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Sample records for exuvium

  1. Developmental strategy of the endoparasite Xenos vesparum (strepsiptera, Insecta): host invasion and elusion of its defense reactions.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Fabio; Giusti, Fabiola; Beani, Laura; Dallai, Romano

    2007-07-01

    To successfully complete its endoparasitic development, the strepsipteran Xenos vesparum needs to elude the defense mechanisms of its host, the wasp Polistes dominulus. SEM and TEM observations after artificial infections allow us to outline the steps of this intimate host-parasite association. Triungulins, the mobile 1st instar larvae of this parasite, are able to "softly" overcome structural barriers of the larval wasp (cuticle and epidermis) without any traumatic reaction at the entry site, to reach the hemocoel where they settle. The parasite molts 48 h later to a 2nd instar larva, which moves away from the 1st instar exuvium, molts twice more without ecdysis (a feature unique to Strepsiptera) and pupates, if male, or develops into a neotenic female. Host encapsulation involves the abandoned 1st larval exuvium, but not the living parasite. In contrast to the usual process of encapsulation, it occurs only 48 h after host invasion or later, and without any melanization. In further experiments, first, we verified Xenos vesparum's ability to reinfect an already parasitized wasp larva. Second, 2nd instar larvae implanted in a new host did not evoke any response by hemocytes. Third, we tested the efficiency of host defense mechanisms by implanting nylon filaments in control larval wasps, excluding any effect due the dynamic behavior of a living parasite; within a few minutes, we observed the beginning of a typical melanotic encapsulation plus an initial melanization in the wound site. We conclude that the immune response of the wasp is manipulated by the parasite, which is able to delay and redirect encapsulation towards a pseudo-target, the exuvia of triungulins, and to elude hemocyte attack through an active suppression of the immune defense and/or a passive avoidance of encapsulation by peculiar surface chemical properties. PMID:17437299

  2. A study of embryonic development in eriophyoid mites (Acariformes, Eriophyoidea) with the use of the fluorochrome DAPI and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chetverikov, Philipp E; Desnitskiy, Alexey G

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic development of four eriophyoid mite species, Cecidophyopsis ribis, Phytoptus avellanae, Oziella liroi and Loboquintus subsquamatus, has been studied with the use of fluorochrome DAPI and confocal microscopy. The first three nuclear divisions occur on the egg periphery (the groups of 2, 4, and 6 nuclei have been recorded), while the biggest part of yolk remains undivided. After four or five nuclear divisions all nuclei are situated only in one sector of the embryo, while other sectors contain only yolk suggesting possible meroblastic cleavage. Later, the formation of superficial blastoderm takes place. A few large yolk cells are situated inside the embryo. Germ band formation initiates as funnel-like cell invagination and leads to formation of a typical stage with four paired prosomal buds (chelicerae, palps, legs I and II). Each palp contains two lobes (anterior and posterior), the adult subcapitulum is presumably a fusion product of the anterior pair of the lobes. Neither rudiments of legs III and IV, traces of opisthosomal segments nor remnants of the prelarval exuvium under the egg shell were detected. Overall, the pattern of embryonic development in eriophyoids re-emphasizes the peculiarity of this ancient group of miniaturized phytoparasitic animals, and invites researches to pursue a deeper investigation of various fundamental aspects of this aberrant group of Acari. Further studies using various fluorescent dyes and transmission electron microscopy are needed to visualize plasma membranes and clarify the pattern of early cleavage of eriophyoids. PMID:26530993

  3. Cuticular protein with a low complexity sequence becomes cross-linked during insect cuticle sclerotization and is required for the adult molt

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Seulgi; Young Noh, Mi; Dittmer, Neal T.; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Kramer, Karl J.; Kanost, Michael R.; Arakane, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the insect cuticle, structural proteins (CPs) and the polysaccharide chitin are the major components. It has been hypothesized that CPs are cross-linked to other CPs and possibly to chitin by quinones or quinone methides produced by the laccase2-mediated oxidation of N-acylcatechols. In this study we investigated functions of TcCP30, the third most abundant CP in protein extracts of elytra (wing covers) from Tribolium castaneum adults. The mature TcCP30 protein has a low complexity and highly polar amino acid sequence. TcCP30 is localized with chitin in horizontal laminae and vertically oriented columnar structures in rigid cuticles, but not in soft and membranous cuticles. Immunoblot analysis revealed that TcCP30 undergoes laccase2-mediated cross-linking during cuticle maturation in vivo, a process confirmed in vitro using recombinant rTcCP30. We identified TcCPR27 and TcCPR18, the two most abundant proteins in the elytra, as putative cross-linking partners of TcCP30. RNAi for the TcCP30 gene had no effect on larval and pupal growth and development. However, during adult eclosion, ~70% of the adults were unable to shed their exuvium and died. These results support the hypothesis that TcCP30 plays an integral role as a cross-linked structural protein in the formation of lightweight rigid cuticle of the beetle. PMID:25994234

  4. Conjugation in Hyalophysa chattoni Bradbury (Apostomatida): An adaptation to a symbiotic life cycle.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Phyllis Clarke; Hash, Stephen M; Rogers, Faye Kucera; Neptun, Steven H; Zhang, Limin

    2013-11-01

    Hyalophysa chattoni, borne as an encysted phoront on a crustacean's exoskeleton, metamorphoses to the trophont during the host's premolt. After the molt within 15min to 2h conjugants with food vacuoles appear in the exuvium, swimming along with the trophonts. Starvation in other ciliates usually precedes conjugation, but food vacuoles in conjugants do not preclude starvation. Only after ingestion and dehydration of vacuoles ceases, does digestion of exuvial fluid begin. Conjugants resorb their feeding apparatus as they fuse. A single imperforate membrane from each partner forms the junction membrane. In a reproductive cyst conjugants divide synchronously, but now the junction membrane is interrupted by pores and channels. After the last division the daughters undergo meiosis--two meiotic divisions and one mitotic division yielding two prokarya as they simultaneously differentiate into tomites. After fertilization, pairs separate and the synkaryon divides once into a macronuclear anlage and a micronucleus. Exconjugants leave the cyst and seek a host. The parental macronucleus remains active until the phoront stage when the anlage develops. Owing to random association of micronuclei during meiosis, Hyalophysa's exconjugants are more genetically diverse than exconjugants from conventional patterns of conjugation. PMID:23706651

  5. Epidermis architecture and material properties of the skin of four snake species

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marie-Christin G.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of structural and experimental data, it was previously demonstrated that the snake integument consists of a hard, robust, inflexible outer surface (Oberhäutchen and β-layer) and softer, flexible inner layers (α-layers). It is not clear whether this phenomenon is a general adaptation of snakes to limbless locomotion or only to specific conditions, such as habitat and locomotion. The aim of the present study was to compare the structure and material properties of the outer scale layers (OSLs) and inner scale layers (ISLs) of the exuvium epidermis in four snake species specialized to live in different habitats: Lampropeltis getula californiae (terrestrial), Epicrates cenchria cenchria (generalist), Morelia viridis (arboreal) and Gongylophis colubrinus (sand-burrowing). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of skin cross sections revealed a strong variation in the epidermis structure between species. The nanoindentation experiments clearly demonstrated a gradient of material properties along the epidermis in the integument of all the species studied. The presence of such a gradient is a possible adaptation to locomotion and wear minimization on natural substrates. In general, the difference in both the effective elastic modulus and hardness of the OSL and ISL between species was not large compared with the difference in epidermis thickness and architecture. PMID:22896567

  6. Epidermis architecture and material properties of the skin of four snake species.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marie-Christin G; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2012-11-01

    On the basis of structural and experimental data, it was previously demonstrated that the snake integument consists of a hard, robust, inflexible outer surface (Oberhäutchen and β-layer) and softer, flexible inner layers (α-layers). It is not clear whether this phenomenon is a general adaptation of snakes to limbless locomotion or only to specific conditions, such as habitat and locomotion. The aim of the present study was to compare the structure and material properties of the outer scale layers (OSLs) and inner scale layers (ISLs) of the exuvium epidermis in four snake species specialized to live in different habitats: Lampropeltis getula californiae (terrestrial), Epicrates cenchria cenchria (generalist), Morelia viridis (arboreal) and Gongylophis colubrinus (sand-burrowing). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of skin cross sections revealed a strong variation in the epidermis structure between species. The nanoindentation experiments clearly demonstrated a gradient of material properties along the epidermis in the integument of all the species studied. The presence of such a gradient is a possible adaptation to locomotion and wear minimization on natural substrates. In general, the difference in both the effective elastic modulus and hardness of the OSL and ISL between species was not large compared with the difference in epidermis thickness and architecture. PMID:22896567

  7. Postecdysis Sclerotization of Mouthparts of the Formosan Subterranean Termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Garima; Chouvenc, Thomas; Su, Nan-Yao

    2016-04-01

    In termites, it is challenging to recognize the incidence of molting in workers because of their successive stationary molt, asynchronous molting among individuals, cryptic behavior, a soft and poorly sclerotized cuticle, and they immediately consume the shed exuvia of nestmates. This study describes a method in which the degree of sclerotization of the mouthparts in newly molted workers of the Formosan subterranean termite can be quantified and used to determine if an individual has recently molted, within a 36-h time frame. Changes in the tanning of mouthparts over time were used as a measure of the index of sclerotization in workers postmolting. Upon ecdysis, the primary point of articulation of the mandible already initiated sclerotization, which may allow the movement of the mandibles during the shedding of the exuvium. The sclerotization of the secondary point of articulation and the mandibular teeth, and the width of sclerotization of the mandibles, progressively increased until reaching a plateau around 36-h postecdysis, which imply that workers can regain some level of activity as early as 2 d after ecdysis. Our observations allowed for the determination of variables for the sclerotization of the mouthparts to easily identify workers that recently molted, and this method will be useful in future studies that focus on the molting activity of workers over time and space within a termite colony, in the scope of improving current control strategies for termite pests. PMID:26743216

  8. Development of respiratory structures in embryos and first and second instars of the bark scorpion, Centruroides gracilis (Scorpiones: Buthidae).

    PubMed

    Farley, Roger D

    2008-09-01

    The SEM was used to study the development of respiratory structures in successive stages in relation to the overall changes occurring in the scorpions. Book lung development is a slow process, starting with spiracles and a sac-like atrium in the early embryo and continuing lamellar formation to 150 or more in the adult. In the embryo, the primordial epithelial cells become aligned in a planar pattern as they secrete granules of material that aggregate spontaneously to form the cuticular walls of the lamellae. A blade-like structure is formed consisting of cells sandwiched within the two cuticle walls they secreted. These cells are in the primordial air channel. The adjacent hemolymph channel is nearly devoid of cells, but cross-bridges develop and help stabilize the cuticle walls and maintain the width of the channel. The cells in the primordial air channel undergo cytolysis, leaving it open for air except for cuticular cross-bridges. Development continues in the newborn (first instars); the air channels of some lamellae still contain cells and are not yet functional for gas exchange. The first instars are weak and relatively inactive. They climb up on the mother's dorsum until the first molt (about 8 days). With the cuticular walls of the lamellae in place, cells adhering to the wall in the hemolymph channel produce a thin, new tissue layer (epithelium) on the lamellar wall facing the hemolymph channel. This layer has many discontinuities as though it is slowly developing. Formation of the tissue layer and cytolysis of the cells in the air channels continue through the first molt in which little book lung cuticle is shed as exuvium. The air channels of the second instars (foraging nymphs) are now cell free and open for air passage except for the cross-bridges. The tissue layer is still incomplete and continues to be formed. It may provide the hypodermal primordium for cuticle replacement in later molts, but development was not studied beyond the second instar