level of quietness, and that even so-called quiet days are at times disturbed by substorm activity. Certain characteristic equivalent flow not typically observed during substorms is noted in the polar cap, and this flow appears to be associated with effects of polar cap perturbations discussed by Svalgaard (1973). A region of equatorward flow at high latitudes near the dawn meridian, appears to be Hall current driven by an eastward electric field. The dayside sub-auroral zone is dominated by the Sq-current system, while the nightside shows no significant current flow in the absence of substorm activity.

  20. Skin dose measurements using MOSFET and TLD for head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Murthy, Vedang; Goel, Vineeta; Tambe, Chandrashekar M; Dhote, Dipak S; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate skin dose for the patients treated with tomotherapy using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). In vivo measurements were performed for two head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy and compared to TLD measurements. The measurements were subsequently carried out for five days to estimate the inter-fraction deviations in MOSFET measurements. The variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for first patient was 2.2%. Similarly, the variation of 2.3% was observed between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for second patient. The tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimated the skin dose as much as by 10-12% when compared to both MOSFET and TLD. However, the MOSFET measured patient skin doses also had good reproducibility, with inter-fraction deviations ranging from 1% to 1.4%. MOSFETs may be used as a viable dosimeter for measuring skin dose in areas where the treatment planning system may not be accurate. PMID:19369084

  1. Development of an algorithm for TLD badge system for dosimetry in the field of X and gamma radiation in terms of Hp(10).

    PubMed

    Bakshi, A K; Srivastava, K; Varadharajan, G; Pradhan, A S; Kher, R K

    2007-01-01

    In view of the introduction of International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements operational quantities Hp(10) and Hp(0.07), defined for individual monitoring, it became necessary to develop an algorithm that gives direct response of the dosemeter in terms of the operational quantities. Hence, for this purpose and also to improve the accuracy in dose estimation especially in the mixed fields of X ray and gamma, an algorithm was developed based on higher-order polynomial fit of the data points generated from the dose-response of discs under different filter regions of the present TL dosemeter system for known delivered doses. Study on the response of the BARC TL dosemeter system based on CaSO(4):Dy Teflon thermoluminescence dosemeter discs in the mixed fields of X and gamma radiation was carried out to ensure that the accuracies are within the prescribed limits recommended by the international organisations. The prevalent algorithm, based on the ratios of the disc response under various filters regions of the dosemeter to pure photons, was tested for different proportion of two radiations in case of mixed field dosimetry. It was found that the accuracy for few fields is beyond the acceptable limit in case of prevalent algorithm. The new proposed algorithm was also tested in mixed fields of photon fields and to pure photon fields of varied angles. It was found that the response of the dosemeter in mixed fields of photons and its angular response are satisfactory. The new algorithm can be used to record and report the personal dose in terms of Hp(10) as per the international recommendation for the present TL dosemeter. PMID:16984896

  2. Assessment of the dose distribution inside a cardiac cath lab using TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, M.; Teles, P.; Cardoso, G.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, there was a substantial increase in the number of interventional cardiology procedures worldwide, and the corresponding ionizing radiation doses for both the medical staff and patients became a subject of concern. Interventional procedures in cardiology are normally very complex, resulting in long exposure times. Also, these interventions require the operator to work near the patient and, consequently, close to the primary X-ray beam. Moreover, due to the scattered radiation from the patient and the equipment, the medical staff is also exposed to a non-uniform radiation field that can lead to a significant exposure of sensitive body organs and tissues, such as the eye lens, the thyroid and the extremities. In order to better understand the spatial variation of the dose and dose rate distributions during an interventional cardiology procedure, the dose distribution around a C-arm fluoroscopic system, in operation in a cardiac cath lab at Portuguese Hospital, was estimated using both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and dosimetric measurements. To model and simulate the cardiac cath lab, including the fluoroscopic equipment used to execute interventional procedures, the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. Subsequently, Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) measurements were performed, in order to validate and support the simulation results obtained for the cath lab model. The preliminary results presented in this study reveal that the cardiac cath lab model was successfully validated, taking into account the good agreement between MC calculations and TLD measurements. The simulated results for the isodose curves related to the C-arm fluoroscopic system are also consistent with the dosimetric information provided by the equipment manufacturer (Siemens). The adequacy of the implemented computational model used to simulate complex procedures and map dose distributions around the operator and the medical staff is discussed, in

  3. Development of a technique for improving coefficient of variation of CaSO4:Dy teflon-based TLD personnel monitoring system in low-dose region.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S M; Sneha, C; Sahai, M K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2015-12-01

    In view of the importance of zero-dose background (null signal) in influencing the coefficient of variation in low-dose region, a technique for the estimation of the same from composite (gross) signal is developed for CaSO4:Dy-based personnel monitoring system being used in India. The technique is based on simple analysis of glow curves (GCs) of unexposed and exposed dosemeters, evolution of trend/model for the zero-dose curves, generation of simulation protocol for individual zero-dose curves, establishment of characteristics of GCs of exposed dosemeters and finally preparation of an algorithm to segregate the components from composite signal. The technique offers the separation of real-time background and gives superior results over other method of approximation of the background. The results also prove efficiency of the empirical trending and simulation protocol of background GCs. The proposed technique can be implemented in routine monitoring without any extra man hours and reader time. PMID:25527179

  4. Hydroclimatic Extremes: Inferences and Prediction from a Dynamical Systems Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, U.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroclimatic extremes , such as major floods and droughts, or periods with a high frequency of clustered tornadoes, fires or cyclones, have often been thought of as random, rare events, and much of the literature on these topics has been obsessed with the estimation of the tail probabilities (e.g., the 100 year event) of these processes. It has taken the "acceptance" of the notion of climate change to question whether the machinery developed for such estimation or even the associated questions are reasonable. However, much of the literature that has evolved since has focused on how to detect and model changes in these probabilities using a variety of methods. In this talk, I will argue that while such efforts may be useful in a certain, outdated context, they are not necessarily leading to an improvement in eihter the science of the application of the science to disaster risk mitigation. I develop an argument that hydroclimatic extremes result from an organization of the associated global and local dynamical systems that leads to the systems trajectories locking into a particular region of state space. Such excursions could be considered as rare events, in their ultimate expression, or in their frequency of visitation and persistence in those states. An open question is whether the dynamics of the system under such conditions are marked by high or low predictabilty in the Lyapunov sense. A characterization of the dimension and predictability of hydroclimatic extremes would allow us to better understand the potential implications of climate change, and also of whether or not a regional drought or similar persistent regime is likely to dissipate or grow.

  5. Wireless pilot monitoring system for extreme race conditions.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Arias, Diego E; Aqueveque, Pablo; Melin, Pedro; Curtis, Dorothy W

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an assistive device to monitor car drivers under extreme conditions. In particular, this system is designed in preparation for the 2012 Atacama Solar Challenge to be held in the Chilean desert. Actual preliminary results show the feasibility of such a project including physiological and ambient sensors, real-time processing algorithms, wireless data transmission and a remote monitoring station. Implementation details and field results are shown along with a discussion of the main problems found in real-life telemetry monitoring. PMID:23367054

  6. Reducing Waste in Extreme Scale Systems through Introspective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bautista-Gomez, Leonardo; Gainaru, Ana; Perarnau, Swann; Engelmann, Christian; Cappello, Franck; Snir, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Resilience is an important challenge for extreme- scale supercomputers. Today, failures in supercomputers are assumed to be uniformly distributed in time. However, recent studies show that failures in high-performance computing systems are partially correlated in time, generating periods of higher failure density. Our study of the failure logs of multiple supercomputers show that periods of higher failure density occur with up to three times more than the average. We design a monitoring system that listens to hardware events and forwards important events to the runtime to detect those regime changes. We implement a runtime capable of receiving notifications and adapt dynamically. In addition, we build an analytical model to predict the gains that such dynamic approach could achieve. We demonstrate that in some systems, our approach can reduce the wasted time by over 30%.

  7. The Potential of Extreme Adaptive Optics Systems for Asteroid Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; Vega, D.

    2014-12-01

    New Adaptive optics (AO) systems, called Extreme AO systemsare becoming available this year on two 8m-class telescopes. Both the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) on the Gemini South Telescope and SPHERE on the Very Large Telescope provide an almost perfect correction of the atmospheric turbulences and are equipped with low-resolution integral field spectrograph and a polarimeter. We will present the analysis of observations of (2) Pallas which was observed with GPI in direct imaging (without coronagraph) on March 22 2014 in Y, J, H, and K1 filters (from 0.95 to 2.19 μm) spectroscopically with a resolution varying from 34 to 70. The 540-km asteroid is well resolved and irregular. An ellipse of 540±9 mas and 470±9 mas fits its silhouette. The surface of the asteroid is mostly featureless but small differences of colors is currently being analyzed. No moons with a diameter larger than 0.5 km and at less than 1.2" were detected on these observations. We will discuss the future contributions of these Extreme AO systems, including SPHERE most recent observations, for the study of large main-belt asteroids addressing the number of targets that can be observed and comparing their on-sky efficiency with previous AO systems. Key scientific questions such as the possible differentiation of the primary of multiple asteroids (e.g. 45 Eugenia by Beauvalet and Marchis, Icarus, 2014 or 87 Sylvia in Berthier et al., Icarus, 2014), and the origin of these systems by comparison of the color of the moons and the primary (e.g. Marchis et al., AGU 2013) could be answered through intensive surveys conducted with these new AO systems.

  8. Predictability of extremes in non-linear hierarchically organized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, V. G.; Soloviev, A.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the complexity of non-linear dynamics of hierarchically organized systems progresses to new approaches in assessing hazard and risk of the extreme catastrophic events. In particular, a series of interrelated step-by-step studies of seismic process along with its non-stationary though self-organized behaviors, has led already to reproducible intermediate-term middle-range earthquake forecast/prediction technique that has passed control in forward real-time applications during the last two decades. The observed seismic dynamics prior to and after many mega, great, major, and strong earthquakes demonstrate common features of predictability and diverse behavior in course durable phase transitions in complex hierarchical non-linear system of blocks-and-faults of the Earth lithosphere. The confirmed fractal nature of earthquakes and their distribution in space and time implies that many traditional estimations of seismic hazard (from term-less to short-term ones) are usually based on erroneous assumptions of easy tractable analytical models, which leads to widespread practice of their deceptive application. The consequences of underestimation of seismic hazard propagate non-linearly into inflicted underestimation of risk and, eventually, into unexpected societal losses due to earthquakes and associated phenomena (i.e., collapse of buildings, landslides, tsunamis, liquefaction, etc.). The studies aimed at forecast/prediction of extreme events (interpreted as critical transitions) in geophysical and socio-economical systems include: (i) large earthquakes in geophysical systems of the lithosphere blocks-and-faults, (ii) starts and ends of economic recessions, (iii) episodes of a sharp increase in the unemployment rate, (iv) surge of the homicides in socio-economic systems. These studies are based on a heuristic search of phenomena preceding critical transitions and application of methodologies of pattern recognition of infrequent events. Any study of rare

  9. Four-mirror extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography projection system

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Simon J; Jeong, Hwan J; Shafer, David R

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a four-mirror catoptric projection system for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography to transfer a pattern from a reflective reticle to a wafer substrate. In order along the light path followed by light from the reticle to the wafer substrate, the system includes a dominantly hyperbolic convex mirror, a dominantly elliptical concave mirror, spherical convex mirror, and spherical concave mirror. The reticle and wafer substrate are positioned along the system's optical axis on opposite sides of the mirrors. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are positioned on the same side of the system's optical axis as the reticle, and are relatively large in diameter as they are positioned on the high magnification side of the system. The hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors are relatively far off the optical axis and hence they have significant aspherical components in their curvatures. The convex spherical mirror is positioned on the optical axis, and has a substantially or perfectly spherical shape. The spherical concave mirror is positioned substantially on the opposite side of the optical axis from the hyperbolic and elliptical mirrors. Because it is positioned off-axis to a degree, the spherical concave mirror has some asphericity to counter aberrations. The spherical concave mirror forms a relatively large, uniform field on the wafer substrate. The mirrors can be tilted or decentered slightly to achieve further increase in the field size.

  10. A millisecond pulsar in an extremely wide binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Tauris, T. M.; Wevers, T.; Jonker, P. G.; Lentati, L.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Desvignes, G.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K. J.; Liu, K.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J.; Osłowski, S.; Perrodin, D.; Sanidas, S.; Shaifullah, G.; Smits, R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on 22 yrs of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024$-$0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, $\\mathrm{[M/H]}=-1.0$, $T_\\mathrm{eff}=4050\\pm50$ K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024$-$0719. We conclude that PSR J1024$-$0719 and 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main-sequence star are in an extremely wide ($P_\\mathrm{b}>200$ yr) orbit. Combining the radial velocity of the companion and proper motion of the pulsar, we find that the binary system has a high spatial velocity of $384\\pm45$ km s$^{-1}$ with respect to the local standard of rest and has a Galactic orbit consistent with halo objects. Since the observed main-sequence companion star cannot have recycled the pulsar to millisecond spin periods, an exotic formation scenario is required. We demonstrate that this extremely wide-orbit binary could have evolved from a triple system that underwent an asymmetric supernova explosion, though find that significant fine-tuning during the explosion is required. Finally, we discuss the implications of the long period orbit on the timing stability of PSR J1024$-$0719 in light of its inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  11. A millisecond pulsar in an extremely wide binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Tauris, T. M.; Wevers, T.; Jonker, P. G.; Lentati, L.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Desvignes, G.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K. J.; Liu, K.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J.; Osłowski, S.; Perrodin, D.; Sanidas, S.; Shaifullah, G.; Smits, R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on 22 yr of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024-0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869-0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, [M/H] = -1.0, Teff = 4050 ± 50 K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024-0719. We conclude that PSR J1024-0719 and 2MASS J10243869-0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main-sequence star are in an extremely wide (Pb > 200 yr) orbit. Combining the radial velocity of the companion and proper motion of the pulsar, we find that the binary system has a high spatial velocity of 384 ± 45 km s-1 with respect to the local standard of rest and has a Galactic orbit consistent with halo objects. Since the observed main-sequence companion star cannot have recycled the pulsar to millisecond spin periods, an exotic formation scenario is required. We demonstrate that this extremely wide-orbit binary could have evolved from a triple system that underwent an asymmetric supernova explosion, though find that significant fine-tuning during the explosion is required. Finally, we discuss the implications of the long period orbit on the timing stability of PSR J1024-0719 in light of its inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  12. Advanced Life Systems for Extreme Environments: An Arctic Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Carol E.; Stanford, Kerry L.; Bubenheim, David L.; Covington, Alan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The problems of obtaining adequate pure drinking water and disposing of liquid and solid waste in the U.S. Arctic, a region where virtually all water is frozen solid for much of the year, has led to unsanitary solutions (U.S. Arctic Research Commission). These solutions are also damaging to the environment. Sanitation and a safe water supply are particularly problems in rural villages. About one-fourth of Alaska's 86.000 Native residents live in these communities. They are without running water and use plastic buckets for toilets. The outbreak of diseases is believed to be partially attributable to exposure to human waste. Villages with the most frequent outbreaks of disease are those in which running water is difficult to obtain (Office of Technology Assessment, 1994). Waste is emptied into open lagoons, rivers, or onto the sea coast. It does not degrade rapidly and in addition to affecting human health, can be harmful to the fragile ecology of the Arctic and the indigenous wildlife and fish populations. Advanced Life Systems for Extreme Environments (ALSEE) provides a solution to sanitation and safe water problems. The system uses an advanced integrated technology developed for Antarctic and space applications. ALSEE uses the systems approach to address more than waste and water problems. By incorporating hydroponic horticulture and aquaculture into the waste treatment system, ALSEE addresses the quality and quantity of fresh foods available to Arctic residents. A temperate climate is required for year-round plant growth. ALSEE facilities can be designed to include a climate controlled area within the structure. This type of environment is a change from the long periods of darkness and cold found in the Arctic and can help alleviate stress so often associated with these extremes. While the overall concept of ALSEE projects is advanced, system facilities can be operated by village residents with appropriate training. ALSEE provides continuing training and

  13. Mechanism for stickiness suppression during extreme events in Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Taline Suellen; Galuzio, Paulo Paneque; Prado, Thiago de Lima; Viana, Ricardo Luiz; Szezech, José Danilo; Lopes, Sergio Roberto

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we study how hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic regions in the neighborhood of a resonant island perform an important role allowing or forbidding stickiness phenomenon around islands in conservative systems. The vicinity of the island is composed of nonhyperbolic areas that almost prevent the trajectory to visit the island edge. For some specific parameters tiny channels are embedded in the nonhyperbolic area that are associated to hyperbolic fixed points localized in the neighborhood of the islands. Such channels allow the trajectory to be injected in the inner portion of the vicinity. When the trajectory crosses the barrier imposed by the nonhyperbolic regions, it spends a long time abandoning the vicinity of the island, since the barrier also prevents the trajectory from escaping from the neighborhood of the island. In this scenario the nonhyperbolic structures are responsible for the stickiness phenomena and, more than that, the strength of the sticky effect. We show that those properties of the phase space allow us to manipulate the existence of extreme events (and the transport associated to it) responsible for the nonequilibrium fluctuation of the system. In fact we demonstrate that by monitoring very small portions of the phase space (namely, ≈1 ×10-5% of it) it is possible to generate a completely diffusive system eliminating long-time recurrences that result from the stickiness phenomenon.

  14. Mechanism for stickiness suppression during extreme events in Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Taline Suellen; Galuzio, Paulo Paneque; Prado, Thiago de Lima; Viana, Ricardo Luiz; Szezech, José Danilo; Lopes, Sergio Roberto

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we study how hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic regions in the neighborhood of a resonant island perform an important role allowing or forbidding stickiness phenomenon around islands in conservative systems. The vicinity of the island is composed of nonhyperbolic areas that almost prevent the trajectory to visit the island edge. For some specific parameters tiny channels are embedded in the nonhyperbolic area that are associated to hyperbolic fixed points localized in the neighborhood of the islands. Such channels allow the trajectory to be injected in the inner portion of the vicinity. When the trajectory crosses the barrier imposed by the nonhyperbolic regions, it spends a long time abandoning the vicinity of the island, since the barrier also prevents the trajectory from escaping from the neighborhood of the island. In this scenario the nonhyperbolic structures are responsible for the stickiness phenomena and, more than that, the strength of the sticky effect. We show that those properties of the phase space allow us to manipulate the existence of extreme events (and the transport associated to it) responsible for the nonequilibrium fluctuation of the system. In fact we demonstrate that by monitoring very small portions of the phase space (namely, ≈1×10(-5)% of it) it is possible to generate a completely diffusive system eliminating long-time recurrences that result from the stickiness phenomenon. PMID:26172768

  15. Water Detected in the Terrestrial Zone of Extreme Solar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farihi, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Life as we know it requires water in contact with a rocky planetary surface. In the Solar System, water and other volatiles must have been delivered to a dry Earth from planetesimals, where asteroids in the outer main belt and Jupiter-Saturn region are excellent candidates. The first extrasolar analog of these rocky and water-rich planetesimals was reported between ESS II and III (Farihi et al. 2013, Science, 342, 218), and there is now evidence for additional examples. These results imply an underlying population of large, extrasolar planetesimals formed near a snow line, and suggesting a common mechanism for water delivery to habitable exoplanets.I will present Hubble, Spitzer, and ground-based data that demonstrate the confirmed and likely water-rich nature of exo-asteroids identified in a growing number of white dwarf planetary systems. These extreme solar systems formed and evolved around A-type (and similar) stars -- now firmly retired -- and the asteroid debris now orbits and pollutes the white dwarf with heavy elements, including oxygen in excess of that expected for oxide minerals. The abundance patterns are also carbon-poor, indicating the parent bodies were not icy planetesimals analogous to comets, but instead similar in overall composition to asteroids in the outer main belt.Importantly, these remnant exoplanetary systems imply architectures similar to the Solar System, where a giant planet exterior to a snow line perturbs rocky asteroids on the interior. Thus, they appear to share basic characteristics with HR 8799, Vega, Fomalhaut, and epsilon Eridani where two disks of debris are separated by giant planet(s), with one belt near the snow line. If such archictectures are as common as implied by polluted white dwarfs, then at least 30% of 1.2-3.0 Msun stars have both the tools and ingredentients for water delivery in their terrestrial planet zones.

  16. An operations and command systems for the extreme ultraviolet explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Korsmeyer, David J.; Olson, Eric C.; Wong, Gary

    1994-01-01

    About 40% of the budget of a scientific spacecraft mission is usually consumed by Mission Operations & Data Analysis (MO&DA) with MO driving these costs. In the current practice, MO is separated from spacecraft design and comes in focus relatively late in the mission life cycle. As a result, spacecraft may be designed that are very difficult to operate. NASA centers have extensive MO expertise but often lessons learned in one mission are not exploited for other parallel or future missions. A significant reduction of MO costs is essential to ensure a continuing and growing access to space for the scientific community. We are addressing some of these issues with a highly automated payload operations and command system for an existing mission, the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). EUVE is currently operated jointly by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), responsible for spacecraft operations, and the Center for Extreme Ultraviolet Astrophysics (CEA) of the University of California, Berkeley, which controls the telescopes and scientific instruments aboard the satellite. The new automated system is being developed by a team including personnel from the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Center for EUV Astrophysics (CEA). An important goal of the project is to provide AI-based technology that can be easily operated by nonspecialists in AI. Another important goal is the reusability of the techniques for other missions. Models of the EUVE spacecraft need to be built both for planning/scheduling and for monitoring. In both cases, our modeling tools allow the assembly of a spacecraft model from separate sub-models of the various spacecraft subsystems. These sub-models are reusable; therefore, building mission operations systems for another small satellite mission will require choosing pre-existing modules, reparametrizing them with respect to the actual satellite telemetry information, and reassembling them in a new model. We

  17. Electro-Mechanical Systems for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Tyler, Tony R.; Abel, Phillip B.; Levanas, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Exploration beyond low earth orbit presents challenges for hardware that must operate in extreme environments. The current state of the art is to isolate and provide heating for sensitive hardware in order to survive. However, this protection results in penalties of weight and power for the spacecraft. This is particularly true for electro-mechanical based technology such as electronics, actuators and sensors. Especially when considering distributed electronics, many electro-mechanical systems need to be located in appendage type locations, making it much harder to protect from the extreme environments. The purpose of this paper to describe the advances made in the area of developing electro-mechanical technology to survive these environments with minimal protection. The Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL), the Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Aeroflex, Inc. over the last few years have worked to develop and test electro-mechanical hardware that will meet the stringent environmental demands of the moon, and which can also be leveraged for other challenging space exploration missions. Prototype actuators and electronics have been built and tested. Brushless DC actuators designed by Aeroflex, Inc have been tested with interface temperatures as low as 14 degrees Kelvin. Testing of the Aeroflex design has shown that a brushless DC motor with a single stage planetary gearbox can operate in low temperature environments for at least 120 million cycles (measured at motor) if long life is considered as part of the design. A motor control distributed electronics concept developed by JPL was built and operated at temperatures as low as -160 C, with many components still operational down to -245 C. Testing identified the components not capable of meeting the low temperature goal of -230 C. This distributed controller is universal in design with the ability to control different types of motors and read many different types of sensors. The controller

  18. Spectral theory of extreme statistics in birth-death systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerson, Baruch

    2008-03-01

    Statistics of rare events, or large deviations, in chemical reactions and systems of birth-death type have attracted a great deal of interest in many areas of science including cell biochemistry, astrochemistry, epidemiology, population biology, etc. Large deviations become of vital importance when discrete (non-continuum) nature of a population of ``particles'' (molecules, bacteria, cells, animals or even humans) and stochastic character of interactions can drive the population to extinction. I will briefly review the novel spectral method [1-3] for calculating the extreme statistics of a broad class of birth-death processes and reactions involving a single species. The spectral method combines the probability generating function formalism with the Sturm-Liouville theory of linear differential operators. It involves a controlled perturbative treatment based on a natural large parameter of the problem: the average number of particles/individuals in a stationary or metastable state. For extinction (the first passage) problems the method yields accurate results for the extinction statistics and for the quasi-stationary probability distribution, including the tails, of metastable states. I will demonstrate the power of the method on the example of a branching and annihilation reaction, A ->-2.8mm2mm2A,,A ->-2.8mm2mm , representative of a rather general class of processes. *M. Assaf and B. Meerson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 200602 (2006). *M. Assaf and B. Meerson, Phys. Rev. E 74, 041115 (2006). *M. Assaf and B. Meerson, Phys. Rev. E 75, 031122 (2007).

  19. Extreme accumulation of nucleotides in simulated hydrothermal pore systems

    PubMed Central

    Baaske, Philipp; Weinert, Franz M.; Duhr, Stefan; Lemke, Kono H.; Russell, Michael J.; Braun, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    We simulate molecular transport in elongated hydrothermal pore systems influenced by a thermal gradient. We find extreme accumulation of molecules in a wide variety of plugged pores. The mechanism is able to provide highly concentrated single nucleotides, suitable for operations of an RNA world at the origin of life. It is driven solely by the thermal gradient across a pore. On the one hand, the fluid is shuttled by thermal convection along the pore, whereas on the other hand, the molecules drift across the pore, driven by thermodiffusion. As a result, millimeter-sized pores accumulate even single nucleotides more than 108-fold into micrometer-sized regions. The enhanced concentration of molecules is found in the bulk water near the closed bottom end of the pore. Because the accumulation depends exponentially on the pore length and temperature difference, it is considerably robust with respect to changes in the cleft geometry and the molecular dimensions. Whereas thin pores can concentrate only long polynucleotides, thicker pores accumulate short and long polynucleotides equally well and allow various molecular compositions. This setting also provides a temperature oscillation, shown previously to exponentially replicate DNA in the protein-assisted PCR. Our results indicate that, for life to evolve, complicated active membrane transport is not required for the initial steps. We find that interlinked mineral pores in a thermal gradient provide a compelling high-concentration starting point for the molecular evolution of life. PMID:17494767

  20. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) to track the LGS light subaperture by

  1. Direct dose confirmation of quantitative autoradiography with micro-TLD measurements for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, M.H.; Yorke, E.D.; Wessels, B.W.; DeNardo, G.L.; Neacy, W.P.

    1988-11-01

    Autoradiography has shown marked heterogeneous distribution of radioactivity in all ten radiolabeled monoclonal antibody/tumor combinations evaluated by our laboratories for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in mice. Quantitative autoradiography was performed on two of these combinations (131I-B72.3/colorectal carcinoma and 131I-LYM-1/Raji B-cell lymphoma) to obtain a correlation of film density with radiolabeled antibody distribution. Through the use of sectioned mini-thermoluminescent dosimeter(s) (TLD) or micro-TLD, isodose curves were generated from the film gradient density lines. A computer program was written to compare theoretical absorbed dose calculations to measured micro-TLD values. First-order agreement was reached for both antibody/tumor systems: (a) B72.3/colorectal system--810 cGy measured/824 cGy calculated per 200 microCi injected and (b) LYM-1/lymphoma system--1,740 cGy measured/1,580 cGy calculated per 656 microCi injected (1 cGy = 1 rad). Additionally, the measured absorbed dose heterogeneity over a 500-micron length of up to 400% which suggests that the use of quantitative autoradiography is necessary in order to correctly determine the underlying radiobiological effects of RIT. Theoretical computer modeling based on similar autoradiographic activity distributions has also provided a convenient means of assessing absorbed dose variation patterns from other radiolabels such as 90Y.

  2. Static binary systems of extreme charged black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Munguia, I.; Manko, V. S.; Ruiz, E.

    2010-12-01

    The extreme limit of the double-Reissner-Nordström spacetime results in two particular solutions. The first one is the Majumdar-Papapetrou solution which describes two charged non-rotating extreme black holes in neutral equilibrium, the individual charges being equal to the respective masses. The second one is identified as the Bonnor solution whose constituents cannot be in equilibrium and are separated by a strut, their charges having opposite signs and exceeding the respective masses in absolute value.

  3. THE COLORS OF EXTREME OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, Scott S.

    2010-04-15

    Extreme outer solar system objects have possible origins beyond the Kuiper Belt edge, high inclinations, very large semimajor axes, or large perihelion distances. Thirty-three such objects were observed in this work to determine their optical colors. All three objects that have been dynamically linked to the inner Oort Cloud by various authors ((90377) Sedna, 2006 SQ{sub 372}, and (87269) 2000 OO{sub 67}) were found to have ultra-red surface material (spectral gradient, S {approx} 25). Ultra-red material is generally associated with rich organics and the low inclination 'cold' classical Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). The observations detailed here show that very red material may be a more general feature for objects kept far from the Sun. The recently discovered retrograde outer solar system objects (2008 KV{sub 42} and 2008 YB{sub 3}) and the high inclination object (127546) 2002 XU{sub 93} show only moderately red surfaces (S {approx} 9) very similar to known comets, suspected dead comets, Jupiter and Neptune Trojans, irregular satellites, D-type asteroids, and damocloids. The extended or detached disk objects, which have large perihelion distances and are thus considered to be detached from the influence of the giant planets but yet have large eccentricities, are found to have mostly moderately red colors (10 {approx}< S {approx}< 18). The colors of the detached disk objects, including the dynamically unusual 2004 XR{sub 190} and (148209) 2000 CR{sub 105}, are similar to the scattered disk and Plutino populations. Thus the detached disk, scattered disk, Plutino, and high inclination 'hot' classical objects likely have a similar mix of objects from the same source regions. Outer classical KBOs, including (48639) 1995 TL{sub 8}, were found to have very red surfaces (18 {approx}< S {approx}< 30). The low inclination 'cold' classical KBOs, outer classical KBOs and possibly the inner Oort Cloud appear to be dominated by ultra-red objects (S {approx}> 25) and thus do not

  4. Radical loss of an extreme extra-pair mating system

    PubMed Central

    Kingma, Sjouke A; Hall, Michelle L; Segelbacher, Gernot; Peters, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Background Mating outside the pair-bond is surprisingly common in socially monogamous birds, but rates of extra-pair paternity (EPP) vary widely between species. Although differences in life-history and contemporary ecological factors may explain some interspecific variation, evolutionary forces driving extra-pair (EP) mating remain largely obscure. Also, since there is a large phylogenetic component to the frequency of EPP, evolutionary inertia may contribute substantially to observed EP mating patterns. However, the relative importance of plasticity and phylogenetic constraints on the incidence of EP mating remains largely unknown. Results We here demonstrate very low levels of EPP (4.4% of offspring) in the purple-crowned fairy-wren Malurus coronatus, a member of the genus with the highest known levels of EPP in birds. In addition, we show absence of the suite of distinctive behavioral and morphological adaptations associated with EP mating that characterize other fairy-wrens. Phylogenetic parsimony implies that these characteristics were lost in one speciation event. Nonetheless, many life-history and breeding parameters that are hypothesized to drive interspecific variation in EPP are not different in the purple-crowned fairy-wren compared to its promiscuous congeners. Conclusion Such radical loss of an extreme EP mating system with all associated adaptations from a lineage of biologically very similar species indicates that evolutionary inertia does not necessarily constrain interspecific variation in EPP. Moreover, if apparently minor interspecific differences regularly cause large differences in EPP, this may be one reason why the evolution of EP mating is still poorly understood. PMID:19454026

  5. On extremal quantum states of composite systems with fixed marginals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Oliver

    2004-11-01

    We study the convex set C(ρ1,ρ2) of all bipartite quantum states with fixed marginal states ρ1 and ρ2. The extremal states in this set have recently been characterized by Parthasarathy [Ann. Henri Poincaré (to appear), quant-ph/0307182]. Here we present an alternative necessary and sufficient condition for a state in C(ρ1,ρ2) to be extremal. Our approach is based on a canonical duality between bipartite states and a certain class of completely positive maps and has the advantage that it is easier to check and to construct explicit examples of extremal states. In dimension 2×2 we give a simple new proof for the fact that all extremal states in C(1/21,1/21) are precisely the projectors onto maximally entangled wave functions. We also prove that in higher dimension this does not hold and construct an explicit example of an extremal state in C(1/31,1/31) that is not maximally entangled. Generalizations of this result to higher dimensions are also discussed.

  6. Sungrazing comets: Probing the inner extremes of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, M.

    2014-07-01

    /Machholz 1. The third group, Meyer, has not been linked to any known solar system object and has an unknown orbital period. The remaining known sungrazing comets have a variety of orbits and, with the notable exception of ISON, are generally not observed extensively. Due to their extreme orbits, sungrazing comets offer unique opportunities for understanding evolutionary processes in our solar system. During their perihelion passages they experience equilibrium temperatures exceeding 1500 K, resulting in sublimation of their dust and potentially allowing the least volatile components of our solar system to be cataloged. In fact, while all of the near-Sun objects discovered by SOHO and STEREO are designated ''comets'', many of those not associated with other known cometary objects may be asteroids or defunct comets whose apparent activity at these distances is due to sublimation of their bare surfaces. Sungrazing comets also experience strong tidal forces, resulting in frequent fragmentation. Such breakups expose the unprocessed interiors, potentially allowing intercomparison of the compositions of discrete fragments and revealing the size distribution of the planetessimals out of which the parent comet formed. Finally, it has recently become possible to use comets as ''solar probes'', treating them as test particles that can reveal properties of the solar environment such as the coronal temperature and density, magnetic field strength, and solar wind speed and direction.

  7. Dedicated Cone-Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al Muhit, Abdullah; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Stayman, J. Webster; Packard, Nathan; Senn, Robert; Yang, Dong; Foos, David H.; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide initial assessment of image quality and dose for a cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scanner dedicated to extremity imaging. Materials and Methods A prototype cone-beam CT scanner has been developed for imaging the extremities, including the weight-bearing lower extremities. Initial technical assessment included evaluation of radiation dose measured as a function of kilovolt peak and tube output (in milliampere seconds), contrast resolution assessed in terms of the signal difference–to-noise ratio (SDNR), spatial resolution semiquantitatively assessed by using a line-pair module from a phantom, and qualitative evaluation of cadaver images for potential diagnostic value and image artifacts by an expert CT observer (musculoskeletal radiologist). Results The dose for a nominal scan protocol (80 kVp, 108 mAs) was 9 mGy (absolute dose measured at the center of a CT dose index phantom). SDNR was maximized with the 80-kVp scan technique, and contrast resolution was sufficient for visualization of muscle, fat, ligaments and/or tendons, cartilage joint space, and bone. Spatial resolution in the axial plane exceeded 15 line pairs per centimeter. Streaks associated with x-ray scatter (in thicker regions of the patient—eg, the knee), beam hardening (about cortical bone—eg, the femoral shaft), and cone-beam artifacts (at joint space surfaces oriented along the scanning plane—eg, the interphalangeal joints) presented a slight impediment to visualization. Cadaver images (elbow, hand, knee, and foot) demonstrated excellent visibility of bone detail and good soft-tissue visibility suitable to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal indications. Conclusion A dedicated extremity cone-beam CT scanner capable of imaging upper and lower extremities (including weight-bearing examinations) provides sufficient image quality and favorable dose characteristics to warrant further evaluation for clinical use. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for

  8. A data logger for personnel monitoring TLD readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M. S.; Ratna, P.; Kannan, S.; Venkateswaran, T. V.

    1993-10-01

    A data logger for the manual type BARC TLD reader has been developed for connecting the TLD reader to an IBM PC/XT for a direct transfer of data, evaluation and preparation of radiation dose reports. The microprocessor controlled data logger has features like low or high resolution glow curve storage, storage of dosimetric data along with the identification numbers of about 300 dosimeters, RS-232 serial interface for connection to a PC and a built-in hand shake software to facilitate connection of two or more data loggers to a PC. The data loggers are in use with TLD readers for personnel monitoring in a number of centres in India. The hardware and software details of the data logger are discussed.

  9. Performance of Harshaw TLD-100H two-element Dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Luo, L Z; Rotunda, J E

    2006-01-01

    One of the advantages of LiF based thermoluminescent (TL) materials is its tissue-equivalent property. The Harshaw TLD-100H (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) material has demonstrated that it has a near-flat photon energy response and high sensitivity. With the optimized dosemeter filters built into the holder, the Harshaw TLD-100H two-element dosemeter can be used as a whole body personnel dosemeter for gamma, X ray and beta monitoring without the use of an algorithm or correction factor. This paper presents the dose performance of the Harshaw TLD-100H two-element dosemeter against the ANSI N13.11-2001 standard and the results of tests that are required in IEC 1066 International Standard. PMID:16644944

  10. TLD-100 and Radiochromic Dye Film in Medical Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado-Uribe, H.

    2006-01-06

    TLD-100 and radiochromic dye films are two types of the dosimeters most used in the medical physics area. Both are secondary detectors and operate in a different way and in different dose measurement ranges. The use of TLD-100 is based on the thermoluminescent process, and the RDF in the optical density change when has been exposed to an irradiation field previously. In this work it is analyzed in a general way, the advantages and characteristics of these detectors and the reasons of the great increase in their use in the last decades.

  11. Pilot system on extreme climate monitoring and early warning for long range forecast in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.; Park, B. K.; E-hyung, P.; Gong, Y.; Kim, H. K.; Park, S.; Min, S. K.; Yoo, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, extreme weather/climate events such as heat waves, flooding/droughts etc. have been increasing in frequency and intensity under climate change over the world. Also, they can have substantial impacts on ecosystem and human society (agriculture, health, and economy) of the affected regions. According to future projections of climate, extreme weather and climate events in Korea are expected to occure more frequently with stronger intensity over the 21st century. For the better long range forecast, it is also fundamentally ruquired to develop a supporting system in terms of extreme weather and climate events including forequency and trend. In this context, the KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration) has recently initiated a development of the extreme climate monintoring and early warning system for long range forecast, which consists of three sub-system components; (1) Real-time climate monitoring system, (2) Ensemble prediction system, and (3) Mechanism analysis and display system for climate extremes. As a first step, a pilot system has been designed focusing on temperature extremes such heat waves and cold snaps using daily, monthly and seasonal observations and model prediction output on the global, regional and national levels. In parallel, the skills of the KMA long range prediction system are being evaluated comprehensively for weather and climate extremes, for which varous case studies are conducted to better understand the observed variations of extrem climates and responsible mechanisms and also to assess predictability of the ensemble prediction system for extremes. Details in the KMA extreme climate monitoring and early warning system will be intorduced and some preliminary results will be discussed for heat/cold waves in Korea.

  12. Calculation of the TLD700:LiF energy response from Ir-192 using novel Monte Carlo and empirical methods.

    PubMed

    Rijken, J D; Harris-Phillips, W; Lawson, J M

    2015-03-01

    Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) exhibit a dependence on the energy of the radiation beam of interest so need to be carefully calibrated for different energy spectra if used for clinical radiation oncology beam dosimetry and quality assurance. TLD energy response was investigated for a specific set of TLD700:LiF(Mg,Ti) chips for a high dose rate (192)Ir brachytherapy source. A novel method of energy response calculation for (192)Ir was developed where dose was determined through Monte Carlo modelling in Geant4. The TLD response was then measured experimentally. Results showed that TLD700 has a depth dependent response in water ranging from 1.170 ± 0.125 at 20 mm to 0.976 ± 0.043 at 50 mm (normalised to a nominal 6 MV beam response). The method of calibration and Monte Carlo data developed through this study could be easily applied by other Medical Physics departments seeking to use TLDs for (192)Ir patient dosimetry or treatment planning system experimental verification. PMID:25663432

  13. Data-driven prediction and prevention of extreme events in a spatially extended excitable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialonski, Stephan; Ansmann, Gerrit; Kantz, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Extreme events occur in many spatially extended dynamical systems, often devastatingly affecting human life, which makes their reliable prediction and efficient prevention highly desirable. We study the prediction and prevention of extreme events in a spatially extended system, a system of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units, in which extreme events occur in a spatially and temporally irregular way. Mimicking typical constraints faced in field studies, we assume not to know the governing equations of motion and to be able to observe only a subset of all phase-space variables for a limited period of time. Based on reconstructing the local dynamics from data and despite being challenged by the rareness of events, we are able to predict extreme events remarkably well. With small, rare, and spatiotemporally localized perturbations which are guided by our predictions, we are able to completely suppress extreme events in this system.

  14. Problems associated with large scale personnel monitoring of photons using lithium-fluoride TLD-100

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The dosimetric properties of a large batch of lithium fluoride TLD-100 dosimeters when exposed to photons for total absorbed doses in the region from 0.1-10 mGy (10-100 mr) have been examined in this work. This region is of particular importance because in many operational health physics situations the majority (>90%) of all recorded absorbed doses to personnel lie in this region. With the possibility that occupational radiation dose limits may be reduced in the future accurate monitoring of individuals in this region will be of prime importance. The purpose of this thesis was to point out several effects which could compromise accurate dosimetric measurements in this region and to suggest some methods to minimize them. These effects include the effect of TLD batch composition, overresponse of the dosimeter to low energy photons, dose rate effects, the effects of storing the dosimeter before readout, and possible interference from ultraviolet and radiofrequency radiation. Each of these items can cause errors which can range up to 70%, depending on the total absorbed dose and the particulars of the radiation exposure. One effect which is of extreme interest is the induction of a thermoluminescent signal by radiofrequency radiation. Although this effect can cause gross errors in estimating the ionizing dose, it opens the possibility that LiF or another phosphor may have an application as a non-ionizing radiation dosimeter.

  15. Systemic inflammation and cerebral palsy risk in extremely preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Kuban, KCK; O’Shea, TM; Allred, EN; Paneth, N; Hirtz, D; Fichorova, RN; Leviton, A

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that among extremely preterm infants, elevated concentrations of inflammation-related proteins in neonatal blood are associated with cerebral palsy (CP) at 24 months. Methods In 939 infants born before 28 weeks gestation, we measured blood concentrations of 25 proteins on postnatal days 1, 7, and 14 and evaluated associations between elevated protein concentrations and CP diagnosis. Results Protein elevations within three days of birth were not associated with CP. Elevations of TNF-α, TNF-R1, IL-8, ICAM-1, on at least two days were associated with diparesis. Recurrent-persistent elevations of IL-6, E-SEL, or IGFBP-1 were associated with hemiparesis. Diparesis and hemiparesis were more likely among infants who had at least four of nine proteins elevations that previously have been associated with cognitive impairment and microcephaly. Interpretation Repeated elevations of inflammation-related proteins during the first two postnatal weeks are associated with increased risk of CP. PMID:24646503

  16. OSLD energy response performance and dose accuracy at 24 - 1250 keV: Comparison with TLD-100H and TLD-100

    SciTech Connect

    Kadir, A. B. A.; Priharti, W.; Samat, S. B.; Dolah, M. T.

    2013-11-27

    OSLD was evaluated in terms of energy response and accuracy of the measured dose in comparison with TLD-100H and TLD-100. The OSLD showed a better energy response performance for H{sub p}(10) whereas for H{sub p}(0.07), TLD-100H is superior than the others. The OSLD dose accuracy is comparable with the other two dosimeters since it fulfilled the requirement of the ICRP trumpet graph analysis.

  17. At-wavelength, system-level flare characterization of extreme-ultraviolet optical systems.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, P; Goldberg, K A; Gullikson, E M; Bokor, J

    2000-06-10

    The extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) has recently been developed to provide high-accuracy wave-front characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Here we describe an enhanced implementation of the PS/PDI that significantly extends its measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wave front and flare. PS/PDI-based flare characterization of two recently fabricated EUV 10x-reduction lithographic optical systems is presented. PMID:18345220

  18. Extreme Cost Reductions with Multi-Megawatt Centralized Inverter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schwabe, Ulrich; Fishman, Oleg

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this project was to fully develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a new type of utility scale PV system. Based on patented technology, this includes the development of a truly centralized inverter system with capacities up to 100MW, and a high voltage, distributed harvesting approach. This system promises to greatly impact both the energy yield from large scale PV systems by reducing losses and increasing yield from mismatched arrays, as well as reduce overall system costs through very cost effective conversion and BOS cost reductions enabled by higher voltage operation.

  19. Error Analysis of non-TLD HDR Brachytherapy Dosimetric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoush, Ahmad

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report43 (AAPM-TG43) and its updated version TG-43U1 rely on the LiF TLD detector to determine the experimental absolute dose rate for brachytherapy. The recommended uncertainty estimates associated with TLD experimental dosimetry include 5% for statistical errors (Type A) and 7% for systematic errors (Type B). TG-43U1 protocol does not include recommendation for other experimental dosimetric techniques to calculate the absolute dose for brachytherapy. This research used two independent experimental methods and Monte Carlo simulations to investigate and analyze uncertainties and errors associated with absolute dosimetry of HDR brachytherapy for a Tandem applicator. An A16 MicroChamber* and one dose MOSFET detectors† were selected to meet the TG-43U1 recommendations for experimental dosimetry. Statistical and systematic uncertainty analyses associated with each experimental technique were analyzed quantitatively using MCNPX 2.6‡ to evaluate source positional error, Tandem positional error, the source spectrum, phantom size effect, reproducibility, temperature and pressure effects, volume averaging, stem and wall effects, and Tandem effect. Absolute dose calculations for clinical use are based on Treatment Planning System (TPS) with no corrections for the above uncertainties. Absolute dose and uncertainties along the transverse plane were predicted for the A16 microchamber. The generated overall uncertainties are 22%, 17%, 15%, 15%, 16%, 17%, and 19% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm, 4cm, and 5cm, respectively. Predicting the dose beyond 5cm is complicated due to low signal-to-noise ratio, cable effect, and stem effect for the A16 microchamber. Since dose beyond 5cm adds no clinical information, it has been ignored in this study. The absolute dose was predicted for the MOSFET detector from 1cm to 7cm along the transverse plane. The generated overall uncertainties are 23%, 11%, 8%, 7%, 7%, 9%, and 8% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm

  20. Sensitivity calibration of an imaging extreme ultraviolet spectrometer-detector system for determining the efficiency of broadband extreme ultraviolet sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, S.; Roedel, C.; Bierbach, J.; Paz, A. E.; Foerster, E.; Paulus, G. G.; Krebs, M.; Haedrich, S.; Limpert, J.; Kuschel, S.; Wuensche, M.; Hilbert, V.; Zastrau, U.

    2013-02-15

    We report on the absolute sensitivity calibration of an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectrometer system that is frequently employed to study emission from short-pulse laser experiments. The XUV spectrometer, consisting of a toroidal mirror and a transmission grating, was characterized at a synchrotron source in respect of the ratio of the detected to the incident photon flux at photon energies ranging from 15.5 eV to 99 eV. The absolute calibration allows the determination of the XUV photon number emitted by laser-based XUV sources, e.g., high-harmonic generation from plasma surfaces or in gaseous media. We have demonstrated high-harmonic generation in gases and plasma surfaces providing 2.3 {mu}W and {mu}J per harmonic using the respective generation mechanisms.

  1. Construction of a composite thin-element TLD using an optical-heating method.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, O; Yasuno, Y; Minamide, S; Hasegawa, S; Tsutsui, H; Takenaga, M; Yamashita, T

    1982-09-01

    A composite thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), composed of four, thin TL elements with a high-speed reader, has been developed by employing an optical-heating method. Each TL element, which is 15 mg/cm2 thick with a 3 mm dia., is prepared by applying Li2B4O7:Cu or CaSO4:Tm to a plastic substrate 14 mg/cm2 thick. Each element can be heated to 350 degree C within 0.8 sec. by IR radiation from a tungsten lamp. The characteristics of this TLD system include the following: (1) the detection limit of the Li2B4O7:Cu is 3 mR and the limit for CaSO4:Tm is 0.1 mR; (2) the energy-dependence curves are similar to the dose-equivalent curve, showing slight under-responses by 15% near 70 KeV for Li2B4O7:Cu and over-responses by 50% at high energies for CaSO4:Tm; (3) despite quick heating, the residual dose is as low as 0.1% of the last exposure signal; (4) responses are very stable for more than 1,000 cycles of repeated exposure readings; (5) no false signal could be detected, even in the cases of sweat or soil contamination; (6) the thin Li2B4O7;Cu element can be used for skin dose monitoring; and (7) the processing time of the automatic reader for the composite dosimeter is 3 hr/500 dosimeters. This TLD system can be applied to personnel dosimetry, gate monitoring and environmental monitoring. PMID:7174331

  2. Woven Thermal Protection System (Woven TPS) for Extreme Entry Environments

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) project explores an innovative way to design, develop and manufacture a family of ablative TPS materials using weaving technology and testing them in the ...

  3. Extreme AO Observations of Two Triple Asteroid Systems with SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Wahhaj, Z.; Beauvalet, L.; Marchis, F.; Dumas, C.; Marsset, M.; Nielsen, E. L.; Vachier, F.

    2016-04-01

    We present the discovery of a new satellite of asteroid (130) Elektra—S/2014 (130) 1—in differential imaging and in integral field spectroscopy data over multiple epochs obtained with Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet Research/Very Large Telescope. This new (second) moonlet of Elektra is about 2 km across, on an eccentric orbit, and about 500 km away from the primary. For a comparative study, we also observed another triple asteroid system, (93) Minerva. For both systems, component-resolved reflectance spectra of the satellites and primary were obtained simultaneously. No significant spectral difference was observed between the satellites and the primary for either triple system. We find that the moonlets in both systems are more likely to have been created by sub-disruptive impacts as opposed to having been captured.

  4. Physics Characterization of TLD-600 and TLD-700 and Acceptance Testing of New XRAD 160 Biological X-Ray Irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanan

    Project 1: Physics characterization of TLD-600 and TLD-700. Purpose: It is suggested that a pair of TLD-600 and TLD-700 can measure the exposure in neutron-photon mix fields. But the basic information of physics characterization of TLD-600 and 700 are not available. The purpose of this study was study the individual TLD variation and the energy dependence of TLD-600 and TLD-700. Methods: The individual calibration factors for 52 TLD-600 chips and 51 TLD-700 chips were determined under x-ray beams of 60 kVp, 80 kVp, 120 kVp, a mono-energetic 662 keV gamma beam of a Cs-137 source, and an Am-Be neutron beam (4.4 MeV). The individual calibration factor was calculated as the ratio of the group average response in uC/mR and the individual response in uC/mR. In addition, energy corrections factors for the individual calibration factors were determined, from each of the x-ray beams (60 kVp, 80 kVp, 120 kVp) to the 662 keV Cs-137 gamma beams. Results: For TLD-600, the range and relative standard deviation of the individual calibration factors are: 60 kVp (0.94003-1.0927, 3.5369%), 80 kVp (0.9395-1.0867, 3.0952%), 120 kVp (0.83403-1.0796, 4.5732%), 662 keV (0.80465-1.1926, 9.2515% ), AmBe (0.91740-0.94905, 3.0882% ); and the energy corrections factors relative to the 662 keV Cs-137 beams are: 60 kVp (1.2223), 80 kVp (1.1013), 120 kVp (1.0299). For TLD-700 the range and relative standard deviation of the individual calibration factors are: 60 kVp (0.94351-1.0630, 2.6044%), 80 kVp (0.91690-1.0614, 2.6996%), 120 kVp (0.95697-1.0474, 2.3606%), 662 keV (0.91348-1.2270, 4.2243%), AmBe (0.79330-1.2268, 9.1577%); and the energy corrections factors relative to the 662 keV Cs-137 beams are: 60 kVp (1.0373), 80 kVp (0.97661), 120 kVp (0.88532). Conclusion: We have measured individual calibration factors and the average energy correction factors for photon beams and Am-Be neutron beams. Our results will be used in the future experiments and measurements with TLD-600 and TLD-700. Project

  5. Scalable PGAS Metadata Management on Extreme Scale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Agarwal, Khushbu; Straatsma, TP

    2013-05-16

    Programming models intended to run on exascale systems have a number of challenges to overcome, specially the sheer size of the system as measured by the number of concurrent software entities created and managed by the underlying runtime. It is clear from the size of these systems that any state maintained by the programming model has to be strictly sub-linear in size, in order not to overwhelm memory usage with pure overhead. A principal feature of Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) models is providing easy access to global-view distributed data structures. In order to provide efficient access to these distributed data structures, PGAS models must keep track of metadata such as where array sections are located with respect to processes/threads running on the HPC system. As PGAS models and applications become ubiquitous on very large transpetascale systems, a key component to their performance and scalability will be efficient and judicious use of memory for model overhead (metadata) compared to application data. We present an evaluation of several strategies to manage PGAS metadata that exhibit different space/time tradeoffs. We use two real-world PGAS applications to capture metadata usage patterns and gain insight into their communication behavior.

  6. EHF (Extremely High Frequency) telecommunications system engineering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, K. C.

    1986-04-01

    An EHF Telecommunication System Engineering Model (ETSEM) has been developed as an aid in the design of line-of-sight (LOS) communication systems from 10 to 100 GHz. ETSEM provides tabulation of path geometry parameters and analyzes ray-path and Fresnel zone clearances to help the engineer design the path. ETSEM also predicts the performance (availability) of both digital and analog systems based on state-of-the-art EHF propagation models and equipment specifications. Attenuation by rain, clear-air absorption, and multipath are modeled. These are expected to essentially determine the statistics of link availability as limited by propagation impairments. Performance may be predicted for any interval of months of the year. A climatological data base for North America and Europe provides parameters for the propagation models. ETSEM has been implemented on a desk-top computer. Weaknesses and limitations of the model are discussed and improvements are suggested.

  7. Novel Hydrogen Production Systems Operative at Thermodynamic Extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsalus, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We have employed a suite of molecular, bioinformatics, and biochemical tools to interrogate the thermodynamically limiting steps of H{sub 2} production from fatty acids in syntrophic communities. We also developed a new microbial model system that generates high H{sub 2} concentrations (over 17% of the gas phase) with high H{sub 2} yields of over 3 moles H{sub 2} per mole glucose. Lastly, a systems-based study of biohydrogen production in model anaerobic consortia was performed to begin identifying key regulated steps as a precursor to modeling co-metabolism. The results of these studies significantly expand our ability to predict and model systems for H{sub 2} production in novel anaerobes that are currently very poorly documented or understood.

  8. An MHD generator energy flow time rate extremal controlling system

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, V.V.

    1993-12-31

    The progress in the development and studying of new methods of producing electric energy, based on direct conversion of heat energy, raises the problem of more effective use of their power characteristics. Disclosure is made of a self-optimizing control system for an object with a unimodal quality function. The system comprises an object, a divider, a band-pass filter, an averaging filter, a multiplier, a final control element, an adder and further includes a search signal generator. The fashion and the system are presented in the USSR No. 684510, in the USA No. 4179730, in France No. 2386854, In Germany No. 2814963, in Japan No. 1369882. The progress in the development and studying of new method of producing electric energy, based on direct conversion of heat in MHD generator into electric energy, raises the problem of more effective use of their power characteristics.

  9. Microwave tomography of extremities: 1. Dedicated 2D system and physiological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Williams, Thomas; Nair, Bindu; Pavlovsky, Andrey; Posukh, Vitaly; Quinn, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Microwave tomography (MWT) is a novel imaging modality which might be applicable for non-invasive assessment of functional and pathological conditions of biological tissues. Imaging of the soft tissue of extremities is one of its potential applications. The feasibility of this technology for such applications was demonstrated earlier. This is the first of two companion papers focused on an application of MWT for imaging of the extremity's soft tissues. The goal of this study is to assess the technical performance of the developed 2D MWT system dedicated for imaging of functional and pathological conditions of the extremity's soft tissues. Specifically, the system's performance was tested by its ability to detect signals associated with physiological activity and soft tissue interventions (circulatory related changes, blood flow reduction and a simulated compartmental syndrome)—the so-called physiological signatures. The developed 2D MWT system dedicated to the imaging of animal extremities demonstrates good technical performance allowing for stable and predictable data acquisition with reasonable agreement between the experimentally measured electromagnetic (EM) field and the simulated EM field within a measurement domain. Using the system, we were able to obtain physiological signatures associated with systolic versus diastolic phases of circulation in an animal extremity, reperfusion versus occlusion phases of the blood supply to the animal's extremity and a compartment syndrome. The imaging results are presented and discussed in the second companion paper.

  10. Microwave tomography of extremities: 1. Dedicated 2D system and physiological signatures.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Williams, Thomas; Nair, Bindu; Pavlovsky, Andrey; Posukh, Vitaly; Quinn, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Microwave tomography (MWT) is a novel imaging modality which might be applicable for non-invasive assessment of functional and pathological conditions of biological tissues. Imaging of the soft tissue of extremities is one of its potential applications. The feasibility of this technology for such applications was demonstrated earlier. This is the first of two companion papers focused on an application of MWT for imaging of the extremity's soft tissues. The goal of this study is to assess the technical performance of the developed 2D MWT system dedicated for imaging of functional and pathological conditions of the extremity's soft tissues. Specifically, the system's performance was tested by its ability to detect signals associated with physiological activity and soft tissue interventions (circulatory related changes, blood flow reduction and a simulated compartmental syndrome)--the so-called physiological signatures. The developed 2D MWT system dedicated to the imaging of animal extremities demonstrates good technical performance allowing for stable and predictable data acquisition with reasonable agreement between the experimentally measured electromagnetic (EM) field and the simulated EM field within a measurement domain. Using the system, we were able to obtain physiological signatures associated with systolic versus diastolic phases of circulation in an animal extremity, reperfusion versus occlusion phases of the blood supply to the animal's extremity and a compartment syndrome. The imaging results are presented and discussed in the second companion paper. PMID:21364265

  11. Extreme Environments and Extreme Science: Reliability and Risk Assessment for Autonomous Systems with Application to Polar Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trembanis, A.; Griffiths, G.

    2006-12-01

    Assessment of reliability and consequent risk to autonomous systems is an increasingly common and critical concern given the number of challenging new extreme environment research programs calling for the utilization of autonomous systems (e.g. AUVs, gliders, floats, etc.). The interest in using autonomous systems amongst the scientific community is particularly strong amongst polar research programs where so much vital area lies beyond the reach of traditional approaches. Therefore, the potential for scientific discovery is significantly increased, because of the very ability of autonomous systems to get to and gather information in the critical zones. The scientific merits and rewards of polar research are great but so too are the risks. There are risks both to mission success (i.e. science delivery) and risks to asset survival and recovery (i.e. retrieval). In polar settings the greatest increased risks are the complexities of operation (e.g. launch/recovery and retrieval) associated with sea ice and shelf ice. Even in open water settings the temporal and spatial dynamics of environmental conditions complicate the operation of autonomous systems. Very little systematic study and quantitative analysis has been conducted to evaluate the reliability and risk to autonomous systems in any operational setting let alone the demanding and increasingly sought after polar environments. Here we present some assessments of AUV reliability for polar and also non-polar settings drawing largely on datasets from both a large autonomous vehicle program (Autosub) and a small autonomous vehicle program (DOERRI) in order to illustrate key and common elements of reliability and risk that may provide insights to scientific end-users (PIs), program managers, and the developers and operators of other similar autonomous systems working in polar settings. An approach to risk management is laid out. Key risk mitigation elements are presented in categories of system stability and

  12. Systemic inflammation associated with mechanical ventilation among extremely preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Carl L.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Van Marter, Linda J.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Leviton, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Little evidence is available to document that mechanical ventilation is an antecedent of systemic inflammation in preterm humans. We obtained blood on postnatal day 14 from 726 infants born before the 28th week of gestation and measured the concentrations of 25 inflammation-related proteins. We created multivariable models to assess the relationship between duration of ventilation and protein concentrations in the top quartile. Compared to newborns ventilated for fewer than 7 days (N=247), those ventilated for 14 days (N=330) were more likely to have elevated blood concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α), chemokines (IL-8, MCP-1), an adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), and a matrix metalloprotease (MMP-9), and less likely to have elevated blood concentrations of two chemokines (RANTES, MIP-1β), a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1), and a growth factor (VEGF). Newborns ventilated for 7-13 days (N=149) had systemic inflammation that approximated the pattern of newborns ventilated for 14 days. These relationships were not confounded by chorioamnionitis or antenatal corticosteroid exposure, and were not altered appreciably among infants with and without bacteremia. These findings suggest that two weeks of ventilation are more likely than shorter durations of ventilation to be accompanied by high blood concentrations of pro-inflammatory proteins indicative of systemic inflammation, and by low concentrations of proteins that might protect from inflammation-mediated organ injury. PMID:23148992

  13. Comparison of TLD calibration methods for 192Ir dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Annette; Butler, Duncan J; Wilfert, Lisa; Ebert, Martin A; Todd, Stephen P; Hayton, Anna J M; Kron, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of dose measurement using a high-dose rate (192)Ir source, four methods of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) calibration were investigated. Three of the four calibration methods used the (192)Ir source. Dwell times were calculated to deliver 1 Gy to the TLDs irradiated either in air or water. Dwell time calculations were confirmed by direct measurement using an ionization chamber. The fourth method of calibration used 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator, and an energy correction factor was applied to account for the difference in sensitivity of the TLDs in (192)Ir and 6 MV. The results of the four TLD calibration methods are presented in terms of the results of a brachytherapy audit where seven Australian centers irradiated three sets of TLDs in a water phantom. The results were in agreement within estimated uncertainties when the TLDs were calibrated with the (192)Ir source. Calibrating TLDs in a phantom similar to that used for the audit proved to be the most practical method and provided the greatest confidence in measured dose. When calibrated using 6 MV photons, the TLD results were consistently higher than the (192)Ir-calibrated TLDs, suggesting this method does not fully correct for the response of the TLDs when irradiated in the audit phantom. PMID:23318392

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of correction factors for IAEA TLD holders.

    PubMed

    Hultqvist, Martha; Fernández-Varea, José M; Izewska, Joanna

    2010-03-21

    The IAEA standard thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) holder has been developed for the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose program for audits of high-energy photon beams, and it is also employed by the ESTRO-QUALity assurance network (EQUAL) and several national TLD audit networks. Factors correcting for the influence of the holder on the TL signal under reference conditions have been calculated in the present work from Monte Carlo simulations with the PENELOPE code for (60)Co gamma-rays and 4, 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV photon beams. The simulation results are around 0.2% smaller than measured factors reported in the literature, but well within the combined standard uncertainties. The present study supports the use of the experimentally obtained holder correction factors in the determination of the absorbed dose to water from the TL readings; the factors calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations may be adopted for the cases where there are no measured data. PMID:20197601

  15. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, Vriddhachalam K.; Newnam, Brian E.

    1993-01-01

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 .mu.m, and preferably less than 100 .mu.m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 .mu.m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm .times.25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  16. Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

    1993-05-18

    A projection reflection optical system has two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have spherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 [mu]m, and preferably less than 100 [mu]m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05-0.1 [mu]m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm [times] 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

  17. Extremal entanglement and mixedness in continuous variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the relationship between mixedness and entanglement for Gaussian states of continuous variable systems. We introduce generalized entropies based on Schatten p norms to quantify the mixedness of a state and derive their explicit expressions in terms of symplectic spectra. We compare the hierarchies of mixedness provided by such measures with the one provided by the purity (defined as tr {rho}{sup 2} for the state {rho}) for generic n-mode states. We then review the analysis proving the existence of both maximally and minimally entangled states at given global and marginal purities, with the entanglement quantified by the logarithmic negativity. Based on these results, we extend such an analysis to generalized entropies, introducing and fully characterizing maximally and minimally entangled states for given global and local generalized entropies. We compare the different roles played by the purity and by the generalized p entropies in quantifying the entanglement and the mixedness of continuous variable systems. We introduce the concept of average logarithmic negativity, showing that it allows a reliable quantitative estimate of continuous variable entanglement by direct measurements of global and marginal generalized p entropies.

  18. Universal persistence exponents in an extremally driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, D. A.

    2002-02-01

    The local persistence R(t), defined as the proportion of the system still in its initial state at time t, is measured for the Bak-Sneppen model. For one and two dimensions, it is found that the decay of R(t) depends on one of two classes of initial configuration. For a subcritical initial state, R(t)~t-θ, where the persistence exponent θ can be expressed in terms of a known universal exponent. Hence θ is universal. Conversely, starting from a supercritical state, R(t) decays by the anomalous form 1-R(t)~tτall until a finite time t0, where τall is also a known exponent. Finally, for the high dimensional model R(t) decays exponentially with a nonuniversal decay constant.

  19. New Phases of Hydrogen-Bonded Systems at Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, M R; Goldman, N; Fried, L E

    2006-10-23

    We study the behavior of hydrogen-bonded systems under high-pressure and temperature. First principle calculations of formic acid under isotropic pressure up to 70 GPa reveal the existence of a polymerization phase at around 20 GPa, in support of recent IR, Raman, and XRD experiments. In this phase, covalent bonding develops between molecules of the same chain through symmetrization of hydrogen bonds. We also performed molecular dynamics simulations of water at pressures up to 115 GPa and 2000 K. Along this isotherm, we are able to define three different phases. We observe a molecular fluid phase with superionic diffusion of the hydrogens for pressure 34 GPa to 58 GPa. We report a transformation to a phase dominated by transient networks of symmetric O-H hydrogen bonds at 95-115 GPa. As in formic acid, the network can be attributed to the symmetrization of the hydrogen bond, similar to the ice VII to ice X transition.

  20. Extreme warm season thunderstorm systems and the urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntelekos, Alexandros Anastasios

    The consequences of a flood are amplified when it occurs in urban environments by virtue of the large concentration of people and wealth affected. This dissertation is devoted to advancing the understanding of the ways that warm season thunderstorm systems interact with the urban environment to produce flooding. The area of study is the northeastern United States with particular focus over the urban environments of Baltimore, Washington, DC, and New York City. The complex topography of the northeastern United States, with the Appalachian Mountains to the west, and the land-ocean boundary to the east of the heavily urbanized northeastern corridor, presents the analyses with great challenges. At the same time, it increases their relevance since most of the world's urban cores are built close to complex terrain. Warm season thunderstorm systems that produce short-duration, high-intensity rain-fall events are shown to be the major flash flooding agents over the urban corridor of the northeastern US. Established theories of inadvertent weather modification by urban environments are put to the test with the use of advanced models and multiple observational techniques. The results reveal unexplored links of inadvertent weather modification arising from synergies between the urban canopy layer and the land-ocean boundary. Aerosols are also shown to play an important role in rain-fall enhancement, under certain environmental conditions that are examined through combined observational analyses and numerical model experiments. The last part of this dissertation is devoted to synthesizing the links between flooding and the urban environment to perform a critical review of the US flood policy framework. Projections of end-of-the 21st Century annual flood costs are made, and recommendations are provided for a modernization of the policy framework to more efficiently mitigate the effects of floods in the future.

  1. Extremely sensitive dual imaging system in solid phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Barnoy, Eran A.; Fixler, Dror; Popovtzer, Rachela; Nayhoz, Tsviya; Ray, Krishanu

    2016-01-01

    Herein we describe promising results from the combination of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and diffusion reflection (DR) medical imaging techniques. Three different geometries of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were prepared: spheres of 20nm diameter, rods (GNRs) of aspect ratio (AR) 2.5, and GNRs of AR 3.3. Each GNP geometry was then conjugated using PEG linkers estimated to be 10nm in length to each of 3 different fluorescent dyes: Fluorescein, Rhodamine B, and Sulforhodamine B. DR provided deep-volume measurements (up to 1cm) from within solid, tissue-imitating phantoms, indicating GNR presence corresponding to the light used by recording light scattered from the GNPs with increasing distance to a photodetector. FLIM imaged solutions as well as phantom surfaces, recording both the fluorescence lifetimes as well as the fluorescence intensities. Fluorescence quenching was observed for Fluorescein, while metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) was observed in Rhodamine B and Sulforhodamine B – the dyes with an absorption peak at a slightly longer wavelength than the GNP plasmon resonance peak. Our system is highly sensitive due to the increased intensity provided by MEF, and also because of the inherent sensitivity of both FLIM and DR. Together, these two modalities and MEF can provide a lot of meaningful information for molecular and functional imaging of biological samples. PMID:27239085

  2. X- and gamma-ray response of the TLD badge based on CaSO4:Dy Teflon TLD discs.

    PubMed

    Vohra, K G; Pradhan, A S; Bhatt, R C

    1982-09-01

    A TLD badge based on CaSO4: Dy Teflon TLD discs has been designed for personnel monitoring of radiation workers encountering X-rays of effective energies above 20 keV. The badge had two Teflon TLD discs, one of which is used bare (without any filter) and other which is used with a metal filter. By taking into account the TL readout of both of these discs, the problems of photon energy dependence as well as directional dependence of the badge have been reduced to a minimum. The uncertainty due to photon energy dependence above 29 KeV (eff.) was found to be within a value of +/- 15% (at an angle of incidence of 45 degrees). The directional dependence of the badge is within +/- 30% in the energy range from 35 KeV to 1.25 MeV. The badge is designed so as to provide approximate information on the effective photon energy of the X-ray exposures. PMID:7174332

  3. Urbanization, Extreme Events, and Health: The Case for Systems Approaches in Mitigation, Management, and Response.

    PubMed

    Siri, José Gabriel; Newell, Barry; Proust, Katrina; Capon, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Extreme events, both natural and anthropogenic, increasingly affect cities in terms of economic losses and impacts on health and well-being. Most people now live in cities, and Asian cities, in particular, are experiencing growth on unprecedented scales. Meanwhile, the economic and health consequences of climate-related events are worsening, a trend projected to continue. Urbanization, climate change and other geophysical and social forces interact with urban systems in ways that give rise to complex and in many cases synergistic relationships. Such effects may be mediated by location, scale, density, or connectivity, and also involve feedbacks and cascading outcomes. In this context, traditional, siloed, reductionist approaches to understanding and dealing with extreme events are unlikely to be adequate. Systems approaches to mitigation, management and response for extreme events offer a more effective way forward. Well-managed urban systems can decrease risk and increase resilience in the face of such events. PMID:26219559

  4. Facilitating Co-Design for Extreme-Scale Systems Through Lightweight Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Christian; Lauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This work focuses on tools for investigating algorithm performance at extreme scale with millions of concurrent threads and for evaluating the impact of future architecture choices to facilitate the co-design of high-performance computing (HPC) architectures and applications. The approach focuses on lightweight simulation of extreme-scale HPC systems with the needed amount of accuracy. The prototype presented in this paper is able to provide this capability using a parallel discrete event simulation (PDES), such that a Message Passing Interface (MPI) application can be executed at extreme scale, and its performance properties can be evaluated. The results of an initial prototype are encouraging as a simple 'hello world' MPI program could be scaled up to 1,048,576 virtual MPI processes on a four-node cluster, and the performance properties of two MPI programs could be evaluated at up to 16,384 virtual MPI processes on the same system.

  5. Investigating Operating System Noise in Extreme-Scale High-Performance Computing Systems using Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Hardware/software co-design for future-generation high-performance computing (HPC) systems aims at closing the gap between the peak capabilities of the hardware and the performance realized by applications (application-architecture performance gap). Performance profiling of architectures and applications is a crucial part of this iterative process. The work in this paper focuses on operating system (OS) noise as an additional factor to be considered for co-design. It represents the first step in including OS noise in HPC hardware/software co-design by adding a noise injection feature to an existing simulation-based co-design toolkit. It reuses an existing abstraction for OS noise with frequency (periodic recurrence) and period (duration of each occurrence) to enhance the processor model of the Extreme-scale Simulator (xSim) with synchronized and random OS noise simulation. The results demonstrate this capability by evaluating the impact of OS noise on MPI_Bcast() and MPI_Reduce() in a simulated future-generation HPC system with 2,097,152 compute nodes.

  6. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-09-15

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  7. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm3 CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0±5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0±6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0±4.0 mGy and 97.0±5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0±5.0 mGy. The author’s results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality. PMID:18841837

  8. Relative Efficiency Of TLD-100 Exposed to X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ixquiac-Cabrera, J. M.; Gamboa-de Buen, I.; Avila, O.; Brandan, M. E.

    2008-08-11

    The relative efficiency of TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) exposed to X-rays in the range from 30 to 250 kV, with respect to {sup 60}CO gamma rays has been measured. Glow curves were deconvoluted into peaks 3 to 9. All efficiencies were greater than 1 having a maximum of 1.38 for the dosimetric region (peaks 3+4+5) and peaks 4, 5 and 9, and 2.2 for peaks 6a, 6b, 7 and 8 at the effective energy of 24 keV.

  9. Combination TLD/TED dose assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, M.A.

    1992-11-01

    During the early 1980s, an appraisal of dosimetry programs at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities identified a significant weakness in dose assessment in fast neutron environments. Basing neutron dose equivalent on thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDS) was not entirely satisfactory for environments that had not been well characterized. In most operational situations, the dosimeters overrespond to neutrons, and this overresponse could be further exaggerated with changes in the neutron quality factor (Q). Because TLDs are energy dependent with an excellent response to thermal and low-energy neutrons but a weak response to fast neutrons, calibrating the dosimetry system to account for mixed and moderated neutron energy fields is a difficult and seldom satisfactory exercise. To increase the detection of fast neutrons and help improve the accuracy of dose equivalent determinations, a combination dosimeter was developed using TLDs to detect thermal and low-energy neutrons and a track-etch detector (TED) to detect fast neutrons. By combining the albedo energy response function of the TLDs with the track detector elements, the dosimeter can nearly match the fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion curve. The polymer CR-39 has neutron detection characteristics superior to other materials tested. The CR-39 track detector is beta and gamma insensitive and does not require backscatter (albedo) from the body to detect the exposure. As part of DOE's Personnel Neutron and Upgrade Program, we have been developing a R-39 track detector over the past decade to address detection and measurement of fast neutrons. Using CR-39 TEDs in combination with TLDs will now allow us to detect the wide spectrum of occupational neutron energies and assign dose equivalents much more confidently.

  10. Combination TLD/TED dose assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, M.A.

    1992-11-01

    During the early 1980s, an appraisal of dosimetry programs at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities identified a significant weakness in dose assessment in fast neutron environments. Basing neutron dose equivalent on thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDS) was not entirely satisfactory for environments that had not been well characterized. In most operational situations, the dosimeters overrespond to neutrons, and this overresponse could be further exaggerated with changes in the neutron quality factor (Q). Because TLDs are energy dependent with an excellent response to thermal and low-energy neutrons but a weak response to fast neutrons, calibrating the dosimetry system to account for mixed and moderated neutron energy fields is a difficult and seldom satisfactory exercise. To increase the detection of fast neutrons and help improve the accuracy of dose equivalent determinations, a combination dosimeter was developed using TLDs to detect thermal and low-energy neutrons and a track-etch detector (TED) to detect fast neutrons. By combining the albedo energy response function of the TLDs with the track detector elements, the dosimeter can nearly match the fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion curve. The polymer CR-39 has neutron detection characteristics superior to other materials tested. The CR-39 track detector is beta and gamma insensitive and does not require backscatter (albedo) from the body to detect the exposure. As part of DOE`s Personnel Neutron and Upgrade Program, we have been developing a R-39 track detector over the past decade to address detection and measurement of fast neutrons. Using CR-39 TEDs in combination with TLDs will now allow us to detect the wide spectrum of occupational neutron energies and assign dose equivalents much more confidently.

  11. Development of an Interactive Upper Extremity Gestural Robotic Feedback System: From Bench to Reality

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Krista A. Coleman; Lathan, Corinna E.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2010-01-01

    Development of an interactive system to treat patients with movement impairments of the upper extremity is described. Gestures and movement of patients as instructed by therapists are detected by accelerometers and feedback is provided directly to the patient via a robot. PMID:19964144

  12. Design and optimization of a dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    The design, initial imaging performance, and model-based optimization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanner for musculoskeletal extremities is presented. The system offers a compact scanner that complements conventional CT and MR by providing sub-mm isotropic spatial resolution, the ability to image weight-bearing extremities, and the capability for integrated real-time fluoroscopy and digital radiography. The scanner employs a flat-panel detector and a fixed anode x-ray source and has a field of view of ~ (20x20x20) cm3. The gantry allows a "standing" configuration for imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities and a "sitting" configuration for imaging of upper extremities and unloaded lower extremities. Cascaded systems analysis guided the selection of x-ray technique (e.g., kVp, filtration, and dose) and system design (e.g., magnification factor), yielding input-quantum-limited performance at detector signal of 100 times the electronic noise, while maintaining patient dose below 5 mGy (a factor of ~2-3 less than conventional CT). A magnification of 1.3 optimized tradeoffs between source and detector blur for a 0.5 mm focal spot. A custom antiscatter grid demonstrated significant reduction of artifacts without loss of contrast-to-noise ratio or increase in dose. Image quality in cadaveric specimens was assessed on a CBCT bench, demonstrating exquisite bone detail, visualization of intra-articular morphology, and soft-tissue visibility approaching that of diagnostic CT. The capability to image loaded extremities and conduct multi-modality CBCT/fluoroscopy with improved workflow compared to whole-body CT could be of value in a broad spectrum of applications, including orthopaedics, rheumatology, surgical planning, and treatment assessment. A clinical prototype has been constructed for deployment in pilot study trials.

  13. Hypersaline Microbial Systems of Sabkhas: Examples of Life's Survival in "Extreme" Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbein, Wolfgang Elisabeth; Gorbushina, Anna A.; Holtkamp-Tacken, Elisabeth

    2004-12-01

    Life and living systems need several important factors to establish themselves and to have a continued tradition. In this article the nature of the borderline situation for microbial life under heavy salt stress is analyzed and discussed using the example of biofilms and microbial mats of sabkha systems of the Red Sea. Important factors ruling such environments are described, and include the following: (1) Microbial life is better suited for survival in extremely changing and only sporadically water-supplied environments than are larger organisms (including humans). (2) Microbial life shows extremely poikilophilic adaptation patterns to conditions that deviate significantly from conditions normal for life processes on Earth today. (3) Microbial life adapts itself to such extremely changing and only ephemerally supportive conditions by the capacity of extreme changes (a) in morphology (pleomorphy), (b) in metabolic patterns (poikilotrophy), (c) in survival strategies (poikilophily), and (d) by trapping and enclosing all necessary sources of energy matter in an inwardly oriented diffusive cycle. All this is achieved without any serious attempt at escaping from the extreme and extremely changing conditions. Furthermore, these salt swamp systems are geophysiological generators of energy and material reservoirs recycled over a geological time scale. Neither energy nor material is wasted for propagation by spore formation. This capacity is summarized as poikilophilic and poikilotroph behavior of biofilm or microbial mat communities in salt and irradiationstressed environmental conditions of the sabkha or salt desert type. We use mainly cyanobacteria as an example, although other bacteria and even eukaryotic fungi may exhibit the same potential of living and surviving under conditions usually not suitable for life on Earth. It may, however, be postulated that such poikilophilic organisms are the true candidates for life support and survival under conditions never recorded

  14. Hypersaline microbial systems of sabkhas: examples of life's survival in "extreme" conditions.

    PubMed

    Krumbein, Wolfgang Elisabeth; Gorbushina, Anna A; Holtkamp-Tacken, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    Life and living systems need several important factors to establish themselves and to have a continued tradition. In this article the nature of the borderline situation for microbial life under heavy salt stress is analyzed and discussed using the example of biofilms and microbial mats of sabkha systems of the Red Sea. Important factors ruling such environments are described, and include the following: (1) Microbial life is better suited for survival in extremely changing and only sporadically water-supplied environments than are larger organisms (including humans). (2) Microbial life shows extremely poikilophilic adaptation patterns to conditions that deviate significantly from conditions normal for life processes on Earth today. (3) Microbial life adapts itself to such extremely changing and only ephemerally supportive conditions by the capacity of extreme changes (a) in morphology (pleomorphy), (b) in metabolic patterns (poikilotrophy), (c) in survival strategies (poikilophily), and (d) by trapping and enclosing all necessary sources of energy matter in an inwardly oriented diffusive cycle. All this is achieved without any serious attempt at escaping from the extreme and extremely changing conditions. Furthermore, these salt swamp systems are geophysiological generators of energy and material reservoirs recycled over a geological time scale. Neither energy nor material is wasted for propagation by spore formation. This capacity is summarized as poikilophilic and poikilotroph behavior of biofilm or microbial mat communities in salt and irradiationstressed environmental conditions of the sabkha or salt desert type. We use mainly cyanobacteria as an example, although other bacteria and even eukaryotic fungi may exhibit the same potential of living and surviving under conditions usually not suitable for life on Earth. It may, however, be postulated that such poikilophilic organisms are the true candidates for life support and survival under conditions never recorded

  15. Linearized stability of extreme shock profiles for systems of conservation laws with viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pego, R. L.

    1982-12-01

    For a genuinely nonlinear hyperbolic system of conservation laws with added artificial viscosity, we prove that traveling wave profiles for small amplitude extreme shocks (the slowest and fastest) are linearly stable to perturbations initial data chosen from certain spaces with weighted norm; i.e., we show that the spectrum of the linearized equation lies strictly in the left half plane, except for a simple eigenvalue at the origin (due to phase translations of the profile). The weight is used in components transverse to the profile, where, for an extreme shock, the linearized equation is dominated by unidirectional convection.

  16. Patterns and singular features of extreme fluctuational paths of a periodically driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-05-01

    Large fluctuations of an overdamped periodically driven oscillating system are investigated theoretically and numerically in the limit of weak noise. Optimal paths fluctuating to certain point are given by statistical analysis using the concept of prehistory probability distribution. The validity of statistical results is verified by solutions of boundary value problem. Optimal paths are found to change topologically when terminating points lie at opposite side of a switching line. Patterns of extreme paths are plotted through a proper parameterization of Lagrangian manifold having complicated structures. Several extreme paths to the same point are obtained by multiple solutions of boundary value solutions. Actions along various extreme paths are calculated and associated analysis is performed in relation to the singular features of the patterns.

  17. Extreme weather events: Should drinking water quality management systems adapt to changing risk profiles?

    PubMed

    Khan, Stuart J; Deere, Daniel; Leusch, Frederic D L; Humpage, Andrew; Jenkins, Madeleine; Cunliffe, David

    2015-11-15

    Among the most widely predicted and accepted consequences of global climate change are increases in both the frequency and severity of a variety of extreme weather events. Such weather events include heavy rainfall and floods, cyclones, droughts, heatwaves, extreme cold, and wildfires, each of which can potentially impact drinking water quality by affecting water catchments, storage reservoirs, the performance of water treatment processes or the integrity of distribution systems. Drinking water guidelines, such as the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines and the World Health Organization Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, provide guidance for the safe management of drinking water. These documents present principles and strategies for managing risks that may be posed to drinking water quality. While these principles and strategies are applicable to all types of water quality risks, very little specific attention has been paid to the management of extreme weather events. We present a review of recent literature on water quality impacts of extreme weather events and consider practical opportunities for improved guidance for water managers. We conclude that there is a case for an enhanced focus on the management of water quality impacts from extreme weather events in future revisions of water quality guidance documents. PMID:26311274

  18. Microwave tomography of extremities: 1) Dedicated 2D system and physiological signatures

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Williams, Thomas; Nair, Bindu; Pavlovsky, Andrey; Posukh, Vitaly; Quinn, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Microwave Tomography (MWT) is a novel imaging modality which might be applicable for non-invasive assessment of functional and pathological conditions of biological tissues. The imaging of the soft tissue of extremities is one of its potential applications. The feasibility of this technology for such applications was demonstrated earlier. This is the first of two companion papers focused on an application of MWT for imaging of the extremity’s soft tissues. The goal of this study is to assess the technical performance of the developed 2D MWT system dedicated for imaging of functional and pathological conditions of the extremity’s soft tissues. Specifically, the system’s performance was tested by its ability to detect signals associated with physiological activity and soft tissue interventions (circulatory related changes, blood flow reduction and a simulated compartmental syndrome) – so called “physiological signatures”. The developed 2D MWT system dedicated for an imaging of animal extremities demonstrates good technical performance allowing for stable and predictable data acquisition with reasonable agreement between experimentally measured electromagnetic (EM) field and simulated EM field within a measurement domain. Using the system we were able to obtain physiological signatures associated with systolic vs diastolic phases of circulation in an animal extremity, reperfusion vs occlusion phases of the blood supply to the animal’s extremity and the a compartment syndrome. The imaging results are presented and discussed in the second companion paper. PMID:21364265

  19. Investigation of radiation doses in open space using TLD detectors.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G; Facius, R; Bilski, P; Olko, P

    2002-01-01

    The low energy component of the cosmic radiation field is strongly modified by the shielding of the spacecraft and it is time and location dependent. Thermoluminescent lithium fluoride detectors have been applied to determine the radiation doses inside the ESA-Facility BIOPAN. The BIOPAN facility was mounted outside and launched on a Foton spacecraft and opened to space to allow exposure of several experiments to open space. Standard TLD-600. TLD-700 chips, two layers MTS-Ns sintered pellets with different effective thickness of the sensitive layer and MTS-N of different thickness have been exposed with different shielding thicknesses in front of them. The measured TL signal in the 0.1 mm thick detector just shielded by an aluminised Kapton foil of 25 microm thickness in front yielded a dose of 29.8 Gy (calibrated with 137Cs gamma rays) for an exposure time of 12.7 days: after 2.5 g.cm(-2) shielding the doses dropped to 3 mGy. The monitoring of radiation doses and its depth dose distribution outside the spacecraft are of great interest for radiation protection of astronauts working in open space. The knowledge of depth-dose distribution is a prerequisite to determine the organ doses an astronaut will receive during an extravehicular activity (EVA). The BIOPAN experiments are to be continued in the future. PMID:12382937

  20. Development of a wafer positioning system for the Sandia extreme ultraviolet lithography tool

    SciTech Connect

    Wronosky, J.B.; Smith, T.G.; Darnold, J.R.

    1995-12-01

    A wafer positioning system was recently developed by Sandia National Laboratories for an Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) tool. The system, which utilizes a magnetically levitated fine stage to provide ultra-precise positioning in all six degrees of freedom, incorporates technological improvements resulting from four years of prototype development. This paper describes the design, implementation, and functional capability of the system. Specifics regarding control system electronics, including software and control algorithm structure, as well as performance design goals and test results are presented. Potential system enhancements, some of which are in process, are also discussed.

  1. Development of a Wafer Positioning System for the Sandia Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronosky, John B.; Smith, Tony G.; Darnold, Joel R.

    1996-01-01

    A wafer positioning system was recently developed by Sandia National Laboratories for an Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) tool. The system, which utilizes a magnetically levitated fine stage to provide ultra-precise positioning in all six degrees of freedom, incorporates technological improvements resulting from four years of prototype development. This paper describes the design, implementation, and functional capability of the system. Specifics regarding control system electronics, including software and control algorithm structure, as well as performance design goals and test results are presented. Potential system enhancements, some of which are in process, are also discussed.

  2. Co-Alignment System (CAS) study. Report on task 1-3. [Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope and Spectrometer pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a suitable coalignment system (CAS) for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope and Spectrometer (SEUTS) is presented. The CAS provides offset adjustment capabilities to SEUTS which will be mounted on a single large pointing system with other devices. The suitability of existing designs is determined and modifications are suggested.

  3. Extreme temperature trends in major cropping systems and their relation to agricultural land use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, N. D.; Butler, E. E.; McKinnon, K. A.; Rhines, A. N.; Tingley, M.; Siebert, S.; Holbrook, N. M.; Huybers, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    High temperature extremes during the growing season can reduce agricultural production. At the same time, agricultural practices can modify temperatures by altering the surface energy budget. Here we investigate growing season climate trends in major cropping systems and their relationship with agricultural land use change. In the US Midwest, 100-year trends exhibit a transition towards more favorable conditions, with cooler summer temperature extremes and increased precipitation. Statistically significant correspondence is found between the cooling pattern and trends in cropland intensification, as well as with trends towards greater irrigated land over a small subset of the domain. Land conversion to cropland, often considered an important influence on historical temperatures, is not significantly associated with cooling. We suggest that cooling is primarily associated with agricultural intensification increasing the potential for evapotranspiration, consistent with our finding that cooling trends are greatest for the highest temperature percentiles, and that increased evapotranspiration generally leads to greater precipitation. Temperatures over rainfed croplands show no cooling trend during drought conditions, consistent with evapotranspiration requiring adequate soil moisture, and implying that modern drought events feature greater warming as baseline cooler temperatures revert to historically high extremes. Preliminary results indicate these relationships between temperature extremes, irrigation, and intensification are also observed in other major summer cropping systems, including northeast China, Argentina, and the Canadian Prairies.

  4. SAXO: the extreme adaptive optics system of SPHERE (I) system overview and global laboratory performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, Jean-Francois; Fusco, Thierry; Petit, Cyril; Costille, Anne; Mouillet, David; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Dohlen, Kjetil; Kasper, Markus; Suarez, Marcos; Soenke, Christian; Baruffolo, Andrea; Salasnich, Bernardo; Rochat, Sylvain; Fedrigo, Enrico; Baudoz, Pierre; Hugot, Emmanuel; Sevin, Arnaud; Perret, Denis; Wildi, Francois; Downing, Mark; Feautrier, Philippe; Puget, Pascal; Vigan, Arthur; O'Neal, Jared; Girard, Julien; Mawet, Dimitri; Schmid, Hans Martin; Roelfsema, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    The direct imaging of exoplanet is a leading field of today's astronomy. The photons coming from the planet carry precious information on the chemical composition of its atmosphere. The second-generation instrument, Spectro-Polarimetric High contrast Exoplanet Research (SPHERE), dedicated to detection, photometry and spectral characterization of Jovian-like planets, is now in operation on the European very large telescope. This instrument relies on an extreme adaptive optics (XAO) system to compensate for atmospheric turbulence as well as for internal errors with an unprecedented accuracy. We demonstrate the high level of performance reached by the SPHERE XAO system (SAXO) during the assembly integration and test (AIT) period. In order to fully characterize the instrument quality, two AIT periods have been mandatory. In the first phase at Observatoire de Paris, the performance of SAXO itself was assessed. In the second phase at IPAG Grenoble Observatory, the operation of SAXO in interaction with the overall instrument has been optimized. In addition to the first two phases, a final check has been performed after the reintegration of the instrument at Paranal Observatory, in the New Integration Hall before integration at the telescope focus. The final performance aimed by the SPHERE instrument with the help of SAXO is among the highest Strehl ratio pretended for an operational instrument (90% in H band, 43% in V band in a realistic turbulence r0, and wind speed condition), a limit R magnitude for loop closure at 15, and a robustness to high wind speeds. The full-width at half-maximum reached by the instrument is 40 mas for infrared in H band and unprecedented 18.5 mas in V band.

  5. Application of laser TLD 2-dimensional dose mapping in medical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Braunlich, P.F.; Jones, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    IST, Inc. has developed a laser-based system for rapid evaluation of two-dimensional monolithic thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) films. For most applications, the authors use arrays of 1.5- mm diameter, 38-{mu}m-thick TLDs, deposited on 0.125-mm-thick polymer in a 3x3-mm grid of up to 30x30-cm size. Continuous films are available for applications requiring higher spatial resolution (300 {mu}m.) The films are re-usable and water-immersible. Results from radiation therapy (photon and charged particle beam) dose measurements, quality assurance in mammography (dose distribution and kVp), interventional radiotherapy and personnel dosimetry (detection of intentional fraudulent exposures) are given.

  6. The LANL model 8823 whole-body TLD and associated dose algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.M.; Mallett, M.W.

    1999-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Model 8823 whole-body TLD has been designed to perform accurate dose estimates for beta, photon, and neutron radiations that are encountered in pure calibration, mixed calibration, and typical field radiation conditions. The radiation energies and field types for which the Model 8823 dosimeter is capable of measuring are described. The Model 8823 dosimeter has been accredited for all performance testing categories in the Department of Energy Laboratory Accrediation Program for external dosimetry systems. The philosophy used in the design of the Model 8823 dosimeter and the associated dose algorithm is to isolate the responses due to beta, photon, and neutron radiations; obtain radiation quality information; and make functional adjustments to the elemental readings to estimate the dose equivalent at 7, 300, and 1,000 mg cm{sup {minus}2}, representing the required reporting quantities for shallow, lens-of-the-eye, and deep dose, respectively.

  7. Multiplex APLP System for High-Resolution Haplogrouping of Extremely Degraded East-Asian Mitochondrial DNAs.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Tsuneo; Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Umetsu, Kazuo; Adachi, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) serves as a powerful tool for exploring matrilineal phylogeographic ancestry, as well as for analyzing highly degraded samples, because of its polymorphic nature and high copy numbers per cell. The recent advent of complete mitochondrial genome sequencing has led to improved techniques for phylogenetic analyses based on mtDNA, and many multiplex genotyping methods have been developed for the hierarchical analysis of phylogenetically important mutations. However, few high-resolution multiplex genotyping systems for analyzing East-Asian mtDNA can be applied to extremely degraded samples. Here, we present a multiplex system for analyzing mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs), which relies on a novel amplified product-length polymorphisms (APLP) method that uses inosine-flapped primers and is specifically designed for the detailed haplogrouping of extremely degraded East-Asian mtDNAs. We used fourteen 6-plex polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) and subsequent electrophoresis to examine 81 haplogroup-defining SNPs and 3 insertion/deletion sites, and we were able to securely assign the studied mtDNAs to relevant haplogroups. Our system requires only 1×10-13 g (100 fg) of crude DNA to obtain a full profile. Owing to its small amplicon size (<110 bp), this new APLP system was successfully applied to extremely degraded samples for which direct sequencing of hypervariable segments using mini-primer sets was unsuccessful, and proved to be more robust than conventional APLP analysis. Thus, our new APLP system is effective for retrieving reliable data from extremely degraded East-Asian mtDNAs. PMID:27355212

  8. Multiplex APLP System for High-Resolution Haplogrouping of Extremely Degraded East-Asian Mitochondrial DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kakuda, Tsuneo; Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Umetsu, Kazuo; Adachi, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) serves as a powerful tool for exploring matrilineal phylogeographic ancestry, as well as for analyzing highly degraded samples, because of its polymorphic nature and high copy numbers per cell. The recent advent of complete mitochondrial genome sequencing has led to improved techniques for phylogenetic analyses based on mtDNA, and many multiplex genotyping methods have been developed for the hierarchical analysis of phylogenetically important mutations. However, few high-resolution multiplex genotyping systems for analyzing East-Asian mtDNA can be applied to extremely degraded samples. Here, we present a multiplex system for analyzing mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs), which relies on a novel amplified product-length polymorphisms (APLP) method that uses inosine-flapped primers and is specifically designed for the detailed haplogrouping of extremely degraded East-Asian mtDNAs. We used fourteen 6-plex polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) and subsequent electrophoresis to examine 81 haplogroup-defining SNPs and 3 insertion/deletion sites, and we were able to securely assign the studied mtDNAs to relevant haplogroups. Our system requires only 1×10−13 g (100 fg) of crude DNA to obtain a full profile. Owing to its small amplicon size (<110 bp), this new APLP system was successfully applied to extremely degraded samples for which direct sequencing of hypervariable segments using mini-primer sets was unsuccessful, and proved to be more robust than conventional APLP analysis. Thus, our new APLP system is effective for retrieving reliable data from extremely degraded East-Asian mtDNAs. PMID:27355212

  9. Extreme multistability in a memristor-based multi-scroll hyper-chaotic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Wang, Guangyi; Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a new memristor-based multi-scroll hyper-chaotic system is designed. The proposed memristor-based system possesses multiple complex dynamic behaviors compared with other chaotic systems. Various coexisting attractors and hidden coexisting attractors are observed in this system, which means extreme multistability arises. Besides, by adjusting parameters of the system, this chaotic system can perform single-scroll attractors, double-scroll attractors, and four-scroll attractors. Basic dynamic characteristics of the system are investigated, including equilibrium points and stability, bifurcation diagrams, Lyapunov exponents, and so on. In addition, the presented system is also realized by an analog circuit to confirm the correction of the numerical simulations.

  10. Extreme multistability in a memristor-based multi-scroll hyper-chaotic system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Wang, Guangyi; Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a new memristor-based multi-scroll hyper-chaotic system is designed. The proposed memristor-based system possesses multiple complex dynamic behaviors compared with other chaotic systems. Various coexisting attractors and hidden coexisting attractors are observed in this system, which means extreme multistability arises. Besides, by adjusting parameters of the system, this chaotic system can perform single-scroll attractors, double-scroll attractors, and four-scroll attractors. Basic dynamic characteristics of the system are investigated, including equilibrium points and stability, bifurcation diagrams, Lyapunov exponents, and so on. In addition, the presented system is also realized by an analog circuit to confirm the correction of the numerical simulations. PMID:27475067

  11. Cutoff low systems and their relevance to large-scale extreme precipitation in the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awan, N. K.; Formayer, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we attempt to highlight the relevance of cutoff low systems (CoLs) to large-scale heavy precipitation events within the Alpine region which often lead to catastrophic flooding. The main results of this study are (1) a detailed climatology (1971-1999) of CoLs for the European region, (2) contribution of CoLs to extreme precipitation events in the European Alpine region, (3) identification of regions within the European Alps most affected by extreme precipitation caused by CoLs, and (4) identification of regions where presence of CoLs is related to extreme precipitation in the Alpine region. The findings of this paper suggest that CoLs have a significant correlation with extreme precipitation events and strongly influence the climate of the Alpine region. The total contribution of CoLs to large-scale heavy precipitation events ranges between 20 and 95 % and is most pronounced in the northern and eastern parts of the Alps. More than 80 % of the events occur in the summer season. The area around the Alps and West of Spain (over the Atlantic Ocean) is the most affected region. The location of the center of CoLs that affect the Alpine region most occur on the northern and southern sides of the Alpine ridge.

  12. Complex networks identify spatial patterns of extreme rainfall events of the South American Monsoon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, Niklas; Bookhagen, Bodo; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, José

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the spatial characteristics of extreme rainfall synchronicity of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS) by means of Complex Networks (CN). By introducing a new combination of CN measures and interpreting it in a climatic context, we investigate climatic linkages and classify the spatial characteristics of extreme rainfall synchronicity. Although our approach is based on only one variable (rainfall), it reveals the most important features of the SAMS, such as the main moisture pathways, areas with frequent development of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS), and the major convergence zones. In addition, our results reveal substantial differences between the spatial structures of rainfall synchronicity above the 90th and above the 95th percentiles. Most notably, events above the 95th percentile contribute stronger to MCS in the La Plata Basin.

  13. Rule based artificial intelligence expert system for determination of upper extremity impairment rating.

    PubMed

    Lim, I; Walkup, R K; Vannier, M W

    1993-04-01

    Quantitative evaluation of upper extremity impairment, a percentage rating most often determined using a rule based procedure, has been implemented on a personal computer using an artificial intelligence, rule-based expert system (AI system). In this study, the rules given in Chapter 3 of the AMA Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment (Third Edition) were used to develop such an AI system for the Apple Macintosh. The program applies the rules from the Guides in a consistent and systematic fashion. It is faster and less error-prone than the manual method, and the results have a higher degree of precision, since intermediate values are not truncated. PMID:8334872

  14. Design implementation and migration of security systems as an extreme project.

    SciTech Connect

    Scharmer, Carol

    2010-10-01

    Decision Trees, algorithms, software code, risk management, reports, plans, drawings, change control, presentations, and analysis - all useful tools and efforts but time consuming, resource intensive, and potentially costly for projects that have absolute schedule and budget constraints. What are necessary and prudent efforts when a customer calls with a major security problem that needs to be fixed with a proven, off-the-approval-list, multi-layered integrated system with high visibility and limited funding and expires at the end of the Fiscal Year? Whether driven by budget cycles, safety, or by management decree, many such projects begin with generic scopes and funding allocated based on a rapid management 'guestimate.' Then a Project Manager (PM) is assigned a project with a predefined and potentially limited scope, compressed schedule, and potentially insufficient funding. The PM is tasked to rapidly and cost effectively coordinate a requirements-based design, implementation, test, and turnover of a fully operational system to the customer, all while the customer is operating and maintaining an existing security system. Many project management manuals call this an impossible project that should not be attempted. However, security is serious business and the reality is that rapid deployment of proven systems via an 'Extreme Project' is sometimes necessary. Extreme Projects can be wildly successful but require a dedicated team of security professionals lead by an experienced project manager using a highly-tailored and agile project management process with management support at all levels, all combined with significant interface with the customer. This paper does not advocate such projects or condone eliminating the valuable analysis and project management techniques. Indeed, having worked on a well-planned project provides the basis for experienced team members to complete Extreme Projects. This paper does, however, provide insight into what it takes for projects

  15. Design, implementation and migration of security systems as an extreme project.

    SciTech Connect

    Scharmer, Carol; Trujillo, David

    2010-08-01

    Decision Trees, algorithms, software code, risk management, reports, plans, drawings, change control, presentations, and analysis - all useful tools and efforts but time consuming, resource intensive, and potentially costly for projects that have absolute schedule and budget constraints. What are necessary and prudent efforts when a customer calls with a major security problem that needs to be fixed with a proven, off-the-approval-list, multi-layered integrated system with high visibility and limited funding and expires at the end of the Fiscal Year? Whether driven by budget cycles, safety, or by management decree, many such projects begin with generic scopes and funding allocated based on a rapid management 'guestimate.' Then a Project Manager (PM) is assigned a project with a predefined and potentially limited scope, compressed schedule, and potentially insufficient funding. The PM is tasked to rapidly and cost effectively coordinate a requirements-based design, implementation, test, and turnover of a fully operational system to the customer, all while the customer is operating and maintaining an existing security system. Many project management manuals call this an impossible project that should not be attempted. However, security is serious business and the reality is that rapid deployment of proven systems via an 'Extreme Project' is sometimes necessary. Extreme Projects can be wildly successful but require a dedicated team of security professionals lead by an experienced project manager using a highly-tailored and agile project management process with management support at all levels, all combined with significant interface with the customer. This paper does not advocate such projects or condone eliminating the valuable analysis and project management techniques. Indeed, having worked on a well-planned project provides the basis for experienced team members to complete Extreme Projects. This paper does, however, provide insight into what it takes for projects

  16. Characteristics of mesoscale-convective-system-produced extreme rainfall over southeastern South Korea: 7 July 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Dong-In; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Han, In-Seong

    2016-04-01

    An extreme-rainfall-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) associated with the Changma front in southeastern South Korea was investigated using observational data. This event recorded historic rainfall and led to devastating flash floods and landslides in the Busan metropolitan area on 7 July 2009. The aim of the present study is to analyse the influences for the synoptic and mesoscale environment, and the reasons that the quasi-stationary MCS causes extreme rainfall. Synoptic and mesoscale analyses indicate that the MCS and heavy rainfall occurred in association with a stationary front which resembled a warm front in structure. A strong southwesterly low-level jet (LLJ) transported warm and humid air and supplied the moisture toward the front, and the air rose upwards above the frontal surface. As the moist air was conditionally unstable, repeated upstream initiation of deep convection by back-building occurred at the coastline, while old cells moved downstream parallel to the convective line with training effect. Because the motion of convective cells nearly opposed the backward propagation, the system as a whole moved slowly. The back-building behaviour was linked to the convectively generated cold pool and its outflow boundary, which played a role in the propagation and maintenance of the rainfall system. As a result, the quasi-stationary MCS caused a prolonged duration of heavy rainfall, leading to extreme rainfall over the Busan metropolitan area.

  17. NRC TLD direct radiation monitoring network: Volume 15, No. 3. Progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-12-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network is operated by the NRC in cooperation with participating states to provide continuous measurement of the ambient radiation levels around licensed NRC facilities, primarily power reactors. Ambient radiation levels result from naturally occurring radionuclides present in the soil, cosmic radiation constantly bombarding the earth from outer space, and the contribution, if any, from the monitored facilities and other man-made sources. The Network is intended to measure radiation levels during routine facility operations and to establish background radiation levels used to assess the radiological impact of an unusual condition, such as an accident. This report presents the radiation levels measured around all facilities in the Network for the third quarter of 1995. A complete listing of the site facilities monitored is included. In some instances, two power reactor facilities are monitored by the same set of dosimeters (e.g., Kewaunee and Point Beach). All radiation measurements are made using small, passive detectors called therinoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which provide a quantitative measurement of the radiation levels in the area in which they are placed. Each site is monitored by arranging approximately 40 to 50 TLD stations in two concentric rings extending to about five miles from the facility. All TLD stations are outside the site boundary of the facility. A complete description of the program can be found in NUREG-0837, Volume 2, Number 4. A similar description can also be found in the fourth quarter report of each subsequent year. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (formerly the National Bureau of Standards) has performed an independent study of the following characteristics of the NRC dosimetry system; energy response, angular dependence, temperature and humidity sensitivity, fading, light dependence, self-irradiation, and reproducibility.

  18. Development and recent results from the Subaru coronagraphic extreme adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, N.; Guyon, O.; Martinache, F.; Clergeon, C.; Singh, G.; Kudo, T.; Newman, K.; Kuhn, J.; Serabyn, E.; Norris, B.; Tuthill, P.; Stewart, P.; Huby, E.; Perrin, G.; Lacour, S.; Vievard, S.; Murakami, N.; Fumika, O.; Minowa, Y.; Hayano, Y.; White, J.; Lai, O.; Marchis, F.; Duchene, G.; Kotani, T.; Woillez, J.

    2014-07-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) instrument is one of a handful of extreme adaptive optics systems set to come online in 2014. The extreme adaptive optics correction is realized by a combination of precise wavefront sensing via a non-modulated pyramid wavefront sensor and a 2000 element deformable mirror. This system has recently begun on-sky commissioning and was operated in closed loop for several minutes at a time with a loop speed of 800 Hz, on ~150 modes. Further suppression of quasi-static speckles is possible via a process called "speckle nulling" which can create a dark hole in a portion of the frame allowing for an enhancement in contrast, and has been successfully tested on-sky. In addition to the wavefront correction there are a suite of coronagraphs on board to null out the host star which include the phase induced amplitude apodization (PIAA), the vector vortex, 8 octant phase mask, 4 quadrant phase mask and shaped pupil versions which operate in the NIR (y-K bands). The PIAA and vector vortex will allow for high contrast imaging down to an angular separation of 1 λ/D to be reached; a factor of 3 closer in than other extreme AO systems. Making use of the left over visible light not used by the wavefront sensor is VAMPIRES and FIRST. These modules are based on aperture masking interferometry and allow for sub-diffraction limited imaging with moderate contrasts of ~100-1000:1. Both modules have undergone initial testing on-sky and are set to be fully commissioned by the end of 2014.

  19. Effects of Extreme Monsoon Precipitation on River Systems Form And Function, an Early Eocene Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plink-Bjorklund, P.; Birgenheier, L.

    2013-12-01

    Here we document effects of extreme monsoon precipitation on river systems with mountainous drainage basin. We discuss the effects of individual extreme monsoon seasons, as well as long-term changes in Earth surface system's form and function. The dataset spans across 1000 m of stratigraphy across ca 200 km of Paleocene and Early Eocene river deposits. The excessive 3-dimensional outcrops, combined with our new Carbon isotope, ichnological and paleosols record allow reconstruction of long-term river system's evolution during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ca 56 million years ago, the transient global warming events during Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO) ca 53 to 51.5 million years ago, as well as the effects of highly peaked precipitation events during single monsoon seasons. On the single season scale, the increase in precipitation peakedness causes high discharge flooding events that remove large quantities of sediment from the drainage basin, due to stream erosion and landslide initiation. The initiation of landslides is especially significant, as the drainage basin is of high gradient, the monsoon intensification is accompanied by significant vegetation decline, as the monsoon cycle changes to multi-year droughts interrupted by extreme monsoon precipitation. These large discharge floods laden with sediment cause rapid deposition from high-velocity currents that resemble megaflood deposits in that they are dominated by high-velocity and high deposition rate sedimentary structures and thick simple depositional packages (unit bars). Such high deposition rates cause locally rapid channel bed aggradation and thus increase frequency of channel avulsions and cause catastrophic high-discharge terrestrial flooding events across the river basin. On long time scales, fluvial megafan systems, similar to those, e.g. in the Himalayan foreland, developed across the ca 200 km wide river basin, causing significant sediment aggradation and a landscape with high

  20. Mesosiderite clasts with the most extreme positive europium anomalies among solar system rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Rubin, Alan E.; Davis, Andrew M.

    1992-01-01

    Pigeonite-plagioclase gabbros that occur as clasts in mesosiderites (brecciated stony-iron meteorites) show extreme fractionations of the rare-earth elements (REEs) with larger positive europium anomalies than any previously known for igneous rocks from the earth, moon, or meteorite parent bodies and greater depletions of light REEs relative to heavy REEs than known for comparable cumulate gabbros. The REE pattern for merrillite in one of these clasts is depleted in light REEs and has a large positive europium anomaly as a result of metamorphic equilibration with the silicates. The extreme REE ratios exhibited by the mesosiderite clasts demonstrate that multistage igneous processes must have occurred on some asteroids in the early solar system. Melting of the crust by large-scale impacts or electrical induction from an early T-Tauri-phase sun may be responsible for these processes.

  1. Minimizing System Noise Effects For Extreme-Scale Scientific Simulation Through Function Delegation

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, Jack J.; Bosilca, George

    2013-06-11

    The primary goal of the Minimizing System Noise Effects For Extreme-Scale Scientific Simulation through Function Delegation project is to eliminate or at best strongly minimize the impact of the noise introduced by the operating system, during large scale parallel applications runs. Collective communication operations are a basic building block for parallel programing models and scientific applications. These operations often dominate execution time of applications and tend to limit their scalability. In order to address this challenge, we evaluated different strategies to adapt the collective communications underlying topologies to the hardware architecture in order to provide increased levels of performance to the parallel applications.

  2. Compact multi-bounce projection system for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2002-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four optical elements providing five reflective surfaces for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The five optical surfaces are characterized in order from object to image as concave, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The second and fourth reflective surfaces are part of the same optical element. The optical system is particularly suited for ring field step and scan lithography methods. The invention uses aspheric mirrors to minimize static distortion and balance the static distortion across the ring field width, which effectively minimizes dynamic distortion.

  3. Recovery of Upper Extremity Sensorimotor System Acuity in Baseball Athletes After a Throwing-Fatigue Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Brady L; Yochem, Eric M; Uhl, Timothy L

    2007-01-01

    Context: Research indicates that upper extremity fatigue hampers sensorimotor system acuity. However, no investigators have observed recovery of upper extremity acuity after fatigue. Objective: To observe recovery of active position reproduction acuity in overhead throwers after a throwing-fatigue protocol. Design: Single-session, repeated-measures design. Setting: University musculoskeletal laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen healthy collegiate baseball players (age = 21.0 ± 1.6 years, height = 175.8 ± 10.2 cm, mass = 82.8 ± 4.3 kg). Intervention(s): Subjects threw a baseball with maximum velocity (every 5 seconds) from a single knee. Every 20 throws, subjects rated their upper extremity exertion on a Borg scale until reporting a level of more than 14. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used an electromagnetic tracking system to measure active multijoint position reproduction acuity at 5 intervals: prefatigue; immediately postfatigue; and after 4, 7, and 10 minutes of recovery. Blindfolded subjects reproduced their arm-cocked and ball-release positions. Dependent variables were 3-dimensional variable errors of scapulothoracic, glenohumeral, elbow, and wrist joints; endpoint (ie, hand) position error represented overall upper extremity acuity. The independent variable was time (measured prefatigue and at 4 postfatigue intervals). Results: Fatigue significantly affected acuity of scapulothoracic, glenohumeral, and elbow joints and endpoint error for both positions (P < .001). Fatigue significantly affected wrist acuity only for ball release (P < .001). For arm-cocked reproduction, each measure of acuity, except that of the glenohumeral joint, recovered by 7 minutes; for ball release, each measure of acuity recovered within 4 minutes (P > .05). Conclusions: The sensorimotor system deficits that we observed after fatigue recovered within 7 minutes in most upper extremity joints. Glenohumeral arm-cocked position reproduction acuity failed to recover within

  4. Modelling Tradeoffs Evolution in Multipurpose Water Systems Operation in Response to Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.; Gazzotti, P.; Amigoni, F.; Giuliani, M.; Castelletti, A.

    2015-12-01

    Multipurpose water resource systems are usually operated on a tradeoff of the operating objectives, which - under steady state climatic and socio-economic boundary conditions - is supposed to ensure a fair and/or efficient balance among the conflicting interests. Extreme variability in the system's drivers might affect operators' risk aversion and force a change in the tradeoff. Properly accounting for these shifts is key to any rigorous retrospective assessment of operators' behavior and the associated system's performance. In this study, we explore how the selection of different optimal tradeoffs among the operating objectives is linked to the variations of the boundary conditions, such as, for example, drifting rainfall season or remarkable changes in crop and energy prices. We argue that tradeoff selection is driven by recent, extreme variations in system performance: underperforming on one of the operating objective target value should push the tradeoff toward the disadvantaged objective. To test this assumption, we developed a rational procedure to simulate the operators' tradeoff selection process. We map the selection onto a multi lateral negotiation process, where different multiple, virtual agents optimize different operating objectives. The agents periodically negotiate a compromise on the operating policy. The agent's rigidity in each negotiation round is determined by the recent system performances according to the specific objective it represents. The negotiation follows a set-based egocentric monotonic concession protocol: at each negotiation step an agent incrementally adds some options to the set of its acceptable compromises and (possibly) accepts lower and lower satisfying policies until an agreement is achieved. We apply this reiterated negotiation framework on the regulated Lake Como, Italy, simulating the lake dam operation and its recurrent updates over the last 50 years. The operation aims to balance shoreline flood prevention and irrigation

  5. Summertime Extremes in the Arctic Climate System: Understanding the 2012 Extreme Greenland Melt in the Context of the 1889 Episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, W. D.; Compo, G. P.; Webb, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The last melting of the high Greenland ice sheet prior to 2012 occurred in 1889 and prior to that a number of times during the Medieval Warm Anomaly. In the case of the 2012 episode, key factors in the summer melt episode were a combination of 1) Central North American drought andheat wave, 2) Amplification of a polar trough-ridge pattern, 3) A positive excursion of the Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation (AMO), and 4) Advection of warm moist air northward along the west coast of Greenland and thence over the ice sheet as an elevated thin liquid cloud layer. In both episodes, transport over the western Atlantic to Greenland in the form of 'Atmospheric Rivers,' thin filaments of high water vapor air, are observed in both the 20CR (which uses only historic global surface pressure measurements and sea-surface temperatures back to 1871) and satellite imagery. In the 2012 case, air mass changes associated with these transport events over Greenland were marked by rapid changes in observed isotope time series (Personal communications, Masson-Delmotte and Steen-Hansen). In this presentation, we use the 2012 episode to 'calibrate' the 20CR as a tool to examine past extreme events involving mid-latitude and northern ice sheet interaction. Of particular importance is determining the limits on 20CR-derived back-trajectory analyses: While the 2012 back-trajectories from modern reanalyses are fairly convincing in documenting the various transport paths, in 1889 the interpretation is complicated by the interplay of the propagation of ridge-trough patterns versus material transport coupled with the relatively coarse resolution of the 20CR. What we found in 1889 were two potential melt-inducing episodes in July. These episodes have many of the key factors seen in 2012: a positive AMO, moisture transport along the U.S. east coast, and warm-air transport from the west with some trajectories originating in the drought-stricken Dakota Territory.

  6. Perfusion Assessment with the SPY System after Arterial Venous Reversal for Upper Extremity Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: The timing and pattern of reperfusion following arterial- venous reversal (AVR) in patients with terminal ischemia of an upper extremity is not well understood. Methods: The current case series describes the timing and pattern of reperfusion observed in patients with terminal upper extremity ischemia who underwent AVR and repeated postoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography between 2004 and 2009. For all included patients, the SPY Near-Infrared Perfusion Assessment System permitted visualization of ICG-labeled blood flow for 60-second sampling periods at scheduled postoperative time points; outflow and rate and amplitude of inflow were objectively quantified with SPY-Q Analysis Toolkit image analysis software. Results: The series comprised 6 male patients (mean age, 46 years) who presented with upper extremity ischemia related to hypothenar hammer syndrome (n = 2), embolism with patent foramen ovale (n = 2), atherosclerosis (n = 1), and avulsion amputation of the thumb (n = 1); the patient with the avulsion amputation was diagnosed with thromboangiitis obliterans at the time of replantation. AVR was successful in all 6 patients. In 5 of 6 patients, ICG angiography and SPY-based visualization/quantification showed that venous outflow and arterial inflow gradually normalized (versus unaffected digits) between postoperative days (PODs) 0 and 3 and was maintained at long-term follow-up (≥3 months); for the patient who underwent thumb replantation, perfusion normalized between POD 3 and month 5 follow-up. Conclusions: AVR effectively reestablished blood flow in patients with terminal upper extremity ischemia. ICG angiography with SPY technology revealed that, in most cases, kinetic curves, timing, and patterns of perfusion gradually normalized over several PODs. PMID:25426368

  7. Overview and Update of the North America Drought Monitor and North America Climate Extremes Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    The North America Drought Monitor (NADM) is a joint operational drought monitoring activity between scientists and other specialists in the United States, Mexico, and Canada. Like all weather phenomena, drought occurs irrespective of political and international boundaries. The monthly map and narrative product created by this first-of-its-kind effort provides an integrated continental-scale drought assessment tool for decision-makers in all three countries involved in drought monitoring, drought mitigation, and related climate services. The product is prepared by a rotating primary author who utilizes drought indicators which are computed using standard methodologies for stations across the continent, plus national drought monitoring products and feedback from local experts in each of the three countries. The participants include, within the United States: the NOAA National Climatic Data Center, NOAA Climate Prediction Center, USDA Joint Agricultural Weather Facility, and National Drought Mitigation Center; within Mexico: Servicio Meteorologico Nacional/Comision Nacional del Agua; and within Canada: Agriculture and Agrifood Canada and the Meteorological Service of Canada. The NADM is part of a North America Climate Extremes Monitoring (NACEM) system which will monitor and assess climate extremes across the continent. Several climate indicators are currently computed from station daily data to measure (in addition to drought) heavy precipitation, heat waves, and cold waves. Future efforts will add indicators to monitor storm severity and severe weather, including the creation of a North America Climate Extremes Index (NACEI) patterned after the U.S. Climate Extremes Index (USCEI). This presentation will review the history of the NADM/NACEM effort, the data utilized, the indicators computed, and the product preparation and peer review process.

  8. Dynamic damage evolution in aluminum as a model system for understanding FCC materials in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Nathaniel Jonathon

    Materials play a key role in many emerging technologies. Future technologies in the energy and defense sectors will place huge demands on material performance with respect to stress, strain, temperature, and pressure. These applications require that the response of materials on dynamic (microsecond) time scales be predictable and controllable. Hence, the goal of this research project was to study the extreme environment of shock loaded damage evolution in aluminum as a model system for understanding dynamic response of FCC metals in these environments. Phase one utilized plate impact experiments to study the influence of spatial effects (in the form of microstructural defect distributions) on the dynamic damage evolution process. Samples were soft recovered for shot analysis and comparison to real time laser velocimetry. Results revealed that the length scale of defects controls the failure mechanisms of the microstructure; suggesting defect density and the spatial distribution of defects are critical factors in the deformation process in extreme environments. Phase two studied the influence of kinetic effects (in the form of dynamic tensile loading rate) to reveal time dependence on the dynamic deformation process. Results concluded damage nucleation and growth rates are highly time dependent and can be overdriven as higher tensile loading rates result in extremely short time durations. It was shown that laser velocimetry provides an adequate means for understanding the dynamic damage evolution process when soft recovery of the sample is unavailable. This was shown by comparing laser velocimetry results with data obtained from optical analysis on recovered specimens. The methodology here provides a means to systematically study materials of interest in extreme conditions and provides a pathway for obtaining the relevant physics needed for model development leading to a predictive capability.

  9. Self-Adaptive System based on Field Programmable Gate Array for Extreme Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Zebulum, Ricardo; Rajeshuni, Ramesham; Stoica, Adrian; Katkoori, Srinivas; Graves, Sharon; Novak, Frank; Antill, Charles

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we report the implementation of a self-adaptive system using a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and data converters. The self-adaptive system can autonomously recover the lost functionality of a reconfigurable analog array (RAA) integrated circuit (IC) [3]. Both the RAA IC and the self-adaptive system are operating in extreme temperatures (from 120 C down to -180 C). The RAA IC consists of reconfigurable analog blocks interconnected by several switches and programmable by bias voltages. It implements filters/amplifiers with bandwidth up to 20 MHz. The self-adaptive system controls the RAA IC and is realized on Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) parts. It implements a basic compensation algorithm that corrects a RAA IC in less than a few milliseconds. Experimental results for the cold temperature environment (down to -180 C) demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  10. Luminescence emission of natural fluorite and synthetic CaF2:Mn (TLD-400)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaksu, Mustafa; Correcher, Virgilio; Garcia-Guinea, Javier

    2016-02-01

    The luminescence properties of natural white fluorite indicate that it could be employed as radiation dosimeter similarly to synthetic CaF2:Mn (TLD-400). The cathodoluminescence emission of the natural sample (two maxima) meanwhile TLD-400 (one peak) exhibits a different behaviour associated with the chemical composition. The mineral sample displays (i) a significant UV-blue emission associated with different structural defects (negligible in the synthetic sample) and (ii) a shift of the green emission to higher wavelengths respect to the TLD-400. The green induced TL emission also shows significant differences in intensity (higher in TLD-400) and sensitivity. Both samples display a complex induced green TL glow curve that could not be analysed assuming the model based on the discrete trap distribution. The Tm-Tstop method indicates the presence of close overlapping groups of components linked probably to a continuum in the trap distribution rather than a single trapping level.

  11. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Volume 15, No. 1. Progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-05-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facilities throughout the country for the first quarter of 1995.

  12. NRC TLD direct radiation monitoring network: Progress report, April--June 1997. Volume 17, Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facilities throughout the country for the second quarter of 1997.

  13. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, July--September 1993: Volume 13, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1993-11-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facilities throughout the country for the third quarter of 1993.

  14. Dosimetry quality assurance in Martin Marietta Energy Systems` centralized external dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Souleyrette, M.L.

    1992-10-23

    External dosimetry needs at the four Martin Marietta Energy Systems facilities are served by Energy Systems Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a four plant program with four dosimeter distribution centers and two dosimeter processing centers. Each plant has its own distribution center, while processing centers are located at ORNL and the Y-12 Plant. The program has been granted accreditation by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). The CEDS is a TLD based system which is responsible for whole-body beta-gamma, neutron, and extremity monitoring. Beta-gamma monitoring is performed using the Harshaw/Solon Technologies model 8805 dosimeter. Effective October 1, 1992 the standard silver mylar has been replaced with an Avery mylar foil blackened on the underside with ink. This was done in an effort to reduce the number of light induced suspect readings. At this time we have little operational experience with the new blackened mylars-The CEDS neutron dosimeter is the Harshaw model 8806B. This card/holder configuration contains two TLD-600/TLD-700 chip pairs; one pair is located beneath a cadmium filter and one pair is located beneath a plastic filter. In routine personnel monitoring the CEDS neutron dosimeter is always paired with a CEDS beta-gamma dosimeter.The CEDS extremity dosimeter is composed of a Harshaw thin TLD-700 dosiclip placed inside a Teledyne RB-4 finger sachet. The finger sachet provides approximately 7 mg/cm{sup 2} filtration over the chip. A teflon ring surrounds the dosiclip to help prevent tearing of the vinyl sachet.

  15. Dosimetry quality assurance in Martin Marietta Energy Systems' centralized external dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Souleyrette, M.L.

    1992-10-23

    External dosimetry needs at the four Martin Marietta Energy Systems facilities are served by Energy Systems Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a four plant program with four dosimeter distribution centers and two dosimeter processing centers. Each plant has its own distribution center, while processing centers are located at ORNL and the Y-12 Plant. The program has been granted accreditation by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). The CEDS is a TLD based system which is responsible for whole-body beta-gamma, neutron, and extremity monitoring. Beta-gamma monitoring is performed using the Harshaw/Solon Technologies model 8805 dosimeter. Effective October 1, 1992 the standard silver mylar has been replaced with an Avery mylar foil blackened on the underside with ink. This was done in an effort to reduce the number of light induced suspect readings. At this time we have little operational experience with the new blackened mylars-The CEDS neutron dosimeter is the Harshaw model 8806B. This card/holder configuration contains two TLD-600/TLD-700 chip pairs; one pair is located beneath a cadmium filter and one pair is located beneath a plastic filter. In routine personnel monitoring the CEDS neutron dosimeter is always paired with a CEDS beta-gamma dosimeter.The CEDS extremity dosimeter is composed of a Harshaw thin TLD-700 dosiclip placed inside a Teledyne RB-4 finger sachet. The finger sachet provides approximately 7 mg/cm[sup 2] filtration over the chip. A teflon ring surrounds the dosiclip to help prevent tearing of the vinyl sachet.

  16. Modeling of the Human - Operator in a Complex System Functioning Under Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzov, Peter; Hubenova, Zoia; Yordanov, Dimitar; Popov, Wiliam

    2013-12-01

    Problems, related to the explication of sophisticated control systems of objects, operating under extreme conditions, have been examined and the impact of the effectiveness of the operator's activity on the systems as a whole. The necessity of creation of complex simulation models, reflecting operator's activity, is discussed. Organizational and technical system of an unmanned aviation complex is described as a sophisticated ergatic system. Computer realization of main subsystems of algorithmic system of the man as a controlling system is implemented and specialized software for data processing and analysis is developed. An original computer model of a Man as a tracking system has been implemented. Model of unmanned complex for operators training and formation of a mental model in emergency situation, implemented in "matlab-simulink" environment, has been synthesized. As a unit of the control loop, the pilot (operator) is simplified viewed as an autocontrol system consisting of three main interconnected subsystems: sensitive organs (perception sensors); central nervous system; executive organs (muscles of the arms, legs, back). Theoretical-data model of prediction the level of operator's information load in ergatic systems is proposed. It allows the assessment and prediction of the effectiveness of a real working operator. Simulation model of operator's activity in takeoff based on the Petri nets has been synthesized.

  17. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Extreme Nanowires and Other 1D Systems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David C.; Spencer, Joseph H.; Sloan, Jeremy; McDonnell, Liam P.; Trewhitt, Harrison; Kashtiban, Reza J.; Faulques, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how nanowires with diameters corresponding to 1 to 5 atoms can be produced by melting a range of inorganic solids in the presence of carbon nanotubes. These nanowires are extreme in the sense that they are the limit of miniaturization of nanowires and their behavior is not always a simple extrapolation of the behavior of larger nanowires as their diameter decreases. The paper then describes the methods required to obtain Raman spectra from extreme nanowires and the fact that due to the van Hove singularities that 1D systems exhibit in their optical density of states, that determining the correct choice of photon excitation energy is critical. It describes the techniques required to determine the photon energy dependence of the resonances observed in Raman spectroscopy of 1D systems and in particular how to obtain measurements of Raman cross-sections with better than 8% noise and measure the variation in the resonance as a function of sample temperature. The paper describes the importance of ensuring that the Raman scattering is linearly proportional to the intensity of the laser excitation intensity. It also describes how to use the polarization dependence of the Raman scattering to separate Raman scattering of the encapsulated 1D systems from those of other extraneous components in any sample. PMID:27168195

  18. [Design of optical system for solar extreme-ultraviolet imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuang; Gong, Yan

    2012-03-01

    Hyper-spectral imaging observation of the sun in the EUV region is an important method of research for solar's upper transition region, corona and plasma's physical property. Based on the application objective of solar extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (SEUIS), combined with the current states of domestic and foreign extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer, a few of parameters for SEUIS design were drew up in the present paper. The advantages and disadvantages of all kinds of optical configurations were discussed,and the configuration of combination of telescope and spectrometer was chosen. The available main components were also described, off-axis parabolic mirror was chosen for telescope, and a high density uniform-line-space toroidal grating for dispersion device. The optical system which satisfies the performance parameters was designed. The design process, detailed parameters and results were presented in the end. The working wavelength of the optics system is 17.0-21.0 nm, the field of view is 1 228" x 1 024", the spatial resolution is 0.8 arc sec x pixel(-1), the spectral resolution is about 0.00198 nm x pixel(-1), and the total length of system is about 2.8 m. PMID:22582664

  19. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Extreme Nanowires and Other 1D Systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, David C; Spencer, Joseph H; Sloan, Jeremy; McDonnell, Liam P; Trewhitt, Harrison; Kashtiban, Reza J; Faulques, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper briefly describes how nanowires with diameters corresponding to 1 to 5 atoms can be produced by melting a range of inorganic solids in the presence of carbon nanotubes. These nanowires are extreme in the sense that they are the limit of miniaturization of nanowires and their behavior is not always a simple extrapolation of the behavior of larger nanowires as their diameter decreases. The paper then describes the methods required to obtain Raman spectra from extreme nanowires and the fact that due to the van Hove singularities that 1D systems exhibit in their optical density of states, that determining the correct choice of photon excitation energy is critical. It describes the techniques required to determine the photon energy dependence of the resonances observed in Raman spectroscopy of 1D systems and in particular how to obtain measurements of Raman cross-sections with better than 8% noise and measure the variation in the resonance as a function of sample temperature. The paper describes the importance of ensuring that the Raman scattering is linearly proportional to the intensity of the laser excitation intensity. It also describes how to use the polarization dependence of the Raman scattering to separate Raman scattering of the encapsulated 1D systems from those of other extraneous components in any sample. PMID:27168195

  20. Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers through Systemic Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Núñez, A. D.; Pérez-Chávez, F.; García-Sánchez, C.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañendo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    This study was designed to, investigate the healing effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on diabetic foot ulcers and test two different exposure systems aimed at reducing the ELF-EMF exposure time of patients. In the first system the ELF-EMF were applied to the arm where only 3% of the total blood volume/min circulates at any given time. In the second system the ELF-EMF were applied to the thorax where more than 100% of the total blood volume/minute circulates at any given time. Twenty-six diabetic patients, with superficial neuropathic ulcers unresponsive to medical treatment were included in this preliminary report. In the first group (17 patients), the arm was exposed two hours twice a week to a extremely low frequency electromagnetic field of 0.45-0.9 mTrms, 120 Hz generated inside a solenoid coil of 10.1 cm by 20.5 cm long. In the second group the thorax of 7 patients was exposed 25 minutes twice a week to an electromagnetic field of 0.4-0.85 mTrms, 120 Hz generated in the center of a squared quasi-Helmholtz coil 52 cm by side. One patient was assigned to a placebo configuration of each exposure system with identical appearance as the active equipment but without magnetic field. Patients with deep ulcers, infected ulcers, cancer, or auto-immune disease were excluded. These preliminary results showed that the two exposure systems accelerate the healing process of neuropathic ulcers. Complete healing of the ulcer had a median duration of 90 days in both exposure systems. Therefore thorax exposure where more blood is exposed to ELF-EMF per unit of time was able to reduce 4.8 times the patient treatment time. In those patients assigned to the placebo equipment no healing effects were observed. This study will continue with a parallel, double blind placebo controlled protocol.

  1. How extreme are extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchi, Marco; Petitta, Marcello; Calmanti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    High temperatures have an impact on the energy balance of any living organism and on the operational capabilities of critical infrastructures. Heat-wave indicators have been mainly developed with the aim of capturing the potential impacts on specific sectors (agriculture, health, wildfires, transport, power generation and distribution). However, the ability to capture the occurrence of extreme temperature events is an essential property of a multi-hazard extreme climate indicator. Aim of this study is to develop a standardized heat-wave indicator, that can be combined with other indices in order to describe multiple hazards in a single indicator. The proposed approach can be used in order to have a quantified indicator of the strenght of a certain extreme. As a matter of fact, extremes are usually distributed in exponential or exponential-exponential functions and it is difficult to quickly asses how strong was an extreme events considering only its magnitude. The proposed approach simplify the quantitative and qualitative communication of extreme magnitude

  2. Can we colonize the solar system? Human biology and survival in the extreme space environment.

    PubMed

    Launius, Roger D

    2010-09-01

    Throughout the history of the space age the dominant vision for the future has been great spaceships plying the solar system, and perhaps beyond, moving living beings from one planet to another. Spacesuited astronauts would carry out exploration, colonization, and settlement as part of a relentlessly forward looking movement of humanity beyond Earth. As time has progressed this image has not changed appreciably even as the full magnitude of the challenges it represents have become more and more apparent. This essay explores the issues associated with the human movement beyond Earth and raises questions about whether humanity will ever be able to survive in the extreme environment of space and the other bodies of the solar system. This paper deals with important historical episodes as well as wider conceptual issues about life in space. Two models of expansion beyond Earth are discussed: (1) the movement of microbes and other types of life on Earth that can survive the space environment and (2) the modification of humans into cyborgs for greater capability to survive in the extreme environments encountered beyond this planet. PMID:20692704

  3. Complex networks identify spatial patterns of extreme rainfall of the South American monsoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boers, Niklas; Bokkhagen, Bodo; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen; Marengo, Jose

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the spatial characteristics of extreme rainfall synchronicity of the South American Monsoon System (SAMS) by means of Complex Networks. We first show how this approach leads to the identification of linkages between large-scale atmospheric conditions and natural hazards occurring at the earth's surface. Thereafter, we exemplify how our methodology can be used to compare different datasets and to test the performance of climate models. In recent years, complex networks have attracted great attention for analyzing the spatial characteristics of interrelations of various time series. Outstanding examples in this context are functional brain networks as well as so-called climate networks. In most approaches, the basic idea is to represent time series at different locations by network nodes, which will be connected by network links if the corresponding time series behave similar. Information on the spatial characteristics of these similarities can be inferred by network measures quantifying different aspects of the networks' topology. By combining several network measures and interpreting them in a climatic context, we investigate climatic linkages and classify the spatial characteristics of extreme rainfall synchronicity. Although our approach is based on only one variable (high spatiotemporal resolution rainfall), it reveals the most important features of the SAMS, such as the main moisture pathways, areas with frequent development of Mesoscale Convective Systems, and the major convergence zones. We will show that these features are only partially reproduced by reanalysis and (regional and global) climate model data.

  4. DISCOVERY OF A BRIGHT, EXTREMELY LOW MASS WHITE DWARF IN A CLOSE DOUBLE DEGENERATE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Vennes, S.; Kawka, A.; Nemeth, P.; Thorstensen, J. R.; Skinner, J. N.; Pigulski, A.; Steslicki, M.; Kolaczkowski, Z.; Srodka, P.

    2011-08-10

    We report the discovery of a bright (V {approx} 13.7), extremely low mass white dwarf in a close double degenerate system. We originally selected GALEX J171708.5+675712 for spectroscopic follow-up among a group of white dwarf candidates in an ultraviolet-optical reduced proper-motion diagram. The new white dwarf has a mass of 0.18 M{sub sun} and is the primary component of a close double degenerate system (P = 0.246137 days, K{sub 1} = 288 km s{sup -1}) comprising a fainter white dwarf secondary with M{sub 2} {approx} 0.9 M{sub sun}. Light curves phased with the orbital ephemeris show evidence of relativistic beaming and weaker ellipsoidal variations. The light curves also reveal secondary eclipses (depth {approx}8 mmag) while the primary eclipses appear partially compensated by the secondary gravitational deflection and are below detection limits. Photospheric abundance measurements show a nearly solar composition of Si, Ca, and Fe (0.1-1 sun), while the normal kinematics suggest a relatively recent formation history. Close binary evolutionary scenarios suggest that extremely low mass white dwarfs form via a common-envelope phase and possible Roche lobe overflow.

  5. Lazy Checkpointing : Exploiting Temporal Locality in Failures to Mitigate Checkpointing Overheads on Extreme-Scale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Devesh; Gupta, Saurabh; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2014-01-01

    Continuing increase in the computational power of supercomputers has enabled large-scale scientific applications in the areas of astrophysics, fusion, climate and combustion to run larger and longer-running simulations, facilitating deeper scientific insights. However, these long-running simulations are often interrupted by multiple system failures. Therefore, these applications rely on ``checkpointing'' as a resilience mechanism to store application state to permanent storage and recover from failures. \\\\ \\indent Unfortunately, checkpointing incurs excessive I/O overhead on supercomputers due to large size of checkpoints, resulting in a sub-optimal performance and resource utilization. In this paper, we devise novel mechanisms to show how checkpointing overhead can be mitigated significantly by exploiting the temporal characteristics of system failures. We provide new insights and detailed quantitative understanding of the checkpointing overheads and trade-offs on large-scale machines. Our prototype implementation shows the viability of our approach on extreme-scale machines.

  6. SAXO, the eXtreme Adaptive Optics System of SPHERE: overview and calibration procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, J.-F.; Fusco, T.; Petit, C.; Meimon, S.; Fedrigo, E.; Suarez Valles, M.; Kasper, M.; Hubin, N.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Charton, J.; Costille, A.; Rabou, P., .; Mouillet, D.; Baudoz, P.; Buey, T.; Sevin, A.; Wildi, F.; Dohlen, K.

    2010-07-01

    The direct imaging of exoplanet is a challenging goal of todays astronomy. The light transmitted by exoplanet atmosphere is of a great interest as it may witness for life sign. SPHERE is a second generation instrument for the VLT, dedicated to exoplanet imaging, detection, and characterisation. SPHERE is a global project of an European consortium of 11 institutes from 5 countries. We present here the state of the art of the AIT of the Adaptive Optics part of the instrument. In addition we present fine calibration procedures dedicated to eXtreme Adaptive Optics systems. First we emphasized on vibration and turbulence identification for optimization of the control law. Then, we describe a procedure able to measure and compensate for NCPA with a coronagraphic system.

  7. Climate engineering of vegetated land for hot extremes mitigation: An Earth system model sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Micah; Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2015-04-01

    Various climate engineering schemes have been proposed as a way to curb anthropogenic climate change. Land climate engineering schemes aiming to reduce the amount of solar radiation absorbed at the surface by changes in land surface albedo have been considered in a limited number of investigations. However, global studies on this topic have generally focused on the impacts on mean climate rather than extremes. Here we present the results of a series of transient global climate engineering sensitivity experiments performed with the Community Earth System Model over the time period 1950-2100 under historical and Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 scenarios. Four sets of experiments are performed in which the surface albedo over snow-free vegetated grid points is increased respectively by 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20. The simulations show a preferential cooling of hot extremes relative to mean temperatures throughout the Northern midlatitudes during boreal summer under the late twentieth century conditions. Two main mechanisms drive this response: On the one hand, a stronger efficacy of the albedo-induced radiative forcing on days with high incoming shortwave radiation and, on the other hand, enhanced soil moisture-induced evaporative cooling during the warmest days relative to the control simulation due to accumulated soil moisture storage and reduced drying. The latter effect is dominant in summer in midlatitude regions and also implies a reduction of summer drought conditions. It thus constitutes another important benefit of surface albedo modifications in reducing climate change impacts. The simulated response for the end of the 21st century conditions is of the same sign as that for the end of the twentieth century conditions but indicates an increasing absolute impact of land surface albedo increases in reducing mean and extreme temperatures under enhanced greenhouse gas forcing.

  8. Comparison of dosimeter response: ionization chamber, TLD, and Gafchromic EBT2 film in 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT techniques for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitriandini, A.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    This research was conducted by measuring point dose in the target area (lungs), heart, and spine using four dosimeters (PTW N30013, Exradin A16, TLD, and the Gafchromic EBT2 film). The measurement was performed in CIRS 002LFC thorax phantom. The main objective of this study was to compare the dosimetry of those different systems. Dose measurements performed only in a single fraction of irradiation. The measurements result shown that TLD has the least accuracy and precision. As the effect of volume averaging, ionization chamber reaches the discrepancy value up to -13.30% in the target area. EBT2 film has discrepancy value of <1% in the 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. This dosimeter is proposed to be an appropriate alternative dosimeter to be used at point dose verification.

  9. Understanding and Exploiting Spatial Properties of System Failures on Extreme-Scale HPC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Devesh; Rogers, James H; Maxwell, Don E

    2015-01-01

    As we approach exascale, the scientific simulations are expected to experience more interruptions due to increased system failures. Designing better HPC resilience techniques requires understanding the key characteristics of system failures on these systems. While temporal properties of system failures on HPC systems have been well-investigated, there is limited understanding about the spatial characteristics of system failures and its impact on the resilience mechanisms. Therefore, we examine the spatial characteristics and behavior of system failures. We investigate the interaction between spatial and temporal characteristics of failures and its implications for system operations and resilience mechanisms on large-scale HPC systems. We show that system failures have spatial locality at different granularity in the system; study impact of different failure-types; and investigate the correlation among different failure-types. Finally, we propose a novel scheme that exploits the spatial locality in failures to improve application and system performance. Our evaluation shows that the proposed scheme significantly improves the system performance in a dynamic and production-level HPC system.

  10. Low-pressure systems and extreme precipitation in central India: sensitivity to temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørland, Silje Lund; Sorteberg, Asgeir

    2015-10-01

    Extreme rainfall events in the central Indian region are often related to the passage of synoptic scale monsoon low-pressure systems (LPS). This study uses the surrogate climate change method on ten monsoon LPS cases connected to observed extreme rainfall events, to investigate how sensitive the precipitation and runoff are to an idealized warmer and moister atmosphere. The ten cases are simulated with three different initial and lateral boundary conditions: the unperturbed control run, and two sets of perturbed runs where the atmospheric temperature is increased uniformly throughout the atmosphere, the specific humidity increased according to Clausius Clapeyron's relation, but the large-scale flow is unchanged. The difference between the control and perturbed simulations are mainly due to the imposed warming and feedback influencing the synoptic flow. The mean precipitation change with warming in the central Indian region is 18-20 %/K, with largest changes at the end of the LPS tracks. The LPS in the warmer runs are bringing more moisture further inland that is released as precipitation. In the perturbed runs the precipitation rate is increasing at all percentiles, and there is more frequent rainfall with very heavy intensities. This leads to a shift in which category that contributes most to the total precipitation: more of the precipitation is coming from the category with very heavy intensities. The runoff changes are similar to the precipitation changes, except the response in intensity of very heavy runoff, which is around twice the change in intensity of very heavy precipitation.

  11. Absolute intensity calibration of the Wendelstein 7-X high efficiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiche, Albert; Biel, Wolfgang; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Burhenn, Rainer

    2008-09-01

    The new high effiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer (HEXOS) system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X is now mounted for testing and adjustment at the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR). One part of the testing phase was the intensity calibration of the two double spectrometers which in total cover a spectral range from 2.5 to 160.0 nm with overlap. This work presents the current intensity calibration curves for HEXOS and describes the method of calibration. The calibration was implemented with calibrated lines of a hollow cathode light source and the branching ratio technique. The hollow cathode light source provides calibrated lines from 16 up to 147 nm. We could extend the calibrated region in the spectrometers down to 2.8 nm by using the branching line pairs emitted by an uncalibrated pinch extreme ultraviolet light source as well as emission lines from boron and carbon in TEXTOR plasmas. In total HEXOS is calibrated from 2.8 up to 147 nm, which covers most of the observable wavelength region. The approximate density of carbon in the range of the minor radius from 18 to 35 cm in a TEXTOR plasma determined by simulating calibrated vacuum ultraviolet emission lines with a transport code was 5.5×1017 m-3 which corresponds to a local carbon concentration of 2%.

  12. Adaption to extreme rainfall with open urban drainage system: an integrated hydrological cost-benefit analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, Toke Emil; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a cross-disciplinary framework for assessment of climate change adaptation to increased precipitation extremes considering pluvial flood risk as well as additional environmental services provided by some of the adaptation options. The ability of adaptation alternatives to cope with extreme rainfalls is evaluated using a quantitative flood risk approach based on urban inundation modeling and socio-economic analysis of corresponding costs and benefits. A hedonic valuation model is applied to capture the local economic gains or losses from more water bodies in green areas. The framework was applied to the northern part of the city of Aarhus, Denmark. We investigated four adaptation strategies that encompassed laissez-faire, larger sewer pipes, local infiltration units, and open drainage system in the urban green structure. We found that when taking into account environmental amenity effects, an integration of open drainage basins in urban recreational areas is likely the best adaptation strategy, followed by pipe enlargement and local infiltration strategies. All three were improvements compared to the fourth strategy of no measures taken. PMID:23334752

  13. Adaption to Extreme Rainfall with Open Urban Drainage System: An Integrated Hydrological Cost-Benefit Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, Toke Emil; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a cross-disciplinary framework for assessment of climate change adaptation to increased precipitation extremes considering pluvial flood risk as well as additional environmental services provided by some of the adaptation options. The ability of adaptation alternatives to cope with extreme rainfalls is evaluated using a quantitative flood risk approach based on urban inundation modeling and socio-economic analysis of corresponding costs and benefits. A hedonic valuation model is applied to capture the local economic gains or losses from more water bodies in green areas. The framework was applied to the northern part of the city of Aarhus, Denmark. We investigated four adaptation strategies that encompassed laissez-faire, larger sewer pipes, local infiltration units, and open drainage system in the urban green structure. We found that when taking into account environmental amenity effects, an integration of open drainage basins in urban recreational areas is likely the best adaptation strategy, followed by pipe enlargement and local infiltration strategies. All three were improvements compared to the fourth strategy of no measures taken.

  14. Low-pressure systems and extreme precipitation in central India: sensitivity to temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørland, Silje Lund; Sorteberg, Asgeir

    2016-07-01

    Extreme rainfall events in the central Indian region are often related to the passage of synoptic scale monsoon low-pressure systems (LPS). This study uses the surrogate climate change method on ten monsoon LPS cases connected to observed extreme rainfall events, to investigate how sensitive the precipitation and runoff are to an idealized warmer and moister atmosphere. The ten cases are simulated with three different initial and lateral boundary conditions: the unperturbed control run, and two sets of perturbed runs where the atmospheric temperature is increased uniformly throughout the atmosphere, the specific humidity increased according to Clausius Clapeyron's relation, but the large-scale flow is unchanged. The difference between the control and perturbed simulations are mainly due to the imposed warming and feedback influencing the synoptic flow. The mean precipitation change with warming in the central Indian region is 18-20 %/K, with largest changes at the end of the LPS tracks. The LPS in the warmer runs are bringing more moisture further inland that is released as precipitation. In the perturbed runs the precipitation rate is increasing at all percentiles, and there is more frequent rainfall with very heavy intensities. This leads to a shift in which category that contributes most to the total precipitation: more of the precipitation is coming from the category with very heavy intensities. The runoff changes are similar to the precipitation changes, except the response in intensity of very heavy runoff, which is around twice the change in intensity of very heavy precipitation.

  15. SU-E-I-09: Application of LiF:Mg,Cu (TLD-100H) Dosimeters for in Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Sina, S; Zeinali, B; Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M; Faghihi, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetery is very essential in diagnostic radiology. The goal of this study is to verify the application of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) in obtaining the Entrance skin dose (ESD) of patients undergoing diagnostic radiology. The results of dosimetry performed by TLD-100H, were compared with those obtained by TLD100, which is a common dosimeter in diagnostic radiology. Methods: In this study the ESD values were measured using two types of Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-100, and TLD-100H) for 16 patients undergoing diagnostic radiology (lumbar spine imaging). The ESD values were also obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom for different imaging techniques and different views (AP, and lateral). The TLD chips were annealed with a standard procedure, and the ECC values for each TLD was obtained by exposing the chips to equal amount of radiation. Each time three TLD chips were covered by thin dark plastic covers, and were put at the surface of the phantom or the patient. The average reading of the three chips was used for obtaining the dose. Results: The results show a close agreement between the dose measuered by the two dosimeters.According to the results of this study, the TLD-100H dosimeters have higher sensitivities (i.e.signal(nc)/dose) than TLD-100.The ESD values varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for measurements. Conclusion: The TLD-100H dosimeters are suggested as effective dosimeters for dosimetry in low dose fields because of their higher sensitivities.

  16. Response of TLD-100 in mixed fields of photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, Michael J.; Junell, Stephanie; Hammer, Cliff; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are routinely used for dosimetric measurements of high energy photon and electron fields. However, TLD response in combined fields of photon and electron beam qualities has not been characterized. This work investigates the response of TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) to sequential irradiation by high-energy photon and electron beam qualities. Methods: TLDs were irradiated to a known dose by a linear accelerator with a 6 MV photon beam, a 6 MeV electron beam, and a NIST-traceable {sup 60}Co beam. TLDs were also irradiated in a mixed field of the 6 MeV electron beam and the 6 MV photon beam. The average TLD response per unit dose of the TLDs for each linac beam quality was normalized to the average response per unit dose of the TLDs irradiated by the {sup 60}Co beam. Irradiations were performed in water and in a Virtual Water Trade-Mark-Sign phantom. The 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV electron beam were used to create dose calibration curves relating TLD response to absorbed dose to water, which were applied to the TLDs irradiated in the mixed field. Results: TLD relative response per unit dose in the mixed field was less sensitive than the relative response in the photon field and more sensitive than the relative response in the electron field. Application of the photon dose calibration curve to the TLDs irradiated in a mixed field resulted in an underestimation of the delivered dose, while application of the electron dose calibration curve resulted in an overestimation of the dose. Conclusions: The relative response of TLD-100 in mixed fields fell between the relative response in the photon-only and electron-only fields. TLD-100 dosimetry of mixed fields must account for this intermediate response to minimize the estimation errors associated with calibration factors obtained from a single beam quality.

  17. A musculoskeletal model of the upper extremity for use in the development of neuroprosthetic systems

    PubMed Central

    Blana, Dimitra; Hincapie, Juan G.; Chadwick, Edward K.; Kirsch, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    Upper extremity neuroprostheses use functional electrical stimulation (FES) to restore arm motor function to individuals with cervical level spinal cord injury. For the design and testing of these systems, a biomechanical model of the shoulder and elbow has been developed, to be used as a substitute for the human arm. It can be used to design and evaluate specific implementations of FES systems, as well as FES controllers. The model can be customized to simulate a variety of pathological conditions. For example, by adjusting the maximum force the muscles can produce, the model can be used to simulate an individual with tetraplegia and to explore the effects of FES of different muscle sets. The model comprises six bones, five joints, nine degrees of freedom, and 29 shoulder and arm muscles. It was developed using commercial, graphics-based modeling and simulation packages that are easily accessible to other researchers and can be readily interfaced to other analysis packages. It can be used for both forward-dynamic (inputs: muscle activation and external load; outputs:motions) and inverse-dynamic (inputs: motions and external load; outputs: muscle activation) simulations. Our model was verified by comparing the model-calculated muscle activations to electromyographic signals recorded from shoulder and arm muscles of five subjects. As an example of its application to neuroprosthesis design, the model was used to demonstrate the importance of rotator cuff muscle stimulation when aiming to restore humeral elevation. It is concluded that this model is a useful tool in the development and implementation of upper extremity neuroprosthetic systems. PMID:18420213

  18. Evaluating secondary neutron doses of a refined shielded design for a medical cyclotron using the TLD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jye-Bin; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Wen-Shan; Lin, Ding-Bang; Hsieh, Teng-San; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2013-11-01

    An increasing number of cyclotrons at medical centers in Taiwan have been installed to generate radiopharmaceutical products. An operating cyclotron generates immense amounts of secondary neutrons from reactions such the 18O(p, n)18F, used in the production of FDG. This intense radiation can be hazardous to public health, particularly to medical personnel. To increase the yield of 18F-FDG from 4200 GBq in 2005 to 48,600 GBq in 2011, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital (CSMUH) has prolonged irradiation time without changing the target or target current to meet requirements regarding the production 18F. The CSMUH has redesigned the CTI Radioisotope Delivery System shield. The lack of data for a possible secondary neutron doses has increased due to newly designed cyclotron rooms. This work aims to evaluate secondary neutron doses at a CTI cyclotron center using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-600). Two-dimensional neutron doses were mapped and indicated that neutron doses were high as neutrons leaked through self-shielded blocks and through the L-shaped concrete shield in vault rooms. These neutron doses varied markedly among locations close to the H218O target. The Monte Carlo simulation and minimum detectable dose are also discussed and demonstrated the reliability of using the TLD-600 approach. Findings can be adopted by medical centers to identify radioactive hot spots and develop radiation protection.

  19. A method to minimise the fading effects of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-600 and TLD-700) using a pre-heat technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, YoungJu; Won, Yuho; Kang, Kidoo

    2015-04-01

    Passive integrating dosemeters [thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL)] are the only legally permitted individual dosemeters for occupational external radiation exposure monitoring in Korea. Also its maximum issuing cycle does not exceed 3 months, and the Korean regulations require personal dosemeters for official assessment of external radiation exposure to be issued by an approved or rather an accredited dosimetry service according to ISO/IEC 17025. KHNP (Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power, LTD), a unique operating company of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Korea, currently has a plan to extend a TLD issuing cycle from 1 to 3 months under the authors' fading error criteria, ±10%. The authors have performed a feasibility study that minimises post-irradiation fading effects within their maximum reading cycle employing pre-heating technique. They repeatedly performed irradiation/reading a bare TLD chip to determine optimum pre-heating conditions by analysing each glow curve. The optimum reading conditions within the maximum reading cycle of 3 months were decided: a pre-heating temperature of 165°C, a pre-heating time of 9 s, a heating rate of 25°C s(-1), a reading temperature of 300°C and an acquisition time of 10 s. The fading result of TLD-600 and TLD-700 carried by newly developed time temperature profile (TTP) showed a much smaller fading effect than that of current TTP. The result showed that the fading error due to a developed TTP resulted in a ∼5% signal loss, whereas a current TTP caused a ∼15% loss. The authors also carried out a legal performance test on newly developed TTP to confirm its possibility as an official dosemeter. The legal performance tests that applied the developed TTP satisfied the criteria for all the test categories. PMID:25301971

  20. Optimization of an on-board imaging system for extremely rapid radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry Kemmerling, Erica M.; Wu, Meng Yang, He; Fahrig, Rebecca; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Next-generation extremely rapid radiation therapy systems could mitigate the need for motion management, improve patient comfort during the treatment, and increase patient throughput for cost effectiveness. Such systems require an on-board imaging system that is competitively priced, fast, and of sufficiently high quality to allow good registration between the image taken on the day of treatment and the image taken the day of treatment planning. In this study, three different detectors for a custom on-board CT system were investigated to select the best design for integration with an extremely rapid radiation therapy system. Methods: Three different CT detectors are proposed: low-resolution (all 4 × 4 mm pixels), medium-resolution (a combination of 4 × 4 mm pixels and 2 × 2 mm pixels), and high-resolution (all 1 × 1 mm pixels). An in-house program was used to generate projection images of a numerical anthropomorphic phantom and to reconstruct the projections into CT datasets, henceforth called “realistic” images. Scatter was calculated using a separate Monte Carlo simulation, and the model included an antiscatter grid and bowtie filter. Diagnostic-quality images of the phantom were generated to represent the patient scan at the time of treatment planning. Commercial deformable registration software was used to register the diagnostic-quality scan to images produced by the various on-board detector configurations. The deformation fields were compared against a “gold standard” deformation field generated by registering initial and deformed images of the numerical phantoms that were used to make the diagnostic and treatment-day images. Registrations of on-board imaging system data were judged by the amount their deformation fields differed from the corresponding gold standard deformation fields—the smaller the difference, the better the system. To evaluate the registrations, the pointwise distance between gold standard and realistic registration

  1. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer observations of the RS Canum Venaticorum systems AR Lacertae and II Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petterer, R. J.; Vedder, P. W.; Jelinsky, P.; Brown, A.; Bowyer, S.

    1993-01-01

    We report observations of two RS CVn systems, II Peg and AR Lac, which were calibration targets during the in-orbit checkout phase of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). We have determined count rates, and, based on these count rates, preliminary emission measure analyses have been done. The Lexan/boron band count rates were 0.0849 +/- 0.0023 counts/s for AR Lac and 0.218 +/- 0.031 counts/s for II Peg during its quiescent state. Temperatures and emission measures derived from the EUVE data are consistent with previously published values. We also report a flare seen during the II Peg observations which has characteristics similar to previously observed flares on II Peg. During the flare the Lexan/boron count rate increased by at least a factor of 2.5, and the minimum total duration was about 34,000 s (about 9.4 hr).

  2. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenforde, T. S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, and the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.

  3. Impact of an absorbent silver-eluting dressing system on lower extremity revascularization wound complications.

    PubMed

    Childress, Beverly B; Berceli, Scott A; Nelson, Peter R; Lee, W Anthony; Ozaki, C Keith

    2007-09-01

    Surgical wounds for lower extremity revascularization are prone to infection and dehiscence. Acticoat Absorbent, an antimicrobial dressing, offers sustained release of ionic silver. We hypothesized that immediate application of Acticoat as a postoperative dressing would reduce wound complications in patients undergoing leg revascularization. All infrainguinal revascularization cases involving leg incisions at a single Veterans Administration Medical Center were identified from July 1, 2002, to September 30, 2005. The control group received conventional dressings, while the treatment group received an Acticoat dressing. Wound complication rates were captured via National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data. Patient characteristics and procedure distributions were similar between groups. The wound complication rate fell 64% with utilization of the Acticoat-based dressing (control 14% [17/118], treatment 5% [7/130]; P = 0.016). An Acticoat-based dressing system offers a potentially useful, cost-effective adjunct to reduce open surgical leg revascularization wound complications. PMID:17521872

  4. The evolution of energy-transducing systems. Studies with an extremely halophilic archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1991-01-01

    The halobacterial ATPase was labeled with C-14-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and subunit 2 of the enzyme was prepared by electroelution. Subunit 2 was cleaved by several chemical and enzymatic procedures for further preparation of peptides. Immunoreactions (Western blotting) of halobacterial membranes were performed with an antiserum against subunit A of the vacuolar ATPase from Neurospora crassa. A 85 K band (subunit 1) from the membranes of H saccharovorum and from two halobacterial isolates, which were isolated from Permian salt sediments, reacted strongly with the antiserum. The ATPase from the latter isolates resembled the ATPase from H saccharovorum, but had a higher content of acidic amino acids. If it can be verified that the age of the bacterial isolates is in the same range as when deposition of salt occurred, an extremely interesting system for the study of evolutionary questions would be available, since the salt-embedded bacteria presumably did not undergo mutational and selectional events.

  5. ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) communications systems ecological monitoring program: Wetland studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guntenspergen, Glenn; Keough, Janet; Stearns, Forest; Wikum, Douglas

    1989-11-01

    The results and conclusions are presented of in situ studies designed to monitor for possible effects on wetland flora from exposure to electromagnetic (EM) fields produced by the U.S. Navy's Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System. The studies examined for possible effects to herbs, shrubs, and trees growing on peat bogs near the Navy's Wisconsin Transmitting Facility (WTF). Plant characteristics studied included foliar cation content, stomatal resistance, and rate of foliar decomposition. Eleven bogs similar in plant community structure and interstitial water chemistry were used as study sites. Treatment sites were located immediately adjacent to the WTF antenna or its grounds, and experienced EM field intensities at least two orders of magnitude greater than control sites.

  6. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes ;in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, and the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.

  7. Invisible marking system by extreme ultraviolet radiation: the new frontier for anti-counterfeiting tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lazzaro, P.; Bollanti, S.; Flora, F.; Mezi, L.; Murra, D.; Torre, A.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a marking technology which uses extreme ultraviolet radiation to write invisible patterns on tags based on alkali fluoride thin films. The shape of the pattern is pre-determined by a mask (in the case of contact lithography) or by a suitable mirror (projection lithography). Tags marked using this method offer a much better protection against fakes than currently available anti-counterfeiting techniques. The complexity and cost of this technology can be tailored to the value of the good to be protected, leaving, on the other hand, the specific reading technique straightforward. So far, we have exploited our invisible marking to tag artworks, identity cards, electrical components, and containers of radioactive wastes. Advantages and limits of this technology are discussed in comparison with the anti-counterfeiting systems available in the market.

  8. Creation of a neo-aortoiliac system from lower extremity deep and superficial veins.

    PubMed Central

    Clagett, G P; Bowers, B L; Lopez-Viego, M A; Rossi, M B; Valentine, R J; Myers, S I; Chervu, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the morbidity, mortality, and intermediate term follow-up of patients undergoing replacement of their aortoiliac-femoral systems with lower extremity deep and superficial veins. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The most commonly used treatment for aortic prosthetic infection is ectopic bypass and removal of the prosthesis. The overall mortality rate with this approach is approximately 20%, with an amputation rate of 10% to 14%. Other limitations include thrombosis of the ectopic bypass leading to limb loss, reinfection of the ectopic bypass, and aortic stump blowout. Dissatisfaction with this approach has led the authors to develop the following. METHODS: A neo-aortoiliac system (NAIS) was fashioned from lower extremity deep veins (DV), greater saphenous veins (GSV), or both in patients with infected aortobifemoral prosthesis (n = 17) and other complex aortic problems (n = 3). Removal of infected prosthetic material, harvest of vein, and creation of NAIS was performed as a single-staged procedure. RESULTS: The in-hospital mortality and amputation rates were 10% each. The mean (+/- standard deviation [SD]) operative time was 6.5 +/- 1.8 hours and the blood transfusion requirement was 4 +/- 3 units. Four patients experienced postoperative gastrointestinal complications with peritonitis and sepsis; NAIS vein graft resisted infection and remained intact. The mean follow-up time was 22.5 +/- 16 months. NAISs constructed from GSVs were prone to the development of focal stenoses requiring intervention or diffuse neointimal hyperplasia leading to occlusion. In contrast, all NAISs from larger caliber DVs have remained widely patent. The failure rate of GSV NAISs was 64%, compared to 0% for DV NAISs (p = 0.006). Despite the high failure rate in patients with GSV NAISs, none has required amputation. In patients who had DVs harvested for NAIS reconstruction, limb edema and other signs of venous hypertension have been minimal. CONCLUSION: NAIS

  9. ASAS J083241+2332.4: A New Extreme Low Mass Ratio Overcontact Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, K.; Malu, S.; Choi, C. S.; Vivekananda Rao, P.

    2016-03-01

    We present the R- and V-band CCD photometry and Hα line studies of an overcontact binary ASAS J083241+2332.4. The light curves exhibit totality along with a trace of the O’Connell effect. The photometric solution indicates that this system falls into the category of extreme low-mass ratio overcontact binaries with a mass ratio, q ˜ 0.06. Although a trace of the O’ Connell effect is observed, constancy of the Hα line along various phases suggest that a relatively higher magnetic activity is needed for it to show a prominent fill-in effect. The study of O-C variations reveals that the period of the binary shows a secular increase at the rate of dP/dt ˜ 0.0765 s years-1, which is superimposed by a low, but significant, sinusoidal modulation with a period of ˜8.25 years. Assuming that the sinusoidal variation is due to the presence of a third body, orbital elements have been derived. There exist three other similar systems, SX Crv, V857 Her, and E53, which have extremely low mass ratios and we conclude that ASAS J083241+2332.4 resembles SX Crv in many respects. Theoretical studies indicate that at a critical mass ratio range, qcritical = 0.07-0.09, overcontact binaries should merge and form a fast rotating star, but it has been suggested that qcritical can continue to fall up to 0.05 depending on the primary's mass and structure. Moreover, the obtained fill-out factors (50%-70%) indicate that mass loss is considerable and hydrodynamical simulations advocate that mass loss from L2 is mandatory for a successful merging process. Comprehensively, the results indicate that ASAS J083241+2332.4 is at a stage of merger. The pivotal role played by the subtle nature of the derived mass ratio in forming a rapidly rotating star has been discussed.

  10. Woven Thermal Protection System Based Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environments Technology (HEEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerby, Donald; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Stackpoole, Margaret; Chinnapongse, Ronald; Munk, Michelle; Dillman, Robert; Feldman, Jay; Prabhu, Dinesh; Beerman, Adam

    2013-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions utilizing an entry system into Venus and the outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely high entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of state of the art low to mid density ablators such as PICA or Avcoat. Therefore mission planners typically assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heat shield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic is a robust TPS material however its high density and relatively high thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, with high heat fluxes and pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose challenges for certification in existing ground based test facilities and the longer-term sustainability of CP will continue to pose challenges. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This project was highly successful demonstrating that a Woven TPS solution compares favorably to CP in performance in simulated reentry environments and provides the opportunity to manufacture graded materials that should result in overall reduced mass solutions and enable a much broader set of missions than does CP. Building off the success of the WTPS project GCDP has funded a follow on project to further mature and scale up the WTPS concept for insertion into future NASA robotic missions. The matured WTPS will address the CP concerns associated with ground based test limitations and sustainability. This presentation will briefly discuss results from the WTPS Project and the plans for WTPS maturation into a heat-shield for extreme entry environment.

  11. Woven Thermal Protection System Based Heat-shield for Extreme Entry Environments Technology (HEEET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnapongse, Ronald; Ellerbe, Donald; Stackpoole, Maragaret; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beerman, Adam; Feldman, Jay; Peterson Keith; Prabhu, Dinesh; Dillman, Robert; Munk, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    NASA's future robotic missions utilizing an entry system into Venus and the outer planets, namely, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, result in extremely severe entry conditions that exceed the capabilities of state of the art low to mid density ablators such as PICA or Avcoat. Therefore mission planners typically assume the use of a fully dense carbon phenolic heat shield similar to what was flown on Pioneer Venus and Galileo. Carbon phenolic (CP) is a robust TPS material however its high density and relatively high thermal conductivity constrain mission planners to steep entries, with high heat fluxes and pressures and short entry durations, in order for CP to be feasible from a mass perspective. The high entry conditions pose challenges for certification in existing ground based test facilities and the longer-­-term sustainability of CP will continue to pose challenges. In 2012 the Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) in NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate funded NASA ARC to investigate the feasibility of a Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) to meet the needs of NASA's most challenging entry missions. This project was highly successful demonstrating that a Woven TPS solution compares favorably to CP in performance in simulated reentry environments and provides the opportunity to manufacture graded materials that should result in overall reduced mass solutions and enable a much broader set of missions than does CP. Building off the success of the WTPS project GCDP has funded a follow on project to further mature and scale up the WTPS concept for insertion into future NASA robotic missions. The matured WTPS will address the CP concerns associated with ground based test limitations and sustainability. This presentation will briefly discuss results from the WTPS Project and the plans for WTPS maturation into a heat-­-shield for extreme entry environment.

  12. Manaus city Flow Warning system and extreme events monitoring in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. L. M. R.; Oliveira, D.; Oliveira, M. A.; Moreira, D.; Maciel, J. S. C.

    2012-04-01

    The Amazon basin is the biggest watershed in the world, in the center of this basin, there is a city called Manaus, with population next to 2 million habitants. Manaus city is bounded by Negro River; one of the main rivers in Amazon, this river has its level checked by Fluvial Station in the Manaus harbor, which has a range of 100 years of hydrological data records. The hydrological cycle in the region next to Manaus has certain regularity, its common variety is considered of 7 months of rising river, in other words, the fluvial quotes rising and 5 months of falling (ebb). Although, the water level variation in Manaus Harbor, from its draft to flow can achieve the variation up to 16 meters of water level height, this difference can affect all the Amazon region, happening impacts such as the interference of regional agriculture and fluvial transportation, besides the economic activities in the harbor and local population welfare, arising from extreme events. Considering the relevance of prediction and accompanying of flows and drafts, the Geologic Survey of Brazil implemented, since 1989, a warning system to these extreme events. This paper focused to demonstrate the a warning system implemented from equations based on the Manaus Harbor quotes, since Negro River has a regular hydrological cycle, thus, it is possible to predict the highest quotes in the hydrological year, in advance till 75 days with accurate prediction, in a gap of 45 to 15 days before the flow. This paper presents, also, the biggest events occurred in a hundred years of records collected by Manaus Harbor, as example, the draft happened in December 2010 and the flow in June 2009, as well demonstrating the values and impacts in the Amazon region.

  13. Wafer and reticle positioning system for the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Engineering Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    WRONOSKY,JOHN B.; SMITH,TONY G.; CRAIG,MARCUS J.; STURGIS,BEVERLY R.; DARNOLD,JOEL R.; WERLING,DAVID K.; KINCY,MARK A.; TICHENOR,DANIEL A.; WILLIAMS,MARK E.; BISCHOFF,PAUL

    2000-01-27

    This paper is an overview of the wafer and reticle positioning system of the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) Engineering Test Stand (ETS). EUVL represents one of the most promising technologies for supporting the integrated circuit (IC) industry's lithography needs for critical features below 100nm. EUVL research and development includes development of capabilities for demonstrating key EUV technologies. The ETS is under development at the EUV Virtual National Laboratory, to demonstrate EUV full-field imaging and provide data that supports production-tool development. The stages and their associated metrology operated in a vacuum environment and must meet stringent outgassing specifications. A tight tolerance is placed on the stage tracking performance to minimize image distortion and provide high position repeatability. The wafer must track the reticle with less than {+-}3nm of position error and jitter must not exceed 10nm rms. To meet these performance requirements, magnetically levitated positioning stages utilizing a system of sophisticated control electronics will be used. System modeling and experimentation have contributed to the development of the positioning system and results indicate that desired ETS performance is achievable.

  14. SU-E-J-101: Retroactive Calculation of TLD and Film Dose in Anthropomorphic Phantom as Assessment of Updated TPS Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhatib, H; Oves, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a quick and comprehensive method verifying the accuracy of the updated dose model by recalculating dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom with a new version of the TPS and comparing the results to measured values. Methods: CT images and IMRT plan of an RPC anthropomorphic head phantom, previously calculated by Pinnacle 9.0, was re-computed using Pinnacle 9.2 and 9.6. The dosimeters within the phantom include four TLD capsules representing a primary PTV, two TLD capsules representing a secondary PTV, and two TLD capsules representing an organ at risk. Also included were three sheets of Gafchromic film. Performance of the updated TPS version was assessed by recalculating point doses and dose profiles corresponding to TLD and film position respectively and then comparing the results to reported values by the RPC. Results: Comparing calculated doses to reported measured doses from the RPC yielded an average disagreement of 1.48%, 2.04% and 2.10% for versions 9.0, 9.2, 9.6 respectively. Computed doses points all meet the RPC's passing criteria with the exception of the point representing the superior organ at risk in version 9.6. However, qualitative analysis of the recalculated dose profiles showed improved agreement with those of the RPC, especially in the penumbra region. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated the calculation results of Pinnacle 9.2 and 9.6 vs 9.0 version. Additionally, this study illustrates a method for the user to gain confidence upgrade to a newer version of the treatment planning system.

  15. Study of the improvement of TLD cards for personal neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, N.; Hassan, G. M.; El-Sersy, A. R.; Ezzat, M.

    2010-04-01

    In this work, personal thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) cards type of GN-6770 (holder type 8806) from Harshaw were used for personal neutron dosimetry. The response of the dosimeters has been determined in terms of the personal absorbed dose and personal dose equivalent for different neutron energy components, based on the recommendations of ICRP-60 and ICRU-49. Neutron irradiation was performed using a 5 mCi Am-Be neutron source. The TLD reader, type Harshaw 6600, was installed and calibrated for accurate neutron doses equivalent to gamma-ray doses. It was found that fast neutron doses measured by TLD (badges or cards) are in agreement with those measured by neutron TE (tissue equivalent gas) ionization chambers and neutron monitors. Thermal neutron doses measured by TLD cards were overestimated when compared with those measured by neutron monitors. Additional Cd was used to reduce thermal neutron doses to be in agreement with actual thermal doses. Other configurations for TLD crystals are also suggested for accurate thermal neutron dose measurements.

  16. Personnel dose equivalent monitoring at SLAC using lithium-fluoride TLD's (thermoluminescent dosimeters)

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, T.M.; Busick, D.D.

    1987-03-01

    TLD's replaced film badges in the early 1970's for all dose equivalent monitoring, both neutron and photon, and for all locations at SLAC. The photon TLD's, composed of Li-7 loaded teflon discs, are calibrated using conventional gamma-ray sources; i.e., Co-60, Cs-137, etc. For these TLD's a nominal value of 1 nC/mrem is used, and is independent of source energy for 100 keV to 3 MeV. Since measured dose equivalents at SLAC are only a small fraction of the allowable levels, it was not deemed necessary to develop neutron dosimeters which would measure dose equivalent accurately for all possible neutron spectra. Today, wallet TLD's, composed of pairs of Li-7 and Li-6 discs, are used, with the Li-6 measuring only thermal neutrons; i.e., they aren't moderated in any way to make them sensitive to neutrons with energies greater than thermal. The assumption is made that there is a correlation between thermal neutron fluences and fast neutron fluences around the research area where almost all neutron doses (exclusive of sealed sources) are received. The calibration factor for these Li-6 TLD's is 1 nC/mrem of fast neutrons. The method of determining the validity of this calibration is the subject of this note. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Susceptibility of South Korea to hydrologic extremes affecting the global food system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puma, M. J.; Chon, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Food security in South Korea is closely linked to trade in the global food system. The country's production of major grains declined from 5.8 million metric tons (mmt) in 1998 to 4.8 mmt in 2014, which coincided with a shift in grain self sufficiency from 43% down to 24% over this same period. Many factors led to these changes, including reductions in domestic agricultural land, governmental policies supporting industry over agriculture, and a push towards trade liberalization. South Korea's self sufficiency is now one of the lowest among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, leaving it vulnerable to disruptions in the global food system. Here we explore this vulnerability by assessing how global trade disruptions would affect Korea's food security. We impose historical extreme drought and flood events that would possibly affect today's major food producing regions concurrently. Next we compute food supply deficits in South Korea that might result from these events. Our analyses provide a framework for formulating domestic food policies to enhance South Korea's food security in the increasingly fragile global food system.

  18. The oceanic response of the Turkish Straits System to an extreme drop in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Jeffrey W.; Jarosz, Ewa; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Beşiktepe, Åükrü

    2014-06-01

    Moorings across all four entry/exit sections of the Dardanelles Strait and the Bosphorus Strait simultaneously measured the response of the Turkish Straits System to the passage of a severe cyclonic storm that included an atmospheric pressure drop of more than 30 mbar in less than 48 h. The bottom pressure response at the Aegean Sea side of the Dardanelles Strait was consistent with an inverted barometer response, but the response at the other sections did not follow an inverted barometer, leading to a large bottom pressure gradient through the Turkish Straits System. Upper-layer flow toward the Aegean Sea was reversed by the storm and flow toward the Black Sea was greatly enhanced. Bottom pressure across the Sea of Marmara peaked 6 h after the passage of the storm's minimum pressure. The response on the Dardanelles side was a combination of sea elevation and pycnocline depth rise, and the response on the Bosphorus side was an even greater sea elevation rise and a drop in pycnocline depth. The peak in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara was followed by another reverse in the flow through the Dardanelles Strait as flow was then directed away from the Sea of Marmara in both straits. A simple conceptual model without wind is able to explain fluctuations in bottom pressure in the Sea of Marmara to a 0.89-0.96 level of correlation. This stresses the importance of atmospheric pressure dynamics in driving the mass flux of the Turkish Strait System for extreme storms.

  19. Hydrogeomorphic response to extreme rainfall in headwater systems: Flash floods and debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borga, Marco; Stoffel, Markus; Marchi, Lorenzo; Marra, Francesco; Jakob, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Flash floods and debris flows develop at space and time scales that conventional observation systems for rainfall, streamflow and sediment discharge are not able to monitor. Consequently, the atmospheric, hydrological and geomorphic controls on these hydrogeomorphic processes are poorly understood, leading to highly uncertain warning and risk management. On the other hand, remote sensing of precipitation and numerical weather predictions have become the basis of several flood forecasting systems, enabling increasingly accurate detection of hazardous events. The objective of this paper is to provide a review on current European and international research on early warning systems for flash floods and debris flows. We expand upon these themes by identifying: (a) the state of the art; (b) knowledge gaps; and (c) suggested research directions to advance warning capabilities for extreme hydrogeomorphic processes. We also suggest three areas in which advancements in science will have immediate and important practical consequence, namely development of rainfall estimation and nowcasting schemes suited to the specific space-time scales, consolidating physical, engineering and social datasets of flash floods and debris-flows, integration of methods for multiple hydrogeomorphic hazard warning.

  20. [Transport systems for carbonate in the extremely natronophilic cyanobacterium Euhalothece sp].

    PubMed

    Mikhodiuk, O S; Zavarzin, G A; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2008-01-01

    The effect of carbonate concentration, pH of the medium, and illumination intensity on the major physiological characteristics (growth rate and the intensities of CO2 assimilation and oxygen photoproduction) of the natronophilic cyanobacterium Euhalothece sp. Z-M001 have been studied. It was established that the investigated microorganism has at least two transport systems (TS) for CO2, which differ in both the pH optimum and substrate affinity: TS I has a pH, 9.4-9.5 and a K(S) 0.5 of 13-17 mM, whereas TS II has a pH(opt) 9.9-10.2 and a K(S) 0.5 of 600-800 mM. The substrate affinity of these transport systems is several orders of magnitude lower than the substrate affinity of the transport systems of freshwater cyanobacteria. It is suggested that they are unique for extremely alkaliphilic cyanobacteria and reflect their adaptation to the seasonal cycles of the lake hydrochemistry. PMID:18825972

  1. Precision and accuracy of 3D lower extremity residua measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Pilgram, Thomas K.

    1996-04-01

    Accurate and reproducible geometric measurement of lower extremity residua is required for custom prosthetic socket design. We compared spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT) and 3D optical surface scanning (OSS) with caliper measurements and evaluated the precision and accuracy of each system. Spiral volumetric CT scanned surface and subsurface information was used to make external and internal measurements, and finite element models (FEMs). SXCT and OSS were used to measure lower limb residuum geometry of 13 below knee (BK) adult amputees. Six markers were placed on each subject's BK residuum and corresponding plaster casts and distance measurements were taken to determine precision and accuracy for each system. Solid models were created from spiral CT scan data sets with the prosthesis in situ under different loads using p-version finite element analysis (FEA). Tissue properties of the residuum were estimated iteratively and compared with values taken from the biomechanics literature. The OSS and SXCT measurements were precise within 1% in vivo and 0.5% on plaster casts, and accuracy was within 3.5% in vivo and 1% on plaster casts compared with caliper measures. Three-dimensional optical surface and SXCT imaging systems are feasible for capturing the comprehensive 3D surface geometry of BK residua, and provide distance measurements statistically equivalent to calipers. In addition, SXCT can readily distinguish internal soft tissue and bony structure of the residuum. FEM can be applied to determine tissue material properties interactively using inverse methods.

  2. Suppression of extreme orbital evolution in triple systems with short-range forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2015-02-01

    The Lidov-Kozai (LK) mechanism plays an important role in the secular evolution of many hierarchical triple systems. The standard LK mechanism consists of large-amplitude oscillations in eccentricity and inclination of a binary subject to the quadrupole potential from an outer perturber. Recent work has shown that when the octupole terms are included in the potential, the inner binary can reach more extreme eccentricities as well as undergo orientation flips. It is known that pericentre precessions due to short-range effects, such as General Relativity and tidal and rotational distortions, can limit the growth of eccentricity and even suppress standard (quadrupolar) LK oscillations, but their effect on the octupole-level LK mechanism has not been fully explored. In this paper, we systematically study how these short-range forces affect the extreme orbital behaviour found in octupole LK cycles. In general, the influence of the octupole potential is confined to a range of initial mutual inclinations itot centred around 90° (when the inner binary mass ratio is ≪1), with this range expanding with increasing octupole strength. We find that, while the short-range forces do not change the width and location of this `window of influence', they impose a strict upper limit on the maximum achievable eccentricity. This limiting eccentricity can be calculated analytically, and its value holds even for strong octupole potential and for the general case of three comparable masses. Short-range forces also affect orbital flips, progressively reducing the range of itot within which flips are possible as the intensity of these forces increases.

  3. A computer aided diagnosis system for thyroid disease using extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Na; Ouyang, Ji-Hong; Chen, Hui-Ling; Liu, Da-You

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present an effective and efficient computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system based on principle component analysis (PCA) and extreme learning machine (ELM) to assist the task of thyroid disease diagnosis. The CAD system is comprised of three stages. Focusing on dimension reduction, the first stage applies PCA to construct the most discriminative new feature set. After then, the system switches to the second stage whose target is model construction. ELM classifier is explored to train an optimal predictive model whose parameters are optimized. As we known, the number of hidden neurons has an important role in the performance of ELM, so we propose an experimental method to hunt for the optimal value. Finally, the obtained optimal ELM model proceeds to perform the thyroid disease diagnosis tasks using the most discriminative new feature set and the optimal parameters. The effectiveness of the resultant CAD system (PCA-ELM) has been rigorously estimated on a thyroid disease dataset which is taken from UCI machine learning repository. We compare it with other related methods in terms of their classification accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate that PCA-ELM outperforms other ones reported so far by 10-fold cross-validation method, with the mean accuracy of 97.73% and with the maximum accuracy of 98.1%. Besides, PCA-ELM performs much faster than support vector machines (SVM) based CAD system. Consequently, the proposed method PCA-ELM can be considered as a new powerful tools for diagnosing thyroid disease with excellent performance and less time. PMID:22327384

  4. VALIDATION OF HANFORD PERSONNEL AND EXTREMITY DOSIMETERS IN PLUTONIUM ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, Robert I.; Fix, John J.; Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2000-02-10

    A study was performed in the Plutonium Finishing Plant to assess the performance of Hanford personnel neutron dosimetry. The study was assessed whole body dosimetry and extremity dosimetry performance. For both parts of the study, the TEPC was used as the principle instrument for characterizing workplace neutron fields. In the whole body study, 12.7-cm-diameter TEPCs were used in ten different locations in the facility. TLD and TED personnel dosimeters were exposed on a water-filled phantom to enable a comparison of TEPC and dosimeter response. In the extremity study, 1.27-cm-diameter TEPCs were exposed inside the fingers of a gloveboxe glove. Extremity dosimeters were wrapped around the TEPCs. The glove was then exposed to six different cans of plutonium, simulating the exposure that a worker's fingers would receive in a glovebox. The comparison of TEPC-measured neutron dose equivalent to TLD-measured gamma dose equivalent provided neutron-to-gamma ratios that can be used to estimate the neutron dose equivalent received by a worker's finger based on the gamma readings of an extremity dosimeter. The study also utilized a Snoopy and detectors based on bubble technology for assessing neutron exposures, providing a comparison of the effectiveness of these instruments for workplace monitoring. The study concludes that the TLD component of the HCND performs adequately overall, with a positive bias of 30%, but exhibits excessive variability in individual results due to instabilities in the algorithm. The TED response was less variable but only 20% of the TEPC reference dose on average because of the low neutron energies involved. The neutron response of the HSD was more variable than the TLD component of the HCND and biased high by a factor of 8 overall due to its calibration to unmoderated 252Cf. The study recommends further work to correct instabilities in the HCND algorithm and to explore the potential shown by the bubble-based dosimeters.

  5. Investigation of LiF, Mg and Ti (TLD-100) Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, M; Sina, S; Faghihi, R

    2015-12-01

    LiF, Mg and Ti cubical TLD chips (known as TLD-100) are widely used for dosimetry purposes. The repeatability of TL dosimetry is investigated by exposing them to doses of (81, 162 and 40.5 mGy) with 662keV photons of Cs-137. A group of 40 cubical TLD chips was randomly selected from a batch and the values of Element Correction Coefficient (ECC) were obtained 4 times by irradiating them to doses of 81 mGy (two times), 162mGy and 40.5mGy. Results of this study indicate that the average reproducibility of ECC calculation for 40 TLDs is 1.5%, while these values for all chips do not exceed 5%. PMID:26688801

  6. Design of a personnel TLD badge for a power reactor beta/gamma spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, D.M.; Labenski, T. )

    1983-10-01

    This paper reports that three basic challenges are inherent in the design of a thermoluminescent dosimeter for a power reactor beta/gamma spectrum: the dosimeter must meet the current standard for performance in laboratory testing, the dosimeter must properly respond to a power reactor spectrum that is different from that specified in the standard, and the dosimeter must function under field conditions. These challenges were met at the Indian Point 3 Nuclear Power Station by modifying the case of a commercial multi-element TLD to include varying thicknesses of tissue equivalent plastic absorbers over the elements. An algorithm was developed to correct the TLD responses for laboratory testing: however, in field use, shallow and deep dose are read directly from the TLD without the use of an algorithm.

  7. NOTE: Monte Carlo simulation of correction factors for IAEA TLD holders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultqvist, Martha; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Izewska, Joanna

    2010-03-01

    The IAEA standard thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) holder has been developed for the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose program for audits of high-energy photon beams, and it is also employed by the ESTRO-QUALity assurance network (EQUAL) and several national TLD audit networks. Factors correcting for the influence of the holder on the TL signal under reference conditions have been calculated in the present work from Monte Carlo simulations with the PENELOPE code for 60Co γ-rays and 4, 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV photon beams. The simulation results are around 0.2% smaller than measured factors reported in the literature, but well within the combined standard uncertainties. The present study supports the use of the experimentally obtained holder correction factors in the determination of the absorbed dose to water from the TL readings; the factors calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations may be adopted for the cases where there are no measured data.

  8. Investigation of LiF, Mg and Ti (TLD-100) Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, M.; Sina, S.; Faghihi, R.

    2015-01-01

    LiF, Mg and Ti cubical TLD chips (known as TLD-100) are widely used for dosimetry purposes. The repeatability of TL dosimetry is investigated by exposing them to doses of (81, 162 and 40.5 mGy) with 662keV photons of Cs-137. A group of 40 cubical TLD chips was randomly selected from a batch and the values of Element Correction Coefficient (ECC) were obtained 4 times by irradiating them to doses of 81 mGy (two times), 162mGy and 40.5mGy. Results of this study indicate that the average reproducibility of ECC calculation for 40 TLDs is 1.5%, while these values for all chips do not exceed 5%. PMID:26688801

  9. Operational comparison of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors in fuel fabrication facilities.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Takada, C; Yoshida, T; Momose, T

    2007-01-01

    The authors carried out an operational study that compared the use of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detector in plutonium environments of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai Works. A selected group of workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX (Plutonium-Uranium mixed oxide) fuel wore both TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors. The TL readings were generally proportional to the counted etch-pits, and thus the dose equivalent results obtained from TLD albedo dosemeter agreed with those from solid state nuclear tracks detector within a factor of 1.5. This result indicates that, in the workplaces of the MOX fuel plants, the neutron spectrum remained almost constant in terms of time and space, and the appropriate range of field-specific correction with spectrum variations was small in albedo dosimetry. PMID:17337735

  10. HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Jose

    2013-11-13

    HPC Colony II has been a 36-month project focused on providing portable performance for leadership class machines—a task made difficult by the emerging variety of more complex computer architectures. The project attempts to move the burden of portable performance to adaptive system software, thereby allowing domain scientists to concentrate on their field rather than the fine details of a new leadership class machine. To accomplish our goals, we focused on adding intelligence into the system software stack. Our revised components include: new techniques to address OS jitter; new techniques to dynamically address load imbalances; new techniques to map resources according to architectural subtleties and application dynamic behavior; new techniques to dramatically improve the performance of checkpoint-restart; and new techniques to address membership service issues at scale.

  11. ExM:System Support for Extreme-Scale, Many-Task Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Daniel S

    2011-05-31

    The ever-increasing power of supercomputer systems is both driving and enabling the emergence of new problem-solving methods that require the effi cient execution of many concurrent and interacting tasks. Methodologies such as rational design (e.g., in materials science), uncertainty quanti fication (e.g., in engineering), parameter estimation (e.g., for chemical and nuclear potential functions, and in economic energy systems modeling), massive dynamic graph pruning (e.g., in phylogenetic searches), Monte-Carlo- based iterative fi xing (e.g., in protein structure prediction), and inverse modeling (e.g., in reservoir simulation) all have these requirements. These many-task applications frequently have aggregate computing needs that demand the fastest computers. For example, proposed next-generation climate model ensemble studies will involve 1,000 or more runs, each requiring 10,000 cores for a week, to characterize model sensitivity to initial condition and parameter uncertainty. The goal of the ExM project is to achieve the technical advances required to execute such many-task applications efficiently, reliably, and easily on petascale and exascale computers. In this way, we will open up extreme-scale computing to new problem solving methods and application classes. In this document, we report on combined technical progress of the collaborative ExM project, and the institutional financial status of the portion of the project at University of Chicago, over the rst 8 months (through April 30, 2011)

  12. Control system architecture of AMICA: a robotic instrument in an extreme environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Rico, Gianluca; Ragni, Maurizio; Corcione, Leonardo; Giro, Enrico; Fantinel, Daniela

    2006-06-01

    AMICA is a camera conceived to automatically acquire infrared astronomical images in the extreme environment of Dome C (T ~ -70 °C, p ~ 640 mbar). For this reason, hardware and software are specially designed. They must guarantee the correct execution of observing procedures, while performing a continuous monitoring of the environmental conditions, the instrument status and the observing parameters, and a real-time adjustment of them when required. All temperature-sensitive components will be placed in a thermally controlled rack. The environmental control inside it is assigned to a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). It is responsible, in particular, for the overall system start-up. Instrument status, mainly concerning vacuum level and temperatures inside the cryostat, is directly monitored by the local cPC, which sends instructions to the PLC in case of failure, in order to start appropriate restoring procedures. All hardware components are conceived to be easily and fast replaceable. Main tasks of the AMICA Control Software (ACS) are: telescope interaction, observation management, environment control, events handling, data storing. Because of the high frame rate, typical of infrared imaging, the acquisition system has been interfaced with an independent application (STS), to perform read-out electronics control, fast data processing (co-adding from chopping raw frames), parameters checking (such as exposure time, chopping frequency, etc.), and data output. The software design has a multithreading architecture, based on the Object Oriented approach and developed for Windows OS platforms.

  13. Groundwater artificial recharge solutions for integrated management of watersheds and aquifer systems under extreme drought scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo-Ferreira, Joao-Paulo; Oliveira, Luís.; Diamantino, Catarina

    2010-05-01

    The paper addresses groundwater artificial recharge solutions for integrated management of watersheds and aquifer systems under extreme drought scenarios. The conceptual idea of Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) is considered as one of the scientific based solutions towards scientific based mitigation measures to climate variability and change in many parts of the world. In Portugal two European Union sponsored 6th Framework Programme for Research Projects have been addressing this topic, namely GABARDINE Project on "Groundwater artificial recharge based on alternative sources of water: Advanced integrated technologies and management" and the Coordinated Action ASEMWATERNet, a "Multi-Stakeholder Platform for ASEM S&T Cooperation on Sustainable Water Use". An application of Aquifer Storage and Recovery methodologies aiming drought mitigation and Integrated Water Resource Management of the Algarve (Portugal). The technique of artificial recharge of groundwater is used in many parts of the world with several aims, e.g. water storing in appropriate aquifers for the mitigation of future water needs during droughts or as protection against pollution or even for the recovery of groundwater quality. Artificial recharge of the aquifer systems of Campina de Faro and Silves-Querença is addressed in this paper, proposed to be an alternative to decrease the vulnerability of the Algarve to a future drought. Integrated management of water resources in the Algarve is not a clear issue since the last decade, when groundwater resources that supplied almost all water needs, have been drastically replaced by surface water stored in new reservoirs.

  14. A newly designed experimental system for exposure of mammalian cells to extremely low frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miyakoshi, J; Ohtsu, S; Tatsumi-Miyajima, J; Takebe, H

    1994-03-01

    To examine the biological effects of extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELFMF), we have designed and manufactured a new equipment for long-term and high-density exposure of cells to ELFMF. The ELFMF exposure system consists of a generator of magnets with a built-in CO2 incubator, an alternating current (AC) power supply, a gas compressor and a thermocontroller for the incubator, and a cooling unit for the magnets. The CO2 incubator made of acrylic resin is inserted into the inner-space of the silicon steel strip-cores. In this system, the temperature of the incubator is maintained at 37 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The maximum magnetic flux density on the exposure area of the incubator is 500 mT (T; tesla) at a current of 556 Arms (rms; root mean square) at 50 Hz. The long-term (up to 120 hr) exposure of 400 mT ELFMF did not affect the growth of both HL60RG and CCRF-CEM cells originated from human leukemia. The post-X-irradiation exposure of 400 mT ELFMF for 2 hr also did not affect the radiation sensitivity of GM0637 and TAT2SF cells originated from a normal human and an ataxia telangiectasia patient. PMID:8057268

  15. Impact of the extreme 2009 wildfires in Victoria on the soil system and implications for fire behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, Stefan; Shakesby, R. A.; Sheridan, G. J.; Lane, P. N. J.; Smith, H. G.; Bell, T.; Brooks, J.; Blake, W. H.

    2010-05-01

    The recent catastrophic wildfires near Melbourne in 2009 occurred during unprecedented extreme fire weather when dry northerly winds gusting up to 100 km/h coincided with the highest temperatures ever recorded in this region. These conditions, combined with the very high biomass of mature eucalypt forests (estimated to exceed 40 t/ha in places), very low fuel moisture conditions and steep slopes, generated extreme burning conditions. A rapid response project, funded by the NERC Urgency scheme, was launched to reconstruct heat input into the soils, and to determine associated effects on soil properties and seed bank survival. Three replicate sites were sampled for extremely high burn severity and high burn severity, and four for long unburnt control terrain, within mature mixed-species eucalypt forests near Marysville in April 2009. Additional exploratory sampling was carried out in 'rainforest'. Ash (where applicable) and surface soil (0-2.5 cm and 2.5-5 cm) were collected at 20 sample grid points at each site. Here we report on preliminary outcomes from soil water repellency determination, and seedbank germination experiments, which allow reconstructing of soil temperature and burn severity, and provide insights into fire behaviour, of this extreme event. Field and laboratory assessment of the soil suggest that the heat input to the soil was less than might be supposed given the extreme estimated fire intensity (>70,000 kW/m). Our data indicate that soil temperatures in the top 0-2.5 cm did not exceed ca 200°C. The limited heat input into the soil stands in stark contrast to the extreme fire intensity. We speculate that it resulted from an unusually fast-moving fire front associated with the extreme wind speeds, causing a short fire residence time. Whilst this fire event has been extreme in many respects, its impact on the soil system has clearly been less than what might have been expected. Thus it could be argued that the more extreme burning conditions that

  16. An evaluation of a coupled atmosphere-ocean modelling system for regional climate studies: extreme events in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, Priscilla A.; Mulligan, Frank J.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the ability of a coupled regional atmosphere-ocean modelling system to simulate two extreme events in the North Atlantic. In this study we use the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST; Warner et al.) modelling system with only the atmosphere and ocean models activated. COAWST couples the atmosphere model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF) to the ocean model (Regional Ocean Modelling System; ROMS) with the Model Coupling Toolkit. Results from the coupled system are compared with atmosphere only simulations of North Atlantic storms to evaluate the performance of the coupled modelling system. Two extreme events (Hurricane Katia and Hurricane Irene) were chosen to assess the level of improvement (or otherwise) arising from coupling WRF with ROMS. These two hurricanes involve different dynamics and present different challenges to the modeling system. This provides a robust assessment of the advantages or disadvantages of coupling WRF with ROMS for regional climate modelling studies of extreme events in the North Atlantic. We examine the ability of the coupled modelling system to simulate these two extreme events by comparing modelled storm tracks, storm intensities, wind speeds and sea surface temperatures with observations in all cases. The effect of domain size, and two different planetary boundary layers used in WRF are also reported.

  17. Application of the TLD albedo technique for monitoring and interpretation of neutron stray radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.

    1980-09-01

    A single sphere albedo technique with TLD 600/TLD 700 detectors has been applied in neutron monitoring to calibrate albedo dosimeters and to interpret neutron stray radiation fields in terms of neutron dose equivalent separated for the energy groups below 0.4 eV, 0.4-10 keV and 10 keV-10 MeV, and Eeff for fast neutrons. The paper describes the technique for field and personnel monitoring under the aspect of an on-line computer program for data recording and processing.

  18. Discrepancies between film and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) readings at an operating power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    The results of exposure measurements using film badges and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) were compared at an operating nuclear power reactor. The film badge overresponded to the high-energy Nitrogen-16 gamma rays produced under power, while the TLD did not. Discussions of charged-particle equilibrium and energy dependence are included. The cause of the overresponse was determined to be the excess pair production electrons created because of the high atomic number in the lead energy-compensating shield surrounding the film and in the film itself.

  19. On the reassessment of thermal neutron doses in TLD-100 by measuring the residual dose.

    PubMed

    Abraham, A; Weinstein, M; German, U; Alfassi, Z B

    2007-01-01

    By employing second readouts and the Phototransferred thermoluminescence (PTTL) method, high doses may be reassessed on the basis of residual dose information. It was shown in the past that for TLD-100, gamma doses can be reassessed by using a simple and efficient method, which consists of expanding the heating time to 30 s. In the present study, the 'extended time' method and the PTTL residual dose evaluations are used for reassessing thermal neutron doses when using TLD-100 crystals. Reassessment characteristics are presented for relatively low thermal neutron doses, in the range between approximately 1 and 18 mSv gamma dose equivalent. PMID:17507383

  20. Practical considerations for TLD-400/700-based gamma ray dosimetry for BNCT applications in a high thermal neutron fluence.

    PubMed

    Martsolf, S W; Johnson, J E; Vostmyer, C E; Albertson, B D; Binney, S E

    1995-12-01

    Operating experience with thermoluminescent dosimeters used in a boron neutron capture therapy research project is reported. In particular, certain facets of the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters for gamma ray dose measurements in the presence of a high thermal neutron fluence are discussed, including a comparison of TLD-400 and TLD-700 for gamma ray dosimetry, annealing procedures, and the effects of neutrons (56Mn activation) on TLD-400. The TLD-400 were observed to have a thermal neutron sensitivity (due to 56Mn beta decay) of 1.5 x 10(-13) Gy per n cm-2. An algorithm was developed to correct for the 56Mn beta decay thermal neutron-induced effects on TLD-400 by using a two-stage thermoluminescent readout for the thermoluminescent dosimeter chips. PMID:7493815

  1. A thermoluminescence dosimetry system for personal monitoring in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Currivan, L; Spain, D; Donnelly, H; Colgan, P A

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 the decision was taken to replace film badges with thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) as the main form of dosemeter for both whole-body and extremity monitoring at the Dosimetry Service of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) in Dublin. A review of commercially available automatic TLD systems was carried out to identify the system which best met the RPII's requirements. This paper describes the dosimetry system used, and, in addition, discusses the problems encountered and how these were addressed. PMID:11586731

  2. Impacts of Irrigation on Daily Extremes in the Coupled Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puma, Michael J.; Cook, Benjamin I.; Krakauer, Nir; Gentine, Pierre; Nazarenka, Larissa; Kelly, Maxwell; Wada, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Widespread irrigation alters regional climate through changes to the energy and water budgets of the land surface. Within general circulation models, simulation studies have revealed significant changes in temperature, precipitation, and other climate variables. Here we investigate the feedbacks of irrigation with a focus on daily extremes at the global scale. We simulate global climate for the year 2000 with and without irrigation to understand irrigation-induced changes. Our simulations reveal shifts in key climate-extreme metrics. These findings indicate that land cover and land use change may be an important contributor to climate extremes both locally and in remote regions including the low-latitudes.

  3. High-precision work distributions for extreme non-equilibrium processes in large systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The distributions of work for strongly non-equilibrium processes are studied using a very general form of a large-deviation approach, which allows one to study distributions down to extremely small probabilities of almost arbitrary quantities of interest for equilibrium, non-equilibrium stationary and even non-stationary processes. The method is applied to varying quickly the external field in a wide range B = 3 <--> 0 for critical (T = 2 . 269) two-dimensional Ising system of size L × L = 128 × 128 . To obtain free energy differences from the work distributions, they must be studied in ranges where the probabilities are as small as 10-240, which is not possible using direct simulation approaches. By comparison with the exact free energies, one sees that the present approach allows one to obtain the free energy with a very high relative precision of 10-4. This works well also for non-zero field, i.e., for a case where standard umbrella-sampling methods seem to be not so efficient to calculate free energies. Furthermore, for the present case it is verified that the resulting distributions of work fulfill Crooks theorem with high precision. Finally, the free energy for the Ising magnet as a function of the field strength is obtained.

  4. Sources and transport systems for low energy extreme of ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Batalin, V.A.; Bugaev, A.S.; Gushenets, V.I.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Johnson, B.M.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kropachev, G.N.; Kuibeda, R.P.; Kulevoy, T.V.; Masunov, E.S.; Oks, E.M.; Pershin, V.I.; Polozov, S.M.; Poole, H.J.; Seleznev, D.N.; Storozhenko, P.A.; Vizir, A.; Svarovski, A.Ya.; Yakushin, P.; Yushkov, G.Yu.

    2010-06-06

    For the past seven years a joint research and development effort focusing on the design of steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal being to meet the two, energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. However, since the last Fortier is low energy ion implantation, focus of the endeavor has shifted to low energy ion implantation. For boron cluster source development, we started with molecular ions of decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}), octadecaborane (B{sub 18}H{sub 22}), and presently our focus is on carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ions developing methods for mitigating graphite deposition. Simultaneously, we are developing a pure boron ion source (without a working gas) that can form the basis for a novel, more efficient, plasma immersion source. Our Calutron-Berna ion source was converted into a universal source capable of switching between generating molecular phosphorous P{sub 4}{sup +}, high charge state ions, as well as other types of ions. Additionally, we have developed transport systems capable of transporting a very large variety of ion species, and simulations of a novel gasless/plasmaless ion beam deceleration method were also performed.

  5. Numerical implementation of time-dependent density functional theory for extended systems in extreme environments

    SciTech Connect

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, DFT-MD has been shown to be a useful computational tool for exploring the properties of WDM. These calculations achieve excellent agreement with shock compression experiments, which probe the thermodynamic parameters of the Hugoniot state. New X-ray Thomson Scattering diagnostics promise to deliver independent measurements of electronic density and temperature, as well as structural information in shocked systems. However, they require the development of new levels of theory for computing the associated observables within a DFT framework. The experimentally observable x-ray scattering cross section is related to the electronic density-density response function, which is obtainable using TDDFT - a formally exact extension of conventional DFT that describes electron dynamics and excited states. In order to develop a capability for modeling XRTS data and, more generally, to establish a predictive capability for rst principles simulations of matter in extreme conditions, real-time TDDFT with Ehrenfest dynamics has been implemented in an existing PAW code for DFT-MD calculations. The purpose of this report is to record implementation details and benchmarks as the project advances from software development to delivering novel scienti c results. Results range from tests that establish the accuracy, e ciency, and scalability of our implementation, to calculations that are veri ed against accepted results in the literature. Aside from the primary XRTS goal, we identify other more general areas where this new capability will be useful, including stopping power calculations and electron-ion equilibration.

  6. An Automated System for Skeletal Maturity Assessment by Extreme Learning Machines.

    PubMed

    Mansourvar, Marjan; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Raj, Ram Gopal; Gunalan, Roshan; Mazinani, Iman

    2015-01-01

    Assessing skeletal age is a subjective and tedious examination process. Hence, automated assessment methods have been developed to replace manual evaluation in medical applications. In this study, a new fully automated method based on content-based image retrieval and using extreme learning machines (ELM) is designed and adapted to assess skeletal maturity. The main novelty of this approach is it overcomes the segmentation problem as suffered by existing systems. The estimation results of ELM models are compared with those of genetic programming (GP) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) models. The experimental results signify improvement in assessment accuracy over GP and ANN, while generalization capability is possible with the ELM approach. Moreover, the results are indicated that the ELM model developed can be used confidently in further work on formulating novel models of skeletal age assessment strategies. According to the experimental results, the new presented method has the capacity to learn many hundreds of times faster than traditional learning methods and it has sufficient overall performance in many aspects. It has conclusively been found that applying ELM is particularly promising as an alternative method for evaluating skeletal age. PMID:26402795

  7. Thermodynamic sensitivities in observed and simulated extreme-rain-producing mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, R. S.; Peters, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are responsible for a large fraction of warm-season extreme rainfall events over the continental United States, as well as other midlatitude regions globally. The rainfall production in these MCSs is determined by numerous factors, including the large-scale forcing for ascent, the organization of the convection, cloud microphysical processes, and the surrounding thermodynamic and kinematic environment. Furthermore, heavy-rain-producing MCSs are most common at night, which means that well-studied mechanisms for MCS maintenance and organization such as cold pools (gravity currents) are not always at work. In this study, we use numerical model simulations and recent field observations to investigate the sensitivity of low-level MCS structures, and their influences on rainfall, to the details of the thermodynamic environment. In particular, small alterations to the initial conditions in idealized and semi-idealized simulations result in comparatively large precipitation changes, both in terms of the intensity and the spatial distribution. The uncertainties in the thermodynamic enviroments in the model simulations will be compared with high-resolution observations from the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field experiment in 2015. The results have implications for the paradigms of "surface-based" versus "elevated" convection, as well as for the predictability of warm-season convective rainfall.

  8. An Automated System for Skeletal Maturity Assessment by Extreme Learning Machines

    PubMed Central

    Mansourvar, Marjan; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Raj, Ram Gopal; Gunalan, Roshan; Mazinani, Iman

    2015-01-01

    Assessing skeletal age is a subjective and tedious examination process. Hence, automated assessment methods have been developed to replace manual evaluation in medical applications. In this study, a new fully automated method based on content-based image retrieval and using extreme learning machines (ELM) is designed and adapted to assess skeletal maturity. The main novelty of this approach is it overcomes the segmentation problem as suffered by existing systems. The estimation results of ELM models are compared with those of genetic programming (GP) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) models. The experimental results signify improvement in assessment accuracy over GP and ANN, while generalization capability is possible with the ELM approach. Moreover, the results are indicated that the ELM model developed can be used confidently in further work on formulating novel models of skeletal age assessment strategies. According to the experimental results, the new presented method has the capacity to learn many hundreds of times faster than traditional learning methods and it has sufficient overall performance in many aspects. It has conclusively been found that applying ELM is particularly promising as an alternative method for evaluating skeletal age. PMID:26402795

  9. [Extreme types - a comparison of public health systems in Thuringia and the Warthegau].

    PubMed

    Vossen, J

    2013-11-01

    Special policing measures in Nazi Germany required centralisation in the public health service which was mainly achieved through the Law for the Unification of Municipal and State Health Administration in 1934. The long-term aim for public health officers was now hereditary and racial welfare. Several following legal regulations contributed to the implementation of a specific national-socialist health and social policy on the basis of racial hygiene and gave immense power to the health officers. Especially with the Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Sick Offspring, compulsory sterilisation was legalised and resulted in about 400,000 victims up to 1945. The central force in this new system was the public health office. The most extreme variation of public health administration was launched in Thuringia, where professional powers and state authority implemented an extensive institutional machinery which managed to reinforce Nazi population policy almost to perfection. After the invasion of western Poland the Germans built up an inhumane regime in the annexed and occupied regions, persecuted and murdered the Polish population and tried to exterminate the Jewish people. Here the health officers of the Warthegau could promote a rigorously racial dominated population policy of segregation. PMID:24142373

  10. ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program: Slime mold studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Eugene; Greenebaum, Ben

    1990-01-01

    It was previously shown that continuous exposure of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum to extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) simulating those generated by the Navy's ELF communication system (then Project Sanguine) could depress the rate of respiration, and lengthen the mitotic cell cycle. In a series of experiments beginning in 1981 and ending in 1987, it was determined that whether exposing Physarum to the field environment around the Wisconsin Transmitting Facility (WTF) could induce an altered physiological state. A laboratory component was also included to help verify methodology and to supplement studies performed at the WTF. Initially, the experimental effort was directed to devising methods to maintain axenic Physarum cultures under ambient environmental conditions. This involved using growth chambers that admit the electric field or current density from the surrounding environment; the cultures were returned to the laboratory for analysis. The successful methods placed the organism on an agar bed inside double containment and introduced the samples to be assayed into shaken liquid culture medium upon arrival at the laboratory. Both WTF-generated electromagnetic fields and background strengths were measured with the help of IITRI at study locations near the antenna, at the west ground of the WTF antenna, as well as at control sites.

  11. Oscillation Responses to an Extreme Weather Event from a Deep Moored Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Dimarco, S. F.; Stoessel, M. M.; Zhang, X.; Ingle, S.

    2011-12-01

    In June 2007 tropical Cyclone Gonu passed directly over an ocean observing system consisting of four, deep autonomous mooring stations along the 3000 m isobath in the northern Arabian Sea. Gonu was the largest cyclone known to have occurred in the Arabian Sea or to strike the Arabian Peninsula. The mooring system was designed by Lighthouse R & D Enterprises, Inc. and installed in cooperation with the Oman Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth. The instruments on the moorings continuously recorded water velocities, temperature, conductivity, pressure, dissolved oxygen and turbidity at multiple depths and at hourly intervals during the storm. Near-inertial oscillations at all moorings from thermocline to seafloor are coincident with the arrival of Gonu. Sub-inertial oscillations with periods of 2-10 days are recorded at the post-storm relaxation stage of Gonu, primarily in the thermocline. These oscillations consist of warm, saline water masses, likely originating from the Persian Gulf. Prominent 12.7-day sub-inertial waves, measured at a station ~300 km offshore, are bottom-intensified and have characteristics of baroclinic, topographically-trapped waves. Theoretical results from a topographically-trapped wave model are in a good agreement with the observed 12.7-day waves. The wavelength of the 12.7-day waves is about 590 km calculated from the dispersion relationship. Further analysis suggests that a resonant standing wave is responsible for trapping the 12.7-day wave energy inside the Sea of Oman basin. The observational results reported here are the first measurements of deepwater responses to a tropical cyclone in the Sea of Oman/Arabian Sea. Our study demonstrates the utility of sustained monitoring for studying the impact of extreme weather events on the ocean.

  12. A Two-Dimensional Extremely Short Optical Pulse in a System of Carbon Nanotubes in a Direct Current Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonenko, M. B.; Galkina, E. N.; Filimonova, Z. A.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of an external dc electric field on the two-dimensional extremely short optical pulse propagating in a zigzag carbon nanotube array was investigated. The electromagnetic field evolution in the investigated nanotube system is described by the Maxwell equations. Using numerical simulation, the interaction between the pulse electromagnetic field and the external electric field applied to the carbon nanotube array is analyzed.

  13. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to (137)Cs dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  14. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to 137Cs) dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  15. Error prediction of LiF-TLD used for gamma dose measurement for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Liu, Y H

    2011-12-01

    To predict the neutron influence on various (6)LiF concentration in the LiF-TLD, the Monte Carlo code MCNP was adopted to simulate the energy deposition on a TLD chip with dimensions of 3.2×3.2×0.9 mm. By assuming that the TL response is proportional to the energy deposition on it, the percentage error of LiF-TLD used for gamma dose measurement in mixed (n, γ) fields can be written as: %Error=R(n)/R(g)×100%. Where R(n) and R(g) are the TL responses resulted from neutron and gamma, respectively. Taking the water phantom irradiated with the BNCT facility at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) as an example, the (6)LiF concentration for TLD-700 is 0.007%, the magnitude of the neutron flux is ~1×10(9) n/cm(2)/s, the neutron energy is ~4×10(-7) MeV (cadmium cut-off energy), the gamma dose rate is ~3 Gy/h, thus the percentage error can be predicted as 38%. PMID:21489808

  16. Investigation of TLD-700 energy response to low energy x-ray encountered in diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrati, Ammar; Bourouina, Mourad; Khalal-Kouache, Karima

    2016-05-01

    The aim of thiswork is to study the energy dependence of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-700) for low energy X-ray beams encountered in conventional diagnostic radiology. In the first step, we studied some characteristics (reproducibility and linearity) of TLD-700 chips using a 137Cs source, and selected TLD chips with reproducibility better than 2.5%. Then we determined TLD-700 energy response for diagnostic radiology X-ray qualities, and investigated its influence on air kerma estimate. A maximum deviation of 60% can be obtained if TLDs are calibrated for 137Cs radiation source and used in diagnostic radiology fields. However, this deviation became less than 20% if TLDs chips are calibrated for the reference x-ray radiation quality RQR5 (recommended by the IEC 61267 standard). Consequently, we recommend calibrating this kind of TLDdetector with RQR5 diagnostic radiology X-ray quality. This method permits to obtain a good accuracy when assessing the entrance dose in diagnostic radiology procedures.

  17. A single TLD dose algorithm to satisfy federal standards and typical field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, N.; McCurdy, D.E. )

    1990-06-01

    Modern whole-body dosimeters are often required to accurately measure the absorbed dose in a wide range of radiation fields. While programs are commonly developed around the fields tested as part of the National Voluntary Accreditation Program (NVLAP), the actual fields of application may be significantly different. Dose algorithms designed to meet the NVLAP standard, which emphasizes photons and high-energy beta radiation, may not be capable of the beta-energy discrimination necessary for accurate assessment of absorbed dose in the work environment. To address this problem, some processors use one algorithm for NVLAP testing and one or more different algorithms for the work environments. After several years of experience with a multiple algorithm approach, the Dosimetry Services Group of Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) developed a one-algorithm system for use with a four-element TLD badge using Li2B4O7 and CaSO4 phosphors. The design of the dosimeter allows the measurement of the effective energies of both photon and beta components of the radiation field, resulting in excellent mixed-field capability. The algorithm was successfully tested in all of the NVLAP photon and beta fields, as well as several non-NVLAP fields representative of the work environment. The work environment fields, including low- and medium-energy beta radiation and mixed fields of low-energy photons and beta particles, are often more demanding than the NVLAP fields. This paper discusses the development of the algorithm as well as some results of the system testing including: mixed-field irradiations, angular response, and a unique test to demonstrate the stability of the algorithm. An analysis of the uncertainty of the reported doses under various irradiation conditions is also presented.

  18. Paediatric personnel extremity dose study.

    PubMed

    Gallet, J M C; Reed, M H

    2002-03-01

    Concern has been expressed in paediatric radiology regarding the magnitude of the extremity dose received by attending personnel during routine fluoroscopic procedures and CT. Common procedures that may be of short duration in adults can be quite the opposite in paediatric patients. The extremities of attending personnel are more likely to be exposed to the primary beam and for a longer period of time owing to a variety of reasons such as assisting in the procedure or physically restraining the patient during the examination. During the period mid 1998 to mid 2000, two paediatric radiologists, four senior radiographers and two paediatric nurses were monitored using ring thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Each participant wore the ring TLD on either the left or right ring finger, depending on which hand the individual favoured. Left/right asymmetrical studies were not conducted, nor were records kept of whether an examination used a grid or gridless technique. Initial apprehension about higher paediatric fluoroscopic and CT extremity doses was dispelled as a result of this quantitative dosimetric study. PMID:11932219

  19. Estimation of fatigue and extreme load distributions from limited data with application to wind energy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzwater, LeRoy M.

    2004-01-01

    An estimate of the distribution of fatigue ranges or extreme loads for wind turbines may be obtained by separating the problem into two uncoupled parts, (1) a turbine specific portion, independent of the site and (2) a site-specific description of environmental variables. We consider contextually appropriate probability models to describe the turbine specific response for extreme loads or fatigue. The site-specific portion is described by a joint probability distribution of a vector of environmental variables, which characterize the wind process at the hub-height of the wind turbine. Several approaches are considered for combining the two portions to obtain an estimate of the extreme load, e.g., 50-year loads or fatigue damage. We assess the efficacy of these models to obtain accurate estimates, including various levels of epistemic uncertainty, of the turbine response.

  20. Dose and scatter characteristics of a novel cone beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Muhit, A.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-03-01

    A novel cone-beam CT (CBCT) system has been developed with promising capabilities for musculoskeletal imaging (e.g., weight-bearing extremities and combined radiographic / volumetric imaging). The prototype system demonstrates diagnostic-quality imaging performance, while the compact geometry and short scan orbit raise new considerations for scatter management and dose characterization that challenge conventional methods. The compact geometry leads to elevated, heterogeneous x-ray scatter distributions - even for small anatomical sites (e.g., knee or wrist), and the short scan orbit results in a non-uniform dose distribution. These complex dose and scatter distributions were investigated via experimental measurements and GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The combination provided a powerful basis for characterizing dose distributions in patient-specific anatomy, investigating the benefits of an antiscatter grid, and examining distinct contributions of coherent and incoherent scatter in artifact correction. Measurements with a 16 cm CTDI phantom show that the dose from the short-scan orbit (0.09 mGy/mAs at isocenter) varies from 0.16 to 0.05 mGy/mAs at various locations on the periphery (all obtained at 80 kVp). MC estimation agreed with dose measurements within 10-15%. Dose distribution in patient-specific anatomy was computed with MC, confirming such heterogeneity and highlighting the elevated energy deposition in bone (factor of ~5-10) compared to soft-tissue. Scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) up to ~1.5-2 was evident in some regions of the knee. A 10:1 antiscatter grid was found earlier to result in significant improvement in soft-tissue imaging performance without increase in dose. The results of MC simulations elucidated the mechanism behind scatter reduction in the presence of a grid. A ~3-fold reduction in average SPR was found in the MC simulations; however, a linear grid was found to impart additional heterogeneity in the scatter distribution

  1. Quantitative recurrence statistics and convergence to an extreme value distribution for non-uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M. P.; Rabassa, P.; Sterk, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    For non-uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems we consider the time series of maxima along typical orbits. Using ideas based upon quantitative recurrence time statistics we prove convergence of the maxima (under suitable normalization) to an extreme value distribution, and obtain estimates on the rate of convergence. We show that our results are applicable to a range of examples, and include new results for Lorenz maps, certain partially hyperbolic systems, and non-uniformly expanding systems with sub-exponential decay of correlations. For applications where analytic results are not readily available we show how to estimate the rate of convergence to an extreme value distribution based upon numerical information of the quantitative recurrence statistics. We envisage that such information will lead to more efficient statistical parameter estimation schemes based upon the block-maxima method.

  2. Extreme Environments of Next-Generation Energy Systems and Materials: Can They Peacefully Co-Exist? (452nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, Nikolaos

    2009-06-17

    "What happens to conventional metals near the ocean?" you might ask the workers who are repairing the water tower at Jones Beach. They will tell you that both the tower's steel framework and copper roof show extensive corrosion from the salty air. To power future generations of cars, homes, utility plants, and even particle accelerators, unprecedented levels of efficiency will be needed. Such efficiency will require new unconventional alloys and composite materials that can also withstand high temperatures, intense radiation fluxes, high stresses, and other extreme conditions in highly corrosive environments that accelerate the aging and weakening of materials, as salty air weakens steel and copper. During the lecture, Simos will discuss the demands of next-generation energy systems and focus on the extreme conditions that materials used in these systems will perform under. He will also explain Brookhaven Lab's role in past, ongoing, and future experiments aimed to analyze and address materials' abilities to endure these conditions.

  3. Development of a collective Thomson scattering system for laser-produced tin plasmas for extreme-ultraviolet light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Kentaro; Sato, Yuta; Nishikawa, Kazutaka; Uchino, Kiichiro; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Tomuro, Hiroaki; Wada, Yasunori; Kunishima, Masahito; Kodama, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    Spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te) of laser-produced Sn plasmas for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) light sources have been obtained using a new collective Thomson scattering system, which has been optimized for the measurement of the ion feature spectrum. The system has an 18 pm spectral resolution, a 5 ns temporal resolution, a 50 µm spatial resolution, and sufficient stray-light rejection near the probing laser wavelength. With this system, measurements of the laser-produced Sn plasmas in the parameter ranges of 3 × 1023 < ne < 1025 m-3 and 10 < Te < 20 eV have been performed.

  4. Extreme Nonlinear Optics: Effect of Carrier Envelope Offset Phase on the Dynamics of Two Level Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parvendra; Sarma, Amarendra K.

    2011-10-01

    We study the effect of carrier envelope offset (CEO) phase of a few cycle pulse on the dynamics of two-level systems in the domain of extreme nonlinear optics. Strong dependence of polarization on the CEO phase is observed. Intensity of different high harmonics and their interference is clearly seen to be dependent on the CEO phase of the optical pulses. Our results show that the final state of the atomic system, just after the few cycle optical pulse has passed through the system, depends very strongly on the CEO phase of the pulse.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Extremely strong damped Lyman-α systems (Noterdaeme+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Paris, I.; Cai, Z.; Finley, H.; Ge, J.; Pieri, M. M.; York, D. G.

    2014-07-01

    We present a study of ~100 high redshift (z ~2-4) extremely strong damped Lyman-α systems (ESDLA, with N(HI)>=0.5x1022cm-2) detected in quasar spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) Data Release 11. We study the neutral hydrogen, metal, and dust content of this elusive population of absorbers and confirm our previous finding that the high column density end of the N(HI) frequency distribution has a relatively shallow slope with power-law index -3.6, similar to what is seen from 21-cm maps in nearby galaxies. The stacked absorption spectrum indicates a typical metallicity ~1/20th solar, similar to the mean metallicity of the overall DLA population. The relatively small velocity extent of the low-ionisation lines suggests that ESDLAs do not arise from large-scale flows of neutral gas. The high column densities involved are in turn more similar to what is seen in DLAs associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows (GRB-DLAs), which are known to occur close to star-forming regions. This indicates that ESDLAs arise from a line of sight passing at very small impact parameters from the host galaxy, as observed in nearby galaxies. This is also supported by simple theoretical considerations and recent high-z hydrodynamical simulations. We strongly substantiate this picture by the first statistical detection of Lyα emission with =~(0.6+/-0.2)x1042erg/s in the core of ESDLAs (corresponding to about 0.1L* at z~2-3), obtained through stacking the fibre spectra (of radius 1" corresponding to ~8kpc at z~2.5). Statistical errors on the Lyα luminosity are of the order of 0.1x1042erg/s but we caution that the measured Lyα luminosity may be overestimated by ~35% due to sky light residuals and/or FUV emission from the quasar host and that we have neglected flux-calibration uncertainties. We estimate a more conservative uncertainty of 0.2x1042erg/s. The properties of the Lyα line (luminosity distribution

  6. Compilation of 1986 annual reports of the Navy ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-07-01

    The U.S. Navy is conducting a long-term program to monitor for possible effects from the operation of its Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System to resident biota and their ecological relationships. This report documents progress of the following studies: soil amoeba; soil and litter arthropoda and earthworm studies; biological studies on pollinating insects: megachilid bees; and small vertebrates: small mammals and nesting birds.

  7. System Characterization of MAHI EXO-II: A Robotic Exoskeleton for Upper Extremity Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    French, James A.; Rose, Chad G.; O'Malley, Marcia K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the performance characterization of the MAHI Exo-II, an upper extremity exoskeleton for stroke and spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation, as a means to validate its clinical implementation and to provide depth to the literature on the performance characteristics of upper extremity exoskeletons. Individuals with disabilities arising from stroke and SCI need rehabilitation of the elbow, forearm, and wrist to restore the ability to independently perform activities of daily living (ADL). Robotic rehabilitation has been proposed to address the need for high intensity, long duration therapy and has shown promising results for upper limb proximal joints. However, upper limb distal joints have historically not benefitted from the same focus. The MAHI Exo-II, designed to address this shortcoming, has undergone a static and dynamic performance characterization, which shows that it exhibits the requisite qualities for a rehabilitation robot and is comparable to other state-of-the-art designs. PMID:25984380

  8. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics System: Enabling High-Contrast Imaging on Solar-System Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, N.; Martinache, F.; Guyon, O.; Clergeon, C.; Singh, G.; Kudo, T.; Garrel, V.; Newman, K.; Doughty, D.; Lozi, J.; Males, J.; Minowa, Y.; Hayano, Y.; Takato, N.; Morino, J.; Kuhn, J.; Serabyn, E.; Norris, B.; Tuthill, P.; Schworer, G.; Stewart, P.; Close, L.; Huby, E.; Perrin, G.; Lacour, S.; Gauchet, L.; Vievard, S.; Murakami, N.; Oshiyama, F.; Baba, N.; Matsuo, T.; Nishikawa, J.; Tamura, M.; Lai, O.; Marchis, F.; Duchene, G.; Kotani, T.; Woillez, J.

    2015-09-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) instrument is a multipurpose high-contrast imaging platform designed for the discovery and detailed characterization of exoplanetary systems and serves as a testbed for high-contrast imaging technologies for ELTs. It is a multiband instrument which makes use of light from 600 to 2500 nm, allowing for coronagraphic direct exoplanet imaging of the inner 3λ/D from the stellar host. Wavefront sensing and control are key to the operation of SCExAO. A partial correction of low-order modes is provided by Subaru's facility adaptive optics system with the final correction, including high-order modes, implemented downstream by a combination of a visible pyramid wavefront sensor and a 2000-element deformable mirror. The well-corrected NIR (y-K bands) wavefronts can then be injected into any of the available coronagraphs, including but not limited to the phase-induced amplitude apodization and the vector vortex coronagraphs, both of which offer an inner working angle as low as 1λ/D. Noncommon path, low-order aberrations are sensed with a coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor in the infrared (IR). Low noise, high frame rate NIR detectors allow for active speckle nulling and coherent differential imaging, while the HAWAII 2RG detector in the HiCIAO imager and/or the CHARIS integral field spectrograph (from mid-2016) can take deeper exposures and/or perform angular, spectral, and polarimetric differential imaging. Science in the visible is provided by two interferometric modules: VAMPIRES and FIRST, which enable subdiffraction limited imaging in the visible region with polarimetric and spectroscopic capabilities respectively. We describe the instrument in detail and present preliminary results both on-sky and in the laboratory.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet marking system for anti-counterfeiting tags with adjustable security level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lazzaro, P.; Bollanti, S.; Flora, F.; Mezi, L.; Murra, D.; Torre, A.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a recently patented apparatus which consists of an extreme ultraviolet radiation source writing invisible patterns on thin tags of alkali halides. The tags patterned using this method are almost impossible to counterfeit, and offer a much better protection against fakes than available anti-counterfeiting techniques. We will discuss if this novel technology is ready for industrial production of anti-counterfeiting tags.

  10. Dominant processes of extreme rainfall-producing mesoscale convective system over southeastern Korea: 7 July 2009 case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.-H.; Lee, D.-I.; Wang, C.-C.; Han, I.-S.

    2015-10-01

    An extreme rainfall-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) associated with the Changma front in southeastern Korea was investigated using observational data. This event recorded historic rainfall and led to devastating flash floods and landslides in the Busan metropolitan area on 7 July 2009. The aim of the present study is to analyze and better understand the synoptic and mesoscale environment, and the behavior of quasi-stationary MCS causing extreme rainfall. Synoptic and mesoscale analyses indicate that the MCS and heavy rainfall occurred association with a stationary front which resembled a warm front in structure. A strong southwesterly low-level jet (LLJ) transported warm and humid air and supplied the moisture toward the front, and the air rose upwards above the frontal surface. As the moist air was conditionally unstable, repeated upstream initiation of deep convection by back-building occurred at the coastline, while old cells moved downstream parallel to the convective line with training effect. Because the motion of convective cells nearly opposed the backward propagation, the system as a whole moved slowly. The back-building behavior was linked to the convectively produced cold pool and its outflow boundary, which played an essential role in the propagation and maintenance of the rainfall system. As a result, the quasi-stationary MCS caused a prolonged duration of heavy rainfall, leading to extreme rainfall over the Busan metropolitan area.

  11. Butterflies, Black swans and Dragon kings: How to use the Dynamical Systems Theory to build a "zoology" of mid-latitude circulation atmospheric extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faranda, D.; Yiou, P.; Alvarez-Castro, M. C. M.

    2015-12-01

    A combination of dynamical systems and statistical techniques allows for a robust assessment of the dynamical properties of the mid-latitude atmospheric circulation. Extremes at different spatial and time scales are not only associated to exceptionally intense weather structures (e.g. extra-tropical cyclones) but also to rapid changes of circulation regimes (thunderstorms, supercells) or the extreme persistence of weather structure (heat waves, cold spells). We will show how the dynamical systems theory of recurrence combined to the extreme value theory can take into account the spatial and temporal dependence structure of the mid-latitude circulation structures and provide information on the statistics of extreme events.

  12. LiF TLD-100 as a Dosimeter in High Energy Proton Beam Therapy-Can It Yield Accurate Results?

    SciTech Connect

    Zullo, John R. Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael T.

    2010-04-01

    In the region of high-dose gradients at the end of the proton range, the stopping power ratio of the protons undergoes significant changes, allowing for a broad spectrum of proton energies to be deposited within a relatively small volume. Because of the potential linear energy transfer dependence of LiF TLD-100 (thermolumescent dosimeter), dose measurements made in the distal fall-off region of a proton beam may be less accurate than those made in regions of low-dose gradients. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy and precision of dose measured using TLD-100 for a pristine Bragg peak, particularly in the distal fall-off region. All measurements were made along the central axis of an unmodulated 200-MeV proton beam from a Probeat passive beam-scattering proton accelerator (Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) at varying depths along the Bragg peak. Measurements were made using TLD-100 powder flat packs, placed in a virtual water slab phantom. The measurements were repeated using a parallel plate ionization chamber. The dose measurements using TLD-100 in a proton beam were accurate to within {+-}5.0% of the expected dose, previously seen in our past photon and electron measurements. The ionization chamber and the TLD relative dose measurements agreed well with each other. Absolute dose measurements using TLD agreed with ionization chamber measurements to within {+-} 3.0 cGy, for an exposure of 100 cGy. In our study, the differences in the dose measured by the ionization chamber and those measured by TLD-100 were minimal, indicating that the accuracy and precision of measurements made in the distal fall-off region of a pristine Bragg peak is within the expected range. Thus, the rapid change in stopping power ratios at the end of the range should not affect such measurements, and TLD-100 may be used with confidence as an in vivo dosimeter for proton beam therapy.

  13. Factors affecting the gamma response of TLD-700 chips in mixed-radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E. ); Scofield, P.A. )

    1986-10-01

    To determine the causes of gamma dose equivalent overestimates observed during mixed-radiation field personnel dosimetry intercomparisons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a study was performed to evaluate the effects of phosphor neutron sensitivity, badge materials, and phantoms on the response of TLD-700 chips. The results of the study presented in this paper indicate that even if a phosphor with relatively low neutron sensitivity is used, significant gamma overestimates can occur in mixed fields due to the interaction of the phosphor and badge materials with neutrons. Low energy photons can also contribute to gamma dose equivalent overestimates due to the increased sensitivity of the TLD-700 phosphor to photons with energies below about 100 keV.

  14. TLD efficiency of 7LiF for doses deposited by high-LET particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of 7 LiF TLDs (TLD-700) in registering dose from high-LET (> or = 10 keV/micrometers) charged particles (relative to 137Cs gamma rays) has been measured for a number of accelerated heavy ions at various particle accelerator facilities. These measured efficiency values have been compared with similar results obtained from the open literature and a dose efficiency function has been fitted to the combined data set. While it was found that the dose efficiency is not only a function of LET, but also of the charge of the incident particle, the fitted function can be used to correct the undermeasured value of dose from exposures made in mixed radiation fields where LET information is available. This LET-dependent dose efficiency function is used in our laboratory in determining total absorbed dose and dose equivalent from combined TLD and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector measurements.

  15. Optimum parameters of TLD100 powder used for radiotherapy beams calibration check

    SciTech Connect

    Arib, M. . E-mail: mehenna.arib@comena-dz.org; Yaich, A.; Messadi, A.; Dari, F.

    2006-10-01

    External audit of the absorbed dose determination from radiotherapy machines is performed using Lithium fluoride (LiF) TLD-100. Optimal parameters needed to obtain highly accurate dosage from LiF powder was investigated, including the setup of the Harshaw 4000 reader. A linear correspondence between the thermoluminescent signal and the mass of the powder was observed, demonstrating that the dose can be evaluated with small samples of powder. The reproducibility of the thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) readings obtained with up to 10 samples from 1 capsule containing 160 mg of powder was around 1.5% (1 standard deviation [SD]). The time required for the manual evaluation of TLDs can be improved by 3 readings without loss of accuracy. Better reproducibility is achieved if the capsules are evaluated 7 days after irradiation using a nitrogen flow of 300 cc/min.

  16. Evaluation of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) for Intraoperative Electron Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Raffaele; Savino, Federica; D’Avino, Vittoria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Cella, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background Purpose of the present work was to investigate thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) response to intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) beams. In an IOERT treatment, a large single radiation dose is delivered with a high dose-per-pulse electron beam (2–12 cGy/pulse) during surgery. To verify and to record the delivered dose, in vivo dosimetry is a mandatory procedure for quality assurance. The TLDs feature many advantages such as a small detector size and close tissue equivalence that make them attractive for IOERT as in vivo dosimeters. Methods LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters (TLD-100) were irradiated with different IOERT electron beam energies (5, 7 and 9 MeV) and with a 6 MV conventional photon beam. For each energy, the TLDs were irradiated in the dose range of 0–10 Gy in step of 2Gy. Regression analysis was performed to establish the response variation of thermoluminescent signals with dose and energy. Results The TLD-100 dose-response curves were obtained. In the dose range of 0–10 Gy, the calibration curve was confirmed to be linear for the conventional photon beam. In the same dose region, the quadratic model performs better than the linear model when high dose-per-pulse electron beams were used (F test; p<0.05). Conclusions This study demonstrates that the TLD dose response, for doses ≤10Gy, has a parabolic behavior in high dose-per-pulse electron beams. TLD-100 can be useful detectors for IOERT patient dosimetry if a proper calibration is provided. PMID:26427065

  17. Response of TLD-albedo and nuclear track dosimeters exposed to plutonium sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Fix, J.J.

    1991-12-01

    Neutron dosimetry has been extensively studied at Hanford since the mid-1940s. At the present time, Hanford contractors use thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo dosimeters to record the neutron dose equivalent received by workers. The energy dependence of the TLD-albedo dosimeter has been recognized and documented since introduced at Hanford in 1964 and numerous studies have helped assure the accuracy of dosimeters. With the recent change in Hanford`s mission, there has been a significant decrease in the handling of plutonium tetrafluoride, and an increase in the handling of plutonium metal and plutonium oxide sources. This study was initiated to document the performance of the current Hanford TLD-albedo dosimeter under the low scatter conditions of the calibration laboratory and under the high scatter conditions in the work place under carefully controlled conditions at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The neutron fields at the PFP facility were measured using a variety of instruments, including a multisphere spectrometer, tissue equivalent proportional counters, and specially calibrated rem meters. Various algorithms were used to evaluate the TLD-albedo dosimeters, and the results are given in this report. Using current algorithms, the dose equivalents evaluated for bare sources and sources with less than 2.5 cm (1 in.) of acrylic plastic shielding in high scatter conditions typical of glove box operations are reasonably accurate. Recently developed CR-39 track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also exposed in the calibration laboratory and at the PFP. The results indicate that the TED dosimeters are quite accurate for both bare and moderated neutron sources. Until personnel dosimeter is available that incorporates a direct measure of the neutron dose to a person, technical uncertainties in the accuracy of the recorded data will continue.

  18. Response of TLD-albedo and nuclear track dosimeters exposed to plutonium sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Fix, J.J.

    1991-12-01

    Neutron dosimetry has been extensively studied at Hanford since the mid-1940s. At the present time, Hanford contractors use thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo dosimeters to record the neutron dose equivalent received by workers. The energy dependence of the TLD-albedo dosimeter has been recognized and documented since introduced at Hanford in 1964 and numerous studies have helped assure the accuracy of dosimeters. With the recent change in Hanford's mission, there has been a significant decrease in the handling of plutonium tetrafluoride, and an increase in the handling of plutonium metal and plutonium oxide sources. This study was initiated to document the performance of the current Hanford TLD-albedo dosimeter under the low scatter conditions of the calibration laboratory and under the high scatter conditions in the work place under carefully controlled conditions at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The neutron fields at the PFP facility were measured using a variety of instruments, including a multisphere spectrometer, tissue equivalent proportional counters, and specially calibrated rem meters. Various algorithms were used to evaluate the TLD-albedo dosimeters, and the results are given in this report. Using current algorithms, the dose equivalents evaluated for bare sources and sources with less than 2.5 cm (1 in.) of acrylic plastic shielding in high scatter conditions typical of glove box operations are reasonably accurate. Recently developed CR-39 track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also exposed in the calibration laboratory and at the PFP. The results indicate that the TED dosimeters are quite accurate for both bare and moderated neutron sources. Until personnel dosimeter is available that incorporates a direct measure of the neutron dose to a person, technical uncertainties in the accuracy of the recorded data will continue.

  19. Neutron photon and electron response functions of CAF{sub 2} and LIF TLD chips

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Hsu, H.H.; Casson, W.H.

    1996-06-01

    TLD material of CaF{sub 2} with various doping has been considered insensitive to neutron radiation for a long time. It is true for low energy neutrons. However neutron interaction cross section data of calcium and fluorine both show significant cross sections for (n, p), (n, {alpha}), and (n, {gamma}) reactions with neutron energy of 1 MeV and above. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to calculate CaF{sub 2} and LiF energy response functions for photons, electrons, and neutrons as incident radiations. The calculations were performed for a TLD free in the air and with a water phantom. In photon and electron cases, the energy deposition, referred to as the *F8 tally, was used. Detailed transport of both primary and secondary particles are included in the calculations. For neutrons, charged particle production and interaction with the TLD material, in form of a neutron heating tally, F6, is the main contribution of energy deposition. We also tallied the energy deposition due to capture gamma rays and secondary electrons. The results show that, for low energy neutrons, {sup 6}LiF, {sup 7}LiF, and CaF{sub 2}, responses differ in several order of magnitudes, but for neutron energy above 5 MeV, the responses are within a factor of two. CaF{sub 2} TLD chips show higher sensitivity to high energy neutrons than to high energy photons. LiF has higher sensitivity than CaF{sub 2} for electrons With energies less than 5 MeV and lower sensitivity for higher energy electrons. For photons, CaF{sub 2} has a higher sensitivity than LiF for energies above 25 keV.

  20. To what extent does variability of historical rainfall series influence extreme event statistics of sewer system surcharge and overflows?

    PubMed

    Schaarup-Jensen, K; Rasmussen, M R; Thorndahl, S

    2009-01-01

    In urban drainage modelling long-term extreme statistics has become an important basis for decision-making e.g. in connection with renovation projects. Therefore it is of great importance to minimize the uncertainties with regards to long-term prediction of maximum water levels and combined sewer overflow (CSO) in drainage systems. These uncertainties originate from large uncertainties regarding rainfall inputs, parameters, and assessment of return periods. This paper investigates how the choice of rainfall time series influences the extreme events statistics of max water levels in manholes and CSO volumes. Traditionally, long-term rainfall series, from a local rain gauge, are unavailable. In the present case study, however, long and local rain series are available. 2 rainfall gauges have recorded events for approximately 9 years at 2 locations within the catchment. Beside these 2 gauges another 7 gauges are located at a distance of max 20 kilometers from the catchment. All gauges are included in the Danish national rain gauge system which was launched in 1976. The paper describes to what extent the extreme events statistics based on these 9 series diverge from each other and how this diversity can be handled, e.g. by introducing an "averaging procedure" based on the variability within the set of statistics. All simulations are performed by means of the MOUSE LTS model. PMID:19587406

  1. Kinematic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Effect of Bracing on Patellar Position: Qualitative Assessment Using an Extremity Magnetic Resonance System

    PubMed Central

    Shellock, Frank G.; Mullin, Michael; Stone, Kevin R.; Coleman, Mark; Crues, John V.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To use an extremity magnetic resonance system to perform kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patellofemoral joint to qualitatively assess the effect of bracing on patellar position. Design and Setting: Subjects underwent kinematic MRI of the symptomatic extremity with a 0.2-Tesla extremity magnetic resonance system. Images were obtained using a knee coil and a T1-weighted, spin echo pulse sequence. Subjects: Seven female patients with patellofemoral joint symptoms. Measurements: Four different axial sections were obtained for each position: extension and 3 positions of flexion up to 36°. An appropriate-sized patellofemoral brace was applied, and the kinematic MRI procedure was repeated. Results: Six patients had lateral displacement of the patella, and 1 patient had medial displacement of the patella. After application of the brace, 6 patients (5 with lateral displacement and 1 with medial displacement, 86%) exhibited correction (5) or improvement (1 with lateral displacement) in the abnormal patellar positions, and 1 patient had worsening of the abnormal position of the patella. Conclusions: We used kinematic MRI to determine the presence of abnormal patellar positioning. Application of the brace counteracted the abnormal patellar positions in most of the patients studied. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3. PMID:16558607

  2. A dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging: Design, optimization, and initial performance characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This paper reports on the design and initial imaging performance of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for musculoskeletal (MSK) extremities. The system complements conventional CT and MR and offers a variety of potential clinical and logistical advantages that are likely to be of benefit to diagnosis, treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response in MSK radiology, orthopaedic surgery, and rheumatology. Methods: The scanner design incorporated a host of clinical requirements (e.g., ability to scan the weight-bearing knee in a natural stance) and was guided by theoretical and experimental analysis of image quality and dose. Such criteria identified the following basic scanner components and system configuration: a flat-panel detector (FPD, Varian 3030+, 0.194 mm pixels); and a low-power, fixed anode x-ray source with 0.5 mm focal spot (SourceRay XRS-125-7K-P, 0.875 kW) mounted on a retractable C-arm allowing for two scanning orientations with the capability for side entry, viz. a standing configuration for imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities and a sitting configuration for imaging of tensioned upper extremity and unloaded lower extremity. Theoretical modeling employed cascaded systems analysis of modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computed as a function of system geometry, kVp and filtration, dose, source power, etc. Physical experimentation utilized an imaging bench simulating the scanner geometry for verification of theoretical results and investigation of other factors, such as antiscatter grid selection and 3D image quality in phantom and cadaver, including qualitative comparison to conventional CT. Results: Theoretical modeling and benchtop experimentation confirmed the basic suitability of the FPD and x-ray source mentioned above. Clinical requirements combined with analysis of MTF and DQE yielded the following system geometry: a {approx}55 cm source-to-detector distance; 1.3 magnification; a

  3. A dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging: Design, optimization, and initial performance characterization

    PubMed Central

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on the design and initial imaging performance of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for musculoskeletal (MSK) extremities. The system complements conventional CT and MR and offers a variety of potential clinical and logistical advantages that are likely to be of benefit to diagnosis, treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response in MSK radiology, orthopaedic surgery, and rheumatology. Methods: The scanner design incorporated a host of clinical requirements (e.g., ability to scan the weight-bearing knee in a natural stance) and was guided by theoretical and experimental analysis of image quality and dose. Such criteria identified the following basic scanner components and system configuration: a flat-panel detector (FPD, Varian 3030+, 0.194 mm pixels); and a low-power, fixed anode x-ray source with 0.5 mm focal spot (SourceRay XRS-125-7K-P, 0.875 kW) mounted on a retractable C-arm allowing for two scanning orientations with the capability for side entry, viz. a standing configuration for imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities and a sitting configuration for imaging of tensioned upper extremity and unloaded lower extremity. Theoretical modeling employed cascaded systems analysis of modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computed as a function of system geometry, kVp and filtration, dose, source power, etc. Physical experimentation utilized an imaging bench simulating the scanner geometry for verification of theoretical results and investigation of other factors, such as antiscatter grid selection and 3D image quality in phantom and cadaver, including qualitative comparison to conventional CT. Results: Theoretical modeling and benchtop experimentation confirmed the basic suitability of the FPD and x-ray source mentioned above. Clinical requirements combined with analysis of MTF and DQE yielded the following system geometry: a ∼55 cm source-to-detector distance; 1.3 magnification; a 20

  4. Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10{sup 11} Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410{sup 9} Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510{sup 9} Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

  5. Dose equivalent response of a TLD badge--influence of body backscatter

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, A.S.; Gambhir, S.P.; Patel, P.H.; Bhatt, R.C.; Supe, S.J. )

    1990-09-01

    In personnel monitoring, operational quantities recommended by ICRU Publication No. 39 for photon radiation can be realized by calibrating dosimeters on a phantom and considering body backscatter photons by using established conversion factors. Personnel dosimeters used in this study are based on CaSO4:Dy Teflon thermoluminescence dosimeter discs (TLD) that have a highly photon energy-dependent response. Since body backscattered photons have lower energies than the incidence photons, methods for correcting for energy dependence of both the incident and body backscattered photons have to be developed. By using readouts of two TLD discs (one under a composite metal filter and the other without a metal filter) in an empirical relation valid at all energies, it is possible to correct for the effect of change in response from change in the photon energies. It was found that the new operational quantities recommended by ICRU could be estimated to within +/- 15% by a TLD badge design based on this method. Angular dependence limits for photons in accordance with the new international standards and a high beta dose-equivalent discrimination in the mixed fields of beta and low-energy x rays could also be achieved.

  6. Dose equivalent response of a TLD badge--influence of body backscatter.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, A S; Gambhir, S P; Patel, P H; Bhatt, R C; Supe, S J

    1990-09-01

    In personnel monitoring, operational quantities recommended by ICRU Publication No. 39 for photon radiation can be realized by calibrating dosimeters on a phantom and considering body backscatter photons by using established conversion factors. Personnel dosimeters used in this study are based on CaSO4:Dy Teflon thermoluminescence dosimeter discs (TLD) that have a highly photon energy-dependent response. Since body backscattered photons have lower energies than the incidence photons, methods for correcting for energy dependence of both the incident and body backscattered photons have to be developed. By using readouts of two TLD discs (one under a composite metal filter and the other without a metal filter) in an empirical relation valid at all energies, it is possible to correct for the effect of change in response from change in the photon energies. It was found that the new operational quantities recommended by ICRU could be estimated to within +/- 15% by a TLD badge design based on this method. Angular dependence limits for photons in accordance with the new international standards and a high beta dose-equivalent discrimination in the mixed fields of beta and low-energy x rays could also be achieved. PMID:2394587

  7. A Novel Twin-TLD Radiation Dosimeter for Astronauts during LEO Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Lambert, Jamil; Fuentes, Carolina; Sunil, C.; Tripathy, Sam; Sarkar, Pradip Kumar

    2012-07-01

    During low earth orbiting (LEO) missions space vehicles are continuously bombarded with energetic protons from the sun and in the events of solar flare (SFE), the proton flux sporadically increases by many orders of magnitudes. The solar protons interact with the containment wall of the vehicle producing high-energy neutrons with a broad energy distribution as well as gamma rays, which result in a high radiation exposure to astronauts. By implementing pairs of TLD-700 (7LiF:Ti, Mg) and TLD-500 (alpha: Al2O3-C) chips we have developed a personal dosimeter for an accurate assessment of biological dose of high-energy mixed radiation field. Dosimeters were irradiated with high-energy neutrons produced by bombarding a 25*25*35 cm3 polystyrene plate phantom with high-energy therapeutic protons at Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen (WPE). The radiation field was simulated using the FLUKA code and the dosimeters were calibrated in-situ with a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). The operation principle of the novel twin-TLD personal dosimeter for astronauts will be highlighted in our presentation.

  8. Extreme Planet-Like Systems: Brown Dwarfs at the Exoplanet Mass Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline Kelly

    2015-12-01

    Brown dwarfs have long been the observational anchors for our theoretical understanding of giant gas planets. Recent studies have uncovered a population of nearby young sources that rival the age and mass of many planetary mass companions. From detailed observations, we postulate that objects in this young population have dynamic atmospheres ripe with exotic, thick condensate cloud species that drive extreme photometric and spectroscopic characteristics. In this talk I will review how we are using these so-called exoplanet analogs to establish luminosity, temperature, age, and mass relations for brown dwarf into planetary mass objects.

  9. Interaction of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields with living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1991-11-01

    The sources and physical properties of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are described in this paper. Biological effects and mechanisms through which ELF fields interact with humans and other organisms are discussed, including several aspects of this subject that are presently under active laboratory investigation. Studies on the potential health effects of ELF fields present in the home and workplace are also summarized, including a critical evaluation of evidence for a possible linkage between exposure to ELF fields and cancer risk. 53 refs.

  10. Development of an early warning system for extreme rainfall, surface inundation, and malaria in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, C.; Jensen, K.; McDonald, K. C.; Ceccato, P.

    2013-12-01

    Malaria is a major health issue in Eastern Africa. In this study, we focus on rainfall and surface inundation, which are both major environmental factors in the transmission and contraction of the disease. We use the two alternative forced choice (2AFC) score and other comparative methods to analyze the efficacy of using a six-day lead precipitation forecast to predict extreme precipitation and inundation events by comparing these forecasts to historical, satellite-based precipitation and inundation observations. We also investigate the dynamics between observed surface inundation, rainfall, and malaria incidence rates in four districts of Eritrea.

  11. Extreme inputs/outputs for multiple input multiple output linear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, David Ora

    2005-09-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the auto spectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the auto spectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input auto spectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one will result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.

  12. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  13. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer attitude determination support with a multimission three-axis stabilized spacecraft flight dynamics support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Richard; Lee, Michael

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) was launched June 7, 1992 by an expendable Delta 2 launch vehicle. The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center used a multimission three-axis stabilized spacecraft (MTASS) Flight Dynamics Support System (FDSS) to support the EUVE launch and mission operations. For EUVE, MTASS has been used to monitor attitude sensor performance, study OBC attitude determination performance, and study attitude perturbations. The current status of these efforts are summarized. After its successful implementation for EUVE, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), and the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), MTASS has demonstrated multimission flight dynamics support systems can effectively bridge the gap between single-mission support systems of the past and future generic systems.

  14. Spatiotemporal variability of rainfall extremes in monsoonal climates - examples from the South American Monsoon and the Indian Monsoon Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, B.; Boers, N.; Marwan, N.; Malik, N.; Kurths, J.

    2013-12-01

    Monsoonal rainfall is the crucial component for more than half of the world's population. Runoff associated with monsoon systems provide water resources for agriculture, hydropower, drinking-water generation, recreation, and social well-being and are thus a fundamental part of human society. However, monsoon systems are highly stochastic and show large variability on various timescales. Here, we use various rainfall datasets to characterize spatiotemporal rainfall patterns using traditional as well as new approaches emphasizing nonlinear spatial correlations from a complex networks perspective. Our analyses focus on the South American (SAMS) and Indian (ISM) Monsoon Systems on the basis of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) using precipitation radar and passive-microwave products with horizontal spatial resolutions of ~5x5 km^2 (products 2A25, 2B31) and 25x25 km^2 (3B42) and interpolated rainfall-gauge data for the ISM (APHRODITE, 25x25 km^2). The eastern slopes of the Andes of South America and the southern front of the Himalaya are characterized by significant orographic barriers that intersect with the moisture-bearing, monsoonal wind systems. We demonstrate that topography exerts a first-order control on peak rainfall amounts on annual timescales in both mountain belts. Flooding in the downstream regions is dominantly caused by heavy rainfall storms that propagate deep into the mountain range and reach regions that are arid and without vegetation cover promoting rapid runoff. These storms exert a significantly different spatial distribution than average-rainfall conditions and assessing their recurrence intervals and prediction is key in understanding flooding for these regions. An analysis of extreme-value distributions of our high-spatial resolution data reveal that semi-arid areas are characterized by low-frequency/high-magnitude events (i.e., are characterized by a ';heavy tail' distribution), whereas regions with high mean annual rainfall have a

  15. The ClimaGrowing Footprint of Climate Change: Can Systems Built Today Cope with Tomorrow's Weather Extremes?

    SciTech Connect

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Kraucunas, Ian P.

    2013-07-11

    This article describes how current climate conditions--with increasingly extreme storms, droughts, and heat waves and their ensuing effects on water quality and levels--are adding stress to an already aging power grid. Moreover, it explains how evaluations of said grid, built upon past weather patterns, are inaqeduate for measuring if the nation's energy systems can cope with future climate changes. The authors make the case for investing in the development of robust, integrated electricity planning tools that account for these climate change factors as a means for enhancing electricity infrastructure resilience.

  16. Enhanced defect detection capability using learning system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask inspection tool with projection electron microscope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask defect detection is a major issue that must be addressed to realize EUVL-based device fabrication. We have designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics for integration into a mask inspection system, and the resulting PEM system performs well in half-pitch (hp) 16-nm-node EUVL patterned mask inspection applications. A learning system has been used in this PEM patterned mask inspection tool. The PEM identifies defects using the "defectivity" parameter that is derived from the acquired image characteristics. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and the costs associated with adjustment of the PEM's detection capabilities to cope with newly defined mask defects. The concepts behind this learning system and the parameter optimization flow are presented here. The learning system for the PEM is based on a library of registered defects. The learning system then optimizes the detection capability by reconciling previously registered defects with newly registered defects. Functional verification of the learning system is also described, and the system's detection capability is demonstrated by applying it to the inspection of hp 11-nm EUV masks. We can thus provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with reduced cost of ownership.

  17. Monte Carlo-derived TLD cross-calibration factors for treatment verification and measurement of skin dose in accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2009-03-21

    Monte Carlo simulation was employed to calculate the response of TLD-100 chips under irradiation conditions such as those found during accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system. The absorbed dose versus radius in the last 0.5 cm of the treated volume was also calculated, employing a resolution of 20 microm, and a function that fits the observed data was determined. Several clinically relevant irradiation conditions were simulated for different combinations of balloon size, balloon-to-surface distance and contents of the contrast solution used to fill the balloon. The thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) cross-calibration factors were derived assuming that the calibration of the dosemeters was carried out using a Cobalt 60 beam, and in such a way that they provide a set of parameters that reproduce the function that describes the behavior of the absorbed dose versus radius curve. Such factors may also prove to be useful for those standardized laboratories that provide postal dosimetry services. PMID:19229101

  18. A new absolute extreme ultraviolet image system designed for studying the radiated power of the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak discharges.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhuang, G; Wang, Z J; Ding, Y H; Zhang, X Q; Tang, Y J

    2010-07-01

    A bolometer imaging system mounted on different toroidal and poloidal locations used for radiation observation has been developed in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT tokamak). Three miniature pinhole AXUV16ELG (16 elements absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiodes) array cameras, which are settled down in the same toroidal position but in three different poloidal places, can provide a broad viewing angle that covers the whole plasma cross-section, and hence can measure the total radiated power and provide the radiated emissive profile, while nine AXUV10EL (10 elements absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiodes) array cameras are divided into three groups and will be mounted on different toroidal locations to observe the toroidal radiated power distribution. Among these detectors, one element of the AXUV16ELG array is absolutely calibrated by the synchrotron radiation source to verify the system reliability. Although there are some discrepancies between the typical responsivity given by IRD Co. and the calibrated results, it is confirmed that the discrepancies have no major effect on the final result after the simulation. The details of the system as well as observations are presented in the paper. PMID:20687724

  19. Recent Advances in Regional Climate System Modeling and ClimateChange Analyses of Extreme Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Norman L.

    2004-09-24

    During the period May 2003 to May 2004, there were two CEC/PIER funded primary research activities by the Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences Group/Earth Science Division at LBNL. These activities are the implementation and testing of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model (CLM) into MM5, and the analysis of extreme heat days under a new set of climate simulations. The new version of MM5,MM5-CLM, has been tested for a 90 day snowmelt period in the northwestern U.S. Results show that this new code upgrade, as compared to the MM5-NOAH, has improved snowmelt, temperature, and precipitation when compared to observations. These are due in part to a subgrid scheme,advanced snow processes, and advanced vegetation. The climate change analysis is the upper and lower IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios, representing fossil fuel intensive and energy conserving future emission scenarios, and medium and low sensitivity Global Climate Models. Results indicate that California cities will see increases in the number of heat wave and temperature threshold days from two to six times.These results may be viewed as potential outcomes based on today's decisions on emissions.

  20. Developing a concept of social-ecological-technological systems to characterize resilience of urban areas and infrastructure to extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, M.; Grimm, N. B.; Redman, C.; Miller, T.; McPherson, T.; Munoz-Erickson, T.; Chandler, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is widely considered one of the greatest challenges to global sustainability, with extreme events being the most immediate way that people experience this phenomenon. Urban areas are particularly vulnerable to these events given their location, concentration of people, and increasingly complex and interdependent infrastructure. We are developing a conceptual framework for urban social-ecological-technological systems (SETS) that will allow researchers and practitioners to assess how infrastructure can be resilient, provide ecosystem services, improve social well being, and exploit new technologies in ways that benefit urban populations. The framework integrates the three domains of social and equity issues, environmental quality and protection, and technical/engineering aspects, to form a concept of infrastructure that occurs at the intersection of the domains. Examples show how the more common socioecological systems and socially sensitive engineering approaches that fail to incorporate the third dimension may elevate vulnerability to climate-related disaster. The SETS conceptual framework bridges currently siloed social science, environmental science, and engineering approaches to significantly advance research into the structure, function, and emergent properties of SETS. Extreme events like heat waves in Phoenix; coastal and urban flooding in the wake of superstorm Sandy and following hurricanes in Miami, FL; drought in Mexico; and urban flooding in Baltimore, Portland, San Juan PR, Syracuse, and Valdivia, Chile provide examples of the impacts of and vulnerability to extreme events that demand a new approach. The infrastructure of the future must be resilient, leverage ecosystem services, improve social well being, and exploit new technologies in ways that benefit all segments of urban populations and are appropriate to the particular urban contexts. These contexts are defined not only by the biophysical environment but also by culture and

  1. Study on extremizing adaptive systems and applications to synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politis, D. T.

    1983-05-01

    Klopf's work on the functioning of the neuron was studied and critically examined for engineering application possibilities. Similarly, Barto's work on the implementation of Klopf's ideas in computer simulated nets/systems was studied to determine if it could provide suitable models for physical systems. The latest learning system investigated by Barto, described as "Learning with an Adaptive Critic' was considered as the most promising for engineering applications. A functional engineering model of that system has been developed and its dynamic behavior of this system is currently being investigated in order to improve our understanding of the system operation and potential applications. In parallel with this study we are looking for possible application of such learning systems in synthetic aperture radars and data exploitation. Several potential applications have already been suggested. These suggestions will be further explored and the most promising will be proposed for full investigation and possible implementation.

  2. Extreme Precipitation and Emergency Room Visits for Gastrointestinal Illness in Areas With and Without Combined Sewer Systems: An Analysis of Massachusetts Data, 2003-2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) occur in combined sewer systems when sewage and stormwater runoff discharge into waterbodies potentially contaminating water sources. CSOs are often caused by heavy precipitation and are expected to increase with increasing extreme pre...

  3. Rolex: Resilience-oriented language extensions for extreme-scale systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lucas, Robert F.; Hukerikar, Saurabh

    2016-05-26

    Future exascale high-performance computing (HPC) systems will be constructed from VLSI devices that will be less reliable than those used today, and faults will become the norm, not the exception. This will pose significant problems for system designers and programmers, who for half-a-century have enjoyed an execution model that assumed correct behavior by the underlying computing system. The mean time to failure (MTTF) of the system scales inversely to the number of components in the system and therefore faults and resultant system level failures will increase, as systems scale in terms of the number of processor cores and memory modulesmore » used. However every error detected need not cause catastrophic failure. Many HPC applications are inherently fault resilient. Yet it is the application programmers who have this knowledge but lack mechanisms to convey it to the system. In this paper, we present new Resilience Oriented Language Extensions (Rolex) which facilitate the incorporation of fault resilience as an intrinsic property of the application code. We describe the syntax and semantics of the language extensions as well as the implementation of the supporting compiler infrastructure and runtime system. Furthermore, our experiments show that an approach that leverages the programmer's insight to reason about the context and significance of faults to the application outcome significantly improves the probability that an application runs to a successful conclusion.« less

  4. Microorganisms in extreme environments with a view to astrobiology in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seckbach, Joseph; Chela-Flores, Julian

    2015-09-01

    We review the various manifestations of the evolution of life in extreme environments. We review those aspects of extremophiles that are most relevant for astrobiology. We are aware that geothermal energy triggering sources of heat in oceanic environments are not unique to our planet, a fact that was exposed by the Voyager mission images of volcanic activity on Io, the Jovian moon. Such activity exceeded by far what was known form terrestrial geology. The science of astrobiology has considered the possible presence of several moon oceans in the vicinity of both giant gas and icy planets. These watery environments include, not only Europa (strongly suggested by data from the Galileo mission), but the Voyager flybys exposed, not only the unusual geothermal activity on Io, but also the possible presence of subsurface oceans and some geothermal activity on the Neptune's moon Triton. More recently, calculations of Hussmann and coworkers with available data do not exclude that even Uranus moons may be candidates for bearing subsurface oceans. These possibilities invite a challenge that we gladly welcome, of preliminary discussions of habitability of extremophiles in so far novel environments for the science of astrobiology. Nevertheless, such exploration is currently believed to be feasible with the new generations of missions suggested for the time window of 2030 - 2040, or even earlier. We are envisaging, not only the current exploration of the moons of Saturn, but in the coming years we expect to go beyond to Uranus and Neptune to include dwarf planets and trans-neptunian worlds. Consequently, it is necessary to begin questioning whether the Europa-like conditions for the evolution of microorganisms are repeatable elsewhere. At present three new missions are in the process of being formulated, including the selection of payloads that will be necessary for the exploration of the various so far unexplored moons.

  5. Extremely short impulse eddy current system for titanium and inconel samples testing

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Frankowski, P.

    2011-06-23

    This paper presents a new system for eddy current testing. The system enables tests with very short current impulses. Therefore, the frequency spectrum of the excitation signal is very wide. In this paper, a study of eddy current differential transducer for testing titanium element is also presented.

  6. Experimental comparison of the responses of CAF{sub 2} and LIF TLD chips

    SciTech Connect

    Mckeever, R.; Hsu, H.H.; Casson, W.H.; Hoffman, J.M.; Vasilik, D.G.

    1996-06-01

    The responses of LiF and CaF{sub 2} TLD chips, calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNP, show the following ratios: (1) for TLD chips free in the air exposed to a bare {sup 252}Cf neutron source; {sup 6}LiF / {sup 7}LiF / CaF{sub 2} = 1.0 / 0.43 / 0.21. (2) to a D{sub 2}O moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron source; {sup 6}LiF / {sup 7}LiF / CaF{sub 2} = 1.00 / 0.022 / 0.010. (3) for TLD chips placed inside a plastic holder and with a water phantom, exposed to a bare {sup 252}Cf source; {sup 6}LiF / {sup 7}LiF / CaF{sub 2} = 1.00 / 0.27 / 0.13 (4) to a D{sub 2}O moderated neutron source; {sup 6}LiF / {sup 7}LiF / CaF{sub 2} = 1.00 / 0.020 / 0.0070. (5) chips free in the air and to a {sup 137}CS photon source at energy of 661 keV, LiF / CaF{sub 2} = 1.00 / 1.05. (6) chips inside a plastic holder and with a water phantom, LiF / CaF{sub 2} = 1.00 / 1.10. Monte Carlo calculations for the responses tallied by energy deposition per unit mass (i.e., absorbed dose) did not include the difference in fluorescence mechanism between two kinds of chips and the optical attenuations of the chip. The measured responses in terms of the photo-mulitiplier tube current may yield different ratios. We performed experimental measurements under the same given conditions used in the calculations. The results show reasonable agreements between calculations and measurements.

  7. Validation of the Microsoft Kinect® camera system for measurement of lower extremity jump landing and squatting kinematics.

    PubMed

    Eltoukhy, Moataz; Kelly, Adam; Kim, Chang-Young; Jun, Hyung-Pil; Campbell, Richard; Kuenze, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cost effective, quantifiable assessment of lower extremity movement represents potential improvement over standard tools for evaluation of injury risk. Ten healthy participants completed three trials of a drop jump, overhead squat, and single leg squat task. Peak hip and knee kinematics were assessed using an 8 camera BTS Smart 7000DX motion analysis system and the Microsoft Kinect® camera system. The agreement and consistency between both uncorrected and correct Kinect kinematic variables and the BTS camera system were assessed using interclass correlations coefficients. Peak sagittal plane kinematics measured using the Microsoft Kinect® camera system explained a significant amount of variance [Range(hip) = 43.5-62.8%; Range(knee) = 67.5-89.6%] in peak kinematics measured using the BTS camera system. Across tasks, peak knee flexion angle and peak hip flexion were found to be consistent and in agreement when the Microsoft Kinect® camera system was directly compared to the BTS camera system but these values were improved following application of a corrective factor. The Microsoft Kinect® may not be an appropriate surrogate for traditional motion analysis technology, but it may have potential applications as a real-time feedback tool in pathological or high injury risk populations. PMID:26835547

  8. Extreme ultraviolet patterned mask inspection performance of advanced projection electron microscope system for 11nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Novel projection electron microscope optics have been developed and integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) , and the resulting system shows promise for application to half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask inspection. To improve the system's inspection throughput for 11-nm hp generation defect detection, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and an image capture area deflector that operates simultaneously with the mask scanning motion have been developed. A learning system has been used for the mask inspection tool to meet the requirements of hp 11-nm node EUV patterned mask inspection. Defects are identified by the projection electron microscope system using the "defectivity" from the characteristics of the acquired image. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and costs associated with adjustment of the detection capability to cope with newly-defined mask defects. We describe the integration of the developed elements into the inspection tool and the verification of the designed specification. We have also verified the effectiveness of the learning system, which shows enhanced detection capability for the hp 11-nm node.

  9. Evaluation and training of upper extremity control from a systems perspective in the patient with neurological dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Charness, A L

    1995-01-01

    Three phases exist for using the arm in a functional activity, namely, localization of the target in the environment, transportation of the arm to the target, and grasp release or in-hand manipulation of the object. According to the systems model of motor control, functional use of the arm requires the integrated activity of the musculoskeletal, sensorimotor integration, commanding, comparing, regulating, and environmental systems. Comprehensive retraining of upper extremity control in the client with neurological dysfunction should include restoration of postural alignment range of motion and strength, elimination of pain, reduction of shoulder subluxation, training postural control and orientation, optimizing sensory processing and organization, training the shoulder elbow coupling needed to transport the arm to the target, reeducating grasp release and manipulation of objects, developing the predictive central set needed for environmental adaptation, developing the patient's intrinsic error detection skills, and maximizing the ability to use knowledge of results and performance for generalization of learning. PMID:27619901

  10. Hindrance of heavy-ion fusion at extreme sub-barrier energies in open-shell colliding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Esbensen, H.; Janssens, R. V.; Back, B. B.; Davids, C. N.; Greene, J. P.; Henderson, D. J.; Lister, C. J.; Pardo, R. C.; Pennington, T.; Peterson, D.; Seweryniak, D.; Shumard, B.; Sinha, S.; Tang, X. D.; Tanihata, I.; Zhu, S.; Collon, P.; Kurtz, S.; Paul, M.

    2005-04-01

    The excitation function for the fusion-evaporation reaction 64Ni+100Mo has been measured down to a cross section of ˜5 nb. Extensive coupled-channels calculations have been performed, which cannot reproduce the steep falloff of the excitation function at extreme sub-barrier energies. Thus, this system exhibits a hindrance for fusion, a phenomenon that has been discovered only recently. In the S-factor representation introduced to quantify the hindrance, a maximum is observed at Es=120.6MeV, which corresponds to 90% of the reference energy Erefs, a value expected from systematics of closed-shell systems. A systematic analysis of Ni-induced fusion reactions leading to compound nuclei with mass A=100-200 is presented in order to explore a possible dependence of fusion hindrance on nuclear structure.

  11. Progress towards extreme attitude testing with Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.; Parker, David H.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is reported in a research effort aimed towards demonstration of the feasibility of suspension and aerodynamic testing of models at high angles of attack in wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems. Extensive modifications, described in this paper, have been made to the Southampton University suspension system in order to facilitate this work. They include revision of electromagnet configuration, installation of all-new position sensors and expansion of control system programs. An angle of attack range of 0 to 90 deg is expected for axisymmetric models. To date, suspension up to 80 deg angle of attack has been achieved.

  12. Dosimetry of fast neutron beams using CaSO 4:Dy (TLD-900) pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, A. S.; Rassow, J.; Meissner, P.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes the use of commercially avialable CaSO 4:Dy (TLD-900) pellets for the measurement of absorbed doses of fast neutrons and gamma rays in mixed fields with one single detector. The gamma ray absorbed doses could be estimated by recording the thermoluminiscence (TL) induced during the neutron beam irradiations, whereas the fast neutron absorbed doses were measured by employing a post-irradiation TL accumulation due to activation of sulphur by the threshold nuclear reaction 32S(n, p) 32P in CaSO 4:Dy.

  13. Comparison of RPL GD-301 and TLD-100 detectors responses by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benali, A.-H.; Medkour Ishak-Boushaki, G.; Nourreddine, A.; Allab, M.

    2015-07-01

    (LiF:Mg,Ti) Thermo Luminescent Detectors are widely used for monitoring patient dose in radiotherapy treatments whereas Radio-Photoluminescent Dosimeters (RPL) are increasingly devoted to radiological protection purposes. A study, aiming at extending the use of RPL glasses to clinical applications, is conducted by comparing the dosimetric characteristics of a RPL glass dosimeter, commercially known as GD-301 to those of a TLD -100 detector. In this paper, preliminary Monte Carlo simulation results describing these dosimeters responses in terms of absorbed dose, source-detector distance and characteristics of the incident gamma field are presented.

  14. Monitoring of Occupational Exposures in Albania Using TLD-100 cards (2003-2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Qafmolla, Luan; Hoxhaj, Enver

    2010-01-21

    In our paper is described the monitoring of occupational staff that works in ionising radiation field of the diagnostic centres in Albania for 2003-2007, and is analysed and discussed the mean annual dose rate recorded for above-mentioned period. The monitoring was based in TLD-100 dosimetric cards and the control was performed all over the country on bimonthly basis covering main and important cities like: Tirana, Durresi, Shkodra, Fieri, Vlora, Korca etj. The Department of Human and Environment Protection, at the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, through the dosimetric service carried out the monitoring for around 350 radiation workers.

  15. Monitoring of Occupational Exposures in Albania Using TLD-100 cards (2003-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qafmolla, Luan; Hoxhaj, Enver

    2010-01-01

    In our paper is described the monitoring of occupational staff that works in ionising radiation field of the diagnostic centres in Albania for 2003-2007, and is analysed and discussed the mean annual dose rate recorded for above-mentioned period. The monitoring was based in TLD-100 dosimetric cards and the control was performed all over the country on bimonthly basis covering main and important cities like: Tirana, Durresi, Shkodra, Fieri, Vlora, Korça etj. The Department of Human & Environment Protection, at the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, through the dosimetric service carried out the monitoring for around 350 radiation workers.

  16. A Photo-Realistic 3-D Mapping System for Extreme Nuclear Environments: Chornobyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimone, M.; Matthies, L.; Osborn, J.; Teza, J.; Thayer, S.

    1998-01-01

    We present a novel stereoscopic mapping system for use in nuclear accident settings. First we discuss a radiation shielded sensor array desigtned to tolerate 10(sup 6)R of cumulative dose. Next we give procedures to ensure timely, accurate range estimation using trinocular stereo. Finally, we review the implementation of a system for the integration of range information into a 3-D, textured, metrically accurate surface mesh.

  17. Bivariate extreme value distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elshamy, M.

    1992-01-01

    In certain engineering applications, such as those occurring in the analyses of ascent structural loads for the Space Transportation System (STS), some of the load variables have a lower bound of zero. Thus, the need for practical models of bivariate extreme value probability distribution functions with lower limits was identified. We discuss the Gumbel models and present practical forms of bivariate extreme probability distributions of Weibull and Frechet types with two parameters. Bivariate extreme value probability distribution functions can be expressed in terms of the marginal extremel distributions and a 'dependence' function subject to certain analytical conditions. Properties of such bivariate extreme distributions, sums and differences of paired extremals, as well as the corresponding forms of conditional distributions, are discussed. Practical estimation techniques are also given.

  18. A radar-based regional extreme rainfall analysis to derive the thresholds for a novel automatic alert system in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panziera, Luca; Gabella, Marco; Zanini, Stefano; Hering, Alessandro; Germann, Urs; Berne, Alexis

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a regional extreme rainfall analysis based on 10 years of radar data for the 159 regions adopted for official natural hazard warnings in Switzerland. Moreover, a nowcasting tool aimed at issuing heavy precipitation regional alerts is introduced. The two topics are closely related, since the extreme rainfall analysis provides the thresholds used by the nowcasting system for the alerts. Warm and cold seasons' monthly maxima of several statistical quantities describing regional rainfall are fitted to a generalized extreme value distribution in order to derive the precipitation amounts corresponding to sub-annual return periods for durations of 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. It is shown that regional return levels exhibit a large spatial variability in Switzerland, and that their spatial distribution strongly depends on the duration of the aggregation period: for accumulations of 3 h and shorter, the largest return levels are found over the northerly alpine slopes, whereas for longer durations the southern Alps exhibit the largest values. The inner alpine chain shows the lowest values, in agreement with previous rainfall climatologies. The nowcasting system presented here is aimed to issue heavy rainfall alerts for a large variety of end users, who are interested in different precipitation characteristics and regions, such as, for example, small urban areas, remote alpine catchments or administrative districts. The alerts are issued not only if the rainfall measured in the immediate past or forecast in the near future exceeds some predefined thresholds but also as soon as the sum of past and forecast precipitation is larger than threshold values. This precipitation total, in fact, has primary importance in applications for which antecedent rainfall is as important as predicted one, such as urban floods early warning systems. The rainfall fields, the statistical quantity representing regional rainfall and the frequency of alerts issued in case of

  19. Dose algorithm for EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter for use at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2011-05-01

    An updated algorithm for the EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter has been derived. This algorithm optimizes the binning of dosimeter element ratios and uses a quadratic function to determine the response factors for low response ratios. This results in lower systematic bias across all test categories and eliminates the need for the 'red strap' algorithm that was used for high energy beta/gamma emitting radionuclides. The Radiation Protection Dosimetry Program (RPDP) at Sandia National Laboratories uses the Thermo Fisher EXTRAD 4100S extremity dosimeter, shown in Fig 1.1 to determine shallow dose to the extremities of potentially exposed individuals. This dosimeter consists of two LiF TLD elements or 'chipstrates', one of TLD-700 ({sup 7}Li) and one of TLD-100 (natural Li) separated by a tin filter. Following readout and background subtraction, the ratio of the responses of the two elements is determined defining the penetrability of the incident radiation. While this penetrability approximates the incident energy of the radiation, X-rays and beta particles exist in energy distributions that make determination of dose conversion factors less straightforward in their determination.

  20. An Expert Diagnosis System for Parkinson Disease Based on Genetic Algorithm-Wavelet Kernel-Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Avci, Derya; Dogantekin, Akif

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a major public health problem all around the world. This paper proposes an expert disease diagnosis system for Parkinson disease based on genetic algorithm- (GA-) wavelet kernel- (WK-) Extreme Learning Machines (ELM). The classifier used in this paper is single layer neural network (SLNN) and it is trained by the ELM learning method. The Parkinson disease datasets are obtained from the UCI machine learning database. In wavelet kernel-Extreme Learning Machine (WK-ELM) structure, there are three adjustable parameters of wavelet kernel. These parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons play a major role in the performance of ELM. In this study, the optimum values of these parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons of ELM were obtained by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is evaluated using statical methods such as classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity analysis, and ROC curves. The calculated highest classification accuracy of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is found as 96.81%. PMID:27274882

  1. An Expert Diagnosis System for Parkinson Disease Based on Genetic Algorithm-Wavelet Kernel-Extreme Learning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Derya; Dogantekin, Akif

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a major public health problem all around the world. This paper proposes an expert disease diagnosis system for Parkinson disease based on genetic algorithm- (GA-) wavelet kernel- (WK-) Extreme Learning Machines (ELM). The classifier used in this paper is single layer neural network (SLNN) and it is trained by the ELM learning method. The Parkinson disease datasets are obtained from the UCI machine learning database. In wavelet kernel-Extreme Learning Machine (WK-ELM) structure, there are three adjustable parameters of wavelet kernel. These parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons play a major role in the performance of ELM. In this study, the optimum values of these parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons of ELM were obtained by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is evaluated using statical methods such as classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity analysis, and ROC curves. The calculated highest classification accuracy of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is found as 96.81%. PMID:27274882

  2. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  3. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  4. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell; Shafer, David R.

    2001-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first convex mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receive a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 9.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 14.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 12 .mu.m. Each of the six reflecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than substantially 16 .mu.m.

  5. High numerical aperture ring field projection system for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell

    2000-01-01

    An all-refelctive optical system for a projection photolithography camera has a source of EUV radiation, a wafer and a mask to be imaged on the wafer. The optical system includes a first concave mirror, a second mirror, a third convex mirror, a fourth concave mirror, a fifth convex mirror and a sixth concave mirror. The system is configured such that five of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle less than substantially 12.degree., and each of the six mirrors receives a chief ray at an incidence angle of less than substantially 15.degree.. Four of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 7 .mu.m. Five of the six reflecting surfaces have an aspheric departure of less than substantially 14 .mu.m. Each of the six refelecting surfaces has an aspheric departure of less than 16.0 .mu.m.

  6. Development of a local electromagnetic shielding for an extremity magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, Shinya; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Kose, Katsumi

    2008-11-01

    A local radio frequency (rf) shielding consisting of a Cu plate and an LC balun circuit has been developed for a compact magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.3 T permanent magnet. Performance of the local rf shielding was evaluated using an artificial external noise source irradiating a human subject whose hand was inserted into the rf coil of the MRI system. Power spectra of the rf signal detected through the rf coil demonstrated that the local rf shield achieved 30.1 dB external noise suppression. With the local rf shielding, a MRI of the subject's hand was performed using a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence. Anatomical structures of the subject's hand were clearly visualized. It was concluded that the local rf shielding could be used for the compact MRI system instead of a rf shielded room.

  7. Analysis of read-out heating rate effects on the glow peaks of TLD-100 using WinGCF software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauk, Sabar; Hussin, Siti Fatimah; Alam, Md. Shah

    2016-01-01

    This study was done to analyze the effects of the read-out heating rate on the LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) glow peaks using WinGCF computer software. The TLDs were exposed to X-ray photons with a potential difference of 72 kVp and 200 mAs in air and were read-out using a Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. The TLDs were read-out using four read-out heating rates at 10, 7, 4 and 1 °C s-1. It was observed that lowering the heating rate could separate more glow peaks. The activation energy for peak 5 was found to be lower than that for peak 4. The peak maximum temperature and the integral value of the main peak decreased as the heating rate decreases.

  8. Systemic Inflammation Associated with Severe Intestinal Injury in Extremely Low Gestational Age Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Camilia R.; Bellomy, Melissa; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Leviton, Alan

    2014-01-01

    To define the role of systemic inflammation in infants with intestinal perforation (IP) and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), we measured 25 blood protein concentrations on days 1, 7, and 14 in 939 infants born before 28 weeks’ gestation. On days 7 and 14, infants with NEC had elevated levels of CRP, serum amyloid A (SAA), IL-6, and IL-8. Infants with IP had elevated levels of CRP and insulin growth factor binding protein-1 on day 7 and elevated CRP, SAA, TNF-receptor-2, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels on day 14. A better understanding of systemic inflammation might help prevent and treat these disorders. PMID:23002960

  9. Susceptibility of South Korea to Extremes Affecting the Global Food System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, So Young; Puma, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Food security in South Korea is tightly linked to the global food system. The country's production of major grains declined from 5.8 million metric tons (mmt) in 1998 to 4.8 mmt in 2014, which caused the country's grain self suciency to decline from 31.4% to 24%. This decline is a consequence of several factors including reductions in domestic agricultural land, governmental policies supporting industry over agriculture, and a push towards trade liberalization. South Korea's self suciency is now one of the lowest among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, leaving it vulnerable to disruptions in the global food system.

  10. Freeing the foot: integrating the foot core system into rehabilitation for lower extremity injuries.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Patrick O; Fourchet, François

    2015-04-01

    The intrinsic muscles of the foot play a critical role in the regulation of absorption and propulsion during dynamic activities. Dysfunction of these may lead to an increased demand on the remaining components within the foot core system to maintain dynamic foot control, leading to a more rapid breakdown of these contributors and those proximal to the foot. Training the intrinsic foot muscles through a systematic progression of isolation via the short foot exercise offers the opportunity to reincorporate their contribution into the foot core system. This article discusses the function of the intrinsic foot muscles, their contributions to dynamic foot control, and a progressive training paradigm. PMID:25818718

  11. Extreme variability in convergence to structural balance in frustrated dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajeev; Dasgupta, Subinay; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2014-01-01

    In many complex systems, heterogeneous connections can subject constituent elements to conflicting influences, resulting in frustration. Here we show numerically that an initially frustrated system can achieve structural balance by a link adaptation process inspired by Hebb's principle, with interaction strengths evolving in accordance with the dynamical states of its components. In the presence of fluctuations the time required to converge to the balanced state exhibits large dispersion characterized by a bimodal distribution, pointing to an intriguing problem in the study of evolving energy landscapes.

  12. Adaptation of the vascular system to extremal factors. [acceleration stress and tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prives, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    Exposure to g-forces causes changes in the vascular systems of animals. The vessels are distorted and their contents may escape. Various parts of a given organ may react differently according to their structure, and arteries will undergo changes that depend on their position relative to the direction of the g-force vector.

  13. Linkages between Families and Political Extremism: A Theory of the Authoritarian Personality and Family System Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie

    This paper seeks to integrate some ideas from family systems theory and attachment theory within a theory of public opinion and social movement. Citing the classic "The Authoritarian Personality," the paper states that the first authorities children know, their parents or other caregivers, shape children's attitudes toward all authorities. The…

  14. Award ER25844: Minimizing System Noise Effects for Extreme-Scale Scientific Simulation Through Function Delegation

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    2012-11-20

    In software running on distributed computing clusters, time spent on communication between nodes in the cluster can be a significant portion of the overall computation time; background operating system tasks and other computational noise on the nodes of the system can have a significant impact on the amount of time this communication takes, especially on large systems. The research completed in this period has improved understanding of when such noise will have a significant impact. Specifically, it was demonstrated that not just noise on the nodes, but also noise on the network between nodes can have a significant impact on computation time. It was also demonstrated that noise patterns matter more than noise intensity: very regular noise can cause less disruption than lighter (on average) but less regular noise. It was also demonstrated that the effect of noise is more prominent as the speed of the network between nodes is increased. Furthermore, a tracing tool, Netgauge, was improved via our work, and a system simulator, LogGOPSim, was developed; they can be used by application developers to improve performance of their program and by system designers to mitigate the effects of noise by adjusting the noise characteristics of the operating system. Both have been made freely available as open source programs. In the course of developing these tools, we demonstrated weaknesses in existing methodologies for modeling communication, and we introduced a more detailed model, LogGOPS, for simulating systems. Not only were the deleterious effects of noise explored but we have also offered solutions. Our studies of simulations of system noise have led to specific recommendations on tuning systems to mitigate noise. We have also improved existing approaches to mitigating noise. Non-blocking collective communication avoids the effects of noise by letting communication continue simultaneously with computation (thus being non-blocking), so that the delays in communication

  15. Extreme Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeff; Larsen, Jon

    2013-11-01

    Acknowledgements; 1. Extreme environments: what, where, how; 2. Properties of dense and classical plasmas; 3. Laser energy absorption in matter; 4. Hydrodynamic motion; 5. Shocks; 6. Equation of state; 7. Ionization; 8. Thermal energy transport; 9. Radiation energy transport; 10. Magnetohydrodynamics; 11. Considerations for constructing radiation-hydrodynamics computer codes; 12. Numerical simulations; Appendix: units and constants, glossary of symbols; References; Bibliography; Index.

  16. System-level line-edge roughness limits in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Naulleau, Patrick P; Niakoula, Dimitra; Zhang, Guojing

    2008-02-13

    As critical dimensions shrink, line edge and width roughness (LER and LWR) become of increasing concern. Traditionally LER is viewed as a resist-limited effect; however, as critical dimensions shrink and LER requirements become proportionally more stringent, system-level effects begin to play an important role. Recent advanced EUV resist testing results have demonstrated lower bounds on achievable LER at the level of approximately 2 to 3 nm. Here we use modeling to demonstrate that a significant portion of this low bound may in fact be do to system-level effects and in particular the mask. Of concern are both LER on the mask as well as roughness of the multilayer reflector. Modeling also shows roughness (flare) in the projection optics not to be of concern.

  17. Modelling the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system of the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, L.; Arcidiacono, C.; Bregoli, G.; Diolaiti, E.; Butler, R. C.; Foppiani, I.; Lombini, M.; Patti, M.; Ciliegi, P.

    MAORY is the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Module for the E-ELT. The baseline design assumes six sodium Laser Guide Stars and three Natural Guide Stars for wavefront sensing. Three deformable mirrors, including the telescope adaptive mirror M4, are optically conjugated to different altitudes in the atmosphere to achieve compensation of the atmospheric turbulence effects over an extended Field of View. In preparation for the project phase-B we are analyzing different critical aspects of such a system. We are developing a versatile and modular end-to-end simulation code that makes use of GPUs to obtain high-fidelity modelling of the system performance and, in parallel, a semplified code for the analysis of the effects induced by the temporal variation of the sodium layer where the artificial laser guide stars are generated. An overview of the work in progress will be given.

  18. Design and Implementation of Broadcast Algorithms for Extreme-Scale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shamis, Pavel; Graham, Richard L; Gorentla Venkata, Manjunath; Ladd, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    The scalability and performance of collective communication operations limit the scalability and performance of many scientific applications. This paper presents two new blocking and nonblocking Broadcast algorithms for communicators with arbitrary communication topology, and studies their performance. These algorithms benefit from increased concurrency and a reduced memory footprint, making them suitable for use on large-scale systems. Measuring small, medium, and large data Broadcasts on a Cray-XT5, using 24,576 MPI processes, the Cheetah algorithms outperform the native MPI on that system by 51%, 69%, and 9%, respectively, at the same process count. These results demonstrate an algorithmic approach to the implementation of the important class of collective communications, which is high performing, scalable, and also uses resources in a scalable manner.

  19. Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) communications system ecological monitoring program. Summary of 1984 progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapotosky, J. E.

    1985-07-01

    A long-term program is being conducted to monitor for possible effects from the operation of the U.S. Navy's ELF Communications System to resident biota and their ecological relationships. Monitoring studies were selected through a peer-reviewed, competitive bidding process in mid-1982; studies were initiated in late summer of that year. Currently, 16 general types of organisms from three major ecosystems in the ELF Communications System are being examined. During 1984, the Program continued and extended those major activities initiated in 1983, consisting of site selection, the characterization of critical study aspects, and, to a lesser degree, the validation of assumptions made in the original proposals. Progress is summarized for the 11 projects that comprise the Program as well as for the support activities of IIT Research Institute.

  20. Water-biomolecule systems under extreme conditions: from confinement to pressure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    Water is a unique liquid, many of whose properties are critical for the continued support of life. In living systems, essential water-related phenomena occur in restricted geometries in cells, and at active sites of proteins and membranes or at their surface. The effects of hydration on equilibrium protein structure and dynamics are fundamental to the relationship between structure and biological function. In particular, the configuration of water molecules near the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces is of considerable relevance. The structure and dynamics of water confined in model systems developing hydrophilic interactions are compared with that of bulk water as determined by hydrophilic interactions are compared with that of bulk water as determined by neutron scattering. It is well known that hydration, internal dynamics, and function in proteins are intimately associated. Studies of dynamics of water molecules at surface of a C-phycocyanin protein are presented.

  1. An efficient gene replacement and deletion system for an extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Tamakoshi, M; Yaoi, T; Oshima, T; Yamagishi, A

    1999-04-15

    A Thermus thermophilus host strain of which the leuB gene was totally deleted was constructed from a delta pyrE strain by a two step method. First, the leuB gene was replaced with the pyrE gene. Second, the inserted pyrE gene was deleted by using 5-fluoroorotic acid. A plasmid vector with the leuB marker was constructed and the plasmid complemented the leuB deficiency of the host. When the leuB gene from Escherichia coli and its derivative encoding a stabilized enzyme were expressed with the host-vector system, their growth temperature reflected the stability of the enzyme. These results suggest that the gene replacement deletion method using the pyrE gene is useful for the construction of a reliable plasmid vector system and it can be applied to the selection of stabilized enzymes. PMID:10227171

  2. Oort Cloud Asteroids: From one extreme of the Solar System to the other

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Andrew Brian; Jackson, Alan P.; Veras, Dimitri; Wyatt, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The record of planetary migration is written in the dynamics of the small bodies they leave in their wake. One such case is the production of the Oort cloud, where scattering by planets injected planetesimals into this long-lived population, which today retains a record of where and when the scattering occured. We use N-body simulations to show that for a static, collisionless solar system history, ~4% of the Oort cloud objects should have formed within 2.5 au of the Sun, and hence be ice-free rock-iron bodies. If we assume that these Oort cloud asteroids have the same size distribution as their cometary counterparts, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should find roughly a dozen Oort cloud asteroids during 10 years of operations. Collisional evolution can substantially change this fraction from the static case, reducing the asteroid fraction of the Oort cloud by as much as two orders of magnitude. We perform additional simulations of Solar system histories with significant planet migration, modelled on the `Nice Model' and `Grand Tack' scenarios, and find they can produce very different asteroid fractions in the Oort cloud population, thus retaining a record of the Solar system's dynamical history in the present day small body populations.

  3. A Path to Operating System and Runtime Support for Extreme Scale Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Barton P; Roth, Philip; DelSignore, John

    2012-08-14

    In this project, we cast distributed resource access as operations on files in a global name space and developed a common, scalable solution for group operations on distributed processes and files. The resulting solution enables tool and middleware developers to quickly create new scalable software or easily improve the scalability of existing software. The cornerstone of the project was the design of a new programming idiom called group file operations that eliminates iterative behavior when a single process must apply the same set of file operations to a group of related files. To demonstrate our novel and scalable ideas for group file operations and global name space composition, we developed a group file system called TBON-FS that leverages a tree-based overlay network (TBON), specifically MRNet, for logarithmic communication and distributed data aggregation. We also developed proc++, a new synthetic file system co-designed for use in scalable group file operations. Over the course of the project, we evaluated the utility and performance of group file operations, global name space composition, TBON-FS, and proc++ in three case studies. The first study focused on the ease in using group file operations and TBON-FS to quickly develop several new scalable tools for distributed system administration and monitoring. The second study evaluated the integration of group file operation and TBON-FS within the Ganglia Distributed Monitoring System to improve its scalability for clusters. The final study involved the integration of group file operations, TBON-FS, and proc++ within TotalView, the widely-used parallel debugger. For this project, the work of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) team occurred primarily in two directions: bringing the MRNet tree-based overlay network (TBON) implementation to the Cray XT platform, and investigating techniques for predicting the performance of MRNet topologies on such systems. Rogue Wave Software (RWS), formerly Total

  4. An alternative method for immediate dose estimation using CaSO4:Dy based TLD badges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Menon, S. N.; Dhabekar, Bhushan; Kadam, Sonal; Chougaonkar, M. P.; Babu, D. A. R.

    2014-11-01

    CaSO4:Dy based Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) are being used in country wide personnel monitoring program in India. The TL glow curve of CaSO4:Dy consists of a dosimetric peak at 220 °C and a low temperature peak at 120 °C which is unstable at room temperature. The TL integral counts in CaSO4:Dy reduces by 15% in seven days after irradiation due to the thermal fading of 120 °C TL peak. As the dosimetric procedure involves total integrated counts for dose conversion, the dosimeters are typically read about a week after receiving. However in the event of a suspected over exposure, where urgent processing is expected, this poses limitation. Post irradiation annealing treatment is used in such cases of immediate readout of cards. In this paper we report a new and easier to use technique based on optical bleaching for the urgent processing of TLD cards. Optical bleaching with green LED (∼555 nm photons) of 25,000 lux for one and half hour removes the low temperature TL peak without affecting the dosimetric peak. This method can be used for immediate dose estimation using CaSO4:Dy based TLD badges.

  5. GEANT4 simulation of the angular dependence of TLD-based monitor response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, C. C.; Moralles, M.; Okuno, E.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, the response of thermoluminescent (TL) monitors to X-ray beams impinging on them at different angles was investigated and compared with results of simulations performed with the GEANT4 radiation transport toolkit. Each monitor used contains four TL detectors (TLD): two CaF 2 pellets and two TLD-100 (one of each type within lead filter and the other without filter). Monitors were irradiated free-in-air with X-ray beams of the narrow and wide spectrum with effective energy of 61 and 130 keV and angles of incidence of 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60°. Curves of TL response relative to air kerma as a function of photon effective energy for each detector, with and without filter, are used to correct the energetic dependence of TL response. Such curves were also obtained from the data of radiation energy stored in the TLDs provided by the simulations. The attenuation increases with the increase of the incidence angle, since the thickness of lead filter traversed by the beam also enlarges. As the monitor calibration is usually performed with the beams impinging the monitor at 0°, changes in the attenuation become a source of error in the energy determination and consequently in the value of dose equivalent obtained with this monitor. The changes in attenuation observed in experiments were corroborated by the Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Extreme Performance Scalable Operating Systems Final Progress Report (July 1, 2008 - October 31, 2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D; Shende, Sameer

    2011-10-31

    This is the final progress report for the FastOS (Phase 2) (FastOS-2) project with Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Oregon (UO). The project started at UO on July 1, 2008 and ran until April 30, 2010, at which time a six-month no-cost extension began. The FastOS-2 work at UO delivered excellent results in all research work areas: * scalable parallel monitoring * kernel-level performance measurement * parallel I/0 system measurement * large-scale and hybrid application performance measurement * onlne scalable performance data reduction and analysis * binary instrumentation

  7. From Local to EXtreme Environments (FLEXE): Promoting Earth Systems Science Literacy Through Student Inquiry and Real Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, E. C.; Carlsen, W.; Larsen, J.; Simms, E.; Smith, M.

    2007-12-01

    From Local to EXtreme Environments (FLEXE) is an innovative new project of the GLOBE Program that involves middle and high school students in systematic, facilitated analyses and comparisons of real environmental data. Through FLEXE, students collect and analyze data from various sources, including the multi-year GLOBE database, deep-sea scientific research projects, and direct measurements of the local environment collected by students using GLOBE sampling protocols. Initial FLEXE materials and training have focused on student understanding of energy transfer through components of the Earth system, including a comparison of how local environmental conditions differ from those found at deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities. While the importance of data acquisition, accuracy and replication is emphasized, FLEXE is also uniquely structured to deepen students' understanding of multiple aspects of the process and nature of science, including written communication of results and on-line peer review. Analyses of data are facilitated through structured, web-based interactions and culminating activities with at-sea scientists through an online forum. The project benefits from the involvement of a professional evaluator, and as the model is tested and refined, it may serve as a template for the inclusion of additional "extreme" earth systems. FLEXE is a partnership of the international GLOBE web- based education program and the NSF Ridge 2000 mid-ocean ridge and hydrothermal vent research program, and includes the expertise of the Center for Science and the Schools at Penn State University. International collaborators also include the InterRidge and ChEss international research programs.

  8. High-frequency electromagnetic radiation injury to the upper extremity: local and systemic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ciano, M.; Burlin, J.R.; Pardoe, R.; Mills, R.L.; Hentz, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    Industrial use of radiofrequency and microwave energy sources (nonionizing, high-frequency electromagnetic radiation) is a growing and widespread phenomenon, with projected risks of exposure to more than 20 million workers in the United States. A description of the nature of this form of electromagnetic energy is given, with emphasis on the variability of energy absorption by humans. The current state of biological research is reviewed, and a summary of the known effects of radiofrequency and microwave radiation exposure on animals and humans provided. These known effects appear to be principally thermal, similar to conventional electrical burn injuries, but with some unique systemic expression. Derangements of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine, hematological, ophthalmological, and behavioral functions are well described in animal experimentation. Two patients are presented--one a young woman exposed to a high-density radiofrequency field in an industrial setting, leading to necrosis of the entire hand and wrist as well as to a constellation of systemic effects, and one an older woman exposed to excessive microwave radiation from a malfunctioning microwave oven, leading to chronic hand pain and paresthesias resembling median nerve entrapment at the carpus. The prevalence of potential exposure in certain industries is noted and recommendations for follow-up care of workers exposed to this form of trauma are delineated.

  9. Extreme density-driven delocalization error for a model solvated-electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Erin R. Otero-de-la-Roza, A. Dale, Stephen G.

    2013-11-14

    Delocalization (or charge-transfer) error is one of the scarce but spectacular failures of density-functional theory. It is particularly apparent in extensively delocalized molecules, and manifests in the calculation of bandgaps, reaction barriers, and dissociation limits. Even though delocalization error is always present in the self-consistent electron density, the differences from reference densities are often quite subtle and the error tends to be driven by the exchange-correlation energy expression. In this article, we propose a model system (the Kevan model) where approximate density functionals predict dramatically different charge distributions because of delocalization error. The model system consists of an electron trapped in a water hexamer and is a finite representation of an experimentally observed class of solids: electrides. The Kevan model is of fundamental interest because it allows the estimation of charge transfer error without recourse to fractional charge calculations, but our results are also relevant in the context of the modeling of confined electrons in density-functional theory.

  10. Development of the RAIDS extreme ultraviolet wedge and strip detector. [Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, D. C.; Chater, W. T.; Christensen, A. B.; Howey, C. K.; Pranke, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    In the next few years the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detector System (RAIDS) package will be flown on a Tiros spacecraft. The EUV spectrometer experiment contains a position-sensitive detector based on wedge and strip anode technology. A detector design has been implemented in brazed alumina and kovar to provide a rugged bakeable housing and anode. A stack of three 80:1 microchannel plates is operated at 3500-4100 V. to achieve a gain of about 10 to the 7th. The top MCP is to be coated with MgF for increased quantum efficiency in the range of 50-115 nm. A summary of fabrication techniques and detector performance characteristics is presented.

  11. Spectral properties of the extreme solar system objects 2012 DR30 and 2013 AZ60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, G.; Kiss, Cs.; Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Licandro, J.

    2014-04-01

    2012 DR30 and 2013 AZ60 represent two examples of TNOs with very large aphelion distances (2405 and 1951 AU, respectively), thus standing for the currently best candidates of possible scattered-in Oort-cloud objects. Though they possibly shared a similar dynamical scenario, the two bodies exhibit surprisingly diverging prediction for orbital evolution and also quite different surface properties (Kiss et al. 2013, Kiss et al. 2014). Here we compare these optical and infrared photometry and spectra of the two bodies. Both show a generaly flat spectrum, but with significantly differing slope. We find clear signs of water ice on 2013 DR30 particulary, which is an exciting diagnostic of a possible water reservoir at very large perihelion distances, and on the other hand, suggests a close link between the giant cometary nuclei of the Oort Cloud (for that Hale-Bopp is the only known example in our Solar System) and these exotic TNOs.

  12. An Extremely Fast Halo Hot Subdwarf Star in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Ziegerer, Eva; Irrgang, Andreas; Geier, Stephan; Fürst, Felix; Kupfer, Thomas; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    New spectroscopic observations of the halo hyper-velocity star candidate SDSS J121150.27+143716.2 (V = 17.92 mag) revealed a cool companion to the hot subdwarf primary. The components have a very similar radial velocity and their absolute luminosities are consistent with the same distance, confirming the physical nature of the binary, which is the first double-lined hyper-velocity candidate. Our spectral decomposition of the Keck/ESI spectrum provided an sdB+K3V pair, analogous to many long-period subdwarf binaries observed in the Galactic disk. We found the subdwarf atmospheric parameters: {T}{{eff}}=30\\600+/- 500 K, {log}g=5.57+/- 0.06 cm s-2, and He abundance {log}(n{{He}}/n{{H}})=-3.0+/- 0.2. Oxygen is the most abundant metal in the hot subdwarf atmosphere, and Mg and Na lines are the most prominent spectral features of the cool companion, consistent with a metallicity of [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]=-1.3. The non-detection of radial velocity variations suggest the orbital period to be a few hundred days, in agreement with similar binaries observed in the disk. Using the SDSS-III flux calibrated spectrum we measured the distance to the system d=5.5+/- 0.5 {{kpc}}, which is consistent with ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometric constraints derived from binary spectral energy distributions. Our kinematic study shows that the Galactic rest-frame velocity of the system is so high that an unbound orbit cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, a bound orbit requires a massive dark matter halo. We conclude that the binary either formed in the halo or was accreted from the tidal debris of a dwarf galaxy by the Milky Way.

  13. An Extremely Fast Halo Hot Subdwarf Star in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Ziegerer, Eva; Irrgang, Andreas; Geier, Stephan; Fürst, Felix; Kupfer, Thomas; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    New spectroscopic observations of the halo hyper-velocity star candidate SDSS J121150.27+143716.2 (V = 17.92 mag) revealed a cool companion to the hot subdwarf primary. The components have a very similar radial velocity and their absolute luminosities are consistent with the same distance, confirming the physical nature of the binary, which is the first double-lined hyper-velocity candidate. Our spectral decomposition of the Keck/ESI spectrum provided an sdB+K3V pair, analogous to many long-period subdwarf binaries observed in the Galactic disk. We found the subdwarf atmospheric parameters: {T}{{eff}}=30\\600+/- 500 K, {log}g=5.57+/- 0.06 cm s‑2, and He abundance {log}(n{{He}}/n{{H}})=-3.0+/- 0.2. Oxygen is the most abundant metal in the hot subdwarf atmosphere, and Mg and Na lines are the most prominent spectral features of the cool companion, consistent with a metallicity of [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]=-1.3. The non-detection of radial velocity variations suggest the orbital period to be a few hundred days, in agreement with similar binaries observed in the disk. Using the SDSS-III flux calibrated spectrum we measured the distance to the system d=5.5+/- 0.5 {{kpc}}, which is consistent with ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometric constraints derived from binary spectral energy distributions. Our kinematic study shows that the Galactic rest-frame velocity of the system is so high that an unbound orbit cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, a bound orbit requires a massive dark matter halo. We conclude that the binary either formed in the halo or was accreted from the tidal debris of a dwarf galaxy by the Milky Way.

  14. Extremely Conserved ATP- or ADP-dependent Enzymatic System for Nicotinamide Nucleotide Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Marbaix, Alexandre Y.; Noël, Gaëtane; Detroux, Aline M.; Vertommen, Didier; Van Schaftingen, Emile; Linster, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    The reduced forms of NAD and NADP, two major nucleotides playing a central role in metabolism, are continuously damaged by enzymatic or heat-dependent hydration. We report the molecular identification of the eukaryotic dehydratase that repairs these nucleotides and show that this enzyme (Carkd in mammals, YKL151C in yeast) catalyzes the dehydration of the S form of NADHX and NADPHX, at the expense of ATP, which is converted to ADP. Surprisingly, the Escherichia coli homolog, YjeF, a bidomain protein, catalyzes a similar reaction, but using ADP instead of ATP. The latter reaction is ascribable to the C-terminal domain of YjeF. This represents an unprecedented example of orthologous enzymes using either ADP or ATP as phosphoryl donor. We also show that eukaryotic proteins homologous to the N-terminal domain of YjeF (apolipoprotein A-1-binding protein (AIBP) in mammals, YNL200C in yeast) catalyze the epimerization of the S and R forms of NAD(P)HX, thereby allowing, in conjunction with the energy-dependent dehydratase, the repair of both epimers of NAD(P)HX. Both enzymes are very widespread in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and archaea, which together with the ADP dependence of the dehydratase in some species indicates the ancient origin of this repair system. PMID:21994945

  15. Systemic inflammation in the extremely low gestational age newborn following maternal genitourinary infections

    PubMed Central

    Fichorova, Raina N.; Beatty, Noah; Sassi, Rita R. S.; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Leviton, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Problem Gestational genitourinary infections are associated with life-long disabilities, but it is unknown if neonatal inflammation is involved. Method Mothers of 914 infants born before 28th gestation week reported cervical/vaginal infection (CVI), and/or urine/bladder/kidney infection (UTI), or neither. Inflammation proteins measured in baby’s blood on postnatal days 1, 7 and 14 were considered elevated if in the top quartile for gestational age. Logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders assessed odds ratios. Results Compared to neither UTI/CVI, mothers with CVI were more likely to have infants with elevated CRP, SAA, MPO, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-6R, TNF-α, RANTES, ICAM-3, E-selectin and VEGF-R2 on day 1; those with UTI were more likely to have infants with elevated MPO, IL-6R, TNF-R1, TNF-R2, and RANTES on day 7. Placental anaerobes and genital micoplasma were more common in pregnancies with CVI. Conclusion Gestational UTI/CVI should be targeted for preventing systemic inflammation in the very preterm newborn. PMID:25164433

  16. The Evolution of Energy-Transducing Systems. Studies with an Extremely Halophilic Archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1997-01-01

    The F-type ATPases are found in remarkably similar versions in the energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria (1). Thus, it is likely that they have originated early in the evolution of life, which is consistent with their function as key enzymes of cellular metabolism. The archaea (formerly called archaebacteria) are a group of microorganisms which, as shown by molecular sequencing and biochemical data, have diverged early from the main line of prokaryotic evolution (2). From studies of members of all three major groups of archaea, the halophiles, methanogens and thermoacidophiles, it emerged that they possess a membrane ATPase, which differs from the F-ATPases. The goal of this project was a comparison of the ATPase from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the well-characterized F-type ATPases on the molecular level. The results were expected to allow a decision about the nature of archaebacterial ATPases, their classification as one of the known or, alternatively, novel enzyme complex, and possibly a deduction of events during the early evolution of energy-transducing systems.

  17. Thermal expansion and magnetostriction under extreme conditions of an archetypal heavy fermion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grockowiak, Audrey; Graf, David; Coniglio, William; Ebihara, Takao; Murphy, Timothy; Tozer, Stanley; Tallahassee Team; Pr Ebihara Collaboration

    Several dilatometry techniques have been developed and used for low temperature and high magnetic field measurements, but do not permit the use of high pressures. Following the experimental development of R.Daou, we successfully coupled Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) with pressure cells enabling us to map the magnetic field-pressure-temperature phase space of various systems. FBG measurements permit us to achieve a resolution of ΔL/L ~3.10 -7 making it a very sensitive technique. Piston-cylinder cells developed at the NHMFL permit us to reach a pressure of 3 GPa, and their compact size allows them to be used in highly constrained sample volume, giving us the ability to do high pressure dilatometry studies in pulsed and dc high magnetic field facility at temperatures as low as 25 mK. Along with the setup we will present our results on the high pressure, high magnetic field dilatometry of CeCu2Ge2. ∖ ∖ Part of this work was funded by the US DoE NNSA SSAA DE-NA0001979, and performed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, which is supported by National Science Foundation Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-1157490 and the State of Florida.

  18. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  19. EXTREME CONDITIONS IN A CLOSE ANALOG TO THE YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM: HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF ε ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, J. S.; Sibthorpe, B.; Holland, W. S.; Acke, B.; Vandenbussche, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Pantin, E. E.; Dominik, C.; Barlow, M. J.; Bendo, G. J.; Dent, W. R. F.; Di Francesco, J.; Fridlund, M.; Gear, W. K.; Harvey, P. M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ivison, R. J.; and others

    2014-08-10

    Far-infrared Herschel images of the ε Eridani system, seen at a fifth of the Sun's present age, resolve two belts of debris emission. Fits to the 160 μm PACS image yield radial spans for these belts of 12-16 and 54-68 AU. The south end of the outer belt is ≈10% brighter than the north end in the PACS+SPIRE images at 160, 250, and 350 μm, indicating a pericenter glow attributable to a planet ''c''. From this asymmetry and an upper bound on the offset of the belt center, this second planet should be mildly eccentric (e{sub c} ≈ 0.03-0.3). Compared to the asteroid and Kuiper Belts of the young Sun, the ε Eri belts are intermediate in brightness and more similar to each other, with up to 20 km sized collisional fragments in the inner belt totaling ≈5% of an Earth mass. This reservoir may feed the hot dust close to the star and could send many impactors through the Habitable Zone, especially if it is being perturbed by the suspected planet ε Eri b, at semi-major axis ≈3 AU.

  20. The evolution of energy-transducing systems. Studies with an extremely halophilic archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1992-01-01

    The F-type ATPases are found in remarkably similar versions in the energy-transducing membranes of eubacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. Thus, it is likely that they have originated early in the evolution of life, which is consistent with their function as key enzymes of cellular metabolism. The archaebacteria are a group of microorganisms which, as shown by molecular sequencing and biochemical data, have diverged early from the main line of prokaryotic evolution. From studies of members of all three major groups of archaebacteria - the halophiles, methanogens, and thermoacidophiles - it emerged that they possess a membrane ATPase which differs from the F-ATPases. The goal of this project was a comparison of the ATPase from the halophilic archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum with the well-characterized F-type ATPases on the molecular level. Amino acid sequences of critical regions of the enzyme were to be determined, as well as immunoreactions of single subunits in the search for common epitopes. The results were expected to allow a decision about the nature of archaebacterial ATPases, their classification as one of the known or, alternatively, novel enzyme complexes, and possibly deduction of events during the early evolution of energy-transducing systems.

  1. Design of a perfect balance system for active upper-extremity exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard L; Lobo-Prat, Joan; van der Kooij, Herman; Stienen, Arno H A

    2013-06-01

    Passive gravity compensation in exoskeletons significantly reduces the amount of torque and energy needed from the actuators. So far, no design has been able to achieve perfect balance without compromising the exoskeleton characteristics. Here we propose a novel design that integrates an existing statically-balanced mechanism with two springs and four degrees of freedom into a general-purpose exoskeleton design, that can support any percentage of the combined weight of exoskeleton and arm. As it allows for three rotational degrees of freedom at the shoulder and one at the elbow, it does not compromise exoskeleton characteristics and can be powered with any choice of passive or active actuation method. For instance, with this design a perfectly balanced exoskeleton design with inherently safe, passive actuators on each joint axis becomes possible. The potential reduction in required actuator torque, power and weight, simplification of control, improved dynamic performance, and increased safety margin, all while maintaining perfect balance, are the major advantages of the design, but the integrated systems does add a significant amount of complexity. Future integration in an actual exoskeleton should prove if this tradeoff is beneficial. PMID:24187195

  2. Late Cretaceous Climate, Vegetation and Ocean Interactions: AN Earth System Approach to Modeling AN Extreme Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconto, Robert Michael

    The Campanian age of the Late Cretaceous was warm, with no evidence for permanent or seasonal sea ice at high latitudes. Sea level was high, creating extensive epicontinental and shallow shelf seas. Very low meridional thermal gradients existed in the oceans and on land. Campanian (80 Ma) climate and vegetation have been simulated using GENESIS (Global ENvironmental and Ecological Simulation of Interactive Systems) Version 2.0 and EVE (Equilibrium Vegetation Ecology model), developed by the Climate Change Research section of the Climate and Global Dynamics division at NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research). GENESIS is a comprehensive Earth system model, requiring high resolution (2^circ by 2^circ) solid earth boundary condition data as input for paleoclimate simulations. Boundary condition data define certain prescribed global fields such as the distribution of land-sea-ice, topography, orographic roughness, and soil texture, as well as atmospheric chemistry, the solar constant, and orbital parameters that define the latitudinal distribution of solar insolation. A comprehensive, high resolution paleogeography has been reconstructed for the Campanian. The paleogeography, based on a new global plate tectonic model, provides the framework for the solid earth boundary conditions used in the paleoclimate simulation. Because terrestrial ecosystems influence global climate by affecting the exchange of energy, water and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere, the distribution of global vegetation should be included in pre-Quaternary paleoclimate simulations. However, reconstructing global vegetation distributions from the fossil record is difficult. EVE predicts the equilibrium state of plant community structure as a function of climate and fundamental ecological principles. The model has been modified to reproduce a vegetation distribution based on life forms that existed in the Late Cretaceous. EVE has been applied as a fully interactive component

  3. Construction of conjugative gene transfer system between E. coli and moderately thermophilic, extremely acidophilic Acidithiobacillus caldus MTH-04.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangmei; Lin, Jianqun; Zhang, Zheng; Bian, Jiang; Zhao, Qing; Liu, Ying; Lin, Jianqiang; Yan, Wangming

    2007-01-01

    A genetic transfer system for introducing foreign genes to biomining microorganisms is urgently needed. Thus, a conjugative gene transfer system was investigated for a moderately thermophilic, extremely acidophilic biomining bacterium, Acidithiobacillus caldus MTH-04. The broad-host-range IncP plasmids RP4 and R68.45 were transferred directly into A. caldus MTH-04 from Escherichia coli by conjugation at relatively high frequencies. Additionally the broad-host-range IncQ plasmids pJRD215, pVLT33, and pVLT35 were also transferred into A. caldus MTH-04 with the help of plasmid RP4 or strains with plasmid RP4 integrated into their chromosome, such as E. coli SM10. The Km(r) and Sm(r) selectable markers from these plasmids were successfully expressed in A. caldus MTH-04. Futhermore, the IncP and IncQ plasmids were transferred back into E. coli cells from A. caldus MTH-04, thereby confirming the initial transfer of these plasmids from E. coli to A. caldus MTH-04. All the IncP and IncQ plasmids studied were stable in A. caldus MTH-04. Consequently, this development of a conjugational system for A. caldus MTH-04 will greatly facilitate its genetic study. PMID:18051368

  4. The extremely populated globular cluster system of the lenticular galaxy NGC 6861

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Carlos G.; Faifer, Favio R.; Bassino, Lilia P.; Calderón, Juan Pablo; Caso, Juan Pablo

    2015-05-01

    We present a photometric study of the globular cluster (GC) system associated with the lenticular galaxy (S0) NGC 6861, which is located in a relatively low density environment. It is based on Gemini/GMOS images in the filters g', r', i' of three fields, obtained under good seeing conditions. Analysing the colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams, we find a large number of GC candidates, which extend out to 100 kpc, and we estimate a total population of 3000 ± 300 GCs. Besides the well-known blue and red subpopulations, the colour distribution shows signs of the possible existence of a third subpopulation with intermediate colours. This could be interpreted as evidence of a past interaction or fusion event. Other signs of interactions presented by the galaxy are the non-concentric isophotes and the asymmetric spatial distribution of GC candidates with colours (g' - i')0 > 1.16. As observed in other galaxies, the red GCs show a steeper radial distribution than the blue GCs. In addition, the spatial distribution of these candidates exhibits strong signs of elongation. This feature is also detected in the intermediate subpopulation. On the other hand, the blue candidates show an excellent agreement with the X-ray surface brightness profile, outside 10 kpc. They also show a colour-luminosity relation (blue tilt), similar to that observed in other galaxies. A new distance modulus has been estimated through the blue subpopulation, which is in good agreement with the previous value obtained through the surface brightness fluctuation method. The specific frequency of NGC 6861 (S N = 10.6 ± 2.1) is probably one of the highest values obtained for an S0 galaxy so far.

  5. Analysis and recent advances in gamma heating measurements in MINERVE facility by using TLD and OSLD techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Amharrak, H.; Di Salvo, J.; Lyoussi, A.; Roche, A.; Masson-Fauchier, M.; Bosq, J. C.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop nuclear heating measurement methods in Zero Power experimental reactors. This paper presents the analysis of Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) and Optically Stimulated Luminescent Detectors (OSLD) experiments in the UO{sub 2} core of the MINERVE research reactor at the CEA Cadarache. The experimental sources of uncertainties on the gamma dose have been reduced by improving the conditions, as well as the repeatability, of the calibration step for each individual TLD. The interpretation of these measurements needs to take into account calculation of cavity correction factors, related to calibration and irradiation configurations, as well as neutron corrections calculations. These calculations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of neutron-gamma and gamma-electron transport coupled particles. TLD and OSLD are positioned inside aluminum pillboxes. The comparison between calculated and measured integral gamma-ray absorbed doses using TLD, shows that calculation slightly overestimates the measurement with a C/E value equal to 1.05 {+-} 5.3 % (k = 2). By using OSLD, the calculation slightly underestimates the measurement with a C/E value equal to 0.96 {+-} 7.0% (k = 2. (authors)

  6. 78 FR 6811 - Country Code Top-Level Domain (ccTLD) for the United States; Policies and Requirements; Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Telecommunications and Information Administration RIN 0660-XC005 Country Code Top-Level Domain (cc... Administration (NTIA) administers the contract for the country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for the...

  7. Structural and functional responses of extremity veins to long-term gravitational loading or unloading—lessons from animal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monos, Emil; Raffai, Gábor; Dörnyei, Gabriella; Nádasy, György L.; Fehér, Erzsébet

    2007-02-01

    Long, transparent tubular tilt-cages were developed to maintain experimental rats either in 45∘ head-up (orthostasis model), or in 45∘ head-down body position (antiorthostasis model) for several weeks. In order to study the functional and structural changes in extremity blood vessels, also novel pressure angiograph systems, as well as special quantitative electron microscopic methods were applied. It was found that several adaptive mechanisms are activated in the lower limb superficial veins and microvessels of muscles when an organism is exposed to long-term (1-2 weeks) orthostatic-type gravitational load including a reversible amplification of the pressure-dependent myogenic response, tuning of the myogenic tone by Ca++- and voltage-sensitive K+ channels in humans, augmentation of the intramural sympathetic innervation involving an increased nerve terminal density and synaptic vesicle count with functional remodeling, reorganization of vascular network properties (microvascular rarefaction in muscles, decreased branching angles in superficial veins), and responses of an endothelin and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) containing vesicle system in the endothelium. On the other hand, when applying long-term head-down tilting, the effects are dichotomous, e.g. it suppresses significantly the pressure-induced myogenic response, however does not diminish the adventitial sympathetic innervation density.

  8. Extreme Programming: Maestro Style

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, I-Hsiang; Powell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "Extreme Programming: Maestro Style" is the name of a computer programming methodology that has evolved as a custom version of a methodology, called extreme programming that has been practiced in the software industry since the late 1990s. The name of this version reflects its origin in the work of the Maestro team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that develops software for Mars exploration missions. Extreme programming is oriented toward agile development of software resting on values of simplicity, communication, testing, and aggressiveness. Extreme programming involves use of methods of rapidly building and disseminating institutional knowledge among members of a computer-programming team to give all the members a shared view that matches the view of the customers for whom the software system is to be developed. Extreme programming includes frequent planning by programmers in collaboration with customers, continually examining and rewriting code in striving for the simplest workable software designs, a system metaphor (basically, an abstraction of the system that provides easy-to-remember software-naming conventions and insight into the architecture of the system), programmers working in pairs, adherence to a set of coding standards, collaboration of customers and programmers, frequent verbal communication, frequent releases of software in small increments of development, repeated testing of the developmental software by both programmers and customers, and continuous interaction between the team and the customers. The environment in which the Maestro team works requires the team to quickly adapt to changing needs of its customers. In addition, the team cannot afford to accept unnecessary development risk. Extreme programming enables the Maestro team to remain agile and provide high-quality software and service to its customers. However, several factors in the Maestro environment have made it necessary to modify some of the conventional extreme

  9. APE: the Active Phasing Experiment to test new control system and phasing technology for a European Extremely Large Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Constanza, A.; Brast, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Esteves, R.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Koenig, E.; Kolb, J.; Nylund, M.; Noethe, L.; Surdej, I.; Courteville, A.; Wilhelm, R.; Montoya, L.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Dohlen, K.; Ferrari, M.; Langlois, M.

    2005-08-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope will be composed of one or two giant segmented mirrors (up to 100 m of diameter) and of several large monolithic mirrors (up to 8 m in diameter). To limit the aberrations due to misalignments and defective surface quality it is necessary to have a proper active optics system. This active optics system must include a phasing system to limit the degradation of the PSF due to misphasing of the segmented mirrors. We will present the lastest design and development of the Active Phasing Experiment that will be tested in laboratory and on-sky connected to a VLT at Paranal in Chile. It includes an active segmented mirror, a static piston plate to simulate a secondary segmented mirror and of four phasing wavefront sensors to measure the piston, tip and tilt of the segments and the aberrations of the VLT. The four phasing sensors are the Diffraction Image Phase Sensing Instrument developed by Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Pyramid Phasing Sensor developed by Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, the Shack-Hartmann Phasing Sensor developed by the European Southern Observatory and the Zernike Unit for Segment phasing developed by Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. A reference measurement of the segmented mirror is made by an internal metrology developed by Fogale Nanotech. The control system of Active Phasing Experiment will perform the phasing of the segments, the guiding of the VLT and the active optics of the VLT. These activities are included in the Framework Programme 6 of the European Union.

  10. Characterization of TLD-100 micro-cubes for use in small field dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Jiménez, Salvador; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel; García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda; Gamboa-deBuen, Isabel

    2014-11-01

    At present there are no international regulations for the management of millimeter scale fields and there are no suggestions for a reference detector to perform the characterization and dose determination for unconventional radiation beams (small fields) so that the dosimetry of small fields remains an open research field worldwide because these fields are used in radiotherapy treatments. Sensitivity factors and reproducibility of TLD-100 micro-cubes (1×1×1 mm3) were determinate irradiating the dosimeters with a 6 MV beam in a linear accelerator dedicated to radiosurgery at the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN). Thermoluminescent response as a function of dose was determined for doses in water between 0.5 and 3 Gy and two field sizes (2×2 cm2 and 10×10 cm2). It was found that the response is linear over the dose range studied and it does not depend on field size.

  11. Characterization of TLD-100 micro-cubes for use in small field dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Peña-Jiménez, Salvador Gamboa-deBuen, Isabel; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com; García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com

    2014-11-07

    At present there are no international regulations for the management of millimeter scale fields and there are no suggestions for a reference detector to perform the characterization and dose determination for unconventional radiation beams (small fields) so that the dosimetry of small fields remains an open research field worldwide because these fields are used in radiotherapy treatments. Sensitivity factors and reproducibility of TLD-100 micro-cubes (1×1×1 mm3) were determinate irradiating the dosimeters with a 6 MV beam in a linear accelerator dedicated to radiosurgery at the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN). Thermoluminescent response as a function of dose was determined for doses in water between 0.5 and 3 Gy and two field sizes (2×2 cm2 and 10×10 cm2). It was found that the response is linear over the dose range studied and it does not depend on field size.

  12. TLD environmental monitoring at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Taam, I H; da Rosa, L A R; Crispim, V R

    2008-09-01

    Since 2003 the Institute of Nuclear Engineering in Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil, operates a new cyclotron, RDS-111, to produce (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose to be used in nuclear medicine. Additionally, the IEN radioactive waste repository has been enlarged during the past last years, receiving a considerable amount of radioactive materials. Therefore, it became necessary to evaluate a possible increase of the environmental gamma exposure rates at the institute site due to the operation of the new accelerator and the enlargement of the institute waste repository as well. LiF:Mg,Cu,P, TLD-100H, and TL detectors were employed for environmental kerma rate evaluation and the results were compared with previous results obtained before the RDS-111 operation initialisation and the enlargement of IEN waste repository. No significant contribution for the enhancement of environmental gamma kerma rates was detected. PMID:18348907

  13. Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Jonathan

    2006-04-01

    The assessment of risks posed by natural hazards such as floods, droughts, earthquakes, tsunamis or cyclones, is often based on short-term historical records that may not reflect the full range or magnitude of events possible. As human populations grow, especially in hazard-prone areas, methods for accurately assessing natural hazard risks are becoming increasingly important. In Extreme Events Jonathan Nott describes the many methods used to reconstruct such hazards from natural long-term records. He demonstrates how long-term (multi-century to millennial) records are essential in gaining a realistic understanding of the variability of natural hazards, and how short-term historical records can often misrepresent the likely risks associated with natural hazards. This book will form a useful resource for students taking courses covering natural hazards and risk assessment. It will also be valuable for urban planners, policy makers and non-specialists as a guide to understanding and reconstructing long-term records of natural hazards. Explains mechanisms that cause extreme events and discusses their prehistoric records Describes how to reconstruct long-term records of natural hazards in order to make accurate risk assessments Demonstrates that natural hazards can follow cycles over time and do not occur randomly

  14. Extreme Precipitation and Emergency Room Visits for Gastrointestinal Illness in Areas with and without Combined Sewer Systems: An Analysis of Massachusetts Data, 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quanlin; Wang, Shiliang; Messier, Kyle P.; Wade, Timothy J.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) occur in combined sewer systems when sewage and stormwater runoff are released into water bodies, potentially contaminating water sources. CSOs are often caused by heavy precipitation and are expected to increase with increasing extreme precipitation associated with climate change. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess whether the association between heavy rainfall and rate of emergency room (ER) visits for gastrointestinal (GI) illness differed in the presence of CSOs. Methods For the study period 2003–2007, time series of daily rate of ER visits for GI illness and meteorological data were organized for three exposure regions: a) CSOs impacting drinking water sources, b) CSOs impacting recreational waters, c) no CSOs. A distributed lag Poisson regression assessed cumulative effects for an 8-day lag period following heavy (≥ 90th and ≥ 95th percentile) and extreme (≥ 99th percentile) precipitation events, controlling for temperature and long-term time trends. Results The association between extreme rainfall and rate of ER visits for GI illness differed among regions. Only the region with drinking water exposed to CSOs demonstrated a significant increased cumulative risk for rate (CRR) of ER visits for GI for all ages in the 8-day period following extreme rainfall: CRR: 1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.28) compared with no rainfall. Conclusions The rate of ER visits for GI illness was associated with extreme precipitation in the area with CSO discharges to a drinking water source. Our findings suggest an increased risk for GI illness among consumers whose drinking water source may be impacted by CSOs after extreme precipitation. Citation Jagai JS, Li Q, Wang S, Messier KP, Wade TJ, Hilborn ED. 2015. Extreme precipitation and emergency room visits for gastrointestinal illness in areas with and without combined sewer systems: an analysis of Massachusetts data, 2003–2007. Environ Health Perspect 123:873–879;

  15. HIGH FILL-OUT, EXTREME MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. X. THE NEWLY DISCOVERED BINARY XY LEONIS MINORIS

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Liu, L.; Zhu, L.-Y.; He, J.-J.; Bernasconi, L. E-mail: yygcn@163.com

    2011-05-15

    The newly discovered short-period close binary star, XY LMi, has been monitored photometrically since 2006. Its light curves are typical EW-type light curves and show complete eclipses with durations of about 80 minutes. Photometric solutions were determined through an analysis of the complete B, V, R, and I light curves using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. XY LMi is a high fill-out, extreme mass ratio overcontact binary system with a mass ratio of q = 0.148 and a fill-out factor of f = 74.1%, suggesting that it is in the late evolutionary stage of late-type tidal-locked binary stars. As observed in other overcontact binary stars, evidence for the presence of two dark spots on both components is given. Based on our 19 epochs of eclipse times, we found that the orbital period of the overcontact binary is decreasing continuously at a rate of dP/dt = -1.67 x 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be caused by mass transfer from the primary to the secondary and/or angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind. The decrease of the orbital period may result in the increase of the fill-out, and finally, it will evolve into a single rapid-rotation star when the fluid surface reaches the outer critical Roche lobe.

  16. Coherent pulse interrogation system for fiber Bragg grating sensing of strain and pressure in dynamic extremes of materials.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, George; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor; Mielke, Chuck H; Azad, Abul; Marshall, Bruce; La Lone, Brandon M; Henson, Bryan; Smilowitz, Laura

    2015-06-01

    A 100 MHz fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation system is described and applied to strain and pressure sensing. The approach relies on coherent pulse illumination of the FBG sensor with a broadband short pulse from a femtosecond modelocked erbium fiber laser. After interrogation of the FBG sensor, a long multi-kilometer run of single mode fiber is used for chromatic dispersion to temporally stretch the spectral components of the reflected pulse from the FBG sensor. Dynamic strain or pressure induced spectral shifts in the FBG sensor are detected as a pulsed time domain waveform shift after encoding by the chromatic dispersive line. Signals are recorded using a single 35 GHz photodetector and a 50 G Samples per second, 25 GHz bandwidth, digitizing oscilloscope. Application of this approach to high-speed strain sensing in magnetic materials in pulsed magnetic fields to ~150 T is demonstrated. The FBG wavelength shifts are used to study magnetic field driven magnetostriction effects in LaCoO3. A sub-microsecond temporal shift in the FBG sensor wavelength attached to the sample under first order phase change appears as a fractional length change (strain: ΔL/L<10-4) in the material. A second application used FBG sensing of pressure dynamics to nearly 2 GPa in the thermal ignition of the high explosive PBX-9501 is also demonstrated. Both applications demonstrate the use of this FBG interrogation system in dynamical extreme conditions that would otherwise not be possible using traditional FBG interrogation approaches that are deemed too slow to resolve such events. PMID:26072789

  17. Lyot-based low order wavefront sensor: implementation on the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics System and its laboratory performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Garima; Guyon, Olivier; Baudoz, Pierre; Jovanovich, Nemanja; Martinache, Frantz; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Serabyn, Eugene; Kuhn, Jonas G.

    2014-08-01

    High throughput, low inner working angle (IWA) phase masks coronagraphs are essential to directly image and characterize (via spectroscopy) earth-like planets. However, the performance of low-IWA coronagraphs is limited by residual pointing errors and other low-order modes. The extent to which wavefront aberrations upstream of the coronagraph are corrected and calibrated drives coronagraphic performance. Addressing this issue is essential for preventing coronagraphic leaks, thus we have developed a Lyot-based low order wave front sensor (LLOWFS) to control the wavefront aberrations in a coronagraph. The LLOWFS monitors the starlight rejected by the coronagraphic mask using a reflective Lyot stop in the downstream pupil plane. The early implementation of LLOWFS at LESIA, Observatoire de Paris demonstrated an open loop measurement accuracy of 0.01 λ/D for tip-tilt at 638 nm when used in conjunction with a four quadrant phase mask (FQPM) in the laboratory. To further demonstrate our concept, we have installed the reflective Lyot stops on the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) system at the Subaru Telescope and modified the system to support small IWA phase mask coronagraphs (< 1λ/D) on-sky such as FQPM, eight octant phase mask, vector vortex coronagraph and the phase induced amplitude apodization complex phase mask coronagraph with a goal of obtaining milli arc-second pointing accuracy. Laboratory results have shown the measurement of tip, tilt, focus, oblique and right astigmatism at 1.55 μm for the vector vortex coronagraph. Our initial on-sky result demonstrate the closed loop accuracy of < 7 x 10-3 λ/D at 1.6 μm for tip, tilt and focus aberrations with the vector vortex coronagraph.

  18. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System: risk stratification based on wound, ischemia, and foot infection (WIfI).

    PubMed

    Mills, Joseph L; Conte, Michael S; Armstrong, David G; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N; Andros, George

    2014-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a subgroup of patients with a threatened lower extremity primarily because of chronic ischemia. It was the intent of the original authors that patients with diabetes be excluded or analyzed separately. The Fontaine and Rutherford Systems have been used to classify risk of amputation and likelihood of benefit from revascularization by subcategorizing patients into two groups: ischemic rest pain and tissue loss. Due to demographic shifts over the last 40 years, especially a dramatic rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus and rapidly expanding techniques of revascularization, it has become increasingly difficult to perform meaningful outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs using these existing classification systems. Particularly in patients with diabetes, limb threat is part of a broad disease spectrum. Perfusion is only one determinant of outcome; wound extent and the presence and severity of infection also greatly impact the threat to a limb. Therefore, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee undertook the task of creating a new classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important considerations. We term this new framework, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). The implementation of this classification system is intended to permit more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of therapy in this challenging, but heterogeneous population. PMID:24126108

  19. An extreme planetary system around HD 219828. One long-period super Jupiter to a hot-Neptune host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, N. C.; Santerne, A.; Faria, J. P.; Rey, J.; Correia, A. C. M.; Laskar, J.; Udry, S.; Adibekyan, V.; Bouchy, F.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Melo, C.; Dumusque, X.; Hébrard, G.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Montalto, M.; Mortier, A.; Pepe, F.; Figueira, P.; Sahlmann, J.; Ségransan, D.; Sousa, S. G.

    2016-07-01

    Context. With about 2000 extrasolar planets confirmed, the results show that planetary systems have a whole range of unexpected properties. This wide diversity provides fundamental clues to the processes of planet formation and evolution. Aims: We present a full investigation of the HD 219828 system, a bright metal-rich star for which a hot Neptune has previously been detected. Methods: We used a set of HARPS, SOPHIE, and ELODIE radial velocities to search for the existence of orbiting companions to HD 219828. The spectra were used to characterise the star and its chemical abundances, as well as to check for spurious, activity induced signals. A dynamical analysis is also performed to study the stability of the system and to constrain the orbital parameters and planet masses. Results: We announce the discovery of a long period (P = 13.1 yr) massive (m sini = 15.1 MJup) companion (HD 219828 c) in a very eccentric orbit (e = 0.81). The same data confirms the existence of a hot Neptune, HD 219828 b, with a minimum mass of 21 M⊕ and a period of 3.83 days. The dynamical analysis shows that the system is stable, and that the equilibrium eccentricity of planet b is close to zero. Conclusions: The HD 219828 system is extreme and unique in several aspects. First, ammong all known exoplanet systems it presents an unusually high mass ratio. We also show that systems like HD 219828, with a hot Neptune and a long-period massive companion are more frequent than similar systems with a hot Jupiter instead. This suggests that the formation of hot Neptunes follows a different path than the formation of their hot jovian counterparts. The high mass, long period, and eccentricity of HD 219828 c also make it a good target for Gaia astrometry as well as a potential target for atmospheric characterisation, using direct imaging or high-resolution spectroscopy. Astrometric observations will allow us to derive its real mass and orbital configuration. If a transit of HD 219828 b is detected

  20. Electronics for Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, J. U.; Cressler, J.; Li, Y.; Niu, G.

    2001-01-01

    Most of the NASA missions involve extreme environments comprising radiation and low or high temperatures. Current practice of providing friendly ambient operating environment to electronics costs considerable power and mass (for shielding). Immediate missions such as the Europa orbiter and lander and Mars landers require the electronics to perform reliably in extreme conditions during the most critical part of the mission. Some other missions planned in the future also involve substantial surface activity in terms of measurements, sample collection, penetration through ice and crust and the analysis of samples. Thus it is extremely critical to develop electronics that could reliably operate under extreme space environments. Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology is an extremely attractive candidate for NASA's future low power and high speed electronic systems because it offers increased transconductance, decreased sub-threshold slope, reduced short channel effects, elimination of kink effect, enhanced low field mobility, and immunity from radiation induced latch-up. A common belief that semiconductor devices function better at low temperatures is generally true for bulk devices but it does not hold true for deep sub-micron SOI CMOS devices with microscopic device features of 0.25 micrometers and smaller. Various temperature sensitive device parameters and device characteristics have recently been reported in the literature. Behavior of state of the art technology devices under such conditions needs to be evaluated in order to determine possible modifications in the device design for better performance and survivability under extreme environments. Here, we present a unique approach of developing electronics for extreme environments to benefit future NASA missions as described above. This will also benefit other long transit/life time missions such as the solar sail and planetary outposts in which electronics is out open in the unshielded space at the ambient space

  1. Primary production response to seasonal-scale extremes in the Bering Sea simulated by the Community Earth System Model, version 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walston, J. M.; Gibson, G. A.; Walsh, J. E.

    2015-08-01

    The biological response to long-term trends and the co-occurrence of seasonal extremes of the physical environment and primary production in the eastern Bering Sea, as simulated by the Community Earth System Model (CESM1), are presented. This analysis covers the late-twentieth century (1950-2005) and focuses on critical drivers of the eastern Bering Sea ecosystem, including air temperature, sea ice area, wind mixing, and mixed layer depth. Primary production showed strong linear relationships to both air temperature and sea ice area during winter and spring. The only season that had a positive linear correspondence between wind mixing and primary production was summer. Over the fifty-five year period the CESM1 simulates a trend toward warmer air temperatures and a subsequent reduction in sea ice for every season; however, no trends were seen in seasonally averaged wind mixing or mixed layer depth. Corresponding to the air temperature increase was an increase in occurrence of positive seasonal extremes in primary production, as well as a reduction in negative production extremes. There were some instances of seasonal production extremes coinciding with seasonal extremes in the physical environment; however, neither these co-occurrences, nor the direction of the biological response to the physics, were robust throughout the study period.

  2. Rich Non-centrosymmetry in a Na-U-Te Oxo-System Achieved under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bin; Kegler, Philip; Bosbach, Dirk; Alekseev, Evgeny V

    2016-05-01

    Two new sodium uranyl tellurites and two new sodium uranyl tellurates have been synthesized from high-temperature/high-pressure conditions and structurally characterized. We demonstrated that crystalline phases, forming in a Na-U-Te system under extreme conditions, appear to favorably have non-centrosymmetric structures. Three out of four novel uranyl tellurium compounds, Na[(UO2)Te(IV)2O5(OH)], Na2[(UO2)(Te(VI)2O8)], and Na2[(UO2)Te(VI)O5], crystallize in non-centrosymmetric space groups. The crystal structure of Na[(UO2)Te(IV)2O5(OH)] is based on two-dimensional [UO2Te2O5(OH)](-) corrugated sheets, which are charge balanced by guest Na(+) cations. The structure of Na2[(UO2)Te(VI)2O8] is constructed from [(UO2)2Te2O8](2+) anionic layers composed of UO7 pentagonal bipyramids and TeO6 octahedra. Na2[(UO2)(Te(VI)O5)] is a new type of three-dimensional anionic open framework built from the interconnection of UO7 pentagonal bipyramids and TeO6 octahedra with different types of interlacing channels within the U-Te anionic framework. Na[(UO2)Te(IV)6O13(OH)], as the only centrosymmetric compound isolated in the Na-U-Te family, is crystallized in space group Pa3̅, and its structure is highly related to that of cliffordite (UO2(Te3O7)), which is composed from UO8 hexagonal bipyramids and TeO5 square pyramids. The vibrational modes associated with U-O, Te(IV)-O, and Te(VI)-O bonds are discussed, and the Raman spectra of the four compounds are characterized for signature bands. PMID:27077323

  3. From One Extreme to Another: Tsunami, Hurricane, and El Niño Observations from the NDBC Ocean Observing Systems of Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R. H.; Henderson, D.; Locke, L.

    2008-05-01

    NOAA`s National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) operates a system of ocean observing systems (NOOSS) to provide critical information in real-time during extreme events, such as tsunamis, hurricanes, and El Niños. NDBC recently completed the 39-station array of tsunameters that employ the second-generation Deep-ocean and Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART II) technology. The tsunameter array spans the Pacific Ocean and the western Atlantic Ocean providing real-time water-level measurements and tsunami detection times. At depths down to 6000 meters the tsunameters can send information in less than 3 minutes to the Tsunami Warning Centers in Hawaii and Alaska and to the international tsunami community. The tsunameters have provided data for the Kuril tsunamis of November 2006 and January 2007, the Peru tsunamis of August and September 2007, and the southern Sumatra tsunami of September 2007. In 2006, NDBC assumed operations of the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean Array (TAO), the "crown jewel" of the Global Climate Observation System. TAO provides real-time data for improved detection, understanding, and prediction of El Niño and La Niña. The 55-buoy TAO array spans the central and eastern equatorial Pacific. Real-time and post-deployment recovery data support climate analysis and forecasts. For more than 30 years, NDBC has operated a system of buoys and coastal automated stations for meteorological and oceanographic observations that support real-time weather analysis, forecasting, and warnings. These "traditional" NDBC stations measure winds, waves, temperature, and humidity routinely. Some stations are augmented with ocean current and temperature and salinity (conductivity) sensors. In recent years, among the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean hurricanes passing in proximity to NDBC stations include Ivan in 2004, Cindy, Emily, Dennis, Katrina, Rita, and Wilma in 2005, Ernesto in 2006, and Dean and Felix in 2007 as well as numerous tropical storms. Not confined to tropical

  4. Significant progression of load on the musculoskeletal system with extremely high loads, with rapid weekly weight gains, using the Anatoly Gravitational System, in a 10-week training period.

    PubMed

    Burke, David T; Tran, David; Cui, Di; Burke, Daniel P; Al-Adawi, Samir; Dorvlo, Atsu Ss

    2013-01-01

    In an age of increasing numbers of lifestyle diseases and plasticity of longevity, exercise and weight training have been increasingly recognized as both preventing and mitigating the severity of many illnesses. This study was designed to determine whether significant weight-lifting gains could be realized through the Anatoly Gravitational System. Specifically, this study sought to determine whether this once-weekly weight-training system could result in significant weekly strength gains during a 10-week training period. A total of 50 participants, ranging in age from 17 to 67 years, completed at least 10 weekly 30-minute training sessions. The results suggest participants could, on average, double their weight-lifting capacity within 10 sessions. This preliminary study, which would require further scrutiny, suggests the Anatoly Gravitational System provides a rather unique opportunity to load the musculoskeletal system with extremely high loads, with rapid weekly weight gains, using only short weekly training sessions. More studies are warranted to scrutinize these findings. PMID:24379727

  5. Measurements of gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in phantoms exposed to a BNCT epithermal beam with TLD-700.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Magni, D; Regazzoni, V; Borroni, M; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Burian, J; Marek, M; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L

    2014-10-01

    Gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in a phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be measured by means of a single thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD-700). The method exploits the shape of the glow curve (GC) and requires the gamma-calibration GC (to obtain gamma dose) and the thermal-neutron-calibration GC (to obtain neutron fluence). The method is applicable for BNCT dosimetry in case of epithermal neutron beams from a reactor because, in most irradiation configurations, thermal neutrons give a not negligible contribution to the TLD-700 GC. The thermal neutron calibration is not simple, because of the impossibility of having thermal neutron fields without gamma contamination, but a calibration method is here proposed, strictly bound to the method itself of dose separation. PMID:24435913

  6. Runtime System for I/O Staging in Support of In-Situ Processing of Extreme Scale Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schwan, Karsten

    2013-11-01

    Our research in this project focused on creating and evaluating an I/O infrastructure and tools for extreme-scale applications and machines so that scientists can reduce their time to discovery at small cost in machine resources and consequent power consumption. We wanted to provide tools that are highly scalable, portable, and easy-to-use, so that scientists can gain control of their science, and concentrate on producing important scientific discovery in their own domain. Accelerating the rate of insight and scientific productivity, therefore, demands new solutions to managing the avalanche of data expected at extreme scale.

  7. Mixed field peronnel dosimetry: Part 1, High temperature peak characteristics of the reader-annealed TLD-600

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C. ); Sims, C.S. )

    1991-02-01

    The high temperature peaks (TL peaks 6--7) of TLD-600 are known to have higher responses to high LET radiation than to low LET radiation. These high temperature peak characteristics were studied for the automatic reader-annealed Harshaw albedo neutron TLD. The high temperature peaks response is linear for neutrons over the dose equivalent range tested (0.05--3 mSv of a {sup 252}Cf source moderated by a 15 cm radius polyethylene sphere), but is supralinear above 20 mSv of {sup 137}Cs photons. The peaks ratio (peaks 6--7/peaks 3--5) of TLD-600 is 0.15 for neutrons of any incident energy, 0.01 for {sup 137}Cs gammas, and 0.02 for M-150 x-rays. Based on the high temperature peak characteristics, a mixed field neutron-photon personnel dosimetry methodology using a single TLD-600 element was developed. The dosimetric method was evaluated in mixed {sup 238}PuBe + {sup 137}Cs fields with four neutron-gamma dose equivalent ratios, and the neutron, photon and total dose equivalent estimations are better than 20% except in one case. However, it was found that the neutron and photon dose equivalent estimations are sensitive to the neutron and photon peaks ratios, depending on the neutron-photon dose equivalent ratio and the neutron source in the mixed field. Therefore, a successful use of this method requires knowledge of the photon and neutron energies in the mixed field. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Long-term fade study of the DT-702 LiF: Mg,Cu,P TLD.

    PubMed

    Delzer, J A; Hawley, J R; Romanyukha, A; Nemmers, S; Selwyn, R; Benevides, L A

    2008-01-01

    LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are used by the US Navy to record radiation exposure of personnel. The Model DT-648 LiF:Mg,Ti TLD has been replaced by a new Model DT-702 LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLD. The DT-648 was used for many years and has undergone extensive testing to identify its pre- and post-irradiation fade operating characteristics. Studies have shown that the addition of copper increases the thermoluminesence sensitivity of the TLD for improved low-level radiation monitoring. This study evaluates various fading characteristics of the new copper-doped dosemeter using current equipment for processing of TLDs and calibrating to a National Institute of Standards and Technology standard source. The 57-week study took place at the Naval Dosimetry Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. TLDs were stored for various lengths of time before and after being exposed to a National Institute of Standards and Technology calibrated radiation sources. TLDs were then processed using current US Navy instructions and the resulting dose compared with the calibrated exposure. Both loss of signal and loss of sensitivity were evaluated. The results of this study have shown that the DT-702 TLD has no statistically significant change in sensitivity or change in signal with up to 57 weeks of pre- or post-irradiation time. The results of this study will increase the accuracy of exposure record keeping for the Navy and will allow longer issue periods. This will increase flexibility with international and domestic shipping procedures, as well as reduce workload requirements for dosimetry processing. PMID:18621919

  9. Evaluate the radioactivity along the central thimble hole of a decommissioned heavy water research reactor using TLD approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lun-Hui; Sher, Hai-Feng; Lu, I-Hsin; Pan, Lung-Kwang

    2012-04-01

    The radioactivity along the central thimble hole of a decommissioned heavy water research reactor, TRR, was evaluated using TLD approach. The decay radionuclide was verified to be Co-60. The dose along the TRR central thimble hole was detected and revised by performing an unfolding analysis. The revised data reduced to 70-90% of the original data (for example, the maximum dose rate was reduced from 6447 to 4831 mSv/h,) and were more reliable. PMID:22197461

  10. Ge and B doped collapsed photonic crystal optical fibre, a potential TLD material for low dose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozaila, Z. Siti; Alyahyawi, Amjad; Khandaker, M. U.; Amin, Y. M.; Bradley, D. A.; Maah, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Offering a number of advantageous features, tailor-made silica-based fibres are attracting attention as thermoluminesence (TL) dosimeters. We have performed a detailed study of the TL properties of Ge-doped and Ge-B-doped collapsed photonic crystal fibres (PCFc), most particularly with regard to their potential use for the environmental and X-ray diagnostic dose monitoring. Extrinsic doping and defects generated by strain at the fused inner walls of the collapsed fibres result in the PCFc-Ge-B and PCFc-Ge fibres producing markedly greater TL response than that of the phosphor-based dosimeter TLD-100, by some 9 and 7×, respectively. The linearity of TL yield has been investigated for X-ray doses from 0.5 mGy to 10 mGy. For a dose of 1 Gy, the energy response of the PCFs and TLD-100 has been studied using X-rays generated at accelerating potentials from 20 kVp through to 200 kVp and for the 1.25 MeV mean gamma-ray energy from 60Co. The effective atomic number , Zeffof PCFc-Ge and PCFc-Ge-B was estimated to be 12.5 and 14.4, respectively. Some 35 days post-irradiation, fading of the stored TL signal from PCFc-Ge-B and PCFc-Ge were found to be ∼15% and 20% respectively, with mean loss in TL emission of 0.4-0.5% per day. The present doped-silica collapsed PCFs provide greatly improved TLD performance compared to that of previous fibre designs and phosphor-based TLD-100.

  11. Energy response of CaSO4:Dy teflon TLD disk dosimeters to photons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Sharada, K S

    1983-01-01

    The photon energy response of CaSO4:Dy teflon disk dosimeters used widely in radiation dosimetry is computed using the energy absorption coefficient values for calcium, sulfur, oxygen, and carbon taken from J. H. Hubbell's tables. For fluorine, the energy absorption coefficients were obtained from the values given by F. H. Attix for CaF2 and Ca. The energy response of the radiation-monitoring disk for the range of 10 keV to 10 MeV, relative to air, is computed and plotted. The response is maximum between 20 and 30 keV and then gradually falls to a constant at 200 keV to 10 MeV. This computed response for different energies is compared with the experimental TL response of the dosimeter. The electron energy response of these TLD disks is computed using the stopping-power values for the different component elements. The electron stopping power for sulfur and calcium from 10 keV to 10 MeV is computed using the Bethe-Bloch formula. Those for oxygen and carbon are taken from the tables given by M. J. Berger and S. M. Seltzer. For fluorine, the values are computed from those for Li and LiF given in the same tables. This calculated response is compared with the experimental beta response of the TL dosimeter. PMID:6823508

  12. Dependence of TLD thermoluminescence yield on absorbed dose in a thermal neutron field.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Roy, M S

    1997-01-01

    The emission from 6LiF and 7LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) exposed to the mixed field of thermal neutrons and gamma-rays of the thermal facility of a TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor has been investigated for various thermal neutron fluences of the order of magnitude of those utilised in radiotherapy, with the purpose of investigating the reliability of TLD readouts in such radiation fields and of giving some information for better obtainment of the absorbed dose values. The emission after exposure in this mixed field is compared with the emission after gamma-rays only. The glow curves have been deconvoluted into gaussian peaks, and the differences in the characteristics of the peaks observed for the two radiation fields, having different linear energy transfers, and for different doses are shown. Irreversible radiation damage in dosimeters having high sensitivity to thermal neutrons is also reported, showing a memory effect of the previous thermal neutron irradiation history which is not restored by anneal treatment. PMID:9463872

  13. A comparison of TLD and Monte Carlo calculation for beta dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.M.; Ben-Shacher, B.; Levine, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Beta particle radiation, which always has a low-penetrating component, is strongly absorbed by the skin, i.e., at a depth of 7 mg/cm{sup 2}. The major problem in using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) for beta dosimetry is that the TLD chips have finite thickness and sometimes their response is nonlinear with beta energy. A new method of determining the beta dose to the skin has been investigated by combining analytic calculations with experimental measurements. The analysis was performed with an experimentally verified Monte Carlo computer program based on electron-transport theory and beta spectrometry. The experimental measurements were made with Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu phosphors having different polyethylene shields and an extrapolation chamber. In the present work the authors used the Panasonic UD-806 badges, which contain four Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu phosphors, shielded by 2, 49, 160, and 160 of mg/cm{sup 2} of polyethylene. The energy deposited by electrons in Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu, shielded by different layers of polyethylene, as a function of the dept, was calculated by using the Monte Carlo electron transport code ZEBRA developed by Berger. Excellent agreement is found between the calculated and measured ratios for any two different shielded phosphors, for both sources, except for the ratios of {sup 204}T1 spectrum when the shield of 77 mg/cm is involved.

  14. Anomalous behavior of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) irradiated with electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triolo, A.; Brai, M.; Bartolotta, A.; Marrale, M.

    2006-12-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) were exposed to 60Co γ-ray, protons, high energy electrons and the glow curves were analyzed. We observed an unusual behavior of the TL response of dosimeters to 7 and 14 MeV electron beam. In fact the relative amplitude between two of the five peaks (2° and 3° peaks) assumes values smaller than the unity for doses up to 5 Gy and values greater than the unity for doses equal to or greater than 10 Gy. A possible explanation of this behavior is given adopting a model of the formation of the peaks 2° and 3° and examining the different ways of energy release in matter for each beam. To perform this analysis we deconvoluted the glow curve adopting general order kinetic (GOK) equation for the description of the peak shape, determining the number of peaks and their trapping parameter (E,s,n0).

  15. Extremal entanglement witnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Leif Ove; Hauge, Andreas; Myrheim, Jan; Sollid, Per Øyvind

    2015-02-01

    We present a study of extremal entanglement witnesses on a bipartite composite quantum system. We define the cone of witnesses as the dual of the set of separable density matrices, thus TrΩρ≥0 when Ω is a witness and ρ is a pure product state, ρ=ψψ† with ψ=ϕ⊗χ. The set of witnesses of unit trace is a compact convex set, uniquely defined by its extremal points. The expectation value f(ϕ,χ)=TrΩρ as a function of vectors ϕ and χ is a positive semidefinite biquadratic form. Every zero of f(ϕ,χ) imposes strong real-linear constraints on f and Ω. The real and symmetric Hessian matrix at the zero must be positive semidefinite. Its eigenvectors with zero eigenvalue, if such exist, we call Hessian zeros. A zero of f(ϕ,χ) is quadratic if it has no Hessian zeros, otherwise it is quartic. We call a witness quadratic if it has only quadratic zeros, and quartic if it has at least one quartic zero. A main result we prove is that a witness is extremal if and only if no other witness has the same, or a larger, set of zeros and Hessian zeros. A quadratic extremal witness has a minimum number of isolated zeros depending on dimensions. If a witness is not extremal, then the constraints defined by its zeros and Hessian zeros determine all directions in which we may search for witnesses having more zeros or Hessian zeros. A finite number of iterated searches in random directions, by numerical methods, leads to an extremal witness which is nearly always quadratic and has the minimum number of zeros. We discuss briefly some topics related to extremal witnesses, in particular the relation between the facial structures of the dual sets of witnesses and separable states. We discuss the relation between extremality and optimality of witnesses, and a conjecture of separability of the so-called structural physical approximation (SPA) of an optimal witness. Finally, we discuss how to treat the entanglement witnesses on a complex Hilbert space as a subset of the

  16. Extreme Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the pulsar planet system discovered by Aleksander Wolszczan in 1992. Wolszczan used the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico to find three planets - the first of any kind ever found outside our solar system - circling a pulsar called PSR B1257+12. Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars, which are the collapsed cores of exploded massive stars. They spin and pulse with radiation, much like a lighthouse beacon. Here, the pulsar's twisted magnetic fields are highlighted by the blue glow.

    All three pulsar planets are shown in this picture; the farthest two from the pulsar (closest in this view) are about the size of Earth. Radiation from charged pulsar particles would probably rain down on the planets, causing their night skies to light up with auroras similar to our Northern Lights. One such aurora is illustrated on the planet at the bottom of the picture.

    Since this landmark discovery, more than 160 extrasolar planets have been observed around stars that are burning nuclear fuel. The planets spotted by Wolszczan are still the only ones around a dead star. They also might be part of a second generation of planets, the first having been destroyed when their star blew up. The Spitzer Space Telescope's discovery of a dusty disk around a pulsar might represent the beginnings of a similarly 'reborn' planetary system.

  17. Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) communications program in Wisconsin and Michigan. System and site definition, program plans, environmental summary and supplemental information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-12-01

    U.S. Navy communications with submarines will be improved by deploying a small, operational Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) communications system. This system will be attained by upgrading the existing ELF Communications Facility near Clam Lake, Wisconsin and building a second ELF Communications facility in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The two facilities will be operated synchronously when completed and will transmit coded messages to ELF receiving systems installed on all submarines. This report identifies the work to be done to implement the ELF communications plan approved by the President.

  18. A connection between extremely strong damped Lyman-α systems and Lyman-α emitting galaxies at small impact parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Pâris, I.; Cai, Z.; Finley, H.; Ge, J.; Pieri, M. M.; York, D. G.

    2014-06-01

    We present a study of ~100 high redshift (z ~ 2-4) extremely strong damped Lyman-α systems (ESDLA, with N(H i) ≥ 0.5 × 1022cm-2) detected in quasar spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) Data Release 11. We study the neutral hydrogen, metal, and dust content of this elusive population of absorbers and confirm our previous finding that the high column density end of the N(H i) frequency distribution has a relatively shallow slope with power-law index -3.6, similar to what is seen from 21-cm maps in nearby galaxies. The stacked absorption spectrum indicates a typical metallicity ~1/20th solar, similar to the mean metallicity of the overall DLA population. The relatively small velocity extent of the low-ionisation lines suggests that ESDLAs do not arise from large-scale flows of neutral gas. The high column densities involved are in turn more similar to what is seen in DLAs associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows (GRB-DLAs), which are known to occur close to star-forming regions. This indicates that ESDLAs arise from a line of sight passing at very small impact parameters from the host galaxy, as observed in nearby galaxies. This is also supported by simple theoretical considerations and recent high-z hydrodynamical simulations. We strongly substantiate this picture by the first statistical detection of Ly α emission with ⟨LESDLA(Ly α)⟩ ≃ (0.6 ± 0.2) × 1042 erg s-1 in the core of ESDLAs (corresponding to about 0.1 L⋆ at z ~ 2-3), obtained through stacking the fibre spectra (of radius 1 ″ corresponding to ~8 kpc at z ~ 2.5). Statistical errors on the Ly α luminosity are of the order of 0.1 × 1042 erg s-1 but we caution that the measured Ly α luminosity may be overestimated by ~35% due to sky light residuals and/or FUV emission from the quasar host and that we have neglected flux-calibration uncertainties. We estimate a more conservative uncertainty of 0.2 × 1042 erg s-1. The

  19. Optimization using Extremal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan

    2001-03-01

    We explore a new heuristic for finding high-quality solutions to NP-hard optimization problems which we have recently introduced [see ``Nature's Way of Optimizing," Artificial Intelligence 119, 275-286 (2000) and cond-mat/0010337]. The method, called extremal optimization, is inspired by self-organized criticality, a concept introduced to describe emergent complexity in physical systems. Extremal optimization successively replaces extremely undesirable elements of a single sub-optimal solution with new, random ones. Large fluctuations ensue that efficiently explore many local optima. With only one adjustable parameter, its performance has proved competitive with more elaborate methods, especially near phase transitions which are believed to contain the hardest instances. In particular, extremal optimization is superior to simulated annealing in the partitioning of sparse graphs, it finds the overlap of all ground-states at the phase transition of the 3-coloring problem, and it provides independent confirmation for the ground-state energy of spin glasses, previously obtained with elaborate genetic algorithms.

  20. Dynamic Response of Watershed Subsurface Systems to Extreme Precipitation Events - Implications for the 2013 Colorado Front Range Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S. R.; Ge, S.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2013, the Boulder Creek watershed (BCW) was severely affected by a 1000-year precipitation event when 17 inches of rain - nearly the annual average - fell over Boulder, Colorado, USA in just eight days. This rainfall caused an unprecedented flood within the BCW. While the enormous amount of water that fell appeared to have left within days, we hypothesize that a majority of the water that fell during the event was not discharged via surface runoff, but infiltrated into the subsurface. This study aims to understand how the subsurface responds to extreme precipitation events by quantifying the volume of precipitation that infiltrates into the vadose zone, the change in subsurface water storage, and the spatial and temporal scale of these effects as caused by extreme events. This study focuses on a small drainage basin that lies within the BCW. This site is actively monitored and provides data of importance for hydrologic modeling. The data include groundwater elevation, soil moisture, stream discharge, and precipitation records. The hydrologic structure of the basin consists of a thin, sandy soil layer that caps weathered regolith and saprolite sourced from underlying crystalline basement bedrock. We use the HYDRUS model to numerically solve the Richards equation for variably saturated flow to simulate 2D groundwater flow both below the groundwater table and in the vadose zone. Average annual precipitation values and groundwater elevation measurements are used to estimate the initial subsurface conditions prior to the event. Atmospheric boundary conditions estimated from meteorological stations are then applied to the top of the model to simulate the extreme event. Preliminary results indicate that the extreme event led to a rise in the groundwater table of up to a meter at low-lying elevations near basin drainages and up to two meters below hillslopes that persisted for over a month after the rain stopped.

  1. EXTREME -- Handling extreme data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    This package provides some utilities, background documentation, and associated files for adapting the Starlink Software Collection, and software which uses it, to handle very large data sets. The principal focus of this is to move to use of 64 bits of address space on 64-bit operating systems. This document (SSN/73) is squarely aimed at the problem of adapting the Starlink Software Collection, and consequently focuses on the three operating systems (Solaris, Linux and Tru64) supported by Starlink, the compiled languages Fortran 77 and ANSI C, and Starlink's somewhat idiosyncratic build mechanisms. However, some of the discussion here may be of interest or use to people who are considering the change from 32 to 64 bits for software in other contexts.

  2. Muscles of the Lower Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Muscular System » Muscle Groups » Lower Extremity Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  3. Long-term TLD measurements of environmental background radiation in the New York City Area

    SciTech Connect

    Maiello, M.

    1994-11-01

    The results of month-long TLD measurements at seven locations within 150 km of New York City are reported for 12 years at a few locations and for up to 18 years at others. At some locations, multiple dosimeters were deployed to acquire concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements. The sites were varied and include an urban high-rise residence, three suburban backyards, a rural hillside, and the wooded outskirts of a nuclear power plant (nonoperational). Long-term mean dose rates in air ranged from 50.8 to 123.1 nGy h{sup {minus}1} (5.8 to 14.1 {mu}R h{sup {minus}1}) across the area. The typical seasonal dose rate in air variations are presented for two of the sites and are briefly discussed in terms of soil conditions. The data indicate that it is possible to achieve monthly variations from the long-term mean as high as 20 to 40%. One of these locations was monitored for indoor (2 floors) and outdoor air dose rates. This allowed for a time series comparison to be performed illustrating the changing contribution of terrestrial radiation to the total dose rate relative to the steady building material-derived radioactivity. This site also permitted the calculation of indoor/outdoor ratios for two floors. Another suburban location yielded an indoor/outdoor ratio using ground floor dose-rate-in-air measurements. Also presented are mean annual dose rates in air showing a long-term decrease at some locations. A statistical Kendall test was performed to quantify the magnitude of the decrease. A definitive explanation of this trend requires further study.

  4. Technical refinements of composite thoracodorsal system free flaps for 1-stage lower extremity reconstruction resulting in reduced donor-site morbidity.

    PubMed

    Bannasch, Holger; Strohm, Peter C; Al Awadi, Khalid; Stark, G Björn; Momeni, Arash

    2008-04-01

    A multitude of local flaps has been suggested for lower extremity reconstruction. However, the gold standard for defect coverage remains free tissue transfer. In this regard, the scapular vascular axis is a well-established source of expendable skin, fascia, muscle, and bone for use in free flap reconstruction of defects requiring bone and soft tissue in complex 3-dimensional relationships. Composite bone and soft-tissue flaps derived from the subscapular vascular axis include the osteocutaneous scapular flap, the "latissimus/bone flap," and the thoracodorsal artery perforator-scapular osteocutaneous flap.Patient outcome following reconstruction of lower extremity defects with composite free flaps from the thoracodorsal system were analyzed. Here, we demonstrate the execution of technical refinements on free composite flap transfers based on the thoracodorsal vascular axis, thus resulting in a stepwise reduction of donor-site morbidity. PMID:18362565

  5. Absolute sensitivity calibration of vacuum and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer systems and Z(eff) measurement based on bremsstrahlung continuum in HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hangyu; Cui, Zhengying; Morita, Shigeru; Fu, Bingzhong; Goto, Motoshi; Sun, Ping; Dong, Chunfeng; Gao, Yadong; Xu, Yuan; Lu, Ping; Yang, Qingwei; Duan, Xuru

    2012-10-01

    A grazing-incidence flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been newly developed in HL-2A tokamak. Typical spectral lines are observed from intrinsic impurities of carbon, oxygen, iron, and extrinsic impurity of helium in the wavelength range of 20 Å-500 Å. Bremsstrahlung continuum is measured at different electron densities of HL-2A discharges to calibrate absolute sensitivity of the EUV spectrometer system and to measure effective ionic charge, Z(eff). The sensitivity of a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer system is also absolutely calibrated in overlapped wavelength range of 300 Å-500 Å by comparing the intensity between VUV and EUV line emissions. PMID:23126850

  6. Absolute sensitivity calibration of vacuum and extreme ultraviolet spectrometer systems and Z{sub eff} measurement based on bremsstrahlung continuum in HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hangyu; Cui Zhengying; Fu Bingzhong; Sun Ping; Gao Yadong; Xu Yuan; Lu Ping; Yang Qingwei; Duan Xuru; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Dong Chunfeng

    2012-10-15

    A grazing-incidence flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer has been newly developed in HL-2A tokamak. Typical spectral lines are observed from intrinsic impurities of carbon, oxygen, iron, and extrinsic impurity of helium in the wavelength range of 20 A-500 A. Bremsstrahlung continuum is measured at different electron densities of HL-2A discharges to calibrate absolute sensitivity of the EUV spectrometer system and to measure effective ionic charge, Z{sub eff}. The sensitivity of a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer system is also absolutely calibrated in overlapped wavelength range of 300 A-500 A by comparing the intensity between VUV and EUV line emissions.

  7. Representing Extremes in Agricultural Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruane, Alex

    2015-01-01

    AgMIP and related projects are conducting several activities to understand and improve crop model response to extreme events. This involves crop model studies as well as the generation of climate datasets and scenarios more capable of capturing extremes. Models are typically less responsive to extreme events than we observe, and miss several forms of extreme events. Models also can capture interactive effects between climate change and climate extremes. Additional work is needed to understand response of markets and economic systems to food shocks. AgMIP is planning a Coordinated Global and Regional Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Agricultural Production and Food Security with an aim to inform the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report.

  8. Effective dose assessment in the maxillofacial region using thermoluminescent (TLD) and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosemeters: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, D; Wolff, J; Rottke, D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare the performance of metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology dosemeters with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) (TLD 100; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) in the maxillofacial area. Methods: Organ and effective dose measurements were performed using 40 TLD and 20 MOSFET dosemeters that were alternately placed in 20 different locations in 1 anthropomorphic RANDO® head phantom (the Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY). The phantom was exposed to four different CBCT default maxillofacial protocols using small (4 × 5 cm) to full face (20 × 17 cm) fields of view (FOVs). Results: The TLD effective doses ranged between 7.0 and 158.0 µSv and the MOSFET doses between 6.1 and 175.0 µSv. The MOSFET and TLD effective doses acquired using four different (FOV) protocols were as follows: face maxillofacial (FOV 20 × 17 cm) (MOSFET, 83.4 µSv; TLD, 87.6 µSv; −5%); teeth, upper jaw (FOV, 8.5 × 5.0 cm) (MOSFET, 6.1 µSv; TLD, 7.0 µSv; −14%); tooth, mandible and left molar (FOV, 4 × 5 cm) (MOSFET, 10.3 µSv; TLD, 12.3 µSv; −16%) and teeth, both jaws (FOV, 10 × 10 cm) (MOSFET, 175 µSv; TLD, 158 µSv; +11%). The largest variation in organ and effective dose was recorded in the small FOV protocols. Conclusions: Taking into account the uncertainties of both measurement methods and the results of the statistical analysis, the effective doses acquired using MOSFET dosemeters were found to be in good agreement with those obtained using TLD dosemeters. The MOSFET dosemeters constitute a feasible alternative for TLDs for the effective dose assessment of CBCT devices in the maxillofacial region. PMID:25143020

  9. Evaluation of effective dose for a patient under Ga-67 nuclear examination using TLD, water phantom and a simplified model

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kuang Hua; Lin, Yu Ting; Hsu, Chia Chun; Chen, Chien Yi; Pan, Lung Kwang

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effective dose of Ga-67 for a patient undergoing Ga-67 citrate nuclear examination by applying thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) technique and an indigenous water phantom. The Ga-67 radionuclide remaining in the body inevitably generated a measurable internal dose even though gamma camera scanning took only minutes to complete the clinical examination. For effective simulation of the cumulated effective dose for a patient undergoing examination, 150 TLDs were placed inside the water phantom for 6 days to monitor the gamma ray dose from the distributed Ga-67 citrate solution. The inserted TLDs represented internal organs, and the effective dose was calculated according to data in the ICRP-60 report. The water phantom was designed to model the body of a healthy human weighing 70 kg, and the water that was mixed with Ga-67 citrate solution was slowly replaced with fresh feed water to yield the required biological half life of the phantom. After continuously feeding in fresh water throughout the 6 days of TLD exposure, the TLDs were analyzed to determine the effective doses from the various biological half lives of the phantom. The derived effective dose of 185 MBq Ga-67 citrate solution for male/female (M/F) was 10.7/12.2, 10.7/12.0, 8.7/9.9 and 6.0/6.8 mSv, of biological half lives of 6.0, 4.5, 3.0 and 1.5 days, respectively. Although these experimental results correlated well with earlier empirical studies, they were lower than most calculated values. The cumulated uncertainty in the effective dose was 12.5–19.4%, which was acceptable in terms of both TLD counting statistic and reproducibility. PMID:22915780

  10. Determination of Radiation Energy Response for Thermoluminescent Dosimeter TLD-100: Determination of Organ Dose in Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Deda, Antoneta; Telhaj, Ervis

    2009-04-19

    TLD-100 (thermoluminescent dosimeter) cards (chips) were calibrated using X-rays with energies of 25-250 kV produced by a Cs-137 source. The energy responses of lithium fluoride crystals for different energies of X-rays were studied. QA/QC was then performed in the Albanian Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory. Based on the QA/QC results, the chips were used to study the doses to different organs in diagnostic radiology. Organ dose was evaluated after calculation of e dose in air (Kair), using an ionizing chamber.

  11. Determination of Radiation Energy Response for Thermoluminescent Dosimeter TLD-100: Determination of Organ Dose in Diagnostic Radiology (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deda, Antoneta; Telhaj, Ervis

    2009-04-01

    TLD-100 (thermoluminescent dosimeter) cards (chips) were calibrated using X-rays with energies of 25-250 kV produced by a Cs-137 source. The energy responses of lithium fluoride crystals for different energies of X-rays were studied. QA/QC was then performed in the Albanian Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory. Based on the QA/QC results, the chips were used to study the doses to different organs in diagnostic radiology. Organ dose was evaluated after calculation of e dose in air (Kair), using an ionizing chamber.

  12. Extreme weather events and global crop production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Gerber, J. S.; West, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme weather events can lead to significant loss in crop production and even trigger global price spikes. However it is still not clear where exactly and what types of extreme events have resulted in sharp declines in crop production. Neither is it clear how frequently such extreme events have resulted in extreme crop production losses. Using extreme event metrics with a newly developed high resolution and long time series of crop statistics database we identify the frequency and type of extreme event driven crop production losses globally at high resolutions. In this presentation we will present our results as global maps identifying the frequency and type of extreme weather events that resulted in extreme crop production losses and quantify the losses. Understanding how extreme events affects crop production is critical for managing risk in the global food system

  13. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  14. Thermoluminescent response and relative efficiency of TLD-100 exposed to low-energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa-de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz, C. G.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Flores, A.; Brandan, M. E.

    1998-08-01

    The dose-response of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) exposed to 15 and 35 kVp ( and keV effective energy respectively) x-rays and -rays has been measured in the dose interval from (1.2-5.4) Gy for x-rays, and from 0.14 to 850 Gy for -rays. In both cases the total TL signal and glow curve peaks 3 to 9 show supralinearity. The supralinearity function f(D) is similar for both x-ray beams, except for peak 8, where a 30% difference is observed. The maxima of f(D) for the total TL signal and peaks 5 to 8 are 2.1, 1.7, 6.4, 3.3 and 7.5 respectively for 8.1 keV x-rays and 3.7, 3.1, 13.6, 9.9 and 11.0 for -rays. The measured relative efficiencies for x-rays with respect to , for the total TL signal and peaks 5 and 7, were 1.04, 0.97 and 3.2 respectively.

  15. System-level understanding of the potential acid-tolerance components of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 under extreme acid stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2015-09-01

    In previous study, two extremely acidophilic strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 (collection site: bioleaching leachate) and ZJJN-5 (collection site: bioleaching wastewater) were isolated from a typical industrial bio-heap in China. Here, we unraveled the potential acid-tolerance components of ZJJN-3 by comparing the physiological differences with ZJJN-5 under different acid stresses. The parameters used for comparison included intracellular pH (pHin), capsule morphology, fatty acid composition of cell membrane, transcription of key molecular chaperones, H(+)-ATPase activities and NAD(+)/NADH ratio. It was indicated that the acid-tolerance of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 was systematically regulated. Capsule first thickened and then shed off along with increased acid stress. Cell membrane maintained the intracellular stability by up-regulating the proportion of unsaturated fatty acid and cyclopropane fatty acids. Meanwhile, the transcription of key repair molecular chaperones (GrpE-DnaK-DnaJ) was up-regulated by 2.2-3.5 folds for ensuring the proper folding of peptide. Moreover, low pHin promoted ZJJN-3 to biosynthesize more H(+)-ATPase for pumping H(+) out of cells. Furthermore, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio increased due to the decreased H(+) concentration. Based on the above physiological analysis, the potential acid-tolerance components of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 were first proposed and it would be useful for better understanding how these extremophiles responded to the high acid stress. PMID:26264736

  16. The effects of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields on melatonin and cortisol, two marker rhythms of the circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Touitou, Yvan; Selmaoui, Brahim

    2012-01-01

    In the past 30 years the concern that daily exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF) (1 to 300 Hz) might be harmful to human health (cancer, neurobehavioral disturbances, etc) has been the object of debate, and has become a public health concern. This has resulted in the classification of ELF-EMF into category 2B, ie, agents that are “possibly carcinogenic to humans” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Since melatonin, a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, has been shown to possess oncostatic properties, a “melatonin hypothesis” has been raised, stating that exposure to EMF might decrease melatonin production and therefore might promote the development of breast cancer in humans. Data from the literature reviewed here are contradictory. In addition, we have demonstrated a lack of effect of ELF-EMF on melatonin secretion in humans exposed to EMF (up to 20 years' exposure) which rebuts the melatonin hypothesis. Currently, the debate concerns the effects of ELF-EMF on the risk of childhood leukemia in children chronically exposed to more than 0.4 μT. Further research is thus needed to obtain more definite answers regarding the potential deleterious effects of ELF-EMF. PMID:23393415

  17. An efficient diagnosis system for Parkinson's disease using kernel-based extreme learning machine with subtractive clustering features weighting approach.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Ouyang, Jihong; Chen, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Xue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid method named SCFW-KELM, which integrates effective subtractive clustering features weighting and a fast classifier kernel-based extreme learning machine (KELM), has been introduced for the diagnosis of PD. In the proposed method, SCFW is used as a data preprocessing tool, which aims at decreasing the variance in features of the PD dataset, in order to further improve the diagnostic accuracy of the KELM classifier. The impact of the type of kernel functions on the performance of KELM has been investigated in detail. The efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method have been rigorously evaluated against the PD dataset in terms of classification accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), f-measure, and kappa statistics value. Experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed SCFW-KELM significantly outperforms SVM-based, KNN-based, and ELM-based approaches and other methods in the literature and achieved highest classification results reported so far via 10-fold cross validation scheme, with the classification accuracy of 99.49%, the sensitivity of 100%, the specificity of 99.39%, AUC of 99.69%, the f-measure value of 0.9964, and kappa value of 0.9867. Promisingly, the proposed method might serve as a new candidate of powerful methods for the diagnosis of PD with excellent performance. PMID:25484912

  18. Manufacture of fly-eye mirror in an extreme-ultraviolet lithography illumination system by means of ultraprecision diamond cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Takeuchi, Yoshimi; Kawai, Tomohiko; Sawada, Kiyoshi; Takino, Hideo; Shibata, Norio

    2002-07-01

    This study deals with the manufacture of so-called Fly-eye mirror in EUV lithography by means of an ultraprecision 5-axis control milling technology. It is extremely difficult to manufacture a highly accurate Fly-eye mirror by conventional methods such as photolithography, mechanical cutting by a lathe, etc. since it is composed of 500 circular arc mirror elements of 15 mm in length and 1 mm in width having a spherical surface of 295 mm in radius, and there are minute steps among them. In order to manufacture Fly-eye mirror with accuracy and efficiency, the study proposes a new machining method to manufacture spherical surface with any radius by employing a rotational single-crystal diamond tool with cutting edge angle of 90 degree. Oxygen-free copper was machined by this method. The machined workpiece shows smooth spherical surface and sharp steps among them without any burrs. It is found that the proposed method has the potential of producing the Fly-eye mirror.

  19. Quantitative analysis of electron energy loss spectra and modelling of optical properties of multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet radiation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Gusenleitner, S.; Hauschild, D.; Reinert, F.; Handick, E.

    2014-03-28

    Ruthenium capped multilayer coatings for use in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation regime have manifold applications in science and industry. Although the Ru cap shall protect the reflecting multilayers, the surface of the heterostructures suffers from contamination issues and surface degradation. In order to get a better understanding of the effects of these impurities on the optical parameters, reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) measurements of contaminated and H cleaned Ru multilayer coatings were taken at various primary electron beam energies. Experiments conducted at low primary beam energies between 100 eV and 1000 eV are very surface sensitive due to the short inelastic mean free path of the electrons in this energy range. Therefore, influences of the surface condition on the above mentioned characteristics can be appraised. In this paper, it can be shown that carbon and oxide impurities on the mirror surface decrease the transmission of the Ru cap by about 0.75% and the overall reflectance of the device is impaired as the main share of the non-transmitted EUV light is absorbed in the contamination layer.

  20. An Efficient Diagnosis System for Parkinson's Disease Using Kernel-Based Extreme Learning Machine with Subtractive Clustering Features Weighting Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Ouyang, Jihong; Chen, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Xue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid method named SCFW-KELM, which integrates effective subtractive clustering features weighting and a fast classifier kernel-based extreme learning machine (KELM), has been introduced for the diagnosis of PD. In the proposed method, SCFW is used as a data preprocessing tool, which aims at decreasing the variance in features of the PD dataset, in order to further improve the diagnostic accuracy of the KELM classifier. The impact of the type of kernel functions on the performance of KELM has been investigated in detail. The efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method have been rigorously evaluated against the PD dataset in terms of classification accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), f-measure, and kappa statistics value. Experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed SCFW-KELM significantly outperforms SVM-based, KNN-based, and ELM-based approaches and other methods in the literature and achieved highest classification results reported so far via 10-fold cross validation scheme, with the classification accuracy of 99.49%, the sensitivity of 100%, the specificity of 99.39%, AUC of 99.69%, the f-measure value of 0.9964, and kappa value of 0.9867. Promisingly, the proposed method might serve as a new candidate of powerful methods for the diagnosis of PD with excellent performance. PMID:25484912

  1. Image-guided method for TLD-based in vivo rectal dose verification with endorectal balloon in proton therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C.; Fagundes, Marcio; Zeidan, Omar; Hug, Eugen; Schreuder, Niek

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To present a practical image-guided method to position an endorectal balloon that improves in vivo thermoluminiscent dosimeter (TLD) measurements of rectal doses in proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods: TLDs were combined with endorectal balloons to measure dose at the anterior rectal wall during daily proton treatment delivery. Radiopaque metallic markers were employed as surrogates for balloon position reproducibility in rotation and translation. The markers were utilized to guide the balloon orientation during daily treatment employing orthogonal x-ray image-guided patient positioning. TLDs were placed at the 12 o'clock position on the anterior balloon surface at the midprostatic plane. Markers were placed at the 3 and 9 o'clock positions on the balloon to align it with respect to the planned orientation. The balloon rotation along its stem axis, referred to as roll, causes TLD displacement along the anterior-posterior direction. The magnitude of TLD displacement is revealed by the separation distance between markers at opposite sides of the balloon on sagittal x-ray images. Results: A total of 81 in vivo TLD measurements were performed on six patients. Eighty-three percent of all measurements (65 TLD readings) were within +5% and -10% of the planning dose with a mean of -2.1% and a standard deviation of 3.5%. Examination of marker positions with in-room x-ray images of measured doses between -10% and -20% of the planned dose revealed a strong correlation between balloon roll and TLD displacement posteriorly from the planned position. The magnitude of the roll was confirmed by separations of 10-20 mm between the markers which could be corrected by manually adjusting the balloon position and verified by a repeat x-ray image prior to proton delivery. This approach could properly correct the balloon roll, resulting in TLD positioning within 2 mm along the anterior-posterior direction. Conclusions: Our results show that image-guided TLD-based in vivo

  2. Understanding the 2013 Boulder Flood: Assessing Extreme Precipitation Events and Future Climates in the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R.; Neale, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Boulder flood of September 2013 resulted in significant structural damage, inundated communities, and accelerated land erosion in central and northern Colorado. This exceptional event led to approximately 11,000 people being evacuated in the area as more than 17 inches of rain fell in parts of Boulder County, Colorado in seven days. This storm resulted from persistent southerly flow and high precipitable water values which were responsible for the record-breaking precipitation. This study assessed the factors associated with extreme precipitation events in both observations and climate model simulations. Satellite-based observed precipitation from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, and ERA-Interim Reanalysis of precipitable water and low-level winds were used in this study. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) were calculated for daily values of observational and reanalysis variables: precipitation, precipitable water, and low-level winds. Each of the PDFs were compared with equivalent variables in the CESM simulations and analyzed over three regions of different areal extent occupying the eastern Rocky Mountains. The PDF calculations were found to be sensitive to the choice of the spatial region with fewer high precipitable water events in the northern domain and a greater number of high precipitable water events in the more southerly domain. The similarities between observational and present-day CESM PDFs enabled us to study changes to PDF distributions in future climate simulations. They predict a significant increase in precipitable water over the Boulder flood region. Given the importance of high precipitable water in the 2013 Boulder flood precipitation event, the potential for more frequent and stronger flooding events in the future is significant.

  3. Solar Weather Ice Monitoring Station (SWIMS). A low cost, extreme/harsh environment, solar powered, autonomous sensor data gathering and transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetty, S.; Field, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic ocean's continuing decrease of summer-time ice is related to rapidly diminishing multi-year ice due to the effects of climate change. Ice911 Research aims to develop environmentally respectful materials that when deployed will increase the albedo, enhancing the formation and/preservation of multi-year ice. Small scale deployments using various materials have been done in Canada, California's Sierra Nevada Mountains and a pond in Minnesota to test the albedo performance and environmental characteristics of these materials. SWIMS is a sophisticated autonomous sensor system being developed to measure the albedo, weather, water temperature and other environmental parameters. The system (SWIMS) employs low cost, high accuracy/precision sensors, high resolution cameras, and an extreme environment command and data handling computer system using satellite and terrestrial wireless communication. The entire system is solar powered with redundant battery backup on a floating buoy platform engineered for low temperature (-40C) and high wind conditions. The system also incorporates tilt sensors, sonar based ice thickness sensors and a weather station. To keep the costs low, each SWIMS unit measures incoming and reflected radiation from the four quadrants around the buoy. This allows data from four sets of sensors, cameras, weather station, water temperature probe to be collected and transmitted by a single on-board solar powered computer. This presentation covers the technical, logistical and cost challenges in designing, developing and deploying these stations in remote, extreme environments. Image captured by camera #3 of setting sun on the SWIMS station One of the images captured by SWIMS Camera #4

  4. Extremely high boron tolerance in Puccinellia distans (Jacq.) Parl. related to root boron exclusion and a well-regulated antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Hamurcu, Mehmet; Hakki, Erdogan E; Demiral Sert, Tijen; Özdemir, Canan; Minareci, Ersin; Avsaroglu, Zuhal Z; Gezgin, Sait; Ali Kayis, Seyit; Bell, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate an extremely high level of tolerance to boron (B) toxicity in Puccinellia distans (Jacq.) Parl. but the mechanistic basis is not known. Puccinellia distans was exposed to B concentrations of up to 1000 mg B L-1 and root B uptake, growth parameters, B and N contents, H2O2 accumulation and ·OH-scavenging activity were measured. Antioxidant enzyme activities including superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, peroxidase and glutathione reductase, and lipid peroxidation products were determined. B appears to be actively excluded from roots. Excess B supply caused structural deformations in roots and leaves, H2O2 accumulation and simultaneous up-regulation of the antioxidative system, which prevented lipid peroxidation even at the highest B concentrations. Thus, P. distans has an efficient root B-exclusion capability and, in addition, B tolerance in shoots is achieved by a well-regulated antioxidant defense system. PMID:27356235

  5. Modeling changes in extreme snowfall events in the Central Rocky Mountains Region with the Fully-Coupled WRF-Hydro Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gochis, David; rasmussen, Roy; Yu, Wei; Ikeda, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    Modeling of extreme weather events often require very finely resolved treatment of atmospheric circulation structures in order to produce and localize large magnitudes of moisture fluxes that result in extreme precipitation. This is particularly true for cool season orographic precipitation processes where the representation of landform can significantly influence vertical velocity profiles and cloud moisture entrainment rates. In this work we report on recent progress in high resolution regional climate modeling of the Colorado Headwaters region using an updated version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and a hydrological extension package called WRF-Hydro. Previous work has shown that the WRF-Hydro modeling system forced by high resolution WRF model output can produce credible depictions of winter orographic precipitation and resultant monthly and annual river flows. Here we present results from a detailed study of an extreme springtime snowfall event that occurred along the Colorado Front Range in March of 2003. First an analysis of the simulated streamflows resulting from the melt out of that event are presented followed by an analysis of projected streamflows from the event where the atmospheric forcing in the WRF model is perturbed using the Psuedo-Global-Warming (PGW) perturbation methodology. Results from the impact of warming on total precipitation, snow-rain partitioning and surface hydrological fluxes (evapotranspiration and runoff) will be discussed in the context of how potential changes in temperature impact the amount of precipitation, the phase of precipitation (rain vs. snow) and the timing and amplitude of streamflow responses. It is shown that under the assumptions of the PGW method, intense precipitation rates increase during the event and, more importantly, that more precipitation falls as rain versus snow which significantly amplifies the runoff response from one where runoff is produced gradually to where runoff is more

  6. Extreme Scale Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2009-11-01

    We live in extraordinary times. With increasingly sophisticated observatories opening up new vistas on the universe, astrophysics is becoming more complex and data-driven. The success in understanding astrophysical systems that are inherently multi-physical, nonlinear systems demands realism in our models of the phenomena. We cannot hope to advance the realism of these models to match the expected sophistication of future observations without extreme-scale computation. Just one example is the advent of gravitational wave astronomy. Detectors like LIGO are about to make the first ever detection of gravitational waves. The gravitational waves are produced during violent events such as the merger of two black holes. The detection of these waves or ripples in the fabric of spacetime is a formidable undertaking, requiring innovative engineering, powerful data analysis tools and careful theoretical modeling. I will discuss the computational and theoretical challenges ahead in our new understanding of physics and astronomy where gravity exhibits its strongest grip on our spacetime.

  7. SU-E-T-118: Dose Verification for Accuboost Applicators Using TLD, Ion Chamber and Gafchromic Film Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chisela, W; Yao, R; Dorbu, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify dose delivered with HDR Accuboost applicators using TLD, ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurements and to examine applicator leakage. Methods: A microSelectron HDR unit was used to deliver a dose of 50cGy to the mid-plane of a 62mm thick solid water phantom using dwell times from Monte Carlo pre-calculated nomograms for a 60mm, 70mm Round and 60mm Skin-Dose Optimized (SDO) applicators respectively. GafChromic EBT3+ film was embedded in the phantom midplane horizontally to measure dose distribution. Absolute dose was also measured with TLDs and an ADCL calibrated parallel-plate ion chamber placed in the film plane at field center for each applicator. The film was calibrated using 6MV x-ray beam. TLDs were calibrated in a Cs-137 source at UW-Madison calibration laboratory. Radiation leakage through the tungsten alloy shell was measured with a film wrapped around outside surface of a 60mm Round applicator. Results: Measured maximum doses at field center are consistently lower than predicated by 5.8% for TLD, 8.8% for ion chamber, and 2.6% for EBT3+ film on average, with measurement uncertainties of 2.2%, 0.3%, and 2.9% for TLD, chamber, film respectively. The total standard uncertainties for ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurement are 4.9% and 4.6% respectively[1]. The area defined by the applicator aperture was covered by 80% of maximum dose for 62mm compression thickness. When 100cGy is delivered to mid-plane with a 60mm Round applicator, surface dose ranges from 60cGy to a maximum of 145cGy, which occurs at source entrance to the applicator. Conclusion: Measured doses by all three techniques are consistently lower than predicted in our measurements. For a compression thickness of 62 mm, the field size defined by the applicator is only covered by 80% of prescribed dose. Radiation leakage of up to 145cGy was found at the source entrance of applicators.

  8. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-05-08

    Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

  9. Between L2 and SLI: Inflections and Prepositions in the Hebrew of Bilingual Children with TLD and Monolingual Children with SLI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armon-Lotem, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Verb inflectional morphology and prepositions are loci of difficulty for bilingual children with typical language development (TLD) as well as children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). This paper examines errors in these linguistic domains in these two populations. Bilingual English-Hebrew and Russian-Hebrew preschool children, aged five…

  10. Calibration of TLD badges for photons of energy above 6 MeV and dosimetric intricacies in high energy gamma ray fields encountered in nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, A S; Bakshi, A K

    2002-01-01

    CaSO4:Dy and LiF TLDs do not exhibit photon energy dependence beyond +/-55% for photons in the energy range from 1 MeV to about 7 MeV. However, when sandwiched between metal filters or used in TLD badge holders having metal filters, the response changes for irradiation from high energy photons as compared to that from 60Co gamma rays (generally used for reference calibrations). This effect is about the same for both the lower atomic number TLD (LiF) and higher atomic number TLD (CaSO4:Dy). For TLDs held on the surface of the phantom and irradiated in collimated photon beams, the response of TLDs without any filter or those under the open window of the TLD badge is considerably reduced due to insufficient build-up to high energy photons, whereas for uncollimated radiation fields from power reactors, an over-response is observed. It is observed that the use of inappropriate encapsulation of dosemeters would cause a significant error not only in the estimation of doses due to penetrating radiations but also in the estimation of beta doses in the mixed fields of beta radiation, high energy gamma rays and high energy electrons often encountered in the fields of pressurised heavy water reactors. PMID:12018745

  11. Physical and numerical modeling of an inclined three-layer (silt/gravelly sand/clay) capillary barrier cover system under extreme rainfall.

    PubMed

    Ng, Charles W W; Liu, Jian; Chen, Rui; Xu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    As an extension of the two-layer capillary barrier, a three-layer capillary barrier landfill cover system is proposed for minimizing rainfall infiltration in humid climates. This system consists of a compacted clay layer lying beneath a conventional cover with capillary barrier effects (CCBE), which is in turn composed of a silt layer sitting on top of a gravelly sand layer. To explore the effectiveness of the new system in minimizing rainfall infiltration, a flume model (3.0 m × 1.0 m × 1.1 m) was designed and set up in this study. This physical model was heavily instrumented to monitor pore water pressure, volumetric water content, surface runoff, infiltration and lateral drainage of each layer, and percolation of the cover system. The cover system was subjected to extreme rainfall followed by evaporation. The experiment was also back-analyzed using a piece of finite element software called CODE_BRIGHT to simulate transient water flows in the test. Based on the results obtained from various instruments, it was found that breakthrough of the two upper layers occurred for a 4-h rainfall event having a 100-year return period. Due to the presence of the newly introduced clay layer, the percolation of the three-layer capillary barrier cover system was insignificant because the clay layer enabled lateral diversion in the gravelly sand layer above. In other words, the gravelly sand layer changed from being a capillary barrier in a convention CCBE cover to being a lateral diversion passage after the breakthrough of the two upper layers. Experimental and back-analysis results confirm that no infiltrated water seeped through the proposed three-layer barrier system. The proposed system thus represents a promising alternative landfill cover system for use in humid climates. PMID:25582391

  12. AIRS Impact on Analysis and Forecast of an Extreme Rainfall Event (Indus River Valley 2010) with a Global Data Assimilation and Forecast System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Lau, W. K.; Susskind, J.; Rosenberg, R.

    2011-01-01

    A set of data assimilation and forecast experiments are performed with the NASA Global data assimilation and forecast system GEOS-5, to compare the impact of different approaches towards assimilation of Advanced Infrared Spectrometer (AIRS) data on the precipitation analysis and forecast skill. The event chosen is an extreme rainfall episode which occurred in late July 11 2010 in Pakistan, causing massive floods along the Indus River Valley. Results show that the assimilation of quality-controlled AIRS temperature retrievals obtained under partly cloudy conditions produce better precipitation analyses, and substantially better 7-day forecasts, than assimilation of clear-sky radiances. The improvement of precipitation forecast skill up to 7 day is very significant in the tropics, and is caused by an improved representation, attributed to cloudy retrieval assimilation, of two contributing mechanisms: the low-level moisture advection, and the concentration of moisture over the area in the days preceding the precipitation peak.

  13. Evolutions from extremality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    We examine the evolution of extremal spherically symmetric black holes, developing both general theory as well as the specific cases of (charged) null dust and massless scalar field spacetimes. As matter accretes onto extremal marginally trapped tubes, they generically evolve to become nonextremal, with the initial extremal horizon bifurcating into inner and outer nonextremal horizons. At the start of this process arbitrarily slow matter accretion can cause a geometrically invariant measure of horizon growth to jump from zero to infinity. We also consider dynamical horizons that are extremal throughout their evolution and see that such spacetimes contain two extremal black hole horizons: an inner isolated one and an outer dynamical one. We compare these extremal dynamical horizons with the dynamical extreme event horizon spacetimes of Murata, Reall and Tanahashi.

  14. High and abnormal forms of aggression in rats with extremes in trait anxiety--involvement of the dopamine system in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Beiderbeck, Daniela I; Reber, Stefan O; Havasi, Andrea; Bredewold, Remco; Veenema, Alexa H; Neumann, Inga D

    2012-12-01

    A better neurobiological understanding of high and abnormal aggression based on adequate animal models is essential for novel therapy and prevention. Selective breeding of rats for extremes in anxiety-related behavior resulted in two behavioral phenotypes with high and abnormal forms of aggression. Rats bred for low anxiety-related behavior (LAB) consistently show highest levels of aggression and little social investigation in the resident-intruder (RI) test, compared with non-selected low-aggressive (NAB) rats. High anxiety-related (HAB) rats also show higher levels of aggression than NAB rats, but to a lesser extent than LAB rats. Accordingly, extremes in inborn anxiety in both directions are linked to an increased aggression level. Further, both LAB and HAB, but not NAB males, display abnormal aggression (attacks towards vulnerable body parts, females or narcotized males), which is particularly prominent in LABs. Also, only in LAB rats, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was found to be strongly activated in response to the RI test as reflected by increased c-fos and zif268 mRNA expression, and higher local dopamine release compared with NAB males, without differences in local dopamine receptor binding. Consequently, local pharmacological manipulation by infusion of an anesthetic (lidocaine, 20 μg/μl) or a dopamine D2 (haloperidol, 10 ng/μl), but not D1 (SCH-23390 10 ng/μl), receptor antagonist significantly reduced high aggression in LAB rats. Thus, LAB rats are an adequate model to study high and abnormal aggression. In LAB males, this is likely to be linked to hyper-activation of the reward system, as found in psychopathic patients. Specifically, activation of the accumbal dopamine system is likely to underlie the high aggression observed in LAB rats. PMID:22608548

  15. A A field test for extremity dose assessment during outages at Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2013-05-01

    During maintenance on the water chamber of a steam generator, the pressuriser heater and the pressure tube feeder in nuclear power plants, workers are likely to receive high radiation doses due to the severe workplace conditions. In particular, it is expected that workers' hands would receive the highest radiation doses because of their contact with the radioactive materials. In this study, field tests for extremity dose assessments in radiation workers undertaking contact tasks with high radiation doses were conducted during outages at pressurised water reactors and pressurised heavy water reactors in Korea. In the test, the radiation workers were required to wear additional thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) on their backs and wrists and an extremity dosemeter on the finger, as well as a main TLD on the chest while performing the maintenance tasks. PMID:23091221

  16. Suitability of laser stimulated TLD arrays as patient dose monitors in high dose x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Geise, R A; Schueler, B A; Lien, W; Jones, S C

    1997-10-01

    Skin entrance doses of patients undergoing interventional x-ray procedures are capable of causing skin damage and should be monitored routinely. Single TLD chips are not suitable because the location of maximum skin exposure cannot be predicted. Most photographic films are too sensitive at diagnostic x-ray energies for dosimetry, exhibit temporal changes in response, and require special packaging by the user. We have investigated the suitability of laser heated MgB4O7 TLDs in a polyimide binder in the range of 0.2-20 Gy. These are available in radioluscent arrays up to 30 x 30 cm for direct measurement of patient skin dose. Dose response was compared with a calibrated ion chamber dosimeter. Exposures were made at 60, 90, and 120 kVp, at low (fluoroscopy) and high (DSA) dose rates, and at different beam incidence angles. Longitudinal reproducibility and response to temperature changes during exposure were also checked. The dose response is linear below approximately 6 Gy where the slope starts to increase 2% per Gy. Errors were less than +/- 2% over a 0-80 degrees range of beam incidence angles; less than +/- 3% for both dose rate variations and kVp differences between 70 and 120 kVp. The response was unaffected by temperature changes between 20 and 37 degrees C. Reproducibility is current +/- 7%. MgB4O7 TLD arrays are suitable for patient dosimetry in high dose fluoroscopy procedures if appropriate calibrations are used. Uncertainty in skin dose measurement is less than 10%, which is substantially better than film dosimetry. PMID:9350720

  17. Photoionized plasmas induced in neon with extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray pulses produced using low and high energy laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Dudzak, R.; Dostal, J.; Krousky, E.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.

    2015-04-15

    A comparative study of photoionized plasmas created by two soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (SXR/EUV) laser plasma sources with different parameters is presented. The two sources are based on double-stream Xe/He gas-puff targets irradiated with high (500 J/0.3 ns) and low energy (10 J/1 ns) laser pulses. In both cases, the SXR/EUV beam irradiated the gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the radiation pulse. Irradiation of gases resulted in formation of photoionized plasmas emitting radiation in the SXR/EUV range. The measured Ne plasma radiation spectra are dominated by emission lines corresponding to radiative transitions in singly charged ions. A significant difference concerns origin of the lines: K-shell or L-shell emissions occur in case of the high and low energy irradiating system, respectively. In high energy system, the electron density measurements were also performed by laser interferometry, employing a femtosecond laser system. A maximum electron density for Ne plasma reached the value of 2·10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}. For the low energy system, a detection limit was too high for the interferometric measurements, thus only an upper estimation for electron density could be made.

  18. Honing the accuracy of extreme-ultraviolet optical system testing: at-wavelength and visible-light measurements of the ETS Set-2 projection optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Chapman, Henry N.

    2002-07-01

    As the quality of optical systems for extreme ultraviolet lithography improves, high-accuracy wavefront metrology for alignment and qualification becomes ever more important. To enable the development of diffraction-limited EUV projection optics, visible-light and EUV interferometries must work in close collaboration. We present a detailed comparison of EUV and visible-light wavefront measurements performed across the field of view of a lithographic-quality EUV projection optical system designed for use in the Engineering Test Stand developed by the Virtual National Laboratory and the EUV Limited Liability Company. The comparisons reveal that the present level of RMS agreement lies in the 0.3-0.4-nm range. Astigmatism is the most significant aberration component for the alignment of this optical system; it is also the dominant term in the discrepancy, and the aberration with the highest measurement uncertainty. With EUV optical systems requiring total wavefront quality in the (lambda) EUV/50 range, and even higher surface-figure quality for the individual mirror elements, improved accuracy through future comparisons, and additional studies, are required.

  19. Laser Station Design for the Global Light System for the Planned JEM-EUSO Extreme Universe Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Christine; Burg, Martin; Bigler, Colton; Wiencke, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    The JEM-EUSO Global Light System (GLS) will provide ground-based calibration and monitoring for the JEM-EUSO detector planned for the International Space Station (ISS). JEM-EUSO will use the atmosphere as a giant calorimeter to measure Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). The GLS will include twelve ground stations. All twelve will have calibration xenon flash bulbs and six will have steered lasers. The GLS laser stations will generate optical signatures by creating light tracks across the JEM-EUSO field of view. The lasers and xenon flashers will be used to benchmark the JEM-EUSO instrument during its mission since energy, duration and orientation of those sources can be controlled. In this presentation, we will describe a project to design and build a working prototype of a GLS laser station. In order to meet the specifications set forth in the design requirements, our design incorporates remote operation capability, solar power, and a controlled internal climate. These components are in addition to the laser and calibration system and steering mechanism. All components will be combined in a robust, durable design that can be deployed and operated in remote locations across the globe.

  20. Development of Extremely Wide-Field CMOS Camera Tomo-e:Contribution to Small Solar System Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Juniichi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Urakawa, Seitaro; Usui, Fumihiko; Ohsawa, Ryou; Sako, Shigeyuki; Arimatsu, Ko

    2016-07-01

    We are developing an ultra wide-field fast camera, Tomo-e Gozen, which will be set up on the 105cm (F3.1) Schmidt telescope in Kiso Observatory at the University of Tokyo. Tomo-e equipped with 84 CMOS image sensors, which work in a room temperature, has a 20 square degree field of view and a fast readout speed of ~2 Hz. The purpose of this camera is the observation of the transient objects such as the counterpart of the gravitational wave events, the ultra wide-field capability with a high survey efficiency is also useful for small solar system bodies; NEOs, occultation events of the TNOs, and meteors. In the presentation, the specifications of Tomo-e are shown together with some preliminary results of the experimental observation run.

  1. Determination of extremely high pressure tolerance of brine shrimp larvae by using a new pressure chamber system.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mihye; Koyama, Sumihiro; Toyofuku, Takashi; Kojima, Shigeaki; Watanabe, Hiromi

    2013-11-01

    Hydrostatic pressure is the only one of a range of environmental parameters (water temperature, salinity, light availability, and so on) that increases in proportion with depth. Pressure tolerance is therefore essential to understand the foundation of populations and current diversity of faunal compositions at various depths. In the present study, we used a newly developed pressure chamber system to examine changes in larval activity of the salt-lake crustacean, Artemia franciscana, in response to a range of hydrostatic pressures. We showed that A. franciscana larvae were able to survive for a short period at pressures of ≤ 60 MPa (approximately equal to the pressure of 6000 m deep). At a pressure of > 20 MPa, larval motor ability was suppressed, but not lost. Meanwhile, at a pressure of > 40 MPa, some of the larval motor ability was lost without recovery after decompression. For all experiments, discordance of movement and timing between right and left appendages, was observed at pressures of > 20 MPa. Our results indicate that the limit of pressure for sustaining active behavior of A. franciscana larvae is ∼20 MPa, whereas the limit of pressure for survival is within the range 30-60 MPa. Thus, members of the genus Artemia possess the ability to resist a higher range of pressures than their natural habitat depth. Our findings demonstrated an example of an organism capable of invading deeper environment in terms of physical pressure tolerance, and indicate the need and importance of pressure study as an experimental method. PMID:24224473

  2. Reliability and Effects of Arm Dominance on Upper Extremity Isokinetic Force, Work, and Power Using the Closed Chain Rider System

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Trundle, Terry L.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to assess the reliability of the Closed Chain Rider System between exercise sessions and to determine the effects of arm dominance using muscle force, work, and power measures during closed chain chest-press exercise. Design and Setting: Sitting subjects underwent identical testing on 2 occasions and performed 5 reciprocal chest-press movements at speeds of 51 and 76 cm/s. Subjects: Thirty-eight healthy college students. Measurements: Average force, total work, average power, and linear range of motion were recorded. Reliability was evaluated by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients. Mean differences between the dominant and nondominant arms for the measured variables were analyzed by dependent t tests. Results: For both the dominant and nondominant arms at the 51 and 76 cm/s speeds, reliabilities of average force (range = 0.85 to 0.91), total work (range = 0.88 to 0.92), and average power (range = 0.86 to 0.89) were clinically acceptable. The dominant arm produced significantly greater average force, total work, and average power compared with the nondominant arm. Conclusions: Our results provide clinically useful information about the reliability of force, work, and power measures during multijoint bilateral chest-press movement. Clinicians should be aware of measured differences between dominant and nondominant arms. Imagesp359-a PMID:16558589

  3. Climate Networks and Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurths, J.

    2014-12-01

    We analyse some climate dynamics from a complex network approach. This leads to an inverse problem: Is there a backbone-like structure underlying the climate system? For this we propose a method to reconstruct and analyze a complex network from data generated by a spatio-temporal dynamical system. This approach enables us to uncover relations to global circulation patterns in oceans and atmosphere. The global scale view on climate networks offers promising new perspectives for detecting dynamical structures based on nonlinear physical processes in the climate system. Moreover, we evaluate different regional climate models from this aspect. This concept is also applied to Monsoon data in order to characterize the regional occurrence of extreme rain events and its impact on predictability. Changing climatic conditions have led to a significant increase in magnitude and frequency of spatially extensive extreme rainfall events in the eastern Central Andes of South America. These events impose substantial natural hazards for population, economy, and ecology by floods and landslides. For example, heavy floods in Bolivia in early 2007 affected more than 133.000 households and produced estimated costs of 443 Mio. USD. Here, we develop a general framework to predict extreme events by combining a non-linear synchronization technique with complex networks. We apply our method to real-time satellite-derived rainfall data and are able to predict a large amount of extreme rainfall events. Our study reveals a linkage between polar and subtropical regimes as responsible mechanism: Extreme rainfall in the eastern Central Andes is caused by the interplay of northward migrating frontal systems and a low-level wind channel from the western Amazon to the subtropics, providing additional moisture. Frontal systems from the Antarctic thus play a key role for sub-seasonal variability of the South American Monsoon System.

  4. Feasibility of the adaptive and automatic presentation of tasks (ADAPT) system for rehabilitation of upper extremity function post-stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current guidelines for rehabilitation of arm and hand function after stroke recommend that motor training focus on realistic tasks that require reaching and manipulation and engage the patient intensively, actively, and adaptively. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a novel robotic task-practice system, ADAPT, designed in accordance with such guidelines. At each trial, ADAPT selects a functional task according to a training schedule and with difficulty based on previous performance. Once the task is selected, the robot picks up and presents the corresponding tool, simulates the dynamics of the tasks, and the patient interacts with the tool to perform the task. Methods Five participants with chronic stroke with mild to moderate impairments (> 9 months post-stroke; Fugl-Meyer arm score 49.2 ± 5.6) practiced four functional tasks (selected out of six in a pre-test) with ADAPT for about one and half hour and 144 trials in a pseudo-random schedule of 3-trial blocks per task. Results No adverse events occurred and ADAPT successfully presented the six functional tasks without human intervention for a total of 900 trials. Qualitative analysis of trajectories showed that ADAPT simulated the desired task dynamics adequately, and participants reported good, although not excellent, task fidelity. During training, the adaptive difficulty algorithm progressively increased task difficulty leading towards an optimal challenge point based on performance; difficulty was then continuously adjusted to keep performance around the challenge point. Furthermore, the time to complete all trained tasks decreased significantly from pretest to one-hour post-test. Finally, post-training questionnaires demonstrated positive patient acceptance of ADAPT. Conclusions ADAPT successfully provided adaptive progressive training for multiple functional tasks based on participant's performance. Our encouraging results establish the feasibility of ADAPT; its efficacy will next be tested

  5. SPHERE eXtreme AO control scheme: final performance assessment and on sky validation of the first auto-tuned LQG based operational system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Fusco, T.; Sevin, A.; Suarez, M.; Costille, A.; Vigan, A.; Soenke, C.; Perret, D.; Rochat, S.; Barrufolo, A.; Salasnich, B.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Dohlen, K.; Mouillet, D.; Puget, P.; Wildi, F.; Kasper, M.; Conan, J.-M.; Kulcsár, C.; Raynaud, H.-F.

    2014-08-01

    The SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetry High-contrast Exoplanet Research) instrument is an ESO project aiming at the direct detection of extra-solar planets. SPHERE has been successfully integrated and tested in Europe end 2013 and has been re-integrated at Paranal in Chile early 2014 for a first light at the beginning of May. The heart of the SPHERE instrument is its eXtreme Adaptive Optics (XAO) SAXO (SPHERE AO for eXoplanet Observation) subsystem that provides extremely high correction of turbulence and very accurate stabilization of images for coronagraphic purpose. However, SAXO, as well as the overall instrument, must also provide constant operability overnights, ensuring robustness and autonomy. An original control scheme has been developed to satisfy this challenging dichotomy. It includes in particular both an Optimized Modal Gain Integrator (OMGI) to control the Deformable Mirror (DM) and a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control law to manage the tip-tilt (TT) mirror. LQG allows optimal estimation and prediction of turbulent angle of arrival but also of possible vibrations. A specific and unprecedented control scheme has been developed to continuously adapt and optimize LQG control ensuring a constant match to turbulence and vibrations characteristics. SPHERE is thus the first operational system implementing LQG, with automatic adjustment of its models. SAXO has demonstrated performance beyond expectations during tests in Europe, in spite of internal limitations. Very first results have been obtained on sky last May. We thus come back to SAXO control scheme, focusing in particular on the LQG based TT control and the various upgrades that have been made to enhance further the performance ensuring constant operability and robustness. We finally propose performance assessment based on in lab performance and first on sky results and discuss further possible improvements.

  6. Understanding extreme winds in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Gudrun Nina

    2015-04-01

    Iceland is a fairly windy country, due to it's location adjacent the North Atlantic storm track. The orography of the island is rugged, mountains are steep and fjords and valleys narrow, and this impacts local winds. Thus, mountain wind phenomena such as low level jets, gap winds, down-slope wind storms, mountain waves and wind wakes are common. To increase our knowledge of the behaviour of wind in Iceland an extreme value analysis was conducted based on observations from 61 automatic weather stations, applying the Peak Over Threshold technique on maximum daily wind speed and maximum daily wind gust at each site. The time series included at least 10 years of data and the threshold was chosen as the 0.9 quantile of maximum mean wind speed/maximum wind gust at each location. Among the results is the larger impact the local orography has on the extreme wind gusts compared to the mean wind. With extreme value models in place, a few significant weather events were selected from recent years and the observed wind speeds compared to the models in order to evaluate how extreme the events were and how large area they impacted. Actually, in most of these events the observed wind speed only turned out to be extreme at a few stations, emphasising the local effects. However, in an event from December 2007, when the observed maximum wind speed exceeded 23 m/s in most of western Iceland, the event was estimated as rare at a number of weather stations. Clearly this gives indication for further studying this particular weather event. An automatic system has been set up, running once an hour, comparing observed wind measurements to the extreme value models and producing maps of the return periods for all sites. This system gives us the possibility to, on a daily basis, evaluate the extremeness of each situation and simultaneously increase our knowledge of extreme wind behaviour in Iceland. This work is a foundation for studying changes in extreme winds in Iceland.

  7. 21st Birthday Drinking: Extremely Extreme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Patricia C.; Park, Aesoon; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite public recognition of the hazards of 21st birthday drinking, there is little empirical information concerning its prevalence, severity, and risk factors. Data from a sample of 2,518 college students suggest that 21st birthday drinking poses an extreme danger: (a) 4 of every 5 participants (83%) reported drinking to celebrate, (b) birthday…

  8. How extreme is extreme hourly precipitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Dialynas, Yannis G.; Pappas, Christoforos

    2016-04-01

    The importance of accurate representation of precipitation at fine time scales (e.g., hourly), directly associated with flash flood events, is crucial in hydrological design and prediction. The upper part of a probability distribution, known as the distribution tail, determines the behavior of extreme events. In general, and loosely speaking, tails can be categorized in two families: the subexponential and the hyperexponential family, with the first generating more intense and more frequent extremes compared to the latter. In past studies, the focus has been mainly on daily precipitation, with the Gamma distribution being the most popular model. Here, we investigate the behaviour of tails of hourly precipitation by comparing the upper part of empirical distributions of thousands of records with three general types of tails corresponding to the Pareto, Lognormal, and Weibull distributions. Specifically, we use thousands of hourly rainfall records from all over the USA. The analysis indicates that heavier-tailed distributions describe better the observed hourly rainfall extremes in comparison to lighter tails. Traditional representations of the marginal distribution of hourly rainfall may significantly deviate from observed behaviours of extremes, with direct implications on hydroclimatic variables modelling and engineering design.

  9. Taming the Mighty Mississippi: Integrating paleo-flood data and modeling to understand the patterns and causes of extreme floods on a major river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Samuel; Giosan, Liviu; Jeffrey, Donnelly; Dee, Sylvia; Shen, Zhixiong

    2016-04-01

    The Mississippi River is an economic artery of the United States that is heavily managed to provide flood control and maintain a navigable shipping channel. The current system of levees and spillway structures was conceived in the early 20th century, but the ability of this system to withstand the altered hydroclimatic conditions projected for the next century is poorly understood. Here, we present initial results from a project that integrates new sedimentary records from floodplain lakes with analyses of sediment geochemistry and climate model simulations to better understand the causes of extreme floods on the lower Mississippi River. In our sedimentary paleoflood records, flood event beds are characterized by an upward fining sequence from deposition of the bedload and suspended load during overbank floods, identified here using high-resolution laser particle-size analysis and elemental composition (XRF), and dated using radioisotopes (137Cs, 210Pb, 14C) and optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz. Grain-size descriptors and elemental ratios of Zr/Fe and Fe/Rb are highly correlated, and are used alongside historical discharge records to develop a statistical model for reconstructing flood magnitude in prehistoric contexts. Geochemical analyses of sediments from the floodplains of major tributaries of the Mississippi are used to assess the systematics of 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 206Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb across the basin, enabling identification of the synoptic patterns of individual paleo-flood events. We investigate the dynamical drivers of past floods on the lower Mississippi using both reanalysis data and the last millennium simulation from NCAR model CESM1 to find that increased likelihoods of extreme floods on the lower Mississippi River are associated with enhanced moisture flux over midcontinental North America that is controlled by the interaction of seasonally variable soil moisture over major tributaries with inter-annual (e.g., ENSO) and

  10. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  11. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  12. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network ``mobile'' can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed.

  13. Techniques for extreme attitude suspension of a wind tunnel model in a magnetic suspension and balance system. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, David Huw

    1989-01-01

    Although small scale magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBSs) for wind tunnel use have been in existence for many years, they have not found general application in the production testing of flight vehicles. One reason for this is thought to lie in the relatively limited range of attitudes over which a wind tunnel model may be suspended. Modifications to a small MSBS to permit the suspension and control of axisymmetric models over angles of attack from less than zero to over ninety degrees are reported. Previous work has shown that existing arrangement of ten electromagnets was unable to generate one of the force components needed for control at extreme attitudes. Examination of possible solutions resulted in a simple alteration to rectify this deficiency. To generate the feedback signals to control the suspended model, an optical position sensing system using collimated laser beams and photodiode arrays was installed and tested. An analytical basis was developed for distributing the demands for force and moment needed for model stabilization amonge the electromagnets over the full attitude range. This was implemented by an MSBS control program able to continually adjust the distribution for the instantaneous incidence in accordance with prescheduled data. Results presented demonstrate rotations of models from zero to ninety degrees at rates up to ninety degrees per second, with pitching rates rising to several hundred degrees per second in response to step-change demands. A study of a design for a large MSBS suggests that such a system could be given the capability to control a model in six degrees of freedom over an unlimited angle of attack range.

  14. Interfacing a haptic robotic system with complex virtual environments to treat impaired upper extremity motor function in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    FLUET, GERARD G.; QIU, QINYIN; KELLY, DONNA; PARIKH, HETA D.; RAMIREZ, DIEGO; SALEH, SOHA; ADAMOVICH, SERGEI V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the ability of the New Jersey Institute of Technology Robot Assisted Virtual Rehabilitation (NJIT-RAVR) system training to elicit changes in upper extremity (UE) function in children with hemiplegia secondary to cerebral palsy. Methods Nine children (mean age 9 years, three males) participated in three pilots. Subjects trained 1 hour, 3 days a week for 3 weeks. Two groups performed this protocol as their only intervention. The third group also performed 5–6 hours of constraint-induced movement therapy. Results All subjects participated in a short programme of nine, 60-minute training sessions without adverse effects. As a group, subjects demonstrated statistically significant improvements in Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function Test, a composite of three timed UE tasks and several measurements of reaching kinematics. Several subjects demonstrated clinically significant improvements in active shoulder abduction and flexion as well as forearm supination. Conclusion Three small pilots of NJIT-RAVR training demonstrated measurable benefit with no complications, warranting further examination. PMID:20828330

  15. [Responses of thymocytes and splenocytes to low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation in normal mice and in mice with systemic inflammation].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Sirota, N P; Kudriavtsev, A A; Chemeris, N K

    2010-01-01

    Changes in T cell subsets and expression of cytokine genes in thymocytes and splenocytes after exposure of BAL/c mice to low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, exposure duration 20 min) under normal conditions and in systemic inflammation were studied using flow cytometry and the methods of reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction. It was found that the number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells statistically significantly increased in the thymus and considerably decreased in the spleen of exposed animals. Apparently, the exposure of animals leads to an intensification of the host defense, by activating the T-cellular immunity. As for effector functions, the increased expression of IL-1beta and IFNgamma genes in thymocytes and essentially enhanced expression of IL-1beta, IL-10, and TNFalpha genes in splenocytes were observed in mice exposed against the background of a progressive inflammatory process. The experimental data obtained specify that the directed (anti-inflammatory) response of an organism to a specific combination of effective exposure parameters of electromagnetic radiation can be realized by the activation of particular immunocompetent cells and changes in the cytokine profile. PMID:20968076

  16. Understanding hydrological extremes in the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mård, Johanna; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological extremes, from floods to droughts, pose one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. Many of these challenges are associated with societal interactions with water, as people control or impact hydrological systems in a multitude of ways while they are also being affected and shaped by hydrological extremes, depending on their response to drought and flood events. However, the fact that the human and natural components of freshwater systems interact and co-evolve over time is often not taken into account. There is a need to study the two-way coupling between hydrology and society within a more comprehensive framework for hydrological extremes to anticipate future trajectories in a rapidly changing world. We present an interdisciplinary framework (and concepts) to identify internal controlling variables, processes and feedbacks, and the external system drivers and disturbances of the coupled human-water system with regard to hydrological extremes. To achieve this, the study (i) synthesizes existing research on coupled human-water system focusing on floods and droughts, (ii) analyzes hydrological extremes that have already occurred and their spatiotemporal patterns to investigate what patterns are observed in different regions of the world, and (iii) systematically describe the observed hydrological extremes, their causes and the interactions and feedbacks between hydrology and society. Advancing our understanding of mechanisms and feedbacks driving hydrological extremes is essential to better anticipate how the coupled human-water system will respond to future environmental change.

  17. Quorum Sensing in Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Kate; Charlesworth, James C.; LeBard, Rebecca; Visscher, Pieter T.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communication, particularly that of quorum sensing, plays an important role in regulating gene expression in a range of organisms. Although this phenomenon has been well studied in relation to, for example, virulence gene regulation, the focus of this article is to review our understanding of the role of microbial communication in extreme environments. Cell signaling regulates many important microbial processes and may play a pivotal role in driving microbial functional diversity and ultimately ecosystem function in extreme environments. Several recent studies have characterized cell signaling in modern analogs to early Earth communities (microbial mats), and characterization of cell signaling systems in these communities may provide unique insights in understanding the microbial interactions involved in function and survival in extreme environments. Cell signaling is a fundamental process that may have co-evolved with communities and environmental conditions on the early Earth. Without cell signaling, evolutionary pressures may have even resulted in the extinction rather than evolution of certain microbial groups. One of the biggest challenges in extremophile biology is understanding how and why some microbial functional groups are located where logically they would not be expected to survive, and tightly regulated communication may be key. Finally, quorum sensing has been recently identified for the first time in archaea, and thus communication at multiple levels (potentially even inter-domain) may be fundamental in extreme environments. PMID:25371335

  18. On causality of extreme events

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Multiple metrics have been developed to detect causality relations between data describing the elements constituting complex systems, all of them considering their evolution through time. Here we propose a metric able to detect causality within static data sets, by analysing how extreme events in one element correspond to the appearance of extreme events in a second one. The metric is able to detect non-linear causalities; to analyse both cross-sectional and longitudinal data sets; and to discriminate between real causalities and correlations caused by confounding factors. We validate the metric through synthetic data, dynamical and chaotic systems, and data representing the human brain activity in a cognitive task. We further show how the proposed metric is able to outperform classical causality metrics, provided non-linear relationships are present and large enough data sets are available. PMID:27330866

  19. Relative HCP-to-gamma Thermoluminescent Efficiencies for TLD-100 Dosemeters Exposed to Low-energy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, O.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Concha, K.; Brandan, M. E.; Aviles, P.; Gamboa de Buen, I.

    2006-09-08

    This work presents data and calculations of (HCP)-to-gamma TLD-100 thermoluminescent efficiencies. Dosemeters were irradiated with low energy hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen ions. For nitrogen and oxygen two energies, corresponding to ''mirror'' values below and above the Bragg peak energy, were used to measure TL efficiencies for the same linear energy transfer (LET) entrance value. Efficiency results, both as a function of LET and energy, show distinct curves for each ion species. For energies above the Bragg peak energy, measurements show the well known tendency, efficiency values decrease with increasing LET. Data for energies lower than the Bragg peak display the opposite, efficiency increases with increasing LET. Results presented as a function of incident energy show that efficiency decreases with decreasing energy. For nitrogen and oxygen ions, the ''mirror'' measurements at higher energy (above the Bragg peak) are found to be 1.45 times greater than their low energy counterparts. Theoretical predictions based on Modified Track Structure Theory (MTST) show agreement with data within 40 % and predict the observed behavior, higher efficiency for higher ion energy.

  20. Investigation of the ionisation density dependence of the glow curve characteristics of LIF:MG,TI (TLD-100)

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Horowitz, A.; Oster, L.; Marino, S.; Datz, H.; Margaliot, M.

    2008-01-01

    The dependence of the shape of the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) on ionisation density was investigated using irradiation with 90Sr/90Y beta rays, 60 and 250 kVp X rays, various heavy-charged particles and 0.2 and 14 MeV neutrons. Special attention is focused on the properties of high-temperature thermoluminescence; specifically, the behaviour of the high-temperature ratio (HTR) of Peaks 7 and 8 as a function of batch and annealing protocol. The correlation of Peaks 7 and 8 with average linear-energy-transfer (LET) is also investigated. The HTR of Peak 7 is found to be independent of LET for values of LET approximately >30 keV µm−1. The behaviour of the HTR of Peak 8 with LET is observed to be erratic, which suggests that applications using the HTR should separate the contributions of Peaks 7 and 8 using computerised glow curve deconvolution. The behaviour of the HTR following neutron irradiation is complex and not fully understood. The shape of composite Peak 5 is observed to be broader following high ionisation alpha particle irradiation, suggesting that the combined use of the HTR and the shape of Peak 5 could lead to improved ionisation density discrimination for particles of high LET. PMID:18667402

  1. Measurement of computed tomography dose profile with pitch variation using Gafchromic XR-QA2 and thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwaningsih, S.; Lubis, L. E.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    This research was aimed to check the patterns of dose profile on adult and pediatric head scan. We compared measurement result on dose profile along the z- axis rotation at peripheries and center phantom with a variety of pitch, i.e. 0.75, 1, 1.5 for adult and pediatric head protocol, keeping the rest of the scan parameters constant. Measurements were performed on homogeneous, cylindrical PMMA phantom with diameters of 16 and 10 cm using XR-QA2 Gafchromic film and TLD as dosimeters. The measurement result indicated a decrease in the dose about 50% and 47% for adult and pediatric head scan with the increase of pitch. For 0.75 value of pitch adult head scan, dose range for each position were (2.4 - 5.0) cGy, (3.1 - 5.3) cGy, (2.2 - 4.5) cGy, (2.8 - 5.3) cGy, and (3.3 - 5.6) cGy for position of center, 3, 6, 9 and 12 o'clock peripheral phantom position respectively. Dose profile for adult and pediatric head scan protocols has pattern curve with the maximum dose in the middle and tendency of symmetry near the edges, with different the plateau length along z- axis direction in accordance to the measurement position in the phantom.

  2. Survival of extreme opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jiann-wien; Huang, Ding-wei

    2009-12-01

    We study the survival of extreme opinions in various processes of consensus formation. All the opinions are treated equally and subjected to the same rules of changing. We investigate three typical models to reach a consensus in each case: (A) personal influence, (B) influence from surroundings, and (C) influence to surroundings. Starting with uniformly distributed random opinions, our calculated results show that the extreme opinions can survive in both models (A) and (B), but not in model (C). We obtain a conclusion that both personal influence and passive adaptation to the environment are not sufficient enough to eradicate all the extreme opinions. Only the active persuasion to change the surroundings eliminates the extreme opinions completely.

  3. Improving extreme value statistics.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni

    2014-11-01

    The rate of convergence in extreme value statistics is nonuniversal and can be arbitrarily slow. Further, the relative error can be unbounded in the tail of the approximation, leading to difficulty in extrapolating the extreme value fit beyond the available data. We introduce the T method, and show that by using simple nonlinear transformations the extreme value approximation can be rendered rapidly convergent in the bulk, and asymptotic in the tail, thus fixing both issues. The transformations are often parametrized by just one parameter, which can be estimated numerically. The classical extreme value method is shown to be a special case of the proposed method. We demonstrate that vastly improved results can be obtained with almost no extra cost. PMID:25493780

  4. Extreme environments and exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, E. I.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological research on extreme environments can be applied to exobiological problems such as the question of life on Mars. If life forms (fossil or extant) are found on Mars, their study will help to solve fundamental questions about the nature of life on Earth. Extreme environments that are beyond the range of adaptability of their inhabitants are defined as "absolute extreme". Such environments can serve as terrestrial models for the last stages of life in the history of Mars, when the surface cooled down and atmosphere and water disappeared. The cryptoendolithic microbial community in porous rocks of the Ross Desert in Antarctica and the microbial mats at the bottom of frozen Antarctic lakes are such examples. The microbial communities of Siberian permafrost show that, in frozen but stable communities, long-term survival is possible. In the context of terraforming Mars, selected microorganisms isolated from absolute extreme environments are considered for use in creation of a biological carbon cycle.

  5. Hardware removal - extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007644.htm Hardware removal - extremity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Surgeons use hardware such as pins, plates, or screws to help ...

  6. The Use of TLD and Gafchromic Film to Assure Submillimeter Accuracy for Image-Guided Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Anthony K. Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steve D.; Main, Bill; Adler, John R.

    2008-04-01

    The Cyberknife is an image-guided radiosurgical system. It uses a compact X-band 6-MV linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm to deliver radiosurgical doses. While routine quality assurance (QA) is essential for any radiosurgery system, QA plays an even more vital role for the Cyberknife system, due to the complexity of the system and the wide range of applications. This paper presents a technique for performing quality assurance using thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) and Gafchromic films that is intended to be specific for the Cyberknife. However, with minor modification, the proposed method can also be used for QA of other radiosurgery systems. Our initial QA procedure for the CyberKnife utilized a 30 x 30 x 11-cm solid water phantom containing a planar array of slots for 1x 1 x 1-mm TLDs on a 2-mm grid. With the objective of significantly simplifying CyberKnife QA, a new procedure for verification was developed, which uses much fewer TLDs than the prior solid water phantom technique. This new method requires only that the system target dose to the center of a cluster of 7 TLDs. In a prior study with Gafchromic films, conducted at 3 different Cyberknife facilities, the mean clinically relevant error was demonstrated to be 0.7 mm. A similar Gafchromic film analysis replicated these error measurements as part of the present investigation. It cannot be emphasized enough the importance of implementing routine QA to verify the accuracy of any radiosurgery system. Our quality assurance procedure tests the treatment planning system, as well as the entire treatment delivery including the image targeting system and the robot system. Either TLDs or Gafchromic films may be used for QA test of a radiosurgery system. Using both methods for measurement has the advantage independently verifying the accuracy of the system. This approach, which is routinely in used at our institution, has repeatedly confirmed the submillimeter targeting accuracy of our Cyberknife.

  7. SU-F-19A-06: Experimental Investigation of the Energy Dependence of TLD Sensitivity in Low-Energy Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To measure the energy dependence of TLD sensitivity in lowenergy photon beams with equivalent mono-energetic energy matching those of 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs brachytherapy sources. Methods: A Pantek DXT 300 x-ray unit (Precision X-ray, Branford, CT), with stable digital voltage control down to 20 kV, was used to establish three lowenergy photon beams with narrow energy spread and equivalent monoenergetic energies matching those of 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs brachytherapy sources. The low-energy x-ray beams and a reference 6 MV photon beam were calibrated according to the AAPM TG-61 and TG-51 protocols, respectively, using a parallel-plate low-energy chamber and a Farmer cylindrical chamber with NIST traceable calibration factors. The dose response of model TLD-100 micro-cubes (1×1×1 mm{sup 3}) in each beam was measured for five different batches of TLDs (each contained approximately 100 TLDs) that have different histories of irradiation and usage. Relative absorbed dose sensitivity was determined as the quotient of the slope of dose response for a beam-of-interest to that of the reference beam. Results: Equivalent mono-energetic photon energies of the low-energy beams established for 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs sources were 20.5, 27.5, and 30.1 keV, respectively. Each beam exhibited narrow spectral spread with energyhomogeneity index close to 90%. The relative absorbed-dose sensitivity was found to vary between different batches of TLD with maximum differences of up to 8%. The mean and standard deviation determined from the five TLD batches was 1.453 ± 0.026, 1.541 ± 0.035 and 1.529 ± 0.051 for the simulated 103P, 125I and 131Cs beams, respectively. Conclusion: Our measured relative absorbed-dose sensitivities are greater than the historically measured value of 1.41. We find that the relative absorbed-dose sensitivity of TLD in the 103P beam is approximately 5% lower than that of 125I and 131Cs beams. Comparison of our results with other studies will be presented.

  8. Performance testing of extremity dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.; Reece, W.D.; Hooker, C.D.

    1987-06-01

    The Health Physics Society Standing Committee (HPSSC) Working Group on Performance Testing of Extremity Dosimeters has issued a draft of a proposed standard for extremity dosimeters. The draft standard proposes methods to be used for testing dosimetry systems that determine occupational radiation dose to the extremities and the performance criterion used to determine compliance. The draft standard has been evaluated by testing the performance of existing processors of extremity dosimeters against the standard's proposed criterion. The proposed performance criterion is: absolute value of B + S less than or equal to 0.35, where B is the bias (calculated as the average of the performance quotients) of 15 dosimeter measurements and S is the standard deviation of the performance quotients. Dosimeter performance was tested in seven irradiation categories: low-energy photons (general and accident dosimetry), high-energy photons (general and accident dosimetry), beta particles, neutrons, and a mixture category. Twenty-one types of extremity dosimeters (both finger ring and wrist/ankle dosimeters) were received from 11 processors. The dosimeters were irradiated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to specific dose levels in one or more of the seven categories as specified in the draft standard and were returned to the processors. The processors evaluated the doses and returned the results to PNL for analysis. The results were evaluated against the performance criterion specified in the draft standard. The results indicate that approximately 60% of both the finger ring and the wrist/ankle dosimeters met the performance criterion. Two-thirds of the dosimeters that did not meet the performance criterion had large biases (ranging from 0.25 to 0.80) but small standard deviations (less than 0.15). 21 refs., 3 figs., 20 tabs.

  9. Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Extremely Well-Preserved 2.45-Billion-Year-Old Hydrothermal Systems in the Vetreny Belt, Baltic Shield: Insights into Paleohydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, D. O.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    The early Paleoproterozoic was an eventful period in the Earth's history. The first portions of free oxygen emerged in the atmosphere, Snowball Earth glaciations happened several times and the first supercontinent broke up due to extensive rifting. These events should have affected the stable isotopic composition of the hydrosphere. In this study, we use rocks that were altered in underwater hydrothermal systems to investigate the stable isotopic composition of the hydrosphere 2.39-2.45 billion years ago (hereinafter, Ga). Extremely low-δ18O (down to -27.5‰ SMOW) rocks from 2.39 Ga metamorphosed subglacial hydrothermal systems of the Belomorian belt, Baltic Shield formed at near-equatorial latitudes suggesting a Snowball (or Slushball) Earth glaciation. These results motivated us to look at temporally and geographically close hydrothermal systems from the unmetamorhposed 2.45 Ga Vetreny Belt rift. The length of the rift is 250 km and it is composed of high-Mg basalts, mafic-ultramafic intrusions and sedimentary successions. We examined several localities of high-Mg basalt flows that include astonishingly fresh pillow lavas, often with preserved volcanic glass, eruptive breccias, and hydrothermal alteration zones. Collected samples serve a great textural evidence of water-rock interaction that occurred in situ while basalts were cooling. The preliminary results from coexisting quartz and epidote (T, D18O=311°C), and from coexisting calcite and quartz (T, D18O=190°C) yield values of δ18O of involved water between -1.6 and -0.9 ‰. The values of δ13C in calcites vary between -4.0 and -2.3 ‰. It is likely that hydrothermal fluids operated in the Vetreny Belt rift were derived from seawater that is no different from modern oceanic water in terms of δ18O. Apparently, the rift was a Paleoproterozoic analog of the modern Red Sea, filled with oceanic water. The result is important because the Vetreny Belt rift predates the onset of Snowball Earth glaciation at 2

  10. Investigation of the predictability and physical mechanisms of an extreme-rainfall-producing mesoscale convective system along the Meiyu front in East China: An ensemble approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yali; Chen, Yangruixue

    2015-10-01

    Forecast uncertainties and physical mechanisms of a quasi-linear extreme-rain-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) along the Meiyu front in East China, during the midnight-to-morning hours on 8 July 2007, are studied using ensembles of 24 h convection-permitting simulations with a nested grid spacing of 1.11 km. The simulations reveal a strong sensitivity to uncertainties in the initial state despite the synoptic environment being favorable for heavy rainfall production. Linear changes of a less skillful member's initial state toward that of a skillful member lead to a monotonic improvement in the precipitation simulation, with the most significant contribution arising from changes in the moisture field. Sensitivity to physics parameterizations representing subgrid-scale processes fail to account for the larger simulation errors (missing the MCS) with the physics variation examined but could result in a large spread in the location and amount of accumulative rainfall. A robust feature of the best-performing members that reasonably simulate the MCS-associated heavy rainfall is the presence of a cold dome ahead of the Meiyu front generated by previous convection. The cold dome promotes nocturnal convective initiation by lifting high equivalent potential temperature air in the southwesterly flow to its level of free convection. The skillful members reproduce the convective backbuilding and echo-band training processes that are observed during this event and many other heavy rainfall events over China. In contrast, the less skillful members that miss the development of the MCS either do not simulate the previous convection or produce a cold dome that is too shallow to initiate the MCS.

  11. Extreme horizontal branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    A review is presented on the properties, origin and evolutionary links of hot subluminous stars which are generally believed to be extreme Horizontal Branch stars or closely related objects. They exist both in the disk and halo populations (globular clusters) of the Galaxy. Amongst the field stars a large fraction of sdBs are found to reside in close binaries. The companions are predominantly white dwarfs, but also low mass main sequence stars are quite common. Systems with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions may qualify as Supernova Ia progenitors. Recently evidence has been found that the masses of some unseen companions might exceed the Chandrasekhar mass, hence they must be neutron stars or black holes. Even a planet has recently been detected orbiting the pulsating sdB star V391 Peg. Quite to the opposite,in globular clusters, only very few sdB binaries amongst are found indicating that the dominant sdB formation processes is different in a dense environment. Binary population synthesis models identify three formation channels, (i) stable Roche lobe overflow, (ii) one or two common envelope ejection phases and (iii) the merger of two helium white dwarfs. The latter channel may explain the properties of the He-enriched subluminous O stars, the hotter sisters of the sdB stars, because their binary fraction is lower than that of the sdBs by a factor of ten or more. The rivaling ''late hot flasher'' scenario is also discussed. Pulsating subluminous B (sdB) stars play an important role for asteroseismology as this technique has already led to mass determinations for a handful of stars. A unique hyper-velocity sdO star moving so fast that it is unbound to the Galaxy has probably been ejected by the super-massive black hole in the Galactic centre.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic scleroderma in patients from the aboriginal people and the newcomers of Yakutia under the extreme conditions of the far north.

    PubMed

    Bezrodnyhk, A A; Karelin, A P

    1994-01-01

    There is some information on the course of two main forms of large collagenoses-systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic scleroderma (SSD) under the conditions of the North of the Asian part of Russia (Yakutia) in this paper. Seventy-nine cases (59 SLE patients and 20 SSD patients) belonging to different ethnic groups were studied. There were 47 patients of Yakutian nationality, among them SLE 38 patients and SSD nine patients. There were 32 patients (SLE-21, and SSD-11) migrant Europeans. It has been proved that the aboriginal people of the North are more subject to SLE and SSD diseases as compared to the migrants. It has also been proved that the greater spreading of the diseases, with the collagen metabolism disturbance in the first ethnic group, including Marfan's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis may be explained by genetic peculiarities. Some ethnically stipulated differences in clinical manifestations of two large collagenosis were revealed. Thus, during SLE smaller frequency of the skin impairment in the Yakuts (due to natural hyperpigmentations) is connected with the considerable frequency of large joints impairment and more frequent course of SLE similar to rheumatoid variant with typical wrist deformation. One-third SLE and SSD patients of Yakut nationality reveal "overlap-syndrome", which are typical of other collagenoses, the so-called overlap-syndrome. Some industrial factors (dust of silicon dioxide, vibration, hydrocarbon compounds) are the main reason for the diseases among the newcomers migrants of Russian and Ukranian nationality. One case of silico-lupus was revealed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7943620

  13. Advanced Instrumentation for Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Melin, Alexander M; Kisner, Roger; Fugate, David L

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is pursuing embedded instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology for next generation nuclear power generation applications. Embedded systems encompass a wide range of configurations and technologies; we define embedding in this instance as the integration of the sensors and the control system design into the component design using a systems engineering process. Embedded I&C systems are often an essential part of developing new capabilities, improving reliability, enhancing performance, and reducing operational costs. The new intrinsically safe, more efficient, and cost effective reactor technologies (Next Generation Nuclear Plant and Small Modular Reactors) require the development and application of new I&C technologies. These new designs raise extreme environmental challenges such as high temperatures (over 700 C) and material compatibility (e.g., molten salts). The desired reliability and functionality requires measurements in these extreme conditions including high radiation environments which were not previously monitored in real time. The DOE/NE Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program currently has several projects investigating I&C technologies necessary to make these reactor designs realizable. The project described in this paper has the specific goal of investigating embedded I&C with the following objectives: 1.Explore and quantify the potential gains from embedded I&C improved reliability, increased performance, and reduced cost 2.Identify practical control, sensing, and measurement techniques for the extreme environments found in high-temperature reactors 3.Design and fabricate a functional prototype high-temperature cooling pump for molten salts represents target demonstration of improved performance, reliability, and widespread usage There are many engineering challenges in the design of a high-temperature liquid salt cooling pump. The pump and motor are in direct contact with

  14. Extremal dynamics and punctuated co-evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim

    1995-02-01

    Extremal dynamics opens up a new way for understanding the coherence that is observed in some large non-equilibrium systems. Extremal dynamics is characterized by quasistatic motion where only one part of the large system is active at a given instant: the part where a local variable assumes a global extremum value. Extremal dynamics may apply when the parts of the system nearly always are caught in metastable states. Examples from physics may include earthquakes, fluid invasion in porous media and possibly also dynamical roughening of interfaces. We discuss a simple model of extremal dynamics and its application to biological macroevolution. The model can be formulated as an ecology of adapting interacting species. The environment of any given species is affected by other species; hence it may change with time. For low mutation rate the model ecology expands at a self-organized critical state where periods of statis alternate with avalanches of evolutionary changes.

  15. Extremity dosimetry for radiation workers handling unsealed radionuclides in nuclear medicine departments in India.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Pankaj; Venkatesh, Meera; Bhatt, B C

    2007-02-01

    In India, for the past five decades, whole body radiation dose of radiation workers has been monitored by means of film and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges worn on the body. However, there are no provision/regulatory requirements to monitor doses received at the extremities, i.e., to fingers. Finger dose monitoring is essential for controlling the extremity dose limits for occupational personnel handling unsealed radioactive sources. In order to estimate the doses received in various types of procedures using unsealed sources, finger dose monitoring was carried out in 54 major institutions in the country using a specially designed plastic finger ring embedded with a TLD. The maximum finger dose of occupational workers involved in handling Tc in such activities as extraction and radiopharmacy work is 0.35 mSv GBq; during injection of radiopharmaceuticals and scintigraphy, the doses were observed to be 1 and 0.95 mSv GBq, respectively. Similarly, while handling F-FDG, the maximum doses received during dispensing, injection, and scintigraphy were 0.098, 0.324, and 0.56 mSv GBq, respectively. The maximum radiation dose received during Re/Re balloon angioplasty and while handling Sm was 3.92 and 6.5 mSv GBq, respectively. All the doses recorded were well within the prescribed limit. However, monitoring of these doses periodically would help in compiling the feedback regarding the work practices followed in institutions handling radioisotopes in the country and would also help in maintaining a record of safe work procedures while handling radioisotopes. PMID:17220712

  16. National and international standards and calibration of thermoluminescence dosimetry systems.

    PubMed

    Soares, C G

    2002-01-01

    Radiation protection for radiation workers, the public, and the environment is of international concern. The use of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) is an acceptable method for dose recording in most countries. For reasons of consistency and data gathering (research) it is important that a Sievert (Sv) in one part of the world equals an Sv on the other side of the globe. To this end, much work has gone into the development of standards and calibration practices for TLD systems so that they compare not only with similar systems, but also with other forms of radiation measurement. While most national laboratories provide calibration services for these systems some, as in the United States, depend on services of secondary calibration laboratories that are traceable to the national laboratories through accreditation programmes. The purpose of this paper is to explain how TLD measurements are traceable to their respective national standards for both personnel and environmental dosimetry. PMID:12382728

  17. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure. PMID:26900120

  18. Extreme black hole holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Thomas Edward

    The connection between black holes in four dimensions and conformal field theories (CFTs) in two dimensions is explored, focusing on zero temperature (extreme) black holes and their low-temperature cousins. It is shown that extreme black holes in a theory of quantum gravity are holographically dual to field theories living in two dimensions without gravity, and that the field theory reproduces a variety of black hole phenomena in detail. The extreme black hole/CFT correspondence is derived from a symmetry analysis near the horizon of a Kerr black hole with mass M and maximal angular momentum J=M 2. The asymptotic symmetry generators form one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge c=12J, which implies that the near-horizon quantum states are identical to those of a two-dimensional CFT. We discuss extensions of this result to near-extreme black holes and cosmological horizons. Astrophysical black holes are never exactly extremal, but the black hole GRS1915+105 observed through X-ray and radio telescopy is likely within 1% of the extremal spin, suggesting that this extraordinary and well studied object is approximately dual to a two-dimensional CFT with c˜1079. As evidence for the correspondence, microstate counting in the CFT is used to derive the Bekenstein-Hawking area law for the Kerr entropy, S=Horizon area/4. Furthermore, the correlators in the dual CFT are shown to reproduce the scattering amplitudes of a charged scalar or spin-½ field by a near-extreme Kerr-Newman black hole, and a neutral spin-1 or spin-2 field by a near-extreme Kerr black hole. Scattering amplitudes probe the vacuum of fields living on the black hole background. For scalars, bound superradiant modes lead to an instability, while for fermions, it is shown that the bound superradiant modes condense and form a Fermi sea which extends well outside the ergosphere. Assuming no further instabilities, the low energy effective theory near the black hole is described by ripples in the

  19. Dome cities for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Raymond S.; Schwartz, Milton

    1992-01-01

    Extreme environments whether they be the frigid nights of the polar regions, the burning sands of the desert, or the harsh environment of space pose interesting challenges to the architect, the engineer, and the constructor in their efforts to create habitats for mankind. In space, the goals are to provide radiation protection while also providing an aesthetic living environment for long duration missions. Because of the need to provide both radiation protection and options for expansion of base facilities, a unique structural system which separates the radiation protection systems from the pressure envelope of the habitats was created. The system uses cable networks in a tensioned structural system, which supports the lunar regolith used for shielding above the facilities. The system is modular, easily expandable, and simple to construct. Additional innovations include the use of rock melting perpetrators for piles and anchoring deadmen, and various sized craters to provide side shielding. The reflective properties of the fabric used in the membrane are utilized to provide diffuse illumination. The use of craters along with the suspended shielding allows the dome to be utilized in fashions similar to those proposed by various designers unaware of the Moon's hostile radiation environment. Additional topics addressed deal with construction techniques for large domes, i.e., on the order of 100's to 1000's of meters, thermal control, the integration of tertiary water treatment schemes with architectural design, human factors, and its implications for the design of habitats for long term use in extreme environments.

  20. Dome cities for extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Raymond S.; Schwartz, Milton

    Extreme environments whether they be the frigid nights of the polar regions, the burning sands of the desert, or the harsh environment of space pose interesting challenges to the architect, the engineer, and the constructor in their efforts to create habitats for mankind. In space, the goals are to provide radiation protection while also providing an aesthetic living environment for long duration missions. Because of the need to provide both radiation protection and options for expansion of base facilities, a unique structural system which separates the radiation protection systems from the pressure envelope of the habitats was created. The system uses cable networks in a tensioned structural system, which supports the lunar regolith used for shielding above the facilities. The system is modular, easily expandable, and simple to construct. Additional innovations include the use of rock melting perpetrators for piles and anchoring deadmen, and various sized craters to provide side shielding. The reflective properties of the fabric used in the membrane are utilized to provide diffuse illumination. The use of craters along with the suspended shielding allows the dome to be utilized in fashions similar to those proposed by various designers unaware of the Moon's hostile radiation environment. Additional topics addressed deal with construction techniques for large domes, i.e., on the order of 100's to 1000's of meters, thermal control, the integration of tertiary water treatment schemes with architectural design, human factors, and its implications for the design of habitats for long term use in extreme environments.

  1. Measurement of residual radioactive surface contamination by 2-D laser heated TLD

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.C.

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of applying and adapting a two-dimensional laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry system to the problem of surveying for radioactive surface contamination was studied. The system consists of a CO{sub 2} laser-based reader and monolithic arrays of thin dosimeter elements. The arrays consist of 10,201 thermoluminescent phosphor elements of 40 micron thickness, covering a 900 cm{sup 2} area. Array substrates are 125 micron thick polyimide sheets, enabling them to easily conform to regular surface shapes, especially for survey of surfaces that are inaccessible for standard survey instruments. The passive, integrating radiation detectors are sensitive to alpha and beta radiation at contamination levels below release guideline limits. Required contact times with potentially contaminated surfaces are under one hour to achieve detection of transuranic alpha emission at 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2}. Positional information obtained from array evaluation is useful for locating contamination zones. Unique capabilities of this system for survey of sites, facilities and material include measurement inside pipes and other geometrical configurations that prevent standard surveys, and below-surface measurement of alpha and beta emitters in contaminated soils. These applications imply a reduction of material that must be classified as radioactive waste by virtue of its possibility of contamination, and cost savings in soil sampling at contaminated sites.

  2. Evaluating environmental joint extremes for the offshore industry using the conditional extremes model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Understanding extreme ocean environments and their interaction with fixed and floating structures is critical for the design of offshore and coastal facilities. The joint effect of various ocean variables on extreme responses of offshore structures is fundamental in determining the design loads. For example, it is known that mean values of wave periods tend to increase with increasing storm intensity, and a floating system responds in a complex way to both variables. Specification of joint extremes in design criteria has often been somewhat ad hoc, being based on fairly arbitrary combinations of extremes of variables estimated independently. Such approaches are even outlined in design guidelines. Mathematically more consistent estimates of the joint occurrence of extreme environmental variables fall into two camps in the offshore industry - response-based and response-independent. Both are outlined here, with emphasis on response-independent methods, particularly those based on the conditional extremes model recently introduced by (Heffernan and Tawn, 2004), which has a solid theoretical motivation. We illustrate an application of the conditional extremes model to joint estimation of extreme storm peak significant wave height and peak period at a northern North Sea location, incorporating storm direction as a model covariate. We also discuss joint estimation of extreme current profiles with depth off the North West Shelf of Australia. Methods such as the conditional extremes model provide valuable additions to the metocean engineer's toolkit.

  3. Predictability and Mechanism of an Extreme-Rainfall-Producing Mesoscale Convective System along a Mei-Yu Front in East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yali; Ruixue Chen, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Forecast uncertainties of a quasi-linear extreme-rain-producing mesoscale convective system (MCS) along a mei-yu front in east China during the midnight-to-morning hours of 8 July 2007 are studied using several 24-h convection-permitting ensembles of simulation with the nested grid spacing of 1.11 km. There is considerable spread in the ensembles' precipitation forecast despite of the synoptic environment known conducive to heavy local rainfall. Forty simulations with perturbed initial condition reveal a very strong sensitivity to uncertainties in the initial fields. A robust feature of the best-performing members that reasonably simulated the MCS and associated heavy rainfall was the presence of a cold dome before the mei-yu front, which was generated by previous convection. The cold dome helped the nocturnal convective initiation (CI) by lifting the moist air in the low-level southwesterly flow to its level of free convection. In contrast, the bad members that missed the MCS' development could not simulate the previous convection or produced a cold dome that was not deep enough to initiate the MCS. At the initial time, the bad members had less atmospheric moisture over and upstream of the CI region than the good members. This resulted in the frontal-lifting-induced CI being delayed by about 4 hours and too weak convection to form the MCS in the bad members. Extra experiments were performed to test the sensitivity of precipitation simulation to the initial condition differences between a good and a bad member. Linear changing of the bad member's initial condition toward the good member's led to monotonic improvement of the precipitation simulation, with the most significant contribution from the moisture field. Sensitivity of the precipitation forecast to the model physical process parameterization schemes is examined by conducting three groups of experiment, each consisting of 9 members using different physics schemes and using the same initial condition as two

  4. Hydrological extremes and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundzewicz, Z. W.; Matczak, P.

    2015-04-01

    Economic losses caused by hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - have been on the rise. Hydrological extremes jeopardize human security and impact on societal livelihood and welfare. Security can be generally understood as freedom from threat and the ability of societies to maintain their independent identity and their functional integrity against forces of change. Several dimensions of security are reviewed in the context of hydrological extremes. The traditional interpretation of security, focused on the state military capabilities, has been replaced by a wider understanding, including economic, societal and environmental aspects that get increasing attention. Floods and droughts pose a burden and serious challenges to the state that is responsible for sustaining economic development, and societal and environmental security. The latter can be regarded as the maintenance of ecosystem services, on which a society depends. An important part of it is water security, which can be defined as the availability of an adequate quantity and quality of water for health, livelihoods, ecosystems and production, coupled with an acceptable level of water-related risks to people, environments and economies. Security concerns arise because, over large areas, hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - are becoming more frequent and more severe. In terms of dealing with water-related risks, climate change can increase uncertainties, which makes the state's task to deliver security more difficult and more expensive. However, changes in population size and development, and level of protection, drive exposure to hydrological hazards.

  5. Going to Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project which gave students a chance to explore the idea of using "extreme" materials in a sculpture. While the process was, at times, challenging and stressful for teacher and student alike, the results proved that, with proper planning, even young students can independently demonstrate multiple solutions…

  6. Climate Extremes and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Philip

    2009-10-01

    In October 2005, as the United States still was reeling from Hurricane Katrina in August and as the alphabet was too short to contain all of that year's named Atlantic tropical storms (Hurricane Wilma was forming near Jamaica), a timely workshop in Bermuda focused on climate extremes and society (see Eos, 87(3), 25, 17 January 2006). This edited volume, which corresponds roughly to the presentations given at that workshop, offers a fascinating look at the critically important intersection of acute climate stress and human vulnerabilities. A changing climate affects humans and other living things not through the variable that most robustly demonstrates the role of rising greenhouse gases—globally averaged temperature—but through local changes, especially changes in extremes. The first part of this book, “Defining and modeling the nature of weather and climate extremes,” focuses on natural science. The second part, “Impacts of weather and climate extremes,” focuses on societal impacts and responses, emphasizing an insurance industry perspective because a primary sponsor of the workshop was the Risk Prediction Initiative, whose aim is to “support scientific research on topics of interest to its sponsors” (p. 320).

  7. Attribution of climate extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Fasullo, John T.; Shepherd, Theodore G.

    2015-08-01

    There is a tremendous desire to attribute causes to weather and climate events that is often challenging from a physical standpoint. Headlines attributing an event solely to either human-induced climate change or natural variability can be misleading when both are invariably in play. The conventional attribution framework struggles with dynamically driven extremes because of the small signal-to-noise ratios and often uncertain nature of the forced changes. Here, we suggest that a different framing is desirable, which asks why such extremes unfold the way they do. Specifically, we suggest that it is more useful to regard the extreme circulation regime or weather event as being largely unaffected by climate change, and question whether known changes in the climate system's thermodynamic state affected the impact of the particular event. Some examples briefly illustrated include 'snowmaggedon' in February 2010, superstorm Sandy in October 2012 and supertyphoon Haiyan in November 2013, and, in more detail, the Boulder floods of September 2013, all of which were influenced by high sea surface temperatures that had a discernible human component.

  8. Comparison of the dose distribution obtained from dosimetric systems with intensity modulated radiotherapy planning system in the treatment of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçe, M.; Uslu, D. Koçyiǧit; Ertunç, C.; Karalı, T.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plan of prostate cancer patients with different dose verification systems in dosimetric aspects and to compare these systems with each other in terms of reliability, applicability and application time. Dosimetric control processes of IMRT plan of three prostate cancer patients were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), ion chamber (IC) and 2D Array detector systems. The difference between the dose values obtained from the dosimetric systems and treatment planning system (TPS) were found to be about % 5. For the measured (TLD) and calculated (TPS) doses %3 percentage differences were obtained for the points close to center while percentage differences increased at the field edges. It was found that TLD and IC measurements will increase the precision and reliability of the results of 2D Array.

  9. TLD skin dose measurements and acute and late effects after lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Francisco . E-mail: francisco.perera@lrcc.on.ca; Chisela, Frank; Stitt, Larry; Engel, Jay; Venkatesan, Varagur

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: This report examines the relationships between measured skin doses and the acute and late skin and soft tissue changes in a pilot study of lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven of 39 women enrolled in this pilot study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (37.2 Gy in 10 fractions b.i.d.) each had thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) at 5 points on the skin of the breast overlying the implant volume. Skin changes at TLD dose points and fibrosis at the lumpectomy site were documented every 6 to 12 months posttreatment using a standardized physician-rated cosmesis questionnaire. The relationships between TLD dose and acute skin reaction, pigmentation, or telangiectasia at 5 years were analyzed using the GEE algorithm and the GENMOD procedure in the SAS statistical package. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant associations between acute skin reaction and late pigmentation or telangiectasia or between the volumes encompassed by various isodoses and fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results: The median TLD dose per fraction (185 dose points) multiplied by 10 was 9.2 Gy. In all 37 patients, acute skin reaction Grade 1 or higher was observed at 5.9% (6 of 102) of dose points receiving 10 Gy or less vs. 44.6% (37 of 83) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.0001). In 25 patients at 60 months, 1.5% telangiectasia was seen at dose points receiving 10 Gy or less (1 of 69) vs. 18% (10 of 56) telangiectasia at dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p 0.004). Grade 1 or more pigmentation developed at 1.5% (1 of 69) of dose points receiving less than 10 Gy vs. 25% (14 of 56) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.001). A Grade 1 or more acute skin reaction was also significantly associated with development of Grade 1 or more pigmentation or telangiectasia at 60 months. This association was most significant for acute reaction and telangiectasia directly over the

  10. Extreme Environments Technologies for Probes to Venus and Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Craig E.; Cutts, James A.; Belz, Andrea P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the technologies that are used to mitigate extreme environments for probes at Venus and Jupiter. The contents include: 1) Extreme environments at Venus and Jupiter; 2) In-situ missions to Venus and Jupiter (past/present/future); and 3) Approaches to mitigate conditions of extreme environments for probes with systems architectures and technologies.

  11. SU-E-T-354: Peak Temperature Ratio of TLD Glow Curves to Investigate the Spatial Dependence of LET in a Clinical Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Reft, C; Pankuch, M; Ramirez, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use the ratio of the two high temperature peaks (HTR) in TLD 700 glow curves to investigate spatial dependence of the linear energy transfer (LET) in proton beams. Studies show that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends upon the physical dose as well as its spatial distribution. Although proton therapy uses a spatially invariant RBE of 1.1, studies suggest that the RBE increases in the distal edge of a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) due to the increased LET. Methods: Glow curve studies in TLD 700 show that the 280 C temperature peak is more sensitive to LET radiation than the 210 C temperature peak. Therefore, the areas under the individual temperature peaks for TLDs irradiated in a proton beam normalized to the peak ratio for 6 MV photons are used to determine the HTR to obtain information on its LET. TLD 700 chips with dimensions 0.31×0.31×0.038 cc are irradiated with 90 MeV protons at varying depths in a specially designed blue wax phantom to investigate LET spatial dependence. Results: Five TLDs were placed at five different depths of the percent depth dose curve (PDD) of range 16.2 cm: center of the SOPB and approximately at the 99% distal edge, 90%, 75% and 25% of the PDD, respectively. HTR was 1.3 at the center of the SOBP and varied from 2.2 to 3.9 which can be related to an LET variation from 0.5 to 18 KeV/μ via calibration with radiation beams of varying LET. Conclusion: HTR data show a spatially invariant LET slightly greater than the 6 MV radiations in the SOBP, but a rapidly increasing LET at the end of the proton range. These results indicate a spatial variation in RBE with potential treatment consequences when selecting treatment margins to minimize the uncertainties in proton RBE.

  12. SU-E-T-108: Development of a Novel Clinical Neutron Dose Monitor for Proton Therapy Based On Twin TLD500 Chips in a Small PE Moderator

    SciTech Connect

    Hentschel, R; Mukherjee, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, it could be desirable to measure out-of-field fast neutron doses at critical locations near and outside the patient body. Methods: The working principle of a novel clinical neutron dose monitor is verified by MCNPX simulation. The device is based on a small PE moderator of just 5.5cm side length for easy handling covered with a thermal neutron suppression layer. In the simulation, a polystyrene phantom is bombarded with a standard proton beam. The secondary thermal neutron flux produced inside the moderator by the impinging fast neutrons from the treatment volume is estimated by pairs of α-Al2O3:C (TLD500) chips which are evaluated offline after the treatment either by TL or OSL methods. The first chip is wrapped with 0.5mm natural Gadolinium foil converting the thermal neutrons to gammas via (n,γ) reaction. The second chip is wrapped with a dummy material. The chip centers have a distance of 2cm from each other. Results: The simulation shows that the difference of gamma doses in the TLD500 chips is correlated to the mean fast neutron dose delivered to the moderator material. Different outer shielding materials have been studied. 0.5mm Cadmium shielding is preferred for cost reasons and convenience. Replacement of PE moderator material by other materials like lead or iron at any place is unfavorable. The spatial orientation of the moderator cube is uncritical. Using variance reduction techniques like splitting/Russian roulette, the TLD500 gamma dose simulation give positive differences up to distances of 0.5m from the treatment volume. Conclusion: Applicability and basic layout of a novel clinical neutron dose monitor are demonstrated. The monitor measures PE neutron doses at locations outside the patient body up to distances of 0.5m from the treatment volume. Tissue neutron doses may be calculated using neutron kerma factors.

  13. THE EXTREME HOSTS OF EXTREME SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, James D.; Quimby, Robert; Ofek, Eran; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Sullivan, Mark; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter; Seibert, Mark; Overzier, Roderik; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2011-01-20

    We use GALEX ultraviolet (UV) and optical integrated photometry of the hosts of 17 luminous supernovae (LSNe, having peak M{sub V} < -21) and compare them to a sample of 26, 000 galaxies from a cross-match between the SDSS DR4 spectral catalog and GALEX interim release 1.1. We place the LSN hosts on the galaxy NUV - r versus M{sub r} color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with the larger sample to illustrate how extreme they are. The LSN hosts appear to favor low-density regions of the galaxy CMD falling on the blue edge of the blue cloud toward the low-luminosity end. From the UV-optical photometry, we estimate the star formation history of the LSN hosts. The hosts have moderately low star formation rates (SFRs) and low stellar masses (M{sub *}) resulting in high specific star formation rates (sSFR). Compared with the larger sample, the LSN hosts occupy low-density regions of a diagram plotting sSFR versus M{sub *} in the area having higher sSFR and lower M{sub *}. This preference for low M{sub *}, high sSFR hosts implies that the LSNe are produced by an effect having to do with their local environment. The correlation of mass with metallicity suggests that perhaps wind-driven mass loss is the factor that prevents LSNe from arising in higher-mass, higher-metallicity hosts. The massive progenitors of the LSNe (>100 M{sub sun}), by appearing in low-SFR hosts, are potential tests for theories of the initial mass function that limit the maximum mass of a star based on the SFR.

  14. Compilation of 1986 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological-monitoring program. Volume 2. Tabs D-G. Annual progress report, January-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The U.S. Navy is conducting a long-term program to monitor for possible effects from the operation of its Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications System to resident biota and their ecological relationships. This report documents progress of the following studies: Soil Amoeba; Soil and Litter Arthropoda and Earthworm Studies; Biological Studies on Pollinating insects: Megachilid Bees; and Small Vertebrates: Small Mammals and Nesting Birds.

  15. Communication path for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C. (Inventor); Betts, Bradley J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and systems for using one or more radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs), or other suitable signal transmitters and/or receivers, to provide a sensor information communication path, to provide location and/or spatial orientation information for an emergency service worker (ESW), to provide an ESW escape route, to indicate a direction from an ESW to an ES appliance, to provide updated information on a region or structure that presents an extreme environment (fire, hazardous fluid leak, underwater, nuclear, etc.) in which an ESW works, and to provide accumulated thermal load or thermal breakdown information on one or more locations in the region.

  16. Extreme Events: The Indian Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, K. S.

    2008-05-01

    The geographical situation of India is such that it experiences varied types of climate in different parts of the country and invariably the natural events, extreme and normal, would affect such areas that are prone to them. Cyclones hit the eastern coast, while floods affect mostly northern India, while earthquakes hit any part of the country, particuarly when itbecame evident after the 1967 earthquake of Koyna that the peninsular part toois prone to seismic events. The National Commission on Floods estimated that nearly 40 millionn hectares of land is prone to flooding, which could rise to60 million soon. The cropped area thus affected annually is about 10 millionhectares. On an average 1500 lives are lost during floods annually, while the damage to property could run into billions of dollars. The total loss on account of floods damage to crops is estimated at about Rs 53,000 crores(crore= 100 lakhs), during the period 1953-1998. The other extreme natural event is drought which affects large parts of the country, except the northeast. Both floods and droughts can hit different parts of the country during the same period. The 2001 earthquake that hit Gujarat is perhaps the severest and studies on that event are still in progress. The 2004 tsunami which hit large parts of southeast Asia did not spare India. Its southern coast was battered and many lives were lost. In fact some geogrphic landmarks were lost, while some of the cities have suffered a shift in their position. It was estimated that about 1.2 billion dollars were required ro meet the rehabilitation and relief measures. The seismic zone map of India thus had to be revised more often than before. Apart from these, extreme rainfall has also caused floods in urban areas as in Mumbai in 2005, but this was mostly because of lack of proper drainage system and the existing system proved ineffective. Human hand in such cases is evident. There are systems working to forecast floods, cyclones, and droughts, though

  17. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacement000.

  18. Rehabilitation in extremity fractures.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, E

    1975-03-01

    General principles in the rehabilitation of a patient with an extremity fracture include: treat the patient, not the x-ray; move all joints not immobilized; prevent disuse atrophy; use gravity to assist in mobilizing a joint; stabilize proximal joints to avoid reverse action of biarticular muscles; permit early protected weight bearing until adequate joint mobility is achieved; appropriately instruct the patient in a home program, and avoid all stretching. PMID:1114932

  19. Penetrating extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Ivatury, Rao R; Anand, Rahul; Ordonez, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating extremity trauma (PET) usually becomes less important when present along with multiple truncal injuries. The middle eastern wars documented the terrible mortality and morbidity resulting from PET. Even in civilian trauma, PET can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. There are now well-established principles in the evaluation and management of vascular, bony, soft tissue, and neurologic lesions that will lead to a reduction of the poor outcomes. This review will summarize some of these recent concepts. PMID:25413177

  20. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network “mobile” can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344