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Sample records for fabry disease patients

  1. Coronary artery bypass graft in a patient with Fabry's disease.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Kanemitsu, Naoki; Kyogoku, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by intracellular accumulation of ceramide trihexoside resulting from alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. While the heart is often involved, coronary artery disease and its management in Fabry's disease patients are extremely rare clinical entities. We report a case of a 72-year-old man with left main disease in Fabry's disease with special consideration of the arterial wall pathology. PMID:27131517

  2. Gastrointestinal Symptoms of Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pensabene, Licia; Sestito, Simona; Nicoletti, Angela; Graziano, Francesca; Strisciuglio, Pietro; Concolino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    In order to characterize gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of 50 patients with Fabry disease (FD) (22 M; age range: 4–70 y; 35 adults and 15 children), validated questionnaires of GI symptoms were used to diagnose the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) of the patients with GI symptoms (33/50 (66%); 25/35 adults and 8/15 children) according to Rome III criteria. In 16/25 of these adults and 2/8 of these children, the symptoms mimicked FGID. The adult subgroup included patients with unspecified functional bowel disorder (n = 9), functional bloating (n = 7), and IBS (n = 5), and the child subgroup included patients with abdominal migraine (n = 1) and IBS (n = 1). Among the 25 adults, 14 reported feeling full after a regular-size meal, and 12 complained of abdominal bloating/distension. All of the children with GI symptoms complained of low abdominal pain associated with changes in the form of the stool/improvements with defecation. In conclusion, according to Rome III criteria, the most frequent diagnoses of FGID among the adults with FD were unspecified functional bowel disorder, followed by functional bloating and IBS. The most frequent GI symptom in the children in our population was IBS-like abdominal pain, while the adults exhibited a full feeling following a regular-size meal and abdominal bloating/distension. PMID:26880903

  3. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions. PMID:26297554

  4. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal α-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual α-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked α-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human α-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs

  5. No Fabry Disease in Patients Presenting with Isolated Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    de Greef, Bianca T. A.; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G. J.; Wolters, Emma E.; Smeets, Hubertus J. M.; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; Merkies, Ingemar S. J.; Faber, Catharina G.; Gerrits, Monique M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Screening for Fabry disease in patients with small fiber neuropathy has been suggested, especially since Fabry disease is potentially treatable. However, the diagnostic yield of testing for Fabry disease in isolated small fiber neuropathy patients has never been systematically investigated. Our aim is to determine the presence of Fabry disease in patients with small fiber neuropathy. Methods Patients referred to our institute, who met the criteria for isolated small fiber neuropathy were tested for Fabry disease by measurement of alpha-Galactosidase A activity in blood, lysosomal globotriaosylsphingosine in urine and analysis on possible GLA gene mutations. Results 725 patients diagnosed with small fiber neuropathy were screened for Fabry disease. No skin abnormalities were seen except for redness of the hands or feet in 30.9% of the patients. Alfa-Galactosidase A activity was tested in all 725 patients and showed diminished activity in eight patients. Lysosomal globotriaosylsphingosine was examined in 509 patients and was normal in all tested individuals. Screening of GLA for mutations was performed for 440 patients, including those with diminished α-Galactosidase A activity. Thirteen patients showed a GLA gene variant. One likely pathogenic variant was found in a female patient. The diagnosis Fabry disease could not be confirmed over time in this patient. Eventually none of the patients were diagnosed with Fabry disease. Conclusions In patients with isolated small fiber neuropathy, and no other signs compatible with Fabry disease, the diagnostic yield of testing for Fabry disease is extremely low. Testing for Fabry disease should be considered only in cases with additional characteristics, such as childhood onset, cardiovascular disease, renal failure, or typical skin lesions. PMID:26866599

  6. Genomic analysis of Brazilian patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Pereira, F S; Jardim, L B; Netto, C B; Burin, M G; Cecchin, C; Giugliani, R; Matte, U S

    2007-12-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal disorder due to a-galactosidase A deficiency that causes storage of globotriaosylceramide. The gene coding for this lysosomal enzyme is located on the long arm of the X chromosome, in region Xq21.33-Xq22. Disease progression leads to vascular disease secondary to involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. Detection of female carriers based solely on enzyme assays is often inconclusive. Therefore, mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Many mutations of the a-galactosidase A gene have been reported with high genetic heterogeneity, being most mutations private found in only one family. The disease is panethnic, and estimates of incidence range from about 1 in 40,000 to 60,000 males. Our objective was to describe the analysis of 6 male and 7 female individuals belonging to 4 different Fabry disease families by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the alpha-galactosidase gene. Sequencing was performed using PCR fragments for each exon amplified from DNA extracted from peripheral blood. Three known mutations and one previously described in another Brazilian family were detected. Of 7 female relatives studied, 4 were carriers. Although the present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease, the finding of the same mutation previously detected in another Fabry family from our region raises the possibility of some founder effect, or genetic drift. Finally, the present study highlights the importance of molecular analysis for carrier detection and genetic counseling. PMID:17713670

  7. X-chromosome inactivation in female patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, L; Benistan, K; Toussaint, A; Dubourg, O; Hagege, A A; Eladari, D; Jabbour, F; Beldjord, C; De Mazancourt, P; Germain, D P

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by the deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase (α-Gal). While males are usually severely affected, clinical presentation in female patients may be more variable ranging from asymptomatic to, occasionally, as severely affected as male patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the existence of skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in females with FD, its concordance between tissues, and its contribution to the phenotype. Fifty-six females with FD were enrolled. Clinical and biological work-up included two global scores [Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and DS3], cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, measured glomerular filtration rate, and measurement of α-Gal activity. XCI was analyzed in four tissues using DNA methylation studies. Skewed XCI was found in 29% of the study population. A correlation was found in XCI patterns between blood and the other analyzed tissues although some punctual variability was detected. Significant differences in residual α-Gal levels, severity scores, progression of cardiomyopathy and deterioration of kidney function, depending on the direction and degree of skewing of XCI were evidenced. XCI significantly impacts the phenotype and natural history of FD in females. PMID:25974833

  8. Podocyte Injury and GL-3 Accumulation are Progressive in Young Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Najafian, Behzad; Svarstad, Einar; Bostad, Leif; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Tøndel, Camilla; Whitley, Chester; Mauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Progressive renal failure often complicates Fabry’s disease. However, the pathogenesis of Fabry nephropathy is not well understood. We applied unbiased stereological methods to the study of the electron microscopic changes of Fabry nephropathy and the relationship between glomerular structural parameters and renal function in young Fabry patients. Renal biopsies from 14 (M/F=8/6) enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)-naive Fabry patients (median age 12 years; range 4–19 years) and 9 (M/F=6/3) normal living kidney donor control subjects were studied. Podocyte GL-3 inclusion volume density [Vv(Inc/PC)] increased progressively with age, while there was no significant relationship between age and endothelial [Vv(Inc/Endo)] or mesangial [Vv(Inc/Mes)] inclusion volume densities. Foot process width which was greater in male Fabry patients vs. controls also progressively increased with age, and correlated directly with proteinuria. Endothelial fenestration was reduced in Fabry patients vs. controls. These studies are the first to show relationships between quantitative glomerular structural parameters of Fabry nephropathy and urinary protein excretion. The parallel progression with increasing age in podocyte GL-3 accumulation, foot process widening and proteinuria, strongly suggest that podocyte injury may play a pivotal role in the development and progression of Fabry nephropathy. PMID:21160462

  9. Fabry Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys may become progressively impaired, leading to renal failure. Other signs include decreased sweating, fever, and gastrointestinal ... of complications from strokes, heart disease, or kidney failure. What research is being done? The mission of ...

  10. The neurocognitive impact of Fabry disease on pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bugescu, Nicolle; Alioto, Andrea; Segal, Summer; Cordova, Matthew; Packman, Wendy

    2015-04-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder that results in progressive multisystemic organ complications. Several studies have examined neurocognitive impairments in adults; however, there is a paucity of research examining neurocognitive functioning in children with FD. This is the first exploratory study to examine the neurocognitive functioning of pediatric patients with FD and to evaluate the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) on neurocognitive functioning within this population. Families attending a national conference with at least one child with FD and one parent affected by FD comprised the sample (n = 48; 24 pediatric patients, 24 parents). Pediatric participants (10 males, 14 females) between the ages of 6 and 18 years and their parent(s) were involved in the study. Data from a demographic questionnaire and two neurocognitive self-report and parent-report measures were analyzed. Parent reports of neurocognitive functioning were also compared to a sample of children with and without head injury and to a sample of children who had undergone liver transplant (LT). Children with FD had poorer cognitive and executive functioning than healthy peers, and were comparable to children with head injury and LT. In addition, children using ERT had higher scores on measures of overall cognitive functioning, as well as fewer problems with attention/working memory and executive functioning. Results of this study suggest that children with FD may exhibit poorer cognitive and executive functioning relative to healthy peers. The use of ERT may mitigate the negative impact of FD on neurocognitive functioning in pediatric patients. PMID:25739920

  11. Impaired small fiber conduction in patients with Fabry disease: a neurophysiological case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an inborn lysosomal storage disorder which is associated with small fiber neuropathy. We set out to investigate small fiber conduction in Fabry patients using pain-related evoked potentials (PREP). Methods In this case–control study we prospectively studied 76 consecutive Fabry patients for electrical small fiber conduction in correlation with small fiber function and morphology. Data were compared with healthy controls using non-parametric statistical tests. All patients underwent neurological examination and were investigated with pain and depression questionnaires. Small fiber function (quantitative sensory testing, QST), morphology (skin punch biopsy), and electrical conduction (PREP) were assessed and correlated. Patients were stratified for gender and disease severity as reflected by renal function. Results All Fabry patients (31 men, 45 women) had small fiber neuropathy. Men with Fabry disease showed impaired cold (p < 0.01) and warm perception (p < 0.05), while women did not differ from controls. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) was reduced at the lower leg (p < 0.001) and the back (p < 0.05) mainly of men with impaired renal function. When investigating A-delta fiber conduction with PREP, men but not women with Fabry disease had lower amplitudes upon stimulation at face (p < 0.01), hands (p < 0.05), and feet (p < 0.01) compared to controls. PREP amplitudes further decreased with advance in disease severity. PREP amplitudes and warm (p < 0.05) and cold detection thresholds (p < 0.01) at the feet correlated positively in male patients. Conclusion Small fiber conduction is impaired in men with Fabry disease and worsens with advanced disease severity. PREP are well-suited to measure A-delta fiber conduction. PMID:23705943

  12. The Psychosocial Impact of Fabry Disease on Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Bugescu, Nicolle; Naylor, Paige E; Hudson, Kyr; Aoki, Christa D; Cordova, Matthew J; Packman, Wendy

    2016-09-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a multisystemic disease that has previously been reported to result in poorer quality of life and psychosocial functioning in impacted adults. However, prior to the current study, limited data were available on the impact of FD in children and adolescents. Therefore, the present study examined the differences of quality of life, psychosocial functioning, and depression in children with FD as compared with a healthy sample. Results indicated that children with FD were experiencing poorer quality of life than their healthy counterparts. Notably, results consistently identified adolescents with FD as more heavily impacted than younger children, although not to the same degree as adults with FD as reported in previous studies. Therefore, adolescence may be a critical point in the development of individuals with FD during which effective multidisciplinary interventions could be utilized to prevent poor quality of life and psychosocial functioning in adulthood. PMID:27617155

  13. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  14. Identification of a novel GLA mutation (F69 L) in a Japanese patient with late-onset Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Seiji; Noriyasu, Kazuyuki; Takamura, Ayumi; Fujisaki, Miwa; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism caused by a mutation in the GLA gene. We sequenced the α-galactosidase A gene (GLA) of a patient who had been clinically diagnosed with late-onset Fabry disease. Abundant globotriaosylceramide was present in his urine, which indicated typical Fabry disease. Here, we report a novel hemizygous mutation, c.207C>A (Phe69 Leu), which caused a mild/late-onset form of Fabry disease. PMID:27081550

  15. Ten-year outcome of enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase beta in patients with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Dominique P; Charrow, Joel; Desnick, Robert J; Guffon, Nathalie; Kempf, Judy; Lachmann, Robin H; Lemay, Roberta; Linthorst, Gabor E; Packman, Seymour; Scott, C Ronald; Waldek, Stephen; Warnock, David G; Weinreb, Neal J; Wilcox, William R

    2015-01-01

    Background Fabry disease results from deficient α-galactosidase A activity and globotriaosylceramide accumulation causing renal insufficiency, strokes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and early demise. We assessed the 10-year outcome of recombinant α-galactosidase A therapy. Methods The outcomes (severe clinical events, renal function, cardiac structure) of 52/58 patients with classic Fabry disease from the phase 3 clinical trial and extension study, and the Fabry Registry were evaluated. Disease progression rates for patients with low renal involvement (LRI, n=32) or high renal involvement (HRI, n=20) at baseline were assessed. Results 81% of patients (42/52) did not experience any severe clinical event during the treatment interval and 94% (49/52) were alive at the end of the study period. Ten patients reported a total of 16 events. Patients classified as LRI started therapy 13 years younger than HRI (mean 25 years vs 38 years). Mean slopes for estimated glomerular filtration rate for LRI and HRI were −1.89 mL/min/1.73 m2/year and −6.82 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, respectively. Overall, the mean left ventricular posterior wall thickness and interventricular septum thickness remained unchanged and normal. Patients who initiated treatment at age ≥40 years exhibited significant increase in left ventricular posterior wall thickness and interventricular septum thickness. Mean plasma globotriaosylceramide normalised within 6 months. Conclusions This 10-year study documents the effectiveness of agalsidase beta (1 mg/kg/2 weeks) in patients with Fabry disease. Most patients remained alive and event-free. Patients who initiated treatment at a younger age and with less kidney involvement benefited the most from therapy. Patients who initiated treatment at older ages and/or had advanced renal disease experienced disease progression. PMID:25795794

  16. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction Versus Treatment Switch

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krebs, Alice; González, Hans Guerrero; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Niemann, Markus; Störk, Stefan; Schelleckes, Michael; Reiermann, Stefanie; Stypmann, Jörg; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Brand, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-beta in 2009, many patients with Fabry disease were treated with lower doses or were switched to agalsidase-alfa. This observational study assessed end-organ damage and clinical symptoms during dose reduction or switch to agalsidase-alfa. A total of 105 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-beta (1.0 mg/kg body weight) for ≥1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=38), receive a reduced dose of 0.3–0.5 mg/kg (dose-reduction group, n=29), or switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-alfa (switch group) and were followed prospectively for 1 year. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD); changes in cardiac, renal, and neurologic function; and Fabry-related symptoms (neuropathic pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea, and disease severity scores). Organ function and Fabry-related symptoms remained stable in the regular-dose group. In contrast, estimated GFR decreased by about 3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (P=0.01) in the dose-reduction group, and the median albumin-to-creatinine ratio increased from 114 (0–606) mg/g to 216 (0–2062) mg/g (P=0.03) in the switch group. Furthermore, mean Mainz Severity Score Index scores and frequencies of pain attacks, chronic pain, gastrointestinal pain, and diarrhea increased significantly in the dose-reduction and switch groups. In conclusion, patients receiving regular agalsidase-beta dose had a stable disease course, but dose reduction led to worsening of renal function and symptoms. Switching to agalsidase-alfa is safe, but microalbuminuria may progress and Fabry-related symptoms may deteriorate. PMID:24556354

  17. Paediatric Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, progressive X-linked inborn error of the glycosphingolipid metabolic pathway. Mutations of the GLA gene result in deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) with accumulation of glycosphingolipids, particularly globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in the vascular endothelium of various tissues. Accumulation of GL3 eventually leads to life threatening renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular complications typically in the third to fifth decades of life. The first signs and symptoms of classic Fabry disease however appear in childhood but diagnosis is often delayed. The symptoms most commonly experienced in childhood include neuropathic pain, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hyperhidrosis and heat intolerance. Timely diagnosis is important as early treatment with enzyme replacement therapy reduces GL3 accumulation, can stabilize disease progression and potentially prevent irreversible organ damage. Physicians should be familiar with the signs and symptoms of Fabry disease in childhood and be particularly vigilant for unusual or non-specific but recurrent or episodic symptoms. PMID:26835405

  18. Paediatric Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, progressive X-linked inborn error of the glycosphingolipid metabolic pathway. Mutations of the GLA gene result in deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) with accumulation of glycosphingolipids, particularly globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in the vascular endothelium of various tissues. Accumulation of GL3 eventually leads to life threatening renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular complications typically in the third to fifth decades of life. The first signs and symptoms of classic Fabry disease however appear in childhood but diagnosis is often delayed. The symptoms most commonly experienced in childhood include neuropathic pain, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hyperhidrosis and heat intolerance. Timely diagnosis is important as early treatment with enzyme replacement therapy reduces GL3 accumulation, can stabilize disease progression and potentially prevent irreversible organ damage. Physicians should be familiar with the signs and symptoms of Fabry disease in childhood and be particularly vigilant for unusual or non-specific but recurrent or episodic symptoms. PMID:26835405

  19. Adult polyglucosan body disease in a patient originally diagnosed with Fabry's disease.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, A; Savoiardo, M; Marchesi, C; Morandi, L; Mora, M; Morbin, M; Farina, L; Mazzeo, A; Toscano, A; Pagliarani, S; Lucchiari, S; Comi, G P; Salsano, E; Pareyson, D

    2014-03-01

    Adult polyglucosan body disease is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by glycogen branching enzyme gene mutations, characterised by urinary dysfunction, spastic paraplegia with vibration sense loss, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive impairment. Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by α-galactosidase A gene mutations; neurological manifestations include cerebrovascular accidents, small-fibre neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction. Here, we report the case of a 44-year-old Sicilian male with stroke-like episodes, hypohidrosis and mild proteinuria, which led to the diagnosis of Fabry's disease after a hemizygous mutation (p.Ala143Thr) in α-galactosidase A gene was detected. Subsequently, he developed progressive walking difficulties and dementia, which were considered atypical for Fabry's disease. Therefore, we performed additional investigations that eventually led to the diagnosis of adult polyglucosan body disease caused by two novel missense mutations (p.Asp413His and p.Gly534Val) in the glycogen branching enzyme gene. Recently, the pathogenic role of the p.Ala143Thr mutation in causing Fabry's disease has been questioned. This case underlines the importance of performing further investigations when facing with atypical features even in the presence of a genetic diagnosis of a rare disease. PMID:24380807

  20. Assessment of Renal Pathology and Dysfunction in Pediatric Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswami, Uma; Najafian, Behzad; Schieppati, Arrigo; Mauer, Michael; Bichet, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Overt renal disease often first presents in males with Fabry disease in early-to-mid adulthood, but proteinuria and reduced glomerular filtration rate may occur in adolescents and in young children. More recently, kidney biopsy data have shown early renal histological changes in pediatric patients. Renal investigations and their timing in children remain poorly defined. A consensus on renal investigations is necessary to understand the natural progression of the disease and to evaluate the efficacy of treatments such as enzyme replacement therapies. This manuscript addresses three main categories, including the use of glomerular filtration rates, measuring albuminuria and renal biopsies in children. PMID:20056758

  1. Serum Globotriaosylceramide Assay as a Screening Test for Fabry Disease in Patients with ESRD on Maintenance Dialysis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Yup; Hyun, Young-Youl; Lee, Ji-Eun; Yoon, Hye-Ran; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook; Cho, Seong-Tae; Chun, No-Won; Jeoung, Byoung-Chunn; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Kim, Keong-Wook; Kim, Seong-Nam; Kim, Yung-A; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Yung-Chun; Lim, Hun-Kwan; Oh, Keong-Sik; Son, Seong-Hwan; Yu, Beong-Hee; Wee, Kyeong-So; Lee, Eun-Jong; Lee, Young-Ki; Noh, Jung-Woo; Kim, Seung-Jung; Choi, Kyu-Bok; Yu, Suk-Hee; Pyo, Heui-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive and progressive disease caused by α-galactosidase A (α-GaL A) deficiency. We sought to assess the prevalence of unrecognized Fabry disease in dialysis-dependent patients and the efficacy of serum globotriaosylceramide (GL3) screening. Methods A total of 480 patients of 1,230 patients among 17 clinics were enrolled. Serum GL3 levels were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Additionally, we studied the association between increased GL3 levels and cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, or left ventricular hypertrophy. Results Twenty-nine patients had elevated serum GL3 levels. The α-GaL A activity was determined for the 26 patients with high GL3 levels. The mean α-GaL A activity was 64.6 nmol/hr/mg (reference range, 45 to 85), and no patient was identified with decreased α-GaL A activity. Among the group with high GL3 levels, 15 women had a α-GaL A genetics analysis. No point mutations were discovered among the women with high GL3 levels. No correlation was observed between serum GL3 levels and α-GaL A activity; the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.01352 (p = 0.9478). No significant correlation was observed between increased GL3 levels and the frequency of cardiovascular disease or cerebrovascular disease. Conclusions Fabry disease is very rare disease in patients with end-stage renal disease. Serum GL3 measurements as a screening method for Fabry disease showed a high false-positive rate. Thus, serum GL3 levels determined by tandem mass spectrometry may not be useful as a screening method for Fabry disease in patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:21179280

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Fabry disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs & Allied Diseases Association, Inc. Resource list from the ... Brady R, Barranger J, Collins AJ, Germain DP, Goldman M, Grabowski G, Packman S, Wilcox WR. Fabry disease, ...

  3. [Cardiac involvement in Fabry's disease].

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Breunig, Frank

    2008-03-15

    Fabry's disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder leading to an accumulation of globotriaosylceramides in the lysosomes of all tissues. The disease is characterized by a progressive involvement of important vital organs like the kidneys, the cerebrovascular system and the heart. Within the scope of this article an overview of Fabry's cardiomyopathy, the necessary cardiac diagnostic tests and, in addition, the new concept of enzyme replacement therapy is given. PMID:18344066

  4. Prevalence of Fabry Disease in Familial Mediterranean Fever Patients from Central Anatolia of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Huzmeli, Can; Candan, Ferhan; Alaygut, Demet; Bagci, Gokhan; Akkaya, Lale; Bagci, Binnur; Sozmen, Eser Yıldırım; Kurtulgan, Hande Kucuk; Kayatas, Mansur

    2016-08-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A (AGALA) activity. FD and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) have typical clinical similarities, and both diseases may progress to end-stage renal diseases. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of FD in patients with FMF from Central Anatolia of Turkey. The study group consisted of 177 FMF patients, followed up by the Adult and Pediatric Nephrology Clinic of Cumhuriyet University Hospital. Screening for AGALA activity was performed by the dry blood spot method. Mutation analysis for GLA gene was carried out for patients having an AGALA enzyme activity value lower than the normal reference value. Low AGALA activity was detected in 23 (13 %) patients. Heterozygous GLA gene mutation c.[937G>T] p.[D313Y] was detected in one female patient (0.56 %). The patient was a 53-year-old female with proteinuria and who had undergone left nephrectomy; her glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by scintigraphy was found to be 70 ml/min. She had M694V mutation and no clinical manifestation of FD. In our study, the prevalence rate of FD was found as 0.56 % in FMF patients. The similarities between the symptoms of FMF and FD might lead to a diagnostic dilemma in physicians at countries where FMF is observed frequently. Although the prevalence of FD is rare, physicians should keep in mind that FD has an ambiguous symptomology pattern of FMF. PMID:27105876

  5. Screening for Fabry Disease by Urinary Globotriaosylceramide Isoforms Measurement in Patients with Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gaggl, Martina; Lajic, Natalija; Heinze, Georg; Voigtländer, Till; Sunder-Plassmann, Raute; Paschke, Eduard; Fauler, Günter; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere; Mundigler, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a frequent echocardiographic feature in Fabry disease (FD) and in severe cases may be confused with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) of other origin. The prevalence of FD in patients primarily diagnosed with HCM varies considerably in screening and case finding studies, respectively. In a significant proportion of patients, presenting with only mild or moderate LVH and unspecific clinical signs FD may remain undiagnosed. Urinary Gb3 isoforms have been shown to detect FD in both, women and men. We examined whether this non-invasive method would help to identify new FD cases in a non-selected cohort of patients with various degree of LVH. Methods and results: Consecutive patients older than 18 years with a diastolic interventricular septal wall thickness of ≥12mm determined by echocardiography were included. Referral diagnosis was documented and spot urine was collected. Gb3 was measured by mass spectroscopy. Subjects with an elevated Gb3-24:18 ratio were clinically examined for signs of FD, α-galactosidase-A activity in leukocytes was determined and GLA-mutation-analysis was performed. We examined 2596 patients. In 99 subjects urinary Gb3 isoforms excretion were elevated. In these patients no new cases of FD were identified by extended FD assessment. In two of three patients formerly diagnosed with FD Gb3-24:18 ratio was elevated and would have led to further diagnostic evaluation. Conclusion: Measurement of urinary Gb3 isoforms in a non-selected cohort with LVH was unable to identify new cases of FD. False positive results may be prevented by more restricted inclusion criteria and may improve diagnostic accuracy of this method. PMID:27226774

  6. Fabry disease: an ultrastructural comparative study of skin in hemizygous and heterozygous patients.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Carmen; Teijeira, Susana; Dominguez, Carmen; Fernandez, Jose M; Rivas, Eloy; Fachal, Carmen; Barrera, Soraya; Rodriguez, Carmen; Iranzo, Pilar

    2006-02-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to alpha galactosidase A deficiency, better known after the advent of a promising treatment, a periodical enzyme replacement. As other hereditary X-linked disorders, females have historically been considered non-affected carriers, although they are, actually, clinically and pathologically affected to a variable degree. Some women are asymptomatic, but the majority present milder forms of the disease and later onset. This wide range of disease expression is supposed to be related to the levels of enzymatic activity, probably in accordance with a skewing of X inactivation. Lysosomal deposits of ceramide trihexoside have been repeatedly documented in a wide range of tissues, including those found in angiokeratoma, the characteristic cutaneous lesion which allowed the definition of Fabry disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was any difference in the amount of dermal lysosomal storage in males and females, thus accounting for the difference in clinical severity of both groups. For that purpose, with electron microscopy and quantitative methods, we studied the extent of lysosomal deposits in dermal fibroblasts of normal-appearing skin in six females and nine men, enzymatically and genetically proven as to have Fabry disease, and results were compared. Our results indicate a statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding both the percentage of dermal fibroblasts bearing stored material, and the storage surface occupied in 100 fibroblasts per case. We suggest that periodical ultrastructural examination of normal-appearing skin could be an indicator of the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy and could help to evaluate results. PMID:16463201

  7. [Priapism associated with Fabry's disease].

    PubMed

    Jaureguizar Monereo, E; López Pereira, P; Cabo, J; Gutiérrez, J M; García-Consuegra, J; Martínez Olivas, J; López Santamaría, M

    1990-07-01

    We present a rare case of priapism in a child, ten years old, in association with Fabry's disease. The child had a history of disseminated nodular enlargement, crises of fever, intermittent pain in the extremities and ten hours persistent painful erection of the penis. We don't obtain pain or erection relief with sedation, epidural block and irrigation of the corporal bodies. A saphenous-cavernous shunt, in the Grayhack fashion made, being results satisfactory. In the follow-up, the child had sporadic pain in the extremities and no erection of the penis. The cavernosography showed the shunt open. Fabry's disease was confirmed by nodular biopsy and the demonstration of deficient alpha-galactosidase. PMID:2127372

  8. Long Term Treatment with Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Patients with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Oder, Daniel; Nordbeck, Peter; Wanner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a potentially life-threatening hereditary lysosomal storage disorder taking origin in over 1,000 known pathogenic mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A encoding gene. Over the past 15 years, intravenous replacement therapy of the deficient alpha agalsidase A enzyme has been well-established retarding the progression of a multisystemic disease and organ involvement. Despite this innovative treatment approach, premature deaths still do occur. The response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) varies considerably and appears to depend on gender, genotype (classic or later onset/non-classic), stage of disease or age and agalsidase inhibition by anti-agalsidase antibodies. Early ERT treatment at young age, a personalized approach, and adjunctive therapies for specific disease manifestations appear to impact on prognosis and are currently favored with the expectance of more effective intravenous and oral treatments in the short future. PMID:27576727

  9. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction and Switch-2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Reiermann, Stefanie; Sommer, Claudia; Stypmann, Jörg; Blaschke, Daniela; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Hense, Hans-Werner; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Brand, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-β supply between 2009 and 2012, patients with Fabry disease either were treated with reduced doses or were switched to agalsidase-α. In this observational study, we assessed end organ damage and clinical symptoms with special focus on renal outcome after 2 years of dose-reduction and/or switch to agalsidase-α. A total of 89 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-β (1.0 mg/kg body wt) for >1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=24), to receive a reduced dose of 0.3-0.5 mg/kg and a subsequent switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (dose-reduction-switch group, n=28), or to directly switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-α (switch group, n=37) and were followed-up for 2 years. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD), changes in cardiac and renal function, Fabry-related symptoms (pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea), and disease severity scores. Determination of renal function by creatinine and cystatin C-based eGFR revealed decreasing eGFRs in the dose-reduction-switch group and the switch group. The Mainz Severity Score Index increased significantly in these two groups (P=0.02 and P<0.001, respectively), and higher frequencies of gastrointestinal pain occurred during follow-up. In conclusion, after 2 years of observation, all groups showed a stable clinical disease course with respect to serious clinical events. However, patients under agalsidase-β dose-reduction and switch or a direct switch to agalsidase-α showed a decline of renal function independent of the eGFR formula used. PMID:26185201

  10. Electrocardiographic Changes and Arrhythmia in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Namdar, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-chromosome-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficient activity or, in most males, absence of the enzyme α-galactosidase A (a-Gal A) leading to systemic, primary lysosomal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) (1). Recent literature refers to an overall birth prevalence of 1:40,000–170,000; however, such data do not allow an estimation on an actual patient number suffering from Fabry disease (2). Multisystem morbidity commonly develops in childhood and, with progression of the disease, life-threatening complications often occur in adulthood, including renal failure, cardiovascular dysfunction, neuropathy, and stroke (3–6). Life expectancy is reduced by an average of 15 years in female patients and 20 years in male patients (7, 8). The pathognomonic Gb3 accumulation has been repeatedly observed over the past decades by many groups in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac conduction tissue, and valvular fibroblasts (3). Although incompletely described, it is likely that inflammatory and neurohormonal mechanisms are involved in subsequent cellular and vascular dysfunction, leading to tissue ischemia, hypertrophy, and fibrosis (9). Furthermore, recently published works on cardiomyocyte dysfunction and conduction tissue involvement have suggested that cardiac dysfunction may reflect increased myocardial nitric oxide production with oxidative damage of cardiomyocyte myofilaments and DNA, causing cell dysfunction and death, and accelerated conduction with prolonged refractoriness and electric instability (10, 11). PMID:27047943

  11. Electrocardiographic Changes and Arrhythmia in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Namdar, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-chromosome-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficient activity or, in most males, absence of the enzyme α-galactosidase A (a-Gal A) leading to systemic, primary lysosomal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) (1). Recent literature refers to an overall birth prevalence of 1:40,000-170,000; however, such data do not allow an estimation on an actual patient number suffering from Fabry disease (2). Multisystem morbidity commonly develops in childhood and, with progression of the disease, life-threatening complications often occur in adulthood, including renal failure, cardiovascular dysfunction, neuropathy, and stroke (3-6). Life expectancy is reduced by an average of 15 years in female patients and 20 years in male patients (7, 8). The pathognomonic Gb3 accumulation has been repeatedly observed over the past decades by many groups in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac conduction tissue, and valvular fibroblasts (3). Although incompletely described, it is likely that inflammatory and neurohormonal mechanisms are involved in subsequent cellular and vascular dysfunction, leading to tissue ischemia, hypertrophy, and fibrosis (9). Furthermore, recently published works on cardiomyocyte dysfunction and conduction tissue involvement have suggested that cardiac dysfunction may reflect increased myocardial nitric oxide production with oxidative damage of cardiomyocyte myofilaments and DNA, causing cell dysfunction and death, and accelerated conduction with prolonged refractoriness and electric instability (10, 11). PMID:27047943

  12. One Year of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Reduces Globotriaosylceramide Inclusions in Podocytes in Male Adult Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Najafian, Behzad; Tøndel, Camilla; Svarstad, Einar; Sokolovkiy, Alexey; Smith, Kelly; Mauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fabry nephropathy is associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in podocytes. Reducing this GL3 burden may reduce podocyte injury. Sensitive methods to quantify podocyte GL3 content may determine whether a given strategy can benefit podocytes in Fabry disease. We developed an unbiased electron microscopic stereological method to estimate the average volume of podocytes and their GL3 inclusions in 6 paired pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) biopsies from 5 men with Fabry disease. Podocyte GL3 content was regularly reduced (average 73%) after 11–12 months of ERT. This was not detectable using a semi-quantitative approach. Parallel to GL3 reduction, podocytes became remarkably smaller (average 63%). These reductions in podocyte GL3 content or size were not significantly correlated with changes in foot process width (FPW). However, FPW after ERT was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in podocyte GL3 content from baseline to 11–12 months of ERT. Also podocytes exocytosed GL3 inclusions, a phenomenon correlated with their reduction in their GL3 content. Demonstrable after11–12 months, reduction in podocyte GL3 content allows for early assessment of treatment efficacy and shorter clinical trials in Fabry disease. PMID:27081853

  13. Sudoscan as a noninvasive tool to assess sudomotor dysfunction in patients with Fabry disease: results from a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sahuc, Pauline; Chiche, Laurent; Dussol, Bertrand; Pouget, Jean; Franques, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Hypohidrosis is a frequent and early symptom in patients with Fabry disease. Studies have reported improved sweating in patients treated with enzyme-replacement therapy. A new method, Sudoscan, has been developed that is noninvasive, is quantitative, and can quickly evaluate sweat gland function. It is based on the electrochemical reaction between sweat chlorides and stainless-steel electrodes in contact with the palms and soles. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Sudoscan as a tool to assess sudomotor dysfunction in patients with Fabry disease. Consecutive patients were prospectively recruited who had a diagnosis of Fabry disease, which had been confirmed genetically and/or by measurement of α-galactosidase activity in leukocytes. Healthy controls, matched (1:1) for age and sex, were also enrolled. Test results were expressed immediately as electrochemical skin conductance (ESC, µS) for hands and feet. Sudomotor dysfunction was considered absent, moderate, or severe if the ESC measured on the feet was >60 µS, between 60 and 40 µS, or <40 µS, respectively. Among the 18 patients, 11 had hypohidrosis or anhidrosis. Hand and feet ESCs were significantly lower in patients compared to their controls (P=0.0015 and P=0.0047, respectively). Among patients, 8/18 (44.5%) had a sudomotor dysfunction, moderate in three and severe in five cases. Hand and feet ESCs were significantly lower in those with hypohidrosis/anhidrosis compared to those without (P=0.0014 and P=0.0056, respectively). This study showed that Sudoscan provided a quick, noninvasive, and quantitative measurement of sudomotor function in Fabry disease patients. PMID:26893567

  14. Organ manifestations and long-term outcome of Fabry disease in patients with the GLA haplotype D313Y

    PubMed Central

    Oder, Daniel; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Petritsch, Bernhard; Sommer, Claudia; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Nordbeck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The severity of Fabry disease is dependent on the type of mutation in the α-galactosidase A (AgalA) encoding gene (GLA). This study focused on the impact of the GLA haplotype D313Y on long-term organ involvement and function. Setting and participants In this monocentric study, all participants presenting with the D313Y haplotype between 2001 and 2015 were comprehensively clinically investigated at baseline and during a 4-year follow-up if available. Five females and one male were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures Cardiac, nephrological, neurological, laboratory and quality of life data. Results AgalA enzyme activity in leucocytes (0.3±0.9 nmol/min/mg protein (mean±SD)) and serum lyso-Gb3 (0.6±0.3 ng/mL at baseline) were in normal range in all patients. Cardiac morphology and function were normal (left-ventricular (LV) ejection fraction 66±8%; interventricular septum 7.7±1.4 mm; LV posterior wall 7.5±1.4 mm; normalised LV mass in MRI 52±9 g/m2; LV global longitudinal strain −21.6±1.9%) and there were no signs of myocardial fibrosis in cardiac MRI. Cardiospecific biomarkers were also in normal range. Renal function was not impaired (estimated glomerular filtration rate MDRD 103±15 mL/min; serum-creatinine 0.75±0.07 mg/dL; cystatin-c 0.71±0.12 mg/L). One female patient (also carrying a Factor V Leiden mutation) had a transitory ischaemic attack. One patient showed white matter lesions in brain MRI, but none had Fabry-associated pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain or permanent pain. Health-related quality of life analysis revealed a reduction in individual well-being. At long-term follow-up after 4 years, no significant change was seen in any parameter. Conclusions The results of the current study suggest that the D313Y genotype does not lead to severe organ manifestations as seen in genotypes known to be causal for classical FD. PMID:27059467

  15. Clinical and biochemical investigation of male patients exhibiting membranous cytoplasmic bodies in biopsied kidney tissues; a pitfall in diagnosis of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Tanaka, Toshie; Togawa, Tadayasu; Takahashi, Naoki; Mikami, Daisuke; Wakai, Sachiko; Akai, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: The existence of membranous cytoplasmic bodies in biopsied kidney tissues is one of the important findings when considering Fabry disease as the first choice diagnosis. However, there are possible acquired lysosomal diseases associated with pharmacological toxicity, although less attention has been paid to them. Case Presentation: We experienced 3 male patients presenting with proteinuria and specific pathological changes strongly suggesting Fabry disease. We sought detailed clinical and biochemical information to avoid a wrong diagnosis. The patients were examined clinically and pathologically, and plasma α-galactosidase A (GLA) activity and the globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) concentrations were measured. Electron microscopic examination revealed numerous membranous inclusion bodies in podocytes, and biochemical analysis revealed normal GLA activity and a normal lyso-Gb3 level in plasma, showing that they did not have Fabry disease. They suffered from hyperlipidemia, myeloma, or lupus nephritis. They had received pitavastatin calcium, clarithromycin, loxoprofen and/or prednisolone, and there was no medication history of cationic amphiphilic drugs. Conclusions: In this case series, the etiology of the inclusions was not clarified. However, these cases indicate that careful attention should be paid on diagnosis of patients exhibiting inclusion bodies in kidney cells, and it is important to confirm their past and present illnesses, and medication history as well as to measure the GLA activity and lyso-Gb3 level. PMID:26312237

  16. Replacement of α-galactosidase A in Fabry disease: effect on fibroblast cultures compared with biopsied tissues of treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Keslová-Veselíková, Jana; Hůlková, Helena; Dobrovolný, Robert; Asfaw, Befekadu; Poupětová, Helena; Berná, Linda; Sikora, Jakub; Goláň, Lubor

    2008-01-01

    The function and intracellular delivery of enzyme therapeutics for Fabry disease were studied in cultured fibroblasts and in the biopsied tissues of two male patients to show diversity of affected cells in response to treatment. In the mutant fibroblasts cultures, the final cellular level of endocytosed recombinant α-galactosidases A (agalsidases, FabrazymeTM, and ReplagalTM) exceeded, by several fold, the amount in control fibroblasts and led to efficient direct intra-lysosomal hydrolysis of (3H)Gb3Cer. In contrast, in the samples from the heart and some other tissues biopsied after several months of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with FabrazymeTM, only the endothelial cells were free of storage. Persistent Gb3Cer storage was found in cardiocytes (accompanied by increase of lipopigment), smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, sweat glands, and skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry of cardiocytes demonstrated, for the first time, the presence of a considerable amount of the active enzyme in intimate contact with the storage compartment. Factors responsible for the limited ERT effectiveness are discussed, namely post-mitotic status of storage cells preventing their replacement by enzyme supplied precursors, modification of the lysosomal system by longstanding storage, and possible relative lack of Sap B. These observations support the strategy of early treatment for prevention of lysosomal storage. PMID:18351385

  17. Mutant α-galactosidase A enzymes identified in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity: biochemical characterization and restoration of normal intracellular processing by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Satoshi; Chang, Hui-Hwa; Kawasaki, Kunito; Yasuda, Kayo; Wu, Hui-Li; Garman, Scott C.; Fan, Jian-Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of α-Gal A (α-galactosidase A) activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying α-Gal A deficiency in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity, enzymes with different missense mutations were purified from transfected COS-7 cells and the biochemical properties were characterized. The mutant enzymes detected in variant patients (A20P, E66Q, M72V, I91T, R112H, F113L, N215S, Q279E, M296I, M296V and R301Q), and those found mostly in mild classic patients (A97V, A156V, L166V and R356W) appeared to have normal Km and Vmax values. The degradation of all mutants (except E59K) was partially inhibited by treatment with kifunensine, a selective inhibitor of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) α-mannosidase I. Metabolic labelling and subcellular fractionation studies in COS-7 cells expressing the L166V and R301Q α-Gal A mutants indicated that the mutant protein was retained in the ER and degraded without processing. Addition of DGJ (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) to the culture medium of COS-7 cells transfected with a large set of missense mutant α-Gal A cDNAs effectively increased both enzyme activity and protein yield. DGJ was capable of normalizing intracellular processing of mutant α-Gal A found in both classic (L166V) and variant (R301Q) Fabry disease patients. In addition, the residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts from both classic and variant hemizygous Fabry disease patients carrying a variety of missense mutations could be substantially increased by cultivation of the cells with DGJ. These results indicate that a large proportion of mutant enzymes in patients with residual enzyme activity are kinetically active. Excessive degradation in the ER could be responsible for the deficiency of enzyme activity in vivo, and the DGJ approach may be broadly applicable to Fabry disease patients with missense mutations. PMID:17555407

  18. Ocular signs correlate well with disease severity and genotype in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Pitz, Susanne; Kalkum, Gisela; Arash, Laila; Karabul, Nesrin; Sodi, Andrea; Larroque, Sylvain; Beck, Michael; Gal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Ocular signs in Fabry disease have generally been regarded to be primarily of diagnostic value. We explored whether ocular findings, alone or in particular in combination with the α-galactosidase A gene mutation, have predictive value for disease severity. Data from the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS), a large, global database sponsored by Shire, were selected for adult patients who had undergone ophthalmological examination. Three ocular signs were assessed: cornea verticillata, tortuous conjunctival and/or retinal vessels, and cataract. Fabry disease severity was measured using FOS Mainz Severity Score Index and modifications thereof. Ophthalmological data were available for 1203 (699 female, 504 male) adult patients with eye findings characteristic of Fabry disease in 55.1%. Cornea verticillata had a similar distribution in women (51.1%) and men (50.8%), whereas tortuous vessels and Fabry cataract were somewhat more frequent in men than in women. Patients with cornea verticillata, selected as the principal ocular sign for this study, had more severe disease (median score, 20.0) versus those without ocular signs (11.0; P<0.001). This finding could be confirmed by applying age adjusted severity scores. Moreover, the prevalence of cornea verticillata was significantly higher in patients with null (male, 76.9%; female, 64.5%) and missense (male, 79.2%; female, 67.4%) mutations versus mild missense (male, 17.1%; female, 23.1%) and the p.N215S (male, 15.0%; female, 15.6%) mutations (P<0.01). Our analyses show a correlation between the prevalence of ocular changes in Fabry disease and disease severity. Consequently, information on ocular findings and α-galactosidase A gene mutation may help assess the risk for more severe Fabry disease. These observed findings are of notable clinical importance, as Fabry disease is characterized by high clinical course variability and only weak genotype-phenotype correlation at the individual patient level. Further confirmatory studies

  19. Ocular Signs Correlate Well with Disease Severity and Genotype in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pitz, Susanne; Kalkum, Gisela; Arash, Laila; Karabul, Nesrin; Sodi, Andrea; Larroque, Sylvain; Beck, Michael; Gal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Ocular signs in Fabry disease have generally been regarded to be primarily of diagnostic value. We explored whether ocular findings, alone or in particular in combination with the α-galactosidase A gene mutation, have predictive value for disease severity. Data from the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS), a large, global database sponsored by Shire, were selected for adult patients who had undergone ophthalmological examination. Three ocular signs were assessed: cornea verticillata, tortuous conjunctival and/or retinal vessels, and cataract. Fabry disease severity was measured using FOS Mainz Severity Score Index and modifications thereof. Ophthalmological data were available for 1203 (699 female, 504 male) adult patients with eye findings characteristic of Fabry disease in 55.1%. Cornea verticillata had a similar distribution in women (51.1%) and men (50.8%), whereas tortuous vessels and Fabry cataract were somewhat more frequent in men than in women. Patients with cornea verticillata, selected as the principal ocular sign for this study, had more severe disease (median score, 20.0) versus those without ocular signs (11.0; P<0.001). This finding could be confirmed by applying age adjusted severity scores. Moreover, the prevalence of cornea verticillata was significantly higher in patients with null (male, 76.9%; female, 64.5%) and missense (male, 79.2%; female, 67.4%) mutations versus mild missense (male, 17.1%; female, 23.1%) and the p.N215S (male, 15.0%; female, 15.6%) mutations (P<0.01). Our analyses show a correlation between the prevalence of ocular changes in Fabry disease and disease severity. Consequently, information on ocular findings and α-galactosidase A gene mutation may help assess the risk for more severe Fabry disease. These observed findings are of notable clinical importance, as Fabry disease is characterized by high clinical course variability and only weak genotype-phenotype correlation at the individual patient level. Further confirmatory studies

  20. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Quantitation of Lyso-Gb3 and Six Related Analogs in Plasma for Fabry Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Michel; Lavoie, Pamela; Abaoui, Mona; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, caused by a deficit in α-galactosidase A enzyme activity, leading to the storage of sphingolipids such as globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3 ), globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 ), and galabiosylceramide (Ga2 ) in organs, tissues and biological fluids. A recent metabolomic study performed in plasma revealed lyso-Gb3 analogs as novel Fabry disease biomarkers. These molecules correspond to lyso-Gb3 with different chemical modifications on the sphingosine chain (-C2 H4 , -H2 , +O, +H2 O, +H2 O2, and +H2 O3 ). An ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the multiplex analysis of lyso-Gb3 and its 6 analogs in plasma. The samples are prepared by solid phase extraction using mixed-mode strong cation exchange (MCX) cartridges. An in-house synthesized N-glycinated lyso-Gb3 derivative was used for the internal standard. The limits of detection (LODs) measured for lyso-Gb3 and its analogs ranged from 0.06 to 0.29 nM. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367163

  1. Increased Arterial Diameters in the Posterior Cerebral Circulation in Men with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Homola, György A.; Guerrero González, Hans; Kramer, Daniela; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank; Solymosi, László; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    A high load of white matter lesions and enlarged basilar arteries have been shown in selected patients with Fabry disease, a disorder associated with an increased stroke risk. We studied a large cohort of patients with Fabry disease to differentially investigate white matter lesion load and cerebral artery diameters. We retrospectively analyzed cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 87 consecutive Fabry patients, 20 patients with ischemic stroke, and 36 controls. We determined the white matter lesion load applying the Fazekas score on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences and measured the diameters of cerebral arteries on 3D-reconstructions of the time-of-flight-MR-angiography scans. Data of different Fabry patient subgroups (males – females; normal – impaired renal function) were compared with data of patients with stroke and controls. A history of stroke or transient ischemic attacks was present in 4/30 males (13%) and 5/57 (9%) females with Fabry disease, all in the anterior circulation. Only one man with Fabry disease showed confluent cerebral white matter lesions in the Fazekas score assessment (1%). Male Fabry patients had a larger basilar artery (p<0.01) and posterior cerebral artery diameter (p<0.05) compared to male controls. This was independent of disease severity as measured by renal function and did not lead to changes in arterial blood flow properties. A basilar artery diameter of >3.2 mm distinguished between men with Fabry disease and controls (sensitivity: 87%, specificity: 86%, p<0.001), but not from stroke patients. Enlarged arterial diameters of the posterior circulation are present only in men with Fabry disease independent of disease severity. PMID:24475221

  2. Variations in plasma and urinary lipids in response to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease patients by nanoflow UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Jin-Sung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-03-01

    A deficiency of α-galactosidase A causes Fabry disease (FD) by disrupting lipid metabolism, especially trihexosylceramide (THC). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is clinically offered to FD patients in an attempt to lower the accumulated lipids. Studies on specific types of lipids that are directly or indirectly altered by FD are very scarce, even though they are crucial in understanding the biological process linked to the pathogenesis of FD. We performed a comprehensive lipid profiling of plasma and urinary lipids from FD patients with nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) and identified 129 plasma and 111 urinary lipids. Among these, lipids that exhibited alternations (>twofold) in patients were selected as targets for selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based high-speed quantitation using nanoflow ultra-performance LC-ESI-MS/MS (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) and 31 plasma and 26 urinary lipids showed significant elevation among FD patients. Higher percentages of sphingolipids (SLs; 48 % for plasma and 42 % for urine) were highly elevated in patients; whereas, a smaller percentage of phospholipids (PLs; 15 % for plasma and 13 % for urine) were significantly affected. Even though α-galactosidase A is reported to affect THC only, the results show that other classes of lipids (especially SLs) are changed as well, indicating that FD not only alters metabolism of THC but various classes of lipids too. Most lipids showing significant increases in relative amounts before ERT decreased after ERT, but overall, ERT influenced plasma lipids more than urinary lipids. Graphical abstract Brief overview of lipidomic analysis for Fabry disease using nLC-ESI-MS/MS and nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS. PMID:26873218

  3. Fabry's Disease: Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Muzaffar Maqsood; Khan, Imran; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Muzaffar

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme with the progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in vascular endothelial cells leading to cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, neuropathic, lenticular, and dermatological manifestations. It is a rare cause of end-stage renal disease. It classically affects males whereas 10–15% of female heterozygote carriers are affected depending on localization. Both the FD and its association with ESRD is rare. With this background, this case series of five patient's along with the review of literature is presented here. PMID:27398254

  4. Effects of enzyme replacement therapy in adult patients with Fabry disease on cardiac structure and function: a retrospective cohort study of the Fabry Münster Study (FaMüS) data

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Markus A; Brand, Eva; Baumeister, Timo B; Marquardt, T; Duning, Thomas; Osada, Nani; Schaefer, Roland M; Stypmann, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Objective Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism caused by deficient lysosomal α-galactosidase A activity. Progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and related glycosphingolipids in vascular endothelial lysosomes of the heart, kidneys and brain is responsible for the main disease manifestations. The aim of our study was to assess short-term and long-term effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) on cardiac mass and function. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Hospital outpatient clinic. Participants 40 FD patients (21 men, 19 women) receiving agalsidase β-ERT. Outcome measures The focus at baseline and follow-up examinations was on structural, functional (Doppler-echocardiography) as well as electrical changes (ECG) and blood pressure. Results In the Early Group, systolic and diastolic blood pressures significantly decreased. Left-ventricular (LV) also decreased; however, wall thickness and LV mass index showed no further increase. VE as an indicator for diastolic function significantly improved (64±21 vs 75±27 cm/s, p=0.038). There were no significant changes of ECG parameters. There were few relevant changes in the Late Group, albeit systolic blood pressure significantly decreased and QRS duration significantly increased. In conclusion, echocardiographic left-ventricular mass index, interventricular septum thickness, left-ventricular posterior wall, left-ventricular end-diastolic dimension) and diastolic function parameters are valuable for follow-up and guidance of therapy. Conclusions The primary positive impact of ERT appears to be an early effect after the start of therapy, and early initiation of ERT should be recommended. PMID:23175739

  5. Fabry's disease: An ultrastructural study of nerve biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gayathri, N.; Yasha, T. C.; Kanjalkar, Makarand; Agarwal, Santosh; Sagar, B. K. Chandrashekar; Santosh, Vani; Shankar, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Fabry's disease, an X linked recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-gal A), leads to progressive accumulation of glycosphingolipids. We report this rare disease in a 19-year-old boy who presented with angiokeratomas, paresthesia and corneal opacities, and nerve biopsy revealed by electron microscopy lamellated inclusions in the smooth muscle, perineurial and endothelial cells characteristic of Fabry's disease. PMID:19893666

  6. [Fabry-Anderson disease: current state of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Vega-Vega, Olynka; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Angélica; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Fabry-Anderson disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase. This enzymatic defect results in the accumulation of glycosphingolipid into different lines cells. Usually the deficiency is complete, resulting in a multisystem disorder, with injury in different organs, predominantly heart, kidney and nervous system. However, in some patients the enzymatic deficit is partial and causes diverse clinical variants of the disease (renal or cardiac variety), this cause a difficult diagnostic and the absence of real epidemiology data. This review is about the epidemiology, the metabolic defect of this disease, it's molecular and genetics bases, the different forms of clinical presentation and the enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:21888295

  7. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups may influence Fabry disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Simoncini, C; Chico, L; Concolino, D; Sestito, S; Fancellu, L; Boadu, W; Sechi, G P; Feliciani, C; Gnarra, M; Zampetti, A; Salviati, A; Scarpelli, M; Orsucci, D; Bonuccelli, U; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2016-08-26

    While the genetic origin of Fabry disease (FD) is well known, it is still unclear why the disease presents a wide heterogeneity of clinical presentation and progression, even within the same family. Emerging observations reveal that mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress may be implicated in the pathogenesis of FD. To investigate if specific genetic polymorphisms within the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) could act as susceptibility factors and contribute to the clinical expression of FD, we have genotyped European mtDNA haplogroups in 77 Italian FD patients and 151 healthy controls. Haplogroups H and I, and haplogroup cluster HV were significantly more frequent in patients than controls. However, no correlation with gender, age of onset, organ involvement was observed. Our study seems to provide some evidence of a contribution of mitochondrial variation in FD pathogenesis, at least in Italy. PMID:27365132

  8. The alpha-galactosidase A p.Arg118Cys variant does not cause a Fabry disease phenotype: data from individual patients and family studies

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Susana; Ortiz, Alberto; Germain, Dominique P.; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Gomes, António Caldeira; Camprecios, Marta; Fenollar-Cortés, Maria; Gallegos-Villalobos, Ángel; Garcia, Diego; García-Robles, José Antonio; Egido, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Eduardo; Herrero, José Antonio; Mas, Sebastián; Oancea, Raluca; Péres, Paloma; Salazar-Martín, Luis Manuel; Solera-Garcia, Jesús; Alves, Helena; Garman, Scott C.; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (α-Gal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked glycosphingolipidosis caused by pathogenic mutations affecting the GLA gene. The early-onset, multi-systemic FD classical phenotype is associated with absent or severe enzyme deficiency, as measured by in vitro assays, but patients with higher levels of residual α-Gal activity may have later-onset, more organ-restricted clinical presentations. A change in the codon 118 of the wild-type α-Gal sequence, replacing basic arginine by a potentially sulfhydryl-binding cysteine residue – GLA p.(Arg118Cys) –, has been recurrently described in large FD screening studies of high-risk patients. Although the Cys118 allele is associated with high residual α-Gal activity in vitro, it has been classified as a pathogenic mutation, mainly on the basis of theoretical arguments about the chemistry of the cysteine residue. However its pathogenicity has never been convincingly demonstrated by pathology criteria. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical and histopathology data obtained from 22 individuals of Portuguese and Spanish ancestry carrying the Cys118 allele, including 3 homozygous females. Cases were identified either on the differential diagnosis of possible FD manifestations and on case-finding studies (n=11; 4 males), or on unbiased cascade screening of probands’ close relatives (n=11; 3 males). Overall, those data strongly suggest that the GLA p.(Arg118Cys) variant does not segregate with FD clinical phenotypes in a Mendelian fashion, but might be a modulator of the multifactorial risk of cerebrovascular disease, since the allelic frequency in stroke patients was 0.0087 (p=0.0185 vs the general population). The Cys118 allelic frequency in healthy Portuguese adults (n=696) has been estimated as 0.001, therefore not qualifying for “rare” condition. PMID:25468652

  9. Understanding the gastrointestinal manifestations of Fabry disease: promoting prompt diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zar-Kessler, Claire; Karaa, Amel; Sims, Katherine Bustin; Clarke, Virginia; Kuo, Braden

    2016-07-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by the dysfunction of multiple systems, including significant gastrointestinal involvement such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, early satiety and nausea. The gastrointestinal symptoms of Fabry disease are thought to be due to neuropathic and myopathic changes leading to symptoms of dysmotility that are encountered in many other disorders. The gastrointestinal symptoms can often be one of the presenting signs of the disease in childhood, but can be misdiagnosed by gastroenterologists for many years due to their nonspecific presentation. As the chief treatment for Fabry is enzyme-replacement therapy that has been shown to stabilize and possibly reverse disease course, recognition of these symptoms and early diagnosis in an attempt to prevent progression with treatment, is critical. PMID:27366228

  10. Understanding the gastrointestinal manifestations of Fabry disease: promoting prompt diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zar-Kessler, Claire; Karaa, Amel; Sims, Katherine Bustin; Clarke, Virginia; Kuo, Braden

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by the dysfunction of multiple systems, including significant gastrointestinal involvement such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, early satiety and nausea. The gastrointestinal symptoms of Fabry disease are thought to be due to neuropathic and myopathic changes leading to symptoms of dysmotility that are encountered in many other disorders. The gastrointestinal symptoms can often be one of the presenting signs of the disease in childhood, but can be misdiagnosed by gastroenterologists for many years due to their nonspecific presentation. As the chief treatment for Fabry is enzyme-replacement therapy that has been shown to stabilize and possibly reverse disease course, recognition of these symptoms and early diagnosis in an attempt to prevent progression with treatment, is critical. PMID:27366228

  11. Fibrosis: a key feature of Fabry disease with potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in the AGAL gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is the current cornerstone of Fabry disease management. Involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system shortens life span, and fibrosis of these organs is a hallmark of the disease. Fibrosis was initially thought to result from tissue ischemia secondary to endothelial accumulation of glycosphingolipids in the microvasculature. However, despite ready clearance of endothelial deposits, ERT is less effective in patients who have already developed fibrosis. Several potential explanations of this clinical observation may impact on the future management of Fabry disease. Alternative molecular pathways linking glycosphingolipids and fibrosis may be operative; tissue injury may recruit secondary molecular mediators of fibrosis that are unresponsive to ERT, or fibrosis may represent irreversible tissue injury that limits the therapeutic response to ERT. We provide an overview of Fabry disease, with a focus on the assessment of fibrosis, the clinical consequences of fibrosis, and recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis that may suggest novel therapeutic approaches to Fabry disease. PMID:23915644

  12. Copious Podocyturia without Proteinuria and with Normal Renal Function in a Young Adult with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, H; Canzonieri, R; Muryan, A; Schiel, A; Araoz, A; Forrester, M; Karl, A; Lombi, F; Andrews, J; Pomeranz, V; Rengel, T; Zotta, E

    2015-01-01

    The time for starting a patient with Fabry disease on enzyme replacement therapy is still a matter of debate, particularly when no overt classical clinical signs or symptoms are present. With respect to Fabry nephropathy, a dual problem coexists: the reluctance of many nephrologists to start enzyme replacement infusion until signs of renal disease appear as the appearance of proteinuria or an elevation in serum creatinine and the lack of validated biomarkers of early renal damage. In this regard, proteinuria is nowadays considered as an early and appropriate marker of kidney disease and of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, in this report we demonstrate that podocyturia antedates the classical appearance of proteinuria and could be considered as an even earlier biomarker of kidney damage. Podocyturia may be a novel indication for the initiation of therapy in Fabry disease. PMID:26064721

  13. Copious Podocyturia without Proteinuria and with Normal Renal Function in a Young Adult with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trimarchi, H.; Canzonieri, R.; Muryan, A.; Schiel, A.; Forrester, M.; Karl, A.; Lombi, F.; Andrews, J.; Pomeranz, V.; Rengel, T.; Zotta, E.

    2015-01-01

    The time for starting a patient with Fabry disease on enzyme replacement therapy is still a matter of debate, particularly when no overt classical clinical signs or symptoms are present. With respect to Fabry nephropathy, a dual problem coexists: the reluctance of many nephrologists to start enzyme replacement infusion until signs of renal disease appear as the appearance of proteinuria or an elevation in serum creatinine and the lack of validated biomarkers of early renal damage. In this regard, proteinuria is nowadays considered as an early and appropriate marker of kidney disease and of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, in this report we demonstrate that podocyturia antedates the classical appearance of proteinuria and could be considered as an even earlier biomarker of kidney damage. Podocyturia may be a novel indication for the initiation of therapy in Fabry disease. PMID:26064721

  14. Fabry Disease – Current Treatment and New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Motabar, Omid; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud; Zheng, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of α-galactosidase A (GLA), resulting in the storage of excess cellular glycosphingolipids. Enzyme replacement therapy is available for the treatment of Fabry disease, but it is a costly, intravenous treatment. Alternative therapeutic approaches, including small molecule chaperone therapy, are currently being explored. High throughput screening (HTS) technologies can be utilized to discover other small molecule compounds, including non-inhibitory chaperones, enzyme activators, molecules that reduce GLA substrate, and molecules that activate GLA gene promoters. This review outlines the current therapeutic approaches, emerging treatment strategies, and the process of drug discovery and development for Fabry disease. PMID:21127742

  15. Eight-Year Follow-Up of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and Brain Structural Changes in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Irene M.; Böttcher, Anna; Hennermann, Julia B.; Beck, Michael; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Brain structural alterations and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been described repeatedly in Fabry disease, yet cognitive deficits have been shown to be only mild. Here, we aimed to investigate neuropsychiatric symptoms and brain structure longitudinally. We expected no clinically relevant increase of neuropsychiatric symptoms in parallel to increased brain structural alterations. We assessed 14 Fabry patients (46.1 ± 10.8 years) who had participated in our investigation eight years ago. Patients engaged in neuropsychiatric testing, as well as structural magnetic resonance imaging and angiography to determine white matter lesions, hippocampal volume, and the diameter of the larger intracranial arteries. While Fabry patients did not differ on cognitive performance, they showed progressive and significant hippocampal volume loss over the 8-year observation period. White matter lesions were associated with older age and higher white matter lesion load at baseline, but did not reach statistical significance when comparing baseline to follow-up. Likewise, intracranial artery diameters did not increase significantly. None of the imaging parameters were associated with the neuropsychiatric parameters. Depression frequency reduced from 50% at baseline to 21% at follow-up, but it did not reach significance. This investigation demonstrates clinical stability in cognitive function, while pronounced hippocampal atrophy is apparent throughout the 8 years. Our middle-aged Fabry patients appeared to compensate successfully for progressive hippocampal volume loss. The hippocampal volume decline indicates brain regional neuronal involvement in Fabry disease. PMID:26340726

  16. p.R301X Mutation and Variable Phenotypic Appearance of Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozelsancak, Ruya; Uyar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 39 Final Diagnosis: Fabry disease Symptoms: Acropareshesia • fatique Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Gene analysis Specialty: Metabolic Disorders and Diabetics Objective: Rare disease Background: Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder. Due to deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A, neutral glycosphingolipids (primarily globotriaosylceramide) progressively accumulate within lysosomes of cells in various organ systems, resulting in a multi-system disorder, affecting both men and women. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis are common because of the nature of Fabry disease. Case Report: We report a case of Fabry disease with a p.R301X (c.901 C>T) mutation in a 39-year-old man who was being treated for chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis for 2 years. Family screening tests showed that the proband’s mother, sister, and daughter had the same mutation with different phenotypes. Levels of α-galactosidase A were low in the proband and his mother and sister. Cornea verticillata and heart involvement were present in multiple family members. Agalsidase alfa treatment was started in patients where indicated. Conclusions: Pedigree analysis is still a powerful, readily available tool to identify individuals at risk for genetic diseases and allows earlier detection and management of disease. PMID:27156739

  17. Lipiduria--with special relevance to Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Becker, Gavin J; Nicholls, Kathleen

    2015-11-01

    Examination of the urine under the microscope using polarised light is invaluable for detecting and identifying lipid particles. Attention to the shape of these Maltese cross bearing bodies can distinguish conventional fat particles from Fabry bodies with great sensitivity and specificity across a wide phenotypic spectrum. This could be a cheap and rapid tool for screening subjects suspected of having Fabry disease for renal involvement. It remains to be seen whether there is value in integrating polarised light into automated urine microscopy machines, but potentially this could greatly help the pathologist or nephrologist in identifying unusual urinary particles, and broaden the capacity for larger scale screening. PMID:26124059

  18. Atypical patterns of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, J J; Elkholy, K; O'Brien, J; Kiernan, T

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our cardiology service with chest pain, exertional dyspnoea and palpitations on a background of known Fabry disease diagnosed with genetic testing in 1994. ECG showed sinus rhythm, shortened PR interval, widespread t wave inversion, q waves in the lateral leads and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Coronary angiogram showed only mild atheroma. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed anterolateral LVH and reduced left ventricular cavity size in keeping with Fabry cardiomyopathy. Cardiac MRI demonstrated asymmetric hypertrophy with evidence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in the maximally hypertrophied segments from base to apex with late gadolinium enhancement in the anterior and anteroseptal walls. This was quite an atypical appearance for Fabry cardiomyopathy. This case highlights the heterogeneity of patterns of cardiac involvement that may be associated with this rare X-linked lysosomal disorder. PMID:26989114

  19. Curvilinear bodies in hydroxychloroquine-induced renal phospholipidosis resembling Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Rui M.; Martul, Eduardo V.; Reboredo, Juan M.; Cigarrán, Secundino

    2013-01-01

    Inherited and acquired metabolic disorders are responsible for renal intracellular accumulation of phospholipids. Ultrastructural analysis revealing typical myeloid or zebra bodies was previously thought to be exclusive to Fabry disease. However, chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine toxicity can cause similar abnormalities. Recent studies have mentioned curvilinear bodies (CLB) in renal cells in such cases, never described in Fabry nephropathy. We report a 31-year-old patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who was on long-term hydroxychloroquine treatment. The presence of zebra bodies on electron microscopy lead to initial interpretation of Fabry disease, but subsequent genetic analysis did not show a relevant mutation. Further evaluation revealed CLB in renal cells, supporting the diagnosis of hydroxycholoroquine-induced renal phospholipidosis. PMID:26120446

  20. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  1. Enzyme enhancers for the treatment of Fabry and Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Jan; Pockrandt, Anne-Marie; Seemann, Susanne; Sharif, Muhammad; Runge, Franziska; Pohlers, Susann; Zheng, Chaonan; Gläser, Anne; Beller, Matthias; Rolfs, Arndt; Giese, Anne-Katrin

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a group of heterogeneous diseases caused by compromised enzyme function leading to multiple organ failure. Therapeutic approaches involve enzyme replacement (ERT), which is effective for a substantial fraction of patients. However, there are still concerns about a number of issues including tissue penetrance, generation of host antibodies against the therapeutic enzyme, and financial aspects, which render this therapy suboptimal for many cases. Treatment with pharmacological chaperones (PC) was recognized as a possible alternative to ERT, because a great number of mutations do not completely abolish enzyme function, but rather trigger degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. The theory behind PC is that they can stabilize enzymes with remaining function, avoid degradation and thereby ameliorate disease symptoms. We tested several compounds in order to identify novel small molecules that prevent premature degradation of the mutant lysosomal enzymes α-galactosidase A (for Fabry disease (FD)) and acid α-glucosidase (GAA) (for Pompe disease (PD)). We discovered that the expectorant Ambroxol when used in conjunction with known PC resulted in a significant enhancement of mutant α-galactosidase A and GAA activities. Rosiglitazone was effective on α-galactosidase A either as a monotherapy or when administered in combination with the PC 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin. We therefore propose both drugs as potential enhancers of pharmacological chaperones in FD and PD to improve current treatment strategies. PMID:25409744

  2. Enzyme Enhancers for the Treatment of Fabry and Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Jan; Pockrandt, Anne-Marie; Seemann, Susanne; Sharif, Muhammad; Runge, Franziska; Pohlers, Susann; Zheng, Chaonan; Gläser, Anne; Beller, Matthias; Rolfs, Arndt; Giese, Anne-Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a group of heterogeneous diseases caused by compromised enzyme function leading to multiple organ failure. Therapeutic approaches involve enzyme replacement (ERT), which is effective for a substantial fraction of patients. However, there are still concerns about a number of issues including tissue penetrance, generation of host antibodies against the therapeutic enzyme, and financial aspects, which render this therapy suboptimal for many cases. Treatment with pharmacological chaperones (PC) was recognized as a possible alternative to ERT, because a great number of mutations do not completely abolish enzyme function, but rather trigger degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. The theory behind PC is that they can stabilize enzymes with remaining function, avoid degradation and thereby ameliorate disease symptoms. We tested several compounds in order to identify novel small molecules that prevent premature degradation of the mutant lysosomal enzymes α-galactosidase A (for Fabry disease (FD)) and acid α-glucosidase (GAA) (for Pompe disease (PD)). We discovered that the expectorant Ambroxol when used in conjunction with known PC resulted in a significant enhancement of mutant α-galactosidase A and GAA activities. Rosiglitazone was effective on α-galactosidase A either as a monotherapy or when administered in combination with the PC 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin. We therefore propose both drugs as potential enhancers of pharmacological chaperones in FD and PD to improve current treatment strategies. PMID:25409744

  3. A Novel Rapid MALDI-TOF-MS-Based Method for Measuring Urinary Globotriaosylceramide in Fabry Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Fahad J.; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Ward, Douglas G.

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in various organs. Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and its isoforms and analogues have been identified and quantified as biomarkers of disease severity and treatment efficacy. The current study aimed to establish rapid methods for urinary Gb3 extraction and quantitation. Urine samples from 15 Fabry patients and 21 healthy control subjects were processed to extract Gb3 by mixing equal volumes of urine, methanol containing an internal standard, and chloroform followed by sonication and centrifugation. Thereafter, the lower phase was analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the relative peak areas of the internal standard and four major species of Gb3 determined. The results showed high reproducibility with intra- and inter-assay coefficients variation of 9.9% and 13.7%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.15 ng/μL and the limit of quantitation was 0.30 ng/μL. Total urinary Gb3 levels in both genders of classic Fabry patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Gb3 levels in Fabry males were higher than in Fabry females (p = 0.08). We have established a novel assay for urinary total Gb3 that takes less than 15 min from start to finish.

  4. A Novel Rapid MALDI-TOF-MS-Based Method for Measuring Urinary Globotriaosylceramide in Fabry Patients.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Fahad J; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Hughes, Derralynn A; Ward, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-galactosidase A, resulting in the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in various organs. Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and its isoforms and analogues have been identified and quantified as biomarkers of disease severity and treatment efficacy. The current study aimed to establish rapid methods for urinary Gb3 extraction and quantitation. Urine samples from 15 Fabry patients and 21 healthy control subjects were processed to extract Gb3 by mixing equal volumes of urine, methanol containing an internal standard, and chloroform followed by sonication and centrifugation. Thereafter, the lower phase was analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and the relative peak areas of the internal standard and four major species of Gb3 determined. The results showed high reproducibility with intra- and inter-assay coefficients variation of 9.9% and 13.7%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.15 ng/μL and the limit of quantitation was 0.30 ng/μL. Total urinary Gb3 levels in both genders of classic Fabry patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). Gb3 levels in Fabry males were higher than in Fabry females (p = 0.08). We have established a novel assay for urinary total Gb3 that takes less than 15 min from start to finish. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26797827

  5. Skin-impedance in Fabry Disease: A prospective, controlled, non-randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Ries, Markus; Murray, Gary J; Quirk, Jane M; Brady, Roscoe O; Lidicker, Jeffrey R; Schiffmann, Raphael; Moore, David F

    2008-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated improved sweating after enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in Fabry disease using the thermo-regularity sweat and quantitative sudomotor axon reflex tests. Skin-impedance, a measure skin-moisture (sweating), has been used in the clinical evaluation of burns and pressure ulcers using the portable dynamic dermal impedance monitor (DDIM) system. Methods We compared skin impedance measurements in hemizygous patients with Fabry disease (22 post 3-years of bi-weekly ERT and 5 ERT naive) and 22 healthy controls. Force compensated skin-moisture values were used for statistical analysis. Outcome measures included 1) moisture reading of the 100th repetitive reading, 2) rate of change, 3) average of 60–110th reading and 4) overall average of all readings. Results All outcome measures showed a significant difference in skin-moisture between Fabry patients and control subjects (p < 0.0001). There was no difference between Fabry patients on ERT and patients naïve to ERT. Increased skin-impedance values for the four skin-impedance outcome measures were found in a small number of dermatome test-sites two days post-enzyme infusions. Conclusion The instrument portability, ease of its use, a relatively short time required for the assessment, and the fact that DDIM system was able to detect the difference in skin-moisture renders the instrument a useful clinical tool. PMID:18990229

  6. Use of a modified alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in the development of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Youichi; Kawashima, Ikuo; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Sugawara, Kanako; Kuroda, Mayuko; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Ohno, Kazuki; Fukushige, Tomoko; Kanekura, Takuro; Itoh, Kohji; Ohashi, Toya; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2009-11-01

    A modified alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NAGA) with alpha-galactosidase A (GLA)-like substrate specificity was designed on the basis of structural studies and was produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The enzyme acquired the ability to catalyze the degradation of 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside. It retained the original NAGA's stability in plasma and N-glycans containing many mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) residues, which are advantageous for uptake by cells via M6P receptors. There was no immunological cross-reactivity between the modified NAGA and GLA, and the modified NAGA did not react to serum from a patient with Fabry disease recurrently treated with a recombinant GLA. The enzyme cleaved globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) accumulated in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with Fabry disease. Furthermore, like recombinant GLA proteins presently used for enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease, the enzyme intravenously injected into Fabry model mice prevented Gb3 storage in the liver, kidneys, and heart and improved the pathological changes in these organs. Because this modified NAGA is hardly expected to cause an allergic reaction in Fabry disease patients, it is highly promising as a new and safe enzyme for ERT for Fabry disease. PMID:19853240

  7. AB171. RNA alternative splicing modulator can effectively increase lymphoblast enzyme activity in patients with cardiac fabry disease caused by IVS4+919G >A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Li, Cheng-Fang; Huang, Chun-Kai; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background In Taiwan, DNA-based newborn screening showed a surprisingly high incidence (1/875 in males and 1/399 in females) of a cardiac fabry mutation (IVS4 + 919G >A). The common cardiac variant fabry mutation, IVS4+919G >A, affects the splicing of GLA RNA by introducing a 57-nucleotide insertion between exons 4 and 5 that contains a stop codon and leads to a truncated protein and inactive enzyme. And this mutation affected males have up to 10% residual enzyme activity and present clinically with late-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Due to the high cost of enzyme replacement therapy and the large number of patients with this mutation, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Several low-molecular-mass compounds, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors or kinase/phosphatase inhibitors, have been identified as modulators of alternative splicing. It may offer a potential alternative to enzyme replacement therapy. We expect to find out a more economic and effective drug by the detailed study of the mechanism of the small molecule modulators on the IVS4+919G >A mutation for the greater benefits of patients with this mutation. Methods In this study, we used to generate Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblast cell lines and incubated with different concentrations of three HDIs (sodium butyrate, valproic acid, and trichostatin A) and Amiloride hydrochloride (Amiloride HCl). To identify the respond of these compound, we were monitored the relative amounts of normal and aberrant splice forms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the relative amounts of the normal and truncated α-Gal A protein products were analyzed by Western blotting and enzyme activities. Results Western blotting revealed those females heterozygous for the IVS4+919G >A mutation had approximately 50% of the normal level of α-Gal A protein, whereas hemizygous males had approximately 10% of the normal level. The three HDIs were all found to rescue the aberrant RNA

  8. Establishing 3-nitrotyrosine as a biomarker for the vasculopathy of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Liming; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Smid, Bouwien E; Aerts, Johannes M FG; Hollak, Carla E M; Shayman, James A

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial dysfunction of Fabry disease results from α-galactosidase A deficiency leading to the accumulation of globotriaosylceramide. Vasculopathy in the α-galactosidase A null mouse is manifested as oxidant-induced thrombosis, accelerated atherogenesis, and impaired arterial reactivity. To better understand the pathogenesis of Fabry disease in humans, we generated a human cell model by using RNA interference. Hybrid endothelial cells were transiently transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) specifically directed against α-galactosidase A. Knockdown of α-galactosidase A was confirmed using immunoblotting and globotriaosylceramide accumulation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity was correspondingly decreased by >60%. Levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT), a specific marker for reactive nitrogen species and quantified using mass spectrometry, increased by 40- to 120-fold without corresponding changes in other oxidized amino acids, consistent with eNOS-derived reactive nitrogen species as the source of the reactive oxygen species. eNOS uncoupling was confirmed by the observed increase in free plasma and protein-bound aortic 3NT levels in the α-galactosidase A knockout mice. Finally, 3NT levels, assayed in biobanked plasma samples from patients with classical Fabry disease, were over sixfold elevated compared with age- and gender-matched controls. Thus, 3NT may serve as a biomarker for the vascular involvement in Fabry disease. PMID:24402087

  9. Cardiac and skeletal myopathy in Fabry disease: a clinicopathologic correlative study.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Cristina; Padua, Luca; Pazzaglia, Costanza; Morgante, Emanuela; Centurion, Carlos; Antuzzi, Daniela; Russo, Matteo A; Frustaci, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Skeletal muscle disturbances are commonly reported in patients with Fabry disease. Whether they derive from cardiac dysfunction or direct muscle involvement is still unclear. Clinical, noninvasive, and invasive cardiac and muscle studies, including an endomyocardial and muscle biopsy, were obtained in 12 patients (mean age, 42.1 ± 12.6 years; range, 24-58 years) with Fabry disease. In the youngest patients (group A, 4 men aged <35 years), results of cardiac and skeletal noninvasive studies were normal, except for reduced velocities in tissue Doppler imaging. Histologic examination indicated that muscle myocytes were unaffected, whereas muscle vessels showed the presence of mild glycosphingolipid accumulation in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In the heart, cardiomyocytes and endothelial and smooth muscle cells of intramural cardiac vessels were involved by the disease. The oldest patients (group B, 6 men and 2 women aged >35 years) showed ultrasound muscle disarray and electromyography signs of myopathy, increased left ventricular mass, and normal cardiac function. Histologic examination showed that muscle myocytes contained mild glycosphingolipid accumulation compared with severe engulfment of cardiomyocytes. Moreover, similar infiltration of myocardial and muscle intramural vessels, causing lumen narrowing and fibrofatty tissue replacement, was observed. Direct muscle involvement occurs in patients with Fabry disease. It is milder and delayed compared with that in the heart. The difference in organ function and the need of residual α-galactosidase A activity are the likely causes. PMID:22406371

  10. Screening for Fabry Disease in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Documentation of a Novel Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Ana; Magalhães, Pedro; Leão, Sílvia; Carvalho, Sofia; Mateus, Pedro; Moreira, Ilídio

    2015-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by enzyme α-galactosidase A deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLA gene. Cardiac involvement is characterized by progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. Objective To estimate the prevalence of Fabry disease in a population with left ventricular hypertrophy. Methods The patients were assessed for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy defined as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 96 g/m2 for women or ≥ 116 g/m2 for men. Severe aortic stenosis and arterial hypertension with mild left ventricular hypertrophy were exclusion criteria. All patients included were assessed for enzyme α-galactosidase A activity using dry spot testing. Genetic study was performed whenever the enzyme activity was decreased. Results A total of 47 patients with a mean left ventricular mass index of 141.1 g/m2 (± 28.5; 99.2 to 228.5 g/m2] were included. Most of the patients were females (51.1%). Nine (19.1%) showed decreased α-galactosidase A activity, but only one positive genetic test − [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5), a mutation not previously described in the literature. This clinical investigation was able to establish the association between the mutation and the clinical presentation. Conclusion In a population of patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, we documented a Fabry disease prevalence of 2.1%. This novel case was defined in the sequence of a mutation of unknown meaning in the GLA gene with further pathogenicity study. Thus, this study permitted the definition of a novel causal mutation for Fabry disease - [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5). PMID:26269958

  11. Sudden death following AV node ablation in a man with Fabry disease mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rodda, Odette A; Lynch, Matthew; Parsons, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of Fabry disease with an uncommon pattern of asymmetrical hypertrophy with septal prominence resulting in an erroneous diagnosis of hypertrophic cardilmyopathy clinically. The deceased presented for a medicolegal autopsy following his sudden death after an AV node ablation. Fabry disease continues to be an important misdiagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a clinical setting. Early diagnosis of Fabry disease is essential so that early treatment can be instituted. PMID:27213840

  12. Increased expression of Trpv1 in peripheral terminals mediates thermal nociception in Fabry disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lakomá, Jarmila; Rimondini, Roberto; Ferrer Montiel, Antonio; Donadio, Vincenzo; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient function of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) enzyme. α-GalA deficiency leads to multisystemic clinical manifestations caused by the preferential accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscles. A hallmark symptom of Fabry disease patients is neuropathic pain that appears in the early stage of the disease as a result of peripheral small fiber damage. The α-GalA gene null mouse model (α-GalA(−/0)) has provided molecular evidence for the molecular alterations in small type-C nociceptors in Fabry disease that may underlie their hyperexcitability, although the specific mechanism remains elusive. Here, we have addressed this question and report that small type-C nociceptors from α-GalA(−/0) mice exhibit a significant increase in the expression and function of the TRPV1 channel, a thermoTRP channel implicated in painful heat sensation. Notably, male α-GalA(−/0) mice displayed a ≈2-fold higher heat sensitivity than wild-type animals, consistent with the augmented expression levels and activity of TRPV1 in α-GalA(−/0) nociceptors. Intriguingly, blockade of neuronal exocytosis with peptide DD04107, a process that inhibits among others the algesic membrane recruitment of TRPV1 channels in peptidergic nociceptors, virtually eliminated the enhanced heat nociception of α-GalA(−/0) mice. Together, these findings suggest that the augmented expression of TRPV1 in α-GalA(−/0) nociceptors may underly at least in part their increased heat sensitivity, and imply that blockade of peripheral neuronal exocytosis may be a valuable pharmacological strategy to reduce pain in Fabry disease patients, increasing their quality of life. PMID:27531673

  13. Increased expression of Trpv1 in peripheral terminals mediates thermal nociception in Fabry disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lakomá, Jarmila; Rimondini, Roberto; Ferrer Montiel, Antonio; Donadio, Vincenzo; Liguori, Rocco; Caprini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient function of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) enzyme. α-GalA deficiency leads to multisystemic clinical manifestations caused by the preferential accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscles. A hallmark symptom of Fabry disease patients is neuropathic pain that appears in the early stage of the disease as a result of peripheral small fiber damage. The α-GalA gene null mouse model (α-GalA(-/0)) has provided molecular evidence for the molecular alterations in small type-C nociceptors in Fabry disease that may underlie their hyperexcitability, although the specific mechanism remains elusive. Here, we have addressed this question and report that small type-C nociceptors from α-GalA(-/0) mice exhibit a significant increase in the expression and function of the TRPV1 channel, a thermoTRP channel implicated in painful heat sensation. Notably, male α-GalA(-/0) mice displayed a ≈2-fold higher heat sensitivity than wild-type animals, consistent with the augmented expression levels and activity of TRPV1 in α-GalA(-/0) nociceptors. Intriguingly, blockade of neuronal exocytosis with peptide DD04107, a process that inhibits among others the algesic membrane recruitment of TRPV1 channels in peptidergic nociceptors, virtually eliminated the enhanced heat nociception of α-GalA(-/0) mice. Together, these findings suggest that the augmented expression of TRPV1 in α-GalA(-/0) nociceptors may underly at least in part their increased heat sensitivity, and imply that blockade of peripheral neuronal exocytosis may be a valuable pharmacological strategy to reduce pain in Fabry disease patients, increasing their quality of life. PMID:27531673

  14. p.R301X Mutation and Variable Phenotypic Appearance of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Ozelsancak, Ruya; Uyar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder. Due to deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A, neutral glycosphingolipids (primarily globotriaosylceramide) progressively accumulate within lysosomes of cells in various organ systems, resulting in a multi-system disorder, affecting both men and women. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis are common because of the nature of Fabry disease. CASE REPORT We report a case of Fabry disease with a p.R301X (c.901 C>T) mutation in a 39-year-old man who was being treated for chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis for 2 years. Family screening tests showed that the proband's mother, sister, and daughter had the same mutation with different phenotypes. Levels of α-galactosidase A were low in the proband and his mother and sister. Cornea verticillata and heart involvement were present in multiple family members. Agalsidase alfa treatment was started in patients where indicated. CONCLUSIONS Pedigree analysis is still a powerful, readily available tool to identify individuals at risk for genetic diseases and allows earlier detection and management of disease. PMID:27156739

  15. MALDI-TOF and cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging of Fabry disease biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, David; Roy, Sandrine; Germain, Dominique P.; Chaminade, Pierre; Brunelle, Alain; Laprevote, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism, in which a partial or total deficiency of [alpha]-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme, results in the progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids (globotriaosylceramide and digalactosylceramide) in most fluids and tissues of the body. Few information is available about the composition and distribution in tissues of the accumulated glycosphingolipids species. Mass spectrometry imaging is an innovative technique, which can provide pieces of information about the distribution of numerous biological compounds, such as lipids, directly on the tissue sections. MALDI-TOF and cluster-TOF-SIMS imaging approaches were used to study the localization of lipids (cholesterol, cholesterol sulfate, vitamin E, glycosphingolipids ...) on skin and kidney sections of patients affected by the Fabry disease. Numerous information on pathophysiology were enlightened by both techniques.

  16. Metabolomic Discovery of Novel Urinary Galabiosylceramide Analogs as Fabry Disease Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Michel; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked, complex, multisystemic lysosomal storage disorder presenting marked phenotypic and genotypic variability among affected male and female patients. Glycosphingolipids, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) isoforms/analogs, globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) and analogs, as well as galabiosylceramide (Ga2) isoforms/analogs accumulate in the vascular endothelium, nerves, cardiomyocytes, renal glomerular and tubular epithelial cells, and biological fluids. The search for biomarkers reflecting disease severity and progression is still on-going. A metabolomic study using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry has revealed 22 galabiosylceramide isoforms/analogs in urine of untreated Fabry patients classified in seven groups according to their chemical structure: (1) Saturated fatty acid; (2) one extra double bond; (3) two extra double bonds; (4) hydroxylated saturated fatty acid; (5) hydroxylated fatty acid and one extra double bond; (6) hydrated sphingosine and hydroxylated fatty acid; (7) methylated amide linkage. Relative quantification of both Ga2 and Gb3 isoforms/analogs was performed. All these biomarkers are significantly more abundant in urine samples from untreated Fabry males compared with healthy male controls. A significant amount of Ga2 isoforms/analogs, accounting for 18% of all glycosphingolipids analyzed (Ga2 + Gb3 and respective isoforms/analogs), were present in urine of Fabry patients. Gb3 isoforms containing saturated fatty acids are the most abundant (60.9%) compared with 26.3% for Ga2. A comparison between Ga2 isoforms/analogs and their Gb3 counterparts also showed that the proportion of analogs with hydroxylated fatty acids is significantly greater for Ga2 (35.8%) compared with Gb3 (1.9%). These results suggest different biological pathways involved in the synthesis and/or degradation of Gb3 and Ga2 metabolites.

  17. Agalsidase alfa: a review of its use in the management of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-10-01

    The enzyme replacement therapy agalsidase alfa (Replagal®) has an amino acid sequence identical to that of native α-galactosidase A; intravenous agalsidase alfa 0.2 mg/kg every other week is indicated for the long-term treatment of patients with confirmed Fabry disease. This article reviews the efficacy and tolerability of agalsidase alfa in patients with Fabry disease, as well as summarizing its pharmacologic properties. Agalsidase alfa had beneficial effects in adult men with Fabry disease, according to the results of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-month trials (n = 15 and 26). For example, left ventricular mass index was reduced to a significantly greater extent with agalsidase alfa than with placebo. Although the change in myocardial globotriaosylceramide content (primary endpoint in one study) did not significantly differ between agalsidase alfa and placebo recipients, the change in the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) 'pain at its worst' score (reflecting neuropathic pain while without pain medications; primary endpoint in the second study) was improved to a significantly greater extent with agalsidase alfa than with placebo. In addition, the change in creatinine clearance, but not inulin clearance, significantly favored agalsidase alfa versus placebo recipients. Abnormalities in functional cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular responses were also reversed with agalsidase alfa therapy. In extensions of these placebo-controlled trials, the reduction in left ventricular mass and improvements in BPI pain scores were maintained after longer-term agalsidase alfa therapy. The significant decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) seen after 48 months' agalsidase alfa treatment was mainly driven by a marked decline in eGFR seen in four patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease at baseline (although the progression of decline appeared slower than that seen in historic controls); renal function appeared stable in patients with

  18. Aging accentuates and bone marrow transplantation ameliorates metabolic defects in Fabry disease mice.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, T; Schiffmann, R; Murray, G J; Kopp, J; Quirk, J M; Stahl, S; Chan, C C; Zerfas, P; Tao-Cheng, J H; Ward, J M; Brady, R O; Kulkarni, A B

    1999-05-25

    Fabry disease is an X-linked metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A). The enzyme defect leads to the systemic accumulation of glycosphingolipids with alpha-galactosyl moieties consisting predominantly of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). In patients with this disorder, glycolipid deposition in endothelial cells leads to renal failure and cardiac and cerebrovascular disease. Recently, we generated alpha-Gal A gene knockout mouse lines and described the phenotype of 10-week-old mice. In the present study, we characterize the progression of the disease with aging and explore the effects of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the phenotype. Histopathological analysis of alpha-Gal A -/0 mice revealed subclinical lesions in the Kupffer cells in the liver and macrophages in the skin with no gross lesions in the endothelial cells. Gb3 accumulation and pathological lesions in the affected organs increased with age. Treatment with BMT from the wild-type mice resulted in the clearance of accumulated Gb3 in the liver, spleen, and heart with concomitant elevation of alpha-Gal A activity. These findings suggest that BMT may have a potential role in the management of patients with Fabry disease. PMID:10339603

  19. Comprehensive and differential long-term characterization of the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mouse model of Fabry disease focusing on the sensory system and pain development

    PubMed Central

    Biko, Lydia; Hose, Dorothea; Hofmann, Lukas; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to impaired activity of alpha-galactosidase A with intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide. Associated small fiber pathology leads to characteristic pain in Fabry disease. We systematically assessed sensory system, physical activity, metabolic parameters, and morphology of male and female mice with alpha-galactosidase A deficiency (Fabry ko) from 2 to 27 months of age and compared results with those of age- and gender-matched wild-type littermates of C57Bl/6J background. Results From the age of two months, male and female Fabry mice showed mechanical hypersensitivity (p < 0.001 each) compared to wild-type littermates. Young Fabry ko mice of both genders were hypersensitive to heat stimulation (p < 0.01) and developed heat hyposensitivity with aging (p < 0.05), while cold hyposensitivity was present constantly in young (p < 0.01) and old (p < 0.05) Fabry ko mice compared to wild-type littermates. Stride angle increased only in male Fabry ko mice with aging (p < 0.01) in comparison to wild-type littermates. Except for young female mice, male (p < 0.05) and female (p < 0.01) Fabry ko mice had a higher body weight than wild-type littermates. Old male Fabry ko mice were physically less active than their wild-type littermates (p < 0.05), had lower chow intake (p < 0.001), and lost more weight (p < 0.001) in a one-week treadmill experiment than wild-type littermates. Also, Fabry ko mice showed spontaneous pain protective behavior and developed orofacial dysmorphism resembling patients with Fabry disease. Conclusions Mice with alpha-galactosidase A deficiency show age-dependent and distinct deficits of the sensory system. alpha-galactosidase A-deficient mice seem to model human Fabry disease and may be helpful when studying the pathophysiology of Fabry-associated pain. PMID:27145802

  20. Molecular damage in Fabry disease: characterization and prediction of alpha-galactosidase A pathological mutations.

    PubMed

    Riera, Casandra; Lois, Sergio; Domínguez, Carmen; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Montaner, Joan; Rodríguez-Sureda, Victor; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) causes Fabry disease (FD), that is a rare and potentially fatal disease. Identification of these pathological mutations by sequencing is important because it allows an early treatment of the disease. However, before taking any treatment decision, if the mutation identified is unknown, we first need to establish if it is pathological or not. General bioinformatic tools (PolyPhen-2, SIFT, Condel, etc.) can be used for this purpose, but their performance is still limited. Here we present a new tool, specifically derived for the assessment of GLA mutations. We first compared mutations of this enzyme known to cause FD with neutral sequence variants, using several structure and sequence properties. Then, we used these properties to develop a family of prediction methods adapted to different quality requirements. Trained and tested on a set of known Fabry mutations, our methods have a performance (Matthews correlation: 0.56-0.72) comparable or better than that of the more complex method, Polyphen-2 (Matthews correlation: 0.61), and better than those of SIFT (Matthews correl.: 0.54) and Condel (Matthews correl.: 0.51). This result is validated in an independent set of 65 pathological mutations, for which our method displayed the best success rate (91.0%, 87.7%, and 73.8%, for our method, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT, respectively). These data confirmed that our specific approach can effectively contribute to the identification of pathological mutations in GLA, and therefore enhance the use of sequence information in the identification of undiagnosed Fabry patients. PMID:25382311

  1. Early diagnosis of peripheral nervous system involvement in Fabry disease and treatment of neuropathic pain: the report of an expert panel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by progressive lysosomal accumulation of lipids in a variety of cell types, including neural cells. Small, unmyelinated nerve fibers are particularly affected and small fiber peripheral neuropathy often clinically manifests at young age. Peripheral pain can be chronic and/or occur as provoked attacks of excruciating pain. Manifestations of dysfunction of small autonomic fibers may include, among others, impaired sweating, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and abnormal pain perception. Patients with Fabry disease often remain undiagnosed until severe complications involving the kidney, heart, peripheral nerves and/or brain have arisen. Methods An international expert panel convened with the goal to provide guidance to clinicians who may encounter unrecognized patients with Fabry disease on how to diagnose these patients early using simple diagnostic tests. A further aim was to offer recommendations to control neuropathic pain. Results We describe the neuropathy in Fabry disease, focusing on peripheral small fiber dysfunction - the hallmark of early neurologic involvement in this disorder. The clinical course of peripheral pain is summarized, and the importance of medical history-taking, including family history, is highlighted. A thorough physical examination (e.g., angiokeratoma, corneal opacities) and simple non-invasive sensory perception tests could provide clues to the diagnosis of Fabry disease. Reported early clinical benefits of enzyme replacement therapy include reduction of neuropathic pain, and adequate management of residual pain to a tolerable and functional level can substantially improve the quality of life for patients. Conclusions Our recommendations can assist in diagnosing Fabry small fiber neuropathy early, and offer clinicians guidance in controlling peripheral pain. This is particularly important since management of pain in young patients with Fabry disease appears to be

  2. Fabry in the older patient: Clinical consequences and possibilities for treatment.

    PubMed

    Lidove, Olivier; Barbey, Frédéric; Niu, Dau-Ming; Brand, Eva; Nicholls, Kathleen; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2016-08-01

    Baseline demographic and phenotypic characteristics of patients aged ≥50years in the Fabry Outcome Survey (Shire; data extracted June 2014) were compared with younger adults to investigate potential factors influencing treatment decisions in later life. Age groups were defined using age at treatment initiation or at FOS entry for untreated patients: 18-49 (n=1344; 49.5% male; 64.6% received agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy [ERT]); 50-64 (n=537; 35.4% male; 74.3% treated); 65-74 (n=137; 32.1% male; 68.6% treated); and ≥75years (n=26; 26.9% male; 50.0% treated). Successive age groups showed higher median age at first symptom and diagnosis. Median alpha-galactosidase A activity, measured as percentage activity of the midpoint of the normal range, was much greater in females than males of all groups except ≥75years (33.4% in females; 27.8% in males). Patients aged ≥75years showed greater values than patients aged 18-49years for median left ventricular mass indexed to height (62.7 vs 42.4g/m(2.7)), mean ventricular wall thickness (15.0 vs 10.0mm) and prevalence of hypertension (57.7% vs 21.8%), and lower median estimated glomerular filtration rate (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease: 65.6 vs 98.5mL/min/1.73m(2)). Larger proportions in the groups aged ≥50 exhibited cardiac and/or cerebrovascular manifestations compared with patients aged 18-49years. The smaller proportion of patients receiving ERT aged ≥75years compared with the younger groups might reflect relatively milder disease burden or physician/patient reluctance to initiate/continue ERT at this age. Further studies are needed to increase knowledge of Fabry disease and ERT in later life. PMID:27221354

  3. Fabry Disease Biomarkers: Analysis of Urinary Lyso-Gb3 and Seven Related Analogs Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Pamela; Boutin, Michel; Abaoui, Mona; Auray-Blais, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the absence or reduction of the enzyme α-galactosidase A activity. Currently, globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3 ) and globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 ) are used as biomarkers to diagnose and monitor Fabry patients. However, recent metabolomic studies have shown that several glycosphingolipids are also elevated in biological fluids of affected patients and may be related to disease manifestations. This unit describes a multiplex methodology targeting the analysis of urinary lyso-Gb3 and seven structurally related analogs. A solid-phase extraction process is performed, then lyso-Gb3 and its analogs are analyzed simultaneously with an internal standard by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to a tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system. This methodology can be useful for the diagnosis of Fabry patients, including patients with cardiac variant mutations, but also to monitor the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, considering that lyso-Gb3 analogs are more elevated than lyso-Gb3 itself in urine. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367162

  4. Cardiomyopathy and response to enzyme replacement therapy in a male mouse model for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Escoubet, Brigitte; Agrapart, Vincent; Griol-Charhbili, Violaine; Schoeb, Trenton; Feng, Wenguang; Jaimes, Edgar; Warnock, David G; Jaisser, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism that results in progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids, (predominately globotriaosylceramide; GL-3) in lysosomes, as well as other cellular compartments and the extracellular space. Our aim was to characterize the cardiac phenotype of male knock-out mice that are deficient in alpha-galactosidase A activity, as a model for Fabry disease and test the efficacy of Enzyme Replacement Therapy with agalsidase-beta. Male mice (3-4 months of age) were characterized with awake blood pressure and heart rate measurements, cardiac echocardiography and electrocardiography measurements under light anesthesia, histological studies and molecular studies with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The Fabry knock-out mouse has bradycardia and lower blood pressure than control wild type (CB7BL/6J) mice. In Fabry knock-out mice, the cardiomyopathy associated mild hypertrophy at echography with normal systolic LV function and mild diastolic dysfunction. Premature atrial contractions were more frequent in without conduction defect. Heart weight normalized to tibial length was increased in Fabry knock-out mice. Ascending aorta dilatation was observed. Molecular studies were consistent with early stages of cardiac remodeling. A single dose of agalsidase-beta (3 mg/kg) did not affect the LV hypertrophy, function or heart rate, but did improve the mRNA signals of early cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mice at 3 to 4 months of age have cardiac and vascular alterations similar to that described in early clinical stage of Fabry disease in children and adolescents. Enzyme replacement therapy affects cardiac molecular remodeling after a single dose. PMID:22574107

  5. Tuning glycosidase inhibition through aglycone interactions: pharmacological chaperones for Fabry disease and GM1 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Moncayo, M; Takai, T; Higaki, K; Mena-Barragán, T; Hirano, Y; Yura, K; Li, L; Yu, Y; Ninomiya, H; García-Moreno, M I; Ishii, S; Sakakibara, Y; Ohno, K; Nanba, E; Ortiz Mellet, C; García Fernández, J M; Suzuki, Y

    2012-07-01

    Competitive inhibitors of either α-galactosidase (α-Gal) or β-galactosidase (β-Gal) with high affinity and selectivity have been accessed by exploiting aglycone interactions with conformationally locked sp(2)-iminosugars. Selected compounds were profiled as potent pharmacological chaperones for mutant lysosomal α- and β-Gal associated with Fabry disease and GM(1) gangliosidosis. PMID:22618082

  6. Fabry disease and Factor V Leiden: a potent vascular risk combination.

    PubMed

    Tchan, M; Sillence, D

    2011-05-01

    A 45-year-old man with heterozygous Factor V Leiden presented with his third cerebrovascular accident despite being on warfarin at a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Subsequent investigation revealed a second genetic diagnosis of Fabry disease. He then had an acute myocardial infarction whilst on aspirin and warfarin. PMID:21605293

  7. Late onset variants in Fabry disease: Results in high risk population screenings in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Serebrinsky, G.; Calvo, M.; Fernandez, S.; Saito, S.; Ohno, K.; Wallace, E.; Warnock, D.; Sakuraba, H.; Politei, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Screening for Fabry disease (FD) in high risk populations yields a significant number of individuals with novel, ultra rare genetic variants in the GLA gene, largely without classic manifestations of FD. These variants often have significant residual α-galactosidase A activity. The establishment of the pathogenic character of previously unknown or rare variants is challenging but necessary to guide therapeutic decisions. Objectives To present 2 cases of non-classical presentations of FD with renal involvement as well as to discuss the importance of high risk population screenings for FD. Results Our patients with non-classical variants were diagnosed through FD screenings in dialysis units. However, organ damage was not limited to kidneys, since LVH, vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and cornea verticillata were also present. Lyso-Gb3 concentrations in plasma were in the pathologic range, compatible with late onset FD. Structural studies and in silico analysis of p.(Cys174Gly) and p.(Arg363His), employing different tools, suggest that enzyme destabilization and possibly aggregation could play a role in organ damage. Conclusions Screening programs for FD in high risk populations are important as FD is a treatable multisystemic disease which is frequently overlooked in patients who present without classical manifestations. PMID:26937405

  8. [Imaging mass spectrometry: a new tool for the analysis of skin biopsy. Application in Fabry's disease].

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Touboul, D; Brunelle, A; Germain, D-P; Prognon, P; Laprévote, O; Chaminade, P

    2006-09-01

    The advent of innovative techniques in mass spectrometry, especially in the area of imaging, prompted us to evaluate two promising techniques: secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. For this purpose, sections of cutaneous biopsies from patients affected by Fabry's disease and control patients were analyzed. In the course of this disease, two physiological glycosphingolipids [globotriasylceramide (Gb3) and the galabiosylceramide (Ga2)] accumulate in certain tissues owing to a catabolism failure. The ability of these techniques to localize sites of accumulation in body tissues and their capacity to identify the accumulated lipid structures by mass spectra were evaluated. Results demonstrated that these two techniques provide complementary information:-secondary ion mass spectrometry enabled precise localization of areas of accumulation with lateral resolution in the micrometer range;-the signal obtained with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry was high enough to identify these structures according to their molecular weight. PMID:17095952

  9. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoxia; Ouyang, Yan; Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  10. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  11. Prevalence of CADASIL and Fabry Disease in a Cohort of MRI Defined Younger Onset Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kilarski, Laura L.; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C. A.; Bevan, Steve; Baker, Rob; Hassan, Ahamad; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, is the most common monogenic disorder causing lacunar stroke and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Fabry disease (FD) due to mutations in the GLA gene has been suggested as an underdiagnosed cause of stroke, and one feature is SVD. Previous studies reported varying prevalence of CADASIL and FD in stroke, likely due to varying subtypes studied; no studies have looked at a large cohort of younger onset SVD. We determined the prevalence in a well-defined, MRI-verified cohort of apparently sporadic patients with lacunar infarct. Methods Caucasian patients with lacunar infarction, aged ≤70 years (mean age 56.7 (SD8.6)), were recruited from 72 specialist stroke centres throughout the UK as part of the Young Lacunar Stroke DNA Resource. Patients with a previously confirmed monogenic cause of stroke were excluded. All MRI’s and clinical histories were reviewed centrally. Screening was performed for NOTCH3 and GLA mutations. Results Of 994 subjects five had pathogenic NOTCH3 mutations (R169C, R207C, R587C, C1222G and C323S) all resulting in loss or gain of a cysteine in the NOTCH3 protein. All five patients had confluent leukoaraiosis (Fazekas grade ≥2). CADASIL prevalence overall was 0.5% (95% CI 0.2%-1.1%) and among cases with confluent leukoaraiosis 1.5% (95% CI 0.6%-3.3%). No classic pathogenic FD mutations were found; one patient had a missense mutation (R118C), associated with late-onset FD. Conclusion CADASIL cases are rare and only detected in SVD patients with confluent leukoaraiosis. No definite FD cases were detected. PMID:26305465

  12. The Fabry disease-associated lipid Lyso-Gb3 enhances voltage-gated calcium currents in sensory neurons and causes pain.

    PubMed

    Choi, L; Vernon, J; Kopach, O; Minett, M S; Mills, K; Clayton, P T; Meert, T; Wood, J N

    2015-05-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterised by accumulation of glycosphingolipids, and accompanied by clinical manifestations, such as cardiac disorders, renal failure, pain and peripheral neuropathy. Globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3), a deacylated form of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), has emerged as a marker of Fabry disease. We investigated the link between Gb3, lyso-Gb3 and pain. Plantar administration of lyso-Gb3 or Gb3 caused mechanical allodynia in healthy mice. In vitro application of 100nM lyso-Gb3 caused uptake of extracellular calcium in 10% of sensory neurons expressing nociceptor markers, rising to 40% of neurons at 1μM, a concentration that may occur in Fabry disease patients. Peak current densities of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels were substantially enhanced by application of 1μM lyso-Gb3. These studies suggest a direct role for lyso-Gb3 in the sensitisation of peripheral nociceptive neurons that may provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Fabry disease-associated pain. PMID:25697597

  13. Infrared imaging microscopy of bone: Illustrations from a mouse model of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Boskey, Adele L.; Goldberg, Michel; Kulkarni, Ashok; Gomez, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Bone is a complex tissue whose composition and properties vary with age, sex, diet, tissue type, health and disease. In this review, we demonstrate how infrared spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopic imaging can be applied to the study of these variations. A specific example of mice with Fabry disease (a lipid storage disease) is presented in which it is demonstrated that the bones of these young animals, while showing typical spatial variation in mineral content, mineral crystal size, and collagen maturity, do not differ from the bones of age- and sex-matched wild type animals. PMID:16697974

  14. Cardiac Troponin I: A Valuable Biomarker Indicating the Cardiac Involvement in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Anne Kathrin; Eichler, Sabrina; Sieweke, Nicole; Speth, Maria; Bauer, Timm; Hamm, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of the clinical severity of Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked, rare, progressive disorder based on a genetic defect in alpha-galactosidase is challenging, especially regarding cardiac involvement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in discriminating FD patients with cardiac involvement in a large FD patient cohort. Methods cTnI levels were measured with a contemporary sensitive assay in plasma samples taken routinely from FD patients. The assay was calibrated to measure cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Elevated cTnI values (cut-off ≥0.04 ng/ml) were correlated with clinical data. Results cTnI was assessed in 62 FD patients (median age: 47 years, males: 36%). Elevated cTnI levels were detected in 23 (37%) patients. Patients with a cTnI elevation were older (median 55 years versus 36 years, p<0.001). Elevated cTnI levels were associated with the presence of a LVH (16/23 versus 1/39; OR 65.81, CI: 6.747–641.859; p<0.001). In almost all patients with a left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) elevated cTnI levels were detected (16/17, 94%). Absolute cTnI levels in patients with LVH were higher than in those without (median 0.23 ng/ml versus 0.02 ng/ml; p<0.001). A cTnI level <0.04ng/ml had a high negative predictive value regarding the presence of a LVH (38/39, 97%). In a control group of non-FD patients (n = 17) with LVH (due to hypertension) none showed cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Conclusions Elevated cTnI levels are common in FD patients, reflecting cardiac involvement. FD patients might benefit from a continuous cTnI monitoring. PMID:27322070

  15. Atmospheric pressure photoionization coupled to porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography for the analysis of globotriaosylceramides. Application to Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Delobel, Arnaud; Roy, Sandrine; Touboul, David; Gaudin, Karen; Germain, Dominique P; Baillet, Arlette; Brion, Françoise; Prognon, Patrice; Chaminade, Pierre; Laprévote, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Globotriaosylceramides (Gb(3)) are biological compounds implicated in Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disease due to the deficient activity of alpha-D-galactosidase A, which results in an accumulation of Gb(3) in many organs. The naturally occurring samples are composed of mixtures of several molecular species differing by the structure of the alkyl chains and the nature of the sphingoid base. Atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry (APPI-MS) proved to be an efficient method for the analysis of globotriaosylceramide molecular species, both in direct injection and by coupling with liquid chromatography (LC). In the positive ion mode, in-source fragmentations yield very precious information that can be used to determine the structure of the alkyl chains. In the negative ion mode, the chloroform solvent participates to the analyte ionization by forming an adduct with chloride ions generated in situ. Combination of LC on a Porous Graphitic Carbon stationary phase and APPI-MS allowed the detection of a great number of species from biological samples isolated from Fabry patients. This method could be an interesting analytical tool for the biochemical investigation of (sphingo) lipid metabolism. PMID:16287034

  16. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain in Fabry Disease: A Nationwide, Long-Time, Prospective Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Granqvist, Henrik; Højgaard, Liselotte; Bollinger, Birgit; Rasmussen, Aase K.; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is a rare metabolic glycosphingolipid storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A—leading to cellular accumulation of globotriasylceramide in different organs, vessels, tissues, and nerves. The disease is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease at a young age in addition to heart and kidney failure. Objective The objective of this study was to assess brain function and structure in the Danish cohort of patients with Fabry disease in a prospective way using 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients Forty patients with Fabry disease (14 males, 26 females, age at inclusion: 10–66 years, median: 39 years) underwent a brain F-18-FDG-PET-scan at inclusion, and 31 patients were followed with FDG-PET biannually for up to seven years. All patients (except one) had a brain MRI-scan at inclusion, and 34 patients were followed with MRI biannually for up to nine years. Image Analysis The FDG-PET-images were inspected visually and analysed using a quantitative 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection analysis (Neurostat). MRI images were also inspected visually and severity of white matter lesions (WMLs) was graded using a visual rating scale. Results In 28 patients brain-FDG-PET was normal; in 23 of these 28 patients brain MRI was normal—of the remaining five patients in this group, four patients had WMLs and one patient never had an MRI-scan. In 10 patients hypometabolic areas were observed on brain-FDG-PET; all of these patients had cerebral infarcts/hemorrhages visualized on MRI corresponding to the main hypometabolic areas. In two patients brain-FDG-PET was ambiguous, while MRI was normal in one and abnormal in the other. Conclusion Our data indicated that, in patients with Fabry disease, MRI is the preferable clinical modality—if applicable—when monitoring cerebral status, as no additional major brain

  17. Genetic screening of Fabry patients with EcoTILLING and HRM technology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anderson-Fabry disease (FD) is caused by a deficit of the α-galactosidase A enzyme which leads to the accumulation of complex sphingolipids, especially globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), in all the cells of the body, causing the onset of a multi-systemic disease with poor prognosis in adulthood. In this article, we describe two alternative methods for screening the GLA gene which codes for the α-galactosidase A enzyme in subjects with probable FD in order to test analysis strategies which include or rely on initial pre-screening. Findings We analyzed 740 samples using EcoTILLING, comparing two mismatch-specificendonucleases, CEL I and ENDO-1, while conducting a parallel screening of the same samples using HRM (High Resolution Melting). Afterwards, all samples were subjected to direct sequencing. Overall, we identified 12 different genetic variations: -10C>T, -12G>A, -30G>A, IVS2-76_80del5, D165H, C172Y, IVS4+16A>G, IVS4 +68 A>G, c.718_719delAA, D313Y, IVS6-22C>T, G395A. This was consistent with the high genetic heterogeneity found in FD patients and carriers. All of the mutations were detected by HRM, whereas 17% of the mutations were not found by EcoTILLING. The results obtained by EcoTILLING comparing the CEL I and ENDO-1 endonucleases were perfectly overlapping. Conclusion On the basis of its simplicity, flexibility, repeatability, and sensitivity, we believe thatHRM analysis of the GLA gene is a reliable presequencing screening tool. This method can be applied to any genomic feature to identify known and unknown genetic alterations, and it is ideal for conducting screening and population studies. PMID:21896204

  18. Multiplex Newborn Screening for Pompe, Fabry, Hunter, Gaucher, and Hurler Diseases Using a Digital Microfluidic Platform

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Ramakrishna S.; Wang, Tong; Wu, Ning; Graham, Carrie; Eckhardt, Allen; Winger, Theodore; Srinivasan, Vijay; Bali, Deeksha; Millington, David S.; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose New therapies for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) have generated interest in screening newborns for these conditions. We present performance validation data on a digital microfluidic platform that performs multiplex enzymatic assays for Pompe, Fabry, Hunter, Gaucher, and Hurler diseases. Methods We developed an investigational disposable digital microfluidic cartridge that uses a single dried blood spot (DBS) punch for performing a 5-plex fluorometric enzymatic assay on up to 44 DBS samples. Precision and linearity of the assays were determined by analyzing quality control DBS samples; clinical performance was determined by analyzing 600 presumed normal and known affected samples (12 for Pompe, 7 for Fabry and 10 each for Hunter, Gaucher and Hurler). Results Overall coefficient of variation (CV) values between cartridges, days, instruments, and operators ranged from 2 to 21%; linearity correlation coefficients were ≥ 0.98 for all assays. The multiplex enzymatic assay performed from a single DBS punch was able to discriminate presumed normal from known affected samples for 5 LSDs. Conclusions Digital microfluidic technology shows potential for rapid, high-throughput screening for 5 LSDs in a newborn screening laboratory environment. Sample preparation to enzymatic activity on each cartridge is less than 3 hours. PMID:23660237

  19. Accurate quantification of sphingosine-1-phosphate in normal and Fabry disease plasma, cells and tissues by LC-MS/MS with (13)C-encoded natural S1P as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Mirzaian, Mina; Wisse, Patrick; Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Gabriel, Tanit L; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Eijk, Marco; Codée, Jeroen D C; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-08-01

    We developed a mass spectrometric procedure to quantify sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in biological materials. The use of newly synthesized (13)C5 C18-S1P and commercial C17-S1P as internal standards rendered very similar results with respect to linearity, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. Caution is warranted with determination of plasma S1P levels. Earlier it was reported that S1P is elevated in plasma of Fabry disease patients. We investigated this with the improved quantification. No clear conclusion could be drawn for patient plasma samples given the lack of uniformity of blood collection and plasma preparation. To still obtain insight, plasma and tissues were identically collected from α-galactosidase A deficient Fabry mice and matched control animals. No significant difference was observed in plasma S1P levels. A significant 2.3 fold increase was observed in kidney of Fabry mice, but not in liver and heart. Comparative analysis of S1P in cultured fibroblasts from normal subjects and classically affected Fabry disease males revealed no significant difference. In conclusion, accurate quantification of S1P in biological materials is feasible by mass spectrometry using the internal standards (13)C5 C18-S1P or C17-S1P. Significant local increases of S1P in the kidney might occur in Fabry disease as suggested by the mouse model. PMID:27221202

  20. Broad spectrum of Fabry disease manifestation in an extended Spanish family with a new deletion in the GLA gene

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Jan; Torras, Joan; Navarro, Itziar; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Böttcher, Tobias; Mascher, Hermann; Lackner, Karl J.; Fauler, Guenter; Paschke, Eduard; Cruzado, Josep M.; Dudesek, Ales; Wittstock, Matthias; Meyer, Wolfgang; Rolfs, Arndt

    2012-01-01

    Background Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked inherited disease based on the absence or reduction of lysosomal-galactosidase (Gla) activity. The enzymatic defect results in progressive impairment of cerebrovascular, renal and cardiac function. Normally, female heterozygote mutation carriers are less strongly affected than male hemizygotes aggravating disease diagnosis. Method Close examination of the patients by renal biopsy, echo- and electrocardiography and MRI. Blood work and subsequent DNA analysis were carried out utilizing approved protocols for PCR and Sequencing. MLPA analysis was done to unveil deletions within the GLA gene locus. Quantitative detection of Glycolipids in patient plasma and urine were carried out using HPLC/MS-MS and ESI-MS. Results In the presented case, a female index patient led to the examination of three generations of a Spanish family. She presented with severe oto-cochlear symptoms and covert renal and cardiac involvement. While conventional sequencing failed to detect a causative mutation, MLPA analysis revealed a deletion within the GLA gene locus, which we were able to map to a region spanning exon 2 and adjacent intronic parts. The analysis of different biomarkers revealed elevated lyso-Gb3 levels in all affected family members. Conclusion Our findings highlight the broad intrafamilial spectrum of symptoms of FD and emphasise the need to use MLPA screening in symptomatic females without conclusive sequencing result. Finally, plasma lyso-Gb3 proved to be a reliable biomarker for the diagnosis of FD. PMID:26019814

  1. Kidney transplantation from a mother with unrecognized Fabry disease to her son with low α-galactosidase A activity: A 14-year follow-up without enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Odani, Keiko; Okumi, Masayoshi; Honda, Kazuho; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of kidney transplantation from mother to son, both of whom were likely to have had an unrecognized renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. The patient was a 54-year-old man, with an unknown primary cause of end stage renal disease. He had no notable past medical history, other than end stage renal disease. He underwent living-related kidney transplantation from his mother at age 40 years. Foam cells in the glomeruli were identified on histology assessment of a 0-hour allograft biopsy, with zebra bodies identified in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells by electron microscopy. These findings were indicative of Fabry disease in the donated kidney. As a definitive diagnosis of Fabry's disease could not be confirmed, enzyme replacement therapy was not initiated. Thirteen years after kidney transplantation, the patient underwent left nephrectomy for a left renal tumour, with pathological findings of clear cell carcinoma, foam cells and zebra bodies in the native kidney. Detailed examinations identified low α-galactosidase A activity and mutation of the α-Gal A gene, confirming a diagnosis of a renal variant phenotype of Fabry disease. Histology of several allograft biopsies performed over the 14 years from the time of kidney transplantation revealed only moderate interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, with no evidence of disease progression on electron microscopy, despite the presence of zebra bodies in the glomerular visceral epithelial cells. PMID:26971403

  2. Enzymatic diagnosis of Fabry disease using a fluorometric assay on dried blood spots: An alternative methodology.

    PubMed

    Caudron, Eric; Prognon, Patrice; Germain, Dominique P

    2015-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD, OMIM#301500) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the functional deficiency of α-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. A method to screen for FD in large populations has been developed using a fluorometric assay of α-galactosidase A activity in dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. However, results can be influenced by quenching of fluorescence by haemoglobin which, together with small sample size, may result in a low light emission signal. An alternative, simple and sensitive fluorometric assay was developed for the determination of α-galactosidase A activity in DBS. The assay uses 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-galactose as an artificial substrate. To minimize the risk of false-positives, zinc sulfate was used for protein precipitation to stop the enzymatic reaction and eliminate interfering species (hemoglobin). Samples from 209 individuals (60 hemizygotes, 68 heterozygotes, and 81 controls) were tested to establish reference values for the assay. The mean α-galactosidase A activity of the 81 controls was 9.1 ± 3.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (mean ± SD). All 60 hemizygotes affected with FD had AGAL activities below 1.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (0.2 ± 0.3 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). For the 68 heterozygous females, AGAL activity ranged from 0 to 12.6 μmol h(-1) L(-1) (3.5 ± 2.7 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Two-thirds of the female patients could be identified using the enzymatic assay and a cut-off level of 40% of the median control value (<3.4 μmol h(-1) L(-1)). Our fluorometric assay using zinc sulfate protein precipitation was shown to have similar sensitivity and robustness while reducing the risk of false positive results due to quenching of 4-MU fluorescence by haemoglobin. PMID:26520229

  3. [The nephropathy in the Anderson-Fabry disease: new recommendations for the diagnosis, the follow-up and the therapy].

    PubMed

    Mignani, Renzo; Gallieni, Maurizio; Feriozzi, Sandro; Pisani, Antonio; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is a characterized by the involvement of several systems: renal, neurological, hearth, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most involved. Despite recent studies have provided new insights in the this disease, there are still lacks and discrepancies among all insiders regarding the diagnosis, clinical and therapeutic management. Enzyme replacement have been demonstrated to improve the course of the disease, especially when the diagnosis is early. There are still some debates on diagnosis and management of patients, in particular in the heterozygote female and the start of enzyme replacement. Thus, an Italian board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, genetics, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve through a consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic Italian management. Authors report the renal clinical and therapeutic management, a useful tool either for expert physicians or for those with a few experience in the diagnosis and management of this disease. PMID:26252265

  4. Fabry disease: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding human alpha-galactosidase A.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D H; Bishop, D F; Bernstein, H S; Quinn, M; Hantzopoulos, P; Desnick, R J

    1985-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked inborn error of metabolism resulting from the deficient activity of the lysosomal hydrolase, alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A; alpha-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.22). To investigate the structure, organization, and expression of alpha-Gal A, as well as the nature of mutations in Fabry disease, a clone encoding human alpha-Gal A was isolated from a lambda gt11 human liver cDNA expression library. To facilitate screening, an improved affinity purification procedure was used to obtain sufficient homogeneous enzyme for production of monospecific antibodies and for amino-terminal and peptide microsequencing. On the basis of an amino-terminal sequence of 24 residues, two sets of oligonucleotide mixtures were synthesized corresponding to adjacent, but not overlapping, amino acid sequences. In addition, an oligonucleotide mixture was synthesized based on a sequence derived from an alpha-Gal A internal tryptic peptide isolated by reversed-phase HPLC. Four positive clones were initially identified by antibody screening of 1.4 X 10(7) plaques. Of these, only one clone (designated lambda AG18) demonstrated both antibody binding specificity by competition studies using homogeneous enzyme and specific hybridization to synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures corresponding to amino-terminal and internal amino acid sequences. Nucleotide sequencing of the 5' end of the 1250-base-pair EcoRI insert of clone lambda AG18 revealed an exact correspondence between the predicted and known amino-terminal amino acid sequence. The insert of clone lambda AG18 appears to contain the full-length coding region of the processed, enzymatically active alpha-Gal A, as well as sequences coding for five amino acids of the amino-terminal propeptide, which is posttranslationally cleaved during enzyme maturation. Images PMID:2997789

  5. [Heart involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease: Italian recommendations for diagnostic, follow-up and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia; Cecchi, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is characterized by a multisystemic involvement: the renal, neurological, heart, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most damaged. Morbidity and mortality of Anderson-Fabry disease depend on renal insufficiency, heart failure and nervous system involvement. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most common cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, and arrhythmias. Mild to moderate left ventricular hypertrophy may simulate a non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Management of Anderson-Fabry disease starting from the diagnosis of cardiac involvement, the prevention of complications, the therapeutic aspects, up to appropriate clinical follow-up, requires a multidisciplinary approach. According to recent management guidelines, only few evidence-based data are available to guide the clinical and therapeutic approach to this rare disease. An Italian Board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, geneticists, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve by consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic management protocol. The authors report the results of this cardiologic management consensus. PMID:26571477

  6. Oral Migalastat HCl Leads to Greater Systemic Exposure and Tissue Levels of Active α-Galactosidase A in Fabry Patients when Co-Administered with Infused Agalsidase

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G.; Bichet, Daniel G.; Holida, Myrl; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Nicholls, Kathy; Thomas, Mark; Eyskens, Francois; Shankar, Suma; Adera, Mathews; Sitaraman, Sheela; Khanna, Richie; Flanagan, John J.; Wustman, Brandon A.; Barth, Jay; Barlow, Carrolee; Valenzano, Kenneth J.; Lockhart, David J.; Boudes, Pol; Johnson, Franklin K.

    2015-01-01

    Migalastat HCl (AT1001, 1-Deoxygalactonojirimycin) is an investigational pharmacological chaperone for the treatment of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) deficiency, which leads to Fabry disease, an X-linked, lysosomal storage disorder. The currently approved, biologics-based therapy for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with either agalsidase alfa (Replagal) or agalsidase beta (Fabrazyme). Based on preclinical data, migalastat HCl in combination with agalsidase is expected to result in the pharmacokinetic (PK) enhancement of agalsidase in plasma by increasing the systemic exposure of active agalsidase, thereby leading to increased cellular levels in disease-relevant tissues. This Phase 2a study design consisted of an open-label, fixed-treatment sequence that evaluated the effects of single oral doses of 150 mg or 450 mg migalastat HCl on the PK and tissue levels of intravenously infused agalsidase (0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg) in male Fabry patients. As expected, intravenous administration of agalsidase alone resulted in increased α-Gal A activity in plasma, skin, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to baseline. Following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase, α-Gal A activity in plasma was further significantly increased 1.2- to 5.1-fold compared to agalsidase administration alone, in 22 of 23 patients (95.6%). Importantly, similar increases in skin and PBMC α-Gal A activity were seen following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase. The effects were not related to the administered migalastat HCl dose, as the 150 mg dose of migalastat HCl increased α-Gal A activity to the same extent as the 450 mg dose. Conversely, agalsidase had no effect on the plasma PK of migalastat. No migalastat HCl-related adverse events or drug-related tolerability issues were identified. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01196871 PMID:26252393

  7. Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes Associated with Fabry and Schindler Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasic, Ivan B.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Clark, Nathaniel E.; Garman, Scott C.

    2010-09-03

    The human lysosomal enzymes {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and {alpha}-N-acetylgalactosaminidase ({alpha}-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-GAL and {alpha}-NAGAL. The engineered {alpha}-GAL (which we call {alpha}-GALSA) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered {alpha}-NAGAL (which we call {alpha}-NAGAL{sup EL}) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the {alpha}-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} and {alpha}-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease.

  8. Interconversion of the specificities of human lysosomal enzymes associated with Fabry and Schindler diseases.

    PubMed

    Tomasic, Ivan B; Metcalf, Matthew C; Guce, Abigail I; Clark, Nathaniel E; Garman, Scott C

    2010-07-01

    The human lysosomal enzymes alpha-galactosidase (alpha-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of alpha- GAL and alpha-NAGAL. The engineered alpha-GAL (which we call alpha-GAL(SA)) retains the antigenicity of alpha-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of alpha-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered alpha-NAGAL (which we call alpha-NAGAL(EL)) retains the antigenicity of alpha-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the alpha-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme alpha-GAL(SA) to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of alpha-GAL(SA) and alpha-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease. PMID:20444686

  9. Usefulness of an Implantable Loop Recorder to Detect Clinically Relevant Arrhythmias in Patients With Advanced Fabry Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Maier, Sebastian K G; Störk, Stefan; Brunner, Thomas; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Seydelmann, Nora; Schneider, Andreas; Becher, Jan; Canan-Kühl, Sima; Blaschke, Daniela; Bijnens, Bart; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Nordbeck, Peter

    2016-07-15

    Patients with genetic cardiomyopathy that involves myocardial hypertrophy often develop clinically relevant arrhythmias that increase the risk of sudden death. Consequently, guidelines for medical device therapy were established for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but not for conditions with only anecdotal evidence of arrhythmias, like Fabry cardiomyopathy. Patients with Fabry cardiomyopathy progressively develop myocardial fibrosis, and sudden cardiac death occurs regularly. Because 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms (ECGs) might not detect clinically important arrhythmias, we tested an implanted loop recorder for continuous heart rhythm surveillance and determined its impact on therapy. This prospective study included 16 patients (12 men) with advanced Fabry cardiomyopathy, relevant hypertrophy, and replacement fibrosis in "loco typico." No patients previously exhibited clinically relevant arrhythmias on Holter ECGs. Patients received an implantable loop recorder and were prospectively followed with telemedicine for a median of 1.2 years (range 0.3 to 2.0 years). The primary end point was a clinically meaningful event, which required a therapy change, captured with the loop recorder. Patients submitted data regularly (14 ± 11 times per month). During follow-up, 21 events were detected (including 4 asystole, i.e., ECG pauses ≥3 seconds) and 7 bradycardia events; 5 episodes of intermittent atrial fibrillation (>3 minutes) and 5 episodes of ventricular tachycardia (3 sustained and 2 nonsustained). Subsequently, as defined in the primary end point, 15 events leaded to a change of therapy. These patients required therapy with a pacemaker or cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and/or anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation. In conclusion, clinically relevant arrhythmias that require further device and/or medical therapy are often missed with Holter ECGs in patients with advanced stage Fabry cardiomyopathy, but they can be detected by telemonitoring with

  10. Fabry nephropathy: a review - how can we optimize the management of Fabry nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Waldek, Stephen; Feriozzi, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Complete or partial deficiency in this enzyme leads to intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and related glycosphingolipids in many cell types throughout the body, including the kidney. Progressive accumulation of Gb3 in podocytes, epithelial cells and the tubular cells of the distal tubule and loop of Henle contribute to the renal symptoms of Fabry disease, which manifest as proteinuria and reduced glomerular filtration rate leading to chronic kidney disease and progression to end-stage renal disease. Early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment of Fabry renal disease is an important facet of disease management. Initiating treatment with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT; agalsidase alfa, Replagal®, Shire; agalsidase beta, Fabrazyme®, Genzyme) as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent complications of the disease, may be beneficial in stabilizing renal function or slowing its decline. Early initiation of ERT may also be more effective than initiating therapy in patients with more advanced disease. Several strategies are required to complement the use of ERT and treat the myriad of associated symptoms and organ involvements. In particular, patients with renal Fabry disease are at risk of cardiovascular events, such as high blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmias and stroke. This review discusses the management of renal involvement in Fabry disease, including diagnosis, treatments, and follow-up, and explores recent advances in the use of biomarkers to assist with diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. PMID:24886109

  11. Reduced Right Ventricular Native Myocardial T1 in Anderson-Fabry Disease: Comparison to Pulmonary Hypertension and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Joseph J.; Chow, Kelvin; Khan, Aneal; Michelakis, Evangelos; Paterson, Ian; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Thompson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is characterized by progressive multiorgan accumulation of intracellular sphingolipids due to α-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency, resulting in progressive ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, arrhythmias, and death. Decreased native (non-contrast) left ventricular (LV) T1 (longitudinal relaxation time) with MRI discriminates AFD from healthy controls or other presentations of concentric hypertrophy, but the right ventricle (RV) has not been studied. The aims of the current study were to evaluate native RV T1 values in AFD, with a goal of better understanding the pathophysiology of RV involvement. Methods and Results Native T1 values were measured in the inferior RV wall (RVI), interventricular septum (IVS), and inferior LV (LVI) in patients with AFD, patients with pulmonary hypertension, who provided an alternative RV pathological process for comparison, and healthy controls. A minimum wall thickness of 4 mm was selected to minimize partial volume errors in tissue T1 analysis. T1 analysis was performed in 6 subjects with AFD, 6 subjects with PH, and 21 controls. Native T1 values were shorter (adjusted p<0.05 for all comparisons), independent of location, in subjects with AFD (RVI-T1 = 1096±49 ms, IVS-T1 = 1053±41 ms, LVI-T1 = 1072±44 ms) compared to both PH (RVI-T1 = 1239±41 ms, IVS-T1 = 1280±123 ms, LVI-T1 = 1274±57 ms) and HC (IVS-T1 = 1180±60 ms, LVI-T1 = 1183±45 ms). RVI measurements were not possible in controls due to insufficient wall thickness. Conclusion Native T1 values appear similarly reduced in the left and right ventricles of individuals with AFD and RV wall thickening, suggesting a common pathology. In contrast, individuals with PH and thickened RVs showed increased native T1 values in both ventricles, suggestive of fibrosis. PMID:27305064

  12. Optimisation of the separation of four major neutral glycosphingolipids: application to a rapid and simple detection of urinary globotriaosylceramide in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Gaudin, K; Germain, D P; Baillet, A; Prognon, P; Chaminade, P

    2004-06-15

    A simple method for the separation of the four major neutral glycosphingolipids, present in all human tissue, was developed. This gradient normal phase-HPLC method utilises a polyvinyl alcohol bonded stationary phase and an evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD). Screening pure solvents in a binary gradient elution mode allowed, in a first step, to assess the behaviour of the studied solutes and to select the solvents for further mobile phase optimisation. The proportion of the remaining solvents was defined to reach a maximal resolution. The reduction of the analysis time and the enhancement of the signal were obtained by optimising the gradient slope and the flow-rate. Optimal levels of triethylamine and formic acid (TEA-FA) for the enhancement of the evaporative light scattering detector response were established at 0.1% (v/v). Thus, the optimal conditions for the separation of the four glycosphingolipids was obtained with a gradient elution from a 100% chloroform to a 100% acetone:methanol (90:10 (v/v)) mobile phase at 0.2 ml min-1, using a 10% min-1 gradient slope. Finally, this method was applied to detect the excess of one of the neutral sphingolipids, namely globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in the urine of patients affected with Fabry disease. A liquid-liquid extraction of the sediments obtained from an aliquot of only ten ml of urine proved sufficient to detect the excess of Gb3 present in both hemizygote and heterozygote patients. In all, the ability of our method to detect abnormal amounts of Gb3 in urinary sediments could allow the diagnosis of weakly symptomatic Fabry patients in large screening programs PMID:15135109

  13. Anderson-Fabry disease: a histopathological study of three cases with observations on the mechanism of production of pain

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Pauline

    1973-01-01

    A clinical review and histopathological study of three cases of Anderson-Fabry disease is presented and pathological changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems are reported, in some sites for the first time. These are telangiectatic changes in vessels of the sympathetic ganglia in the vertebral trunk; storage of glycolipid in pigmented cells of the substantia nigra and in anterior horn cells; and degeneration of nerve fibres in the dorsal root entry zone and substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord. The histopathological findings suggest that in this disease pain is due to involvement of dorsal root ganglion cells with associated axonal degeneration of the small fibres in pathways subserving pain. Images PMID:4204059

  14. Pedigree analysis of Mexican families with Fabry disease as a powerful tool for identification of heterozygous females.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Amavizca, B E; Orozco-Castellanos, R; R Padilla-Gutiérrez, J; Valle, Y; Figuera, L E

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency; in contrast to other X-linked diseases, heterozygous females can be as affected as men. The construction and analysis of a family pedigree is a powerful tool to aid clinicians in diagnosis, establishment of inheritance pattern, and early detection of potentially affected relatives. The present study highlights the importance of pedigree analysis in families with FD for identifying other possibly affected relatives and investigating the clinical manifestations. This clinical report included 12 Mexican index cases with confirmed FD diagnosis. We constructed and analyzed their pedigree, and diagnosed FD in 24 affected relatives. Clinical features were similar to those reported for other populations. Pedigree analysis further identified an additional 30 women as possible carriers. We conclude that pedigree construction and analysis is a useful tool to help physicians detect and diagnose relatives at risk for FD, particularly heterozygous females, so that they can receive genetic counseling and early treatment. Mexican families with FD were similar to other populations reported in the literature, and our findings confirmed that heterozygous females can have signs and symptoms ranging from subtle manifestations to the classical severe presentation described in males. PMID:25177955

  15. Distributions of Globotriaosylceramide Isoforms, and Globotriaosylsphingosine and Its Analogues in an α-Galactosidase A Knockout Mouse, a Model of Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sueoka, Hideaki; Aoki, Mikio; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Togawa, Tadayasu; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease is caused by deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (GLA) and characterized by systemic accumulation of glycosphingolipids, substrates of the enzyme. To gain insight into the pathogenesis of Fabry disease based on accumulated substrates, we examined the tissue and plasma distributions of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) isoforms, and globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) and its analogues in a GLA knockout mouse, a model of Fabry disease, by means of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. The results revealed that the contents of these substrates in the liver, kidneys, heart, and plasma of GLA knockout mice were apparently higher than in those of wild-type ones, and organ specificity in the accumulation of Gb3 isoforms was found. Especially in the kidneys, accumulation of a large amount of Gb3 isoforms including hydroxylated residues was found. In the GLA knockout mice, the proportion of hydrophobic Gb3 isoforms was apparently higher than that in the wild-type mice. On the other hand, hydrophilic residues were abundant in plasma. Unlike that of Gb3, the concentration of lyso-Gb3 was high in the liver, and the lyso-Gb3/Gb3 ratio in plasma was significantly higher than those in the organs. The concentration of lyso-Gb3 was apparently higher than those of its analogues in the organs and plasma from both the GLA knockout and wild-type mice. This information will be useful for elucidating the basis of Fabry disease. PMID:26661087

  16. A systematic review on screening for Fabry disease: prevalence of individuals with genetic variants of unknown significance.

    PubMed

    van der Tol, L; Smid, B E; Poorthuis, B J H M; Biegstraaten, M; Deprez, R H Lekanne; Linthorst, G E; Hollak, C E M

    2014-01-01

    Screening for Fabry disease (FD) reveals a high prevalence of individuals with α-galactosidase A (GLA) genetic variants of unknown significance (GVUS). These individuals often do not express characteristic features of FD. A systematic review on FD screening studies was performed to interpret the significance of GLA gene variants and to calculate the prevalence of definite classical and uncertain cases. We searched PubMed and Embase for screening studies on FD. We collected data on screening methods, clinical, biochemical and genetic assessments. The pooled prevalence of identified subjects and those with a definite diagnosis of classical FD were calculated. As criteria for a definite diagnosis, we used the presence of a GLA variant, absent or near-absent leukocyte enzyme activity and characteristic features of FD. Fifty-one studies were selected, 45 in high-risk and 6 in newborn populations. The most often used screening method was an enzyme activity assay. Cut-off values comprised 10-55% of the mean reference value for men and up to 80% for women. Prevalence of GLA variants in newborns was 0.04%. In high-risk populations the overall prevalence of individuals with GLA variants was 0.62%, while the prevalence of a definite diagnosis of FD was 0.12%. The majority of identified individuals in high-risk and newborn populations harbour GVUS or neutral variants in the GLA gene. To determine the pathogenicity of a GVUS in an individual, improved diagnostic criteria are needed. We propose a diagnostic algorithm to approach the individual with an uncertain diagnosis. PMID:23922385

  17. Fabry disease: characterization of alpha-galactosidase A double mutations and the D313Y plasma enzyme pseudodeficiency allele.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Makiko; Shabbeer, Junaid; Benson, Stacy D; Maire, Irene; Burnett, Roger M; Desnick, Robert J

    2003-12-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, results from mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal exoglycohydrolase, alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A; GLA). In two unrelated classically affected males, two alpha-Gal A missense mutations were identified: R112C + D313Y (c.334C>T + c.937G>T) and C172G + D313Y (c.514T>G + c.937G>T). The D313Y lesion was previously identified in classically affected males as the single mutation [Eng et al., 1993] or in cis with another missense mutation, D313Y + G411D (c.937G>T + c.1232G>A) [Guffon et al., 1998]. To determine whether the D313Y mutation was a deleterious mutation or a coding region sequence variant, the frequency of D313Y in normal X-chromosomes, as well as its enzymatic activity and subcellular localization in COS-7 cells was determined. D313Y occurred in 0.45% of 883 normal X-chromosomes, while the R112C, C172G, and G411D missense mutations were not detected in over 500 normal X-chromosomes. Expression of D313Y in COS-7 cells resulted in approximately 60% of wild-type enzymatic activity and showed lysosomal localization, while R112C, C172G, G411D, and the double-mutated constructs had markedly reduced or no detectable activity and were all retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The expressed D313Y enzyme was stable at lysosomal pH (pH 4.6), while at neutral pH (pH 7.4), it had decreased activity. A molecular homology model of human alpha-Gal A, based on the X-ray crystal structure of chicken alpha-galactosidase B (alpha-Gal B; alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) was generated [Garman et al., 2002], which provided evidence that D313Y did not markedly disrupt the alpha-Gal A enzyme structure. Thus, D313Y is a rare exonic variant with about 60% of wild-type activity in vitro and reduced activity at neutral pH, resulting in low plasma alpha-Gal A activity. PMID:14635108

  18. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of three dosing regimens of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in adults with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Goláň, Lubor; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Holida, Myrl; Kantola, Ikka; Klopotowski, Mariusz; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linhart, Aleš; Musial, Jacek; Nicholls, Kathleen; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Derlis; Sharma, Reena; Vujkovac, Bojan; Chang, Peter; Wijatyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Efficacy and safety of agalsidase alfa at 0.2 mg/kg weekly were compared with 0.2 mg/kg every other week (EOW). Exploratory analyses were performed for 0.4 mg/kg weekly. Patients and methods This was a 53-week, Phase III/IV, multicenter, open-label study (NCT01124643) in treatment-naïve adults (≥18 years) with Fabry disease. Inclusion criteria were left ventricular hypertrophy at baseline, defined as left ventricular mass indexed to height >50 g/m2.7 for males and >47 g/m2.7 for females. Primary endpoint was reduction of left ventricular mass indexed to height as assessed by echocardiography. Secondary endpoints included cardiac (peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, New York Heart Association classification), renal (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and biomarker (plasma globotriaosylceramide) assessments. Safety endpoints were adverse events and anti–agalsidase alfa antibodies. Results Twenty patients were randomized to 0.2 mg/kg EOW (mean age, 50.3 years; 70% male), 19 to 0.2 mg/kg weekly (51.8 years; 53% male), and 5 to 0.4 mg/kg weekly (49.4 years; 40% male). The mean change in left ventricular mass indexed to height by Week 53 in the 0.2-mg/kg EOW and weekly groups was 3.2 g/m2.7 and 0.5 g/m2.7, with no significant difference between groups. No clinically meaningful changes by Week 53 were found within or between the 0.2-mg/kg groups for peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, or Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. Two patients in each group improved by ≥1 New York Heart Association classification. No significant differences were found between 0.2 mg/kg EOW and weekly for mean change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (−1.21 mL/min/1.73 m2 vs −3.32 mL/min/1.73 m2) or plasma globotriaosylceramide (−1.05 nmol/mL vs −2.13 nmol/mL), respectively. Infusion-related adverse events were experienced by 25% and 21% in the

  19. An open-label clinical trial of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in children with Fabry disease who are naïve to enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Longo, Nicola; McDonald, Marie; Shankar, Suma P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Chang, Peter; Shen, Yinghua; Pano, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a drug manufacturing process change, safety/efficacy of agalsidase alfa were evaluated in enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)-naïve children with Fabry disease. Methods In an open-label, multicenter, Phase II study (HGT-REP-084; Shire), 14 children aged ≥7 years received 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase alfa every other week for 55 weeks. Primary endpoints: safety, changes in autonomic function (2-hour Holter monitoring). Secondary endpoints: estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), midwall fractional shortening, pharmacodynamic parameters, and patient-reported quality-of-life. Results Among five boys (median 10.2 [range 6.7, 14.4] years) and nine girls (14.8 [10.1, 15.9] years), eight patients experienced infusion-related adverse events (vomiting, n=4; nausea, n=3; dyspnea, n=3; chest discomfort, n=2; chills, n=2; dizziness, n=2; headache, n=2). One of these had several hypersensitivity episodes. However, no patient discontinued for safety reasons and no serious adverse events occurred. One boy developed immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralizing antidrug antibodies. Overall, no deterioration in cardiac function was observed in seven patients with low/abnormal SDNN (standard deviation of all filtered RR intervals; <100 ms) and no left ventricular hypertrophy: mean (SD) baseline SDNN, 81.6 (20.9) ms; mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) change from baseline to week 55, 17.4 (2.9, 31.9) ms. Changes in SDNN correlated with changes in LVMI (r=−0.975). No change occurred in secondary efficacy endpoints: mean (95% CI) change from baseline at week 55 in LVMI, 0.16 (−3.3, 3.7) g/m2.7; midwall fractional shortening, −0.62% (−2.7%, 1.5%); estimated glomerular filtration rate, 0.15 (−11.4, 11.7) mL/min/1.73 m2; urine protein, −1.8 (−6.0, 2.4) mg/dL; urine microalbumin, 0.6 (−0.5, 1.7) mg/dL; plasma globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), −5.71 (−10.8, −0.6) nmol/mL; urinary Gb3, −1,403.3 (−3,714.0, 907.4) nmol/g creatinine

  20. Accelerated transport and maturation of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A in Fabry lymphoblasts by an enzyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fan, J Q; Ishii, S; Asano, N; Suzuki, Y

    1999-01-01

    Fabry disease is a disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by deficiency of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-Gal A), resulting in renal failure along with premature myocardial infarction and strokes. No effective treatment of this disorder is available at present. Studies of residual activities of mutant enzymes in many Fabry patients showed that some of them had kinetic properties similar to those for normal alpha-Gal A, but were significantly less stable, especially in conditions of neutral pH (refs. 3-5). The biosynthetic processing was delayed in cultured fibroblasts of a Fabry patient, and the mutant protein formed an aggregate in endoplasmic reticulum, indicating that the enzyme deficiency in some mutants was mainly caused by abortive exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to excessive degradation of the enzyme. We report here that 1-deoxy-galactonojirimycin (DGJ), a potent competitive inhibitor of alpha-Gal A, effectively enhanced alpha-Gal A activity in Fabry lymphoblasts, when administrated at concentrations lower than that usually required for intracellular inhibition of the enzyme. DGJ seemed to accelerate transport and maturation of the mutant enzyme. Oral administration of DGJ to transgenic mice overexpressing a mutant alpha-Gal A substantially elevated the enzyme activity in some organs. We propose a new molecular therapeutic strategy for genetic metabolic diseases of administering competitive inhibitors as 'chemical chaperons' at sub-inhibitory intracellular concentrations. PMID:9883849

  1. Genetic Disorders with Dyshidrosis: Ectodermal Dysplasia, Incontinentia Pigmenti, Fabry Disease, and Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Sweating is regulated by various neurohormonal mechanisms. A disorder in any part of the sweating regulatory pathways, such as the thermal center, neurotransmitters in the central to peripheral nerve, innervation of periglandular neurotransmission, and sweat secretion in the sweat gland itself, induces dyshidrosis. Therefore, hereditary disorders with dyshidrosis result from a variety of causes. These diseases have characteristic symptoms derived from each pathogenesis besides dyshidrosis. The information in this chapter is useful for the differential diagnosis of representative genetic disorders with dyshidrosis. PMID:27584961

  2. Antiproteinuric therapy and Fabry nephropathy: factors associated with preserved kidney function during agalsidase-beta therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G; Thomas, Christie P; Vujkovac, Bojan; Campbell, Ruth C; Charrow, Joel; Laney, Dawn A; Jackson, Leslie L; Wilcox, William R; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Nephropathy is an important feature of classical Fabry disease, which results in alpha-galactosidase A deficiency and cellular globotriaosylceramide accumulation. We report the safety and efficacy of antiproteinuric therapy with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in a study of classical Fabry patients receiving recombinant agalsidase-beta therapy. Methods and design The goal was maintenance of urine protein to creatinine ratio (UPCR) <0.5 g/g or a 50% reduction in baseline UPCR for 24 patients at eight study sites. The change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 21 months of treatment. Results 18 out of 24 patients achieved the UPCR goal with eGFR slopes that were significantly better than six patients who did not achieve the UPCR goal (−3.6 (−4.8 to −1.1) versus −7.0 (−9.0 to −5.6) mL/min/1.73 m2/year, respectively, p=0.018). Despite achieving the UPCR goal, 67% (12/18 patients) still progressed with an eGFR slope <−2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year. Regression analysis showed that increased age at initiation of agalsidase-beta therapy was significantly associated with worsened kidney outcome. Hypotension and hyperkalaemia occurred in seven and eight patients, respectively, which required modification of antiproteinuric therapy but was not associated with serious adverse events. Conclusions This study documents the effectiveness of agalsidase-beta (1 mg/kg/2 weeks) and antiproteinuric therapy with ACE inhibitors and/or ARB in patients with severe Fabry nephropathy. Patients had preservation of kidney function if agalsidase-beta treatment was initiated at a younger age, and UPCR maintained at or below 0.5 g/g with antiproteinuric therapy. Trial registration number NCT00446862. PMID:26490103

  3. Fabry_CEP: a tool to identify Fabry mutations responsive to pharmacological chaperones.

    PubMed

    Cammisa, Marco; Correra, Antonella; Andreotti, Giuseppina; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria

    2013-01-01

    Fabry_CEP is a user-friendly web-application designed to help clinicians Choose Eligible Patients for the therapy with pharmacological chaperones. It provides a database and a predictive tool to evaluate the responsiveness of lysosomal alpha-galactosidase mutants to a small molecule drug, namely 1-Deoxy-galactonojirimycin. The user can introduce any missense/nonsense mutation in the coding sequence, learn whether it is has been tested and gain access to appropriate reference literature. In the absence of experimental data structural, functional and evolutionary analysis provides a prediction and the probability that a given mutation is responsive to the drug. PMID:23883437

  4. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions. PMID:27264859

  5. Information for patients about inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J C; Tanner, A R; Bramble, M G

    1997-01-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease it is important that patients understand their condition since this helps to improve long-term management of the disease. The aim of this study was to assess the information given to patients with inflammatory bowel disease about their condition, its treatment and the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease. Two surveys were performed, using anonymous questionnaires. One was of all association members in north-east England, the other was a sample of patients attending medical outpatients. The surveys showed that more patients heard of the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease from the media than from medical sources. Of patients seen in medical clinics, 75% would welcome more information about their disease. In four of the six participating centres less than half the patients had been told about the existence of a patients' association. There was considerable variation in the instructions on what action to take in the event of a relapse. These findings suggest that the opportunity offered by out-patient clinics to educate and inform patients is often wasted. Clinicians often neglect to mention the National Association for Colitis and Crohn's disease, especially to patients with long-standing disease. A higher priority should be given to providing patients with appropriate information on inflammatory bowel disease. Three simple audit standards for the organisation of outpatient clinic information are proposed. PMID:9131520

  6. Kawasaki disease in a postpartum patient.

    PubMed Central

    Fason, Janet T.; Fry, Yvonne W.; Smith, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Kawasaki disease, also known as mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome, is a multisystem disease. It usually affects children below the age of five, but it occasionally affects adults. There are less than 50 English-reported adult cases in the literature, and only five reported cases of Kawasaki disease and pregnancy, as of 2003. The cases associated with pregnancy involved patients who had a history of Kawasaki disease during childhood and addressed how the complications of the illness (i.e,. coronary artery aneurysms) were managed during pregnancy and delivery. There are no reported cases of Kawasaki disease in postpartum patients. This article presents a case of Kawasaki disease in a 21-year-old, four-week postpartum patient who initially responded to intravenous (IV) antibiotic therapy. This paper will review the diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki disease as well as the multiple outside variables that impact the management of adult postpartum patients with Kawasaki disease. PMID:15586654

  7. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  8. Peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Atmer, B; Jogestrand, T; Laska, J; Lund, F

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease in patients with coronary artery disease has been investigated in many different ways and depends on the diagnostic methods and the definition of the atherosclerotic manifestations in the different vascular beds. In this study we used the non-invasive methods digital volume pulse plethysmography and ankle and toe blood pressure measurements to identify arterial abnormalities in the lower limbs in 58 patients (49 males and 9 females; age 37-72 years) examined with coronary angiography. The prevalence of peripheral artery disease was 22%, in agreement with the results of most previous investigations. There was a tendency towards increasing prevalence of peripheral artery disease with more advanced coronary artery disease: 14% of the patients with no or minimal coronary atheromotous lesions, 18% of the patients with moderate coronary atheromotous lesions and 32% of the patients with marked coronary atheromotous disease. For this reason a non-invasive investigation of the peripheral arterial circulation should be included early in the clinical consideration of patients with chest pain or similar symptoms suggesting coronary heart disease. Toe pressure measurement appears to be the most appropriate technique being rather simple in management and also in evaluation of results. PMID:7658111

  9. Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients & Caregivers Parkinson's Disease Highlights for Patients & ... and progression biomarkers for PD. NINDS Parkinson's Disease Information Parkinson's Disease Information Page Parkinson's Disease: Hope Through ...

  10. [Neurological presentations of lysosomal diseases in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Sedel, F; Turpin, J-C; Baumann, N

    2007-10-01

    Lysosomal diseases represent a large group of genetic storage disorders characterized by a defect in the catabolism of complex molecules within the lysosome. Effective treatments are now possible for some of them given progresses in bone-marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy. Neurologists and psychiatrists are concerned by these diseases because they can present in adolescence or adulthood with progressive neuropsychiatric signs. Here we focus on late-onset clinical forms which can be met in an adult neurology or psychiatric department. Lysosomal diseases were classified into 3 groups: (1) leukodystrophies (metachromatic leukodystrophy, Krabbe's disease and Salla's disease); (2) Neurodegenerative or psychiatric-like diseases (GM1 and GM2 gangliosidoses, Niemann Pick type C disease, sialidosis type I, ceroid-lipofuscinosis, mucopolysaccharidosis type III); (3) multisystemic diseases (Gaucher's disease, Fabry's disease, alpha and B mannosidosis, Niemann Pick disease type B, fucosidosis, Schindler/Kanzaki disease, and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and II. We propose a diagnostic approach guided by clinical examination, brain MRI, electrodiagnostic studies and abdominal echography. PMID:18033028

  11. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Gupta, Shruti; Jain, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181) in females and 3.17% (21/661) in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%). The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%), followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization. PMID:27605851

  12. Left Ventricular Geometry and Blood Pressure as Predictors of Adverse Progression of Fabry Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Johannes; Bijnens, Bart; Störk, Stefan; Ritter, Christian O.; Liu, Dan; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Weidemann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background In spite of several research studies help to describe the heart in Fabry disease (FD), the cardiomyopathy is not entirely understood. In addition, the impact of blood pressure and alterations in geometry have not been systematically evaluated. Methods In 74 FD patients (mean age 36±12 years; 45 females) the extent of myocardial fibrosis and its progression were quantified using cardiac magnetic-resonance-imaging with late enhancement technique (LE). Results were compared to standard echocardiography complemented by 2D-speckle-tracking, 3D-sphericity-index (SI) and standardized blood pressure measurement. At baseline, no patient received enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). After 51±24 months, a follow-up examination was performed. Results Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was higher in patients with vs. without LE: 123±17 mmHg vs. 115±13 mmHg; P = 0.04. A positive correlation was found between SI and the amount of LE-positive myocardium (r = 0.51; P<0.001) indicating an association of higher SI in more advanced stages of the cardiomyopathy. SI at baseline was positively associated with the increase of LE-positive myocardium during follow-up. The highest SBP (125±19 mmHg) and also the highest SI (0.32±0.05) was found in the subgroup with a rapidly increasing LE (ie, ≥0.2% per year; n = 16; P = 0.04). Multivariate logistic regression analysis including SI, SBP, EF, left ventricular volumes, wall thickness and NT-proBNP adjusted for age and sex showed SI as the most powerful parameter to detect rapid progression of LE (AUC = 0.785; P<0.05). Conclusions LV geometry as assessed by the sphericity index is altered in relation to the stage of the Fabry cardiomyopathy. Although patients with FD are not hypertensive, the SBP has a clear impact on the progression of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:26600044

  13. Serologic celiac disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli, Hamid; Haghdani, Saeid; Adilipour, Haiedeh; Daghaghzadeh, Hamed; Minakari, Mohammad; Adibi, Peyman; Ahmadi, Khalil; Emami, Mohammah Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is an association of celiac disease (CD) with several gastrointestinal illnesses. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CD in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to evaluate the value of the routine serological tests for CD in these patients. Materials and Methods: patients with IBD underwent screening test for CD. The screening test was based on IgA anti-tTG antibody evaluated by ELISA method and IgA EMA (endomysial antibody) measured by the indirect immunofluorescence method. Fisher exact and chi-square and t tests were used for data analysis. Results: the study was conducted on 100 patients, with a mean age of 34.74 ± 12.03 (SD) years. The mean simplified Crohn's disease activity index was 90 ± 17 (SE) and the mean colitis activity index was 3.46± 0.96 (SE). Seventeen patients (17%) had IgA anti-tTG antibody levels above the cutoff point (> 20). Thirty-two patients were positive for IgA EMA. IgA EMA was positive in nine IgA anti-tTG positive patients (three patients with Crohn's Disease and six ones with ulcerative colitis). Then, the prevalence of serologic CD was 9% that was higher than that of general population. A significant correlation was found between the results of IgA EMA and those of IgA anti-tTG (P=0.001) whereas Fisher exact test revealed significant difference between frequency distribution of positive and negative results of IgA EMA and IgA anti-tTG in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (P=0). Conclusion: the prevalence of serologic CD in general population in Iran has been reported to be 0.6–0.96%. Then, its prevalence in our sample size was about ten times more than that in general population. PMID:23264789

  14. Tracheobronchitis in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Vincent; Govind, Anusha G.; Arastu, Sanaa

    2016-01-01

    We report a 63-year-old woman who presented with 1 month of non-productive cough and non-bloody diarrhea. She was on maintenance therapy for a 15-year history of Crohn's disease. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of both her diarrhea and respiratory symptoms. Our patient is unique in that she presented with tracheobronchitis during an acute flare of her Crohn's without obvious lung pathology on chest imaging. Tracheobronchitis is a rare manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that should be considered in Crohn's disease patients presenting with persistent non-infectious cough. PMID:27144198

  15. Vaccination recommendations for patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bruno, Claudio; Berardinelli, Angela; Filosto, Massimiliano; Mongini, Tiziana; Morandi, Lucia; Musumeci, Olimpia; Pegoraro, Elena; Siciliano, Gabriele; Tonin, Paola; Marrosu, Gianni; Minetti, Carlo; Servida, Maura; Fiorillo, Chiara; Conforti, Giorgio; Scapolan, Silvia; Ansaldi, Filippo; Vianello, Andrea; Castaldi, Silvana; Principi, Nicola; Toscano, Antonio; Moggio, Maurizio

    2014-10-14

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) encompass a broad spectrum of conditions. Because infections may be relevant to the final prognosis of most NMDs, vaccination appears to be the simplest and most effective solution for protecting NMD patients from vaccine-preventable infections. However, very few studies have evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, tolerability, and efficacy of different vaccines in NMD patients; therefore, detailed vaccination recommendations for NMD patients are not available. Here, we present vaccination recommendations from a group of Italian Scientific Societies for optimal disease prevention in NMD patients that maintain high safety levels. We found that NMD patients can be classified into two groups according to immune function: patients with normal immunity and patients who are immunocompromised, including those who intermittently or continuously take immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with normal immunity and do not take immunosuppressive therapy can be vaccinated as healthy subjects. In contrast, immunocompromised patients, including those who take immunosuppressive therapy, should receive all inactivated vaccines as well as influenza and pneumococcal vaccines; these patients should not be administered live attenuated vaccines. In all cases, the efficacy and long-term persistence of immunity from vaccination in NMD patients can be lower than in normal subjects. Household contacts of immunocompromised NMD patients should also be vaccinated appropriately. PMID:25223270

  16. Alzheimer's disease. Physician-patient communication.

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J. B.; Molloy, D. W.; Lever, J. A.; Darzins, P.; Ganesan, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The number of cognitively impaired elderly in Canada has increased greatly during the past two decades; nearly all have Alzheimer's disease (AD). The memory problems and changes in language and communication of these patients place tremendous strain on physicians who are searching for a differential diagnosis and are trying to communicate with them. Reviewing the salient language and communication features of AD patients leads to strategies for improving effective physician-patient communication. PMID:8019193

  17. Persistent Hypoglycemia in Patient with Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Harold Cinco; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a rare complication of Hodgkin's disease. Several explanations have been postulated but the exact pathophysiology is not well understood. We are presenting a case of newly diagnosed Stage IV Hodgkin's disease that developed persistent and recurrent hypoglycemia despite giving glucagon, repeated 50% dextrose, and D5 and D10 continuous infusion. Hypoglycemia workup showed the C-peptide level to be low. Patient was suspected of having hypoglycemia related to lymphoma and was given a trial of prednisone which resolved the hypoglycemic episodes and made the patient euglycemic for the rest of his hospital stay. The presence of a substance that mimicked the effects of insulin was highly suspected. Several case reports strengthen the hypothesis of an insulin-like growth factor or antibodies secreted by the cancer cells causing hypoglycemia in Hodgkin's disease but none of them have been confirmed. Further investigation is warranted to more clearly define the pathophysiology of persistent hypoglycemia in patients with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:26839722

  18. Be vigilant for patients with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kate E; Leeds, John S; Sanders, David S

    2009-10-01

    Recent population studies show that coeliac disease affects around 1 in 100 people. The estimated ratio of diagnosed to undiagnosed individuals is 1:8, and the average delay in diagnosis is reported to be 11 years. The contemporary coeliac patient is diagnosed between the ages of 40 and 60, has normal or even high BMI, and subtle symptoms. Patients are often identified in screening groups which would include those with type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, or a first-degree relative with coeliac disease. The presence of relevant symptoms is not essential for a diagnosis of coeliac disease. Additionally, positive serological testing alone is not sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Endomysial antibody (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (TTG) have a combined sensitivity and specificity of > 90% when used in combination in selected populations. However, false positives occur in conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, and autoimmune disease. Conversely antibody-negative disease accounts for around 9% of cases. IgA deficiency is a cause of false negatives and levels should be checked at the same time as EMA and TTG. Patients must consume a gluten-containing diet for six weeks before serological testing and biopsy if necessary. All those with positive serological tests, and those for whom clinical suspicion is high even if seronegative, should be referred to a gastroenterologist for a duodenal biopsy to confirm or exclude coeliac disease. Diagnosis requires the demonstration of villous atrophy in the small bowel which improves when gluten is withdrawn. PMID:19938558

  19. Ophthalmological findings in patients with Takayasu disease.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, M; Baba, T

    1998-10-01

    We examined 65 (61 female and 4 male) Takayasu patients. Patient age ranged from 17 to 78 years old (mean 50.2); age of onset was from 11 to 60 years old (mean 32.8); and duration from onset to referral ranged from 1 month to 43 years (mean 16.8 years). Routine ophthalmological examinations were performed. Fluorescein angiography, kinetic perimetry by Goldmann perimetry, static perimetry by Octopus 1-2-3, electroretinography (ERG), and measurements of central retinal arterial pressure were also performed, as appropriate. Major causes of impaired visual acuity (less than 16/20) were cataract. A few patients had low visual acuity caused by Takayasu disease itself. On the other hand, although not many complained of visual disturbance, about 35% of patients had subnormal visual functions. Because the visual deterioration may be based on ocular hypoperfusion, which may subsequently lead to more serious changes, regular ophthalmological examination for every Takayasu disease patient is recommended. PMID:9951814

  20. Coronary artery disease in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Iain; White, S; Gill, R; Gray, H H; Rees, P

    2015-09-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the most common cause of sudden death in the UK, and the most common cardiac cause of medical discharge from the Armed Forces. This paper reviews current evidence pertaining to the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease from a military perspective, encompassing stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. Emphasis is placed on the limitations inherent in the management of acute coronary syndromes in the deployed environment. Occupational issues affecting patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. Consideration is also given to the potential for coronary artery disease screening in the military, and the management of modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors, to help decrease the prevalence of coronary artery disease in the military population. PMID:26246347

  1. [Metronome therapy in patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Enzensberger, W; Oberländer, U; Stecker, K

    1997-12-01

    We studied 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 12 patients with Parkinson-plus-syndrome, trying to improve patients' gait by application of various external rhythmic stimuli, including metronome stimulation (96 beats per minute = middle andante). The test course of the patients was 4 x 10 meters and 3 U-turns. The patients' gait quality under stimulation was compared with their free walk (velocity, number of steps, number of freezing episodes). Metronome stimulation significantly reduced the time and number of steps needed for the test course and also diminished the number of freezing episodes. March music stimulation was less effective and tactile stimulation (rhythmically tapping on the patient's shoulder) even produced negative results. The positive effect of metronome stimulation was also found, when the tests were not performed inside the hospital building, but outside in the hospital parc. Metronome stimulation was comparably effective in both patient sub-groups examined in this study (M. Parkinson, Parkinson-plus-syndrome) and seems to be an important additional help in the treatment of these patients. Electronical metronomes are not expensive, easy in handling, and portable. A theoretical explanation of metronome stimulation effectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease still needs to be elucidated. PMID:9465340

  2. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: 2

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    The first article in this series explored epidemiology and patterns of pain in advanced disease, non-pharmacological treatments, and the use of opioids to manage pain. This second article examines the use of non-opioid drugs and anaesthetic interventions for pain relief in advanced disease. It also discusses an approach to managing analgesia in dying patients and finally looks at future developments. PMID:15082837

  3. Surgery in a Patient with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rakesh; Nagral, Sanjay; Nagral, Aabha

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is often needed in patients with concurrent liver disease. The multiple physiological roles of the liver places these patients at an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Diseases necessitating surgery like gallstones and hernia are more common in patients with cirrhosis. Assessment of severity of liver dysfunction before surgery is important and the risk benefit of the procedure needs to be carefully assessed. The disease severity may vary from mild transaminase rise to decompensated cirrhosis. Surgery should be avoided if possible in the emergency setting, in the setting of acute and alcoholic hepatitis, in a patient of cirrhosis who is child class C or has a MELD score more than 15 or any patient with significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction. In this subset of patients, all possible means to manage these patients conservatively should be attempted. Modified Child–Pugh scores and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores can predict mortality after surgery fairly reliably including nonhepatic abdominal surgery. Pre-operative optimization would include control of ascites, correction of electrolyte imbalance, improving renal dysfunction, cardiorespiratory assessment, and correction of coagulation. Tests of global hemostasis like thromboelastography and thrombin generation time may be more predictive of the risk of bleeding compared with the conventional tests of coagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Correction of international normalized ratio with fresh frozen plasma does not necessarily mean reduction of bleeding risk and may increase the risk of volume overload and lung injury. International normalized ratio liver may better reflect the coagulation status. Recombinant factor VIIa in patients with cirrhosis needing surgery needs further study. Intra-operatively, safe anesthetic agents like isoflurane and propofol with avoidance of hypotension are advised. In general, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) and benzodiazepines should

  4. Monitoring nonresponsive patients who have celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Norbert; Schuppan, Detlef

    2006-04-01

    Because of the wide variations in the clinical presentation of celiac disease and because treatment exists that is effective in most cases, screening of the general population for celiac disease has been considered. There is still no evidence that patients who have symptom-free celiac disease are at increased risk of small intestinal lymphoma or other complications. Prevention of osteoporosis seems to be the strongest indicator for widespread screening today [22]. The major cause of failure to respond to a gluten-free diet is continuing ingestion of gluten, but other underlying diseases must be considered. Many different drugs (eg, anti-tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha) have been used in patients who have RCD [23]. Steroid treatment has been reported to be effective even in patients who have underlying early EATL. Histologic recovery in patients who have celiac disease usually takes several months but can take up to 1 year, even if the patient remains on a strict gluten-free diet. Some patients report celiac-related symptoms for months after a single gluten intake. The definitions for RCD in literature vary. The authors consider the definition give by Daum and colleagues [24] suitable. They defined true RCD as villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia and increased IELs persisting for more than 12 months in spite of a strict gluten-free diet. If a patient is not responding well to a gluten-free diet, three considerations are necessary: (1) the initial diagnosis of celiac disease must be reassessed;(2) the patient should be sent to a dietician to check for errors in diet or compliance problems, because problems with the gluten-free diet are the most important cause for persisting symptoms; (3) other reasons for persisting symptoms (eg, pancreatic insufficiency, irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth, lymphocytic colitis, collagenous colitis, ulcerative jejunitis, protein-losing enteropathy,T-cell lymphoma, fructose intolerance, cavitating lymphadenopathy, and

  5. Severe Darier's disease in a psychiatric patient*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Lopes, Roberta Simão; Pereira, Medéia Carolina Fernandes; Tebcherani, Antonio Jose; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2015-01-01

    Darier’s disease is characterized by dense keratotic lesions in the seborrheic areas of the body such as scalp, forehead, nasolabial folds, trunk and inguinal region. It is a rare genodermatosis, an autosomal dominant inherited disease that may be associated with neuropsichiatric disorders. It is caused by ATPA2 gene mutation, presenting cutaneous and dermatologic expressions. Psychiatric symptoms are depression, suicidal attempts, and bipolar affective disorder. We report a case of Darier’s disease in a 48-year-old female patient presenting severe cutaneous and psychiatric manifestations. PMID:26312677

  6. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. PMID:24814173

  7. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  8. Myopathy in patients with Hashimoto's disease.

    PubMed

    Villar, Jaqueline; Finol, Héctor J; Torres, Sonia H; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients may present or not a hypothyroid state, and frequently have manifestations of myopathy. The present work was aimed to assess the clinical symptoms and signs of skeletal muscle alterations in HT, describe the muscular pathological changes and relate them to the functional thyroid status and to the autoimmune condition of the patient. Clinical and laboratory studies were performed in ten HT patients and three control subjects (hormonal levels and electromyography). Biopsies from their vastus lateralis of quadriceps femoris muscle were analyzed under light (histochemistry and immunofluorescense) and electron microscopy. All patients showed muscle focal alterations, ranging from moderate to severe atrophy, necrosis, activation of satellite cells, presence of autophagosomes, capillary alterations and macrophage and mast cell infiltration, common to autoimmune diseases. The intensity of clinical signs and symptoms was not related to the morphological muscle findings, the electromyography results, or to the state of the thyroid function. Reactions for immunoglobulin in muscle fibers were positive in 80% of the patients. Fiber type II proportion was increased in all patients, with the exception of those treated with L-thyroxine. In conclusion, autoimmune processes in several of the patients may be associated to the skeletal muscle alterations, independently of the functional state of the thyroid gland; however, fiber II type proportion could have been normalized by L-thyroxine treatment. PMID:25920184

  9. Strained layer Fabry-Perot device

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Fritz, Ian J.; Hammons, Burrell E.

    1994-01-01

    An asymmetric Fabry-Perot reflectance modulator (AFPM) consists of an active region between top and bottom mirrors, the bottom mirror being affixed to a substrate by a buffer layer. The active region comprises a strained-layer region having a bandgap and thickness chosen for resonance at the Fabry-Perot frequency. The mirrors are lattice matched to the active region, and the buffer layer is lattice matched to the mirror at the interface. The device operates at wavelengths of commercially available semiconductor lasers.

  10. Insomnia in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Anett V; Novak, Marta; Bohra, Miqdad; Mucsi, Istvan

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia and poor self-perceived sleep are very common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Poor sleep is associated with fatigue, sleepiness, impaired daytime functioning, impaired health-related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. Many illness- and treatment-related factors (metabolic changes, inflammation, altered sleep regulatory mechanisms, symptoms and complications of CKD, comorbid conditions, medications, and renal replacement therapies) may disturb sleep and contribute to the high prevalence of insomnia in this patient population. Accordingly, the approach to both diagnosing and treating this condition is quite complex. Although sleep-related problems are very important for patients with CKD, they largely are under-recognized and undertreated. Very few intervention trials provide an evidence base to support treatment decisions in this particular patient population. With this review we hope to increase awareness of insomnia among professionals involved in the management of patients with CKD and to provide guidance in recognizing and treating this important condition. PMID:26355254

  11. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  12. Oral status in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sundh, B; Hultén, L

    1982-01-01

    The dental status in a randomly selected group of patients with Crohn's disease was assessed and compared with that in a normal population. The results showed evidence that these patients in spite of an ordinary oral hygiene standard have a high caries frequency and activity, and that dental caries was particularly common in those subjected to extensive small bowel resection. Unusual dietary habits and malabsorption may probably be the main cause of the condition, although neglect of oral hygiene during active phases of the disease might also be important. Increased attention has to be directed towards this problem. A strict oral hygiene should be recommended and the regular use of fluoride treatment appears to be justified in such a high risk group of patients. PMID:7158213

  13. Infective endocarditis in patients with hepatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Seminari, E; De Silvestri, A; Ravasio, V; Ludovisi, S; Utili, R; Petrosillo, N; Castelli, F; Bassetti, M; Barbaro, F; Grossi, P; Barzaghi, N; Rizzi, M; Minoli, L

    2016-02-01

    Few data have been published regarding the epidemiology and outcome of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with chronic hepatic disease (CHD). A retrospective analysis of the Studio Endocarditi Italiano (SEI) database was performed to evaluate the epidemiology and outcome of CHD+ patients compared with CHD- patients. The diagnosis of IE was defined in accordance with the modified Duke criteria. Echocardiography, diagnosis, and treatment procedures were in accordance with current clinical practice. Among the 1722 observed episodes of IE, 300 (17.4 %) occurred in CHD+ patients. The cause of CHD mainly consisted of chronic viral infection. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacterial species in CHD+ patients; the frequency of other bacterial species (S. epidermidis, streptococci, and enterococci) were comparable among the two groups. The percentage of patients undergoing surgery for IE was 38.9 in CHD+ patients versus 43.7 in CHD- patients (p = 0.06). Complications were more common among CHD+ patients (77 % versus 65.3 %, p < 0.001); embolization (43.3 % versus 26.1 %, p < 0.001) and congestive heart failure (42 % versus 34.1 %, p = 0.01) were more frequent among CHD+ patients. Mortality was comparable (12.5 % in CHD- and 15 % in CHD+ patients). At multivariable analysis, factors associated with hospital-associated mortality were having an infection sustained by S. aureus, a prosthetic valve, diabetes and a neoplasia, and CHD. Being an intravenous drug user (IVDU) was a protective factor and was associated with a reduced death risk. CHD is a factor worsening the prognosis in patients with IE, in particular in patients for whom cardiac surgery was required. PMID:26690071

  14. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:24380085

  15. Lentivector Transduction Improves Outcomes Over Transplantation of Human HSCs Alone in NOD/SCID/Fabry Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pacienza, Natalia; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Mizue, Nobuo; Au, Bryan CY; Wang, James CM; Fan, Xin; Takenaka, Toshihiro; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) activity that results in progressive globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) deposition. We created a fully congenic nonobese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/Fabry murine line to facilitate the in vivo assessment of human cell-directed therapies for Fabry disease. This pure line was generated after 11 generations of backcrosses and was found, as expected, to have a reduced immune compartment and background α-gal A activity. Next, we transplanted normal human CD34+ cells transduced with a control (lentiviral vector-enhanced green fluorescent protein (LV-eGFP)) or a therapeutic bicistronic LV (LV-α-gal A/internal ribosome entry site (IRES)/hCD25). While both experimental groups showed similar engraftment levels, only the therapeutic group displayed a significant increase in plasma α-gal A activity. Gb3 quantification at 12 weeks revealed metabolic correction in the spleen, lung, and liver for both groups. Importantly, only in the therapeutically-transduced cohort was a significant Gb3 reduction found in the heart and kidney, key target organs for the amelioration of Fabry disease in humans. PMID:22472949

  16. Lentivector transduction improves outcomes over transplantation of human HSCs alone in NOD/SCID/Fabry mice.

    PubMed

    Pacienza, Natalia; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Mizue, Nobuo; Au, Bryan C Y; Wang, James C M; Fan, Xin; Takenaka, Toshihiro; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2012-07-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) activity that results in progressive globotriaosylceramide (Gb(3)) deposition. We created a fully congenic nonobese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/Fabry murine line to facilitate the in vivo assessment of human cell-directed therapies for Fabry disease. This pure line was generated after 11 generations of backcrosses and was found, as expected, to have a reduced immune compartment and background α-gal A activity. Next, we transplanted normal human CD34(+) cells transduced with a control (lentiviral vector-enhanced green fluorescent protein (LV-eGFP)) or a therapeutic bicistronic LV (LV-α-gal A/internal ribosome entry site (IRES)/hCD25). While both experimental groups showed similar engraftment levels, only the therapeutic group displayed a significant increase in plasma α-gal A activity. Gb(3) quantification at 12 weeks revealed metabolic correction in the spleen, lung, and liver for both groups. Importantly, only in the therapeutically-transduced cohort was a significant Gb(3) reduction found in the heart and kidney, key target organs for the amelioration of Fabry disease in humans. PMID:22472949

  17. Emotional Working Memory in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satler, Corina; Tomaz, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether emotional content affects processes supporting working memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods We assessed 22 AD patients and 40 elderly controls (EC) with a delayed matching and non-matching to sample task (DMST/DNMST), and a spatial-delayed recognition span task (SRST; unique/varied) using emotional stimuli. Results AD patients showed decreased performance on both tasks compared with EC. With regard to the valence of the stimuli, we did not observe significant performance differences between groups in the DMST/DNMST. However, both groups remembered a larger number of negative than positive or neutral pictures on unique SRST. Conclusion The results suggest that AD patients show a relative preservation of working memory for emotional information, particularly for negative stimuli. PMID:22163239

  18. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes. PMID:26087735

  19. Coronary artery disease in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Ross; Byrne, Matthew; Sinclair, Hannah; Tang, Eugene; Kunadian, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    Our population is ageing. The prevalence of dementia is increasing as the population ages. Dementia is known to share many common risk factors with coronary artery disease including age, genetics, smoking, the components of the metabolic syndrome and inflammation. Despite the growing ageing population with dementia, there is underutilization of optimal care (pharmacotherapy and interventional procedures) in this cohort. Given common risk factors and potential benefit, patients with cognitive impairment and dementia should be offered contemporary care. However, further research evaluating optimal care in this patient cohort is warranted. PMID:27159265

  20. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  1. Foods for patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J A

    1982-11-15

    As a general rule patients with celiac disease must avoid five cereals--wheat rye, triticale, barley and oats. Very sensitive individuals must also avoid two products of these cereals--malt and hydrolyzed vegetable protein. Some less sensitive individuals may be able to tolerate barley and oats in small quantities. All other foods are acceptable, including the cereals corn, rice, buckwheat, millet and sorghum, as well as malt-flavored breakfast cereals. Wine, spirits, beer and ale are also acceptable unless otherwise contraindicated. Monosodium glutamate, other food additives and pharmaceutical preparations are also acceptable. The ingredients of prepackaged processed foods are listed on the labels. Patients with celiac disease must examine labels to ensure that they avoid the harmful cereals. With appropriate precautions they need not be concerned about eating away from home. PMID:7139445

  2. Pulmonary disease in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Venerino; Trisolini, Rocco; Tura, Sante

    2002-03-01

    Patients with hematologic neoplasms frequently experience pulmonary disease. The possibility of a malignant involvement of the lung parenchyma is a well recognized and not unusual event, secondary spread due to lymphoproliferative disorders being the most common situation. Furthermore, the development and the advances in treatment options such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, radiation therapy and/or combined drug regimen use have significantly widened the spectrum of non-neoplastic pulmonary complications that can crop up in these patients. Infections, drug/radiation-induced toxicity, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related complications account by now for most pulmonary problems in hematologic patients and represent a difficult challenge both in diagnostic and in therapeutic terms for the clinician. The aim of this review is to highlight the clinicopathologic spectrum of lung diseases which can occur in the setting of hematologic malignancies. A particular emphasis is devoted to the diagnostic approach, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) assuming a key role since different patterns of CT abnormalities are associated with a different yield of the available diagnostic tools and may help in narrowing the differential diagnosis. PMID:12002382

  3. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  4. [Aspirin treatment for patients with Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiromichi

    2014-09-01

    Aspirin was first used for patients with Kawasaki disease(KD) at 1970s. Favorable outcomes of KD patients treated with aspirin were reported in 1970-80s and now it is one of the standard therapeutic agents for KD. Its anti-inflammation effects suppress vascular wall inflammation of KD at acute phase. In addition, its antiplatelet effects heal endothelial dysfunction and prevent clot formation in coronary arteries at sub-acute and convalescent phase. Long-term dosage for patients with coronary artery aneurysms(CAA) is also important, however, there are few evidences of risk-benefit assessment for its long-term use especially for middle-aged and senior adults with KD and CAA. PMID:25518411

  5. Cough determinants in patients with neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Trebbia, Grégoire; Lacombe, Mathieu; Fermanian, Christophe; Falaize, Line; Lejaille, Michèle; Louis, Alain; Devaux, Christian; Raphaël, Jean Claude; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2005-04-15

    Neuromuscular disease leads to cough impairment. Cough augmentation can be achieved by mechanical insufflation (MI) or manually assisted coughing (MAC). Many studies have compared these two methods, but few have evaluated them in combination. In 155 neuromuscular patients, we assessed determinants of peak cough flow (PCF) using stepwise correlation. Maximal inspiratory capacity contributed 44% of the variance (p<0.001), expiratory reserve volume 13%, and maximal expiratory pressure 2%. Thus, augmenting inspiration seems crucial. However, parameters dependent on expiratory muscles independently influence PCF. We measured vital capacity and PCF in 10 neuromuscular patients during cough augmentation by MI, MAC, or both. MI or MAC significantly improved VC and PCF (p<0.01) as compared to the basal condition and VC and PCF were higher during MI plus MAC than during MAC or MI alone (p<0.01). In conclusion, combining MAC and MI is useful for improving cough in neuromuscular patients. PMID:15766917

  6. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-02-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  7. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  8. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  9. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  10. Disease-Related Knowledge and Information Needs Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yang-Sook; Cha, Kyeong-Sook

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify disease-related knowledge and information needs of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The 313 patients (Crohn disease: n = 169, colitis: n = 144) presenting to an outpatient gastroenterology clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea, were scored on their knowledge of Crohn disease and colitis and their information needs were assessed in the questionnaire. Patients with Crohn disease obtained a higher mean knowledge score than patients with colitis. The patients with Crohn disease had significantly higher scores about complications than patients with colitis. The patients with Crohn disease showed significantly higher mean scores relating to the patients' information needs than patients with colitis. The favorite topics of information needed were disease, medication, and diagnosis/operations. The patients with Crohn disease wanted more information than patients with colitis about medications used for treatment, daily life, and pregnancy. The effectiveness of the training and education given to patients can be maximized in this education system when the information about disease and medications for Crohn disease patients or information about disease and diet for colitis patients is primarily provided according to the degree of the patients' need for information. PMID:25159269

  11. Thyroid diseases in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Tarach, Jerzy Stanisław; Kurowska, Maria; Nowakowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Acromegaly often involves the presence of different pathologies of the thyroid gland. Long-lasting stimulation of the follicular epithelium by growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) can cause disorders in thyroid function, an increase in its mass and the development of goitre. Acromegalic patients present most frequently with non-toxic multinodular goitre. Nodules are more prevalent in patients with active acromegaly. It has been suggested that then thyroid size increases and it can be reduced through treatment with somatostatin analogues. The relationship between thyroid volume and the level of IGF-1 and the duration of the disease is unclear. Each acromegalic patient requires a hormonal and imaging evaluation of the thyroid when the diagnosis is made, and an accurate evaluation during further observation and treatment. Although the data concerning the co-occurrence of acromegaly and thyroid cancer still remain controversial, it is particularly important to diagnose the patient early and to rule out thyroid cancer. PMID:25276172

  12. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of "expert patient" has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  13. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  14. Parkinson's disease in the older patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Simon J; Gangadharan, Sanjay; Padmakumar, Chandrasekhara Pillai

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most commonly encountered neurodegenerative condition in clinical practice and probably offers a significantly greater variety of challenges than the management of Alzheimer's disease. As with most neurodegenerative diseases, age represents the leading risk factor for the development of PD. Current estimates would suggest that PD affects 1-2% of people over the age of 65 years and each decade sees an increasing number of cases. In addition, it is well recognised that most industrialised nations have an increasing proportion of individuals living longer. For example, recent data from Australia indicates that the prevalence of PD is anticipated to rise by 80% over the next 20 years and as such, we must all strive towards improving our clinical management of this common condition. In this article, we will attempt to highlight the issues that should be actively sought out and, where possible, addressed. We hope that an improved level of understanding will lead to better outcomes in older patients with PD. PMID:27481385

  15. An Archetype Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin; VanZyl, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We introduce and demonstrate the generation of a novel resonator, termed Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP), that exhibits unique features, such as, its use of one plane mirror, allowing the SRFP to be easily fabricated as a symmetrical device. In addition to its unique features, it exhibits advantages of ring and Fabry-Perot resonators: 1) compared to a ring resonator that only allows a transmitted intensity, the Semi-Ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) supports standing waves, allowing both a reflected and transmitted intensity; 2) the reflected light spectrum of the SRFP resonator is much narrower than similar Fabry-Perot, implying higher finesse.

  16. Striped Fabry-Perots: Improved efficiency for velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, C.; Steinmetz, L.

    1990-07-01

    Removing a narrow stripe of the reflective coating from the input mirror of a Fabry-Perot interferometer can dramatically increase the amount of light transmitted through the system; we have observed gains in excess of 50 when we compare a conventional Fabry-Perot with the striped Fabry-Perot under similar lighting conditions. The stripe affects the distribution of light in the Fabry-Perot peaks causing them to be lower in the center of the pattern. We examine this distribution, and discuss its application in analyzing velocities. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Nutrition in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hebuterne, Xavier; Filippi, Jerome; Schneider, Stephane M

    2014-01-01

    Seventy five percent of hospitalized patients with Crohn's disease suffer from malnutrition. One third of Crohn's disease patients have a body mass index below 20. Sixty percent of Crohn's disease patients have sarcopenia. However some inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are obese or suffer from sarcopenic-obesity. IBD patients have many vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, which can lead to important consequences such as hyperhomocysteinemia, which is associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic disease. Nutritional deficiencies in IBD patients are the result of insufficient intake, malabsorption and protein-losing enteropathy as well as metabolic disturbances directly induced by the chronic disease and its treatments, in particular corticosteroids. Screening for nutritional deficiencies in chronic disease patients is warranted. Managing the deficiencies involves simple nutritional guidelines, vitamin supplements, and nutritional support in the worst cases. PMID:25266810

  18. Pain management in patients with vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Seretny, M; Colvin, L A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease covers a wide range of conditions, including arterial, venous, and lymphatic disorders, with many of these being more common in the elderly. As the population ages, the incidence of vascular disease will increase, with a consequent increase in the requirement to manage both acute and chronic pain in this patient population. Pain management can be complex, as there are often multiple co-morbidities to be considered. An understanding of the underlying pain mechanisms is helpful in the logical direction of treatment, particularly in chronic pain states, such as phantom limb pain or complex regional pain syndrome. Acute pain management for vascular surgery presents a number of challenges, including coexisting anticoagulant medication, that may preclude the use of regional techniques. Within the limited evidence base, there is a suggestion that epidural analgesia provides better pain relief and reduced respiratory complications after major vascular surgery. For carotid endarterectomy, there is again some evidence supporting the use of local anaesthetic analgesia, either by infiltration or by superficial cervical plexus block. Chronic pain in vascular disease includes post-amputation pain, for which well-known risk factors include high pain levels before amputation and in the immediate postoperative period, emphasizing the importance of good pain control in the perioperative period. Complex regional pain syndrome is another challenging chronic pain syndrome with a wide variety of treatment options available, with the strongest evidence being for physical therapies. Further research is required to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in pain associated with vascular disease and the best analgesic approaches to manage it. PMID:27566812

  19. The Expert Patient and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The concept of “expert patient” has been developed in the last two decades to define a patient who has a significant knowledge of his/her disease and treatment in addition to self-management skills. However, this concept has evolved over the last years, and these patients are now considered, not only to be more efficient in the management of their own condition and communicating effectively with health professionals, but to also act as educators for other patients and as resources for the last, provide feedback on care delivery, and be involved in the production and implementation of practice guidelines, as well as in the development and conduct of research initiatives. There are some barriers, however, to the integration of this new contributor to the health care team, and specific requirements need to be considered for an individual to be considered as an expert. This new player has, however, a potentially important role to improve current care, particularly in respiratory health. PMID:27445572

  20. Noninfectious lung pathology in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Mary B; Tazelaar, Henry D; Myers, Jeffrey L; Hunninghake, Gary W; Kakar, Sanjay; Kalra, Sanjay X; Ashton, Rendell; Colby, Thomas V

    2003-02-01

    Lung involvement in Crohn's disease is not well characterized. We reviewed our experience with 11 lung biopsies (seven wedge and four transbronchial) from patients with Crohn's disease to study this association further. Negative cultures, special stains for organisms Gomori-methenamine-silver [GMS], acid fast), and polymerase chain reaction for (four cases) were required for inclusion. The group included five women and six men with a mean age of 47 years (range 13-84 years). A diagnosis of Crohn's disease preceded the lung disease in nine patients. In two patients the diagnosis of Crohn's disease followed the diagnosis of their pulmonary disease 1 and 15 months later. Radiologically, eight patients had diffuse infiltrates, two had bilateral nodular infiltrates, and one had a mass. Chronic bronchiolitis with nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation was present in four patients, one of whom was taking mesalamine. Two patients had an acute bronchiolitis associated with a neutrophil-rich bronchopneumonia with suppuration and vague granulomatous features. One patient on mesalamine had cellular interstitial pneumonia with rare giant cells. Four patients demonstrated organizing pneumonia with focal granulomatous features, two of whom were taking mesalamine, and one of these two responded to infliximab (anti-tumor necrosis factor) monoclonal antibody therapy. Noninfectious pulmonary disease in patients with Crohn's disease has variable histologic appearances, including granulomatous inflammation and airway-centered disease resembling that seen in patients with ulcerative colitis. Drugs may contribute to pulmonary disease in some patients. PMID:12548168

  1. Exercise manual for liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Vivian; Dos Santos, Daniele Costa; de Oliveira da Silva, Aurea Maria; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira; Stucchi, Raquel Silveira Bello

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To increase inspiratory muscle strength and improve the quality of life of candidates for liver transplantation. METHODS: Twenty-three candidates for liver transplantation participated in the control group and 14 made up the intervention group. The control group consisted of 18 men and 5 women, body mass index (BMI) 27.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2 and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) 18.2 ± 6.1. The intervention group consisted of 11 men and 3 women, BMI 28.6 ± 5.4 kg/m2 and MELD 18 ± 4.5. The presence or absence of ascites was identified in the first patient evaluation and after three months. We evaluated maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure, spirometry, root mean square (RMS) of diaphragm and rectus abdominis, and the quality of life. The exercises were performed daily by patients at home for three months and were supervised at distance monthly. The manual consisted of diaphragmatic breathing exercises, diaphragmatic isometric exercise, Threshold IMT®, lifting upper limbs with a bat and strengthening the abdomen. RESULTS: There was significant difference (P = 0.01) between the first (initial) and the third month (final) MIP in the control group and in the intervention group, but there was no difference (P = 0.45) between the groups. The RMS of the diaphragm was lower (P = 0.001) and the functional capacity was higher (P = 0.006) in the intervention group compared to the control. The general health and mental health domains received higher scores after three months in the control group (P = 0.01) and the intervention group (P = 0.004), but there was no significant difference between them. The comparison between the presence of initial ascites with the presence of ascites was performed after three months in the control group (P = 0.083) and intervention group (P = 0.31). There was no significant difference, in relation to the presence of ascites after three months between groups (P = 0.21). In the intervention group, patients with

  2. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  3. Technology innovation for patients with kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitsides, Nicos; Keane, David F; Lindley, Elizabeth; Mitra, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    The loss of kidney function is a life-changing event leading to life-long dependence on healthcare. Around 5000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure every year. Historically, technology in renal medicine has been employed for replacement therapies. Recently, a lot of emphasis has been placed on technologies that aid early identification and prevent progression of kidney disease, while at the same time empowering affected individuals to gain control over their chronic illness. There is a shift in diversity of technology development, driven by collaborative innovation initiatives such the National Institute's for Health Research Healthcare Technology Co-operative for Devices for Dignity. This has seen the emergence of the patient as a key figure in designing technologies that are fit for purpose, while business involvement has ensured uptake and sustainability of these developments. An embodiment of this approach is the first successful Small Business Research Initiative in the field of renal medicine in the UK. PMID:26453039

  4. Dental considerations for the patient with renal disease receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, S S; Glick, M

    1996-02-01

    An increasing number of Americans are living with end-stage renal disease. This disease has many implications for dentistry, in terms of oral manifestations and management of afflicted patients. The authors present pertinent information to help dentists treat patients who exhibit the oral and systemic manifestations of renal disease, from the onset of renal impairment through hemodialysis. PMID:8682990

  5. Neurologic diseases in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bilgrami, Mohammed; O'Keefe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy there has been an improvement in the quality of life for people with HIV infection. Despite the progress made, about 70% of HIV patients develop neurologic complications. These originate either in the central or the peripheral nervous system (Sacktor, 2002). These neurologic disorders are divided into primary and secondary disorders. The primary disorders result from the direct effects of the virus and include HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy (VM), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). Secondary disorders result from marked immunosuppression and include opportunistic infections and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). A differential diagnosis which can be accomplished by detailed history, neurologic examination, and by having a good understanding of the role of HIV in various neurologic disorders will help physicians in approaching these problems. The focus of this chapter is to discuss neuropathogenesis of HIV, the various opportunistic infections, primary CNS lymphoma, neurosyphilis, CNS tuberculosis, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), and vacuolar myelopathy (VM). It also relies on the treatment recommendations and guidelines for the above mentioned neurologic disorders proposed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. PMID:24365422

  6. Thyroid Disease in the Older Patient

    MedlinePlus

    ... these patients, without treatment unless they are symptomatic. HYPOTHYROIDISM IN THE OLDER PATIENT Hypothyroidism is very common ... is given. TREATMENT OF THE OLDER PATIENT WITH HYPOTHYROIDISM As with the younger patient, pure synthetic thyroxine ( ...

  7. Molecular basis for globotriaosylceramide regulation and enzyme uptake in immortalized aortic endothelial cells from Fabry mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing-Li; Day, Taniqua S; McNeill, Nathan; Ashcraft, Paula; Frischmuth, Thomas; Cheng, Seng H; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Shen, Jin-Song; Schiffmann, Raphael

    2016-05-01

    Fabry disease is caused by deficient activity of α-galactosidase A and subsequent intracellular accumulation of glycosphingolipids, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Vascular endothelial cells may play important roles in disease pathogenesis, and are one of the main target cell types in therapeutic interventions. In this study, we generated immortalized aortic endothelial cell lines from a mouse model of Fabry disease. These cells retained endothelial cell-specific markers and functions. Gb3 expression level in one of these clones (referred to as FMEC2) was highly susceptible to culture media, and appeared to be regulated by glucosylceramide synthase. Results also showed that Gb3 could be upregulated by hydrocortisone. FMEC2 express the mannose 6-phosphate receptor and sortilin but not the mannose receptor. Uptake studies suggested that sortilin plays a role in the binding and internalization of mammalian cell-produced α-galactosidase A. Moss-aGal (a plant-made enzyme) was endocytosed by FMEC2 via a receptor other than the aforementioned receptors. In conclusion, this study suggests that glucosylceramide synthase and hydrocortisone may play important roles in modulating Gb3 levels in Fabry mouse aortic endothelial cells, and that endocytosis of recombinant α-galactosidase A involves a combination of multiple receptors depending on the properties of the enzyme. PMID:26960552

  8. Three Cavity Tunable MEMS Fabry Perot Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Avinash; Shah, Ankur; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Sivakumar, Narayanswamy

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a four-mirror tunable micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) Fabry Perot Interferometer (FPI) concept is proposed with the mathematical model. The spectral range of the proposed FPI lies in the infrared spectrum ranging from 2400 to 4018 (nm). FPI can be finely tuned by deflecting the two middle mirrors (or by changing the three cavity lengths). Two different cases were separately considered for the tuning. In case one, tuning was achieved by deflecting mirror 2 only and in case two, both mirrors 2 and 3 were deflected for the tuning of the FPI.

  9. International Registry for Patients With Castleman Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Castleman Disease; Castleman's Disease; Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymph Node Hyperplasia; Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; GLNH; Hyperplasia, Giant Lymph Node; Lymph Node Hyperplasia, Giant

  10. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  11. Sexually, transmitted disease in clinic patients in Salisbury, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed Central

    Latif, A S

    1981-01-01

    During the three months between December 1979 and February 1980, 2867 patients attended a sexually transmitted diseases clinic. Of the 929 (32.4%) patients examined and interviewed clinical and laboratory finding showed that chancroid was the commonest disease (38.4%) and gonorrhoea almost as common (35.3%) in men. Pelvic inflammatory disease was the commonest disease (47.0%) and gonorrhoea the next commonest (22.7%) in women. PMID:6894561

  12. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  13. Diagnosis, disease stage, and distress of Chinese cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyan; Chen, Huiping; Deng, Yaotiao; Yi, Tingwu; Wang, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective is to assess how cancer patients know about their diagnosis what they know about their real stage, and the relationship between cancer stage and psychological distress. Methods A questionnaire including the Distress Thermometer was delivered to 422 cancer inpatients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Most of patients (68.7%) knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis. Half of patients knew their diagnosis directly from medical reports. Nearly one third of patients were informed by doctors. Cancer stages, which patients believed, differed significantly from their real disease stages (P<0.001). Over half of patients did not know their real disease stages. Patients with stage I–III cancer were more likely to know their real disease stage than patients with stage IV cancer (P<0.001). Distress scores of cancer patients were determined by the real cancer stage (P=0.012), not the stage which patients believed. Conclusions Although most of participants knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis, less than half of them knew their real disease stage. Patient with stage I–III cancer was more likely to know the real disease stage and had a DT score <4 than patient with stage IV disease. PMID:27004220

  14. Lung Disease Caused by Mycobacterium malmoense in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Min Kyung; Yoon, Jung A; Kim, Junhwan; Yi, Sangyoung; Sung, Heungsup; Shim, Tae Sun

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium malmoense is a very rare cause of lung disease in South Korea. We reported the first case of lung disease caused by M. malmoense in an immunocompetent patient. The patient was successfully treated with a 14-month course of antibiotics. PMID:26175789

  15. Anorectal Complications During Neutropenic Period in Patients with Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Korur, Aslı; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Asma, Süheyl; Büyükkurt, Nurhilal; Kasar, Mutlu; Yeral, Mahmut; Kozanoğlu, İlknur; Boğa, Can; Ozdoğu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutropenic patients are susceptible to any anorectal disease, and symptomatic anorectal disease afflicts 2–32% of oncology patients. Perianal infections are the most feared complication, considering the lack of natural defense against infectious microorganisms. When septic complications develop, the anorectal disease is potentially fatal, especially in neutropenic patients in whom mortality rates range between 11–57%. Although anorectal diseases are a frequent complication with potentially fatal outcomes among patients with hematologic diseases, sufficient data are not available in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anorectal complications developing during the neutropenic period in patients with hematologic diseases. Methods A total of 79 patients whose neutropenic period (absolute neutrophil count <500/mcL) continued for 7 days, or longer were included in the study. Results A total of 34 patients out of 79 (43%) were detected to develop anorectal complications, of them 6 (7.6%) developed an anorectal infection. The patients were characterized according to the hematological disease and its status (active or not), the type of treatment and the presence of a history of an anorectal pathology before the onset of the hematologic disease. Nineteen (24.1%) patients had the history of anorectal disturbances before diagnosis of the hematologic disease, and recurrence of an anorectal pathology was found in 14 out of 19 patients(73.7%). In addition, the overall mortality rate was higher among the patients who developed anorectal complications compared to another group (41.2% vs. 22.2%, p=0.059). Conclusion Anorectal pathology is a common complication with high recurrence rate in neutropenic patients. Perianal infections are important as they can cause life-threatening outcomes although they are relatively rare among all anorectal complications. Therefore perianal signs and symptoms should be meticulously evaluated concerning early

  16. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Quercus fabri (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z Z; Chen, W W; Bao, W; Wang, R; Li, Y Y

    2016-01-01

    Quercus fabri is a pioneer species of secondary succession in evergreen broadleaved forests in China. In this study, we isolated and developed 12 polymorphic and 2 monomorphic microsatellite loci for Q. fabri using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. We characterized 12 polymorphic loci in 52 individuals from two populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 23. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus were 0.033-0.773 and 0.138-0.924, respectively. These microsatellite loci will facilitate the studies on genetic variation, mating system, and gene flow of Q. fabri. PMID:27420954

  18. Two adolescent patients with coexistent Graves' disease and Moyamoya disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Chong Kun; Kim, Su Yung; Yoo, Jae-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular condition that results in the narrowing of the vessels of the circle of Willis and collateral vessel formation at the base of the brain. Although relationships between Graves' disease and cerebrovascular accidents in Moyamoya disease are obscure, the coexistence of the two diseases is noteworthy. Moyamoya disease has been rarely reported in adolescent patients with thyrotoxicosis. Recently, we encountered two adolescent Korean patients with Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease who presented with episodic right-sided hemiparesis and syncope. These two girls who had Graves' disease had no history of other diseases or head trauma. A thyroid function test revealed a euthyroid state and a high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody titer at that time. The patients were diagnosed with Moyamoya disease based on brain magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral four-vessel angiography. The patients underwent cranial revascularization by encephalo-duroarterio-synangiosis as soon as a diagnosis was made, which resulted in successful symptom resolution. They fared well and had no additional neurological symptoms as of their last follow-up visits. Here, we report these two cases of confirmed Moyamoya disease complicated by Graves' disease with a review of the literature, and discuss the possible association between the two diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first report in South Korea on Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease in adolescents with a euthyroid. PMID:25076974

  19. Managing inflammatory bowel disease in adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J; Lemberg, D A; Day, As

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of adolescents are being diagnosed with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, the two main subtypes of inflammatory bowel disease. These young people face many short- and long-term challenges; one or more medical therapies may be required indefinitely; their disease may have great impact, in terms of their schooling and social activities. However, the management of adolescents with one of these incurable conditions needs to encompass more than just medical therapies. Growth, pubertal development, schooling, transition, adherence, and psychological well-being are all important aspects. A multidisciplinary team setting, catering to these components of care, is required to ensure optimal outcomes in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24729736

  20. Nutritional support for the patient with pancreatobiliary disease.

    PubMed

    Kohn, C L; Brozenec, S; Foster, P F

    1993-03-01

    Critically ill patients with severe pancreatobiliary disease exhibit multiple nutritional alterations compounded by the stress response. Acute pancreatitis may present as a life-threatening illness; patients are likely to be hypermetabolic and may have hyperglycemia and hypocalcemia. Nutritional support from parenteral or enteral feeding will probably be required in patients presenting with three or more positive risk factors as determined by Ranson criteria. Nutritional therapies for liver disease vary according to the specific disorder manifested. Patients with fulminant hepatic failure need to be monitored for profound hypoglycemia. Encephalopathy may develop in patients with acute-on-chronic liver disease, necessitating a protein restriction. Patients undergoing liver transplant are a perioperative challenge due to the combination of preoperative malnutrition, an extensive surgical procedure, and postoperative stress. Such patients require individualized assessment and management. PMID:8448001

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Simone; Fattori, Andre; Saad, Sarita T; Costallat, Lilian T L

    2008-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a prevalent genetic disorder that includes sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS), hemoglobin SC, and hemoglobin Sb-thalassemia. Patients with SCD present with a defective activation of the alternate pathway of the complement system that increases the risk of capsulate bacteria infection and failure to eliminate antigens, predisposing these patients to autoimmune diseases. The authors describe three patients with SCD that developed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In all patients, SLE diagnosis was delayed because symptoms were initially attributable to SCD. Physicians should be alerted to the possible development of SLE in patients with SCD to not delay the diagnosis and start appropriate treatment. PMID:18000698

  2. Late appearance of chronic pericardial disease in patients treated by radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Applefeld, M.M.; Cole, J.F.; Pollock, S.H.; Sutton, F.J.; Slawson, R.G.; Singleton, R.T.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1981-03-01

    Radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease was recognized in nine patients 53 to 124 months (mean, 88 months) after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. Depending on whether abnormal cardiac hemodynamics occurred before or after a fluid challenge, patients were considered to have either constrictive pericarditis (Group I) or occult constrictive pericarditis (Group II). There were no differences between these groups in various radiotherapy data, the use of chemotherapy, or the interval after treatment when the diagnosis of chronic pericardial disease was made. There were no consistent noninvasive variables to support the diagnosis of radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease before cardiac catheterization. Four patients underwent pericardiectomy. Two of the four operated patients had an excellent surgical result; a third patient died 4 months postoperatively of drug-induced granulocytopenia; the fourth patient has persistent visceral constrictive pericarditis 18 months after surgery. Speculation over the causes of radiation-induced chronic pericardial disease is made and our recommendations for its treatment given.

  3. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  4. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  5. Management of Spinal Deformity in Adult Patients With Neuromuscular Disease.

    PubMed

    Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Boniello, Anthony J; Schwab, Frank J

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of neuromuscular diseases, including Parkinson disease, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and myopathy, are associated with spinal deformities. The most common postural deformities include anterocollis, Pisa syndrome (pleurothotonus), scoliosis, and camptocormia. Nonsurgical management of spinal deformity in patients with neuromuscular disease centers on maximizing the medical management of the underlying neurodegenerative pathology before surgical intervention is contemplated. Surgical management can include decompression alone, or decompression and fusion with short or long fusion constructs. Patients with neuromuscular disease are susceptible to postoperative medical complications, such as delirium, epidural hematomas, pulmonary emboli, and cardiac events. Compared with outcomes in the typical patient with spinal deformity, postoperative outcomes in patients with neuromuscular disease have higher rates of surgical complications, such as instrumentation failure, proximal junctional kyphosis, loss of correction, and the need for revision surgery, regardless of the magnitude of surgical treatment. PMID:27471900

  6. Challenges of treatment adherence in older patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L; Ruscin, J Mark

    2009-01-01

    Patient adherence to a medication regimen is critical to treatment outcome, quality of life and future healthcare costs. For elderly patients with Parkinson's disease, obstacles to adherence can be particularly complex. Beyond age-related and economic factors, elderly patients with Parkinson's disease often require complicated dosing or titration schedules and have multiple co-morbidities that necessitate administration of therapies from multiple drug classes. In addition, neuropsychiatric disturbances and cognitive impairment, which are often part of the disease process, can affect adherence, as can variable responses to anti-parkinsonian agents as the disease progresses. Several recent studies in patients with Parkinson's disease point to the need for establishing good adherence patterns early and maintaining these throughout the course of treatment. To achieve optimal adherence in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease, a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches appears to be the best strategy for success. Examples include a strong provider-patient relationship, educational intervention by phone or face-to-face contact, simplified dosing and administration schedules, management and understanding of medication adverse events, and the use of adherence aids such as pill boxes and hour-by-hour organizational charts. Research into new avenues that include improved drug monitoring, pharmacogenetics and neuroprotective regimens may give rise to better adherence in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease in the future. PMID:19220071

  7. Hepatopulmonary Syndrome in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Oded; Shteyer, Eyal; Wilschanski, Michael; Perles, Zeev; Cohen-Cymberknoh, Malena; Kerem, Eitan; Shoseyov, David

    2016-02-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a liver-induced lung disorder defined as a triad of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatation, and a defect in oxygenation. It can complicate chronic liver disease of any etiology, but is most commonly associated with portal hypertension. Severe liver disease with portal hypertension is present in 2% to 8% of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), but to date, to our knowledge, only one patient with CF has been reported to suffer from HPS. Here, we describe two patients with CF diagnosed with HPS, one subsequent to unresolved hypoxemia and the other following screening for HPS performed in our center. We speculate that HPS is underdiagnosed in patients with CF because of their coexisting respiratory morbidity, and we advocate routine screening for every patient with CF who has liver disease and portal hypertension. PMID:26867851

  8. Patients with Celiac Disease Are Not Followed Adequately

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Margot L.; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Lahr, Brian D.; Larson, Joseph J.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Adherence to a gluten-free diet is the only effective treatment for celiac disease. It has been recommended that patients be followed, make regular visits to the clinic, and undergo serologic analysis for markers of celiac disease, although a follow-up procedure has not been standardized. We determined how many patients with celiac disease are actually followed. Methods We collected data on 122 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease, diagnosed between 1996 and 2006 in Olmsted County, Minnesota (70% women, median age of 42 years) for whom complete medical records and verification of residency were available. We determined the frequency at which patients received follow-up examinations, from 6 months to 5 years after diagnosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate event rates at 1 and 5 year(s). Patients were classified according to categories of follow-up procedures recommended by the American Gastroenterology Association (AGA). Results We estimated that by 1 and 5 year(s) after diagnosis with celiac disease, 41.0% and 88.7% of the patients had follow-up visits, 33.6% and 79.8% were assessed for compliance with a gluten-free diet, 3.3% and 15.8% met with a registered dietitian, 2.5% and 18.1% had an additional intestinal biopsy, and 22.1% and 65.6% received serologic testing for markers of celiac disease. Among 113 patients (93%) who were followed for more than 4 years, only 35% received follow-up analyses that were consistent with AGA recommendations. Conclusions Patients with celiac disease are not followed consistently. Follow-up examinations are often inadequate and do not follow AGA recommendations. Improving follow-up strategies for patients with celiac disease could improve management of this disease. PMID:22610009

  9. Fabry-Perot diaphragm fiber-optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ken K; Sun, Yan; Feng, Guanhua; Georgiou, George E; Guo, Kangzhu; Niver, Edip; Roman, Harry; Noe, Karen

    2007-11-01

    The general theory of a diaphragm fiber-optic sensor (DFOS) is proposed. We use a critical test to determine if a DFOS is based on Fabry-Perot interference or intensity modulation. By use of the critical test, this is the first design, to the best of our knowledge, of a purely Fabry-Perot DFOS, fabricated with microelectromechanical system technology, and characterized as an audible microphone and ultrasonic hydrophone with orders of improvement in signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:17973004

  10. Managing inflammatory bowel disease in adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, J; Lemberg, DA; Day, AS

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of adolescents are being diagnosed with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, the two main subtypes of inflammatory bowel disease. These young people face many short- and long-term challenges; one or more medical therapies may be required indefinitely; their disease may have great impact, in terms of their schooling and social activities. However, the management of adolescents with one of these incurable conditions needs to encompass more than just medical therapies. Growth, pubertal development, schooling, transition, adherence, and psychological well-being are all important aspects. A multidisciplinary team setting, catering to these components of care, is required to ensure optimal outcomes in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24729736

  11. Case report: Patient presenting with Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Backgound: Cushing's syndrome is a rare disease that is caused by the overproduction of cortisol by the adrenal glands. This can be caused by a tumor of the adrenal glands, the lungs or the pituitary gland. When a pituitary tumor produces too much ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone), it causes the overproduction of cortisol by the adrenal glands. When the pituitary is the source of the over production, it is called Cushing's disease. Case Description: A 32-year-old female who developed symptoms of Cushing's about one and a half years prior to her visit at a large teaching hospital in the Mid-Atlantic. Her symptoms included amenorrhea, facial hair and acne, and back pain. She had previously been diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome. Conclusion: Cushing's disease is a rare disease, which can be successfully treated by experienced pituitary specialists. PMID:26069847

  12. A case of phrynoderma in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Gabriela; Cornejo, Christine; McMahon, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Phrynoderma is a type of follicular hyperkeratosis associated with nutritional deficiencies. It is rarely seen in developed countries, although cases have been reported in patients with severe malnutrition or malabsorption secondary to various causes. This report describes a 19-year-old patient with poorly controlled Crohn's disease and malnutrition who developed the characteristic hyperkeratotic papules and plaques on his trunk and extremities in the setting of low serum vitamin A levels. To our knowledge, there are no reports of phrynoderma associated with Crohn's disease. It is likely that our patient's low vitamin A level and subsequent phrynoderma was the result of increased Crohn's disease activity and malnutrition. PMID:24274972

  13. Echocardiography in the Assessment of Patients with Rheumatologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Al-Mohaissen, Maha A; Chan, Kwan-Leung

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important extra-articular manifestation of rheumatologic diseases leading to considerable mortality and morbidity. Echocardiography emerges as a useful non-invasive technique for the screening and evaluation of cardiac involvement in these patients. With the technological advancement in echocardiographic techniques, we have gained a greater appreciation of the prevalence and nature of the cardiac involvement in these patients, as detection of subclinical disease is increasingly feasible. This review discusses cardiac involvement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome, systemic sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis, and the role of different echocardiographic modalities in their evaluation. PMID:27306356

  14. Oral health of patients with severe rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Breminand; Vayej, Ahmed C

    2012-07-01

    In order to determine whether adequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis, we studied 44 black patients with severe rheumatic heart disease before they had cardiac surgery. Plaque and gingival index scores were calculated and panoramic radiographs were done in all patients. There were 17 males and 27 females (mean age: 30.6 years). The plaque and gingival index scores were classified as poor in 31.8 and 54.6% of patients, respectively. Panoramic radiographic findings included caries in 56.8% of patients, peri-apical pathology in 18.1% and retained roots in 22.7% of patients. This study demonstrates that inadequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients with severe rheumatic heart disease. The oral and dental care of patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis needs to be improved. PMID:22836156

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia developing in patients with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Fouad, Tamer M; Summa, Valentina; Hasan, Syed KH; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia is an unfortunate complication of cancer treatment, particularly for patients with highly curable primary malignancies and favorable life expectancy. The risk of developing therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia also applies to patients with non-malignant conditions, such as autoimmune diseases treated with cytotoxic and/or immunosuppressive agents. There is considerable evidence to suggest that there is an increased occurrence of hematologic malignancies in patients with autoimmune diseases compared to the general population, with a further increase in risk after exposure to cytotoxic therapies. Unfortunately, studies have failed to reveal a clear correlation between leukemia development and exposure to individual agents used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Given the dismal outcome of secondary acute myeloid leukemia and the wide range of available agents for treatment of autoimmune diseases, an increased awareness of this risk and further investigation into the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute leukemia in autoimmune disease patients are warranted. This article will review the data available on the development of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with autoimmune diseases. Possible leukemogeneic mechanisms in these patients, as well as evidence supporting the association of their primary immunosuppressive status and their exposure to specific therapies, will also be reviewed. This review also supports the idea that it may be misleading to label leukemias that develop in patients with autoimmune diseases who are exposed to cytotoxic agents as ‘therapy-related leukemias’. A better understanding of the molecular defects in autoimmune disease patients who develop acute leukemia will lead to a better understanding of the association between these two diseases entities. PMID:22180424

  16. Rectal biopsy in patients presenting to an infectious disease unit with diarrhoeal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, R J; Gilmour, H M; McClelland, D B

    1979-01-01

    The role of sigmoidoscopy and rectal biopsy was investigated in patients referred to an infectious diseases unit with diarrhoea. Seventy-four patients were studied. Nine patients (12%) had inflammatory bowel disease, either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Thirty-six patients (48%) had infective diarrhoea. A wide variety of conditions accounted for the diarrhoea in the remaining patients. Sigmoidoscopy was abnormal in 25 patients and rectal biopsy in 56. The abnormalities in rectal mucosal histology were classified into six grades. Some patients with infective diarrhoea showed rather characteristic histological changes which may be of diagnostic value. Eight showed features which suggested a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. However, repeat rectal biopsy in the convalescent period showed a striking improvement in the patients with infective diarrhoea. In contrast, the histological changes persisted in the patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Repeat rectal biopsy may be essential before making a firm diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease in some patients who present with diarrhoea and apparently typical histological changes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:428826

  17. A new Internet resource for chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ormandy, P; Vlaminck, H; Harrington, M; Forest, M; Visser, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a portal in the World Wide Web (WWW), which captures and locates quality information for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It examines the problems patients face when accessing and understanding information gleaned from Web sites and describes an idea from a Research Board Member to facilitate patient access to quality information. The idea germinated into the development of a patient specific Web site, providing one stop access and links to appropriate CKD information, assessed by patients and health professionals. Collaboration between the EDTNA/ERCA Research Board and CEAPIR the European Federation of Kidney Patients has enhanced the project. PMID:16700172

  18. A feeding mechanism for Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Broadhurst, M; Stammers, C W

    1988-01-01

    A pivotted four-bar chain mechanism has been studied and built as a feeding aid for Parkinson's patients. This system provides a good feeding path. Guidance is by means of a spring restrained sliding handle. The tremor exhibited by three patients was established in constant force tests. Shake tests using simulated inputs spanning the frequency range indicated (2.5 Hz-6 Hz) established the vibration isolation properties of the system. PMID:3361598

  19. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment. PMID:27319043

  20. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation. PMID:26239457

  1. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  2. Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Edward M.

    2001-05-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), over 40 different diseases, are now considered treatable disorders. Only a few short years ago, Lysosomal storage disorders were seen as interesting neurodegenerative disorders without any potential for treatment. Effective treatment strategies such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), and glycolipid synthesis inhibition have been developed in the last 20 years and continue to be researched and evaluated. Bone marrow transplantation began approximately 15 years ago and has shown benefit for some of the lysosomal storage disorders. In order to be effective, the transplant must be performed early in the course of the disease, before the development of irreversible neurologic damage. Diseases such as Hurler appear to respond to BMT, however, improvement in bone disease is much less vigorous than responses in other organs. Krabbe disease responds if the transplant is performed before irreversible signs of neurologic damage appear. Metachromatic leukodystrophy may respond if the transplant can be performed early enough although peripheral nerve findings appear to progress. Other diseases, eg, GM1- and GM2-gangliosidoses do not appear to be altered by BMT. Despite its high cost, ERT has been very effective treatment for type I (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy for other LSDs, including ERT for Fabry and Pompe diseases, which are planned to be imminently introduced, and other enzymes such as for Morquio and Hunter diseases that are in the study phases, may be marketed in the very near future. Glycolipid inhibitors, such as N-butyldeoxynijirimycin (OGS-918), have been effective in reducing the liver and spleen volume in type I Gaucher disease. These oral inhibitors may prove to be important adjuncts to ERT and provide the advantage of being able to cross the blood/brain barrier, which limits enzyme access to brain. Currently, clinical studies are being conducted on patients

  3. Integrated Fabry-Perot optical space switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Michael

    As information technologies are adopted by more people to accomplish a greater variety of tasks, the need for optical telecommunication networks with higher capacity and flexibility grows. In addition to improving throughput by increasing transmission rates and the number of wavelength channels, novel network architectures using optical burst or packet based switching are investigated because they allow a more efficient use of transmission capacity and they enable the reorganisation of wavelength connections according to traffic demands. The implementation of such networks requires fast, broadband, transparent, and scalable optical space switches. Although research on optical space switches has been on going for decades, no solution that meets all of the above requirements has been reported yet. The work presented in this thesis introduces a novel optical space switch configuration based on tunable integrated Fabry-Perot filters working at oblique incidence and investigates their performance. A design method to implement this new switch concept is described and demonstrated with the fabrication and characterisation of optical prototypes. The prototypes are implemented in GaAs/AlGaAs planar waveguides and they are designed to be operated using the electro-optic effect. Deep etching is used to create the switch features and a comprehensive optimization of the waveguide structure is conducted to minimize radiation losses. To maximize the number of wavelength channels that can be controlled with a small refractive index modulation, the switches have a 200 GHz comb frequency response that transmits/reflects one out of every two channels on the ITU 100 GHz grid. Thus, shifting their frequency response by one channel spacing is sufficient to change the state of every channel. Furthermore, four Fabry-Perot cavities are coupled to obtain a flat and wide theoretical passband of more than 50 GHz. A Gaussian beam propagation analysis is performed to determine the minimum beam

  4. Clostridium difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Biesiada, Grażyna; Perucki, William; Mach, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium widely distributed in the human environment. In the last decade the incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection has grown, particularly in Europe and North America, making it one of the more common nosocomial infections. A group particularly susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection are patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with involvement of the colon. This paper presents relevant data on Clostridium difficile infections in inflammatory bowel disease patients, including epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25097707

  5. Palliative care for patients with non-malignant respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Clare

    2015-05-01

    Non-malignant respiratory disease is a chronic life-limiting condition that requires holistic palliative care. Patients with non-malignant respiratory disease have a range of biopsychosocial and spiritual needs, which healthcare professionals should recognise and manage effectively. Healthcare professionals have an important role in enabling the delivery of effective palliative care to this group of patients and their carers, and in recognising the many factors that may impede delivery of palliative care. PMID:25942985

  6. Quality of Life in Chronic Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Megari, Kalliopi

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades there was an increasing predominance of chronic disorders, with a large number of people living with chronic diseases that can adversely affect their quality of life. The aim of the present paper is to study quality of life and especially Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in chronic diseases. HRQOL is a multidimensional construct that consists of at least three broad domains – physical, psychological, and social functioning – that are affected by one’s disease and/or treatment. HRQoL is usually measured in chronic conditions and is frequently impaired to a great extent. In addition, factors that are associated with good and poor HRQoL, as well as HRQoL assessment will be discussed. The estimation of the relative impact of chronic diseases on HRQoL is necessary in order to better plan and distribute health care resources aiming at a better HRQoL. [«All the people perceive the concept of living good or being well, that is the same as being happy». (Aristotle. 384-322 BC. Ethica Nichomachea)] PMID:26973912

  7. Melatonin for Sleep Disorders in Patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Karroum, Elias G

    2016-07-01

    In patients with neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders are common; they impair the quality of life for patients and caregivers and are associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Melatonin has circadian, hypnotic, and free radical-scavenging effects, and preclinical data suggest benefits of melatonin on neurodegeneration. However, randomized, controlled trials of melatonin in patients with neurodegenerative diseases have not shown strong effects. Trials in Alzheimer's patients demonstrate a lack of benefit on sleep quantity. Subjective measures of sleep quality are mixed, with possible symptomatic improvements seen only on some measures or at some time points. Benefits on cognition have not been observed across several studies. In Parkinson's patients, there may be minimal benefit on objective sleep measures, but a suggestion of subjective benefit in few, small studies. Effective treatments for the sleep disorders associated with neurodegenerative diseases are urgently needed, but current data are insufficient to establish melatonin as such a treatment. PMID:27180068

  8. Alterations in Fibrin Structure in Patients with Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lisman, Ton; Ariëns, Robert A S

    2016-06-01

    The hemostatic balance in patients with liver diseases is relatively well preserved due to concomitant alterations in pro- and antihemostatic pathways. Thrombin generation studies support the notion of hemostatic competence in liver diseases, but in such tests alterations in fibrinogen level and function are not taken into account. We have recently studied structural and functional properties of the fibrin clot in patients with liver diseases. Although we have confirmed previous findings that hypersialylation of the fibrinogen molecule in patients with liver diseases contributes to a defective fibrinogen-to-fibrin conversion, we have found that once the clot has been formed, it has a thrombogenic nature as assessed by permeability assays. These thrombogenic properties of the fibrin clot in cirrhosis relate to incompletely characterized intrinsic changes in the fibrinogen molecule, which may include oxidation and hypersialylation. In addition, in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease thrombogenic properties of the fibrin clot are not only due to liver disease but also to obesity and the metabolic syndrome. During liver transplantation, the clot normalizes and becomes increasingly permeable, and the functional properties of the fibrin clot are markedly normalized by fibrinogen concentrate, when added to plasma samples in vitro. These new insights in the functional properties of the fibrin clot in patients with liver diseases facilitate a more rational approach to treatment and prevention of both bleeding and thrombotic complications. PMID:27071046

  9. Spheroplastic phase of mycobacteria isolated from patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodini, R J; Van Kruiningen, H J; Thayer, W R; Coutu, J A

    1986-01-01

    Two strains of an unclassified Mycobacterium species were isolated after 18 and 30 months of incubation of media inoculated with resected intestinal tissues from patients with Crohn's disease. These strains represented the third and fourth isolates of this organism from Crohn's disease patients. Ultrastructural examination of this strain and two previously isolated strains revealed the presence of spheroplasts which eventually transformed into the bacillary form of a previously unrecognized Mycobacterium species. These cell wall-deficient forms did not stain with conventional dyes and failed to grow on hypertonic media. Restriction polymorphism of the ribosomal DNA genes was used to determine the relationship between the cell wall-deficient and bacillary forms. Identical restriction patterns of the ribosomal DNA genes were found between the spheroplasts and Mycobacterium sp. isolates with EcoRI, BamHI, and XhoI restriction endonucleases, thus providing definitive evidence of their origin. Unidentified spheroplasts were isolated from an additional 12 patients with Crohn's disease, of which 7 of 10 seroagglutinated with antiserum prepared against the Mycobacterium sp. Spheroplasts were isolated from 16 of 26 (61%) patients with Crohn's disease but not from tissues of 13 patients with ulcerative colitis or 13 patients with other diseases of the bowel. These findings support the role of mycobacteria as etiologic agents in some cases of Crohn's disease. Images PMID:3760132

  10. Medical management of the patient with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Mask, A G

    2000-06-01

    Cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and periodontal disease have been established as major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Dentists and physicians should work aggressively to educate periodontitis patients about this relationship in an effort to improve the quality of health and contribute to their long-term survival. Blood pressure should be checked at the initial dental visit and at each subsequent visit in patients whose blood pressure is found to be high and/or has a history of hypertension. Dental and medical assistants should receive in-service training to assure competency in measuring blood pressures. All staff should be certified in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Emergency protocol procedures should be in writing and rehearsed regularly. Patients should take their blood pressure medication as usual on the day of the dental procedure. It is helpful for the patients to bring all medications to the office for review at the time of the dental procedure. Good communication should be established between the dentist and physician to maximize good dental and physical health. Because the patient with periodontal disease is at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, a standardized form should be developed for the convenient exchange of vital information, including but not limited to: blood pressure, medications, allergies, medical conditions and pertinent highlights of dental procedures. Minimize stress in patients with coronary artery disease. This includes providing solid local anesthesia, avoidance of intravascular medication injections, and encouraging relaxation techniques. Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated in patients with valvular heart disease but does not guarantee the prevention of endocarditis. These patients should be alerted to monitor any symptoms such as fever, chills or shortness of breath. It has also been documented that toothbrushing, flossing and home plaque removers can cause transient bacteremia in

  11. Treatment options in the young patient with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Tim; Bliss, Richard

    2016-08-01

    The treatment options in the young patient with Graves' disease are the same as in adults, namely antithyroid drug (ATD), surgery (partial or total thyroidectomy) and radioiodine. However, the emphasis and expectation is different in the young person, reflecting a range of considerations including age, pubertal status, disease natural history, likely impact of ATD on disease course and the implications of radiation exposure. New therapeutic strategies that could increase the likelihood of long-term remission are being explored. PMID:26252256

  12. Rare disease policies to improve care for patients in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, Charlotte; Aymé, Ségolène

    2015-10-01

    Rare diseases are those with a particularly low prevalence; in Europe, diseases are considered to be rare when they affect not more than 5 in 10000 persons in the European Union. The specificities of rare diseases make the area a veritable public health challenge: the limited number of patients and scarcity of knowledge and expertise single rare diseases out as a distinctive domain of high European added-value. The Orphan Medicinal Product Regulation of 1999 was the first European legislative text concerning rare diseases, followed by many initiatives, including recommendations by the Council of Ministers of the European Union in 2009. These initiatives contributed to the development of rare diseases policies at European and national level aimed at improving care for patients with rare diseases. A review of the political framework at European level and in European countries is provided to demonstrate how legislation has created a dynamic that is progressively improving care for patients with rare diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)". PMID:25725454

  13. Nocardia infections among immunomodulated inflammatory bowel disease patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Human nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia spp., an ubiquitous soil-borne bacteria, is a rare granulomatous disease close related to immune dysfunctions. Clinically can occur as an acute life-threatening disease, with lung, brain and skin being commonly affected. The infection was classically diagnosed in HIV infected persons, organ transplanted recipients and long term corticosteroid treated patients. Currently the widespread use of immunomodulators and immunossupressors in the treatment of inflammatory diseases changed this scenario. Our purpose is to review all published cases of nocardiosis in immunomodulated patients due to inflammatory diseases and describe clinical and laboratory findings. We reviewed the literature concerning human cases of nocardiosis published between 1980 and 2014 in peer reviewed journals. Eleven cases of nocardiosis associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) prescription (9 related with infliximab and 2 with adalimumab) were identified; 7 patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 4 had rheumatological conditions; nocardia infection presented as cutaneous involvement in 3 patients, lung disease in 4 patients, hepatic in one and disseminated disease in 3 patients. From the 10 cases described in IBD patients 7 were associated with anti-TNF and 3 with steroids and azathioprine. In conclusion, nocardiosis requires high levels of clinical suspicion and experience of laboratory staff, in order to establish a timely diagnosis and by doing so avoid worst outcomes. Treatment for long periods tailored by the susceptibility of the isolated species whenever possible is essential. The safety of restarting immunomodulators or anti-TNF after the disease or the value of prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole is still debated. PMID:26074688

  14. The GREGOR Fabry-Pérot Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschmann, K. G.; Denker, C.; Kneer, F.; Al Erdogan, N.; Balthasar, H.; Bauer, S. M.; Beck, C.; Bello González, N.; Collados, M.; Hahn, T.; Hirzberger, J.; Hofmann, A.; Louis, R. E.; Nicklas, H.; Okunev, O.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Popow, E.; Seelemann, T.; Volkmer, R.; Wittmann, A. D.; Woche, M.

    2012-11-01

    The GREGOR Fabry-Pérot Interferometer (GFPI) is one of three first-light instruments of the German 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The GFPI uses two tunable etalons in collimated mounting. Thanks to its large-format, high-cadence CCD detectors with sophisticated computer hard- and software it is capable of scanning spectral lines with a cadence that is sufficient to capture the dynamic evolution of the solar atmosphere. The field-of-view (FOV) of 50 arcsec × 38 arcsec is well suited for quiet Sun and sunspot observations. However, in the vector spectropolarimetric mode the FOV reduces to 25 arcsec × 38 arcsec. The spectral coverage in the spectroscopic mode extends from 530-860 nm with a theoretical spectral resolution of R ≈ 250,000, whereas in the vector spectropolarimetric mode the wavelength range is at present limited to 580-660 nm. The combination of fast narrow-band imaging and post-factum image restoration has the potential for discovery science concerning the dynamic Sun and its magnetic field at spatial scales down to ˜50 km on the solar surface.

  15. Fabry-Perot observations of comet Austin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, David; Scherb, F.; Roesler, F. L.; Li, G.; Harlander, J.; Roberts, T. P. P.; Vandenberk, D.; Nossal, S.; Coakley, M.; Oliversen, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary results of a program to observe Comet Austin (1990c1) from 16 April to 4 May and from 11 May to 27 May 1990 using the West Auxiliary of the McMath Solar Telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona were presetned. The observations were made with a 15 cm duel-etalon Fabry-Perot scanning and imaging spectrometer with two modes of operation: a high resolution mode with a velocity resolution of 1.2 km/s and a medium resolution mode with a velocity resolution 10 km/s. Scanning data was obtained with an RCA C31034A photomultiplier tube and imaging data was obtained with a Photometrics LN2 cooled CCD camera with a 516 by 516 Ford chip. The results include: (1) information on the coma outflow velocity from high resolution spectral profiles of (OI)6300 and NH2 emissions, (2) gaseous water production rates from medium resolution observation of (OI)6300, (3) spectra of H2O(+) emissions in order to study the ionized component of the coma, (4) spatial distribution of H2O(+) emission features from sequences of velocity resolved images (data cubes), and (5) spatial distribution of (OI)6300 and NH2 emissions from medium resolution images. The field of view on the sky was 10.5 arcminutes in diameter. In the imaging mode the CCD was binned 4 by 4 resulting in 7.6 sec power pixel and a subarray readout for a field of view of 10.5 min.

  16. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  17. Conservative treatment of arterial pseudoaneurism in patients with behcet disease.

    PubMed

    Unal, O; Citgez, B; Cipe, G; Toydemir, T; Karatepe, O

    2013-02-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a rare disease, of unknown origin that generally causes an inflammation in the subcutaneous tissue, eyes and brain vessels, and related with the immune system, predominantly seen in male patients and the mean age at onset is mainly in the third decade. The aim of the study was to present our experiences with the cases of arterial pseudoaneurysms that we treated conservatively without surgical or radiological intervention. Eleven patients with Behcet's disease who developed arterial pseudoaneuryms and responsed to the medical treatment are included in the study. The operation requirement, the complication rates, and factors that influence morbidity and mortality are evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 29,5 (18-35) years. Nine of the patients were male and 2 were female. The mean period of hospitalization was 18 (11-34) days. Six patients redeveloped aneurysm during their follow-up. Three of these patients were treated with surgery. Five patients had no complication during an average of 20 months of follow-up period. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication of Behcet's disease. Despite the good response to conservative treatment at the beginning period, the patients should be closely followed up and redevelopment of the aneurysm should be kept in mind. PMID:23482359

  18. Learning Style Preferences of Elderly Coronary Artery Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Saundra L.; Merritt, Sharon L.

    1992-01-01

    The Patient Learning Styles Questionnaire derived from Canfield and administered to 134 elderly coronary artery disease patients revealed the following order of learning preferences: structure, iconics, listening, direct experience, reading, achievement, affiliation, and eminence. Level of education significantly influenced preferred learning…

  19. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  20. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients' Participation, Attitude and Preferences Toward Exercise.

    PubMed

    Chae, J; Yang, H I; Kim, B; Park, S J; Jeon, J Y

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the level of exercise participation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to investigate their intention, attitude and preference toward exercise. The data of 158 IBD patients that participated in a self-administered survey at Severance Hospital between March 2013 and November 2013 were included in this cross sectional and descriptive analysis. Questionnaires included 3 sections to determine the IBD patient's current exercise participation, attitude toward exercise, and exercise preferences. This study investigated IBD patients both collectively, and according to their specific disease: Crohn's disease (CD) (n=62), Ulcerative colitis (UC) (n=73) and intestinal Behçet's disease (BD) (n=23). IBD patients currently participate in 103 min/week of exercise including mild, moderate and strenuous intensity, with BD patients being the least active, followed by CD, and UC being most active. The majority of IBD patients found exercise to be pleasant (57.7%), beneficial (80.5%), sensible (71.8%), uplifting (61%) and good (70.5%), and 44.4% found exercise to be enjoyable. This study shows the IBD patients' participation, attitude and preferences toward exercise and provides much needed information for the development of evidence based exercise programs that are specific to IBD. PMID:27191208

  1. Gait in SWEDDs patients: comparison with Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Mian, Omar S; Schneider, Susanne A; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Bhatia, Kailash P; Day, Brian L

    2011-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease on clinical grounds who subsequently turn out to have normal dopamine transporter imaging have been referred to as SWEDDs (scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficits). Despite having clinical features similar to those of Parkinson's disease, these patients seem to have different pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment requirements. In this study we determined the similarities and differences in the gaits of SWEDDs and Parkinson's disease patients to investigate whether walking patterns can distinguish these entities. We used 3-D motion capture to analyze the gaits of 11 SWEDDs patients (who had unilateral or asymmetric upper limb tremor with a rest component), 12 tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease patients, and 13 healthy control participants. In common with Parkinson's disease patients, SWEDDs patients had a slow gait mainly because of a small stride length, as well as a reduced arm swing. However, several abnormal features of posture and gait in Parkinson's disease were normal in SWEDDs. Thus, SWEDDs patients had normal trunk and elbow posture, normal stride length variability, and normal bilateral step-phase coordination, all of which were abnormal in Parkinson's disease patients. We also searched for signs of ataxic movements during normal and tandem walking, but found no evidence that ataxic gait was a general feature in SWEDDs. These findings could aid the clinician in identification of potential tremulous SWEDDs cases. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society. PMID:21442658

  2. Exercise Decreases Risk of Future Active Disease in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patricia D.; Kappelman, Michael D.; Martin, Christopher F.; Chen, Wenli; Sandler, Robert S.; Long, Millie D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although exercise impacts quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), little is known about its role in disease activity. Among IBD patients in remission, we aimed to evaluate the association between exercise and subsequent active disease. Methods We performed a prospective study using the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) Partners Internet-based cohort of individuals with self-reported IBD. We identified participants in remission, defined as short Crohn's disease activity index (sCDAI) <150 or simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI) ≤2. The primary exposure was exercise status, measured using the validated Godin leisure time activity index. The primary study outcome, assessed after six months, was active disease defined using the above disease activity index thresholds. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to describe the independent association between exercise and risk of active disease. Results We identified 1308 patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) and 549 with ulcerative or indeterminate colitis (UC/IC) in remission, of whom 227(17.4%) with CD and 135 (24.6%) with UC/IC developed active disease after 6 months. Higher exercise level was associated with decreased risk of active disease for CD (adjusted RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.94) and UC/IC (adjusted RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.54-1.13). Conclusions In patients with CD in remission, those with higher exercise levels were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. In patients with UC/IC in remission, patients with higher exercise levels were less likely to develop active disease at six months, however this was not statistically significant. PMID:25723616

  3. [Vascular rehabilitation in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Ana; Aubourg, Marion; Dubus-Bausière, Valérie; Eveno, Dominique; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent debilitating disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. The benefit of rehabilitation in PAD patients has been largely demonstrated, both for patients that undergo amputation, and for patients with claudication. In these latter patients, rehabilitation programs rely on a variety of additional techniques or tools, among which: stretching, specific muscle proprioception, walking and a variety of other physical activities, exercise or situations adapted to community life, lower limb and respiratory physiotherapy, patient's education, support for smoking cessation and healthy nutrition, social support, etc. Whether rehabilitation is performed in specialised integrated structures or performed on a home-based basis, various clinicians are involved. Despite evidence-based proof of efficacy, rehabilitation of PAD patients with claudication is still under-used. PMID:23669319

  4. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management. PMID:26846749

  5. Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Nancy; Wong, Titus

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is now the leading cause of nosocomial infection. There has been an upsurge of CDI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients with CDI have increased morbidity and mortality. The establishment, proliferation, and recurrence of CDI in IBD patients form a complex interplay of microbial, environmental, and host-susceptibility factors. Different risk factors have been found predisposing IBD patients to CDI. Vancomycin performs better than metronidazole in treating IBD patients with CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation continues to be a very effective therapy. New therapeutic modalities such as vaccinations and bile salts are currently being investigated. PMID:27137789

  6. [Invasive mould disease in haematological patients].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mould infections (IMI) are a persistent problem with high morbidity and mortality rates among patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Management of IMI in this setting has become increasingly complex with the advent of new antifungal agents and diagnostic tests, which have resulted in different therapeutic strategies (prophylactic, empirical, pre-emptive, and directed). A proper assessment of the individual risk for IMI appears to be critical in order to use the best prophylactic and therapeutic approach and increase the survival rates. Among the available antifungal drugs, the most frequently used in the hematologic patient are fluconazole, mould-active azoles (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole), candins (anidulafungin, caspofungin and micafungin), and lipid formulations of amphotericin B. Specific recommendations for their use, and criteria for selecting the antifungal agents are discussed in this paper. PMID:25434346

  7. Visual dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Štenc Bradvica, Ivanka; Bradvica, Mario; Matić, Suzana; Reisz-Majić, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the Pelli-Robson and Ishihara diagnostic methods in differing Parkinson's disease from essential tremor compared to DaTSCAN (dopamine transporter scan) findings. The intention was to investigate whether visual dysfunction appears in the early state of Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we included patients with the symptomatology of parkinsonism lasting between 6 and 12 months. The study included 164 patients of which 59 (36.0%) suffered from Parkinson's disease, 51 (31.1%) from essential tremor, and 54 (32.9%) healthy patients which presented the control group. The specificity of Pelli-Robson test in confirming Parkinson's disease was 53% and the sensitivity 81.4%. The specificity of Ishihara test in confirming Parkinson's disease was 88.2%, and sensitivity 55.9%. We found that the colour and contrast dysfunction are present as the earliest symptoms of Parkinson's disease. In this study the Pelli-Robson test is highly sensitive and the Ishihara tables are highly specific in the differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, but neither of these methods fulfils the criteria for the validity of a test. We suggest performing both of these methods to evaluate which patients are indicated for DaTSCAN. PMID:25164787

  8. [Genetic, population and phenotypic characteristics of patients with Hirschsprung disease].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Aja, E; Vega Hernández, L; Martínez Ezquerra, N; De Diego García, E; Pérez Marrodan, A; Alvarez-Buhilla, P López

    2012-07-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is caused by the absence of ganglion cells in the intestine due to defects in the migration of enteric nervous system cells during embryologic development. The incidence is one in every 5000 births, more common in men than women. There are two main phenotypes according to the aganglionic segment length: Short (S-HSCR, (80% of patients) and Long (L-HSCR, 20%). Variations have been detected in the coding sequence of the RET proto-oncogene in patients with HSCR, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the disease. Our aim is to find and analyze polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the disease. We are interested also in stablish an association between sex and type of aganglionic segment. We analyzed the RET promoter as well a polymorphism in exon 13 strongly associated to the disease. The populations for the study were a group of 56 patients with sporadic HSCR and 178 healthy controls. The results obtained show that the disease is more common in men than in women (3:1). The RET genotype shows that alleles A and G of the promoter (c.-200A > G and c.-196C > A) and G of exon 13 (c.2307T > G) are associated with the affected population. Our data suggest neither association between the disease phenotype and the distribution of the polymorphisms analyzed nor with the sex of the patients. The presence of certain polymorphisms in the RET sequence indicates a genetic predisposition (combined with other genetic or environmental factors) to the disease. PMID:23480009

  9. Characteristics of handwriting of patients with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J G; Bradshaw, J L; Chiu, E; Bradshaw, J A

    1994-09-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease exhibit poorer-quality handwriting, sometimes clinically exhibiting macrographia, an increase in the size of handwriting. To characterize deficits in handwriting of patients with Huntington's disease, we compared the writing of 12 young, 12 age-matched controls, and 12 patients with Huntington's disease. Subjects were asked to write the letter "l" four times, at a constant length, on a graphics tablet that sampled pen position at 200 Hz. Huntington's disease causes chorea (involuntary movement), akinesia (difficulty in initiating voluntary movement), and bradykinesia (slowness and difficulty in maintaining voluntary movement). To distinguish changes in handwriting quality due to involuntary movement from impairments of voluntary movement, handwriting samples with obvious choreic movements were analyzed separately from other handwriting samples. Several measures of quality of handwriting were considered, based on: the regularity and consistency of handwriting, the efficiency of movement trajectories, and the proportions of movement occurring at specific frequencies. Results suggested that Huntington's disease increases variability of movement parameters, and causes problems in producing smooth movements. Choreic movement was best characterized by the number of zero crossings in the velocity function relative to the prescribed number of writing strokes. We hypothesize that macrographia in Huntington's disease occurs when chorea predominates over bradykinesia. Comparisons were made between the handwriting of patients with Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:7990847

  10. [Airway Management in a Patient with Forestier's Disease].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuriko; Echigo, Noriyuki; Akata, Mariko; Yokoyama, Kaori; Takasugi, Naoya; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-04-01

    Airway management in a patient with Forestier's disease can be challenging clinically because this disease may cause not only dysphagia but also airway obstruction due to the compression of the pharynx and esophagus caused by the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament. We report our anesthetic management in a patient with Forestier's disease. Meanwhile, we studied the causes of difficult airway and the most suitable airway device for a patient with this disease from a standpoint of anatomy of upper airway. Our study indicated the possibility that the most suitable airway device differed depending on the actual location of the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine and that more prudent airway management would be required if its lesion location extended to upper cervical spine. PMID:27188118