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Sample records for eye migration pigmentation

  1. Calcium binding in pigmented and albino eyes.

    PubMed Central

    Dräger, U C

    1985-01-01

    The localization of calcium binding sites in eyes was determined autoradiographically after extracting endogenous Ca from tissue sections and replacing it with 45Ca. The strongest labeling was associated with pigmented tissues due to the high concentration of melanin, which was shown to bind Ca effectively and in a pH-dependent fashion. The second strongest binding was over the tapetum lucidum of the cat eye, and moderate labeling was associated with eye muscles and epithelium and endothelium of the cornea. The neural retina was generally more lightly labeled than the surrounding tissue of the eye; here the plexiform layers stood out in comparison to the nuclear layers, as did a band located internal to the photoreceptor outer segments. The possibility that the Ca buffering capacity of melanin may represent the common denominator for the various neurological defects found in hypopigmentation mutants is discussed. Images PMID:3863122

  2. Epithelia-mesenchyme interaction plays an essential role in transdifferentiation of retinal pigment epithelium of silver mutant quail: localization of FGF and related molecules and aberrant migration pattern of neural crest cells during eye rudiment formation.

    PubMed

    Araki, Masasuke; Takano, Takako; Uemonsa, Tomoko; Nakane, Yoshifumi; Tsudzuki, Masaoki; Kaneko, Tomoko

    2002-04-15

    Homozygotes of the quail silver mutation, which have plumage color changes, also display a unique phenotype in the eye: during early embryonic development, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) spontaneously transdifferentiates into neural retinal tissue. Mitf is considered to be the responsible gene and to function similarly to the mouse microphthalmia mutation, and tissue interaction between RPE and surrounding mesenchymal tissue in organ culture has been shown to be essential for the initiation of the transdifferentiation process in which fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is involved. The immunohistochemical results of the present study show that laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, both acting as cofactors for FGF binding, are localized in the area of transdifferentiation of silver embryos much more abundantly than in wild-type embryos. More intense immunohistochemical staining with FGF-1 antibody, but not with FGF-2 antibody, is also found in the neural retina, RPE, and choroidal tissue of silver embryos than in wild-type embryos. HNK-1 immunohistochemistry revealed that clusters of HNK-1-positive cells (presumptive migrating neural crest cells) are frequently located around the developing eyes and in the posterior region of the silver embryonic eye. Finally, chick-quail chimerical eyes were made by grafting silver quail optic vesicles to chicken host embryos: in most cases, no transdifferentiation occurs in the silver RPE, but in a few cases, transdifferentiation occurs where silver quail cells predominate in the choroid tissue. These observations together with our previous in vitro study indicate that the silver mutation affects not only RPE cells but also cephalic neural crest cells, which migrate to the eye rudiment, and that these crest cells play an essential role in the transdifferentiation of RPE, possibly by modifying the FGF signaling pathway. The precise molecular mechanism involved in RPE-neural crest cell interaction is still unknown

  3. Primary adenocarcinoma of pigmented ciliary epithelium in a phthisical eye.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaya B; Proia, Alan D; Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi; Sharma, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium arising in a phthisical eye. A 92-year-old man who initially presented with severe ocular pain had calcification extending from the posterior pole to ciliary body on B-scan ultrasonography to a degree not previously reported. We highlight the importance of screening for intraocular neoplasms in adults with a long-standing phthisical eye. PMID:26597037

  4. Eye pigments of the blood-sucking insect, Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera, Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Moraes, A S; Pimentel, E R; Rodrigues, V L C C; Mello, M L S

    2005-08-01

    The pigmentation of black (wild) and red (mutant) eyes of Triatoma infestans was studied spectrophotometrically and compared with red-eyed (wild) and white-eyed (mutant) forms of Drosophila melanogaster. The spectral absorption profiles of the black and red eye pigments of T. infestans were similar to each other and to that of the wild-type eyes of D. melanogaster. The similarity to the wild form of D. melanogaster indicated that both eye forms of T. infestans contained ommochromes of the xanthommatin type, a finding confirmed by ascending paper chromatography. Pteridines, melanins, and ommins were not detected as eye pigments in T. infestans. The eye color difference in T. infestans was assumed to be a function of the xanthommatin concentration, with a smaller content of ommochrome in red eyes, although this probably did not affect the insect's visual acuity. These data support other findings regarding the similarities between black- and red-eyed specimens of T. infestans for other characteristics. PMID:16341426

  5. Oxidative stress, photodamage and the role of screening pigments in insect eyes.

    PubMed

    Insausti, Teresita C; Le Gall, Marion; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2013-09-01

    Using red-eyed mutant triatomine bugs (Hemiptera: Reduvidae), we tested the hypothesis of an alternative function of insect screening pigments against oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis, we studied the morphological and physiological changes associated with the mutation. We found that wild-type eyes possess a great amount of brown and red screening pigment inside the primary and secondary pigment cells as well as in the retinular cells. Red-eyed mutants, however, have only scarce red granules inside the pigmentary cells. We then compared the visual sensitivity of red-eyed mutants and wild types by measuring the photonegative responses of insects reared in light:dark cycles [12 h:12 h light:dark (LD)] or constant darkness (DD). Finally, we analyzed both the impact of oxidative stress associated with blood ingestion and photodamage of UV light on the eye retina. We found that red-eyed mutants reared in DD conditions were the most sensitive to the light intensities tested. Retinae of LD-reared mutants were gradually damaged over the life cycle, while for DD-reared insects retinae were conserved intact. No retinal damage was observed in non-fed mutants exposed to UV light for 2 weeks, whereas insects fed on blood prior to UV exposure showed clear signs of retinal damage. Wild-type insects exposed to UV light showed a marked increase in the amount and density of screening pigments. PMID:23661779

  6. Technical note: Digital quantification of eye pigmentation of cattle with white faces.

    PubMed

    Davis, K M; Smith, T; Bolt, B; Meadows, S; Powell, J G; Vann, R C; Arthington, J D; DiLorenzo, N; Lalman, D L; Rouquette, F M; Hansen, G R; Cooper, A J; Cloud, J E; Garcia, M D; Herring, A D; Hale, D S; Sanders, J O; Hairgrove, T B; DeWitt, T J; Riley, D G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the eye in cattle with white faces occurs less frequently in cattle with pigmented eyelids. Corneoscleral pigmentation is related to eyelid pigmentation and occurrence of lesions that may precede cancer. Objectives of this study were to assess 1) variation in the proportion of eyelid and corneoscleral pigmentation in Hereford, Bos taurus, and Bos indicus crossbreds and 2) the occurrence of lesions with the presence of pigmentation in those areas. Hereford and Bos indicus crosses (Brahman or Nellore with Angus and Hereford and straightbred Brafords) and Bos taurus crosses (Angus-Hereford) were included in the study (n = 1,083). Eyelid pigmentation proportions were estimated by pixel quantification and were evaluated as total proportions and for upper and lower eyelids distinctly for each eye. Fixed effects included breed type, age categories, and sex of the animal. Lesion presence (1) or absence (0) was obtained by visual appraisal of image and was assumed to be binomially distributed. Eyelid pigmentation proportions (overall, upper, and lower eyelids) for Hereford ranged from 0.65 ± 0.03 to 0.68 ± 0.03 and were significantly lower than Bos indicus (range from 0.93 ± 0.02 to 0.95 ± 0.02) or Bos taurus (ranged from 0.88 ± 0.02 to 0.92 ± 0.02) crosses. Corneoscleral pigmentation in Hereford cows (0.17 ± 0.06) did not differ (P = 0.91) from Hereford calves and yearlings (0.16 ± 0.07). Bos indicus and Bos taurus crossbred cows had larger corneoscleral pigmentation (0.38 ± 0.05 and 0.48 ± 0.04 for left eyes and 0.37 ± 0.05 and 0.53 ± 0.04 for right eyes, respectively) than all calves (P < 0.001), and their corneoscleral pigmentations were greater than that of Hereford cows (P < 0.003). Bos indicus and Bos taurus cows had greater proportions of left eye corneoscleral pigmentation (0.38 ± 0.05 and 0.48 ± 0.04, respectively) than Hereford cows (0.17 ± 0.06) and all young animal breed types (P < 0.05). Right eye proportions differed for all cow

  7. Clonal origins of cells in the pigmented retina of the zebrafish eye

    SciTech Connect

    Streisinger, G.; Coale, F.; Taggart, C.; Walker, C.; Grunwald, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Mosaic analysis has been used to study the clonal basis of the development of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish, Brachydanio rerio. Zebrafish embryos heterozygous for a recessive mutation at the gol-1 locus were exposed to gamma-irradiation at various developmental stages to create mosaic individuals consisting of wild-type pigmented cells and a clone of pigmentless (golden) cells in the eye. The contribution of individual embryonic cells to the pigmented retina was measured and the total number of cells in the embryo that contributed descendants to this tissue was determined. Until the 32-cell stage, almost every blastomere has some descendants that participate in the formation of the pigmented retina of the zebrafish. During subsequent cell divisions, up to the several thousand-cell stage, the number of ancestral cells is constant: approximately 40 cells are present that will give rise to progeny in the pigmented retina. Analysis of the size of clones in the pigmented retina indicates that the cells of this tissue do not arise through a rigid series of cell divisions originating in the early embryo. The findings that each cleavage stage cell contributes to the pigmented retina and yet the contribution of such cells is highly variable are consistent with the interpretation that clonal descendants of different blastomeres normally intermix extensively prior to formation of the pigmented retina.

  8. Nitisinone improves eye and skin pigmentation defects in a mouse model of oculocutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Onojafe, Ighovie F; Adams, David R; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Zhang, Jun; Chan, Chi-Chao; Bernardini, Isa M; Sergeev, Yuri V; Dolinska, Monika B; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Brilliant, Murray H; Gahl, William A; Brooks, Brian P

    2011-10-01

    Mutation of the tyrosinase gene (TYR) causes oculocutaneous albinism, type 1 (OCA1), a condition characterized by reduced skin and eye melanin pigmentation and by vision loss. The retinal pigment epithelium influences postnatal visual development. Therefore, increasing ocular pigmentation in patients with OCA1 might enhance visual function. There are 2 forms of OCA1, OCA-1A and OCA-1B. Individuals with the former lack functional tyrosinase and therefore lack melanin, while individuals with the latter produce some melanin. We hypothesized that increasing plasma tyrosine concentrations using nitisinone, an FDA-approved inhibitor of tyrosine degradation, could stabilize tyrosinase and improve pigmentation in individuals with OCA1. Here, we tested this hypothesis in mice homozygous for either the Tyrc-2J null allele or the Tyrc-h allele, which model OCA-1A and OCA-1B, respectively. Only nitisinone-treated Tyrc-h/c-h mice manifested increased pigmentation in their fur and irides and had more pigmented melanosomes. High levels of tyrosine improved the stability and enzymatic function of the Tyrc-h protein and also increased overall melanin levels in melanocytes from a human with OCA-1B. These results suggest that the use of nitisinone in OCA-1B patients could improve their pigmentation and potentially ameliorate vision loss. PMID:21968110

  9. Pigmented anatomy in Carboniferous cyclostomes and the evolution of the vertebrate eye.

    PubMed

    Gabbott, Sarah E; Donoghue, Philip C J; Sansom, Robert S; Vinther, Jakob; Dolocan, Andrei; Purnell, Mark A

    2016-08-17

    The success of vertebrates is linked to the evolution of a camera-style eye and sophisticated visual system. In the absence of useful data from fossils, scenarios for evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate eye have been based necessarily on evidence from development, molecular genetics and comparative anatomy in living vertebrates. Unfortunately, steps in the transition from a light-sensitive 'eye spot' in invertebrate chordates to an image-forming camera-style eye in jawed vertebrates are constrained only by hagfish and lampreys (cyclostomes), which are interpreted to reflect either an intermediate or degenerate condition. Here, we report-based on evidence of size, shape, preservation mode and localized occurrence-the presence of melanosomes (pigment-bearing organelles) in fossil cyclostome eyes. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses reveal secondary ions with a relative intensity characteristic of melanin as revealed through principal components analyses. Our data support the hypotheses that extant hagfish eyes are degenerate, not rudimentary, that cyclostomes are monophyletic, and that the ancestral vertebrate had a functional visual system. We also demonstrate integument pigmentation in fossil lampreys, opening up the exciting possibility of investigating colour patterning in Palaeozoic vertebrates. The examples we report add to the record of melanosome preservation in Carboniferous fossils and attest to surprising durability of melanosomes and biomolecular melanin. PMID:27488650

  10. Pigmented anatomy in Carboniferous cyclostomes and the evolution of the vertebrate eye

    PubMed Central

    Gabbott, Sarah E.; Sansom, Robert S.; Vinther, Jakob; Dolocan, Andrei; Purnell, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The success of vertebrates is linked to the evolution of a camera-style eye and sophisticated visual system. In the absence of useful data from fossils, scenarios for evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate eye have been based necessarily on evidence from development, molecular genetics and comparative anatomy in living vertebrates. Unfortunately, steps in the transition from a light-sensitive ‘eye spot’ in invertebrate chordates to an image-forming camera-style eye in jawed vertebrates are constrained only by hagfish and lampreys (cyclostomes), which are interpreted to reflect either an intermediate or degenerate condition. Here, we report—based on evidence of size, shape, preservation mode and localized occurrence—the presence of melanosomes (pigment-bearing organelles) in fossil cyclostome eyes. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses reveal secondary ions with a relative intensity characteristic of melanin as revealed through principal components analyses. Our data support the hypotheses that extant hagfish eyes are degenerate, not rudimentary, that cyclostomes are monophyletic, and that the ancestral vertebrate had a functional visual system. We also demonstrate integument pigmentation in fossil lampreys, opening up the exciting possibility of investigating colour patterning in Palaeozoic vertebrates. The examples we report add to the record of melanosome preservation in Carboniferous fossils and attest to surprising durability of melanosomes and biomolecular melanin. PMID:27488650

  11. Dissection of a Mouse Eye for a Whole Mount of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Claybon, Alison; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2011-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) lies at the back of the mammalian eye, just under the neural retina, which contains the photoreceptors (rods and cones). The RPE is a monolayer of pigmented cuboidal cells and associates closely with the neural retina just above it. This association makes the RPE of great interest to researchers studying retinal diseases. The RPE is also the site of an in vivo assay of homology-directed DNA repair, the pun assay. The mouse eye is particularly difficult to dissect due to its small size (about 3.5mm in diameter) and its spherical shape. This article demonstrates in detail a procedure for dissection of the eye resulting in a whole mount of the RPE. In this procedure, we show how to work with, rather than against, the spherical structure of the eye. Briefly, the connective tissue, muscle, and optic nerve are removed from the back of the eye. Then, the cornea and lens are removed. Next, strategic cuts are made that result in significant flattening of the remaining tissue. Finally, the neural retina is gently lifted off, revealing an intact RPE, which is still attached to the underlying choroid and sclera. This whole mount can be used to perform the punassay or for immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescent assessment of the RPE tissue. PMID:21403630

  12. The control of pigment migration in isolated erythrophores of Holocentrus ascensionis (Osbeck). I. Energy requirements.

    PubMed

    Luby, K J; Porter, K R

    1980-08-01

    Erythrophores isolated from the scales of the marine teleost, Holocentrus ascensionis (Osbeck), are capable of rapidly aggregating or dispersing numberous red pigment granules within their cytoplasm by translocating them along radial paths delineated by bundles of radially oriented microtubules. Pigment translocation is accompanied by transformations in the morphology of the cytoplasmic matrix, or microtrabecular lattice (MTL), in which the pigment granules are suspended. It appears that the MTL as a whole contracts toward the cell center during aggregation, carrying the pigment granules inward along with it, and is restructured during dispersion, using the radial microtubules as guides. We examined the energy requirements of pigment migration and the accompanying MTL transformations. Cellular ATP was depleted using the specific metabolic inhibitors 2,4 dinitrophenol, NaCN and oligomycin. All three of these drugs, which inhibit oxidative phosphorylation by different mechanisms, prevent both pigment dispersion and MTL transformation to dispersed morphology, while aggregation is unaffected. Inhibitor-treated cells recover normal pigment movements and MTL morphology when inhibitor is washed out of the cells with fresh medium. Potential energy apparently is stored in the MTL by some ATP-dependent process during dispersion and is converted to kinetic energy during aggregation. The results of this study strengthen the hypothesis that the MTL, working in concert with the radial microtubules, is the vehicle for pigment translocation in the erythrophore system. PMID:7407908

  13. Absorption of the eye lens and macular pigment derived from the reflectance of cone photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagers, Niels P. A.; van Norren, Dirk

    2004-12-01

    We measured the amplitude of the directional component of the bleached fundus reflectance, the so-called optical Stiles-Crawford effect, as a function of wavelength. The directional reflectance originates from within the outer segments of the photoreceptors. Thus only two anterior absorbers are of importance: macular pigment and the crystalline lens. Analysis of spectra obtained in pseudophakes established that the cone photoreceptors act as spectrally neutral reflectors. The reflectance spectra, expressed in density units, resembled the macular pigment density spectrum. Studying age effects in the lens of normal subjects resulted in a description of the optical density of the lens in terms of a ``young'' and an ``aged'' template. The young template represents the pigment O-β-glucoside of 3-hydroxykynurenine, which dominates the light absorption in young eyes and decreases with age. The aged template represents the pigments accumulating in the lens with age. The total optical density increased with age, but it was lower in the wavelength region 500-650 nm than was previously assumed on the basis of psychophysical studies. Analysis of the spectra also provided precise individual estimates of the optical density of macular pigment. Finally, we observed a decrease in the photoreceptor reflectivity with age, possibly reflecting a degradation of the photoreceptors.

  14. Genome-wide association studies of quantitatively measured skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in four European populations.

    PubMed

    Candille, Sophie I; Absher, Devin M; Beleza, Sandra; Bauchet, Marc; McEvoy, Brian; Garrison, Nanibaa' A; Li, Jun Z; Myers, Richard M; Barsh, Gregory S; Tang, Hua; Shriver, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation of the skin, hair, and eyes varies both within and between human populations. Identifying the genes and alleles underlying this variation has been the goal of many candidate gene and several genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most GWAS for pigmentary traits to date have been based on subjective phenotypes using categorical scales. But skin, hair, and eye pigmentation vary continuously. Here, we seek to characterize quantitative variation in these traits objectively and accurately and to determine their genetic basis. Objective and quantitative measures of skin, hair, and eye color were made using reflectance or digital spectroscopy in Europeans from Ireland, Poland, Italy, and Portugal. A GWAS was conducted for the three quantitative pigmentation phenotypes in 176 women across 313,763 SNP loci, and replication of the most significant associations was attempted in a sample of 294 European men and women from the same countries. We find that the pigmentation phenotypes are highly stratified along axes of European genetic differentiation. The country of sampling explains approximately 35% of the variation in skin pigmentation, 31% of the variation in hair pigmentation, and 40% of the variation in eye pigmentation. All three quantitative phenotypes are correlated with each other. In our two-stage association study, we reproduce the association of rs1667394 at the OCA2/HERC2 locus with eye color but we do not identify new genetic determinants of skin and hair pigmentation supporting the lack of major genes affecting skin and hair color variation within Europe and suggesting that not only careful phenotyping but also larger cohorts are required to understand the genetic architecture of these complex quantitative traits. Interestingly, we also see that in each of these four populations, men are more lightly pigmented in the unexposed skin of the inner arm than women, a fact that is underappreciated and may vary across the world. PMID:23118974

  15. Subretinal delivery and electroporation in pigmented and nonpigmented adult mouse eyes

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, John M.; Goodman, Penny; Chrenek, Micah A.; Johnson, Christiana J.; Berglin, Lennart; Redmond, T. Michael.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Subretinal injection offers one of the best ways to deliver many classes of drugs, reagents, cells and treatments to the photoreceptor, Müller, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Agents delivered to this space are placed within microns of the intended target cell, accumulating to high concentrations because there is no dilution due to transport processes or diffusion. Dilution in the interphotoreceptor space (IPS) is minimal because the IPS volume is only 10-20 microliters in the human eye and less than 1 microliter in the mouse eye. For gene delivery purposes, we wished to transfect the cells adjacent to the IPS in adult mouse eyes. Others transfect these cells in neonatal rats to study the development of the retina. In both neonates and adults, electroporation is found to be effective Here we describe the optimization of electroporation conditions for RPE cells in the adult mouse eye with naked plasmids. However, both techniques, subretinal injection and electroporation, present some technical challenges that require skill on the part of the surgeon to prevent untoward damage to the eye. Here we describe methods that we have used for the past ten years (1). PMID:22688698

  16. Synthesis and migration of /sup 3/H-fucose-labeled glycoproteins in the retinal pigment epithelium of albino rats, as visualized by radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, A.; Bennett, G.

    1987-03-01

    /sup 3/H-fucose was injected into the vitreous body of the eye(s) of 250-gm rats, which were then killed by means of an intracardiac perfusion with glutaraldehyde after intervals of 10 min, 1 and 4 hr, and 1 and 7 days. The eyes were removed and further fixed, and pieces of retina were processed for light and electron microscope radioautography. Light microscope radioautography showed that the pigment epithelial cells actively incorporated /sup 3/H-fucose label. The intensity of reaction peaked at 4 hr after injection of the label and then slowly declined. Quantitative electron microscope radioautography revealed that, at 10 min after /sup 3/H-fucose injection, over 70% of the label was localized to the Golgi apparatus, indicating that fucose residues are added to newly synthesized glycoproteins principally at this site. With time the proportion of label associated with the Golgi apparatus decreased, but that assigned to the infolded basal plasma membrane, the apical microvilli, and various apical lysosomes increased. These results indicate that in retinal pigment epithelial cells newly synthesized glycoproteins continuously migrate from the Golgi apparatus to lysosomes and to various regions of the plasma membrane. In this case, the membrane glycoproteins may play specific roles in receptor functions of the basal plasma membrane or phagocytic activities at the apical surface. Very little label migrated to Bruch's membrane, indicating either a very slow turnover or a paucity of fucose-containing glycoproteins at this site.

  17. Melanosomes in pigmented epithelia maintain eye lens transparency during zebrafish embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Masanari; Xu, Feng; Suhonen, Heikki; Gourain, Victor; Yang, Lixin; Ho, Nga Yu; Helfen, Lukas; Schröck, Anne; Etard, Christelle; Grabher, Clemens; Rastegar, Sepand; Schlunck, Günther; Reinhard, Thomas; Baumbach, Tilo; Strähle, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Altered levels of trace elements are associated with increased oxidative stress that is eventually responsible for pathologic conditions. Oxidative stress has been proposed to be involved in eye diseases, including cataract formation. We visualized the distribution of metals and other trace elements in the eye of zebrafish embryos by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) imaging. Many elements showed highest accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the zebrafish embryo. Knockdown of the zebrafish brown locus homologues tyrp1a/b eliminated accumulation of these elements in the RPE, indicating that they are bound by mature melanosomes. Furthermore, albino (slc45a2) mutants, which completely lack melanosomes, developed abnormal lens reflections similar to the congenital cataract caused by mutation of the myosin chaperon Unc45b, and an in situ spin trapping assay revealed increased oxidative stress in the lens of albino mutants. Finally transplanting a wildtype lens into an albino mutant background resulted in cataract formation. These data suggest that melanosomes in pigment epithelial cells protect the lens from oxidative stress during embryonic development, likely by buffering trace elements. PMID:27141993

  18. Melanosomes in pigmented epithelia maintain eye lens transparency during zebrafish embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Takamiya, Masanari; Xu, Feng; Suhonen, Heikki; Gourain, Victor; Yang, Lixin; Ho, Nga Yu; Helfen, Lukas; Schröck, Anne; Etard, Christelle; Grabher, Clemens; Rastegar, Sepand; Schlunck, Günther; Reinhard, Thomas; Baumbach, Tilo; Strähle, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Altered levels of trace elements are associated with increased oxidative stress that is eventually responsible for pathologic conditions. Oxidative stress has been proposed to be involved in eye diseases, including cataract formation. We visualized the distribution of metals and other trace elements in the eye of zebrafish embryos by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) imaging. Many elements showed highest accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the zebrafish embryo. Knockdown of the zebrafish brown locus homologues tyrp1a/b eliminated accumulation of these elements in the RPE, indicating that they are bound by mature melanosomes. Furthermore, albino (slc45a2) mutants, which completely lack melanosomes, developed abnormal lens reflections similar to the congenital cataract caused by mutation of the myosin chaperon Unc45b, and an in situ spin trapping assay revealed increased oxidative stress in the lens of albino mutants. Finally transplanting a wildtype lens into an albino mutant background resulted in cataract formation. These data suggest that melanosomes in pigment epithelial cells protect the lens from oxidative stress during embryonic development, likely by buffering trace elements. PMID:27141993

  19. Drosophila Eyes Absent Is Required for Normal Cone and Pigment Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Umesh C.; Jin, Meng; Jusiak, Barbara; Kwak, SuJin; Chen, Rui; Mardon, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila, development of the compound eye is orchestrated by a network of highly conserved transcriptional regulators known as the retinal determination (RD) network. The retinal determination gene eyes absent (eya) is expressed in most cells within the developing eye field, from undifferentiated retinal progenitors to photoreceptor cells whose differentiation begins at the morphogenetic furrow (MF). Loss of eya expression leads to an early block in retinal development, making it impossible to study the role of eya expression during later steps of retinal differentiation. We have identified two new regulatory regions that control eya expression during retinal development. These two enhancers are necessary to maintain eya expression anterior to the MF (eya-IAM) and in photoreceptors (eya-PSE), respectively. We find that deleting these enhancers affects developmental events anterior to the MF as well as retinal differentiation posterior to the MF. In line with previous results, we find that reducing eya expression anterior to the MF affects several early steps during early retinal differentiation, including cell cycle arrest and expression of the proneural gene ato. Consistent with previous observations that suggest a role for eya in cell proliferation during early development we find that deletion of eya-IAM leads to a marked reduction in the size of the adult retinal field. On the other hand, deletion of eya-PSE leads to defects in cone and pigment cell development. In addition we find that eya expression is necessary to activate expression of the cone cell marker Cut and to regulate levels of the Hedgehog pathway effector Ci. In summary, our study uncovers novel aspects of eya-mediated regulation of eye development. The genetic tools generated in this study will allow for a detailed study of how the RD network regulates key steps in eye formation. PMID:25057928

  20. Expression of pigment epithelium‐derived factor and thrombospondin‐1 regulate proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Farnoodian, Mitra; Kinter, James B.; Yadranji Aghdam, Saeed; Zaitoun, Ismail; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age‐related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss among elderly. Although the pathogenesis of AMD is associated with retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) dysfunction and abnormal neovascularization the detailed mechanisms remain unresolved. RPE is a specialized monolayer of epithelial cells with important functions in ocular homeostasis. Pathological RPE damage contributes to major ocular conditions including retinal degeneration and irreversible loss of vision in AMD. RPE cells also assist in the maintenance of the ocular angiogenic balance by production of positive and negative regulatory factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thrombospondin‐1 (TSP1), and pigment epithelium‐derived factor (PEDF). The altered production of PEDF and TSP1, as endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis and inflammation, by RPE cells have been linked to pathogenesis of AMD and choroidal and retinal neovascularization. However, lack of simple methods for isolation and culture of mouse RPE cells has resulted in limited knowledge regarding the cell autonomous role of TSP1 and PEDF in RPE cell function. Here, we describe a method for routine isolation and propagation of RPE cells from wild‐type, TSP1, and PEDF‐deficient mice, and have investigated their impact on RPE cell function. We showed that expression of TSP1 and PEDF significantly impacted RPE cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, oxidative state, and phagocytic activity with minimal effect on their basal rate of apoptosis. Together, our results indicated that the expression of PEDF and TSP1 by RPE cells play crucial roles not only in regulation of ocular vascular homeostasis but also have significant impact on their cellular function. PMID:25602019

  1. The retinal pigment epithelium as a gateway for monocyte trafficking into the eye.

    PubMed

    Benhar, Inbal; Reemst, Kitty; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Schwartz, Michal

    2016-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium within the brain ventricles orchestrates blood-derived monocyte entry to the central nervous system under injurious conditions, including when the primary injury site is remote from the brain. Here, we hypothesized that the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) serves a parallel role, as a gateway for monocyte trafficking to the retina following direct or remote injury. We found elevated expression of genes encoding leukocyte trafficking determinants in mouse RPE as a consequence of retinal glutamate intoxication or optic nerve crush (ONC). Blocking VCAM-1 after ONC interfered with monocyte infiltration into the retina and resulted in a local pro-inflammatory cytokine bias. Live imaging of the injured eye showed monocyte accumulation first in the RPE, and subsequently in the retina, and peripheral leukocytes formed close contact with the RPE Our findings further implied that the ocular milieu can confer monocytes a phenotype advantageous for neuroprotection. These results suggest that the eye utilizes a mechanism of crosstalk with the immune system similar to that of the brain, whereby epithelial barriers serve as gateways for leukocyte entry. PMID:27107049

  2. High dietary arachidonic acid levels affect the process of eye migration and head shape in pseudoalbino Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis early juveniles.

    PubMed

    Boglino, A; Wishkerman, A; Darias, M J; Andree, K B; de la Iglesia, P; Estévez, A; Gisbert, E

    2013-11-01

    The effect of high dietary levels of arachidonic acid (ARA) on the eye migration and cranial bone remodelling processes in Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis early juveniles (age: 50 days post hatch) was evaluated by means of geometric morphometric analysis and alizarin red staining of cranial skeletal elements. The incidence of normally pigmented fish fed the control diet was 99·1 ± 0·3% (mean ± s.e.), whereas it was only 18·7 ± 7·5% for those fed high levels of ARA (ARA-H). The frequency of cranial deformities was significantly higher in fish fed ARA-H (95·1 ± 1·5%) than in those fed the control diet (1·9 ± 1·9%). Cranial deformities were significantly and negatively correlated with the incidence of normally pigmented animals (r² = -0·88, P < 0·001, n = 16). Thus, fish displaying pigmentary disorders differed in the position of their eyes with regard to the vertebral column and mouth axes, and by the interocular distance and head height, which were shorter than in fish not displaying pigmentary disorders. In addition to changes in the positioning of both eyes, pseudoalbino fish showed some ARA-induced osteological differences for some of the skeletal elements from the splanchnocranium (e.g. right premaxillary, dentary, angular, lacrimal, ceratohyal and branchiostegal rays) and neurocranium (e.g. sphenotic, left lateral ethmoid and left frontal) by comparison to normally pigmented specimens. Pseudoalbino fish also had teeth in both lower and upper jaws. This is the first study in Pleuronectiformes that describes impaired metamorphic relocation of the ocular side eye, the right eye in the case of S. senegalensis, whereas the left eye migrated into the ocular side almost normally. PMID:24580667

  3. The genetics of skin, hair, and eye color variation and its relevance to forensic pigmentation predictive tests.

    PubMed

    Maroñas, O; Söchtig, J; Ruiz, Y; Phillips, C; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the potential application of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based predictive tests for skin, hair, and eye color to forensic analysis in support of police investigations lacking DNA database matches or eyewitness testimony. Brief descriptions of the biology of melanogenesis and the main genes involved are presented in order to understand the basis of common pigmentation variation in humans. We outline the most recently developed forensically sensitive multiplex tests that can be applied to investigative analyses. The review also describes the biology of the SNPs with the closest associations to, and therefore the best predictors for, common variation in eye, hair, and skin pigmentation. Because pigmentation pathways are complex in their patterns, many of the better-studied human albinism traits provide insight into how pigmentation SNPs interact, control, or modify gene expression and show varying degrees of association with the key genes identified to date. These aspects of SNP action are discussed in an overview of each of the functional groups of pigmentation genes. PMID:26227136

  4. Pirfenidone inhibits migration, differentiation, and proliferation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Yangfan; Xu, Jiangang; Lin, Xianchai; Wu, Kaili

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of pirfenidone (PFD) on the migration, differentiation, and proliferation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and demonstrate whether the drug induces cytotoxicity. Methods Human RPE cells (line D407) were treated with various concentrations of PFD. Cell migration was measured with scratch assay. The protein levels of fibronectin (FN), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor beta (TGFβS), and Smads were assessed with western blot analyses. Levels of mRNA of TGFβS, FN, and Snail1 were analyzed using reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Cell apoptosis was detected with flow cytometry using the Annexin V/PI apoptosis kit, and the percentages of cells labeled in different apoptotic stage were compared. A Trypan Blue assay was used to assess cell viability. Results PFD inhibited RPE cell migration. Western blot analyses showed that PFD inhibited the expression of FN, α-SMA, CTGF, TGFβ1, TGFβ2, Smad2/3, and Smad4. Similarly, PFD also downregulated mRNA levels of Snail1, FN, TGFβ1, and TGFβ2. No significant differences in cell apoptosis or viability were observed between the control and PFD-treated groups. Conclusions PFD inhibited RPE cell migration, differentiation, and proliferation in vitro and caused no significant cytotoxicity. PMID:24415895

  5. Histologic Basis of Variations in Retinal Pigment Epithelium Autofluorescence in Eyes with Geographic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Martin; Vogt, Susan D.; Curcio, Christine A.; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Wagner, Anna; Grisanti, Salvatore; Read, Russell W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lipofuscin contained in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the main source of fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF), the target of an imaging method useful for estimating the progression of geographic atrophy (GA) in clinical trials. To establish a cellular basis for hyperfluorescent GA border zones, histologic autofluorescence (HAF) was measured at defined stages of RPE pathologic progression. Design Experimental study. Participants and Controls Ten GA donor eyes (mean age ± standard deviation, 87.1±4.0 years) and 3 age-matched control eyes (mean age ± standard deviation, 84.0±7.2 years) without GA. Methods Ten–micrometer-thick sections were divided into zones of RPE morphologic features according to an 8-point scale. Any HAF excited by 488 nm light was imaged by laser confocal microscopy. The HAF intensity summed along vertical lines perpendicular to Bruch’s membrane at 0.2-μm intervals served as a surrogate for FAF. Intensity profiles in 151 zones were normalized to grade 0 at a standard reference location in each eye. Cross-sectional area, mean, and sum autofluorescence for individual RPE cells were measured (cellular autofluorescence [CAF]). Main Outcome Measures Statistically significant differences in intensity and localization of HAF and CAF at defined stages of RPE morphologic progression for GA and control eyes. Results The RPE morphologic features were most abnormal (cell rounding, sloughing, and layering; grade 2) and HAF intensity profiles were highest and most variable immediately adjacent to atrophic areas. Peaks in HAF intensity frequently were associated with vertically superimposed cells. The HAF value that optimally separated reactive RPE was 0.66 standard deviations more than the mean for uninvolved RPE and was associated with a sensitivity of 75.8% and a specificity of 76.3%. When variable cell area was accounted for, neither mean nor sum CAF differed significantly among the RPE pathologic grades. Conclusions Areas with advanced

  6. Direct evidence for positive selection of skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in Europeans during the last 5,000 y

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Sandra; Timpson, Adrian; Kirsanow, Karola; Kaiser, Elke; Kayser, Manfred; Unterländer, Martina; Hollfelder, Nina; Potekhina, Inna D.; Schier, Wolfram; Thomas, Mark G.; Burger, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Pigmentation is a polygenic trait encompassing some of the most visible phenotypic variation observed in humans. Here we present direct estimates of selection acting on functional alleles in three key genes known to be involved in human pigmentation pathways—HERC2, SLC45A2, and TYR—using allele frequency estimates from Eneolithic, Bronze Age, and modern Eastern European samples and forward simulations. Neutrality was overwhelmingly rejected for all alleles studied, with point estimates of selection ranging from around 2–10% per generation. Our results provide direct evidence that strong selection favoring lighter skin, hair, and eye pigmentation has been operating in European populations over the last 5,000 y. PMID:24616518

  7. Direct evidence for positive selection of skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in Europeans during the last 5,000 y.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Sandra; Timpson, Adrian; Kirsanow, Karola; Kaiser, Elke; Kayser, Manfred; Unterländer, Martina; Hollfelder, Nina; Potekhina, Inna D; Schier, Wolfram; Thomas, Mark G; Burger, Joachim

    2014-04-01

    Pigmentation is a polygenic trait encompassing some of the most visible phenotypic variation observed in humans. Here we present direct estimates of selection acting on functional alleles in three key genes known to be involved in human pigmentation pathways--HERC2, SLC45A2, and TYR--using allele frequency estimates from Eneolithic, Bronze Age, and modern Eastern European samples and forward simulations. Neutrality was overwhelmingly rejected for all alleles studied, with point estimates of selection ranging from around 2-10% per generation. Our results provide direct evidence that strong selection favoring lighter skin, hair, and eye pigmentation has been operating in European populations over the last 5,000 y. PMID:24616518

  8. Sub-cellular localisation of the white/scarlet ABC transporter to pigment granule membranes within the compound eye of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, S M; Howells, A J; Cox, G B; Ewart, G D

    2000-01-01

    The white, scarlet, and brown genes of Drosophila melanogaster encode ABC transporters involved with the uptake and storage of metabolic precursors to the red and brown eye colour pigments. It has generally been assumed that these proteins are localised in the plasma membrane and transport precursor molecules from the heamolymph into the eye pigment cells. However, the immuno-electron microscopy experiments in this study reveal that the White and Scarlet proteins are located in the membranes of pigment granules within pigment cells and retinula cells of the compound eye. No evidence of their presence in the plasma membrane was observed. This result suggests that, rather than tranporting tryptophan into the cell across the plasma membrane, the White/Scarlet complex transports a metabolic intermediate (such as 3-hydroxy kynurenine) from the cytoplasm into the pigment granules. Other functional implications of this new finding are discussed. PMID:11294610

  9. Delivery of Celecoxib for Treating Diseases of the Eye: Influence of Pigment and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kompella, Uday; Amrite, Aniruddha C; Pugazhenthi, Vidya; Cheruvu, Narayan PS

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are two major causes of blindness. In these disorders, growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are upregulated leading to either enhanced vascular permeability or proliferation of endothelium. While currently available corticosteroid therapies suffer from side effects including cataracts and elevated intraocular pressure, anti-VEGF antibody therapies require frequent intravitreal injections, a procedure that can potentially lead to retinal detachment or endophthalmitis. Thus, there is currently a need to develop safe, sustained release therapeutic approaches for treating AMD and DR. Areas covered in this review This review discusses the pharmacological basis for using celecoxib, an anti-inflammatory drug capable of selectively inhibiting cycloxygenase 2, in treating AMD and DR. In addition, this article discusses the safety, delivery advantage, and efficacy of celecoxib by transscleral retinal delivery, a periocular delivery approach that is less invasive to the globe compared to intravitreal injections. What the reader will gain The reader will gain insights into the development of a pharmacological agent and a sustained release delivery system for treating DR and AMD. Further, the reader will gain insights into the role of eye physiology including pigmentation and disease states such as DR on retinal drug delivery. Take home message Transscleral sustained delivery of anti-inflammatory agents is a viable option for treating retinal disorders. PMID:20205602

  10. Identification and characterization of visual pigments in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona), an order of limbless vertebrates with rudimentary eyes.

    PubMed

    Mohun, S M; Davies, W L; Bowmaker, J K; Pisani, D; Himstedt, W; Gower, D J; Hunt, D M; Wilkinson, M

    2010-10-15

    In comparison with the other amphibian orders, the Anura (frogs) and Urodela (salamanders), knowledge of the visual system of the snake-like Gymnophiona (caecilians) is relatively sparse. Most caecilians are fossorial with, as far as is known any surface activity occurring mainly at night. They have relatively small, poorly developed eyes and might be expected to possess detectable changes in the spectral sensitivity of their visual pigments. Microspectrophotometry was used to determine the spectral sensitivities of the photoreceptors in three species of caecilian, Rhinatrema bivittatum, Geotrypetes seraphini and Typhlonectes natans. Only rod opsin visual pigment, which may be associated with scotopic (dim light) vision when accompanied by other 'rod-specific' components of the phototransduction cascade, was found to be present. Opsin sequences were obtained from the eyes of two species of caecilian, Ichthyophis cf. kohtaoensis and T. natans. These rod opsins were regenerated in vitro with 11-cis retinal to give pigments with spectral sensitivity peaks close to 500 nm. No evidence for cone photoreception, associated with diurnal and colour vision, was detected using molecular and physiological methods. Additionally, visual pigments are short-wavelength shifted in terms of the maximum absorption of light when compared with other amphibian lineages. PMID:20889838

  11. SCF/c-kit signaling is required in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced migration and differentiation of hair follicle melanocytes for epidermal pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weiming; Yang, Ke; Lei, Mingxing; Yan, Hongtao; Tang, Hui; Bai, Xiufeng; Yang, Guihong; Lian, Xiaohua; Wu, Jinjin

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle melanocyte stem cells (McSCs) are responsible for hair pigmentation and also function as a major melanocyte reservoir for epidermal pigmentation. However, the molecular mechanism promoting McSCs for epidermal pigmentation remains elusive. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) mimics key signaling involved in melanocyte growth, migration and differentiation. We therefore investigated the molecular basis for the contribution of hair follicle McSCs to epidermal pigmentation using the TPA induction model. We found that repetitive TPA treatment of female C57BL/6 mouse dorsal skin induced epidermal pigmentation by increasing the number of epidermal melanocytes. Particularly, TPA treatment induced McSCs to initiate proliferation, exit the stem cell niche and differentiate. We also demonstrated that TPA promotes melanoblast migration and differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, TPA treatment induced robust expression of stem cell factor (SCF) in keratinocytes and c-kit in melanoblasts and melanocytes. Administration of ACK2, a neutralizing antibody against the Kit receptor, suppressed mouse epidermal pigmentation, decreased the number of epidermal melanocytes, and inhibited melanoblast migration. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPA promotes the expansion, migration and differentiation of hair follicle McSCs for mouse epidermal pigmentation. SCF/c-kit signaling was required for TPA-induced migration and differentiation of hair follicle melanocytes. Our findings may provide an excellent model to investigate the signaling mechanisms regulating epidermal pigmentation from mouse hair follicle McSCs, and a potential therapeutic option for skin pigmentation disorders. PMID:25727244

  12. Comparison of accumulation of clenbuterol and salbutamol residues in animal internal tissues, non-pigmented eyes and hair.

    PubMed

    Pleadin, Jelka; Vulić, Ana; Terzić, Svjetlana; Vahčić, Nada; Šandor, Ksenija; Perak, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accumulation of β-adrenergic agonist residues clenbuterol (CLB) and salbutamol (SAL) in internal tissues, non-pigmented eyes and hair of laboratory animals repeatedly administered with CLB and SAL during 7 days. Experimental albino guinea pigs (n = 20) were treated with CLB (n = 10) and SAL (n = 10) in anabolic doses of 0.25 and 2.5 mg/kg, whereas the control animal group (n = 10) was left untreated. Methodology validation showed that the ELISA assay to be suitable for β-agonists' semiquantitative determination. The results revealed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) accumulation potential of CLB in comparison with SAL in all investigated tissues. Despite of their lack of pigmentation and the applied dose, the highest residual CLB concentrations were determined in the eyes of the studied animals, followed by their hair, liver, lungs, kidney, heart and adipose and muscle tissue, whereas residual SAL concentrations found in the eyes and hair of the administered animals did not significantly differ (P > 0.05) from those obtained in their internal tissues. PMID:24990876

  13. Macular Pigment Imaging in AREDS2 Participants: An Ancillary Study of AREDS2 Subjects Enrolled at the Moran Eye Center

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Paul S.; Ahmed, Faisal; Liu, Aihua; Allman, Susan; Sheng, Xiaoming; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakov, Igor; Gellermann, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) is a randomized, placebo-controlled study designed to determine whether supplementation with 10 mg of lutein and 2 mg of zeaxanthin per day can slow the rate of progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although some biomarkers of response to carotenoid supplementation such as serum concentrations are part of the AREDS2 protocol, measurement of carotenoid concentrations in the eye and other tissues is not. In this approved ancillary study, macular pigment optical density (MPOD), macular pigment distributions, and skin carotenoid levels at enrollment and at each annual visit were measured to assess baseline carotenoid status and to monitor response to assigned interventions. Methods. All subjects enrolled at the Moran Eye Center had MPOD and macular pigment spatial distributions measured by dual-wavelength autofluorescence imaging and total skin carotenoids measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy. Results. Baseline MPOD in enrolled subjects was unusually high relative to an age-matched control group that did not consume carotenoid supplements regularly, consistent with the high rate of habitual lutein and zeaxanthin consumption in Utah AREDS2 subjects prior to enrollment. MPOD did not correlate with serum or skin carotenoid measurements. Conclusions. Useful information is provided through this ancillary study on the ocular carotenoid status of AREDS2 participants in the target tissue of lutein and zeaxanthin supplementation: The macula. When treatment assignments are unmasked at the conclusion of the study, unique tissue-based insights will be provided on the progression of AMD in response to long-term, high-dose carotenoid supplementation versus diet alone. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00345176.) PMID:22879423

  14. From a Bird's Eye View: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Juliann

    2007-01-01

    Inspiring students to learn about birds can be a daunting task--students see birds just about every day and often don't think twice about them. The activity described here is designed to excite students to "become" birds. Students are asked to create a model and tell the life story of a bird by mapping its migration pattern. (Contains 6 figures, 6…

  15. Rhabdom constriction enhances filtering by the red screening pigment in the eye of the Eastern Pale Clouded yellow butterfly, Colias erate (Pieridae).

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Kentaro; Pirih, Primoz; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2009-07-01

    Here we report the remarkable anatomy of the eye of the Eastern Pale Clouded yellow butterfly, Colias erate. An ommatidium of C. erate bears nine photoreceptors, R1-9, which together form a tiered and fused rhabdom. The distal tier of the rhabdom consists of the rhabdomeral microvilli of R1-4 photoreceptors, R5-8 photoreceptors contribute the proximal tier, and the R9 photoreceptor adds a few microvilli at the base. In transverse sections, four spots of red pigment surrounding the rhabdom are evident in the ventral region of the eye. The red pigment acts as a strong red filter for the proximal photoreceptors. The arrangement of the pigment spots distinguishes the ommatidia into three types: trapezoidal (type I), square (type II) and rectangular (type III). In all types of ommatidia, the distal and the proximal tiers of the rhabdom are divided by a strong constriction, clearly to enhance the filtering effect of the red pigment. The ommatidial heterogeneity can also be observed by optical measurements. The eye shine, resulting from tapetal reflections, peaks in type I ommatidia at 660 nm, and in type II and III ommatidia at 730 nm. The far-red-peaking eye shine indicates that C. erate has far-red-sensitive photoreceptors. Type I ommatidia fluoresce under violet excitation, implying the presence of a violet-absorbing pigment that acts as a short-wavelength filter. PMID:19525432

  16. Eye drop delivery of pigment epithelium-derived factor-34 promotes retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Esmaeili, Maryam; Deer, Louise; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Ahmed, Zubair

    2015-09-01

    Axotomised retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) die rapidly by apoptosis and fail to regenerate because of the limited availability of neurotrophic factors and a lack of axogenic stimuli. However, we have recently showed that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) promotes RGC survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve crush injury. PEDF has multiple fragments of the native peptide that are neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory. Here we investigated the neuroprotective and axogenic properties of a fragment of PEDF, PEDF-34, in retinal neurons in vitro and when delivered by intravitreal injection and eye drops in vivo. We found that PEDF-34 was 43% more neuroprotective and 52% more neuritogenic than PEDF-44 in vitro. Moreover, in vivo, intravitreal delivery of 1.88nM PEDF-34 was 71% RGC neuroprotective at 21days after optic nerve crush compared to intact controls, whilst daily eye drops containing 1.88nM PEDF-34 promoted 87% RGC survival. After topical eye drop delivery, PEDF-34 was detected in the vitreous body within 30min and attained physiologically relevant concentrations in the retina by 4h peaking at 1.4±0.05nM by 14days. In eye drop- compared to intravitreal-treated PEDF-34 animals, 55% more RGC axons regenerated 250μm beyond the optic nerve lesion. We conclude that daily topical eye drop application of PEDF-34 is superior to weekly intravitreal injections in promoting RGC survival and axon regeneration through both direct effects on retinal neurons and indirect effects on other retinal cells. PMID:26260110

  17. Eye drop delivery of pigment epithelium-derived factor-34 promotes retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection and axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Esmaeili, Maryam; Deer, Louise; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Ahmed, Zubair

    2015-01-01

    Axotomised retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) die rapidly by apoptosis and fail to regenerate because of the limited availability of neurotrophic factors and a lack of axogenic stimuli. However, we have recently showed that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) promotes RGC survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve crush injury. PEDF has multiple fragments of the native peptide that are neuroprotective, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory. Here we investigated the neuroprotective and axogenic properties of a fragment of PEDF, PEDF-34, in retinal neurons in vitro and when delivered by intravitreal injection and eye drops in vivo. We found that PEDF-34 was 43% more neuroprotective and 52% more neuritogenic than PEDF-44 in vitro. Moreover, in vivo, intravitreal delivery of 1.88 nM PEDF-34 was 71% RGC neuroprotective at 21 days after optic nerve crush compared to intact controls, whilst daily eye drops containing 1.88 nM PEDF-34 promoted 87% RGC survival. After topical eye drop delivery, PEDF-34 was detected in the vitreous body within 30 min and attained physiologically relevant concentrations in the retina by 4 h peaking at 1.4 ± 0.05 nM by 14 days. In eye drop- compared to intravitreal-treated PEDF-34 animals, 55% more RGC axons regenerated 250 μm beyond the optic nerve lesion. We conclude that daily topical eye drop application of PEDF-34 is superior to weekly intravitreal injections in promoting RGC survival and axon regeneration through both direct effects on retinal neurons and indirect effects on other retinal cells. PMID:26260110

  18. Inadvertent migration of guidewire into Murphy's eye of endotracheal tube during percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Binita; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Kumar, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a commonly performed bedside procedure in the Intensive Care Unit. Although serious and fatal complications have been reported, the procedure is by and large safe to perform in experienced hands. We report here an innocuous problem encountered twice. After the guidewire insertion and dilatation, subsequent railroading became difficult owing to migration of guidewire into the Murphy's eye of the endotracheal tube (ETT). Awareness about this possibility can avert inadvertent delays and complications during the procedure. A tug or gentle pulling of ETT after insertion of the guidewire rules out an impaction in the eye or other part of the ETT. PMID:27076734

  19. Spinster controls Dpp signaling during glial migration in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed

    Yuva-Aydemir, Yeliz; Bauke, Ann-Christin; Klämbt, Christian

    2011-05-11

    The development of multicellular organisms requires the well balanced and coordinated migration of many cell types. This is of particular importance within the developing nervous system, where glial cells often move long distances to reach their targets. The majority of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system of the Drosophila embryo is derived from the CNS and migrates along motor axons toward their targets. In the developing Drosophila eye, CNS-derived glial cells move outward toward the nascent photoreceptor cells, but the molecular mechanisms coupling the migration of glial cells with the growth of the eye imaginal disc are mostly unknown. Here, we used an enhancer trap approach to identify the gene spinster, which encodes a multipass transmembrane protein involved in endosome-lysosome trafficking, as being expressed in many glial cells. spinster mutants are characterized by glial overmigration. Genetic experiments demonstrate that Spinster modulates the activity of several signaling cascades. Within the migrating perineurial glial cells, Spinster is required to downregulate Dpp (Decapentaplegic) signaling activity, which ceases migratory abilities. In addition, Spinster affects the growth of the carpet cell, which indirectly modulates glial migration. PMID:21562262

  20. Coexpression of two visual pigments in a photoreceptor causes an abnormally broad spectral sensitivity in the eye of the butterfly Papilio xuthus.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Kentaro; Mizuno, Shin; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2003-06-01

    The compound eye of the butterfly Papilio xuthus consists of three different types of ommatidia, each containing nine photoreceptor cells (R1-R9). We have found previously that the R5-R8 photoreceptors of type II ommatidia coexpress two different mRNAs, encoding opsins of green- and orange-red-absorbing visual pigments (Kitamoto et al., 1998). Do these cells contain two functionally distinct visual pigments? First, we identified the sensitivity spectrum of these photoreceptors by using combined intracellular recording and dye injection. We thus found that the R5-R8 of type II ommatidia have a characteristic sensitivity spectrum extending over an excessively broad spectral range, from the violet to the red region; the photoreceptors are therefore termed broadband photoreceptors. The spectral shape was interpreted with a computational model for type II ommatidia, containing a UV visual pigment in cells R1 and R2, two green visual pigments in cells R3 and R4, a far-UV-absorbing screening pigment (3-hydroxyretinol) in the distal part of the ommatidium, and a red-screening pigment that surrounds the rhabdom. The modeling suggests that both visual pigments in the R5-R8 photoreceptors participate in phototransduction. This work provides the first compelling evidence that multiple visual pigments participate in phototransduction in single invertebrate photoreceptors. PMID:12805293

  1. Migration study of 1,3-butadiene in eye-drop solutions.

    PubMed

    Pistos, Constantinos; Karampela, Sevasti; Vardakou, Ioanna; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Athanaselis, Sotiris

    2012-07-01

    The potential deleterious effects of extractables/leachables in pharmaceutical products led the USP, EP, and JP to require extractable and toxicity testing of container/closure systems. To that, a headspace gas chromatography flame ionization detection method was developed and validated for the determination of 1,3-butadiene (1,3-BD) as a potential extractable residue from a pharmaceutical container/closure system into eye-drop solutions. A migration study was further applied in eight eye-drop solutions (currently marketed products) after short- and long-term exposure of these products at various temperatures. This method allows the establishment of safety-qualification thresholds for 1,3-BD being capable of monitoring eye-drop solution products for this residue. PMID:22187982

  2. Lipofuscin Redistribution and Loss Accompanied by Cytoskeletal Stress in Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Tolstik, Elen; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zarubina, Anna V.; Heintzmann, Rainer; Curcio, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) and melanolipofuscin (MLF) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are the principal sources of autofluorescence (AF) signals in clinical fundus–AF imaging. Few details about the subcellular distribution of AF organelles in AMD are available. We describe the impact of aging and AMD on RPE morphology revealed by the distribution of AF LF/MLF granules and actin cytoskeleton in human tissues. Methods. Thirty-five RPE-Bruch's membrane flatmounts from 35 donors were prepared (postmortem: ≤4 hours). Ex vivo fundus examination at the time of accession revealed either absence of chorioretinal pathologies (10 tissues; mean age: 83.0 ± 2.6 years) or stages of AMD (25 tissues; 85.0 ± 5.8 years): early AMD, geographic atrophy, and late exudative AMD. Retinal pigment epithelium cytoskeleton was labeled with AlexaFluor647-Phalloidin. Tissues were imaged on a spinning-disk fluorescence microscope and a high-resolution structured illumination microscope. Results. Age-related macular degeneration impacts individual RPE cells by (1) lipofuscin redistribution by (i) degranulation (granule-by-granule loss) and/or (ii) aggregation and apparent shedding into the extracellular space; (2) enlarged RPE cell area and conversion from convex to irregular and sometimes concave polygons; and (3) cytoskeleton derangement including separations and breaks around subretinal deposits, thickening, and stress fibers. Conclusions. We report an extensive and systematic en face analysis of LF/MLF-AF in AMD eyes. Redistribution and loss of AF granules are among the earliest AMD changes and could reduce fundus AF signal attributable to RPE at these locations. Data can enhance the interpretation of clinical fundus–AF and provide a basis for future quantitative studies. PMID:25758814

  3. High glucose promotes the migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells through increased oxidative stress and PEDF expression.

    PubMed

    Farnoodian, Mitra; Halbach, Caroline; Slinger, Cassidy; Pattnaik, Bikash R; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-09-01

    Defects in the outer blood-retinal barrier have significant impact on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. However, the detailed mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. This is, in part, attributed to the lack of suitable animal and cell culture models, including those of mouse origin. We recently reported a method for the culture of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from wild-type and transgenic mice. The RPE cells are responsible for maintaining the integrity of the outer blood-retinal barrier whose dysfunction during diabetes has a significant impact on vision. Here we determined the impact of high glucose on the function of RPE cells. We showed that high glucose conditions resulted in enhanced migration and increased the level of oxidative stress in RPE cells, but minimally impacted their rate of proliferation and apoptosis. High glucose also minimally affected the cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions of RPE cells. However, the expression of integrins and extracellular matrix proteins including pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) were altered under high glucose conditions. Incubation of RPE cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine under high glucose conditions restored normal migration and PEDF expression. These cells also exhibited increased nuclear localization of the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2 and ZO-1, reduced levels of β-catenin and phagocytic activity, and minimal effect on production of vascular endothelial growth factor, inflammatory cytokines, and Akt, MAPK, and Src signaling pathways. Thus high glucose conditions promote RPE cell migration through increased oxidative stress and expression of PEDF without a significant effect on the rate of proliferation and apoptosis. PMID:27440660

  4. Yellow-throated and Red-eyed Vireos foraging on green anoles during migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, P.W., Jr.; Atherton, L.S.; Payne, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Yellow-throated (Vireo flavifrons) and Red-eyed vireos (V. olivaceus) were observed feeding on green anoles (Anolis carolinensis carolinensis) at two localities in Florida and one in South Carolina. Vireos are long-distance migrants that require foods high in fatty acid content, especially when engaging in migration. It is not unlikely that vireos have an opportunistic foraging strategy to obtain the necessary food requirements, including attacking and consuming prey items such as small lizards. This note provides the first published reports of lizards taken as prey by these two species.

  5. Nanofiber Scaffold-Based Tissue-Engineered Retinal Pigment Epithelium to Treat Degenerative Eye Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, Nathan A; Khristov, Vladimir; Wan, Qin; Sharma, Ruchi; Jha, Balendu Shekhar; Lotfi, Mostafa; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Simon, Carl G; Bharti, Kapil

    2016-06-01

    Clinical-grade manufacturing of a functional retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) monolayer requires reproducing, as closely as possible, the natural environment in which RPE grows. In vitro, this can be achieved by a tissue engineering approach, in which the RPE is grown on a nanofibrous biological or synthetic scaffold. Recent research has shown that nanofiber scaffolds perform better for cell growth and transplantability compared with their membrane counterparts and that the success of the scaffold in promoting cell growth/function is not heavily material dependent. With these strides, the field has advanced enough to begin to consider implementation of one, or a combination, of the tissue engineering strategies discussed herein. In this study, we review the current state of tissue engineering research for in vitro culture of RPE/scaffolds and the parameters for optimal scaffold design that have been uncovered during this research. Next, we discuss production methods and manufacturers that are capable of producing the nanofiber scaffolds in such a way that would be biologically, regulatory, clinically, and commercially viable. Then, a discussion of how the scaffolds could be characterized, both morphologically and mechanically, to develop a testing process that is viable for regulatory screening is performed. Finally, an example of a tissue-engineered RPE/scaffold construct is given to provide the reader a framework for understanding how these pieces could fit together to develop a tissue-engineered RPE/scaffold construct that could pass regulatory scrutiny and can be commercially successful. PMID:27110730

  6. Identification of hydroxyapatite spherules provides new insight into subretinal pigment epithelial deposit formation in the aging eye.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard B; Reffatto, Valentina; Bundy, Jacob G; Kortvely, Elod; Flinn, Jane M; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Jones, Emrys A; McPhail, David S; Fearn, Sarah; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Ratu, Savanjeet Guy Singh; Pauleikhoff, Laurenz; Bird, Alan C; Lengyel, Imre

    2015-02-01

    Accumulation of protein- and lipid-containing deposits external to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is common in the aging eye, and has long been viewed as the hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The cause for the accumulation and retention of molecules in the sub-RPE space, however, remains an enigma. Here, we present fluorescence microscopy and X-ray diffraction evidence for the formation of small (0.5-20 μm in diameter), hollow, hydroxyapatite (HAP) spherules in Bruch's membrane in human eyes. These spherules are distinct in form, placement, and staining from the well-known calcification of the elastin layer of the aging Bruch's membrane. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging confirmed the presence of calcium phosphate in the spherules and identified cholesterol enrichment in their core. Using HAP-selective fluorescent dyes, we show that all types of sub-RPE deposits in the macula, as well as in the periphery, contain numerous HAP spherules. Immunohistochemical labeling for proteins characteristic of sub-RPE deposits, such as complement factor H, vitronectin, and amyloid beta, revealed that HAP spherules were coated with these proteins. HAP spherules were also found outside the sub-RPE deposits, ready to bind proteins at the RPE/choroid interface. Based on these results, we propose a novel mechanism for the growth, and possibly even the formation, of sub-RPE deposits, namely, that the deposit growth and formation begin with the deposition of insoluble HAP shells around naturally occurring, cholesterol-containing extracellular lipid droplets at the RPE/choroid interface; proteins and lipids then attach to these shells, initiating or supporting the growth of sub-RPE deposits. PMID:25605911

  7. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3) Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A.; Dell’Angelica, Esteban C.

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptor Protein (AP)-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions–which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes–to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with molecules implicated

  8. Guanine deaminase functions as dihydropterin deaminase in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin, a minor red eye pigment of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaekwang; Park, Sang Ick; Ahn, Chiyoung; Kim, Heuijong; Yim, Jeongbin

    2009-08-28

    Dihydropterin deaminase, which catalyzes the conversion of 7,8-dihydropterin to 7,8-dihydrolumazine, was purified 5850-fold to apparent homogeneity from Drosophila melanogaster. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 48 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is a monomer under native conditions. The pI value, temperature, and optimal pH of the enzyme were 5.5, 40 degrees C, and 7.5, respectively. Interestingly the enzyme had much higher activity for guanine than for 7,8-dihydropterin. The specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) for guanine (8.6 x 10(6) m(-1).s(-1)) was 860-fold higher than that for 7,8-dihydropterin (1.0 x 10(4) m(-1).s(-1)). The structural gene of the enzyme was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis as CG18143, located at region 82A1 on chromosome 3R. The cloned and expressed CG18143 exhibited both 7,8-dihydropterin and guanine deaminase activities. Flies with mutations in CG18143, SUPor-P/Df(3R)A321R1 transheterozygotes, had severely decreased activities in both deaminases compared with the wild type. Among several red eye pigments, the level of aurodrosopterin was specifically decreased in the mutant, and the amount of xanthine and uric acid also decreased considerably to 76 and 59% of the amounts in the wild type, respectively. In conclusion, dihydropterin deaminase encoded by CG18143 plays a role in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin by providing one of its precursors, 7,8-dihydrolumazine, from 7,8-dihydropterin. Dihydropterin deaminase also functions as guanine deaminase, an important enzyme for purine metabolism. PMID:19567870

  9. Analytical imaging studies of the migration of degraded orpiment, realgar, and emerald green pigments in historic paintings and related conservation issues

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keune, Katrien; Mass, Jennifer; Mehta, Apurva; Church, Jonathan; Meirer, Florian

    2016-04-21

    Yellow orpiment (As2S3) and red–orange realgar (As4S4) photo-degrade and the nineteenth-century pigment emerald green (Cu(C2H3O2)2·3Cu(AsO2)2) degrades into arsenic oxides. Because of their solubility in water, arsenic oxides readily migrate and are found throughout the multi-layered paint system. The widespread arsenic migration has consequences for conservation, and this paper provides better insight into the extent of the problem. Five paint samples containing orpiment, realgar or emerald green pigments deriving from paintings by De Heem (17th C), Van Gogh (19th C), Rousseau (19th C), an unknown 17th C northern European artist and an Austrian painted cupboard (19th C) were investigated using SEM/EDX,more » imaging ATR-FTIR and arsenic (As) K–edge μ-XANES to obtain the spatial distribution and chemical speciation of arsenic in the paint system. In all of the samples investigated arsenic had migrated throughout the multi-layered paint structure of the art object, from support to varnish. Furthermore, As5+-species were found throughout the entire paint sample. We hypothesize that arsenic trioxide is first formed, dissolves in water, further oxidizes to arsenic pentaoxide, and then reacts with lead, calcium and other ions and is deposited in the paint system as insoluble arsenates. Since the degradation of arsenic pigments such as orpiment, realgar and emerald green occurs through a highly mobile intermediate stage, it not only affects the regions rich in arsenic pigments, but also the entire object, including substrate and top varnish layers. Furthermore, because of this widespread potential for damage, preventing degradation of arsenic pigments should be prioritized and conservators should minimize exposure of objects containing arsenic pigments to strong light, large fluctuations in relative humidity and water-based cleaning agents.« less

  10. Xeno-Free and Defined Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Functionally Integrate in a Large-Eyed Preclinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Plaza Reyes, Alvaro; Petrus-Reurer, Sandra; Antonsson, Liselotte; Stenfelt, Sonya; Bartuma, Hammurabi; Panula, Sarita; Mader, Theresa; Douagi, Iyadh; André, Helder; Hovatta, Outi; Lanner, Fredrik; Kvanta, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells could replace lost tissue in geographic atrophy (GA) but efficacy has yet to be demonstrated in a large-eyed model. Also, production of hESC-RPE has not yet been achieved in a xeno-free and defined manner, which is critical for clinical compliance and reduced immunogenicity. Here we describe an effective differentiation methodology using human laminin-521 matrix with xeno-free and defined medium. Differentiated cells exhibited characteristics of native RPE including morphology, pigmentation, marker expression, monolayer integrity, and polarization together with phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we established a large-eyed GA model that allowed in vivo imaging of hESC-RPE and host retina. Cells transplanted in suspension showed long-term integration and formed polarized monolayers exhibiting phagocytic and photoreceptor rescue capacity. We have developed a xeno-free and defined hESC-RPE differentiation method and present evidence of functional integration of clinically compliant hESC-RPE in a large-eyed disease model. PMID:26724907

  11. Xeno-Free and Defined Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Functionally Integrate in a Large-Eyed Preclinical Model.

    PubMed

    Plaza Reyes, Alvaro; Petrus-Reurer, Sandra; Antonsson, Liselotte; Stenfelt, Sonya; Bartuma, Hammurabi; Panula, Sarita; Mader, Theresa; Douagi, Iyadh; André, Helder; Hovatta, Outi; Lanner, Fredrik; Kvanta, Anders

    2016-01-12

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells could replace lost tissue in geographic atrophy (GA) but efficacy has yet to be demonstrated in a large-eyed model. Also, production of hESC-RPE has not yet been achieved in a xeno-free and defined manner, which is critical for clinical compliance and reduced immunogenicity. Here we describe an effective differentiation methodology using human laminin-521 matrix with xeno-free and defined medium. Differentiated cells exhibited characteristics of native RPE including morphology, pigmentation, marker expression, monolayer integrity, and polarization together with phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we established a large-eyed GA model that allowed in vivo imaging of hESC-RPE and host retina. Cells transplanted in suspension showed long-term integration and formed polarized monolayers exhibiting phagocytic and photoreceptor rescue capacity. We have developed a xeno-free and defined hESC-RPE differentiation method and present evidence of functional integration of clinically compliant hESC-RPE in a large-eyed disease model. PMID:26724907

  12. Autologous transplantation of genetically modified iris pigment epithelial cells: A promising concept for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and other disorders of the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, Irina; Kreppel, Florian; Welsandt, Gerhard; Luther, Thomas; Kozlowski, Jolanta; Janicki, Hanna; Kochanek, Stefan; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2002-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause for visual impairment and blindness in the elder population. Laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy and excision of neovascular membranes have met with limited success. Submacular transplantation of autologous iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells has been proposed to replace the damaged retinal pigment epithelium following surgical removal of the membranes. We tested our hypothesis that the subretinal transplantation of genetically modified autologous IPE cells expressing biological therapeutics might be a promising strategy for the treatment of ARMD and other retinal disorders. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has strong antiangiogenic and neuroprotective activities in the eye. Subretinal transplantation of PEDF expressing IPE cells inhibited pathological choroidal neovascularization in rat models of laser-induced rupture of Bruch's membrane and of oxygen induced ischemic retinopathy. PEDF expressing IPE transplants also increased the survival and preserved rhodopsin expression of photoreceptor cells in the RCS rat, a model of retinal degeneration. These findings suggest a promising concept for the treatment of ARMD and other retinal disorders.

  13. Distortion of frontal bones results from cell apoptosis by the mechanical force from the up-migrating eye during metamorphosis in Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingyan; Wei, Fen; Li, Hui; Xu, Juan; Chen, Xinye; Gong, Xiaoling; Tian, Yongsheng; Chen, Songlin; Bao, Baolong

    2015-05-01

    Craniofacial remodeling during flatfish metamorphosis, including eye migration, is perhaps the most striking example of asymmetric postembryonic development in the vertebrate world. The asymmetry of the cranium mainly results from distortion of the frontal bones, which depends on eye migration during metamorphosis. However, it is unclear how the up-migrating eye causes distortion of the frontal bones. In this study, we first show that distortion of the frontal bones during metamorphosis in Paralichthys olivaceus is the result of cell apoptosis, rather than cell autophagy or cell proliferation. Secondly, we report that cell apoptosis in the frontal bones is induced by the mechanical force transferred from the up-migrating eye. The mechanical force from the up-migrating eye signals through FAK to downstream molecules that are integrated into the BMP-2 signal pathway. Finally, it is shown that cell apoptosis in the frontal bones is activated by the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway; the extrinsic death receptor is not involved in this process. Moreover, cell apoptosis in frontal bones is not induced directly by thyroid hormones, which are thought to mediate metamorphosis in flatfishes and directly mediate cell apoptosis during amphibian metamorphosis. These findings help identify the major signaling route used during regulation of frontal bone distortion during metamorphosis in flatfish, and indicate that the asymmetry of the cranium, or at least the distortion of frontal bones, is the result of rather than the reason underlying eye migration. PMID:25622577

  14. A Unifying Concept of Uveal Pigment Cell Distribution and Dissemination Based on an Animal Model: Insights into Ocular Melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Christoph; Wackernagel, Werner; Grinninger, Petra; Mayer, Christoph; Schwab, Katharina; Langmann, Gerald; Richtig, Erika; Wedrich, Andreas; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Zalaudek, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented cells are derived from neural crest cells, which migrate along the peripheral nerve sheets into their specific final region. During their migration, cells progressively acquire pigment-producing capabilities, maturation, and the shape of melanocytes. These insights, along with specific clinical characteristics of melanocytic nevi, have led to new concepts of cutaneous, periocular, and iris nevogenesis. To further elucidate the specific ocular embryogenic melanoblast distribution and dissemination - that could explain the distinct distribution of uveal melanocytic neoplasms - we investigated the ocular pigmentation of dogs affected by a specific mutation called Merle, which results in either pigment- (wild type) or non-pigment- (mutated type) producing cells. Based on our observations, we propose a unifying concept of uveal pigment cell distribution and dissemination, which postulates melanoblast migration and maturation following the trigeminal V1 branch and, later, their entrance into the eye along the ciliary nerves and their finest iris branches. Our concept provides an explanation not only for the specific distribution of ocular melanocytic lesions, including uveal and iris nevi, but also for the different locations depending on the metastatic potential of the ocular melanoma. Though speculative, the higher metastatic potential of posterior uveal melanomas compared to iris melanomas may be related to a less differentiated stage in the maturation of migrating melanocytes in the posterior segment compared to the anterior segment of the eye. However, there is a need of further studies focusing on cell differentiation markers of melanocytes at different locations in the eye. PMID:27002320

  15. The PBDE metabolite 6-OH-BDE 47 affects melanin pigmentation and THRβ MRNA expression in the eye of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wu; Macaulay, Laura J; Kwok, Kevin WH; Hinton, David E; Ferguson, P Lee; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their hydroxyl-metabolites (OH-BDEs) are commonly detected contaminants in human serum in the US population. They are also considered to be endocrine disruptors, and are specifically known to affect thyroid hormone regulation. In this study, we investigated and compared the effects of a PBDE and its OH-BDE metabolite on developmental pathways regulated by thyroid hormones using zebrafish as a model. Exposure to 6-OHBDE 47 (10–100 nM), but not BDE 47 (1–50 μM), led to decreased melanin pigmentation and increased apoptosis in the retina of zebrafish embryos in a concentration-dependent manner in short-term exposures (4 – 30 hours). Six-OH-BDE 47 exposure also significantly decreased thyroid hormone receptor β (THRβ) mRNA expression, which was confirmed using both RT-PCR and in situ hybridization (whole mount and paraffin- section). Interestingly, exposure to the native thyroid hormone, triiodothyronine (T3) also led to similar responses: decreased THRβ mRNA expression, decreased melanin pigmentation and increased apoptosis, suggesting that 6-OH-BDE 47 may be acting as a T3 mimic. To further investigate short-term effects that may be regulated by THRβ, experiments using a morpholino gene knock down and THRβ mRNA over expression were conducted. Knock down of THRβ led to decreases in melanin pigmentation and increases in apoptotic cells in the eye of zebrafish embryos, similar to exposure to T3 and 6-OH-BDE 47, but THRβ mRNA overexpression rescued these effects. Histological analysis of eyes at 22 hpf from each group revealed that exposure to T3 or to 6-OH-BDE 47 was associated with a decrease of melanin and diminished proliferation of cells in layers of retina near the choroid. This study suggests that 6-OH-BDE 47 disrupts the activity of THRβ in early life stages of zebrafish, and warrants further studies on effects in developing humans. PMID:25767823

  16. Lycopene inhibits PDGF-BB-induced retinal pigment epithelial cell migration by suppression of PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi-Ming; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Hsin-Huang; Yang, Chi-Yea; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2009-10-09

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells play a dominant role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), which is the leading cause of failure in retinal reattachment surgery. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) exhibits chemotaxis and proliferation effects on RPE cells in PVR. In this study, the inhibitory effect of lycopene on PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration is examined. In electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) and Transwell migration assays, significant suppression of PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration by lycopene is observed. Cell viability assays show no cytotoxicity of lycopene on RPE cells. Lycopene shows no effect on ARPE19 cell adhesion and is found to inhibit PDGF-BB-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and the underlying signaling pathways of PI3K, Akt, ERK and p38 activation. However, PDGF-BB and lycopene show no effects on JNK activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that lycopene inhibits PDGF-BB-induced ARPE19 cell migration through inhibition of PI3K/Akt, ERK and p38 activation.

  17. TNF-{alpha} promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin; Yao, Jin

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-{alpha} promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-{alpha} promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  18. Recurrent uveitis and pigment dispersion in an eye with in-the-bag acrylic foldable intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Monica; Bhatia, Prashant; Chandrasekhar, Garudadri; Senthil, Sirisha

    2016-01-01

    Phacoemulsification with in-the-bag intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is the standard procedure for cataract surgery. Pigment dispersion and uveitis can result when an IOL is placed in the sulcus. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman, with pigmentary glaucoma, who developed recurrent uveitis following uneventful cataract surgery and an in-the-bag hydrophobic acrylic IOL implant. Recurrent uveitis did not subside despite use of topical steroids over 3 months. Dilated examination revealed capsulophimosis with anterior dislocation of the IOL haptic. The mechanical trauma to the iris due to the displaced haptic was implicated as the cause of recurrent uveitis, which completely resolved after capsular excision and IOL repositioning. This case illustrates a rare cause of recurrent uveitis due to IOL haptic dislocation following severe capsulophimosis. PMID:26921366

  19. Retinal pigment epithelial cell multinucleation in the aging eye - a mechanism to repair damage and maintain homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Rajapakse, Dinusha; Fraczek, Monika; Luo, Chang; Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2016-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are central to retinal health and homoeostasis. Dysfunction or death of RPE cells underlies many age-related retinal degenerative disorders particularly age-related macular degeneration. During aging RPE cells decline in number, suggesting an age-dependent cell loss. RPE cells are considered to be postmitotic, and how they repair damage during aging remains poorly defined. We show that RPE cells increase in size and become multinucleate during aging in C57BL/6J mice. Multinucleation appeared not to be due to cell fusion, but to incomplete cell division, that is failure of cytokinesis. Interestingly, the phagocytic activity of multinucleate RPE cells was not different from that of mononuclear RPE cells. Furthermore, exposure of RPE cells in vitro to photoreceptor outer segment (POS), particularly oxidized POS, dose-dependently promoted multinucleation and suppressed cell proliferation. Both failure of cytokinesis and suppression of proliferation required contact with POS. Exposure to POS also induced reactive oxygen species and DNA oxidation in RPE cells. We propose that RPE cells have the potential to proliferate in vivo and to repair defects in the monolayer. We further propose that the conventionally accepted 'postmitotic' status of RPE cells is due to a modified form of contact inhibition mediated by POS and that RPE cells are released from this state when contact with POS is lost. This is seen in long-standing rhegmatogenous retinal detachment as overtly proliferating RPE cells (proliferative vitreoretinopathy) and more subtly as multinucleation during normal aging. Age-related oxidative stress may promote failure of cytokinesis and multinucleation in RPE cells. PMID:26875723

  20. Ultraviolet vision in lacertid lizards: evidence from retinal structure, eye transmittance, SWS1 visual pigment genes and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pérez i de Lanuza, Guillem; Font, Enrique

    2014-08-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) vision and UV colour patches have been reported in a wide range of taxa and are increasingly appreciated as an integral part of vertebrate visual perception and communication systems. Previous studies with Lacertidae, a lizard family with diverse and complex coloration, have revealed the existence of UV-reflecting patches that may function as social signals. However, confirmation of the signalling role of UV coloration requires demonstrating that the lizards are capable of vision in the UV waveband. Here we use a multidisciplinary approach to characterize the visual sensitivity of a diverse sample of lacertid species. Spectral transmission measurements of the ocular media show that wavelengths down to 300 nm are transmitted in all the species sampled. Four retinal oil droplet types can be identified in the lacertid retina. Two types are pigmented and two are colourless. Fluorescence microscopy reveals that a type of colourless droplet is UV-transmitting and may thus be associated with UV-sensitive cones. DNA sequencing shows that lacertids have a functional SWS1 opsin, very similar at 13 critical sites to that in the presumed ancestral vertebrate (which was UV sensitive) and other UV-sensitive lizards. Finally, males of Podarcis muralis are capable of discriminating between two views of the same stimulus that differ only in the presence/absence of UV radiance. Taken together, these results provide convergent evidence of UV vision in lacertids, very likely by means of an independent photopigment. Moreover, the presence of four oil droplet types suggests that lacertids have a four-cone colour vision system. PMID:24902749

  1. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Pigment Disorders Overview of Skin Pigment Albinism Vitiligo Hyperpigmentation Melasma Melanin is the brown pigment ... dark-skinned people produce the most. People with albinism have little or no melanin and thus their ...

  2. Temsirolimus inhibits proliferation and migration in retinal pigment epithelial and endothelial cells via mTOR inhibition and decreases VEGF and PDGF expression.

    PubMed

    Liegl, Raffael; Koenig, Susanna; Siedlecki, Jakob; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Kernt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high prevalence, retinal vascular diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vein occlusions (RVO), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema have been major therapeutic targets over the last years. The pathogenesis of these diseases is complex and yet not fully understood. However, increased proliferation, migration and angiogenesis are characteristic cellular features in almost every retinal vascular disease. The introduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding intravitreal treatment strategies has led to great advances in the therapy of these diseases. While the predominant part of affected patients benefits from the specific binding of VEGF by administering an anti-VEGF antibody into the vitreous cavity, a small number of non-responders exist and alternative or additional therapeutic strategies should therefore be evaluated. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central signaling pathway that eventually triggers up-regulation of cellular proliferation, migration and survival and has been identified to play a key role in angiogenesis. In the present study we were able to show that both retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells as wells as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) are inhibited in proliferating and migrating after treatment with temsirolimus in non-toxic concentrations. Previous studies suggest that the production of VEGF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and other important cytokines is not only triggered by hypoxia but also by mTOR itself. Our results indicate that temsirolimus decreases VEGF and PDGF expression on RNA and protein levels significantly. We therefore believe that the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus might be a promising drug in the future and it seems worthwhile to evaluate complementary therapeutic effects with anti-VEGF drugs for patients not profiting from mono anti-VEGF therapy alone. PMID:24586308

  3. Silencing heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lu, Hong; Matsukura, Makoto; Zhao, Jien; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HO-1 is highly induced in RPE cells by hypoxia. •Inhibition of HO-1 activity and knockdown of HO-1 expression inhibit VEGF expression in RPE cells under hypoxia. •Knockdown of HO-1 in RPE cells inhibits angiogenesis of endothelial cells in vitro. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the vasculature and in the angiogenesis of tumors, wounds and other environments. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are the main cells involved in choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a process in which hypoxia plays an important role. Our aim was to evaluate the role of human RPE-cell HO-1 in the angiogenic activities of cocultured endothelial cells under hypoxia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for HO-1 was transfected into human RPE cell line ARPE-19, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was used to inhibit HO-1 activity. Knockdown of HO-1 expression and inhibition of HO-1 activity resulted in potent reduction of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) under hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of HO-1 suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells. These findings indicated that HO-1 might have an angiogenic effect in CNV through modulation of VEGF expression and might be a potential target for treating CNV.

  4. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  5. [Migration].

    PubMed

    Maccotta, W; Perotti, A; Thebaut, F; Cristofanelli, L; Pittau, F; Sergi, N; Pittau, L; Morelli, A; Morsella, M; Grinover, A P

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of 11 individual articles on aspects of current migration problems affecting developed countries. The geographical focus is on immigration in Europe, with particular reference to Italy, although one paper is concerned with Quebec. The topical focus is on the social problems associated with immigration. The articles are in Italian, with one exception, which is in French. PMID:12343393

  6. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  7. Reconstructing the eyes of Urbilateria.

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, D; Wittbrodt, J

    2001-01-01

    The shared roles of Pax6 and Six homologues in the eye development of various bilaterians suggest that Urbilateria, the common ancestors of all Bilateria, already possessed some simple form of eyes. Here, we re-address the homology of bilaterian cerebral eyes at the level of eye anatomy, of eye-constituting cell types and of phototransductory molecules. The most widespread eye type found in Bilateria are the larval pigment-cup eyes located to the left and right of the apical organ in primary, ciliary larvae of Protostomia and Deuterostomia. They can be as simple as comprising a single pigment cell and a single photoreceptor cell in inverse orientation. Another more elaborate type of cerebral pigment-cup eyes with an everse arrangement of photoreceptor cells is found in adult Protostomia. Both inverse larval and everse adult eyes employ rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells and thus differ from the chordate cerebral eyes with ciliary photoreceptors. This is highly significant because on the molecular level we find that for phototransduction rhabdomeric versus ciliary photoreceptor cells employ divergent rhodopsins and non-orthologous G-proteins, rhodopsin kinases and arrestins. Our comparison supports homology of cerebral eyes in Protostomia; it challenges, however, homology of chordate and non-chordate cerebral eyes that employ photoreceptor cells with non-orthologous phototransductory cascades. PMID:11604122

  8. Migration of 18 trace elements from ceramic food contact material: influence of pigment, pH, nature of acid and temperature.

    PubMed

    Demont, M; Boutakhrit, K; Fekete, V; Bolle, F; Van Loco, J

    2012-03-01

    The effect of pH, nature of acid and temperature on trace element migration from ceramic ware treated with 18 commercially available glazes was studied. Besides of the well-studied lead and cadmium, migration of other toxic and non toxic elements such as aluminum, boron, barium, cobalt, chrome, copper, iron, lithium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, antimony, tin, strontium, titanium, vanadium, zinc and zirconium was investigated in order to evaluate their potential health hazards. Trace element concentrations were determined with Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). This study suggests that there is indeed a health risk concerning the possible migration of other elements than lead and cadmium. At low pH (2migration kinetics between pH 2 and 3 in acetic acid of these exceptions also are more exponential while the other elements display a decreasing linear gradient. In ceramics used for this study (fired at 900 °C), a linear relationship between the migration and the temperature was observed. PMID:22265939

  9. Birthmarks - pigmented

    MedlinePlus

    ... its own appearance: Cafe-au-lait spots are light tan, the color of coffee with milk. Moles are small clusters of colored skin cells. Mongolian spots (also called Mongolian blue ... dark or light skin Growth of hair from pigmented skin Skin ...

  10. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in aged human choroid and eyes with age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bhutto, Imran A.; McLeod, D. Scott; Hasegawa, Takuya; Kim, Sahng Y.; Merges, Carol; Tong, Patrick; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the localization and relative levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; an angiogenic factor) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF; an antiangiogenic factor) in aged human choroid and to determine if the localization or their relative levels changed in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Ocular tissues were obtained from eight aged control donors (age range, 75–86 years; mean age, 79.8 years) with no evidence or history of chorioretinal disease and from 12 donors diagnosed with AMD (age range, 61–105 years; mean age, 83.9 years). Tissues were cryopreserved and streptavidin alkaline phosphatase immunohistochemistry was performed with rabbit polyclonal anti-human VEGF and rabbit polyclonal anti-human PEDF antibodies. Binding of the antibodies was blocked by preincubation of the antibody with an excess of recombinant human PEDF or VEGF peptide. Choroidal blood vessels were identified with mouse anti-human CD-34 antibody in adjacent tissue sections. Three independent observers graded the immunohistochemical reaction product. The most prominent sites of VEGF and PEDF localization in aged control choroid were RPE–Bruch’s membrane–choriocapillaris complex including RPE basal lamina, intercapillary septa, and choroidal stroma. There was no significant difference in immunostaining intensity and localization of VEGF and PEDF in aged control choroids. The most intense VEGF immunoreactivity was observed in leukocytes within blood vessels. AMD choroid had a similar pattern and intensity of VEGF immunostaining to that observed in aged controls. However, PEDF immunoreactivity was significantly lower in RPE cells (p = 0.0073), RPE basal lamina (p = 0.0141), Bruch’s membrane (p < 0.0001), and choroidal stroma (p = 0.0161) of AMD choroids. The most intense PEDF immunoreactivity was observed in disciform scars. Drusen and basal laminar deposits (BLDs) were positive for VEGF and PEDF. In aged control subjects

  11. Skin as a living coloring book: how epithelial cells create patterns of pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Lorin; Fu, Wenyu; Chirico, William J; Brissette, Janice L

    2014-11-01

    The pigmentation of mammalian skin and hair develops through the interaction of two basic cell types - pigment donors and recipients. The pigment donors are melanocytes, which produce and distribute melanin through specialized structures. The pigment recipients are epithelial cells, which acquire melanin and put it to use, collectively yielding the pigmentation visible to the eye. This review will focus on the pigment recipients, the historically less understood cell type. These end-users of pigment are now known to exert a specialized control over the patterning of pigmentation, as they identify themselves as melanocyte targets, recruit pigment donors, and stimulate the transfer of melanin. As such, this review will discuss the evidence that the skin is like a coloring book: the pigment recipients create a 'picture,' a blueprint for pigmentation, which is colorless initially but outlines where pigment should be placed. Melanocytes then melanize the recipients and 'color in' the picture. PMID:25104547

  12. SKIN AS A LIVING COLORING BOOK: HOW EPITHELIAL CELLS CREATE PATTERNS OF PIGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Lorin; Fu, Wenyu; Chirico, William J.; Brissette, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The pigmentation of mammalian skin and hair develops through the interaction of two basic cell types — pigment donors and recipients. The pigment donors are melanocytes, which produce and distribute melanin through specialized structures. The pigment recipients are epithelial cells, which acquire melanin and put it to use, collectively yielding the pigmentation visible to the eye. This review will focus on the pigment recipients, the historically less understood cell type. These end-users of pigment are now known to exert a specialized control over the patterning of pigmentation, as they identify themselves as melanocyte targets, recruit pigment donors, and stimulate the transfer of melanin. As such, this review will discuss the evidence that the skin is like a coloring book: the pigment recipients create a “picture,” a blueprint for pigmentation, which is colorless initially but outlines where pigment should be placed. Melanocytes then melanize the recipients and “color in” the picture. PMID:25104547

  13. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  14. Relation of the fractal structure of organic pigments to their performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillas, G.; Agashe, N.; Kohls, D. J.; Ilavsky, J.; Jemian, P.; Clapp, L.; Schwartz, R. J.; Beaucage, G.

    2002-05-01

    Different pigments embedded in polymer matrices were examined by small angle scattering of x- rays over 3 wave number decades. The scattering intensities show differences both in the mass fractal dimension (varying between 1.4 and 2.67) and the size of the particles. The differences are pronounced between dry pigment powders and the same powders in a polymer matrix as well as between the pigments themselves. Further, a correlation of pigment geometrical configuration and pigment performance, as perceived by the human eye, shows how pigments with a maximum color brightness per pigment mass can be created.

  15. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  16. Human pigmentation genes under environmental selection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and comparative genomics have established major loci and specific polymorphisms affecting human skin, hair and eye color. Environmental changes have had an impact on selected pigmentation genes as populations have expanded into different regions of the globe. PMID:23110848

  17. Reversible Conjunctival Pigmentation Associated With Prostaglandin Use.

    PubMed

    Choi, Daniel Y; Chang, Robert T; Yegnashankaran, Krishnan; Friedman, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old Indian male with a diagnosis of ocular hypertension was started on a prostaglandin analog (PGA) in both eyes to lower intraocular pressure. Six years later, he developed progressively increasing bilateral limbal conjunctival hyperpigmentation. Travoprost was discontinued and replaced with brinzolamide and over the next year, the patient's conjunctival pigmentation improved significantly in both the eyes. This case report documents with slit-lamp photography the first case of conjunctival pigmentation associated with PGA use that has been shown to have reversal with discontinuation of the PGA. Because of the widespread use of PGAs, and the evolving nature of the conjunctival pigmentation, clinicians should be aware of this reversible condition when considering biopsy or removal of conjunctival melanocytic lesions. PMID:25967530

  18. Predicting phenotype from genotype: normal pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Robert K; Henderson, Miquia S; Walsh, Monica H; Garrison, Nanibaa' A; Kelch, Jessica T; Cohen-Barak, Orit; Erickson, Drew T; John Meaney, F; Bruce Walsh, J; Cheng, Keith C; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Frudakis, Tony; Thomas, Matthew; Brilliant, Murray H

    2010-03-01

    Genetic information in forensic studies is largely limited to CODIS data and the ability to match samples and assign them to an individual. However, there are circumstances, in which a given DNA sample does not match anyone in the CODIS database, and no other information about the donor is available. In this study, we determined 75 SNPs in 24 genes (previously implicated in human or animal pigmentation studies) for the analysis of single- and multi-locus associations with hair, skin, and eye color in 789 individuals of various ethnic backgrounds. Using multiple linear regression modeling, five SNPs in five genes were found to account for large proportions of pigmentation variation in hair, skin, and eyes in our across-population analyses. Thus, these models may be of predictive value to determine an individual's pigmentation type from a forensic sample, independent of ethnic origin. PMID:20158590

  19. Transcriptome analysis of the planarian eye identifies ovo as a specific regulator of eye regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lapan, Sylvain W.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Among the millions of invertebrate species with visual systems, the genetic basis of eye development and function is well understood only in Drosophila melanogaster. We describe an eye transcriptome for the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Planarian photoreceptors expressed orthologs of genes required for phototransduction and microvillus structure in Drosophila and vertebrates, and optic pigment cells expressed solute transporters and melanin synthesis enzymes similar to those active in the vertebrate retinal pigment epithelium. Orthologs of several planarian eye genes, such as bestrophin-1 and Usher syndrome genes, cause eye defects in mammals when perturbed and were not previously described to have roles in invertebrate eyes. Five previously undescribed planarian eye transcription factors were required for normal eye formation during head regeneration. In particular, a conserved, transcription factor-encoding ovo gene was expressed from the earliest stages of eye regeneration and was required for regeneration of all cell types of the eye. PMID:22884275

  20. A melanosomal two-pore sodium channel regulates pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Oancea, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular organelles mediate complex cellular functions that often require ion transport across their membranes. Melanosomes are organelles responsible for the synthesis of the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanin synthesis result in pigmentation defects, visual deficits, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Although genes encoding putative melanosomal ion transporters have been identified as key regulators of melanin synthesis, melanosome ion transport and its contribution to pigmentation remain poorly understood. Here we identify two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) as the first reported melanosomal cation conductance by directly patch-clamping skin and eye melanosomes. TPC2 has been implicated in human pigmentation and melanoma, but the molecular mechanism mediating this function was entirely unknown. We demonstrate that the vesicular signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate PI(3,5)P2 modulates TPC2 activity to control melanosomal membrane potential, pH, and regulate pigmentation. PMID:27231233

  1. A melanosomal two-pore sodium channel regulates pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Escobar, Iliana E.; Oancea, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular organelles mediate complex cellular functions that often require ion transport across their membranes. Melanosomes are organelles responsible for the synthesis of the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanin synthesis result in pigmentation defects, visual deficits, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Although genes encoding putative melanosomal ion transporters have been identified as key regulators of melanin synthesis, melanosome ion transport and its contribution to pigmentation remain poorly understood. Here we identify two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) as the first reported melanosomal cation conductance by directly patch-clamping skin and eye melanosomes. TPC2 has been implicated in human pigmentation and melanoma, but the molecular mechanism mediating this function was entirely unknown. We demonstrate that the vesicular signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate PI(3,5)P2 modulates TPC2 activity to control melanosomal membrane potential, pH, and regulate pigmentation. PMID:27231233

  2. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Eye Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Eye Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Eye Cancer Overview Statistics ...

  3. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral infection; Conjunctival infection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies and some are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Others are nothing to worry about. ...

  4. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  5. Eye emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trauma A black eye is usually caused by direct trauma to the eye or face. The bruise ... can cause bruising around the eyes, even without direct injury to the eye. Sometimes, serious damage to ...

  6. Effects of exogenous thyroid hormones on visual pigment composition in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Temple, Shelby E; Ramsden, Samuel D; Haimberger, Theodore J; Veldhoen, Kathy M; Veldhoen, Nik J; Carter, Nicolette L; Roth, Wolff-Michael; Hawryshyn, Craig W

    2008-07-01

    The role of exogenous thyroid hormone on visual pigment content of rod and cone photoreceptors was investigated in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Coho vary the ratio of vitamin A1- and A2-based visual pigments in their eyes. This variability potentially alters spectral sensitivity and thermal stability of the visual pigments. We tested whether the direction of shift in the vitamin A1/A2 ratio, resulting from application of exogenous thyroid hormone, varied in fish of different ages and held under different environmental conditions. Changes in the vitamin A1/A2 visual pigment ratio were estimated by measuring the change in maximum absorbance (lambda max) of rods using microspectrophotometry (MSP). Exogenous thyroid hormone resulted in a long-wavelength shift in rod, middle-wavelength-sensitive (MWS) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone photoreceptors. Rod and LWS cone lambda max values increased, consistent with an increase in vitamin A2. MWS cone lambda max values increased more than predicted for a change in the vitamin A1/A2 ratio. To account for this shift, we tested for the expression of multiple RH2 opsin subtypes. We isolated and sequenced a novel RH2 opsin subtype, which had 48 amino acid differences from the previously sequenced coho RH2 opsin. A substitution of glutamate for glutamine at position 122 could partially account for the greater than predicted shift in MWS cone lambda max values. Our findings fit the hypothesis that a variable vitamin A1/A2 ratio provides seasonality in spectral tuning and/or improved thermal stability of visual pigments in the face of seasonal environmental changes, and that multiple RH2 opsin subtypes can provide flexibility in spectral tuning associated with migration-metamorphic events. PMID:18552303

  7. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of ...

  8. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  9. Overview of plant pigments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains are four major classes of biological pigments produced in plants. Chlorophylls are the primary pigments responsible for plant green and photosynthesis. The other three are accessary pigments and secondary metabolites that yield non-green colors and...

  10. Is the Schwabe Organ a Retained Larval Eye? Anatomical and Behavioural Studies of a Novel Sense Organ in Adult Leptochiton asellus (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) Indicate Links to Larval Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren H.; Sigwart, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a sensory organ, the Schwabe organ, was recently reported as a unifying feature of chitons in the order Lepidopleurida. It is a patch of pigmented tissue located on the roof of the pallial cavity, beneath the velum on either side of the mouth. The epithelium is densely innervated and contains two types of potential sensory cells. As the function of the Schwabe organ remains unknown, we have taken a cross-disciplinary approach, using anatomical, histological and behavioural techniques to understand it. In general, the pigmentation that characterises this sensory structure gradually fades after death; however, one particular concentrated pigment dot persists. This dot is positionally homologous to the larval eye in chiton trochophores, found in the same neuroanatomical location, and furthermore the metamorphic migration of the larval eye is ventral in species known to possess Schwabe organs. Here we report the presence of a discrete subsurface epithelial structure in the region of the Schwabe organ in Leptochiton asellus that histologically resembles the chiton larval eye. Behavioural experiments demonstrate that Leptochiton asellus with intact Schwabe organs actively avoid an upwelling light source, while Leptochiton asellus with surgically ablated Schwabe organs and a control species lacking the organ (members of the other extant order, Chitonida) do not (Kruskal-Wallis, H = 24.82, df = 3, p < 0.0001). We propose that the Schwabe organ represents the adult expression of the chiton larval eye, being retained and elaborated in adult lepidopleurans. PMID:26366861

  11. Is the Schwabe Organ a Retained Larval Eye? Anatomical and Behavioural Studies of a Novel Sense Organ in Adult Leptochiton asellus (Mollusca, Polyplacophora) Indicate Links to Larval Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren H; Sigwart, Julia D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a sensory organ, the Schwabe organ, was recently reported as a unifying feature of chitons in the order Lepidopleurida. It is a patch of pigmented tissue located on the roof of the pallial cavity, beneath the velum on either side of the mouth. The epithelium is densely innervated and contains two types of potential sensory cells. As the function of the Schwabe organ remains unknown, we have taken a cross-disciplinary approach, using anatomical, histological and behavioural techniques to understand it. In general, the pigmentation that characterises this sensory structure gradually fades after death; however, one particular concentrated pigment dot persists. This dot is positionally homologous to the larval eye in chiton trochophores, found in the same neuroanatomical location, and furthermore the metamorphic migration of the larval eye is ventral in species known to possess Schwabe organs. Here we report the presence of a discrete subsurface epithelial structure in the region of the Schwabe organ in Leptochiton asellus that histologically resembles the chiton larval eye. Behavioural experiments demonstrate that Leptochiton asellus with intact Schwabe organs actively avoid an upwelling light source, while Leptochiton asellus with surgically ablated Schwabe organs and a control species lacking the organ (members of the other extant order, Chitonida) do not (Kruskal-Wallis, H = 24.82, df = 3, p < 0.0001). We propose that the Schwabe organ represents the adult expression of the chiton larval eye, being retained and elaborated in adult lepidopleurans. PMID:26366861

  12. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Fronk, Aaron H; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included. PMID:27493715

  13. Methods for culturing retinal pigment epithelial cells: a review of current protocols and future recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fronk, Aaron H; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium is an important part of the vertebrate eye, particularly in studying the causes and possible treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The retinal pigment epithelium is difficult to access in vivo due to its location at the back of the eye, making experimentation with age-related macular degeneration treatments problematic. An alternative to in vivo experimentation is cultivating the retinal pigment epithelium in vitro, a practice that has been going on since the 1970s, providing a wide range of retinal pigment epithelial culture protocols, each producing cells and tissue of varying degrees of similarity to natural retinal pigment epithelium. The purpose of this review is to provide researchers with a ready list of retinal pigment epithelial protocols, their effects on cultured tissue, and their specific possible applications. Protocols using human and animal retinal pigment epithelium cells, derived from tissue or cell lines, are discussed, and recommendations for future researchers included. PMID:27493715

  14. Retinal pigment epithelium in incontinentia pigmenti.

    PubMed

    Mensheha-Manhart, O; Rodrigues, M M; Shields, J A; Shannon, G M; Mirabelli, R P

    1975-04-01

    An 18-month-old white girl with incontinentia pigmenti presented clinically with leukokoria of the right eye. B-scan ultrasound demonstrated a retrolental mass consistent with a detached retina. Histologic examination of the skin revealed changes compatible with the intermediate verrucous phase of the disease. Microscopic examination of the right eye showed retinal detachment and nodular proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium. The nodules contained macrophages laden with melanin and lipofuscin. An unusually large amount of lipofuscin was present for a child of this age. The basic pigmentary abnormality may affect the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in changes in the overlying neurosensory retina that may lead to the retinal dysplasia or retinal detachemnt often associated with this condition. PMID:1119517

  15. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  16. Eye Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of ... light-sensitive membrane in the back of the eye (the retina) from its supporting layers. It is ...

  17. Eye Wear

    MedlinePlus

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  18. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  19. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  20. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work ...

  1. Argon Laser Photoablation for Treating Benign Pigmented Conjunctival Nevi

    PubMed Central

    Alsharif, Abdulrahman M.; Al-Gehedan, Saeed M.; Alasbali, Tariq; Alkuraya, Hisham S.; Lotfy, Nancy M.; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of argon laser photoablation of benign conjunctival pigmented nevi with different clinical presentations. Patients and Methods: This interventional case series was conducted between July 2014 and January 2015. Patients presenting with benign conjunctival nevi were included. Data were collected on the clinical features at presentation, argon laser photoablation, and follow-up at 8 and 24 weeks. Postoperative photography allowed recording of the success of each case and the overall success rate. Complete removal of conjunctival pigments was considered an absolute success. Partial pigmentation requiring repeat laser treatment was considered a qualified success. Results: There were 14 eyes (four right eyes and ten left eyes) with benign pigmented conjunctival nevi. There were three males and eight females in the study sample. The median age was 36 (25% percentile: 26 years). Three patients had bilateral lesions. The nevi were located temporally in nine eyes, nasally in three eyes, and on the inferior bulbar conjunctiva in two eyes. The mean horizontal and vertical diameters of nevi were 5 ± 2 mm and 4 ± 2.7 mm, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 5 months. Following laser treatment, no eyes had subconjunctival hemorrhage, infection, scarring, neovascularization, recurrence, or corneal damage. The absolute success rate of laser ablation was 79%. Three eyes with elevated nevi had one to three sessions of laser ablation resulting in a qualified success rate of 100%. Conclusions: Argon laser ablation was a safe and effective treatment for the treatment of selective benign pigmented conjunctival nevi in Arab patients. PMID:27555708

  2. Abnormalities of fundus autofluorescence in pigmented paravenous chorioretinal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Kase, Satoru; Saito, Wataru; Ishida, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate fundus autofluorescence (FAF) as well as fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (IA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in a patient with pigmented paravenous chorioretinal atrophy (PPCRA). A funduscopic examination revealed chorioretinal atrophy along the paravenous area in both eyes. A marked bone spicule pigment clumping together with the atrophy was noted left eye. FA and IA showed a window defect and hypofluorescence, respectively, which exclusively corresponds to the atrophic area along the retinal vein area and the optic disc both eyes. FAF revealed geographic hypofluorescence along the paravenous and supranasal retinal areas. Hyperfluorescence was noted, which comparatively surrounded the hypofluorescence in the peripheral paravenous distribution. Hypofluorescence detected by FAF corresponded to the areas of retinal thinning and atrophy detected by OCT and FA. FAF is a useful examination in PPCRA, which can noninvasively demonstrate the distribution of deficit and dysfunction of retinal pigment epithelium. PMID:23264840

  3. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  4. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. PMID:25513726

  5. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Shabnam; Prendiville, Kevin John; Martinez, Eladio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We report a case of iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn and discuss the importance of an accurate diagnosis for prevention of amblyopia. Methods: We describe a case of an abnormal red reflex seen on a newborn exam. Results: A full-term female born via normal spontaneous vaginal delivery without any complications was seen in the newborn nursery. She was noted to have an abnormal eye exam. Pupils were large with circular dark excrescences of the iris pigment epithelium. She was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist where she was noted to fixate and follow faces. No afferent pupillary defect was seen. OD red reflex was normal whereas OS red reflex was blocked mostly by dark excrescences. A 2–3 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OD iris and a 3–5 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OS iris, consistent with a pupillary iris pigment epithelial cyst. Central visual axis was clear OU. Glaucoma was not present and patching was not performed. Observations and clinical photographs were recommended with follow-up in three months. Conclusion: Iris pigment epithelial cysts are uncommonly seen in children. The primary care provider first seeing a newborn must be aware of lesions obscuring a red reflex with appropriate follow-up. Follow-up in three months with IOP measurements is recommended. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in children may be a cause of amblyopia, thus prompt evaluation is important for prognostic purposes and the prevention of amblyopia. PMID:27625966

  6. Positive selection of a duplicated UV-sensitive visual pigment coincides with wing pigment evolution in Heliconius butterflies.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Adriana D; Bybee, Seth M; Bernard, Gary D; Yuan, Furong; Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Reed, Robert D; Warren, Andrew D; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2010-02-23

    The butterfly Heliconius erato can see from the UV to the red part of the light spectrum with color vision proven from 440 to 640 nm. Its eye is known to contain three visual pigments, rhodopsins, produced by an 11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal chromophore together with long wavelength (LWRh), blue (BRh) and UV (UVRh1) opsins. We now find that H. erato has a second UV opsin mRNA (UVRh2)-a previously undescribed duplication of this gene among Lepidoptera. To investigate its evolutionary origin, we screened eye cDNAs from 14 butterfly species in the subfamily Heliconiinae and found both copies only among Heliconius. Phylogeny-based tests of selection indicate positive selection of UVRh2 following duplication, and some of the positively selected sites correspond to vertebrate visual pigment spectral tuning residues. Epi-microspectrophotometry reveals two UV-absorbing rhodopsins in the H. erato eye with lambda(max) = 355 nm and 398 nm. Along with the additional UV opsin, Heliconius have also evolved 3-hydroxy-DL-kynurenine (3-OHK)-based yellow wing pigments not found in close relatives. Visual models of how butterflies perceive wing color variation indicate this has resulted in an expansion of the number of distinguishable yellow colors on Heliconius wings. Functional diversification of the UV-sensitive visual pigments may help explain why the yellow wing pigments of Heliconius are so colorful in the UV range compared to the yellow pigments of close relatives lacking the UV opsin duplicate. PMID:20133601

  7. Positive selection of a duplicated UV-sensitive visual pigment coincides with wing pigment evolution in Heliconius butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Briscoe, Adriana D.; Bybee, Seth M.; Bernard, Gary D.; Yuan, Furong; Sison-Mangus, Marilou P.; Reed, Robert D.; Warren, Andrew D.; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2010-01-01

    The butterfly Heliconius erato can see from the UV to the red part of the light spectrum with color vision proven from 440 to 640 nm. Its eye is known to contain three visual pigments, rhodopsins, produced by an 11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal chromophore together with long wavelength (LWRh), blue (BRh) and UV (UVRh1) opsins. We now find that H. erato has a second UV opsin mRNA (UVRh2)—a previously undescribed duplication of this gene among Lepidoptera. To investigate its evolutionary origin, we screened eye cDNAs from 14 butterfly species in the subfamily Heliconiinae and found both copies only among Heliconius. Phylogeny-based tests of selection indicate positive selection of UVRh2 following duplication, and some of the positively selected sites correspond to vertebrate visual pigment spectral tuning residues. Epi-microspectrophotometry reveals two UV-absorbing rhodopsins in the H. erato eye with λmax = 355 nm and 398 nm. Along with the additional UV opsin, Heliconius have also evolved 3-hydroxy-DL-kynurenine (3-OHK)-based yellow wing pigments not found in close relatives. Visual models of how butterflies perceive wing color variation indicate this has resulted in an expansion of the number of distinguishable yellow colors on Heliconius wings. Functional diversification of the UV-sensitive visual pigments may help explain why the yellow wing pigments of Heliconius are so colorful in the UV range compared to the yellow pigments of close relatives lacking the UV opsin duplicate. PMID:20133601

  8. Retinal Development and Ommin Pigment in the Cranchiid Squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida).

    PubMed

    Evans, Aaron B; Acosta, Monica L; Bolstad, Kathrin S

    2015-01-01

    The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species. PMID:25970484

  9. Retinal Development and Ommin Pigment in the Cranchiid Squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida)

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Aaron B.; Acosta, Monica L.; Bolstad, Kathrin S.

    2015-01-01

    The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species. PMID:25970484

  10. Light and dark adaptation mechanisms in the compound eyes of Myrmecia ants that occupy discrete temporal niches.

    PubMed

    Narendra, Ajay; Greiner, Birgit; Ribi, Willi A; Zeil, Jochen

    2016-08-15

    Ants of the Australian genus Myrmecia partition their foraging niche temporally, allowing them to be sympatric with overlapping foraging requirements. We used histological techniques to study the light and dark adaptation mechanisms in the compound eyes of diurnal (Myrmecia croslandi), crepuscular (M. tarsata, M. nigriceps) and nocturnal ants (M. pyriformis). We found that, except in the day-active species, all ants have a variable primary pigment cell pupil that constricts the crystalline cone in bright light to control for light flux. We show for the nocturnal M. pyriformis that the constriction of the crystalline cone by the primary pigment cells is light dependent whereas the opening of the aperture is regulated by an endogenous rhythm. In addition, in the light-adapted eyes of all species, the retinular cell pigment granules radially migrate towards the rhabdom, a process that in both the day-active M. croslandi and the night-active M. pyriformis is driven by ambient light intensity. Visual system properties thus do not restrict crepuscular and night-active ants to their temporal foraging niche, while day-active ants require high light intensities to operate. We discuss the ecological significance of these adaptation mechanisms and their role in temporal niche partitioning. PMID:27535985

  11. Electroporation of Embryonic Chick Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustín; Grajales-Esquivel, Erika; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia

    2016-01-01

    The chick embryo has prevailed as one of the major models to study developmental biology, cell biology and regeneration. From all the anatomical features of the chick embryo, the eye is one of the most studied. In the chick embryo, the eye develops between 26 and 33 h after incubation (Stages 8–9, Hamburger and Hamilton, 1951). It originates from the posterior region of the forebrain, called the diencephalon. However, the vertebrate eye includes tissues from different origins including surface ectoderm (lens and cornea), anterior neural plate (retina, iris, ciliary body and retinal pigmented epithelium) and neural crest/head mesoderm (stroma of the iris and of the ciliary body as well as choroid, sclera and part of the cornea). After gastrulation, a single eye field originates from the anterior neural plate and is characterized by the expression of eye field transcriptional factors (EFTFs) that orchestrate the program for eye development. Later in development, the eye field separates in two and the optic vesicles form. After several inductive interactions with the lens placode, the optic cup forms. At Stages 14–15, the outer layer of the optic cup becomes the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) while the inner layer forms the neuroepithelium that eventually differentiates into the retina. One main advantage of the chick embryo, is the possibility to perform experiments to over-express or to down-regulate gene expression in a place and time specific manner to explore gene function and regulation. The aim of this protocol is to describe the electroporation techniques at Stages 8–12 (anterior neural fold and optic vesicle stages) and Stages 19–26 (eye cup, RPE and neuroepithelium). We provide a full description of the equipment, materials and electrode set up as well as a detailed description of the highly reproducible protocol including some representative results. This protocol has been adapted from our previous publications Luz-Madrigal et al. (2014) and Zhu

  12. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in the cells of the retina. ... from other parts of the body. Treatment for eye cancer varies by the type and by how advanced ...

  13. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Healthy Eyes Maintaining Your Vision Click for more information Taking good care of ... are qualified to perform eye exams. Aging and Vision Changes As you age, it is normal to ...

  14. Eye Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  15. Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye and keeps it healthy. previous continue Light, Lens, Action These next parts are really cool, ... the eye. previous continue Rods and Cones Process Light The retina uses special cells called rods and ...

  16. Mechanisms of protein delivery to melanosomes in pigment cells

    PubMed Central

    Sitaram, Anand; Marks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate pigment cells in the eye and skin are useful models for cell types that use specialized endosomal trafficking pathways to partition cargo proteins to unique lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes. This review describes current models of protein trafficking required for melanosome biogenesis in mammalian melanocytes. PMID:22505665

  17. Eye floaters

    MedlinePlus

    ... eyes are not on the surface of your eyes, but inside them. These floaters are bits of cell debris that drift around ... is the layer in the back of the eye.) If you notice a sudden increase in floaters or if you see floaters along with flashes ...

  18. Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do you have diabetes, and have you noticed any changes in your vision? Yes Over time, too much glucose (sugar) in the ... eye pink, red or irritated, and are there any secretions or mucus from the eye? Yes CONJUNCTIVITIS, also called "PINK EYE," can be caused ...

  19. Circadian rhythms affect electroretinogram, compound eye color, striking behavior and locomotion of the praying mantis Hierodula patellifera.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Aaron E; Prete, Frederick R; Mantes, Edgar S; Urdiales, Andrew F; Bogue, Wil

    2014-11-01

    Many behaviors and physiological processes oscillate with circadian rhythms that are synchronized to environmental cues (e.g. light onset), but persist with periods of ~24 h in the absence of such cues. We used a multilevel experimental approach to assess whether circadian rhythms modulate several aspects of the visual physiology and behavior of the praying mantis Hierodula patellifera. We used electroretinograms (ERGs) to assess compound eye sensitivity, colorimetric photographic analyses to assess compound eye color changes (screening pigment migration), behavioral assays of responsiveness to computer-generated prey-like visual stimuli and analyses of locomotor activity patterns on a modified treadmill apparatus. Our results indicate that circadian clocks control and/or modulate each of the target behaviors. Strong rhythms, persisting under constant conditions, with periods of ~24 h were evident in photoreceptor sensitivity to light, appetitive responsiveness to prey-like stimuli and gross locomotor activity. In the first two cases, responsiveness was highest during the subjective night and lowest during the subjective day. Locomotor activity was strongly clustered around the transition time from day to night. In addition, pigment migration and locomotor behavior responded strongly to light:dark cycles and anticipated the light-dark transition, suggesting that the circadian clocks modulating both were entrained to environmental light cues. Together, these data indicate that circadian rhythms operate at the cellular, cellular systems and organismal level in H. patellifera. Our results represent an intriguing first step in uncovering the complexities of circadian rhythms in the Mantodea. PMID:25214491

  20. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  1. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  2. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  3. Comparative morphology of the eyes of Sagitta (Chaetognatha) in relation to depth of habitat.

    PubMed

    Goto, T; Terazaki, M; Yoshida, M

    1989-01-01

    A survey of the eye structure in 10 species of Sagitta (phylum Chaetognatha) which differ in habitat was carried out: 5 epipelagic, 4 mesopelagic and 1 bathypelagic species. Paying attention to the dimension of the pigment cell, and assuming that the perforated lamellae are the photoreceptive regions (PRs), we classified the eyes of the 10 species into 5 types. In type I and II eyes there is one large pigment cell. The maximum length of the pigment cell relative to that of the eye (PC/E) is more than 30% in dorsal view and more than 50% in transverse sections. The pigment cell is surrounded by a wide area of the PR that we designated "central PR". The type II eye possesses, in addition, near the periphery of the eye, masses of PRs which measure about 15% of the central one in size. We call these positionally separated PRs "peripheral PR". In type III eyes the pigment cell and the central PR are small (PC/E is about 10% in dorsal view and less than 40% in transverse sections) and the peripheral PRs are scattered. In type IV eye the pigment cell is also small and the central PRs extend to the periphery. In type V eye the pigment cell is absent and the PR occupies a wide area of the dorsal half of the eye. The type I and II eyes were found mostly in epipelagic species, the type III and IV, in mesopelagic species, and the type V, in bathypelagic species. The adaptational significance of the small pigment cells, the peripheral PRs, and the pigmentless eye is discussed. In addition, we report a new type of photoreceptive cell in mesopelagic Sagitta zetesios, in which two receptoral processes emerge from single cells, in contrast to one in all the other species of Sagitta. PMID:2920816

  4. Skin pigmentation evaluation in broilers fed natural and synthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, M P; Hirschler, E M; Sams, A R

    2005-01-01

    Broiler carcass skin color is important in the United States and Mexico. This study evaluated the use of natural and synthetic pigments in broiler diets at commercial levels. Birds were fed natural or synthetic pigments at low or high levels, simulating US and Mexican commercial practices. Skin color was measured during live production (3 to 7 wk of age) and after slaughter and chilling. The natural pigments had consistently greater skin b* values (yellowness) than the synthetic pigments. The high levels produced greater skin b* values than the low levels, regardless of source. The synthetic pigments had a slower increase in skin b* but reached the same level as the natural low by 7 wk. There was no difference in skin a* values (redness) due to pigment source or level or the age of the bird. By 7 wk, all pigment sources approached plateau levels in the blood, but the synthetic pigment diet produced higher blood levels of yellow and red pigments than the natural pigment diets. Processing intensified skin yellowness and reduced skin redness. These data suggest that although synthetic pigments might have been absorbed better than natural ones, natural pigments were more efficient at increasing skin yellowness and there were only small differences between high and low levels for each pigment source. This finding may allow reduction in pigment use and feed cost to achieve the same skin acceptance by the consumer. PMID:15685954

  5. Corrosion-Indicating Pigment And Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed hydrogen-sensitive paint for metal structures changes color at onset of corrosion, involving emission of hydrogen as result of electrochemical reactions. Pigment of suitable paint includes rhodium compound RhCl(PPh3)3, known as Wilkinson's catalyst. As coating on critical parts of such structures as bridges and aircraft, paint gives early warning of corrosion, and parts thus repaired or replaced before failing catastrophically. Reveals corrosion before it becomes visible to eye. Inspection for changes in color not ordinarily necessitate removal of structure from service, and costs less than inspection by x-ray or thermal neutron radiography, ultrasonic, eddy-current, or acoustic-emission techniques.

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of pigmented lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareau, Daniel; Jacques, Steven; Krueger, James

    2014-03-01

    Colors observed in clinical dermoscopy are critical to diagnosis but the mechanisms that lead to the spectral components of diffuse reflectance are more than meets the eye: combinations of the absorption and scattering spectra of the biomolecules as well as the "structural color" effect of skin anatomy. We modeled diffuse remittance from skin based on histopathology. The optical properties of the tissue types were based on the relevant chromophores and scatterers. The resulting spectral images mimic the appearance of pigmented lesions quite well when the morphology is mathematically derived but limited when based on histopathology, raising interesting questions about the interaction between various wavelengths with various pathological anatomical features.

  7. Eye development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicholas E; Li, Ke; Quiquand, Manon; Ruggiero, Robert; Wang, Lan-Hsin

    2014-06-15

    The eye has been one of the most intensively studied organs in Drosophila. The wealth of knowledge about its development, as well as the reagents that have been developed, and the fact that the eye is dispensable for survival, also make the eye suitable for genetic interaction studies and genetic screens. This article provides a brief overview of the methods developed to image and probe eye development at multiple developmental stages, including live imaging, immunostaining of fixed tissues, in situ hybridizations, and scanning electron microscopy and color photography of adult eyes. Also summarized are genetic approaches that can be performed in the eye, including mosaic analysis and conditional mutation, gene misexpression and knockdown, and forward genetic and modifier screens. PMID:24784530

  8. EYE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicholas E.; Li, Ke; Quiquand, Manon; Ruggiero, Robert; Wang, Lan-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The eye has been one of the most intensively studied organs in Drosophila. The wealth of knowledge about its development, as well as the reagents that have been developed, and the fact that the eye is dispensable for survival, also make the eye suitable for genetic interaction studies and genetic screens. This chapter provides a brief overview of the methods developed to image and probe eye development at multiple developmental stages, including live imaging, immunostaining of fixed tissues, in situ hybridizations, and scanning electron microscopy and color photography of adult eyes. Also summarized are genetic approaches that can be performed in the eye, including mosaic analysis and conditional mutation, gene misexpression and knockdown, and forward genetic and modifier screens. PMID:24784530

  9. Ultraviolet vision in birds: the importance of transparent eye media

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Olle; Mitkus, Mindaugas; Olsson, Peter; Kelber, Almut

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive visual pigments are widespread in the animal kingdom but many animals, for example primates, block UV light from reaching their retina by pigmented lenses. Birds have UV-sensitive (UVS) visual pigments with sensitivity maxima around 360–373 nm (UVS) or 402–426 nm (violet-sensitive, VS). We describe how these pigments are matched by the ocular media transmittance in 38 bird species. Birds with UVS pigments have ocular media that transmit more UV light (wavelength of 50% transmittance, λT0.5, 323 nm) than birds with VS pigments (λT0.5, 358 nm). Yet, visual models predict that colour discrimination in bright light is mostly dependent on the visual pigment (UVS or VS) and little on the ocular media. We hypothesize that the precise spectral tuning of the ocular media is mostly relevant for detecting weak UV signals, e.g. in dim hollow-nests of passerines and parrots. The correlation between eye size and UV transparency of the ocular media suggests little or no lens pigmentation. Therefore, only small birds gain the full advantage from shifting pigment sensitivity from VS to UVS. On the other hand, some birds with VS pigments have unexpectedly low UV transmission of the ocular media, probably because of UV blocking lens pigmentation. PMID:24258716

  10. Histopathologic Findings in the Areas of Orange Pigment Overlying Choroidal Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maria D.; Salomao, Diva R.; Marmorstein, Alan D.; Pulido, Jose S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Orange pigment is an important sign of malignancy in melanocytic tumors. There is a question as to whether the pigment accumulation is inside of macrophages or retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. We investigated which cells are involved with this color alteration. Methods We examined enucleated specimens from two patients with choroidal melanoma and dense orange pigment on fundus examination. Color fundus and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) photographs were reviewed followed by examination with fluorescent microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry of enucleated eyes for the specific areas corresponding to the orange pigment. Results Orange pigment was observed on color fundus photography and correlated with areas of hyperautofluorescence on FAF. Fluorescent microscopy of sections of the enucleated eyes showed autofluorescence in the RPE, which were most pronounced where there was a localized retinal detachment and reactive hyperplasia of the RPE. Immunohistochemical studies were done with keratin (OSCAR and AE1/AE3) and S-100 stained RPE cells, which still were attached to Bruch's membrane. Histiocytes present in the detached retina stained with anti-CD163 antibody and did not show autofluorescence. Electron microscopy studies of the same areas showed the presence of lipofuscin and melanolipofuscin within the clustered RPE cells. Conclusions Orange pigment in choroidal melanocytic lesions originates from the RPE cells, rather than macrophages, and is most abundant where there is proliferation of the RPE. Translational Relevance The orange pigment tumoral biomarker arises and is in the retinal pigment epithelium. PMID:27190699

  11. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  12. Adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sukeda, Aoi; Mori, Taisuke; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pigmented ciliary epithelium is an exceptionally rare eye tumour, with only a few cases reported to date. We encountered such a case in a 50-year-old woman who reported seeing floaters in her right eye. Fundus examination and MRI revealed an elevated lesion located in the ciliary body compressing the lens. The ciliary body was resected under the diagnosis of ciliary adenoma. On histological examination, the tumour exhibited epithelial features with glandular formation and moderate nuclear pleomorphism. The tumour invaded the subepithelial stroma of the ciliary body. Immunohistochemical findings were positive for cytokeratin OSCAR, AE1/AE3, CK7, EMA, S100, Melan A, HMB45, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. PMID:25015166

  13. MULTISPECTRAL DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING OF THE IRIS IN PIGMENT DISPERSION SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Daniel K.; Lukic, Ana; Yang, Yongyi; Wilensky, Jacob T.; Wernick, Miles N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine if wavelength selection with near infrared (NIR) iris imaging may enhance iris transillumination defects (ITDs) in pigment dispersion syndrome. Methods An experimental apparatus was used to acquire iris images in 6 African-American (AA) and 6 White patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. Light emitting diode (LED) probes of 6 different spectral bands (700 to 950 nm) were used to project light into patients' eyes. Iris patterns were photographed, ITD regions of interest were outlined, and region of interest contrasts were calculated for each spectral band. Results Contrasts varied as a function of wavelength (P<0.0001) for both groups, but tended to be highest in the 700 to 800 nm range. Contrasts were higher in Whites than AAs at 700 nm but the opposite was found at 810 nm (P<0.001). Conclusions Optimized NIR iris imaging may be wavelength dependent. Ideal wavelength to image ITDs in more pigmented eyes may be slightly longer than for less pigmented eyes. PMID:21423031

  14. Stripes and belly-spots -- a review of pigment cell morphogenesis in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kelsh, Robert N; Harris, Melissa L; Colanesi, Sarah; Erickson, Carol A

    2009-02-01

    Pigment patterns in the integument have long-attracted attention from both scientists and non-scientists alike since their natural attractiveness combines with their excellence as models for the general problem of pattern formation. Pigment cells are formed from the neural crest and must migrate to reach their final locations. In this review, we focus on our current understanding of mechanisms underlying the control of pigment cell migration and patterning in diverse vertebrates. The model systems discussed here - chick, mouse, and zebrafish - each provide unique insights into the major morphogenetic events driving pigment pattern formation. In birds and mammals, melanoblasts must be specified before they can migrate on the dorsolateral pathway. Transmembrane receptors involved in guiding them onto this route include EphB2 and Ednrb2 in chick, and Kit in mouse. Terminal migration depends, in part, upon extracellular matrix reorganization by ADAMTS20. Invasion of the ectoderm, especially into the feather germ and hair follicles, requires specific signals that are beginning to be characterized. We summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms regulating melanoblast number and organization in the epidermis. We note the apparent differences in pigment pattern formation in poikilothermic vertebrates when compared with birds and mammals. With more pigment cell types, migration pathways are more complex and largely unexplored; nevertheless, a role for Kit signaling in melanophore migration is clear and indicates that at least some patterning mechanisms may be highly conserved. We summarize the multiple factors thought to contribute to zebrafish embryonic pigment pattern formation, highlighting a recent study identifying Sdf1a as one factor crucial for regulation of melanophore positioning. Finally, we discuss the mechanisms generating a second, metamorphic pigment pattern in adult fish, emphasizing recent studies strengthening the evidence that undifferentiated

  15. Effect of cadmium chloride on the distal retinal pigment cells of the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P.S.; Fingerman, M.; Nguyen, L.K.; Obih, P.

    1997-03-01

    Crustaceans have two sets of pigmentary effectors, chromatophores and retinal pigment cells. Retinal pigments control the amount of light striking the rhabdom, the photosensitive portion of each ommatidium, screening the rhabdom in bright light and uncovering it in darkness or dim light. Migration of the distal pigment in the fiddler crab, Uca pugilalor, is regulated by a light-adapting hormone and a dark-adapting hormone. The black chromatophores of this crab are also controlled by a pair of hormones. Both pigmentary effectors exhibit circadian rhythms. The effects of some organic and inorganic pollutants on the ability of Uca pugilator to change color have been described. Exposure of this crab to naphthalene or cadmium results in decreased ability to disperse the pigment in their black chromatophores, the exposed crabs becoming paler than the unexposed crabs. Norepinephrine triggers release of both the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone. In view of the facts that (a) these hormones which regulate the black chromatophores and distal pigment are synthesized in and released from the eyestalk neuroendocrine complex, (b) the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone may actually be the same hormone. having two different activities and (c) release of both the black pigment-dispersing hormone and the light-adapting hormone is triggered by norepinephrine, the present investigation was carried out to determine the effect of cadmium on distal pigment migration in Uca pugilator. More specifically, for comparison with the previously reported effect of cadmium on pigment migration in the black chromatophores, we wished to determine whether the distal pigment of fiddler crabs exposed to cadmium chloride is capable of as wide a range of movement as in unexposed crabs, and if not what might be the explanation. This is the first report of the effect of a pollutant on a retinal pigment of any crustacean. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Biology of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.

    1981-01-01

    The many factors involved in the normal pigmentation of human skin are highly complex involving anatomic, biochemical, and genetic aspects of melanocytes in the skin and the influence of UV light and various hormones on the melanocytes. It is probably more than just coincidence that the melanocytes, which are of neurogenic origin, are so responsive to several trophic hormones produced in the brain. Understanding of the various factors involved in the normal pigmentary process is crucial to explaining the many alterations and anomalies in human pigmentation.

  17. Eye Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cornea, which focuses light while protecting the eye. After light passes through the cornea, it travels through a ... and have them progress faster. With cataracts, the eye's clear lens clouds, blocking light. To help deal with mild cataracts, you may ...

  18. Dry Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, called punctal cautery, is recommended to permanently close the drainage holes. The procedure helps keep the limited volume of tears on the eye for a longer period of time. In some patients with dry eye, supplements or dietary sources (such as tuna fish) of omega-3 fatty ...

  19. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity.

    PubMed

    Saksens, Nicole T M; Krebs, Mark P; Schoenmaker-Koller, Frederieke E; Hicks, Wanda; Yu, Minzhong; Shi, Lanying; Rowe, Lucy; Collin, Gayle B; Charette, Jeremy R; Letteboer, Stef J; Neveling, Kornelia; van Moorsel, Tamara W; Abu-Ltaif, Sleiman; De Baere, Elfride; Walraedt, Sophie; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Cremers, Frans P M; Boon, Camiel J F; Roepman, Ronald; Leroy, Bart P; Peachey, Neal S; Hoyng, Carel B; Nishina, Patsy M; den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-02-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the CTNNA1 gene (encoding α-catenin 1) in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy. In addition, we identified a Ctnna1 missense mutation in a chemically induced mouse mutant, tvrm5. Parallel clinical phenotypes were observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of individuals with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and in tvrm5 mice, including pigmentary abnormalities, focal thickening and elevated lesions, and decreased light-activated responses. Morphological studies in tvrm5 mice demonstrated increased cell shedding and the presence of large multinucleated RPE cells, suggesting defects in intercellular adhesion and cytokinesis. This study identifies CTNNA1 gene variants as a cause of macular dystrophy, indicates that CTNNA1 is involved in maintaining RPE integrity and suggests that other components that participate in intercellular adhesion may be implicated in macular disease. PMID:26691986

  20. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity

    PubMed Central

    Saksens, Nicole T.M.; Krebs, Mark P.; Schoenmaker-Koller, Frederieke E.; Hicks, Wanda; Yu, Minzhong; Shi, Lanying; Rowe, Lucy; Collin, Gayle B.; Charette, Jeremy R.; Letteboer, Stef J.; Neveling, Kornelia; van Moorsel, Tamara W.; Abu-Ltaif, Sleiman; De Baere, Elfride; Walraedt, Sophie; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Boon, Camiel J.F.; Roepman, Ronald; Leroy, Bart P.; Peachey, Neal S.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Nishina, Patsy M.; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here, we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the α-catenin 1 (CTNNA1) gene in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy. In addition, we identified a Ctnna1 missense mutation in a chemically induced mouse mutant, tvrm5. Parallel clinical phenotypes were observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of individuals with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and in tvrm5 mice, including pigmentary abnormalities, focal thickening and elevated lesions, and decreased light-activated responses. Morphological studies in tvrm5 mice revealed increased cell shedding and large multinucleated RPE cells, suggesting defects in intercellular adhesion and cytokinesis. This study identifies CTNNA1 gene variants as a cause of macular dystrophy, suggests that CTNNA1 is involved in maintaining RPE integrity, and suggests that other components that participate in intercellular adhesion may be implicated in macular disease. PMID:26691986

  1. New pigment pattern of the polychromatic Mesanthura protei, Kensley 1980 (Isopoda, Cymothoida, Anthuroidea) from Pulau Tinggi, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Melvin; Rahim, Azman Bin Abdul; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Binti Mohd

    2015-09-01

    A female Mesanthura protei, Kensley 1980 with a new polychromatic pigment pattern found from dead coral rubbles in the shallow water coral reef area of Pulau Tinggi, Johor, Malaysia is described. The present species is the fifth colour morph of M. protei. In addition, it is distinctive in having irregular spotted pigment pattern (1) between the eyes and (2) pereonites and pleonites dorsally.

  2. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes. PMID:26361975

  3. Altered melanocyte differentiation and retinal pigmented epithelium transdifferentiation induced by Mash1 expression in pigment cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Lanning, Jessica L; Wallace, Jaclyn S; Zhang, Deming; Diwakar, Ganesh; Jiao, Zhongxian; Hornyak, Thomas J

    2005-10-01

    Transcription factor genes governing pigment cell development that are associated with spotting mutations in mice include members of several structural transcription factor classes but not members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class, important for neurogenesis and myogenesis. To determine the effects of bHLH factor expression on pigment cell development, the neurogenic bHLH factor Mash1 was expressed early in pigment cell development in transgenic mice from the dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) promoter. Dct:Mash1 transgenic founders exhibit variable microphthalmia and patchy coat color hypopigmentation. Transgenic F1 mice exhibit microphthalmia with complete coat color dilution. Marker analysis demonstrates that Mash1 expression in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) initiates neurogenesis in this cell layer, whereas expression in remaining neural crest-derived melanocytes alters their differentiation, in part by profoundly downregulating expression of the p (pink-eyed dilution) gene, while maintaining their cell fate. The effects of transcriptional perturbation of pigment cell precursors by Mash1 further highlight differences between pigment cells of distinct developmental origins, and suggest a mechanism for the alteration of melanogenesis to result in marked coat color dilution. PMID:16185282

  4. Calibration of an eye oximeter with a dynamic eye phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabili, A.; Bardakci, D.; Helling, K.; Matyas, C.; Muro, S.; Ramella-Roman, J. C.

    2008-02-01

    Measurements of oxygen saturation and flow in the retina can yield information about the eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as Diabetic Retinopathy. Recently we have realized an instrument capable of measuring oxygenation in the retina using six different wavelengths and capable of measuring blood flow using speckle-based techniques. The calibration of such instrument is particularly difficult due to the layered structure of the eye and the lack of alternative measurement techniques. For this purpose we have realized an in vitro model of the human eye. The artificial eye is composed of four layers: the retina vessels, the choroids, the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), and the sclera. The retina vessels are modeled with 150 μm tube connected to a micro-pump delivering 34 μl/min. The micro-tube, the pump, and a blood reservoir were connected in a closed circulatory system; blood oxygenation in the vessel could be modified using an external oxygen reservoir. The optical properties of all other layers were mimicked using titanium dioxide as a scatterer and ink as an absorber. The absorption coefficient μa and the scattering coefficient µs of these layers were independently measured using an integrating sphere. Absorption and scattering coefficient of all layers were modified before experimental measurements and a Monte Carlo program was finally used to model the experimental results.

  5. Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  6. Healthy Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs Training and Jobs Home > Healthy Eyes Healthy Vision Diabetes Diabetes Home How Much Do You Know? ... seeing your best. Read more. What are common vision problems? Some of the most common vision problems ...

  7. Eye Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD Mar. 01, 2015 Eye allergies, called allergic conjunctivitis , are a common condition that occurs when the ... with tearing and burning. Unlike bacterial or viral conjunctivitis, allergic conjunctivitis is not spread from person to ...

  8. Eye emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... and there is a good chance of recovery. Alkaline substances -- such as lime, lye, drain cleaners, and ... at high speed by machining, grinding, or hammering metal have the highest risk of injuring the eye. ...

  9. Black Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aug 30, 2016 Toddlers Most at Risk of Chemical Burns to Eyes Aug 26, 2016 Firework Blinds Teenager, Severs Hand Jun 29, ... at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  10. Progression of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Atrophy in Antiangiogenic Therapy of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Christopher; Wedl, Manuela; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To monitor retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy progression during antiangiogenic therapy of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) over 2 years using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Design Prospective interventional case series. Methods setting: Clinical practice. study population: Thirty patients (31 eyes) with treatment-naïve neovascular AMD. observation procedures: Standard intravitreal therapy (0.5 mg ranibizumab) was administered monthly during the first year and pro re nata (PRN; as-needed) during the second year. Spectral-domain (SD) OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (selectively imaging the RPE) examinations were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using a standardized protocol. RPE-related changes were evaluated using a semi-automated polarization-sensitive OCT segmentation algorithm and correlated with SD OCT and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) findings. main outcome measures: RPE response, geographic atrophy (GA) progression. Results Atrophic RPE changes included RPE thinning, RPE porosity, focal RPE atrophy, and development of GA. Early RPE loss (ie, RPE porosity, focal atrophy) increased progressively during initial monthly treatment and remained stable during subsequent PRN-based therapy. GA developed in 61% of eyes at month 24. Mean GA area increased from 0.77 mm2 at 12 months to 1.10 mm2 (standard deviation = 1.09 mm2) at 24 months. Reactive accumulation of RPE-related material at the lesion borders increased until month 3 and subsequently decreased. Conclusions Progressive RPE atrophy and GA developed in the majority of eyes. RPE migration signifies certain RPE plasticity. Polarization-sensitive OCT specifically images RPE-related changes in neovascular AMD, contrary to conventional imaging methods. Polarization-sensitive OCT allows for precisely monitoring the sequence of RPE-related morphologic changes. PMID:25769245

  11. Aging and Your Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Eyes Heath and Aging Aging and Your Eyes Steps to Protect Your Eyesight Common Eye Problems ... weight can also help protect your vision. Common Eye Problems The following common eye problems can be ...

  12. Zinc Deficiency Leads to Lipofuscin Accumulation in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Pigmented Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinou, Despina; Eibl, Oliver; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with lipofuscin accumulation whereas the content of melanosomes decreases. Melanosomes are the main storage of zinc in the pigmented tissues. Since the elderly population, as the most affected group for AMD, is prone to zinc deficit, we investigated the chemical and ultrastructural effects of zinc deficiency in pigmented rat eyes after a six-month zinc penury diet. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult Long Evans (LE) rats were investigated. The control animals were fed with a normal alimentation whereas the zinc-deficiency rats (ZD-LE) were fed with a zinc deficient diet for six months. Quantitative Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis yielded the zinc mole fractions of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The lateral resolution of the analysis was 100 nm. The zinc mole fractions of melanosomes were significantly smaller in the RPE of ZD-LE rats as compared to the LE control rats. Light, fluorescence and electron microscopy, as well as immunohistochemistry were performed. The numbers of lipofuscin granules in the RPE and of infiltrated cells (Ø>3 µm) found in the choroid were quantified. The number of lipofuscin granules significantly increased in ZD-LE as compared to control rats. Infiltrated cells bigger than 3 µm were only detected in the choroid of ZD-LE animals. Moreover, the thickness of the Bruch's membrane of ZD-LE rats varied between 0.4–3 µm and thin, rangy ED1 positive macrophages were found attached at these sites of Bruch's membrane or even inside it. Conclusions/Significance In pigmented rats, zinc deficiency yielded an accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE and of large pigmented macrophages in the choroids as well as the appearance of thin, rangy macrophages at Bruch's membrane. Moreover, we showed that a zinc diet reduced the zinc mole fraction of melanosomes in the RPE and modulated the thickness of the Bruch's membrane. PMID:22216222

  13. The Genetic Inheritance of the Blue-eyed White Phenotype in Alpacas (Vicugna pacos)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Warren E.; Appleton, Belinda R.

    2014-01-01

    White-spotting patterns in mammals can be caused by mutations in the gene KIT, whose protein is necessary for the normal migration and survival of melanocytes from the neural crest. The alpaca (Vicugna pacos) blue-eyed white (BEW) phenotype is characterized by 2 blue eyes and a solid white coat over the whole body. Breeders hypothesize that the BEW phenotype in alpacas is caused by the combination of the gene causing gray fleece and a white-spotting gene. We performed an association study using KIT flanking and intragenic markers with 40 unrelated alpacas, of which 17 were BEW. Two microsatellite alleles at KIT-related markers were significantly associated (P < 0.0001) with the BEW phenotype (bew1 and bew2). In a larger cohort of 171 related individuals, we identify an abundance of an allele (bew1) in gray animals and the occurrence of bew2 homozygotes that are solid white with pigmented eyes. Association tests accounting for population structure and familial relatedness are consistent with a proposed model where these alleles are in linkage disequilibrium with a mutation or mutations that contribute to the BEW phenotype and to individual differences in fleece color. PMID:23144493

  14. Chemical purity and toxicology of pigments used in tattoo inks.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Henrik; Lewe, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The safety of tattoo inks has obviously increased in Europe since the existence of European Union Resolution ResAP(2008)1, which resulted in the improved quality control of pigment raw materials due to the definition of impurity limits that manufacturers can refer to. High-performance pigments are mostly used in tattoo inks, and these pigments are supposed to be chemically inert and offer high light fastness and low migration in solvents. However, these pigments were not developed or produced for applications involving long-term stay in the dermis or contact with bodily fluids. Therefore, these pigments often do not comply with the purity limits of the resolution; however, it is required that every distributed tattoo ink does not contain aromatic amines and not exceed the limits of heavy metals or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Current toxicity studies of pigments underline that no ecotoxicological threat to human health or to the environment should be expected. However, the pigment as well as its impurities and coating materials must be considered. In order to evaluate the safety of pigments according to their impurities, two different validated sample preparation methods are necessary: (1) simulation of their long-term stay in the bodily fluid of the dermis and (2) simulation of cleavage due to laser removal or ultraviolet exposure. The development of standardized, validated and well-adapted methods for this application has to be part of prospective efforts. Concerning legislation, it might be appropriate that the first regulative approaches be based on those of cosmetics. PMID:25833635

  15. Pupil Size in Spider Eyes Is Linked to Post-Ecdysal Lens Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fenk, Lisa M.; Heidlmayr, Karin; Lindner, Philipp; Schmid, Axel

    2010-01-01

    In this study we describe a distinctive pigment ring that appears in spider eyes after ecdysis and successively decreases in size in the days thereafter. Although pigment stops in spider eyes are well known, size variability is, to our knowledge, reported here for the first time. Representative species from three families (Ctenidae, Sparassidae and Lycosidae) are investigated and, for one of these species (Cupiennius salei, Ctenidae), the progressive increase in pupil diameter is monitored. In this species the pupil occupies only a fourth of the total projected lens surface after ecdysis and reaches its final size after approximately ten days. MicroCT images suggest that the decrease of the pigment ring is linked to the growth of the corneal lens after ecdysis. The pigment rings might improve vision in the immature eye by shielding light rays that would otherwise enter the eye via peripheral regions of the cornea, beside the growing crystalline lens. PMID:21209876

  16. Eye tracker.

    PubMed

    Pruehsner, W; Enderle, J D

    1999-01-01

    A device that records saccadic eye movements, the Eye Tracker, is presented in this paper. The Eye Tracker utilizes infra-red technology mounted on fully adjustable goggles to follow eye movements targeted by either a goggles mounted HUD type display or a wall mounted light bank. Output from the goggles is remotely sent to a PC type computer, which leads to device portability. The goggles can also maintain output data in an internal memory for latter download. The user interface is Windows based with the output from the goggles represented as a trace map or plotted points. This output can also be saved or printed for future reference. The user interface can be used on any PC type computer. The device is designed with reference to standard ISO design methodology. Safety in design and final product usage has also been addressed with reference to standard ISO type procedures. Device accuracy is maintained by precise construction of the IR units in the goggles and tight control of cross talk between each IR device plus filtering of ambient light signals. Also, a reset feature is included to maintain equal baseline control. An automatic switching device is included in the goggles to allow the Eye Tracker to "warm up," assuring that equal IR power is delivered for each subject tested. The IR units in the goggles are also modular in case replacement is required. PMID:11143354

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  18. P gene as an inherited biomarker of human eye color.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Kanetsky, Peter A; Walker, Amy H; Holmes, Robin; Halpern, Allan C; Schuchter, Lynn M; Elder, David E; Guerry, DuPont

    2002-08-01

    Human pigmentation, including eye color, has been associated with skin cancer risk. The P gene is the human homologue to the mouse pink-eye dilution locus and is responsible for oculocutaneous albinism type 2 and other phenotypes that confer eye hypopigmentation. The P gene is located on chromosome 15q11.2-q12, which is also the location of a putative eye pigmentation gene (EYCL3) inferred to exist by linkage analysis. Therefore, the P gene is a strong candidate for determination of human eye color. Using a sample of 629 normally pigmented individuals, we found that individuals were less likely to have blue or gray eyes if they had P gene variants Arg305Trp (P = 0.002), Arg419Gln (P = 0.001), or the combination of both variants (P = 0.003). These results suggest that P gene, in part, determines normal phenotypic variation in human eye color and may therefore represent an inherited biomarker of cutaneous cancer risk. PMID:12163334

  19. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  20. A global view of the OCA2-HERC2 region and pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Michael P; Paschou, Peristera; Grigorenko, Elena; Gurwitz, David; Barta, Csaba; Lu, Ru-Band; Zhukova, Olga V; Kim, Jong-Jin; Siniscalco, Marcello; New, Maria; Li, Hui; Kajuna, Sylvester L B; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Speed, William C; Pakstis, Andrew J; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in the gene OCA2 are responsible for oculocutaneous albinism type 2, but polymorphisms in and around OCA2 have also been associated with normal pigment variation. In Europeans, three haplotypes in the region have been shown to be associated with eye pigmentation and a missense SNP (rs1800407) has been associated with green/hazel eyes (Branicki et al. in Ann Hum Genet 73:160-170, 2009). In addition, a missense mutation (rs1800414) is a candidate for light skin pigmentation in East Asia (Yuasa et al. in Biochem Genet 45:535-542, 2007; Anno et al. in Int J Biol Sci 4, 2008). We have genotyped 3,432 individuals from 72 populations for 21 SNPs in the OCA2-HERC2 region including those previously associated with eye or skin pigmentation. We report that the blue-eye associated alleles at all three haplotypes were found at high frequencies in Europe; however, one is restricted to Europe and surrounding regions, while the other two are found at moderate to high frequencies throughout the world. We also observed that the derived allele of rs1800414 is essentially limited to East Asia where it is found at high frequencies. Long-range haplotype tests provide evidence of selection for the blue-eye allele at the three haplotyped systems but not for the green/hazel eye SNP allele. We also saw evidence of selection at the derived allele of rs1800414 in East Asia. Our data suggest that the haplotype restricted to Europe is the strongest marker for blue eyes globally and add further inferential evidence that the derived allele of rs1800414 is an East Asian skin pigmentation allele. PMID:22065085

  1. Reflections on colourful ommatidia of butterfly eyes.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, Doekele G

    2002-04-01

    The eye shine of butterflies from a large number of ommatidia was observed with a modified epi-illumination apparatus equipped with an objective lens of large numerical aperture. A few representative cases are presented: the satyrine Bicyclus anynana, the heliconian Heliconius melpomene, the small white Pieris rapae and the small copper Lycaena phlaeas. The colour of the eye shine is determined mainly by the reflectance spectrum of the tapetal mirror and the transmittance spectrum of the photoreceptor screening pigments, if present near the light-guiding rhabdom. Reflectance spectra measured from individual ommatidia show that tapetum and screening pigments are co-expressed in fixed combinations, thus determining different ommatidial classes. The classes are distributed in an irregular pattern that can be rapidly assessed with the novel epi-illumination apparatus. Many butterfly species appear to have red-reflecting ommatidia, which is interpreted to indicate the presence of red-sensitive photoreceptors. PMID:11919267

  2. [Posterior iris bowing after accommodation--elucidation of the etiology of pigment dispersion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ueda, J; Sawaguchi, S; Watanabe, J; Shirakashi, M; Abe, H

    1997-02-01

    Recent advancements in imaging the anterior segment structures using the ultrasound biomicro scope (UBM) have proven the involvement of posterior iris bowing due to reverse pupillary block as the cause of pigment dispersion syndrome. In this report, we examined whether the posterior iris bowing occurs even in normal eyes following accommodation, and whether the degree of iris concavity tends to be greater in myopic eyes than in emmetropic eyes. The subjects were normal eyes with sufficient accommodation power, i.e. 5 myopic eyes with less than-5 diopter reflection, 5 emmetropic eyes within +/- 1 dioptor reflection, respectively. We obtained UBM images of the iris at 4 portions before and after accommodation, and measured the degree of posterior iris bowing. We found that almost all data shift posteriorly after accommodation, and that the iris concavity is more distinct in myopic eyes than in emmetropic eyes both before and after accommodation (before: p = 0.0004, after: p < 0.0001). From these results, we confirmed that iris concavity after accommodation occurs in normal eyes but not enough for iridozonular contact, and that pigment dispersion syndrome results from augmented iris concavity owing to pre-existing factors such as iris flexibility, myopia, and sufficient accommodation power. PMID:9124102

  3. Dual-modal whole eye photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-09-01

    We developed a prototype dual-modal ocular imaging system integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging modalities. This system can perform high-resolution ocular imaging from the anterior region down to the fundus area. The novel system successfully imaged the murine eyes in vivo, including iris, lens, retina, and retinal pigment epithelium. Our results demonstrated that this system has a great potential in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases.

  4. Ritonavir and bull’s eye maculopathy: case report

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rita; Vila-Franca, Marta; Oliveira Afonso, Cláudia; Ornelas, Conceição; Santos, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To report on a case of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) toxicity apparently associated with ritonavir. Methods: We describe a case of gradual-onset blurry vision in both eyes in a 30-year-old HIV-positive male on Highly-Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) including ritonavir Results: The patient presented with a visual acuity of 3/10 in each eye, and fundoscopy revealed paracentral pigment mottling. Computerized perimetry showed a ring-scotoma in both eyes. Fluorescein angiography revealed an anular RPE defect in both eyes, congruent with hyperautofluorescent changes on autofluorescence imaging. Full-field ERG was normal. Conclusions: Since ritonavir has previously been linked with toxicity to the RPE, we consider this report as further evidence of this association.

  5. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  6. Eye Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  7. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  8. Why Do Eyes Water?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? Print ... out of your nose. continue Why Do Eyes Water? Eyes water for lots of different reasons besides ...

  9. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Cockell, Charles S.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. Key Words: Biosignatures—Exoplanets—Halophiles—Pigmentation—Reflectance spectroscopy—Spectral models. Astrobiology 15, 341–361. PMID:25941875

  10. Nonphotosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Schwieterman, Edward W; Cockell, Charles S; Meadows, Victoria S

    2015-05-01

    Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. PMID:25941875

  11. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  12. New directions in phthalocyanine pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Diep VO

    1994-01-01

    Phthalocyanines have been used as a pigment in coatings and related applications for many years. These pigments are some of the most stable organic pigments known. The phthalo blue and green pigments have been known to be ultraviolet (UV) stable and thermally stable to over 400 C. These phthalocyanines are both a semiconductor and photoconductor, exhibiting catalytic activity and photostabilization capability of polymers. Many metal free and metallic phthalocyanine derivatives have been prepared. Development of the new classes of phthalocyanine pigment could be used as coating on NASA spacecraft material such as glass to decrease the optical degradation from UV light, the outside of the space station modules for UV protection, and coating on solar cells to increase lifetime and efficiency.

  13. Resveratrol inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of retinal pigment epithelium and development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Keijiro; He, Shikun; Terasaki, Hiroto; Nazari, Hossein; Zhang, Huiming; Spee, Christine; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a serious complication of retinal detachment and ocular trauma, and its recurrence may lead to irreversible vision loss. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a critical step in the pathogenesis of PVR, which is characterized by fibrotic membrane formation and traction retinal detachment. In this study, we investigated the potential impact of resveratrol (RESV) on EMT and the fibrotic process in cultured RPE cells and further examined the preventive effect of RESV on PVR development using a rabbit model of PVR. We found that RESV induces mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and inhibits transforming growth factor-β2(TGF-β2)-induced EMT of RPE cells by deacetylating SMAD4. The effect of RESV on MET was dependent on sirtuin1 activation. RESV suppressed proliferation, migration and fibronectin synthesis induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB or TGF-β2. In vivo, RESV inhibited the progression of experimental PVR in rabbit eyes. Histological findings showed that RESV reduced fibrotic membrane formation and decreased α-SMA expression in the epiretinal membranes. These results suggest the potential use of RESV as a therapeutic agent to prevent the development of PVR by targeting EMT of RPE. PMID:26552368

  14. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly. PMID:27281924

  15. Natural pigments and sacred art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The

  16. [Sepsis caused by pigmented and no pigmented Chromobacterium violaceum].

    PubMed

    Guevara, Armando; Salomón, Marlly; Oliveros, María; Guevara, Esmirna; Guevara, Milarys; Medina, Laida

    2007-10-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum sepsis is rare but associated with a high mortality rate. We report a fatal case of C. violaceum sepsis in a 6 years old Venezuelan indian boy. Clinical manifestations were fever and swelling in the right inguinal region. The initial diagnosis was an appendicular plastron. Appendicectomy was performed and during surgery a right psoas abscess was identified that resulted culture positive for pigmented C. violaceum. Blood cultures were positive for a pigmented and non pigmented C. violaceum strain. Imipenem and amikacin were administered despite of which the child died 9 days after hospital admission. PMID:17989847

  17. [Regulatory proteins of vertebrate eye tissues].

    PubMed

    Krasnov, M S; Grigorian, E N; Iamskova, V P; Boguslavskiĭ, D V; Iamskov, I A

    2003-01-01

    In our work the new proteins likely belonged to the microenvironment of pigmented epithelium cells and retinal neurons in mammalian eye were studied. We attempted to understand the role of these proteins in the maintenance of normal morphological and functional state of these eye tissues. Earlier for the first time we identified the adhesion molecules with physico-chemical and biological properties much different from other known cell adhesion molecules of bovine eye. Probably, they represent one family of low molecular weigh, highly glicosylated proteins, that express biological activity in extremely low doses--10(-10) mg/ml. The homogeneity of studying proteins is confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. It is shown also that these proteins are N-glycosylated, because they contain mannose and N-acetilglucosamine residues. They demonstrate as well a high calcium-binding activity, with Kd corresponded to 10(-4)-10(-6) mg/ml. For a study of the biological effect of these glycoproteins in extremely low doses, a new experimental model was proposed and developed. It was the cultivation in vitro of the posterior part of the eye obtained from the newt Pleurodeles waltl. In short-time culture system it was demonstrated that the studied glycoproteins could stabilize pigment epithelium cell differentiation and cellular interactions in the neural retina in vitro. In addition, glycoproteins, obtained from the pigmented epithelium of bovine eye could decrease the rate of bipolar cell apoptosis in the neural retina. Therefore, the novel adhesion glycoproteins, expressing their biological activity in extremely low doses, pretend to be the regulatory molecules with vivid gomeostatic effects necessary for the delicate adjustment of cell behavior action and function in sensory tissues. PMID:12881976

  18. Effects of low-level laser therapy, electroacupuncture, and radiofrequency on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Min, Kyoung-Ok; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] In this study, the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), electroacupuncture (EA), and radiofrequency (RF), which are used in physical therapy, on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women's faces were investigated to provide basic data for skin interventions. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult females were assigned to either an LLLT group (n=10), an EA group (n=10), or an RF group (n=10). The intervention was performed in two 15-minute sessions per week for six weeks. Subjects' skin tone and pigmentation were observed before and after the intervention. [Results] The EA group showed significant reductions in pigmentation in the left and right eye rims, as well as in the left cheek. The RF group showed significant post-intervention reductions in pigmentation under the left eye, as well as in the left and right eye rims and the left cheek. The LLLT group showed significant increases in skin tone in the forehead and both eye rims. The RF group showed significant increases in skin tone under both eyes. [Conclusion] The application of LLLT, EA, and RF had positive effects on pigmentation and skin tone of adult women's faces. PMID:27313340

  19. Effects of low-level laser therapy, electroacupuncture, and radiofrequency on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Min, Kyoung-Ok; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), electroacupuncture (EA), and radiofrequency (RF), which are used in physical therapy, on the pigmentation and skin tone of adult women’s faces were investigated to provide basic data for skin interventions. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty adult females were assigned to either an LLLT group (n=10), an EA group (n=10), or an RF group (n=10). The intervention was performed in two 15-minute sessions per week for six weeks. Subjects’ skin tone and pigmentation were observed before and after the intervention. [Results] The EA group showed significant reductions in pigmentation in the left and right eye rims, as well as in the left cheek. The RF group showed significant post-intervention reductions in pigmentation under the left eye, as well as in the left and right eye rims and the left cheek. The LLLT group showed significant increases in skin tone in the forehead and both eye rims. The RF group showed significant increases in skin tone under both eyes. [Conclusion] The application of LLLT, EA, and RF had positive effects on pigmentation and skin tone of adult women’s faces. PMID:27313340

  20. Shyness and little boy blue: iris pigmentation, gender, and social wariness in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Coplan, R J; Coleman, B; Rubin, K H

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have uncovered a link between iris pigmentation and inhibition/social wariness among young children (e.g., Rosenberg & Kagan, 1987, 1989; Rubin & Both, 1989). In the present study, 152 Caucasian preschool-aged (Mage = 54.09 months, SD = 5.84) children (77 males) with either blue (n = 84) or brown (n = 68) eyes, were compared in terms of parental and teacher ratings of social wariness, social play, and aggression. A significant Eye Color x Gender Interaction was found in terms of indices of social wariness; blue-eyed males were rated as more socially wary than brown-eyed males, while blue- and brown-eyed females did not differ in this regard. These results supported the notion that eye color is a marker variable for social wariness in young children. PMID:9452906

  1. Genotype-phenotype associations and human eye color.

    PubMed

    White, Désirée; Rabago-Smith, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Although eye color is usually modeled as a simple, Mendelian trait, further research and observation has indicated that eye color does not follow the classical paths of inheritance. Eye color phenotypes demonstrate both epistasis and incomplete dominance. Although there are about 16 different genes responsible for eye color, it is mostly attributed to two adjacent genes on chromosome 15, hect domain and RCC1-like domain-containing protein 2 (HERC2) and ocular albinism (that is, oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2)). An intron in HERC2 contains the promoter region for OCA2, affecting its expression. Therefore, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in either of these two genes have a large role in the eye color of an individual. Furthermore, with all genetic expression, aberration also occurs. Some individuals may express two phenotypes--one in each eye--or a complete lack of pigmentation, ocular albinism. In addition, the evolutionary and population roles of the different expressions are significant. PMID:20944644

  2. What Is Eye Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... more common than intraocular melanomas. Melanomas develop from pigment-making cells called melanocytes . When melanoma develops in ... uvea). Choroid cells make the same kind of pigment as melanocytes in the skin, so it’s not ...

  3. Efficient transgenesis mediated by pigmentation rescue in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Itrat; Carbonneau, Seth; Moore, Bethany M; Nguyen, Gina; Anderson, Nicole M; Saini, Amandeep S; Kanki, John P; Jette, Cicely A; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish represents a revolutionary tool in large-scale genetic and small-molecule screens for gene and drug discovery. Transgenic zebrafish are often utilized in these screens. Many transgenic fish lines are maintained in the heterozygous state due to the lethality associated with homozygosity; thus, their progeny must be sorted to ensure a population expressing the transgene of interest for use in screens. Sorting transgenic embryos under a fluorescence microscope is very labor-intensive and demands fine-tuned motor skills. Here we report an efficient transgenic method of utilizing pigmentation rescue of nacre mutant fish for accurate naked-eye identification of both mosaic founders and stable transgenic zebrafish. This was accomplished by co-injecting two constructs with the I-SceI meganuclease enzyme into pigmentless nacre embryos: I-SceI-mitfa:mitfa-I-SceI to rescue the pigmentation and I-SceI-zpromoter:gene-of-interest-I-SceI to express the gene of interest under a zebrafish promoter (zpromoter). Pigmentation rescue reliably predicted transgene integration. Compared with other transgenic techniques, our approach significantly increases the overall percentage of founders and facilitates accurate naked-eye identification of stable transgenic fish, greatly reducing laborious fluorescence microscope sorting and PCR genotyping. Thus, this approach is ideal for generating transgenic fish for large-scale screens. PMID:26757807

  4. Don't it make my blue eyes brown: heterochromia and other abnormalities of the iris.

    PubMed

    Rennie, I G

    2012-01-01

    Eye colour is one of the most important characteristics in determining facial appearance. In this paper I shall discuss the anatomy and genetics of normal eye colour, together with a wide and diverse range of conditions that may produce an alteration in normal iris pigmentation or form. PMID:21979861

  5. Don't it make my blue eyes brown: heterochromia and other abnormalities of the iris

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, I G

    2012-01-01

    Eye colour is one of the most important characteristics in determining facial appearance. In this paper I shall discuss the anatomy and genetics of normal eye colour, together with a wide and diverse range of conditions that may produce an alteration in normal iris pigmentation or form. PMID:21979861

  6. Monitoring the accumulation of lipofuscin in aging murine eyes by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrated fluorescence of murine eyes is collected as a function of age. This fluorescence is attributed to pigments generally referred to as lipofuscin and is observed to increase with age. No difference in fluorescence intensity is observed between the eyes of males or females. This work p...

  7. Die Pigmente der antiken Malerei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, J.

    1982-02-01

    Scientific analysis of painted antique objects provides us with information about the pigments used in earlier periods of history. Beginning in prehistoric times, coloured earths and minerals were used exclusively until the 3rd millenium B.C. when an extensive production of artificial pigments started. Following Egyptian Blue, a potassium copper chloride, cobalt blue, and a cobalt aluminium oxide was invented but used only over a short period, until it was reinvented 200 years ago. In the Greecian and Roman times the palette was considerably enlarged by the use of other coloured minerals and artificially prepared pigments.

  8. ADENOCARCINOMA OF THE RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM IN THE GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA PETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single case of adenocarcinoma of the retinal pigment epithelium occurred in a guppy, Poecilia reticulata Peters. his is the first such tumor reported from fishes. he left eye of the affected fish was severely exophthalmic because of a large intraocular tumor mass. he tumor, whi...

  9. Gold: a unique pigmentation defective laboratory strain of the lady beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory colony of Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer) was selected for a novel phenotypic color trait. The phenotype was paler in color than the wild type, although not as pale as a previously described mutant strain, yellow (ye), and retained dark pigmentation in the eyes. This selected strain was ...

  10. Pigment Deposition of Cosmetic Contact Lenses on the Cornea after Intense Pulsed-Light Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sojin; Lee, Jong Rak

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of corneal deposition of pigments from cosmetic contact lenses after intense pulsed-light (IPL) therapy. A 30-year-old female visited our outpatient clinic with ocular pain and epiphora in both eyes; these symptoms developed soon after she had undergone facial IPL treatment. She was wearing cosmetic contact lenses throughout the IPL procedure. At presentation, her uncorrected visual acuity was 2/20 in both eyes, and the slit-lamp examination revealed deposition of the color pigment of the cosmetic contact lens onto the corneal epithelium. We scraped the corneal epithelium along with the deposited pigments using a no. 15 blade; seven days after the procedure, the corneal epithelium had healed without any complications. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of ocular complications during IPL treatment, particularly in individuals using contact lenses. To prevent ocular damage, IPL procedures should be performed only after removing the lenses and applying eyeshields. PMID:21165237

  11. Historic perspectives. Macular yellow pigment. The first 200 years.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, J J; Pruett, R C; Delori, F C

    1981-01-01

    Since 1782 there has been continuing controversy concerning the curious central coloration referred to as "macular yellow," but no cumulative source of information on the subject exists. This paper reviews the research efforts of two centuries to determine the existence, nature, location, and function of a specialized pigment in the foveal region. Using white-light illumination, it is difficult to see a macular yellow spot in the living eye; it is best observed and documented by red-free ophthalmoscopy and blue-light monochromatic photography. Histologic, biochemical, and spectral absorption data suggest that the yellow color is due to a xanthophyllic pigment, lutein, that is distributed in all retinal layers internal to the outer nuclear layer, with greatest concentration in the outer and inner plexiform layers. Clinically absent in newborns, the pigment gradually accumulates from dietary sources and appears to serve both as an optical filter, by absorbing blue light and reducing chromatic aberration, and in a protective capacity, preventing actinic damage. The absorption characteristics of the yellow pigment contribute to the central dark spot seen during fluorescein angiography and to the risk of photocoagulation near the fovea. Its apparent absence in albinos and the reported functional improvement in certain degenerative retinopathies following supplemental xanthophyll administration suggest a possible role in hereditary or acquired maculopathies. PMID:6758089

  12. EXPLORING RPE AS A SOURCE OF PHOTORECEPTORS: DIFFERENTIATION AND INTEGRATION OF TRANSDIFFERENTIATING CELLS GRAFTED INTO EMBRYONIC CHICK EYES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possibility of generating photoreceptors through programming retina pigment epithelium (RPE) transdifferentiation by examining cell differentiation after transplantation into the developing chicken eye was examined. RPE cells were dissociated, cultured, and guided to transdifferentiate by infec...

  13. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs. PMID:6681678

  14. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePlus

    ... catch problems early if you get regular eye exams. ... diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam every 1 to 2 years by an eye ... problems with your vision. Many can do screening exams for damage from diabetes. Once you have eye ...

  15. Oil droplets of bird eyes: microlenses acting as spectral filters

    PubMed Central

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2014-01-01

    An important component of the cone photoreceptors of bird eyes is the oil droplets located in front of the visual-pigment-containing outer segments. The droplets vary in colour and are transparent, clear, pale or rather intensely yellow or red owing to various concentrations of carotenoid pigments. Quantitative modelling of the filter characteristics using known carotenoid pigment spectra indicates that the pigments’ absorption spectra are modified by the high concentrations that are present in the yellow and red droplets. The high carotenoid concentrations not only cause strong spectral filtering but also a distinctly increased refractive index at longer wavelengths. The oil droplets therefore act as powerful spherical microlenses, effectively channelling the spectrally filtered light into the photoreceptor's outer segment, possibly thereby compensating for the light loss caused by the spectral filtering. The spectral filtering causes narrow-band photoreceptor spectral sensitivities, which are well suited for spectral discrimination, especially in birds that have feathers coloured by carotenoid pigments. PMID:24395968

  16. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  17. Cell migration.

    PubMed

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2012-10-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  18. Assembly of the cnidarian camera-type eye from vertebrate-like components

    PubMed Central

    Kozmik, Zbynek; Ruzickova, Jana; Jonasova, Kristyna; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Vopalensky, Pavel; Kozmikova, Iryna; Strnad, Hynek; Kawamura, Shoji; Piatigorsky, Joram; Paces, Vaclav; Vlcek, Cestmir

    2008-01-01

    Animal eyes are morphologically diverse. Their assembly, however, always relies on the same basic principle, i.e., photoreceptors located in the vicinity of dark shielding pigment. Cnidaria as the likely sister group to the Bilateria are the earliest branching phylum with a well developed visual system. Here, we show that camera-type eyes of the cubozoan jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora, use genetic building blocks typical of vertebrate eyes, namely, a ciliary phototransduction cascade and melanogenic pathway. Our findings indicative of parallelism provide an insight into eye evolution. Combined, the available data favor the possibility that vertebrate and cubozoan eyes arose by independent recruitment of orthologous genes during evolution. PMID:18577593

  19. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  20. Hormonal regulation of colour change in eyes of a cryptic fish

    PubMed Central

    Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Yngsell, Daniel; Mubashishir, Muhmd; Wallin, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colour change of the skin in lower vertebrates such as fish has been a subject of great scientific and public interest. However, colour change also takes place in eyes of fish and while an increasing amount of data indicates its importance in behaviour, very little is known about its regulation. Here, we report that both eye and skin coloration change in response to white to black background adaptation in live sand goby Pomatoschistus minutes, a bentic marine fish. Through in vitro experiments, we show that noradrenaline and melanocyte concentrating hormone (MCH) treatments cause aggregation of pigment organelles in the eye chromatophores. Daylight had no aggregating effect. Combining forskolin to elevate intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) with MCH resulted in complete pigment dispersal and darkening of the eyes, whereas combining prolactin, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) with MCH resulted in more yellow and red eyes. ACTH and MSH also induced dispersal in the melanophores, resulting in overall darker eyes. By comparing analysis of eyes, skin and peritoneum, we conclude that the regulation pattern is similar between these different tissues in this species which is relevant for the cryptic life strategy of this species. With the exception of ACTH which resulted in most prominent melanophore pigment dispersal in the eyes, all other treatments provided similar results between tissue types. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has directly analysed hormonal regulation of physiological colour change in eyes of fish. PMID:25596278

  1. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  2. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  3. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  4. Fluorescent eye test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fluorescent eye test is useful in determining if there is a scratch or other problem with the surface ... has thoroughly covered the eye a cobalt blue light is then directed on the eye. The light ...

  5. Retinal pigment epithelial expression of complement regulator CD46 is altered early in the course of geographic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Susan D; Curcio, Christine A; Wang, Lan; Li, Chuan-Ming; McGwin, Gerald; Medeiros, Nancy E; Philp, Nancy J; Kimble, James A; Read, Russell W

    2011-10-01

    In geographic atrophy (GA), the non-neovascular end stage of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the macular retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) progressively degenerates. Membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46) is the only membrane-bound regulator of complement expressed on the human RPE basolateral surface. Based on evidence of the role of complement in AMD, we hypothesized that altered CD46 expression on the RPE would be associated with GA development and/or progression. Here we report the timeline of CD46 protein expression changes across the GA transition zone, relative to control eyes, and relative to events in other chorioretinal layers. Eleven donor eyes (mean age 87.0 ± 4.1 yr) with GA and 5 control eyes (mean age 84.0 ± 8.9 yr) without GA were evaluated. Macular cryosections were stained with PASH for basal deposits, von Kossa for calcium, and for CD46 immunoreactivity. Internal controls for protein expression were provided by an independent basolateral protein, monocarboxylate transporter 3 (MCT3) and an apical protein, ezrin. Within zones defined by 8 different semi-quantitative grades of RPE morphology, we determined the location and intensity of immunoreactivity, outer segment length, and Bruch's membrane calcification. Differences between GA and control eyes and between milder and more severe RPE stages in GA eyes were assessed statistically. Increasing grades of RPE degeneration were associated with progressive loss of polarity and loss of intensity of staining of CD46, beginning with the stages that are considered normal aging (grades 0-1). Those GA stages with affected CD46 immunoreactivity exhibited basal laminar deposit, still-normal photoreceptors, and concomitant changes in control protein expression. Activated or anteriorly migrated RPE (grades 2-3) exhibited greatly diminished CD46. Changes in RPE CD46 expression thus occur early in GA, before there is evidence of morphological RPE change. At later stages of degeneration, CD46

  6. Eyeing Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter casts a baleful eye toward the moon Ganymede in this enhanced-contrast image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

    Jupiter's 'eye', the Great Red Spot, was captured just before disappearing around the eastern edge of the planet. The furrowed eyebrow above and to the left of the spot is a turbulent wake region caused by westward flow that has been deflected to the north and around the Red Spot. The smallest features visible are about 240 kilometers (150 miles) across.

    Within the band south of the Red Spot are a trio of white ovals, high pressure counterclockwise-rotating regions that are dynamically similar to the Red Spot. The dark filamentary features interspersed between white ovals are probably cyclonic circulations and, unlike the ovals, are rotating clockwise.

    Jupiter's equatorial zone stretching across the planet north of the Spot appears bright white, with gigantic plume clouds spreading out from the equator both to the northeast and to the southeast in a chevron pattern. This zone looks distinctly different than it did during the Voyager flyby 21 years ago. Then, its color was predominantly brown and the only white plumes conspicuous against the darker material beneath them were oriented southwest-to-northeast.

    Ganymede is Jupiter's largest moon, about 50 percent larger than our own Moon and larger than the planet Mercury. The visible details in this image are different geological terrains. Dark areas tend to be older and heavily cratered; brighter areas are younger and less cratered. Cassini images of Ganymede and Jupiter's other large moons taken near closest approach on Dec. 30 will have resolutions about four times better than that seen here.

    This image is a color composite of ones taken with different filters by Cassini's narrow-angle camera on Nov. 18, 2000, processed to enhance contrast. Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of

  7. Multiple pigmented basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shoji, T; Lee, J; Hong, S H; Oh, C H; Kim, W K; Bhawan, J

    1998-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common of all skin cancers and the most prevalent one among Caucasians. Rarely, these tumors are seen in other races. We report a 77-year-old Korean woman who presented with multiple darkly pigmented enlarging nodules on her scalp, face, trunk, and extremities. The patient had first noted a 6-mm pigmented lesion on her left eyebrow 10 years previously. Since then, other lesions had appeared in many locations on her body. She had been otherwise healthy and without a history of exposure to arsenic or radiation. There was no family history of skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum, or basal cell nevus syndrome. On physical examination, multiple darkly pigmented dome-shaped papules and nodules were present on her scalp, face, right forearm, lower abdomen, and inguinal areas. They ranged in size from 0.5 mm to 2 cm. The larger ones showed central ulceration. Multiple biopsy specimens from different sites showed pigmented basal cell carcinomas. Clinically, there was no evidence of nevus sebaceus, xeroderma pigmentosum, basal cell nevus syndrome, or immunodeficiency. Clinical workup including chest radiography, abdominal ultrasound, bone scan, and brain computerized axial tomography scan did not demonstrate primary or secondary tumors. The results of serologic and hematologic tests were also within normal limits. This is an unusual case report of multiple pigmented basal cell carcinomas in an Asian woman without any predisposing risk factors. PMID:9557792

  8. Exogenous pigment in Peyer's patches

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, N.A.; Crocker, P.R.; Smith, A.P.; Levison, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dark brown granular pigment was found consistently in macrophages in the deep aspect of adult Peyer's patches. Tissue sections from intestinal resections of 35 patients with a variety of pathologic diagnoses and of seven postmortem cases with no evidence of gastrointestinal disease were examined for the presence of this pigment. It was found in all patients over the age of 6 years (34 cases) but was not found in any children below that age (eight cases). Scanning electron microscopy with secondary and backscattered electron imaging and x-ray energy spectroscopy were performed on routine histologic sections. The pigmented macrophages contained aluminum and silicon, diffusely present throughout the cytoplasm, and numerous discrete foci of titanium. Pigment containing these same elements has also been found around dilated submucosal lymphatics, in mesenteric lymph nodes, and in some transmural inflammatory aggregates of Crohn's disease. The pigment probably is derived from the diet and actively taken up by Peyer's patches, which are able to incorporate inert particulate matter.

  9. Pigment Analysis of Chloroplast Pigment-Protein Complexes in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Eskins, Kenneth; Duysen, Murray E.; Olson, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Pigment-protein complexes separated from wheat (Triticum aestivum L. selection ND96-25 by two gel electrophoresis techniques were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography for chlorophylls and carotenoids. The two techniques are compared, and pigment analyses are given for the major reaction centers and light-harvesting complexes. Reaction centers contain mostly chlorophyll a, carotene, and lutein, whereas light-harvesting complexes contain chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, lutein, and neoxanthin. The amounts of violaxanthin are variable. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16662906

  10. Polypeptide composition of the purified photosystem II pigment-protein complex from spinach.

    PubMed

    Satoh, K

    1979-04-11

    The Photosystem II pigment-protein complex, the chlorophyll alpha-protein comprising the reaction center of Photosystem II, was prepared from EDTA-treated spinach chloroplasts by digitonin extraction, sucrose-gradient centrifugation, DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, and isoelectrofocussing on Ampholine. The dissociated pigment-protein complex exhibits two polypeptide subunits that migrate in SDS-polyacrylamide gel with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to molecular weights of approximately 43,000 and 27,000. the chlorophyll was always found in the free pigment zone at the completion of the electrophoresis. Heat-treatment of the sample (100 degrees C, 90 s) for electrophoresis caused association of the two polypeptides into large aggregates. It is concluded that these two polypeptides, 43,000 and 27,000, are valid structural or functional components of Photosystem II pigment-protein complex. PMID:444494

  11. Compact single-channel Raman detector for macular pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Raman detection of macular pigments (MP) holds promise as a novel noninvasive technology for the quantification of lutein and zeaxanthin carotenoids, which are thought to prevent or delay the onset of age-related macular degeneration. Using resonant excitation in the visible, we measure the Raman signals that originate from the double-bond stretch vibrations of the p-conjugated carotenoid molecule's carbon backbone. In this paper we describe the construction and performance of a new, compact, and low-cost MP Raman instrument using dielectric, angle-tuned band-pass filters for wavelength selection and single-channel photo-multiplier detection of carotenoid Raman responses. MP concentration measurements are fast and accurate, as seen in experiments with model eyes and living human eyes. The ease and rapidity of Raman MP measurements, the relative simplicity of the instrumentation, the high accuracy of the measurements, and the lack of significant systematic errors should make this technology useful for widespread clinical research.

  12. Reduction of Endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors in Bruch’s Membrane of the Submacular Region in Eyes With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bhutto, Imran A.; Uno, Koichi; Merges, Carol; Zhang, Lei; McLeod, D. Scott; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the relative levels of 3 potent inhibitors of angiogenesis (endostatin, pigment epithelium–derived factor, and thrombospondin 1) in the retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch’s membrane–choriocapillaris complex in the submacular region in aged control eyes and eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Immunohistochemical analysis with antibodies against endostatin, pigment epithelium–derived factor, and thrombospondin 1 was performed on the macular region of aged control donor eyes (n=8; mean age, 79.8 years) and eyes with AMD (n=12; mean age, 83.9 years). Three independent masked observers scored the reaction product (scored from 0–7). Mean scores from the control eyes and the eyes with AMD were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and unpaired t test. Results In control eyes, strong immunoreactivity of all 3 inhibitors was observed in the retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch’s membrane–choriocapillaris complex. Immunoreactivity for endostatin, pigment epithelium–derived factor, and thrombospondin 1 in Bruch’s membrane was significantly lower in eyes with AMD compared with aged control eyes (analysis of variance, P=.003, P = .009, and P< .001, respectively). In the choriocapillaris, a significant reduction was observed in endostatin (analysis of variance, P=.02) and thrombospondin 1 (analysis of variance, P=.005) in eyes with AMD. Conclusions These findings suggest that endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors in the retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch’s membrane–choriocapillaris complex may provide a biochemical barrier for choroidal neovascular invasion. Clinical Relevance Decreased levels of angiogenic inhibitors at the retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch’s membrane–choriocapillaris complex in eyes with AMD make Bruch’s membrane vulnerable to choroidal neovascularization. PMID:18474778

  13. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  14. Pigmented Porokeratosis. A Further Variant?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tracy S P; Tallon, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Porokeratosis is a clonal disorder of keratinization characterized by the presence of the cornoid lamella. A number of variants of porokeratosis have been described, based on the clinical features and histologic features of the lesions. The authors present a case of porokeratosis with prominent melanocytic hyperplasia, which was biopsied to clinically exclude melanoma. The authors retrospectively studied cases of porokeratosis to look for the presence of melanocytic hyperplasia. Melanocytic hyperplasia was identified in 8 of 31 cases (25.8%). All of the cases except the index case were clinically nonpigmented but arose in solar damaged skin. This case represents a distinct variant of porokeratosis, and the authors propose the designation pigmented porokeratosis. Melanocytic hyperplasia is a benign condition, and it is important that this is not histologically confused with melanoma in situ, particularly in a context of clinically pigmented lesion. Increased recognition of pigmented porokeratosis is essential to avoid an erroneous diagnosis of melanoma in situ. PMID:26894774

  15. Modifications of the falciform process in the eye of beloniformes (Teleostei: Atherinomorpha): evolution of a curtain-like septum in the eye.

    PubMed

    Reckel, Frank; Melzer, Roland R

    2004-04-01

    In order to comparatively analyze curtain-like septa in the eyes of visually orientated "close-to-surface-predators" among atherinomorph teleosts, we examined the eyes of 24 atherinomorph species under a binocular microscope with regard to the falciform process and related structures in the vitreous cavity. Additionally, falciform process samples were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. All the studied representatives of the Cyprinodontiformes and Atheriniformes, and of one of the beloniform suborder, Adrianichthyioidei, possess a "typical" processus falciformis. In the eyes of the representatives of the other beloniform suborder, Belonoidei, however, pigmented structures that originate in the region of the optic disc and protrude into the vitreous cavity were noted. In the Hemiramphidae (halfbeaks) and Exocoetidae (flying fishes) these pigmented structures have a more cone-like shape, whereas in the Belonidae (needlefishes) and Scomberesocidae (sauries) horizontally oriented heavily pigmented curtain-like septa occur that divide the vitreous cavity dorsoventrally. It is suggested that the "typical" processus falciformis represents a plesiomorphic feature within the Atherinomorpha, whereas the pigmented modifications of the falciform process must be seen as a synapomorphic character state of the Belonoidei. The curtain-like septum of the Belonidae and Scomberesocidae might have evolved from the cone-like structures that are found in the Exocoetoidea. The functional significance of the pigmented structures in the eye is as yet not clear, except for the curtain-like septum found in Belonidae. It might play a role in visual orientation near the water surface at Snell's window. PMID:15052593

  16. Pigment cell localizations in anuran ventral skin at climactic metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Denèfle, J P; Lechaire, J P

    1991-09-01

    In anuran amphibians, the specific color pattern of the skin is expressed after metamorphosis, and its formation involves pigment cell migrations. Pigment cells are differently distributed in the tadpole, larval, and froglet skin. To learn more about their fate during metamorphic climax and in the young froglet, we focused our attention on the different localizations of larval melanophores and iridophores in the ventral skin of Rana esculenta before and during skin homing. Localizations of melanophores and iridophores can be elucidated at the developmental stages suggested by Taylor and Kollros (TK stages). At TK stage II (during early premetamorphosis), large melanophores beneath the larval skin are detected. At TK stage X, dispersed melanophores lie under bundles of muscular striated fibrils near the larval skin; they are also observed at the vascular level. At TK stage XVII (prometamorphosis), melanophores are extended on the inner side of the basement lamellar collagen. At the end of prometamorphosis, iridophores are located with melanophores in the separating space between attached basement collagen and derived basement collagen. At TK stage XX (earlier climax), melanophores and iridophores are detected inside the upper extremities of fractures opened in the derived basement collagen. At TK stage XXIV (later climax), both types of larval pigment cells are observed in the inner extremities of breaks derived from the fractures. During climax, these pigment cells occupy the well-formed breaks. At TK stage XXV in young froglet, the pigment cells remain alone in the breaks formed in the derived basement collagen. Briefly, breaks in the basement lamellar collagen are opened by invading cell processes of mesenchymal cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1750384

  17. Eye muscle repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ... The extraocular muscles of the eye (external to the eyeball) control the positioning of the eyes. They coordinate of the eye ...

  18. Eating for Your Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stastny, Sherri Nordstrom; Garden-Robinson, Julie

    2011-01-01

    An educational program targeting older adults was developed to increase knowledge regarding nutrition and eye health. With age, the chance for eye disease increases, so prevention is critical. The Eating for Your Eyes program has promoted behavior changes regarding eye health among the participants. This program is easily replicated and use is…

  19. Unilateral non-pigmented palpebral conjunctival lesions due to cosmetics use.

    PubMed

    Pao, Kristina Y; Murchison, Ann P; Eagle, Ralph C

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman with a history of dry eyes was found to have unilateral pedunculated, nonpigmented palpebral conjunctival lesions. Excisional biopsy was performed, and the lesions were studied histopathologically. Microscopic examination of the lesions demonstrated exuberant granulation tissue with a granulomatous foreign body giant cell reaction surrounding pigmented and partially birefringent foreign material. Histopathologic examination of the patient's cosmetics revealed that the pigmented foreign bodies seen on the biopsy specimens were compatible with her mascara and/or eyeliner. While cosmetics have been reported to have ophthalmic sequelae, palpebral lesions such as these have not been reported to the authors' knowledge. PMID:22327635

  20. Does an Association between the Idiopathic Left-Sided Varicocele and Eye Colour Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Kumanov, Philip; Tomova, Analia

    2014-01-01

    The possible interrelation between male reproductive disorders and iris pigmentation is poorly understood. We have found a link between eye colour and the existence of adolescent varicocele. Therefore, we aimed to extend our investigation on the relationship between the eye colour and varicocele in adult men. 231 andrology outpatients from Caucasian origin were included in the study. The presence of varicocele, sperm disturbances, and the iris pigment of the patients were investigated. Left-sided varicocele was found in 93 adults. In the group of light-eyed men the prevalence of varicocele was significantly lower than among the dark-eyed men (15% versus 59.5%, P < 0.001). No associations were found between the eye colour and disturbances in semen parameters in males with varicocele (P = 0.419) and in those without varicocele (P = 0.586). The present results in adult men suggest that the prevalence of varicocele could be associated with the iris pigment. A possible genetic linkage between the eye colour and the susceptibility to some disorders like varicocele could not be excluded. However, the iris pigmentation seems not to have a direct relationship with the sperm disturbances. PMID:24803926

  1. Medical migration.

    PubMed

    Loefler, I J

    2001-10-01

    The issue of professional migration, however emotional it may have become, ought not to be regarded in moralizing terms. The history of western medicine is the history of migrating physicians. A doctor who moves from a locality to another to take up a new assignment there cannot be said to have "abandoned his patients". This emotional bond has become the victim of specialization and of depersonalization of medical services and not of medical migration, brain drain or otherwise. The primary reason for medical migration is not financial; the desire to migrate usually begins with the desire to learn. Professionals crave in the first line for professional satisfaction. The migration of medical manpower cannot be stopped with administrative measures and will not be stopped by exhortations and appeals, moralization and condemnations. Brain drain is a global phenomenon and has always been so. A country which loses its professionals, its doctors, should examine the social relationships within the profession and should investigate whether the opportunities for deriving professional satisfaction from everyday work exist or whether these have been thwarted by the hierarchy, conservatism, cronyism and the general lack of comprehension of what good medical care is about. PMID:11593497

  2. Visual pigment processes and prolonged pupillary responses in insect photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, D G

    1979-01-01

    The visual pigment in the peripheral retinular cells of the hoverfly Syrphus balteatus was investigated by absorbance difference measurements. Different visual pigments were found in the dorsal versus the ventral part of the eye in the male, but not in the female. In the male in the dorsal part of the eye the visual pigment has an isosbestic point at 513 nm; in the ventral part this value is 490 nm. The latter value is found in the female in both parts of the eye. Prolonged pupillary responses were studied in the male Syrphus and appeared to be most marked in the ventral part of the eye. In both hoverfly and blowfly prolonged pupillary responses are induced by short wavelength light only; i.e., by light which excessively can convert rhodopsin into metarhodopsin. By contrast, in butterflies red light (and a long dark adaptation time) is necessary to evoke a prolonged pupillary response. It was demonstrated in both hoverfly and blowfly that long wavelength light, which reconverts metarhodopsin into rhodopsin, inhibits a prolonged pupillary response; or, accelerates pupil opening. PMID:22730591

  3. Clofazimine-induced Hair Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Philip, Mariam; Samson, Joan Felicita; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2012-07-01

    A 45-year-old man was treated with WHO multibacillary multidrug therapy for borderline leprosy and high dose daily Clofazimine for lepra reaction. Along with the expected side effect of skin pigmentation, the patient also noticed darkening of previously grey hair. This colour persisted eight months after completing multibacillary multidrug therapy. PMID:23180930

  4. [Internal migration].

    PubMed

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  5. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  6. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  8. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  9. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  10. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  11. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  12. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  13. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  14. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  15. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, C; Ortiz-Morales, M; Bujdud-Pérez, J M; Magaña-Cota, G E; Mejía-Falcón, R

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIEL*a*b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 microm x 246 microm) that was the case for the lead white pigment. PMID:19875330

  16. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frausto-Reyes, C.; Ortiz-Morales, M.; Bujdud-Pérez, J. M.; Magaña-Cota, G. E.; Mejía-Falcón, R.

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIE L* a* b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 μm × 246 μm) that was the case for the lead white pigment.

  17. Separation of pigment formulations by high-performance thin-layer chromatography with automated multiple development.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Constanze; Dietzel, Sylvia; Endress, Marc; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2016-09-01

    Food packaging is designed to provide sufficient protection for the respective filling, legally binding information for the consumers like nutritional facts or filling information, and an attractive appearance to promote the sale. For quality and safety of the package, a regular quality control of the used printing materials is necessary to get consistently good print results, to avoid migration of undesired ink components into the food and to identify potentially faulty ink batches. Analytical approaches, however, have hardly been considered for quality assurance so far due to the lack of robust, suitable methods for the analysis of rarely soluble pigment formulations. Thus, a simple and generic high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) method for the separation of different colored pigment formulations was developed on HPTLC plates silica gel 60 by automated multiple development. The gradient system provided a sharp resolution for differently soluble pigment constituents like additives and coating materials. The results of multi-detection allowed a first assignment of the differently detectable bands to particular chemical substance classes (e.g., lipophilic components), enabled the comparison of different commercially available pigment batches and revealed substantial variations in the composition of the batches. Hyphenation of HPTLC with high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy allowed the characterization of single unknown pigment constituents, which may partly be responsible for known quality problems during printing. The newly developed, precise and selective HPTLC method can be used as part of routine quality control for both, incoming pigment batches and monitoring of internal pigment production processes, to secure a consistent pigment composition resulting in consistent ink quality, a faultless print image and safe products. Hyphenation of HPTLC with the A. fischeri bioassay gave first information on the bioactivity or rather

  18. Neurobiology of Monarch Butterfly Migration.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Steven M; Guerra, Patrick A; Merlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the migration of the eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) have revealed mechanisms behind its navigation. The main orientation mechanism uses a time-compensated sun compass during both the migration south and the remigration north. Daylight cues, such as the sun itself and polarized light, are processed through both eyes and integrated through intricate circuitry in the brain's central complex, the presumed site of the sun compass. Monarch circadian clocks have a distinct molecular mechanism, and those that reside in the antennae provide time compensation. Recent evidence shows that migrants can also use a light-dependent inclination magnetic compass for orientation in the absence of directional daylight cues. The monarch genome has been sequenced, and genetic strategies using nuclease-based technologies have been developed to edit specific genes. The monarch butterfly has emerged as a model system to study the neural, molecular, and genetic basis of long-distance animal migration. PMID:26473314

  19. Deletion of autophagy inducer RB1CC1 results in degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jingyu; Jia, Lin; Khan, Naheed; Lin, Chengmao; Mitter, Sayak K; Boulton, Michael E; Dunaief, Joshua L; Klionsky, Daniel J; Guan, Jun-Lin; Thompson, Debra A; Zacks, David N

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy regulates cellular homeostasis and response to environmental stress. Within the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye, the level of autophagy can change with both age and disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between reduced autophagy and age-related degeneration of the RPE. The gene encoding RB1CC1/FIP200 (RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1), a protein essential for induction of autophagy, was selectively knocked out in the RPE by crossing Best1-Cre mice with mice in which the Rb1cc1 gene was flanked with Lox-P sites (Rb1cc1flox/flox). Ex vivo and in vivo analyses, including western blot, immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography were performed to assess the structure and function of the retina as a function of age. Deletion of Rb1cc1 resulted in multiple autophagy defects within the RPE including decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, accumulation of autophagy-targeted precursors, and increased numbers of mitochondria. Age-dependent degeneration of the RPE occurred, with formation of atrophic patches, subretinal migration of activated microglial cells, subRPE deposition of inflammatory and oxidatively damaged proteins, subretinal drusenoid deposits, and occasional foci of choroidal neovascularization. There was secondary loss of photoreceptors overlying the degenerated RPE and reduction in the electroretinogram. These observations are consistent with a critical role of autophagy in the maintenance of normal homeostasis in the aging RPE, and indicate that disruption of autophagy leads to retinal phenotypes associated with age-related degeneration. PMID:26075877

  20. Ciliary photoreceptors in the cerebral eyes of a protostome larva

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eyes in bilaterian metazoans have been described as being composed of either ciliary or rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Phylogenetic distribution, as well as distinct morphologies and characteristic deployment of different photopigments (ciliary vs. rhabdomeric opsins) and transduction pathways argue for the co-existence of both of these two photoreceptor types in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Both receptor types exist throughout the Bilateria, but only vertebrates are thought to use ciliary photoreceptors for directional light detection in cerebral eyes, while all other invertebrate bilaterians studied utilize rhabdomeric photoreceptors for this purpose. In protostomes, ciliary photoreceptors that express c-opsin have been described only from a non-visual deep-brain photoreceptor. Their homology with vertebrate rods and cones of the human eye has been hypothesized to represent a unique functional transition from non-visual to visual roles in the vertebrate lineage. Results To test the hypothesis that protostome cerebral eyes employ exclusively rhabdomeric photoreceptors, we investigated the ultrastructure of the larval eyes in the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We show that these pigment-cup eyes consist of a lens cell and a shading pigment cell, both of which are putative photoreceptors, deploying a modified, enlarged cilium for light perception, and have axonal connections to the larval brain. Our investigation of the gene expression patterns of c-opsin, Pax6 and otx in these eyes confirms that the larval eye spots of brachiopods are cerebral eyes that deploy ciliary type photoreceptors for directional light detection. Interestingly, c-opsin is also expressed during early embryogenesis in all potential apical neural cells, becoming restricted to the anterior neuroectoderm, before expression is initiated in the photoreceptor cells of the eyes. Coincident with the expression of c-opsin in the presumptive neuroectoderm, we found that middle

  1. Migration Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-08-01

    The great variety of the architectures of the extra-solar planetary systems has revealed the fundamental role played by planetary migration: the interactions between the planets and the gaseous disk in which they form leads to a modification of their orbits. Here, I will review the basic processes and the most recent results in this area.Planets up to ~50 Earth masses are prone to so-called type I migration.I will describe the processes at play, namely the Lindblad and corotation torques, and explain how the total torque depends on the planet mass and the local disk structure. Application to realistic disks shows one or two sweet spot(s) for outward migration of planets roughly between 5 and 30 Earth masses around the snowline ; this is confirmed by dedicated 3D numerical simulations. This has strong consequences on the formation of hot Super-Earths or mini-Neptunes.For smaller mass planets, it has been recently proposed that the heating of the neighboring gas by the luminous planet can lead to a positive torque, hence promoting outward migration. On the other hand, if the planet is not a heat source, a cold finger appears, whose resulting torque is negative. Applications of these two recent results should be discussed.Giant planets open gaps in the proto-planetary disk, and then are supposedly subject to type II migration, following the viscous accretion of the disk. This standard picture has been questioned recently, as gas appears to drift through the gap. Although the gap opening process is well understood in 2D for a planet on a fixed orbit, recent results on 3D simulations or migrating planets make the picture more accurate.Our ever better understanding of planet-disk interactions is of crucial importance as the statistics on extra solar systems keep growing and the results of these interactions are now imaged.

  2. Availability and Utilization of Pigments from Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Begum, Hasina; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Khatoon, Helena; Shariff, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Microalgae are the major photosynthesizers on earth and produce important pigments that include chlorophyll a, b and c, β-carotene, astaxanthin, xanthophylls, and phycobiliproteins. Presently, synthetic colorants are used in food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. However, due to problems associated with the harmful effects of synthetic colorants, exploitation of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors becomes an attractive option. There are various factors such as nutrient availability, salinity, pH, temperature, light wavelength, and light intensity that affect pigment production in microalgae. This paper reviews the availability and characteristics of microalgal pigments, factors affecting pigment production, and the application of pigments produced from microalgae. The potential of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors is enormous as an alternative to synthetic coloring agents, which has limited applications due to regulatory practice for health reasons. PMID:25674822

  3. Free-Floating Iris Pigmented Epithelial Cyst in the Anterior Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Rotsos, Tryfon; Bagikos, Georgios; Christou, Spyridon; Symeonidis, Chrysanthos; Papadaki, Thekla; Papaeuthimiou, Ioannis; Miltsakakis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of a free-floating peripheral pigmented cyst in the anterior chamber is presented. A 30-year-old Caucasian male presented reporting a visual defect on his right eye in prone position over the past year. Slit-lamp examination revealed a small pigmented free-floating peripheral iris cyst at the 6 o'clock position in the anterior chamber. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed an unfixed epithelial pigmented cyst with an extremely thin wall and no internal reflectivity. Due to the lack of severity of visual disturbance of the patient, no surgical treatment was indicated. The patient is to be followed up annually and advised to return immediately in case of pain or any visual symptoms. Free-floating iris cysts in the anterior chamber are uncommon and remain stable in the majority of cases. Management includes only regular observation until any complications arise. PMID:26904334

  4. Free-Floating Iris Pigmented Epithelial Cyst in the Anterior Chamber.

    PubMed

    Rotsos, Tryfon; Bagikos, Georgios; Christou, Spyridon; Symeonidis, Chrysanthos; Papadaki, Thekla; Papaeuthimiou, Ioannis; Miltsakakis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of a free-floating peripheral pigmented cyst in the anterior chamber is presented. A 30-year-old Caucasian male presented reporting a visual defect on his right eye in prone position over the past year. Slit-lamp examination revealed a small pigmented free-floating peripheral iris cyst at the 6 o'clock position in the anterior chamber. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed an unfixed epithelial pigmented cyst with an extremely thin wall and no internal reflectivity. Due to the lack of severity of visual disturbance of the patient, no surgical treatment was indicated. The patient is to be followed up annually and advised to return immediately in case of pain or any visual symptoms. Free-floating iris cysts in the anterior chamber are uncommon and remain stable in the majority of cases. Management includes only regular observation until any complications arise. PMID:26904334

  5. Pigment phenotype and biogeographical ancestry from ancient skeletal remains: inferences from multiplexed autosomal SNP analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouakaze, Caroline; Keyser, Christine; Crubézy, Eric; Montagnon, Daniel; Ludes, Bertrand

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, a multiplexed genotyping assay for ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within six pigmentation candidate genes was developed on modern biological samples and applied to DNA retrieved from 25 archeological human remains from southern central Siberia dating from the Bronze and Iron Ages. SNP genotyping was successful for the majority of ancient samples and revealed that most probably had typical European pigment features, i.e., blue or green eye color, light hair color and skin type, and were likely of European individual ancestry. To our knowledge, this study reports for the first time the multiplexed typing of autosomal SNPs on aged and degraded DNA. By providing valuable information on pigment traits of an individual and allowing individual biogeographical ancestry estimation, autosomal SNP typing can improve ancient DNA studies and aid human identification in some forensic casework situations when used to complement conventional molecular markers. PMID:19415315

  6. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  7. Monarch Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Brad; Taylor, Orley

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Monarch Watch program that tracks the migration of the monarch butterfly. Presents activities that introduce students to research and international collaboration between students and researchers. Familiarizes students with monarchs, stimulates their interest, and helps them generate questions that can lead to good research projects.…

  8. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma. PMID:27136637

  9. Nanoscience of an ancient pigment.

    PubMed

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Barrett, Christopher A; Sharafi, Asma; Salguero, Tina T

    2013-02-01

    We describe monolayer nanosheets of calcium copper tetrasilicate, CaCuSi(4)O(10), which have strong near-IR luminescence and are amenable to solution processing methods. The facile exfoliation of bulk CaCuSi(4)O(10) into nanosheets is especially surprising in view of the long history of this material as the colored component of Egyptian blue, a well-known pigment from ancient times. PMID:23215240

  10. Anatomy of the Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... Examinations, Adults Patient Eye Examinations, Children Refractive Errors Scientists in the Laboratory Visual Acuity Testing Anatomy of the Eye × Warning message Automatic fallback to the cURL connection method kicked in to handle the request. Result code ...