Science.gov

Sample records for face-centered cubic spheres

  1. Face-Centered-Cubic Nanostructured Polymer Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, C.; Baughman, R. H.; Liu, L. M.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Khayrullin, I. I.

    1998-03-01

    Beautifully iridescent polymer foams having Fm-3m cubic symmetry and periodicities on the scale of the wavelength of light have been synthesized by the templating of porous synthetic opals. These fabrication processes involve the filling of porous SiO2 opals (with typical cubic lattice parameters of 250 nm) with either polymers or polymer precursors, polymerization of the precursors if necessary, and removal of the fcc array of SiO2 balls to provide an all-polymer structure. The structures of these foams are similar to periodic minimal surfaces, although the Gaussian curvature can have both positive and negative values. Depending upon whether the internal surfaces of the opal are polymer filled or polymer coated, the polymer replica has either one or two sets of independent channels. We fill these channels with semiconductors, metals, or superconductors to provide electronic and optical materials with novel properties dependent on the nanoscale periodicity.

  2. Ferromagnetic Ground States in Face-Centered Cubic Hubbard Clusters.

    PubMed

    Souza, T X R; Macedo, C A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the ground state energies of face-centered cubic Hubbard clusters are analyzed using the Lanczos method. Examination of the ground state energy as a function of the number of particle per site n showed an energy minimum for face-centered cubic structures. This energy minimum decreased in n with increasing coulombic interaction parameter U. We found that the ground state energy had a minimum at n = 0.6, when U = 3W, where W denotes the non-interacting energy bandwidth and the face-centered cubic structure was ferromagnetic. These results, when compared with the properties of nickel, shows strong similarity with other finite temperature analyses in the literature and supports the Hirsh's conjecture that the interatomic direct exchange interaction dominates in driving the system into a ferromagnetic phase. PMID:27583653

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flow in a porous, face centered cubic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoliang; Apte, Sourabh; Wood, Brian

    2014-11-01

    DNS of flow through a 3D, periodic, face centered cubic (FCC) unit cell geometry at Re = 300 , 550, and 950 based on diameter is performed. This low porosity arrangement of spheres is characterized by rapid flow expansions and contractions, and thus features an early onset to turbulence. The simulations are performed using a fictitious domain approach [Apte et al., J. Comp. Physics 2009], which uses non-body conforming Cartesian grids, with resolution up to D / Δ = 250 (3543 cells total). The results are used to investigate the structure of turbulence in the Eulerian and Lagrangian frames, the distribution and budget of turbulent kinetic energy, and the characteristics of the energy spectrum in complex packed beds and porous media. The porescale flow physics, which are important to properties such as bulk mixing performance and permeability, are investigated. Specifically, the data generated is being used to understand the important turbulence characteristics in low porosity packed beds of relevance for heat tranfer applications in chemical/nuclear reactors. Funding: NSF Project Number 1336983.

  4. Resistance calculation of the face-centered cubic lattice: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owaidat, M. Q.

    2013-12-01

    The effective resistance between two arbitrary lattice points in an infinite, face-centered cubic lattice network of identical resistors is calculated using the lattice Green's function method. Theoretical results have been verified experimentally by constructing actual finite networks of resistors. This problem could be useful in undergraduate courses (e.g., advanced mathematical methods course) and would provide a good example for introducing the concept of Green's function.

  5. Phonon densities of states of face-centered-cubic Ni-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Matthew; Mauger, L; Munoz, Jorge A.; Halevy, I; Horwath, J; Semiatin, S L; Leontsev, S. O.; Stone, Matthew B; Abernathy, Douglas L; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, P; Fultz, B.

    2013-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering were used to determine the phonon densities of states of face-centered-cubic Ni-Fe alloys. Increasing Fe concentration results in an average softening of the phonon modes. Chemical ordering of the Ni0.72Fe0.28 alloy results in a reduction of the partial vibrational entropy of the Fe atoms but does not significantly change the partial vibrational entropy of the Ni atoms. Changes in the phonon densities of states with composition and chemical ordering are discussed and analyzed with a cluster expansion method.

  6. Formation of recrystallization cube texture in high purity face-centered cubic metal sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, W.

    1999-10-01

    An investigation on recrystallization textures in high purity face-centered cubic (fcc) aluminum, copper, and nickel indicated that the cube texture is a unique dominant final texture. In a macroview of rolling deformation, a balanced activation of four slip systems can result in certain stability of some substructure with cube orientation in the deformed matrix. In the stable substructure the dislocation density is very low, and the dislocation configuration is rather simple in comparison to other orientations so that the cube substructure can easily be transformed into cube recrystallization nuclei by a recovery process. A high orientation gradient and correspondingly high angle boundaries to the deformed matrix are usually expected around the cube nuclei, which, therefore, grow rapidly. After the primary recrystallization, the size of cube grains is much larger than the grains with other orientations, which will be expensed as the cube grains grow further, so that the cube texture can finally become a dominant texture component.

  7. Anisotropic Size-Dependent Plasticity in Face-Centered Cubic Micropillars Under Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Ill; Cai, Wei; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations are performed to investigate the size-dependent plasticity in submicron face-centered cubic (FCC) micropillars under torsion. By using a previously implemented surface nucleation algorithm within DD, we show that the plastic behavior of FCC micropillars under torsion is strongly affected by the crystallographic orientation: In <110> oriented submicron pillars, coaxial dislocations nucleate and pile up near the axis, leading to homogeneous deformation along the pillars. In contrast, in <100> and <111> oriented pillars, heterogeneous plasticity has been observed due to the formation of localized dislocation arrays. As a result of the existence of a coaxial slip plane in <110> oriented pillars, stronger size-dependent plasticity is observed in this case compared with those in other orientations.

  8. High dose effects in neutron irradiated face-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    During neutron irradiation, most face-centered cubic metals and alloys develop saturation or quasi-steady state microstructures. This, in turn, leads to saturation levels in mechanical properties and quasi-steady state rates of swelling and creep deformation. Swelling initially plays only a small role in determining these saturation states, but as swelling rises to higher levels, it exerts strong feedback on the microstructure and its response to environmental variables. The influence of swelling, either directly or indirectly via second order mechanisms, such as elemental segregation to void surfaces, eventually causes major changes, not only in irradiation creep and mechanical properties, but also on swelling itself. The feedback effects of swelling on irradiation creep are particularly complex and lead to problems in applying creep data derived from highly pressurized creep tubes to low stress situations, such as fuel pins in liquid metal reactors.

  9. Synthesis and microstructure of electrodeposited and sputtered nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Wang, Morris; Liu, Yue; Lu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The remarkable properties of nanotwinned (NT) face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals arise directly from twin boundaries, the structures of which can be initially determined by growth twinning during the deposition process. When we understand the synthesis process and its relation to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to material properties, we realize how key it is to understanding and utilizing these materials. Furthermore, our article presents recent studies on electrodeposition and sputtering methods that produce a high density of nanoscale growth twins in fcc metals. Nanoscale growth twins tend to form spontaneously in monolithic and alloyed fcc metals with lower stacking-fault energies, whilemore » engineered approaches are necessary for fcc metals with higher stacking-fault energies. Finally, growth defects and other microstructural features that influence nanotwin behavior and stability are introduced here, and future challenges in fabricating NT materials are highlighted.« less

  10. Anisotropy of tensile strength and fracture mode of perfect face-centered-cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. F.; Xu, J.; Qu, R. T.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an effective method to calculate the ideal tensile strength of six face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystals (Cu, Au, Ni, Pt, Al, and Ir) along an arbitrary tensile direction by considering the coupling effect of normal stress and shear stress on a given crystallographic plane. Meanwhile, the fracture modes of the six crystals can also be derived from the competition between shear and cleavage fracture along different crystallographic planes. The results show that both the intrinsic factors (the ideal shear strength and cleavage strength of low-index planes) and the orientation may affect the tensile strength and fracture modes of ideal fcc crystals, which may give the reliable strength limit of fcc metals and well interpret the observed high strength in nano-scale mechanical experiments.

  11. Rolling-induced Face Centered Cubic Titanium in Hexagonal Close Packed Titanium at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H. C.; Kumar, A.; Wang, J.; Bi, X. F.; Tomé, C. N.; Zhang, Z.; Mao, S. X.

    2016-04-01

    Combining transmission electron microscopes and density functional theory calculations, we report the nucleation and growth mechanisms of room temperature rolling induced face-centered cubic titanium (fcc-Ti) in polycrystalline hexagonal close packed titanium (hcp-Ti). Fcc-Ti and hcp-Ti take the orientation relation: <0001>hcp||<001>fcc and , different from the conventional one. The nucleation of fcc-Ti is accomplished via pure-shuffle mechanism with a minimum stable thickness of three atomic layers, and the growth via shear-shuffle mechanisms through gliding two-layer disconnections or pure-shuffle mechanisms through gliding four-layer disconnections. Such phase transformation offers an additional plastic deformation mode comparable to twinning.

  12. Rolling-induced Face Centered Cubic Titanium in Hexagonal Close Packed Titanium at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H. C.; Kumar, A.; Wang, J.; Bi, X. F.; Tomé, C. N.; Zhang, Z.; Mao, S. X.

    2016-01-01

    Combining transmission electron microscopes and density functional theory calculations, we report the nucleation and growth mechanisms of room temperature rolling induced face-centered cubic titanium (fcc-Ti) in polycrystalline hexagonal close packed titanium (hcp-Ti). Fcc-Ti and hcp-Ti take the orientation relation: 〈0001〉hcp||〈001〉fcc and , different from the conventional one. The nucleation of fcc-Ti is accomplished via pure-shuffle mechanism with a minimum stable thickness of three atomic layers, and the growth via shear-shuffle mechanisms through gliding two-layer disconnections or pure-shuffle mechanisms through gliding four-layer disconnections. Such phase transformation offers an additional plastic deformation mode comparable to twinning. PMID:27067515

  13. Atomic Mobilities in the Ag-Cu-Sn Face-Centered Cubic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierlotka, W.; Chen, Y. H.; Haque, M. A.; Rahman, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of atomic mobilities is necessary to predict the evolution of microstructure. The theoretical description of atomic mobilities is connected to the chemical potentials of the components in a given phase. A new thermodynamic description of the quaternary Ag-Cu-In-Sn system was recently published, and it is clear that a new description of the mobilities is also necessary. Based on the available literature and using Dictra software, optimization of the mobility parameters of silver, copper, and tin in the face-centered cubic phase was carried out. The results were compared with relevant data from literature as well as with our own experimental results. Good agreement between calculations and experiment was obtained.

  14. Experimental study of grain interactions on rolling texture development in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Ray, Atish

    There exists considerable debate in the texture community about whether grain interactions are a necessary factor to explain the development of deformation textures in polycrystalline metals. Computer simulations indicate that grain interactions play a significant role, while experimental evidence shows that the material type and starting orientation are more important in the development of texture and microstructure. A balanced review of the literature on face-centered cubic metals shows that the opposing viewpoints have developed due to the lack of any complete experimental study which considers both the intrinsic (material type and starting orientation) and extrinsic (grain interaction) factors. In this study, a novel method was developed to assemble ideally orientated crystalline aggregates in 99.99% aluminum (Al) or copper (Cu) to experimentally evaluate the effect of grain interactions on room temperature deformation texture. Ideal orientations relevant to face-centered cubic rolling textures, Cube {100} <001>, Goss {110} <001>, Brass {110} <11¯2> and Copper {112} <111¯> were paired in different combinations and deformed by plane strain compression to moderate strain levels of 1.0 to 1.5. Orientation dependent mechanical behavior was distinguishable from that of the neighbor-influenced behavior. In interacting crystals the constraint on the rolling direction shear strains (gammaXY , gammaXZ) was found to be most critical to show the effect of interactions via the evolution of local microstructure and microtexture. Interacting crystals with increasing deformations were observed to gradually rotate towards the S-component, {123} <634>. Apart from the average lattice reorientations, the interacting crystals also developed strong long-range orientation gradients inside the bulk of the crystal, which were identified as accumulating misorientations across the deformation boundaries. Based on a statistical procedure using quaternions, the orientation and

  15. Effective refractive index of face-centered-cubic and hexagonal close-packed 250 nm-SiO2 based colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo-Reyes, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative kinematic analysis, of the refraction properties of face-centered-cubic and hexagonal close-packed 250 nm-SiO2-based colloidal crystals, was performed using the plane wave expansion method. The angle-dependent effective refractive index, for different frequencies, was calculated taking into account the continuity of the tangential component of the wave vector across the interface and the energy conservation principle as well. The results demonstrate that the unusual optical properties, of the close packed SiO2-based colloidal crystals, depend strongly on the sphere-packing symmetry rather than from the material itself.

  16. Deformation twinning evolution from a single crystal in a face-centered-cubic ternary alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Yang, Song; Guo, Dongming; Yuan, Boya; Guo, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Bi; Huo, Yanxia

    2015-01-01

    Deformation twinning evolution from a single crystal is conducted by molecular dynamics simulations, to elucidate a twinned face-centered-cubic alloy in an experiment with hardness up to 100 times as that of single crystals, and with ductility simultaneously. Critical twinning stress of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) calculated is 1.38 GPa. All the twin boundaries are along the (11-1) orientation, except the one with the (-111) plane that supports the indentation, interpreting the unidirectional and boundary-free characteristics, confirmed in the experiment. Three twin thicknesses after unloading are 3.2, 3.5, and 16 nm, which is consistent with the experimentally repeated pattern of a lamellar twin with thickness larger than 12.7 nm, followed by one or several twins with thicknesses smaller than 12.7 nm. An inverse triangle of a twin combining with three twins generate a synergistic strengthening effect through the hardening and softening functions, illuminating the ultrahigh hardness demonstrated in the experiment. Twinning takes place in loading, and detwinning occurs in unloading, which expounds the high ductility observed in the experiment. PMID:26060979

  17. Quantitative modeling of solute drag by vacancies in face-centered-cubic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Thomas; Trinkle, Dallas R.; Nastar, Maylise; Bellon, Pascal

    2014-04-01

    Transport coefficients, the elements of the so-called Onsager matrix, are essential quantities for modeling solid-state kinetics controlled by diffusion. In a face-centered-cubic structure, drag of solute atoms by vacancies can be caused by solute-vacancy binding at nearest neighbors. In order to investigate solute drag in alloys with interactions up to the third-nearest-neighbor sites, we extend an analytic method: the self-consistent mean field method. With this method, we calculate the Onsager matrix of model alloys to identify kinetic effects arising from individual and collective jump frequencies and assess the results on select cases using atomic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Using preexisting density functional theory data from various sources, we show that many impurities have low-temperature solute drag before changing to solute exchange at high temperatures. We evaluate the transition temperature for these alloys between these two regimes and compare the results with available experimental data. Some disagreement is found, which can be due both to experimental and numerical shortcomings. In order to guide diffusion calculations, the sensitivity of the Onsager matrix to the range of the kinetic correlation and to the input density functional theory data is studied.

  18. Numerical Modeling of the Stability of Face-Centered Cubic Metals with High Vacancy Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Brian P. Somerday; M. I. Baskes

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to assess the possibility of forming an atomically porous structure in a low-density metal, e.g., Al with vacancies up to 0.20/lattice site; and to examine the effects of hydrogen and vacancy concentration on the stability of an atomically porous structure that has been experimentally produced in nickel. The approach involves numerical modeling using the Embedded-Atom Method (EAM). High vacancy concentrations cause the Al lattice to disorder at 300K. In contrast, Ni retains the face-centered-cubic structure at 300K for vacancy concentrations up to 0.15 Vac/lattice site. Unexpectedly, the lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable than the lattice with 0.10 or 0.20 Vac/lattice site. The Ni systems with 0.10 and 0.15 Vac/lattice site exhibit domains consisting of uniform lattice rotations. The Ni lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable with an initial distribution of random vacancies compared to ordered vacancies. The equilibrium lattice structures of Ni a d Al containing vacancies and H are less ordered to structures with vacancies only at 300K.

  19. Stacking fault energy of face-centered cubic metals: thermodynamic and ab initio approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihuan; Lu, Song; Kim, Dongyoo; Schönecker, Stephan; Zhao, Jijun; Kwon, Se Kyun; Vitos, Levente

    2016-10-01

    The formation energy of the interface between face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close packed (hcp) structures is a key parameter in determining the stacking fault energy (SFE) of fcc metals and alloys using thermodynamic calculations. It is often assumed that the contribution of the planar fault energy to the SFE has the same order of magnitude as the bulk part, and thus the lack of precise information about it can become the limiting factor in thermodynamic predictions. Here, we differentiate between the interfacial energy for the coherent fcc(1 1 1)/hcp(0 0 0 1) interface and the 'pseudo-interfacial energy' that enters the thermodynamic expression for the SFE. Using first-principles calculations, we determine the coherent and pseudo-interfacial energies for six elemental metals (Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, and Au) and three paramagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Our results show that the two interfacial energies significantly differ from each other. We observe a strong chemistry dependence for both interfacial energies. The calculated pseudo-interfacial energies for the Fe-Cr-Ni steels agree well with the available literature data. We discuss the effects of strain on the description of planar faults via thermodynamic and ab initio approaches. PMID:27484794

  20. Order-by-disorder effects in antiferromagnets on face-centered cubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalov, L. A.; Syromyatnikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the role of quantum fluctuations in Heisenberg antiferromagnets on face-centered cubic lattice with small dipolar interaction in which the next-nearest-neighbor exchange coupling dominates over the nearest-neighbor one. It is well known that a collinear magnetic structure which contains (111) ferromagnetic planes arranged antiferromagnetically along one of the space diagonals of the cube is stabilized in this model via order-by-disorder mechanism. On the mean-field level, the dipolar interaction forces spin to lie within (111) planes. By considering 1 / S corrections to the ground state energy, we demonstrate that quantum fluctuations lead to an anisotropy within (111) planes favoring three equivalent directions for the staggered magnetization (e.g., [ 11 2 bar ], [ 1 2 bar 1 ], and [ 2 bar 11 ] directions for (111) plane). Such in-plane anisotropy was obtained experimentally in related materials MnO, α-MnS, α-MnSe, EuTe, and EuSe. We find that the order-by-disorder mechanism can contribute significantly to the value of the in-plane anisotropy in EuTe. Magnon spectrum is also derived in the first order in 1 / S.

  1. Multiple Bragg diffraction at W point in the face centered cubic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Rajesh V.; Jagatap, Bhagawantrao N.

    2015-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of multiple Bragg diffraction that occurs when the tip of the incident wave vector lies on a line joining the L and W points in the Brillouin zone of a face-centered cubic (FCC) photonic crystal. The multiple Bragg diffraction is analyzed for photonic crystals with different lattice constants and refractive index contrasts. Angle-dependent reflectance spectroscopy indicates strong hybridization of diffraction resonances when the tip of the incident wave vector crosses the W point and the multiple Bragg diffraction is seen to be extended over an angular range of 8 deg around the W point. We also observe a new diffraction resonance in the short-wavelength region for wave vectors shifting toward the W point in the hexagonal facet of the FCC Brillouin zone. Each diffraction resonance is fitted using the Bragg's law for different planes in the FCC photonic crystal taking into account the internal angle between the planes. The diffraction resonances in the multiple Bragg diffraction regime are assigned to FCC crystal planes with Miller indices (111), (200), (1¯11), and (220). Our results have implications for diverse kinds of wave propagations in periodic structures and applications in light emission, sensing, and structural color pigments.

  2. Deformation twinning evolution from a single crystal in a face-centered-cubic ternary alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Yang, Song; Guo, Dongming; Yuan, Boya; Guo, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Bi; Huo, Yanxia

    2015-01-01

    Deformation twinning evolution from a single crystal is conducted by molecular dynamics simulations, to elucidate a twinned face-centered-cubic alloy in an experiment with hardness up to 100 times as that of single crystals, and with ductility simultaneously. Critical twinning stress of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) calculated is 1.38 GPa. All the twin boundaries are along the (11-1) orientation, except the one with the (-111) plane that supports the indentation, interpreting the unidirectional and boundary-free characteristics, confirmed in the experiment. Three twin thicknesses after unloading are 3.2, 3.5, and 16 nm, which is consistent with the experimentally repeated pattern of a lamellar twin with thickness larger than 12.7 nm, followed by one or several twins with thicknesses smaller than 12.7 nm. An inverse triangle of a twin combining with three twins generate a synergistic strengthening effect through the hardening and softening functions, illuminating the ultrahigh hardness demonstrated in the experiment. Twinning takes place in loading, and detwinning occurs in unloading, which expounds the high ductility observed in the experiment. PMID:26060979

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Ru Cubic Nanocages with a Face-Centered Cubic Structure by Templating with Pd Nanocubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Figueroa-Cosme, Legna; Elnabawy, Ahmed O; Vara, Madeline; Yang, Xuan; Roling, Luke T; Chi, Miaofang; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2016-08-10

    Nanocages have received considerable attention in recent years for catalytic applications owing to their high utilization efficiency of atoms and well-defined facets. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of Ru cubic nanocages with ultrathin walls, in which the atoms are crystallized in a face-centered cubic (fcc) rather than hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. The key to the success of this synthesis is to ensure layer-by-layer deposition of Ru atoms on the surface of Pd cubic seeds by controlling the reaction temperature and the injection rate of a Ru(III) precursor. By selectively etching away the Pd from the Pd@Ru core-shell nanocubes, we obtain Ru nanocages with an average wall thickness of 1.1 nm or about six atomic layers. Most importantly, the Ru nanocages adopt an fcc crystal structure rather than the hcp structure observed in bulk Ru. The synthesis has been successfully applied to Pd cubic seeds with different edge lengths in the range of 6-18 nm, with smaller seeds being more favorable for the formation of Ru shells with a flat, smooth surface due to shorter distance for the surface diffusion of the Ru adatoms. Self-consistent density functional theory calculations indicate that these unique fcc-structured Ru nanocages might possess promising catalytic properties for ammonia synthesis compared to hcp Ru(0001), on the basis of strengthened binding of atomic N and substantially reduced activation energies for N2 dissociation, which is the rate-determining step for ammonia synthesis on hcp Ru catalysts. PMID:27458871

  4. Wang-Landau sampling in face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Yao, Yonglei; Xue, Yu; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Finding the global minimum-energy structure is one of the main problems of protein structure prediction. The face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice model can reach high approximation ratios of real protein structures, so the fcc lattice model is a good choice to predict the protein structures. The lacking of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. The Wang-Landau sampling method is especially useful for complex systems with a rough energy landscape and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems. We apply the improved Wang-Landau (IWL) sampling method, which incorporates the generation of an initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood strategy based on pull moves into the Wang-Landau sampling method to predict the protein structures on the fcc HP lattice model. Unlike conventional Monte Carlo simulations that generate a probability distribution at a given temperature, the Wang-Landau sampling method can estimate the density of states accurately via a random walk, which produces a flat histogram in energy space. We test 12 general benchmark instances on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) fcc HP lattice models. The lowest energies by the IWL sampling method are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. We then test five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by the S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D fcc HP lattice model. The numerical results show that our algorithm performs better than the other five methods in the literature on both the lowest energies and the average lowest energies in all runs. The IWL sampling method turns out to be a powerful tool to study the structure prediction of the fcc HP lattice model proteins.

  5. Current-direction dependence of the transport properties in single-crystalline face-centered-cubic cobalt films

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Liang, J. H.; Chen, B. L.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.; Ma, D. H.

    2015-07-28

    Face-centered-cubic cobalt films are epitaxially grown on insulating LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Transport measurements are conducted in different current directions relative to the crystal axes. We find that the temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends on the current direction. However, the anomalous Hall effect shows isotropic behavior independent of the current direction. Our results demonstrate the interplay between the current direction and the crystalline lattice in single-crystalline ferromagnetic films. A phenomenological analysis is presented to interpret the experimental data.

  6. Current-direction dependence of the transport properties in single-crystalline face-centered-cubic cobalt films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X.; Liang, J. H.; Chen, B. L.; Li, J. X.; Ma, D. H.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2015-07-01

    Face-centered-cubic cobalt films are epitaxially grown on insulating LaAlO3(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Transport measurements are conducted in different current directions relative to the crystal axes. We find that the temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends on the current direction. However, the anomalous Hall effect shows isotropic behavior independent of the current direction. Our results demonstrate the interplay between the current direction and the crystalline lattice in single-crystalline ferromagnetic films. A phenomenological analysis is presented to interpret the experimental data.

  7. Low-temperature thermostatics of face-centered-cubic metallic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    The thermostatic properties of a high-symmetry phase of metallic hydrogen with atomic sphere radius between 0.1 and 1.5 bohr are studied, with special emphasis accorded to electronic screening and quantum proton motion. The electron-proton and proton-proton interactions receive a perturbation treatment based on the Singwi dielectric function, while the proton motion is handled by self-consistent harmonic approximation. Quantum behavior is found to be less pronounced than expected, and nuclear magnetism is absent. The phonon spectrum is, however, affected by screening and large proton motion. The zero-point vibrational energy and the superconducting critical temperature are below previous estimates. The crystalline-defect formation energies are a few times the Debye energy, which implies that defects contribute significantly to melting at the lower particle densities.

  8. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed. PMID:27430188

  9. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  10. Effects of stacking fault energy on defect formation process in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Taira; Yang, Yingjuan; Hirabayashi, Junichi; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of stacking fault energies (SFEs) on defect formation by the collision cascade process for face-centred cubic metals, we used six sets of interatomic potentials with different SFEs while keeping the other properties almost identical. Molecular dynamic simulations of the collision cascade were carried out using these potentials with primary knock-on atom energies (EPKA) of 10 and 20 keV at 100 K. Neither the number of residual defects nor the size distributions for both self-interstitial atom (SIA) type and vacancy type clusters were affected by the difference in the SFE. In the case of EPKA = 20 keV, the ratio of glissile SIA clusters increased as the SFE decreased, which was not expected by a prediction based on the classical dislocation theory. The trend did not change after annealing at 1100 K for 100 ps. For vacancy clusters, few stacking fault tetrahedrons (SFTs) formed before the annealing. However, lower SFEs tended to increase the SFT fraction after the annealing, where large vacancy clusters formed at considerable densities. The findings of this study can be used to characterise the defect formation process in low SFE metals such as austenitic stainless steels.

  11. Mixed structural face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic orders in near stoichiometric Fe2MnGa alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Y. V.; Perekos, A. E.; Uvarov, N. V.; Kolchiba, M. R.; Synoradzki, K.; Dubowik, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic and transport properties of near stoichiometric metastable FexMnyGaz alloys (46 ≤ x ≤ 52, 17 ≤ y ≤ 25, 26 ≤ z ≤ 30) with face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC), and two-phase (FCC + BCC) structures are investigated. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of first-principles calculations of stoichiometric Fe2MnGa alloy with the L21, L12, and the tetragonally distorted L21 structural orderings. It is shown that the pure BCC and FCC phases have distinct magnetic and transport properties. Two-phase Fe2MnGa alloys have magnetic and transport properties typical of the mixed BCC and FCC phases. Among the investigated alloys, Fe46Mn24Ga30 has a martensitic transformation accompanied with significant changes of its magnetic and transport properties.

  12. Extended Peierls-Nabarro model for cross slip in face centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Benjamin R.

    dislocation configurations are approximated by a network of cubic parametric splines with tangent continuity. The first approximation of cross-slip activation energy for zero stress was performed by using a non-singular dislocation theory with a core parameter determined from an atomistic method (Peierls-Nabarro approach). An energy barrier of 1.9 [eV] is determined for Cu at the saddle point, which is in good agreement with values determined by other models, including those of Puschl and Escaig. Furthermore, a refinement of the proposed model is developed by representing the Shockley partials with fractional dislocations and adding lattice restoring forces to the dislocations, which are determined from ab-initio methods. Thus, this calculation gives a value of 1.43 [eV] for the cross-slip activation energy, which is in excellent agreement with the activation energy determined from the Bonneville-Escaig experimental value of 1.11 +/- 0.37 [eV]. Finally, a cross-slip scenario with pile-up dislocations on the glide plane is simulated to show the versatility of the proposed model for more realistic dislocation arrangements.

  13. Lattice Green functions: the d-dimensional face-centered cubic lattice, d = 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, S.; Koutschan, Ch; Maillard, J.-M.; Zenine, N.

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported on a recursive method to generate the expansion of the lattice Green function (LGF) of the d-dimensional face-centered cubic lattice (fcc). The method was used to generate many coefficients for d=7 and the corresponding linear differential equation has been obtained. In this paper, we show the strength and the limit of the method by producing the series and the corresponding linear differential equations for d=8,9,10,11,12. The differential Galois groups of these linear differential equations are shown to be symplectic for d=8,10,12 and orthogonal for d=9,11. The recursion relation naturally provides a two-dimensional array {t}d(n,j) where only the coefficients {t}d(n,0) correspond to the coefficients of the LGF of the d-dimensional fcc. The coefficients {t}d(n,j) are associated to D-finite bivariate series annihilated by linear partial differential equations that we analyze. Dedicated to Guttmann, for his 70th birthday.

  14. Magnetic cluster expansion model for random and ordered magnetic face-centered cubic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentiev, M. Yu.; Wróbel, J. S.; Nguyen-Manh, D.; Dudarev, S. L.; Ganchenkova, M. G.

    2016-07-01

    A Magnetic Cluster Expansion model for ternary face-centered cubic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys has been developed, using DFT data spanning binary and ternary alloy configurations. Using this Magnetic Cluster Expansion model Hamiltonian, we perform Monte Carlo simulations and explore magnetic structures of alloys over the entire range of compositions, considering both random and ordered alloy structures. In random alloys, the removal of magnetic collinearity constraint reduces the total magnetic moment but does not affect the predicted range of compositions where the alloys adopt low-temperature ferromagnetic configurations. During alloying of ordered fcc Fe-Ni compounds with Cr, chromium atoms tend to replace nickel rather than iron atoms. Replacement of Ni by Cr in ordered alloys with high iron content increases the Curie temperature of the alloys. This can be explained by strong antiferromagnetic Fe-Cr coupling, similar to that found in bcc Fe-Cr solutions, where the Curie temperature increase, predicted by simulations as a function of Cr concentration, is confirmed by experimental observations. In random alloys, both magnetization and the Curie temperature decrease abruptly with increasing chromium content, in agreement with experiment.

  15. First-principles path-integral molecular dynamics study of diffusion process of hydrogen in face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimizuka, Hajime; Ogata, Shigenobu

    We investigated the H diffusivity in face-centered cubic Pd and Al by performing path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) modeling in the framework of density functional theory (DFT); in our calculations, we took nuclear quantum effects into consideration. The DFT results showed that the H-migration barriers (Em) in Pd and Al exhibited similar values (approximately 0.16 eV), while the H atoms were stable at octahedral (O) sites for Pd and at tetrahedral (T) sites for Al. The PIMD-based free-energy profiles for H migration between the O-site and T-site were evaluated using the thermodynamic integration of the centroid forces at 150-600 K. We confirmed that the quantum effects significantly affected the Em and the difference between the energies of the H atom at the O-site and the T-site (EO - T); The Em and EO - T values in Pd at 300 K increased by 32% and 98%, respectively, relative to the classical limit. On the other hand, the Em and ET - O (i.e., -EO - T) values in Al at 300 K decreased by 3% and 41%, respectively. This suggested that the quantum nature of H nuclei was essential for understanding the H-diffusion kinetics in these metals even above ambient temperature.

  16. Energy-landscape paving for prediction of face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Liu, Zhaoxia; Huang, Weibo; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is a classical NP-hard problem in computational biology. The energy-landscape paving (ELP) method is a class of heuristic global optimization algorithm, and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems with complex energy landscapes in the continuous space. By putting forward a new update mechanism of the histogram function in ELP and incorporating the generation of initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood search strategy based on pull moves into ELP, an improved energy-landscape paving (ELP+) method is put forward. Twelve general benchmark instances are first tested on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice models. The lowest energies by ELP+ are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. Then, five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D FCC HP lattice model are tested. The proposed algorithm finds lower energies than those by the five other methods in literature. Not unexpectedly, this is particularly pronounced for the longer sequences considered. Computational results show that ELP+ is an effective method for PSP on the fcc HP lattice model.

  17. Mechanism-based crystal plasticity modeling of twin boundary migration in nanotwinned face-centered-cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhani, Hamidreza; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    2014-08-01

    Nanotwinned (nt) metals are an important subset of nanostructured materials because they exhibit impressive strength and ductility. Several recent investigations on nt face-centered-cubic (FCC) metals indicate that their macroscopic responses emerge from complex microscopic mechanisms that are dominated by dislocation-TB interactions. Under applied stimulus, nt microstructures evolve through migration of twin boundaries (TBs) that may have implications on the material strength and stability. This work focuses on modeling TB migration within finite element framework in an explicit manner and studying its effects on the micromechanics of twinned FCC metals under quasi-static loading conditions. The theoretical setting is developed using three-dimensional single crystal plasticity as a basis wherein the plastic slip on the {111}<1bar10> slip systems in an FCC crystal structure is modeled as visco-plastic behavior. Owing to their governing role, twins are modeled as discrete lamellas with full crystallographic anisotropy. To model TB migration, an additional visco-plastic slip-law for twinning partial systems ({111}<112bar>) based on the nucleation and motion of twin partial dislocations is introduced. This size-dependent constitutive law is presumed to prevail in the vicinity of the TB and naturally facilitates TB migration when combined with a twinning condition that is based on the accrual of the necessary shear strain. The constitutive development is implemented within a finite element framework through a User Material (UMAT) facility within ABAQUS/STANDARD®. Detailed micromechanics simulations on model microstructures involving single-grained and polycrystalline topologies are presented.

  18. Bismuth doping strategies in GeTe nanowires to promote high-temperature phase transition from rhombohedral to face-centered cubic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Huang, Rong; Wei, Fenfen; Cheng, Guosheng; Kong, Tao

    2014-11-17

    The phase transition of Bi-doped (∼3 at. %) GeTe nanowires from a rhombohedral (R) to a face-centered cubic (C) structure was observed in in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction. The promotion of high-temperature R-C phase transition by a doping approach was revealed. Ab initio energy calculations of doped GeTe at various Bi doping concentrations were performed to interpret the promoted temperature-induced phase transitions. Those results indicated that the total energy differences between R and C structures of doped GeTe decreased as Bi doping concentrations increased, which facilitated R-C phase transitions.

  19. Ion-beam-induced magnetic and structural phase transformation of Ni-stabilized face-centered-cubic Fe films on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gloss, Jonas; Shah Zaman, Sameena; Jonner, Jakub; Novotny, Zbynek; Schmid, Michael; Varga, Peter; Urbánek, Michal

    2013-12-23

    Metastable face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe/Cu(100) thin films are good candidates for ion-beam magnetic patterning due to their magnetic transformation upon ion-beam irradiation. However, pure fcc Fe films undergo spontaneous transformation when their thickness exceeds 10 ML. This limit can be extended to approximately 22 ML by deposition of Fe at increased CO background pressures. We show that much thicker films can be grown by alloying with Ni for stabilizing the fcc γ phase. The amount of Ni necessary to stabilize nonmagnetic, transformable fcc Fe films in dependence on the residual background pressure during the deposition is determined and a phase diagram revealing the transformable region is presented.

  20. Single crystal plastic behavior of a single-phase, face-center-cubic-structured, equiatomic FeNiCrCo alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Zhenggang; Gao, Y. F.; Bei, Hongbin

    2015-07-25

    To understand the fundamental deformation mechanisms of compositionally complex alloys, single crystals of a multi-component equiatomic FeNiCoCr alloy with face-centered cubic (FCC) structure were grown for mechanical studies. Similarly to typical FCC pure metals, slip trace analyses indicate that dislocation slips take place on (1 1 1) planes along [11¯0] directions. The critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) obeys the Schmid law at both 77 and 293 K, and tension–compression asymmetry is not observed. Although this material slips in a normal FCC manner both at 293 and 77 K, compared to typical FCC metals the CRSS’s strong temperature dependence is abnormal.

  1. Simulation of the third law free energies of face-centered-cubic and hexagonal-close-packed Lennard-Jones solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasi, Sweta; Khomami, Bamin; Lovett, Ronald

    2000-09-01

    On a thermodynamic path proposed by Lutsko, Wolf, and Yip, a solid is transformed at fixed density into an ideal gas. The accuracy of molecular dynamics simulation results for the free energy of solids using this path is compromised by the presence of a singularity on the path and by the nonergodic behavior of the ideal gas. We present calculations of the third law free energies of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) and hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) solids of argon (modeled as a Lennard-Jones system) to illustrate how the singularity and the nonergodic dynamics introduce errors. Strategies for removing the singularity and the nonergodic dynamics are presented. Finally, an analytic expansion around the ideal state is developed to provide an alternate route to the free energy of those states for which simulation estimates give large statistical uncertainties. The quantitative errors in these new approaches to the simulation of the free energy of a solid are given.

  2. The Hexagonal Close-Packed (HCP) ⇆ Face-Centered Cubic (FCC) Transition in Co-Re-Based Experimental Alloys Investigated by Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashis; Strunz, Pavel; Piegert, Sebastian; Gilles, Ralph; Hofmann, Michael; Hölzel, Markus; Rösler, Joachim

    2012-06-01

    Co-Re-based alloys have been developed to supplement the Ni-base superalloys used in gas turbine applications at high temperatures (1473 K [1200 °C] bare metal temperature). Unlike other commercial Co-based alloys, the Co matrix in the Co-Re alloys has a stable hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure at room temperature. In situ neutron diffraction measurements on experimental Co-Re alloys hardened by carbide precipitates showed that the matrix undergoes an hcp ⇆ face-centered cubic (fcc) allotropic transformation after heating to high temperatures. Furthermore, it was found that this transformation has a large hysteresis (~100 K). Thermodynamic calculations were undertaken to study the high-temperature phase stability and transformations in the complex multicomponent, multiphase Co-Re-Cr-C system with or without the addition of Ta. The results show that the minor phases (Cr23C6-type carbides and the Cr2Re3-type σ phase) play an important role in the hcp ⇆ fcc hysteresis by influencing the partitioning of Cr and Re between the matrix and the other phases.

  3. Analysis of the twin spacing and grain size effects on mechanical properties in hierarchically nanotwinned face-centered cubic metals based on a mechanism-based plasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linli; Qu, Shaoxing; Guo, Xiang; Lu, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Hierarchical twin lamellae in polycrystalline face-centered cubic (fcc) metals possess a possibility to achieve higher strength with keeping an acceptable elongation. The present work is concerned with the analysis of twin spacing and grain size-dependent plastic performance in hierarchically nanotwinned fcc metals using a generalized strain-gradient plasticity model. The dislocation density-based physical model for constitutive description of nanotwinned fcc metals is expanded for the hierarchical structures of nanotwins. The strengthening mechanism and the failure behavior in these hierarchical nanostructures are studied to evaluate the strength and ductility. Moreover, the transition twin spacing between the strengthening and softening is obtained in different order of twin lamellae. A dislocation-based model on nucleating deformation twins is presented to predict the critical twin spacing in the lowest twin lamellae for generating the subordinate twin lamellae. Our simulation results demonstrate that the existence of the hierarchical nanotwins gives rise to a significant enhancement in the strength, and the resulting global flow stresses are sensitive to the twin spacings of the hierarchical twin lamellae and the grain size. Two softening stages are observed with variation of twin spacing, and the relevant transition twin spacing depends on the microstructural size in hierarchically nanotwinned metals. We further find that the predicted failure strain decreases with decreasing the twin spacing, which is quite different from the case of the individually nanotwinned fcc metals. The critical twin spacing for generating subordinate twins also depends on the twin spacing of superordinate twin lamellae and the grain size. These findings suggest that the high yield strength and good ductility can be achieved by optimizing the grain size and the twin spacings in the hierarchical twins.

  4. Formation of Novel Silicon Nitride with Face-Centered Cubic Crystal Structure in a TaN/Ta/Si(100) Thin Film System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chun; Jou, Shyan-Kay; Chiu, Chuei-Fu

    2005-07-01

    We discovered a new silicon nitride with cubic symmetry formed in the silicon at the Ta/Si interface of the TaN/Ta/Si(100) thin film system when the silicon wafer was annealed at 500 or 600°C. The cubic silicon nitride grew into the silicon crystal in the shape of an inverse pyramid after the annealing process. The boundary planes of the inverse pyramid were the \\{111\\} planes of the silicon crystal. The orientation relationship between the silicon nitride and silicon crystal is cubic to cubic. The lattice constant of the new silicon nitride is a=0.5548 nm and is about 2.2% larger than that of the silicon crystal.

  5. Procedures for construction of anisotropic elastic plastic property closures for face-centered cubic polycrystals using first-order bounding relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2006-08-01

    Microstructure-sensitive design (MSD) is a novel mathematical framework that facilitates a rigorous consideration of the material microstructure as a continuous design variable in the engineering design enterprise [Adams, B.L., Henrie, A., Henrie, B., Lyon, M., Kalidindi, S.R., Garmestani, H., 2001. Microstructure-sensitive design of a compliant beam. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49(8), 1639-1663; Adams, B.L., Lyon, M., Henrie, B., 2004. Microstructures by design: linear problems in elastic-plastic design. Int. J. Plasticity 20(8-9), 1577-1602; Kalidindi, S.R., Houskamp, J.R., Lyons, M., Adams, B.L., 2004. Microstructure sensitive design of an orthotropic plate subjected to tensile load. Int. J. Plasticity 20(8-9), 1561-1575]. MSD employs spectral representations of the local state distribution functions in describing the microstructure quantitatively, and these in turn enable development of invertible linkages between microstructure and effective properties using established homogenization (composite) theories. As a natural extension of the recent publications in MSD, we provide in this paper a detailed account of the methods that can be readily used by mechanical designers to construct first-order elastic-plastic property closures. The main focus in this paper is on the crystallographic texture (also called Orientation Distribution Function or ODF) as the main microstructural parameter controlling the elastic and yield properties of cubic (fcc and bcc) polycrystalline metals. The following specific advances are described in this paper: (i) derivation of rigorous first-order bounds for the off-diagonal terms of the effective elastic stiffness tensor and their incorporation in the MSD framework, (ii) delineation of the union of the property closures corresponding to both the upper and lower bound theories resulting in comprehensive first-order closures, (iii) development of generalized and readily usable expressions for effective anisotropic elastic-plastic properties

  6. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatarenko, Valentine A.; Tsysman, Constantin L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Yelena T.

    1995-01-01

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC-60) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distortion relaxation of the host fullerene (C-60) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distortion field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. The given paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of static concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method(*). In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the static inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the 'average-lattice' sites' as well as on the lattice parameter a of a elastically-anysotropic 'cubic' C-60 crystal are taken into account.

  7. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsysman, C.L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Y.T.

    1994-12-31

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC{sub 60}) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distoration relaxation of the host fullerene (C{sub 60}) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distoration field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. This paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of statistic concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method. In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the statistic inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the average-lattice sites as well as on the lattice parameter a of the elastically-anysotropic cubic C{sub 60} crystal are taken into account.

  8. Tuning of the temperature window for unit-cell and pore-size enlargement in face-centered-cubic large-mesopore silicas templated by swollen block copolymer micelles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingyu; Yi, Jinhui; Kruk, Michal

    2015-09-01

    The unit-cell size and pore diameter as functions of temperature are investigated in the syntheses of FDU-12 silicas with face-centered cubic structure templated by Pluronic (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymer micelles swollen by toluene. The temperature range in which the unit-cell size and pore size strongly increase as temperature decreases is correlated with the critical micelle temperature (CMT) of the surfactant. While Pluronic F127 affords a wide range of unit-cell parameters (28-51 nm) and pore diameters (16-32 nm), it renders moderately enlarged pore sizes at 25 °C. The use of Pluronic F108 with higher CMT affords FDU-12 with very large unit-cell size (∼49 nm) and large pore diameter (27 nm) at 23 °C. Large unit-cell size (40-41 nm) and pore size (22 nm) were obtained even at 25 °C. The application of Pluronics F87 and F88 with much smaller molecular weights and higher CMTs also allows one to synthesize FDU-12 with quite large unit-cell parameters and pore sizes at room temperature. The present work demonstrates that one can judiciously select Pluronic surfactants with appropriate CMT to shift the temperature range in which the pore diameter is readily tunable. PMID:26178137

  9. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of the face-centered cubic/hexagonal close-packed martensite transformation in Co-31.8 wt pct Ni alloy: Part 2. Plate intersections, extended defects, and nucleation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, D. W.; Howe, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    The face-centered cubic/hexagonal close-packed (fcc/hcp) martensite phase transformation in a Co-31.8 wt pct Ni alloy was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The HRTEM was used to study the structure and properties of intersections between martensite plates and other defects observed in the alloy such as stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and Z-type defects. The HRTEM was also used to attempt to determine if various proposed mechanisms for the fcc/hcp martensite transformation were operating. There is evidence to suggest that the reflection mechanism proposed by Bollmann and the dipole mechanism proposed by Hirth are active in the fcc/hcp martensitic transformation, although the evidence is not completely certain in either case. Growth of the hcp phase by a four- or six-plane mechanism as proposed by Mahajan et al. is possible in theory but was not observed in this study. Transformation by previously proposed pole mechanisms was also not observed in this study, although evidence for a new type of pole mechanism was found. The formation of SFT along the fcc/hcp martensite interface was observed to occur by the cross-slip of Shockley partial dislocations out of the fcc/hcp interface onto conjugate fcc matrix planes, followed by further cross-slip to form the SFT, as previously observed for grain boundaries in fcc alloys.

  10. The quantization of the radii of coordination spheres cubic crystals and cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, G.; Emelyanov, S.; Ignatenko, N.; Ignatenko, G.

    2016-02-01

    The article deals with the creation of an algorithm for calculating the radii of coordination spheres and coordination numbers cubic crystal structure and cluster systems in liquids. Solution has important theoretical value since it allows us to calculate the amount of coordination in the interparticle interaction potentials, to predict the processes of growth of the crystal structures and processes of self-organization of particles in the cluster system. One option accounting geometrical and quantum factors is the use of the Fibonacci series to construct a consistent number of focal areas for cubic crystals and cluster formation in the liquid.

  11. Direct simulation of pore level Fickian dispersion scale for transport through dense cubic packed spheres with vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2009-12-01

    The transition from non-Fickian to Fickian macroscale transport is explicitly demonstrated for an increasing array of three-dimensional pores with vortices in between a lattice of cubic packed spheres by microscale finite element Navier-Stokes flow and transport simulations. Solute residence time distribution begins with a power law for one pore but gradually and eventually transforms to an exponential distribution typical of classic dispersive transport after about ten pores. Parameter fitting of an analytical solution to the 1-D advection-dispersion equation using the simulated breakthrough curves leads to fitted pore velocities within 1% of actual values and an asymptotic fitted dispersion coefficient after a few pores. Therefore, after dozens of pores, bulk transport can be described by the advection-dispersion equation. Persistent vortices in similarly structured porous media subjected to similar grain-scale Reynolds and Peclet numbers may have minimal contribution to anomalous transport observed at larger scales.

  12. Numerical simulation of a shear-thinning fluid through packed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai Long; Moon, Jong Sin; Hwang, Wook Ryol

    2012-12-01

    Flow behaviors of a non-Newtonian fluid in spherical microstructures have been studied by a direct numerical simulation. A shear-thinning (power-law) fluid through both regular and randomly packed spheres has been numerically investigated in a representative unit cell with the tri-periodic boundary condition, employing a rigorous three-dimensional finite-element scheme combined with fictitious-domain mortar-element methods. The present scheme has been validated for the classical spherical packing problems with literatures. The flow mobility of regular packing structures, including simple cubic (SC), body-centered cubic (BCC), face-centered cubic (FCC), as well as randomly packed spheres, has been investigated quantitatively by considering the amount of shear-thinning, the pressure gradient and the porosity as parameters. Furthermore, the mechanism leading to the main flow path in a highly shear-thinning fluid through randomly packed spheres has been discussed.

  13. Large Amplitude Oscillatory Shear of Block Copolymer Spheres on a Body-Centered Cubic Lattice: Are Micelles Like Metals?

    SciTech Connect

    Torija, Maria A.; Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2013-03-07

    Small-angle X-ray diffraction experiments have uncovered a remarkable mechanism of grain alignment during plastic deformation of ordered sphere-forming diblock copolymer micelles when subjected to large amplitude dynamic shearing. A nearly monodisperse poly(styrene-b-ethylene-alt-propylene) (SEP) diblock copolymer with block molecular weights of 42,000 and 60,000 was mixed with squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}), an EP selective solvent, at a concentration of 10 wt %. After high temperature annealing, the sample formed an ordered polydomain morphology containing glassy S cores at room temperature. SAXS powder patterns confirm body-centered cubic (BCC) symmetry and reveal the development of a complex array of two-dimensionally resolved Bragg reflections following the application, and cessation, of oscillatory shearing. These diffraction results are interpreted on the basis of the classic mechanism of crystalline slip, which accounts for plastic deformation of ductile materials such as metals. Four distinct slip systems are shown to be active in this work, suggesting a robust basis for deforming and mixing of soft ordered solids.

  14. Phase diagram of dipolar hard and soft spheres: manipulation of colloidal crystal structures by an external field.

    PubMed

    Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2005-04-01

    Phase diagrams of hard and soft spheres with a fixed dipole moment are determined by calculating the Helmholtz free energy using simulations. The pair potential is given by a dipole-dipole interaction plus a hard-core and a repulsive Yukawa potential for soft spheres. Our system models colloids in an external electric or magnetic field, with hard spheres corresponding to uncharged and soft spheres to charged colloids. The phase diagram of dipolar hard spheres shows fluid, face-centered-cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) phases. The phase diagram of dipolar soft spheres exhibits, in addition to the above mentioned phases, a body-centered-orthorhombic (bco) phase, and it agrees well with the experimental phase diagram [Nature (London) 421, 513 (2003)]. Our results show that bulk hcp, bct, and bco crystals can be realized experimentally by applying an external field. PMID:15904046

  15. Use of the Primitive Unit Cell in Understanding Subtle Features of the Cubic Closest-Packed Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, John A.; Rittenhouse, Jeffrey L.; Soper, Linda M.; Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important crystal structures adopted by metals is characterized by the "abcabc"...stacking of close-packed layers. This structure is commonly referred to in textbooks as the cubic close-packed (ccp) or face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, since the entire lattice can be generated by replication of a face-centered cubic unit cell…

  16. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature. PMID:25426007

  17. Structural stability and energetics of grain boundary triple junctions in face centered cubic materials

    PubMed Central

    Adlakha, I.; Solanki, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study to elucidate the role of triple junctions (TJs) and their constituent grain boundaries on the structural stability of nanocrystalline materials. Using atomistic simulations along with the nudge elastic band calculations, we explored the atomic structural and thermodynamic properties of TJs in three different fcc materials. We found that the magnitude of excess energy at a TJ was directly related to the atomic density of the metal. Further, the vacancy binding and migration energetics in the vicinity of the TJ were examined as they play a crucial role in the structural stability of NC materials. The resolved line tension which takes into account the stress buildup at the TJ was found to be a good measure in predicting the vacancy binding tendency near the TJ. The activation energy for vacancy migration along the TJ was directly correlated with the measured excess energy. Finally, we show that the resistance for vacancy diffusion increased for TJs with larger excess stored energy and the defect mobility at some TJs is slower than their constituent GBs. Hence, our results have general implications on the diffusional process in NC materials and provide new insight into stabilizing NC materials with tailored TJs. PMID:25732834

  18. Molecular dynamic simulation for nanometric cutting of single-crystal face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanhua; Zong, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting of single crystal copper and aluminum with a diamond cutting tool. The atomic interactions in the two metallic materials are modeled by two sets of embedded atom method (EAM) potential parameters. Simulation results show that although the plastic deformation of the two materials is achieved by dislocation activities, the deformation behavior and related physical phenomena, such as the machining forces, machined surface quality, and chip morphology, are significantly different for different materials. Furthermore, the influence of material properties on the nanometric cutting has a strong dependence on the operating temperature. PMID:25426007

  19. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125-1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  20. Structural stability and energetics of grain boundary triple junctions in face centered cubic materials.

    PubMed

    Adlakha, I; Solanki, K N

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study to elucidate the role of triple junctions (TJs) and their constituent grain boundaries on the structural stability of nanocrystalline materials. Using atomistic simulations along with the nudge elastic band calculations, we explored the atomic structural and thermodynamic properties of TJs in three different fcc materials. We found that the magnitude of excess energy at a TJ was directly related to the atomic density of the metal. Further, the vacancy binding and migration energetics in the vicinity of the TJ were examined as they play a crucial role in the structural stability of NC materials. The resolved line tension which takes into account the stress buildup at the TJ was found to be a good measure in predicting the vacancy binding tendency near the TJ. The activation energy for vacancy migration along the TJ was directly correlated with the measured excess energy. Finally, we show that the resistance for vacancy diffusion increased for TJs with larger excess stored energy and the defect mobility at some TJs is slower than their constituent GBs. Hence, our results have general implications on the diffusional process in NC materials and provide new insight into stabilizing NC materials with tailored TJs. PMID:25732834

  1. Structural stability and energetics of grain boundary triple junctions in face centered cubic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlakha, I.; Solanki, K. N.

    2015-03-01

    We present a systematic study to elucidate the role of triple junctions (TJs) and their constituent grain boundaries on the structural stability of nanocrystalline materials. Using atomistic simulations along with the nudge elastic band calculations, we explored the atomic structural and thermodynamic properties of TJs in three different fcc materials. We found that the magnitude of excess energy at a TJ was directly related to the atomic density of the metal. Further, the vacancy binding and migration energetics in the vicinity of the TJ were examined as they play a crucial role in the structural stability of NC materials. The resolved line tension which takes into account the stress buildup at the TJ was found to be a good measure in predicting the vacancy binding tendency near the TJ. The activation energy for vacancy migration along the TJ was directly correlated with the measured excess energy. Finally, we show that the resistance for vacancy diffusion increased for TJs with larger excess stored energy and the defect mobility at some TJs is slower than their constituent GBs. Hence, our results have general implications on the diffusional process in NC materials and provide new insight into stabilizing NC materials with tailored TJs.

  2. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125–1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  3. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Summary The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline PdxAu1− x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin–twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  4. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst; Kübel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline Pd x Au1- x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin-twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  5. Cubic Unit Cell Construction Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Presents instructions for building a simple interactive unit-cell construction kit that allows for the construction of simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic lattices. The lit is built from inexpensive and readily available materials and can be built in any number of sizes. (WRM)

  6. Dynamic self-assembly of non-Brownian spheres studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvente, O.; Salazar-Cruz, M.; Peñuñuri, F.; Ruiz-Suárez, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Granular self-assembly of confined non-Brownian spheres under gravity is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from a disordered phase, dry or cohesive spheres organize, by vibrational annealing, into body-centered-tetragonal or face-centered-cubic structures, respectively. During the self-assembling process, isothermal and isodense points are observed. The existence of such points indicates that both granular temperature and packing fraction undergo an inversion process that may be in the core of crystal nucleation. Around the isothermal point, a sudden growth of granular clusters having the maximum coordination number takes place, indicating the outcome of a first-order phase transition. We propose a heuristic equation that successfully describes the dynamic evolution of the local packing fraction in terms of the local granular temperature, along the entire crystallization process.

  7. Self-consistent phonon theory of the crystallization and elasticity of attractive hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Shin, Homin; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2013-02-28

    We propose an Einstein-solid, self-consistent phonon theory for the crystal phase of hard spheres that interact via short-range attractions. The approach is first tested against the known behavior of hard spheres, and then applied to homogeneous particles that interact via short-range square well attractions and the Baxter adhesive hard sphere model. Given the crystal symmetry, packing fraction, and strength and range of attractive interactions, an effective harmonic potential experienced by a particle confined to its Wigner-Seitz cell and corresponding mean square vibrational amplitude are self-consistently calculated. The crystal free energy is then computed and, using separate information about the fluid phase free energy, phase diagrams constructed, including a first-order solid-solid phase transition and its associated critical point. The simple theory qualitatively captures all the many distinctive features of the phase diagram (critical and triple point, crystal-fluid re-entrancy, low-density coexistence curve) as a function of attraction range, and overall is in good semi-quantitative agreement with simulation. Knowledge of the particle localization length allows the crystal shear modulus to be estimated based on elementary ideas. Excellent predictions are obtained for the hard sphere crystal. Expanded and condensed face-centered cubic crystals are found to have qualitatively different elastic responses to varying attraction strength or temperature. As temperature increases, the expanded entropic solid stiffens, while the energy-controlled, fully-bonded dense solid softens. PMID:23464163

  8. Topological and metrical property characterization of radical subunits for ternary hard sphere crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; An, Xizhong; Wang, Defeng; Qian, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative characterization on the topological and metrical properties of radical subunits (polyhedra) for two new ternary hard sphere crystals was studied. These two ideal crystalline structures are numerically constructed by filling small and medium spheres into interstices (corresponding to regular tetrahedral and octahedral pores) of perfect face centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystals formed by the packing of large spheres. Topological properties such as face number, edge number, vertex number of each radical polyhedron (RP), edge number of each RP face and metrical properties such as volume, surface area, total perimeter and pore volume of each RP, area and perimeter of each RP face were analyzed and compared. The results show that even though the overall packing densities for FCC and HCP ternary crystals are the same, different characteristics of radical polyhedra for corresponding spheres in these two crystals can be identified. That is, in the former structure RPs are more symmetric than those in the latter; the orientations of corresponding RP in the latter are twice as many as that in the former. Moreover, RP topological and metrical properties in the HCP ternary crystal are much more complicated than those in the FCC ternary crystal. These differences imply the structure and property differences of these two ternary crystals. Analyses of RPs provide intensive understanding of pores in the structure.

  9. Force distribution/transmission in amorphous and crystalline packings of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xizhong; Huang, Fei

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the discrete element modeling (DEM) was used to study the force distributions/transmissions in the packings of amorphous and crystalline states generated by equal spheres subjected to an external load (of a large sphere) applied on the top of a packing. Crystalline packings such as {100}-and {111}-oriented face centered cubic (FCC), hexagonal close packed (HCP) and body centered cubic (BCC) were considered. The results show that the forces among the particles in these packings are quite different, with different force chains identified with different structures. For amorphous packings, the force chain supporting the external load gives a conical shape. The force chain in a crystalline packing is mainly of a pyramid shape and the forces therein are transmitted along the crystalline lattice. For {100}-FCC, {111}-FCC, and BCC other than HCP, the forces transmit along straight lines with different orientations. In crystalline packings, the forces in the chains are uniformly distributed in each layer and decrease linearly with the height. The force distributions in amorphous and crystalline granular packings are structure-dependent.

  10. Effect of Ti seed layers on structure of self-organized epitaxial face-centered-cubic-Ag(001) oriented nanodots

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiko, M.; Nose, K.; Suenaga, R.; Kyuno, K.; Koo, J.-W.; Ha, J.-G.

    2013-12-28

    The influence of Ti seed layers on the structure of self-organized Ag nanodots, obtained with a Ti seed-layer-assisted thermal agglomeration method, has been investigated. The samples were grown on MgO(001) single crystal substrates by RF magnetron sputter deposition. The samples were deposited at room temperature and post-annealed at 350 °C for 4 h while maintaining the chamber vacuum conditions. The results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations indicated that the insertion of the Ti seed layer (0.6–5.0 nm) between the MgO substrate and Ag layer promotes the agglomeration process, forming the nanodot array. Comparisons between the AFM images revealed that the size of the Ag nanodots was increased with an increase in the Ti seed layer thickness. The atomic concentration of the film surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS result suggested that the nanodot surface mainly consisted of Ag. Moreover, X-ray diffraction results proved that the initial deposition of the Ti seed layer (0.6–5.0 nm) onto MgO(001) prior to the Ag deposition yielded high-quality fcc-Ag(001) oriented epitaxial nanodots. The optical absorbance spectra of the fabricated Ag nanodots with various Ti seed layer thicknesses were obtained in the visible light range.

  11. Atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation due to ductile void growth in ultrathin films of face-centered-cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2005-06-01

    A comprehensive computational analysis is reported of the atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation and failure in free-standing Cu thin films under applied biaxial tensile strain for strain levels up to 6%. The analysis focuses on nanometer-scale-thick films with a preexisting void extending across the film thickness and the film plane oriented normal to the [111] crystallographic direction. Our computational study is based on isothermal-isostrain large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations within an embedded-atom-method parametrization for Cu. Our analysis has revealed various regimes in the film's mechanical response as the applied strain level increases. Within the considered strain range, after an elastic response at a low strain (<2%), void growth is the major strain relaxation mechanism mediated by the emission of perfect screw dislocation pairs from the void surface and subsequent dislocation propagation; as a result, a plastic zone forms around the void. Plastic deformation is accompanied by the glide motion of the dislocations emitted from the void surface, void surface morphological transitions, formation of a step pattern on the film's surfaces, dislocation jogging, vacancy generation due to gliding jogged dislocations, dislocation-vacancy interactions, vacancy pipe diffusion along dislocation cores, as well as dislocation-dislocation interactions. The increase in film surface roughness with increasing strain eventually leads to nucleation and propagation from the film surfaces of threading dislocation loops, which ultimately break up when they reach the opposite free surface of the thin film.

  12. Research into preparation and properties of graded cemented carbides with face center cubic-rich surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Deng, Xin; Gong, Manfeng; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua

    2016-09-01

    This paper systematically investigated a set of functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides with modified surface layer (called fcc-rich surface layer in this study), which is mainly composed of fcc phases (Ti(CN) and TiN) and WC. Nitridation at liquid phase sintering temperature is the key process making this fcc-rich surface layer. The functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides synthesized in this study show 3 layer structure: the outer layer, i.e. the fcc-rich surface layer; the intermediate layer, which is characterized by abnormally large WC and high Co content; and the inner layer. It was found that TiC is the most critical component for the formation of fcc-rich surface layer. The higher content of TiC results in the thicker fcc-rich outer layer, higher (Ti(CN) and TiN) content in the outer layer, and higher hardness of the fcc-rich outer layer. The formation of this fcc-rich surface layer is mainly due to the nitridation process between Ti and N, which leads to the diffusion of Ti outwards (from the inside of the sample to the surface) and the subsequent migration of liquid cobalt inwards (from surface to the inside of the sample). The three-layer structure developed in this study provides the excellent combination of high wear resistance and high toughness, which is favorable for some applications.

  13. Computational study of the melting-freezing transition in the quantum hard-sphere system for intermediate densities. II. Structural features.

    PubMed

    Sesé, Luis M; Bailey, Lorna E

    2007-04-28

    The structural features of the quantum hard-sphere system in the region of the fluid-face-centered-cubic-solid transition, for reduced number densities 0.45face-centered-cubic-solid phase transition of hard spheres has been performed, and some interesting differences between the classical and quantum melting-freezing transition are observed. PMID:17477616

  14. Stabilizing the hexagonal close packed structure of hard spheres with polymers: Phase diagram, structure, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Edison, John R; Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-01

    We study the phase behaviour of a binary mixture of colloidal hard spheres and freely jointed chains of beads using Monte Carlo simulations. Recently Panagiotopoulos and co-workers predicted [Nat. Commun. 5, 4472 (2014)] that the hexagonal close packed (HCP) structure of hard spheres can be stabilized in such a mixture due to the interplay between polymer and the void structure in the crystal phase. Their predictions were based on estimates of the free-energy penalty for adding a single hard polymer chain in the HCP and the competing face centered cubic (FCC) phase. Here we calculate the phase diagram using free-energy calculations of the full binary mixture and find a broad fluid-solid coexistence region and a metastable gas-liquid coexistence region. For the colloid-monomer size ratio considered in this work, we find that the HCP phase is only stable in a small window at relatively high polymer reservoir packing fractions, where the coexisting HCP phase is nearly close packed. Additionally we investigate the structure and dynamic behaviour of these mixtures. PMID:27497577

  15. Dynamics of Disorder-Order Transitions in Hard Sphere Colloidal Dispersions in micro-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Li, M.; Phan, S. E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Rogers, Rick; Meyers, W.

    1996-01-01

    We performed a series of experiments on 0.518 millimeter PMMA spheres suspended in an index matching mixture of decalin and tetralin the microgravity environment provided by the Shuttle Columbia on mission STS-73. The samples ranged in concentration from 0.49 to 0.62. volume fraction (phi) of spheres, which covers the range in which liquid, coexistence, solid and glass phases are expected from Earth bound experiments. Light scattering was used to probe the static structure, and the particle dynamics. Digital and 35 mm photos provided information on the morphology of the crystals. In general, the crystallites grew considerably larger (roughly an order of magnitude larger) than the same samples with identical treatment in 1 g. The dynamic light scattering shows the typical short time diffusion and long time caging effects found in 1 g. The surprises that were encountered in microgravity include the preponderance of random hexagonal close packed (RHCP) structures and the complete absence of the expected face centered cubic (FCC) structure, existence of large dendritic crystals floating in the coexistence samples (where liquid and solid phases coexist) and the rapid crystallization of samples which exist only in glass phase under the influence of one g. These results suggest that colloidal crystal growth is profoundly effected by gravity in yet unrecognized ways. We suspect that the RCHP structure is related to the nonequilibrium growth that is evident from the presence of dendrites. An analysis of the dendritic growth instabilities is presented within the framework of the Ackerson-Schatzel equation.

  16. Stabilizing the hexagonal close packed structure of hard spheres with polymers: Phase diagram, structure, and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edison, John R.; Dasgupta, Tonnishtha; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-01

    We study the phase behaviour of a binary mixture of colloidal hard spheres and freely jointed chains of beads using Monte Carlo simulations. Recently Panagiotopoulos and co-workers predicted [Nat. Commun. 5, 4472 (2014)] that the hexagonal close packed (HCP) structure of hard spheres can be stabilized in such a mixture due to the interplay between polymer and the void structure in the crystal phase. Their predictions were based on estimates of the free-energy penalty for adding a single hard polymer chain in the HCP and the competing face centered cubic (FCC) phase. Here we calculate the phase diagram using free-energy calculations of the full binary mixture and find a broad fluid-solid coexistence region and a metastable gas-liquid coexistence region. For the colloid-monomer size ratio considered in this work, we find that the HCP phase is only stable in a small window at relatively high polymer reservoir packing fractions, where the coexisting HCP phase is nearly close packed. Additionally we investigate the structure and dynamic behaviour of these mixtures.

  17. Effects of periodicity on flow and dispersion through closely packed fixed beds of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, A. M.

    2002-02-01

    A lattice-Boltzmann formulation is used to investigate the effects of ``periodicity'' (geometry) on fluid flow and tracer-particle dispersion through fixed beds of spheres comprising of closely packed layers. In the ``period-1'' arrangement, spheres in the adjacent layers contact at their poles while the ``period-2'' and ``period-3'' arrangements correspond to hexagonal and faced-centered cubic close packing. For all three packing arrangements, there is a transition with increasing Reynolds number from a power law to a log-normal distribution of kinetic energies and, velocity and vorticity become more closely aligned giving rise to helical tracer-particle trajectories. It is suggested that these flow characteristics, unlike the stability of flow and the distribution of helicity, are largely insensitive to geometry, even when the geometry creates direct channels through the pack bed orientated along the gradient in applied pressure. For steady flows and strongly turbulent flows, such channels are predicted to provide direct routes for dispersion through a packed bed, while for weakly turbulent flows they influence dispersion primarily by destabilizing the flow and thereby promoting dispersion throughout a bed. The dispersion of tracer-particles released from a source located on or close to a ``stagnation streamline'' is predicted to be faster than ballistic in the near field and the transition to long-time Fickian diffusion is predicted to be distinguished by a regime of subdiffusion.

  18. Determining the activation energies and slip systems for dislocation nucleation in body-centered cubic mo and face-centered cubic Ni single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Bei, Hongbin; Li, T.; Gao, Y. F.; George, Easo P; Nieh, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoindentation tests were performed on single crystals of Mo and Ni. The critical shear stress for the first pop-in was {approx}1/7 of the shear modulus in both crystals. The dependence of pop-in probability on load was understood in terms of a thermally activated dislocation nucleation process. Comparison of the activation energies suggests nucleation of full dislocations in Mo and partial dislocations in Ni. The activation energy analysis also offers information on the specific slip system on which dislocations are nucleated.

  19. Crystallization of Hard Sphere Colloids in Microgravity: Results of the Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition, CDOT on USML-2. Experiment 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Chaikin, P. M.; Li, Min; Russel, W. B.; Ottewill, R. H.; Rogers, R.; Meyer, W. V.

    1998-01-01

    Classical hard spheres have long served as a paradigm for our understanding of the structure of liquids, crystals, and glasses and the transitions between these phases. Ground-based experiments have demonstrated that suspensions of uniform polymer colloids are near-ideal physical realizations of hard spheres. However, gravity appears to play a significant and unexpected role in the formation and structure of these colloidal crystals. In the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle, crystals grow purely via random stacking of hexagonal close-packed planes, lacking any of the face-centered cubic (FCC) component evident in crystals grown in 1 g beyond melting and allowed some time to settle. Gravity also masks 33-539 the natural growth instabilities of the hard sphere crystals which exhibit striking dendritic arms when grown in microgravity. Finally, high volume fraction "glass" samples which fail to crystallize after more than a year in 1 g begin nucleation after several days and fully crystallize in less than 2 weeks on the Space Shuttle.

  20. Crystal nucleation of hard spheres using molecular dynamics, umbrella sampling, and forward flux sampling: A comparison of simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filion, L.; Hermes, M.; Ni, R.; Dijkstra, M.

    2010-12-01

    Over the last number of years several simulation methods have been introduced to study rare events such as nucleation. In this paper we examine the crystal nucleation rate of hard spheres using three such numerical techniques: molecular dynamics, forward flux sampling, and a Bennett-Chandler-type theory where the nucleation barrier is determined using umbrella sampling simulations. The resulting nucleation rates are compared with the experimental rates of Harland and van Megen [Phys. Rev. E 55, 3054 (1997)], Sinn et al. [Prog. Colloid Polym. Sci. 118, 266 (2001)], Schätzel and Ackerson [Phys. Rev. E 48, 3766 (1993)], and the predicted rates for monodisperse and 5% polydisperse hard spheres of Auer and Frenkel [Nature 409, 1020 (2001)]. When the rates are examined in units of the long-time diffusion coefficient, we find agreement between all the theoretically predicted nucleation rates, however, the experimental results display a markedly different behavior for low supersaturation. Additionally, we examined the precritical nuclei arising in the molecular dynamics, forward flux sampling, and umbrella sampling simulations. The structure of the nuclei appears independent of the simulation method, and in all cases, the nuclei contains on average significantly more face-centered-cubic ordered particles than hexagonal-close-packed ordered particles.

  1. Sphere launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The sphere launcher was designed to eject a 200 lb, 15 in. diameter sphere from a space vehicle or missile, at a velocity of 58 ft/sec without imparting excessive lateral loads to the vehicle. This launching is accomplished with the vehicle operating in vacuum conditions and under a 9 g acceleration. Two principal elements are used: a high thrust, short burn time rocket motor and two snubbers for reducing the lateral loads to acceptable limits.

  2. Nonclassical Nucleation in a Solid-Solid Transition of Confined Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Weikai; Peng, Yi; Han, Yilong; Bowles, Richard K.; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2015-10-01

    A solid-solid phase transition of colloidal hard spheres confined between two planar hard walls is studied using a combination of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation. The transition from a solid consisting of five crystalline layers with square symmetry (5 □ ) to a solid consisting of four layers with triangular symmetry (4 △ ) is shown to occur through a nonclassical nucleation mechanism that involves the initial formation of a precritical liquid cluster, within which the cluster of the stable 4 △ phase grows. Free-energy calculations show that the transition occurs in one step, crossing a single free-energy barrier, and that the critical nucleus consists of a small 4 △ solid cluster wetted by a metastable liquid. In addition, the liquid cluster and the solid cluster are shown to grow at the planar hard walls. We also find that the critical nucleus size increases with supersaturation, which is at odds with classical nucleation theory. The △-solid-like cluster is shown to contain both face-centered-cubic and hexagonal-close-packed ordered particles.

  3. Orientation dependence of the dislocation microstructure in compressed body-centered cubic molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Wang, M.P.; Chen, C.; Xiao, Z.; Jia, Y.L.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z.X.

    2014-05-01

    The orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure has been investigated in commercial pure molybdenum. After deformation, the dislocation boundaries of compressed molybdenum can be classified, similar to that in face-centered cubic metals, into three types: dislocation cells (Type 2), and extended planar boundaries parallel to (Type 1) or not parallel to (Type 3) a (110) trace. However, it shows a reciprocal relationship between face-centered cubic metals and body-centered cubic metals on the orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure. The higher the strain, the finer the microstructure is and the smaller the inclination angle between extended planar boundaries and the compression axis is. - Highlights: • A reciprocal relationship between FCC metals and BCC metals is confirmed. • The dislocation boundaries can be classified into three types in compressed Mo. • The dislocation characteristic of different dislocation boundaries is different.

  4. Electron work function and surface energy of body-centered and face-centered cubic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, L. P.; Shebzukhova, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for the evaluation of the electron work function of metallic single crystals and the electron work function anisotropy has been developed in the framework of the electron-statistical method. The surface energy and the electron work function have been calculated for crystal faces of allotropic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals. A change in the electron work function due to the allotropic transformations has been estimated, and the periodic dependence of the electron work function has been determined. It has been shown that the results obtained using the proposed technique correlate with the available experimental data for polycrystals.

  5. First-principles calculations of the twin boundary energies and adhesion energies of interfaces for cubic face-centered transition-metal nitrides and carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tengfei; Liu, Tianmo; Wei, Hongmei; Hussain, Shahid; Wang, Jinxing; Zeng, Wen; Peng, Xianghe; Wang, Zhongchang

    2015-11-01

    The twin boundary energies of TiN, ZrN, HfN, TiC, ZrC, HfC, VC, NbC and TaC and the adhesion energies of twin interfaces and interfaces of TiN/ZrN, VC/TiC and TiN/TiC were calculated using first-principles methods. A new route in the preparation of mechanically superhard films has been proposed by introducing twin into the multilayer of transition-metal nitrides and carbides.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Gamma(face-centered cubic) + Gamma Prime(L12) Precipitation-Strengthened Cobalt-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchini, Peter J.

    High-temperature structural alloys for aerospace and energy applications have long been dominated by Ni-based superalloys, whose high-temperature strength and creep resistance can be attributed to a two-phase microstructure consisting of a large volume fraction of ordered gamma'(L12)-precipitates embedded in a disordered gamma(f.c.c.)-matrix. These alloys exhibit excellent mechanical behavior and thermal stability, but after decades of incremental improvement, are nearing the theoretical limit of their operating temperatures. In 2006, an analogous gamma(f.c.c.) + gamma'(L12) microstructure was identified in the Co-Al-W ternary system with liquidus and solidus temperatures 50-150 °C higher than conventional Ni-based superalloys. The work herein focuses on assessing the effects of alloying additions on microstructure and mechanical behavior in an effort to lay the foundations for understanding this emerging alloy system. A variety of Co-based superalloys are investigated in order to study fundamental materials properties and to address key engineering challenges. Coarsening rate constants and temporal exponents are measured for gamma'(L1 2)-precipitates in a ternary Co-Al-W alloy aged at 650 °C and 750 °C. A series of Co-Al-W-B-Zr alloys are cast to study the influence of segregation of B and Zr to grain boundaries (GBs) on mechanical properties. Co-Ni-Al-W-Ti alloys with various amounts of Al, W, and Ti are cast in order to fabricate Co-based superalloys with decreased density and increased gamma'(L1 2)-solvus temperature. 2-D dislocation dynamics modeling is employed to predict how gamma'(L12)-precipitate size and volume fraction affect the mechanical properties of Ni- and Co-based superalloys. Compositional information such as phase concentrations, partitioning behavior, and GB segregation are measured with local electrode atom probe (LEAP) tomography in alloys with fine microstructures and with scanning electron microscope (SEM) electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in alloys with coarse microstructures. High-temperature mechanical properties are determined with compression creep at 850 °C and flow stress tests conducted between room temperature and 900 °C. gamma'(L12)-solvus temperature, as well as solidus and liquidus temperatures, are measured with differential thermal analysis (DTA). B and Zr strongly segregate to GBs in Co-Al-W-B-Zr alloys. B additions of 0.05 at. % result in micron-sized GB-precipitates that improve creep strength by two orders of magnitude. Segregation of B or Zr in amounts where GB-precipitates do not form, have no effect on creep strength over a ternary Co-Al-W alloy. The concurrent addition of B and Zr improves creep strength, though to a lesser degree than in alloys containing GB-borides. Ti is an effective substitute for W and Al in Co-Ni-Al-W alloys where density is decreased by 9 % and solvus is increased to 1137 °C in a Co-10Ni-5Al-5W-8Ti at. % alloy compared to 982 °C in a Co-10Ni-9Al-9W at. % alloy. Further investigation of reducing W in a Co-10Ni-6Al-xW-6Ti at. % (x=6, 4, 2, 0) alloys ascertain that, with the addition of Ti, gamma'(L12)-precipitates can form in a wider composition range than in ternary Co-Al-W alloys. 2-D dislocation dynamics simulations are in good agreement with experimental measurements for binary Ni-Al and ternary Co-Al-W alloys. General trends in strengthening are captured for higher order Ni-Al-Cr and Ni-Al-Cr-W alloys.

  7. Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment: Significant and Quantitative Findings Made

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    (Earth's gravity), and the emergence of face-centered-cubic (FCC) crystals late in the coarsening process (as small crystallites lost particles to the slow ripening of large crystallites). Significant quantitative findings from the microgravity experiments have been developed describing complex interactions among crystallites during the growth process, as concentration fields overlap in the surrounding disordered phase. Time-resolved Bragg scattering under microgravity captures one effect of these interactions quite conclusively for the sample at a volume fraction of 0.528. From the earliest time until the sample is almost fully crystalline, the size and overall crystallinity grow monotonically, but the number of crystallites per unit volume (number density) falls. Apparently nucleation is slower than the loss of crystallites because of the transfer of particles from small to large crystals. Thus, coarsening occurs simultaneously with growth, rather than following the completion of nucleation and growth as is generally assumed. In the same sample, an interesting signature appears in the apparent number density of crystallites and the volume fraction within the crystallites shortly before full crystallinity is reached. A brief upturn in both indicates the creation of more domains of the size of the average crystallite simultaneous with the compression of the crystallites. Only the emergence of dendritic arms offers a reasonable explanation. The arms would be "seen" by the light scattering as separate domains whose smaller radii of curvature would compress the interior phase. In fiscal year 1999, numerous papers, a doctoral dissertation, and the PHaSE final report were produced. Although this flight project has been completed, plans are in place for a follow-on colloid experiment by Chaikin and Russel that employs a light microscope within Glenn's Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. PHaSE is providing us with a deeper understanding of the

  8. SPHERES Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andres; Benavides, Jose Victor; Ormsby, Steve L.; GuarnerosLuna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized satellites that provide a test bed for development and research into multi-body formation flying, multi-spacecraft control algorithms, and free-flying physical and material science investigations. Up to three self-contained free-flying satellites can fly within the cabin of the International Space Station (ISS), performing flight formations, testing of control algorithms or as a platform for investigations requiring this unique free-flying test environment. Each satellite is a self-contained unit with power, propulsion, computers, navigation equipment, and provides physical and electrical connections (via standardized expansion ports) for Principal Investigator (PI) provided hardware and sensors.

  9. Simulation of rotary-drum and repose tests for frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, O.R.; Braun, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    The effects of rotation rate and interparticle friction on the bulk flow behavior in rotating horizontal cylinders are studied via particle-dynamic simulations. Assemblies of inelastic, frictional spheres and rigid sphere clusters are utilized, and rotation rates from quasistatic to centrifuging are examined. Flow phenomena explored include size segregation, avalanching, slumping and centrifuging. Simulated drum flows with two sizes of frictional spheres showed very rapid segregation of species perpendicular to the drum axis; however, simulations of up to 10 revolutions, utilizing periodic-boundary ends, did not exhibit the experimentally observed axial segregation into stripes. Angles of repose for uniform-sized spheres in slowly rotating cylinders varied from 13 to 31 degrees as the friction coefficient varied from 0.02 to 1.0. For simulated rotation rates higher than the threshold to obtain uniform flow conditions, the apparent angle of repose increases as the rotation rats increases, consistent with experiments. Also, simulations with rigid clusters of 4 spheres in a tetrahedral shape or 8 spheres in a cubical arrangement, demonstrate that particle shape strongly influences the repose angle. Simulations of cubical 8-sphere clusters, with a surface coefficient of friction of 0.1, produced apparent angles of repose exceeding 35 degrees, compared to 23 degrees for assemblies of single spheres interacting with the same force model parameters. Centrifuging flows at very high rotation rates exist as stationary beds moving exactly as the outer rotating wall. At somewhat slower speeds the granular bed remains in contact with the wall but exhibits surface sliding down the rising inner bed surface, moving a short distance on each revolution. At still slower speeds particles rain from the surface of the upper half of the rotating bed.

  10. SPHERES Smartphone Workbench

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Smart SPHERES space robot (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) equipped with an Android smartphone performs a video survey inside of the International Space S...

  11. Grain-boundary strengthening in nanocrystalline chromium and the Hall- Petch coefficient of body-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong; Junyan, Zhang; Huang, J C; Bei, Hongbin; Nieh, Tai-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Cr (nc-Cr) was synthesized by electrodeposition. Samples with various grain sizes (19 57 nm) were prepared by annealing the as-deposited sample. Microstructures were examined using X-ray and electron microscopy, and the mechanical prop- erties were evaluated using nanoindentation. The strength of nc-Cr samples apparently obeyed the classical Hall Petch relationship. It was found that hardening potency caused by grain refinement was generally higher in body-centered cubic metals than that in face-centered cubic and hexagonal close-packed metals. A possible explanation was offered.

  12. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  13. Lorentzian fuzzy spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, A.; Lu, Lei; Stern, A.

    2015-09-01

    We show that fuzzy spheres are solutions of Lorentzian Ishibashi-Kawai-Kitazawa-Tsuchiya-type matrix models. The solutions serve as toy models of closed noncommutative cosmologies where big bang/crunch singularities appear only after taking the commutative limit. The commutative limit of these solutions corresponds to a sphere embedded in Minkowski space. This "sphere" has several novel features. The induced metric does not agree with the standard metric on the sphere, and, moreover, it does not have a fixed signature. The curvature computed from the induced metric is not constant, has singularities at fixed latitudes (not corresponding to the poles) and is negative. Perturbations are made about the solutions, and are shown to yield a scalar field theory on the sphere in the commutative limit. The scalar field can become tachyonic for a range of the parameters of the theory.

  14. Acoustic band gaps of three-dimensional periodic polymer cellular solids with cubic symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanyu; Yao, Haimin; Wang, Lifeng

    2013-07-01

    The band structure and sound attenuation of the triply periodic co-continuous composite materials with simple cubic lattice, body-centered cubic lattice, and face-centered cubic lattice consisting of PMMA and air are investigated using finite element method. Complete band gaps are found in these structures and the width of band gaps is depending on volume fraction. It is shown that the width of band gaps along different directions in the first irreducible Brillouin zone enlarges as the volume fraction increases from 0.2 to 0.7. The largest complete band gap widths of the three types of co-continuous structures are 0.29, 0.54, and 0.55, respectively. As the complete band gaps appear in audible range of frequencies, these triply periodic co-continuous composite materials can be utilized to control noise.

  15. Piecewise Cubic Interpolation Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1982-04-23

    PCHIP (Piecewise Cubic Interpolation Package) is a set of subroutines for piecewise cubic Hermite interpolation of data. It features software to produce a monotone and "visually pleasing" interpolant to monotone data. Such an interpolant may be more reasonable than a cubic spline if the data contain both 'steep' and 'flat' sections. Interpolation of cumulative probability distribution functions is another application. In PCHIP, all piecewise cubic functions are represented in cubic Hermite form; that is, f(x)more » is determined by its values f(i) and derivatives d(i) at the breakpoints x(i), i=1(1)N. PCHIP contains three routines - PCHIM, PCHIC, and PCHSP to determine derivative values, six routines - CHFEV, PCHFE, CHFDV, PCHFD, PCHID, and PCHIA to evaluate, differentiate, or integrate the resulting cubic Hermite function, and one routine to check for monotonicity. A FORTRAN 77 version and SLATEC version of PCHIP are included.« less

  16. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  17. Experiment SPHERE status 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Besshapov, S. P.; Kabanova, N. V.; Sysoeva, T. I.; Antonov, R. A.; Anyuhina, A. M.; Bronvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Tkaczyk, W.; Finger, M.; Sonsky, M.

    2009-12-01

    The expedition carried out in March, 2008 to Lake Baikal became an important stage in the development of the SPHERE experiment. During the expedition the SPHERE-2 installation was hoisted, for the first time, on a tethered balloon, APA, to a height of 700 m over the lake surface covered with ice and snow. A series of test measurements were made. Preliminary results of the data processing are presented. The next plan of the SPHERE experiment is to begin a set of statistics for constructing the CR spectrum in the energy range 10-10 eV.

  18. PREPARATION OF HIGH-DENSITY THORIUM OXIDE SPHERES

    DOEpatents

    McNees, R.A. Jr.; Taylor, A.J.

    1963-12-31

    A method of preparing high-density thorium oxide spheres for use in pellet beds in nuclear reactors is presented. Sinterable thorium oxide is first converted to free-flowing granules by means such as compression into a compact and comminution of the compact. The granules are then compressed into cubes having a density of 5.0 to 5.3 grams per cubic centimeter. The cubes are tumbled to form spheres by attrition, and the spheres are then fired at 1250 to 1350 deg C. The fired spheres are then polished and fired at a temperature above 1650 deg C to obtain high density. Spherical pellets produced by this method are highly resistant to mechanical attrition hy water. (AEC)

  19. ISS Update: Smart SPHERES

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries conducts a phone interview with Mark Micire, SPHERES Engineering Manager at Ames Research Center. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include ...

  20. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  1. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  2. Catalytic hollow spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The improved, heterogeneous catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitably formed of a shell (12) of metal such as aluminum having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be, itself, catalytic or the catalyst can be coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  3. Chinese Armillary Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    The armillary sphere was perhaps the most important type of astronomical instrument in ancient China. It was first invented by Luoxia Hong in the first century BC. After Han times, the structure of the armillary sphere became increasingly sophisticated by including more and more rings representing various celestial movements as recognized by the Chinese astronomers. By the eighth century, the Chinese armillary sphere consisted of three concentric sets of rings revolving on the south-north polar axis. The relative position of the rings could be adjusted to reflect the precession of the equinoxes and the regression of the Moon's nodes along the ecliptic. To counterbalance the defect caused by too many rings, Guo Shoujing from the late thirteenth century constructed the Simplified Instruments which reorganized the rings of the armillary sphere into separate instruments for measuring equatorial coordinates and horizontal coordinates. The armillary sphere was still preserved because it was a good illustration of celestial movements. A fifteenth-century replica of Guo Shoujing's armillary sphere still exists today.

  4. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  5. Diagnosis of a poorly performing liquid hydrogen bulk storage sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Angela Gray

    2012-06-01

    There are two 3,218 cubic meter (850,000 gallon) Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A, the other at Launch Pad B. The Sphere at Pad B had a high boiloff rate when brought into service in the 1960s. In 2001, the daily commodity loss was approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the maximum allowed by the specification. After being re-painted in the 1990s a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere that resulted in poor paint bonding and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of service, which provided a unique opportunity to perform a series of visual inspections of the insulation. Boroscope examinations revealed a large Perlite void in the region where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and offloaded into the annular void region until full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  6. Core/shell face-centered tetragonal FePd/Pd nanoparticles as an efficient non-Pt catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Jiang, Guangming; Zhang, Xu; Shen, Bo; Wu, Liheng; Zhang, Sen; Lu, Gang; Wu, Zhongbiao; Sun, Shouheng

    2015-10-04

    We report the synthesis of core/shell face-centered tetragonal (fct)-FePd/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via reductive annealing of core/shell Pd/Fe3O4 NPs followed by temperature-controlled Fe etching in acetic acid. Among three different kinds of core/shell FePd/Pd NPs studied (FePd core at similar to 8 nm and Pd shell at 0.27, 0.65, or 0.81 nm), the fct-FePd/Pd-0.65 NPs are the most efficient catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO4 with Pt-like activity and durability. This enhanced ORR catalysis arises from the desired Pd lattice compression in the 0.65 nm Pd shell induced by the fct-FePd core. Lastly, our study offers a general approach to enhance Pd catalysis in acid for ORB.

  7. Core/shell face-centered tetragonal FePd/Pd nanoparticles as an efficient non-Pt catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Jiang, Guangming; Zhang, Xu; Shen, Bo; Wu, Liheng; Zhang, Sen; Lu, Gang; Wu, Zhongbiao; Sun, Shouheng

    2015-10-04

    We report the synthesis of core/shell face-centered tetragonal (fct)-FePd/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via reductive annealing of core/shell Pd/Fe3O4 NPs followed by temperature-controlled Fe etching in acetic acid. Among three different kinds of core/shell FePd/Pd NPs studied (FePd core at similar to 8 nm and Pd shell at 0.27, 0.65, or 0.81 nm), the fct-FePd/Pd-0.65 NPs are the most efficient catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO4 with Pt-like activity and durability. This enhanced ORR catalysis arises from the desired Pd lattice compression in the 0.65 nm Pd shell induced by the fct-FePd core. Lastly, our study offersmore » a general approach to enhance Pd catalysis in acid for ORB.« less

  8. Observation of Body-Centered Cubic Gold Nanocluster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Tao; Li, Gao; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Zeng, Chenjie; Pang, Guangsheng; Rosi, Nathaniel L; Jin, Rongchao

    2015-08-17

    The structure of nanoparticles plays a critical role in dictating their material properties. Gold is well known to adopt face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. Herein we report the first observation of a body-centered cubic (bcc) gold nanocluster composed of 38 gold atoms protected by 20 adamantanethiolate ligands and two sulfido atoms ([Au38S2(SR)20], where R=C10H15) as revealed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This bcc structure is in striking contrast with the fcc structure of bulk gold and conventional Au nanoparticles, as well as the bi-icosahedral structure of [Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24]. The bcc nanocluster has a distinct HOMO-LUMO gap of ca. 1.5 eV, much larger than the gap (0.9 eV) of the bi-icosahedral [Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24]. The unique structure of the bcc gold nanocluster may be promising in catalytic applications. PMID:26136241

  9. Cubic-normal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gan Chew; Hin, Pooi Ah; Ho, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The power-normal distribution given in Yeo and Johnson in year 2000 is a unimodal distribution with wide ranges of skewness and kurtosis. A shortcoming of the power-normal distribution is that the negative and positve parts of the underlying random variable have to be specified by two different expressions of the standard normal random variable. In this paper, we construct a new distribution, called the cubic-normal distribution, via a single polynomial expression in cubic root function. Apart from having the properties which are similar to those of the power-normal distribution, this cubic-normal distribution can be developed into a multivariate version which is more attractive from the theoretical and computational points of view.

  10. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  11. First science with SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, R.; Gratton, R.; Desidera, S.; Maire, A.-L.; Mesa, D.; Turatto, M.; Baruffolo, A.; Cascone, E.; De Caprio, V.; D'Orazi, V.; Fantinel, D.; Giro, E.; Salasnich, B.; Scuderi, S.; Sissa, E.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Mouillet, D.

    The Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet Research (SPHERE) facility mounted at ESO-VLT aims at discovering giant extrasolar planets in the proximity of bright stars and characterising them through spectroscopic and polarimetric observations. SPHERE is a complete system with a core made of an extreme-Adaptive Optics (XAO) turbulence correction, a pupil tracker and NIR and Visible coronagraph devices. At its back end, a differential dual imaging camera (IRDIS) and an integral field spectrograph (IFS) work in the Near Infrared (NIR) (0.95 < lambda < 2.32 μm) while a high resolution polarization camera covers the visible domain (0.6 < lambda < 0.9 μm). The IFS is a low resolution spectrograph (R˜50) that operates in the near IR (0.95< lambda < 1.6 μm), an optimal wavelength range for the detection of planetary features, over a field of view of about 1.7 × 1.7 square arcsecs. From spectra it is possible to reconstruct monochromatic images with high contrast (10-6 at 0.5 arcsec) and high spatial resolution, well inside the star PSF. The commissioning of the instrument ended in October 2014 and ESO has already offered SPHERE to the community. In this paper several results obtained during the commissioning and science verification phase are described.

  12. The distribution sphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.; Montgomery, F.C.; Morris, R.N.

    1993-08-01

    The equivalent sphere model, which is widely used in calculating the release of fission gases from nuclear fuel, is idealized. The model is based on the diffusion of fission products in and their escape from a homogeneous sphere of fuel; the fission products are generated at a constant rate and undergo radiodecay. The fuel is assumed to be a set of spherical particles with a common radius. The value of the radius is such that the surface-to-volume ratio, S/V, of the set of spherical particles is the same as the S/V of the fuel mass of interest. The release rate depends on the dimensionless quantity {lambda}a{sup 2}/D where {lambda} is the radiodecay constant, a, the equivalent sphere radius and D, the diffusion coefficient. In the limit {lambda}t {much_gt} 1, the steady-state fractional release for isotopes with half-lives less than about 5 d is given by the familiar relation R/B = 3{radical}D/{lambda}a{sup 2} (1). For the spherical particles, S/V = 3/a. However, in important cases, the assumption of a single value of a is inappropriate. Examples of configurations for which multiple values of a are appropriate include powders, hydrolyzed fuel kernels, normally configured HTR fuel particles and perhaps, fuel kernels alone. In the latter case, one can imagine a distribution of values of a whose mean yields the value appropriate for agreement of Eq. (1) with measurement.

  13. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  14. Ultraviolet characterization of integrating spheres.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Ping-Shine; Li, Zhigang; Arp, Uwe; Lykke, Keith R

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the performance of polytetrafluoroethylene integrating spheres in the ultraviolet (UV) region with wavelengths as short as 200 nm. Two techniques were used for this study; first, the spectral throughput of an integrating sphere irradiated by a deuterium lamp was analyzed by a monochromator. Second, a UV laser beam was directed into an integrating sphere, and spectrally dispersed laser induced fluorescence was studied. Significant absorption and fluorescence features were observed in the UV region and attributed to the contamination in the integrating sphere. We demonstrate that integrating spheres are easily contaminated by environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from engine exhaust. Baking of the contaminated integrating sphere can reverse some but not all of the effects caused by contaminants. The implications for using integrating spheres for UV measurement are discussed. PMID:17676122

  15. Ultraviolet characterization of integrating spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Ping-Shine; Li, Zhigang; Arp, Uwe; Lykke, Keith R.

    2007-08-01

    We have studied the performance of polytetrafluoroethylene integrating spheres in the ultraviolet (UV) region with wavelengths as short as 200 nm. Two techniques were used for this study; first, the spectral throughput of an integrating sphere irradiated by a deuterium lamp was analyzed by a monochromator. Second, a UV laser beam was directed into an integrating sphere, and spectrally dispersed laser induced fluorescence was studied. Significant absorption and fluorescence features were observed in the UV region and attributed to the contamination in the integrating sphere. We demonstrate that integrating spheres are easily contaminated by environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from engine exhaust. Baking of the contaminated integrating sphere can reverse some but not all of the effects caused by contaminants. The implications for using integrating spheres for UV measurement are discussed.

  16. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  17. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  18. Coherent potential approximation for the absorption spectra and the densities of states of cubic Frenkel exciton systems with Gaussian diagonal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgin, I.; Boukahil, A.; Huber, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    Using the coherent potential approximation, we investigate the optical absorption and the density of states of Frenkel exciton systems on simple, body centered, and face centered cubic lattices with nearest-neighbor interactions and a Gaussian distribution of transition frequencies (i.e. Gaussian diagonal disorder). The analysis is based on an elliptic integral approach with a variety of variances. The results for the simple cubic lattice are in good agreement with the finite array calculations of Schreiber and Toyozawa. Our findings suggest that the coherent potential approximation can be useful in interpreting the optical properties of cubic crystals where the optically excited states are Frenkel excitons with the dominant interactions limited to nearest-neighbors.

  19. Dynamical tachyons on fuzzy spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Berenstein, David; Trancanelli, Diego

    2011-05-15

    We study the spectrum of off-diagonal fluctuations between displaced fuzzy spheres in the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase plane wave matrix model. The displacement is along the plane of the fuzzy spheres. We find that when two fuzzy spheres intersect at angles, classical tachyons develop and that the spectrum of these modes can be computed analytically. These tachyons can be related to the familiar Nielsen-Olesen instabilities in Yang-Mills theory on a constant magnetic background. Many features of the problem become more apparent when we compare with maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a sphere, of which this system is a truncation. We also set up a simple oscillatory trajectory on the displacement between the fuzzy spheres and study the dynamics of the modes as they become tachyonic for part of the oscillations. We speculate on their role regarding the possible thermalization of the system.

  20. Dynamical tachyons on fuzzy spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, David; Trancanelli, Diego

    2011-05-01

    We study the spectrum of off-diagonal fluctuations between displaced fuzzy spheres in the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase plane wave matrix model. The displacement is along the plane of the fuzzy spheres. We find that when two fuzzy spheres intersect at angles, classical tachyons develop and that the spectrum of these modes can be computed analytically. These tachyons can be related to the familiar Nielsen-Olesen instabilities in Yang-Mills theory on a constant magnetic background. Many features of the problem become more apparent when we compare with maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a sphere, of which this system is a truncation. We also set up a simple oscillatory trajectory on the displacement between the fuzzy spheres and study the dynamics of the modes as they become tachyonic for part of the oscillations. We speculate on their role regarding the possible thermalization of the system.

  1. Periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-05-15

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through observation that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been observed in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.

  2. Exchange stiffness, magnetization, and spin waves in cubic and hexagonal phases of cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Steiner, M.M.; Sooryakumar, R.; Prinz, G.A.; Farrow, R.F.; Harp, G.

    1996-05-01

    We utilize Brillouin light scattering to investigate the magnetic properties of the hexagonal-close-packed as well as the body- and face-centered cubic phases of elemental cobalt stabilized as thin epilayers. Expressions for the dependence of the surface and bulk magnons on applied magnetic field and in-plane propagation direction yield the exchange stiffness constant {ital D}, saturation magnetization {ital M}, and magnetic anisotropy fields of the cobalt atoms synthesized in these distinct crystal structures. Estimates of {ital D} and {ital M} are also calculated from the electronic band structure for the different crystalline phases. Satisfactory agreement is found between theory and experiment. The implications of these results towards our understanding of magnetic properties of itinerant ferromagnets are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Phonon frequencies and elastic constants of cubic Pu from electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, G.K.

    1996-11-01

    The phonon frequencies and elastic constants of plutonium are calculated using a model for the electronic structure that treats the valance electrons as a pseudopotential and the f-electrons in tight-binding theory. An effective interaction between ions is presented with electron screening treated in the Thomas-Fermi approximation and the f-electrons contributing bonding and repulsive terms to the potential. The phonon frequencies and elastic constants are calculated using the face-centered cubic lattice structure for both the {alpha}-, and {delta}-phases of Pu. The electronic structure predicts the qualitative behavior of the elastic constants and the transverse branches of the phonon dispersion curves in agreement with experimental values of the elastic constants for B-phase Pu.

  4. Higher-order elasticity of cubic metals in the embedded-atom method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantasiriwan, Somchart; Milstein, Frederick

    1996-06-01

    The higher-order elasticity of cubic metals in the framework of the embedded-atom method (EAM) is investigated. Proper groupings of the second- and third-order elastic moduli are shown to yield expressions that depend solely on either the electron density function or the pair potential and which therefore facilitate the construction of EAM models. This formulation also makes evident some important restrictions on the EAM functions and lattice summations. In order for the EAM to model the anharmonic properties accurately, (a) at least the third-nearest-neighbor interactions must be included in the expressions for the cohesive energies of both the body-centered-cubic and face-centered-cubic metals and (b) an electron density function of an inverse power form, as has been employed previously, generally is not valid. Specific EAM models are constructed for a diverse selection of metals (i.e., aluminum, copper, sodium, and molybdenum). These models identically reproduce the respective second- and third-order elastic moduli, as well as the binding energy, atomic volume, unrelaxed vacancy formation energy, and Rose's universal equation of state. They also provide reasonable phonon frequency spectra and structural energy differences

  5. Particle linear theory on a self-gravitating perturbed cubic Bravais lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, B.

    2008-08-15

    Discreteness effects are a source of uncontrolled systematic errors of N-body simulations, which are used to compute the evolution of a self-gravitating fluid. We have already developed the so-called ''particle linear theory''(PLT), which describes the evolution of the position of self-gravitating particles located on a perturbed simple cubic lattice. It is the discrete analogue of the well-known (Lagrangian) linear theory of a self-gravitating fluid. Comparing both theories permits us to quantify precisely discreteness effects in the linear regime. It is useful to develop the PLT also for other perturbed lattices because they represent different discretizations of the same continuous system. In this paper we detail how to implement the PLT for perturbed cubic Bravais lattices (simple, body, and face-centered) in a cubic simulation box. As an application, we will study the discreteness effects--in the linear regime--of N-body simulations for which initial conditions have been set up using these different lattices.

  6. Science off the Sphere: Bistronauts

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  7. Ancient Celestial Spheres from Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    2006-08-01

    We present several ancient celestial spheres from the 8th century B.C. found throughout Greece, mainly in Thessaly, at the temple of Itonia Athena, but also in Olympia and other places. These celestial spheres have an axis, equator and several meridians and they have several markings with the symbol of stars (today's symbol for the Sun) $\\odot$. Such instruments could have been used to measure the time, the latitude of a location, or the coordinates of stars.

  8. The SPHERE View of Betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, O.; Schmid, H.-M.; Carbillet, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Abe, L.; Mouillet, D.

    2013-05-01

    SPHERE, the Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch instrument for the VLT is optimized towards reaching the highest contrast in a limited field of view and at short distances from the central star, thanks to an extreme AO system. SPHERE is very well suited to study the close environment of Betelgeuse, and has a strong potential for detecting the ejection activity around this key red supergiant.

  9. Ricochet of sphere off water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoockron, Joseph

    1989-06-01

    This work deals with the analysis and calculation of the critical angle for the ricochet of a sphere off water. The critical angle is defined as the maximum incidence angle of a sphere over water which enables it to ricochet. This work presents the development and calculation of the forces acting on the sphere during its entry into the water. Since the critical angle is very sensitive to the hydrodynamic forces, the accurate development and calculation of these forces has been emphasized in some previous methods. There is a simple empirical formula for calculation of the critical angle, which is theta(sub c) = 18 deg/square root of zeta, where theta(sub c) is the critical angle and zeta is the ratio between the density of the sphere and the density of the water. Likewise, there are works which give a theoretical basis to the above-mentioned formula. This formula does not depend on the incidence velocity of the sphere or on the sphere radius, these being parameters that affect the critical angle. In this work it is verified that the critical angle depends on these added parameters, in the form of the F(sub r) number, where F(sub r) = V(exp 2)/Rg.

  10. Blocking temperature of interacting magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial and cubic anisotropies from Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russier, V.

    2016-07-01

    The low temperature behavior of densely packed interacting spherical single domain nanoparticles (MNP) is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the framework of an effective one spin model. The particles are distributed through a hard sphere like distribution with periodic boundary conditions and interact through the dipole dipole interaction (DDI) with an anisotropy energy including both cubic and uniaxial symmetry components. The cubic component is shown to play a sizable role on the value of the blocking temperature Tb only when the MNP easy axes are parallel to the cubic easy direction ([111] direction for a negative cubic anisotropy constant). The nature of the collective low temperature state, either ferromagnetic or spin glass like, is found to depend on the ratio of the anisotropy to the dipolar energies characterizing partly the disorder in the system.

  11. Porous Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    This document is a slide presentation that examines the use of a simple templating process to produce hollow ceramic spheres with a pore size of 1 to 10 microns. Using ion exchange process it was determined that the method produces porous ceramic spheres with a unique structure: (i.e., inner sphere surrounded by an outer sphere.)

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of delamination of a stiff, body-centered-cubic crystalline film from a compliant Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, L. M.; Zhou, X. W.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Moody, N. R.; Ballarini, R.; Gerberich, W. W.

    2009-10-01

    Compliant substrate technology offers an effective approach to grow high-quality multilayered films, of importance to microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems devices. By using a thin, soft substrate to relieve the mismatch strain of an epitaxial film, the critical thickness of misfit dislocation formation in the overlayer is effectively increased. Experiments have indicated that stiff films deposited onto Si substrates can delaminate at the interface. However, the atomic mechanisms of the deformation and the fracture of the films have not been well studied. Here, we have applied molecular dynamics simulations to study the delamination of a stiff body-centered-cubic crystalline film from a compliant Si substrate due to tensile loading. The observed mechanical behavior is shown to be relatively independent of small changes in temperature, loading rate, and system size. Fracture occurs at the interface between the two materials resulting in nearly atomically clean surfaces. Dislocations are seen to nucleate in the body-centered-cubic film prior to delamination. At higher strains, a phase change to a face centered cubic is observed within the body-centered-cubic film, facilitating extensive dislocation growth and interaction. The various defects that form prior to fracture are discussed and related to the mechanical properties of the system.

  13. Computational Meso-Scale Study of Representative Unit Cubes for Inert Spheres Subject to Intense Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Cameron; Najjar, Fady; Stewart, D. Scott; Bdzil, John

    2012-11-01

    Modern-engineered high explosive (HE) materials can consist of a matrix of solid, inert particles embedded into an HE charge. When this charge is detonated, intense shock waves are generated. As these intense shocks interact with the inert particles, large deformations occur in the particles while the incident shock diffracts around the particle interface. We will present results from a series of 3-D DNS of an intense shock interacting with unit-cube configurations of inert particles embedded into nitromethane. The LLNL multi-physics massively parallel hydrodynamics code ALE3D is used to carry out high-resolution (4 million nodes) simulations. Three representative unit-cube configurations are considered: primitive cubic, face-centered and body-centered cubic for two particle material types of varying impedance ratios. Previous work has only looked at in-line particles configurations. We investigate the time evolution of the unit cell configurations, vorticity being generated by the shock interaction, as well as the velocity and acceleration of the particles until they reach the quasi-steady regime. LLNL-ABS-567694. CSS was supported by a summer internship through the HEDP program at LLNL. FMN's work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. LAGO on the unit sphere.

    PubMed

    Laflamme-Sanders, Alexandra; Zhu, Mu

    2008-11-01

    LAGO is an efficient kernel algorithm designed specifically for the rare target detection problem. However, unlike other kernel algorithms, LAGO cannot be easily used with many domain-specific kernels. We solve this problem by first providing a unified framework for LAGO and clarifying its basic principle, and then applying that principle on the unit sphere instead of in the Euclidean space. PMID:18775643

  15. Simple manipulator for rotating spheres.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, B W; Hendricks, C D; Ward, C M; Willenborg, D L

    1978-06-01

    We describe a simple device for rapidly rotating a small sphere to any orientation for inspection of the surface. The ball is held between two small, flat surfaces and rolls as the surfaces are moved differentially parallel to one another. PMID:18699214

  16. Science off the Sphere: Fun with Antibubbles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit injects air bubbles inside a sphere of water to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership betwe...

  17. Tessellating the Sphere with Regular Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto-Johnson, Hortensia; Bechthold, Dawn

    2004-01-01

    Tessellations in the Euclidean plane and regular polygons that tessellate the sphere are reviewed. The regular polygons that can possibly tesellate the sphere are spherical triangles, squares and pentagons.

  18. BDA: A novel method for identifying defects in body-centered cubic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Johannes J.; Bitzek, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The accurate and fast identification of crystallographic defects plays a key role for the analysis of atomistic simulation output data. For face-centered cubic (fcc) metals, most existing structure analysis tools allow for the direct distinction of common defects, such as stacking faults or certain low-index surfaces. For body-centered cubic (bcc) metals, on the other hand, a robust way to identify such defects is currently not easily available. We therefore introduce a new method for analyzing atomistic configurations of bcc metals, the BCC Defect Analysis (BDA). It uses existing structure analysis algorithms and combines their results to uniquely distinguish between typical defects in bcc metals. In essence, the BDA method offers the following features:•Identification of typical defect structures in bcc metals.•Reduction of erroneously identified defects by iterative comparison to the defects in the atom's neighborhood.•Availability as ready-to-use Python script for the widespread visualization tool OVITO [http://ovito.org]. PMID:27114926

  19. BDA: A novel method for identifying defects in body-centered cubic crystals.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes J; Bitzek, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The accurate and fast identification of crystallographic defects plays a key role for the analysis of atomistic simulation output data. For face-centered cubic (fcc) metals, most existing structure analysis tools allow for the direct distinction of common defects, such as stacking faults or certain low-index surfaces. For body-centered cubic (bcc) metals, on the other hand, a robust way to identify such defects is currently not easily available. We therefore introduce a new method for analyzing atomistic configurations of bcc metals, the BCC Defect Analysis (BDA). It uses existing structure analysis algorithms and combines their results to uniquely distinguish between typical defects in bcc metals. In essence, the BDA method offers the following features:•Identification of typical defect structures in bcc metals.•Reduction of erroneously identified defects by iterative comparison to the defects in the atom's neighborhood.•Availability as ready-to-use Python script for the widespread visualization tool OVITO [http://ovito.org]. PMID:27114926

  20. Eddy currents in a conducting sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, John; Hestenes, David

    1986-01-01

    This report analyzes the eddy current induced in a solid conducting sphere by a sinusoidal current in a circular loop. Analytical expressions for the eddy currents are derived as a power series in the vectorial displacement of the center of the sphere from the axis of the loop. These are used for first order calculations of the power dissipated in the sphere and the force and torque exerted on the sphere by the electromagnetic field of the loop.

  1. Coating a Sphere With Evaporated Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    In vacuum coating apparatus, metal evaporated onto sphere from small source located some distance away. Sphere held in path of metal vapor while rotated about axis that rocks back and forth. One tilting motion particularly easy to produce is sinusoidal rocking with frequency much lower than rotational frequency. Apparatus developed for coating single-crystal sapphire spheres with niobium.

  2. Active swarms on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Henkes, Silke

    2015-02-01

    We show that coupling to curvature nontrivially affects collective motion in active systems, leading to motion patterns not observed in flat space. Using numerical simulations, we study a model of self-propelled particles with polar alignment and soft repulsion confined to move on the surface of a sphere. We observe a variety of motion patterns with the main hallmarks being polar vortex and circulating band states arising due to the incompatibility between spherical topology and uniform motion—a consequence of the "hairy ball" theorem. We provide a detailed analysis of density, velocity, pressure, and stress profiles in the circulating band state. In addition, we present analytical results for a simplified model of collective motion on the sphere showing that frustration due to curvature leads to stable elastic distortions storing energy in the band.

  3. Active swarms on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Sknepnek, Rastko; Henkes, Silke

    2015-02-01

    We show that coupling to curvature nontrivially affects collective motion in active systems, leading to motion patterns not observed in flat space. Using numerical simulations, we study a model of self-propelled particles with polar alignment and soft repulsion confined to move on the surface of a sphere. We observe a variety of motion patterns with the main hallmarks being polar vortex and circulating band states arising due to the incompatibility between spherical topology and uniform motion-a consequence of the "hairy ball" theorem. We provide a detailed analysis of density, velocity, pressure, and stress profiles in the circulating band state. In addition, we present analytical results for a simplified model of collective motion on the sphere showing that frustration due to curvature leads to stable elastic distortions storing energy in the band. PMID:25768504

  4. Archaic artifacts resembling celestial spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    We present several bronze artifacts from the Archaic Age in Greece (750-480 BC) that resemble celestial spheres or forms of other astronomical significance. They are studied in the context of the Dark Age transition from Mycenaean Age astronomical themes to the philosophical and practical revival of astronomy in the Classical Age with its plethora of astronomical devices. These artifacts, mostly votive in nature are spherical in shape and appear in a variety of forms their most striking characteristic being the depiction of meridians and/or an equator. Most of those artifacts come from Thessaly, and more specifically from the temple of Itonia Athena at Philia, a religious center of pan-Hellenic significance. Celestial spheres, similar in form to the small artifacts presented in this study, could be used to measure latitudes, or estimate the time at a known place, and were thus very useful in navigation.

  5. Numerical simulation of a sphere moving down an incline with identical spheres placed equally apart

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Chen, Cheng-lung; Shen, Hsieh Wen

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of an elastic sphere moving down an incline with a string of identical spheres placed equally apart. Two momentum equations and a moment equation formulated for the moving sphere are solved numerically for the instantaneous velocity of the moving sphere on an incline with different angles of inclination. Input parameters for numerical simulation include the properties of the sphere (the radius, density, Poison's ratio, and Young's Modulus of elasticity), the coefficient of friction between the spheres, and a damping coefficient of the spheres during collision.

  6. Hard sphere packings within cylinders.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Steinhardt, William; Zhao, Hao; Socolar, Joshua E S; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2016-02-23

    Arrangements of identical hard spheres confined to a cylinder with hard walls have been used to model experimental systems, such as fullerenes in nanotubes and colloidal wire assembly. Finding the densest configurations, called close packings, of hard spheres of diameter σ in a cylinder of diameter D is a purely geometric problem that grows increasingly complex as D/σ increases, and little is thus known about the regime for D > 2.873σ. In this work, we extend the identification of close packings up to D = 4.00σ by adapting Torquato-Jiao's adaptive-shrinking-cell formulation and sequential-linear-programming (SLP) technique. We identify 17 new structures, almost all of them chiral. Beyond D ≈ 2.85σ, most of the structures consist of an outer shell and an inner core that compete for being close packed. In some cases, the shell adopts its own maximum density configuration, and the stacking of core spheres within it is quasiperiodic. In other cases, an interplay between the two components is observed, which may result in simple periodic structures. In yet other cases, the very distinction between the core and shell vanishes, resulting in more exotic packing geometries, including some that are three-dimensional extensions of structures obtained from packing hard disks in a circle. PMID:26843132

  7. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  8. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-06-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild’s 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star—a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density—the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres.

  9. Cubic Icosahedra? A Problem in Assigning Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    There is a standard convention that the icosahedral groups are classified separately from the cubic groups, but these two symmetry types have been conflated as "cubic" in some chemistry textbooks. In this note, the connection between cubic and icosahedral symmetries is examined, using a simple pictorial model. It is shown that octahedral and…

  10. Solving Cubic Equations by Polynomial Decomposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra G.

    2011-01-01

    Several mathematicians struggled to solve cubic equations, and in 1515 Scipione del Ferro reportedly solved the cubic while participating in a local mathematical contest, but did not bother to publish his method. Then it was Cardano (1539) who first published the solution to the general cubic equation in his book "The Great Art, or, The Rules of…

  11. Steel and titanium hollow sphere foams

    SciTech Connect

    Hurysz, K.M.; Clark, J.L.; Nagel, A.R.; Lee, K.J.; Cochran, J.K.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Hardwicke, C.U.

    1998-12-31

    Metal hollow sphere foams are fabricated by bonding millimeter sized metal alloy hollow spheres at points of contact. The spheres are formed as powder shells from slurries. For stainless steel spheres, the starting powder is a mixture of iron and chromium oxide. Thermal treatment in hydrogen reduces the oxides to Fe/Cr alloys with less than 2% porosity in sphere walls. The nominal composition is close to that of 405 stainless. Carburization in CO/CO{sub 2} atmosphere followed by heat treatment produces foams of either 410 or 420 type stainless steels depending on carbon content. Compressive stress-strain behavior was measured on point contact bonded stainless foams both before and after carburization. Hardness measurements on steel sphere walls were used to estimate the yield strength. Relative strengths of the foams were positioned between open and closed cell models. This was encouraging because bonding in the foams was less than optimum and the hollow sphere walls contained defects. As processing improves, strengths should increase. To produce titanium alloy spheres, the starting powder is titanium alloy hydride. Thermal treatment in an inert atmosphere decomposes the hydride and sinters the titanium powder in the sphere walls to greater than 96% relative density. Both titanium and Ti-6V-4V spheres and foams have been produced. Oxygen contents are a concern for titanium compositions and processing is being altered to reduce oxygen levels to increase ductility.

  12. Brittle onset of monodispersed magmatic suspensions: from spheres to spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordonnier, B.; Kaus, B.; Manga, M.; Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Castro, J.; Hess, K.-U.; Gottschaller, S.; Dingwell, D. B.; Burlini, L.

    2012-04-01

    post-processing are all performed under MATLAB. For the largest meshes, the computation has been performed with the help of the BRUTUS cluster at ETH Zurich. For solving the system of equation we used the MILAMIN solver and extended it from 2-D to 3-D by the use of Crouzeix-Raviart type elements. MILAMIN is a native MATLAB implementation, which takes advantage of Tim Davi's SuiteSparse package. Here we solve the incompressible Stokes equations. We tested random to structured configurations (Simple Cubic, Body Centered Cubic and Face Centered Cubic) for different particle orientations from random to aligned. These numerical simulations allow us to estimate the stress concentration in magmas due to the presence of the crystals. Our results first confirm the hydrodynamics effects on the flow of elongated particles. The calculated apparent viscosity of the material versus the crystal fraction confirms an early increase for the suspensions viscosity with elongated particles. More importantly, the stress localization due to the particles suggests that the melt will start cracking for a relatively lower bulk stress. Finally, the experimental trend is supported by the numerical simulations, which highlight the importance of the critical packing fraction in addition to the maximum packing fraction. The combination of experimental results and numerical modeling allow us to characterize the physical processes responsible for the failure of particle bearing suspensions and characterize the effect of fraction and shape on the brittle-ductile transition.

  13. Perturbative Casimir Energies of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, G.

    The Casimir energies of single bodies (as opposed to the interaction between mutually disjoint bodies) have accumulated deceptive folklore which this talk will try to exorcise, by mean of calculations for atomic solids that, though optically dilute, are realistically dispersive. This is easy, because quantum electrodynamics then yields identically the same energy as one gets from the properly retarded interatomic potentials. The problem of regularizing (nominal) divergences turns out to be quite distinct from the appropriate process of renormalization: simply discarding all nominally divergent contributions would prevent one from understanding the physics. Contrary to legend, the pertinent Casimir energies for dielectric spheres are attractive.

  14. Visual attention on the sphere.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Iva; Bur, Alexandre; Hugli, Heinz

    2008-11-01

    Human visual system makes an extensive use of visual attention in order to select the most relevant information and speed-up the vision process. Inspired by visual attention, several computer models have been developed and many computer vision applications rely today on such models. However, the actual algorithms are not suitable to omnidirectional images, which contain a significant amount of geometrical distortion. In this paper, we present a novel computational approach that performs in spherical geometry and thus is suitable for omnidirectional images. Following one of the actual models of visual attention, the spherical saliency map is obtained by fusing together intensity, chromatic, and orientation spherical cue conspicuity maps that are themselves obtained through multiscale analysis on the sphere. Finally, the consecutive maxima in the spherical saliency map represent the spots of attention on the sphere. In the experimental part, the proposed method is then compared to the standard one using a synthetic image. Also, we provide examples of spots detection in real omnidirectional scenes which show its advantages. Finally, an experiment illustrates the homogeneity of the detected visual attention in omnidirectional images. PMID:18854253

  15. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  16. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  17. Sphere-Pac Evaluation for Transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is sponsoring a project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the objective of conducting the research and development necessary to evaluate the use of sphere-pac transmutation fuel. Sphere-pac fuels were studied extensively in the 1960s and 1970s. More recently, this fuel form is being studied internationally as a potential plutonium-burning fuel. For transmutation fuel, sphere-pac fuels have potential advantages over traditional pellet-type fuels. This report provides a review of development efforts related to the preparation of sphere-pac fuels and their irradiation tests. Based on the results of these tests, comparisons with pellet-type fuels are summarized, the advantages and disadvantages of using sphere-pac fuels are highlighted, and sphere-pac options for the AFCI are recommended. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory development activities are also outlined.

  18. Process for making hollow carbon spheres

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

    2013-04-16

    A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

  19. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  20. Impingement of Water Droplets on a Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Saper, Paul G.; Kadow, Charles F.

    1955-01-01

    Droplet trajectories about a sphere in ideal fluid flow were calculated. From the calculated droplet trajectories the droplet impingement characteristics of the sphere were determined. Impingement data and equations for determining the collection efficiency, the area, and the distribution of impingement are presented in terms of dimensionless parameters. The range of flight and atmospheric conditions covered in the calculations was extended considerably beyond the range covered by previously reported calculations for the sphere.

  1. Photonic crystals from multiply-coated spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Che Ting

    2000-03-01

    We show theoretically and experimentally that photonic band gaps can be realized using metal or metal-coated spheres as building blocks. Robust photonic gaps exist in any periodic structure built from such spheres when the filling ratio of the spheres exceeds a threshold, and they are not sensitive to the symmetry or the global long range order, with stacking faults cause almost no degradation. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained in the microwave regime. The gaps persist even in a random packing of such spheres. Calculations show that the approach can be scaled up to IR and optical frequencies.

  2. Science off the Sphere: Earth in Infrared

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit views cities, agricultural areas and deserts using an infrared camera for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA...

  3. Unexpected ricochet of spheres off water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlien, D. J.

    1994-08-01

    A sphere was observed to apparently ricochet off the free surface of water at incident angles as large as 45° while the expected (empirical/analytical) maximum angle to the horizontal for ricochet was 6°. Closer examination of the process revealed that the cavitating sphere penetrated the liquid to depths as great as 35 sphere diameters. Under certain circumstances the sphere was also observed to leave the liquid in a direction close to the incoming direction; that is, the sphere ricocheted backwards! This peculiar behavior was found to be a result of an unintentional spin applied to the sphere upon launching. By crudely modelling the process, the sphere path is qualitatively predicted. It was found that the drag and lift coefficients required to model the trajectory data were several times smaller than those obtained for the non-cavitating case or for the non-spinning case. If more precise sphere trajectory data were available, this experiment could be used to measure the lift and drag coefficients of a spinning and cavitating sphere.

  4. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1979-01-09

    Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

  5. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1979-01-09

    Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  6. Preparation of thorium-uranium gel spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Haas, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    Ceramic oxide spheres with diameters of 15 to 1500 ..mu..m are being evaluated for fabrication of power reactor fuel rods. (Th,U)O/sub 2/ spheres can be prepared by internal or external chemical gelation of nitrate solutions or oxide sols. Two established external gelation techniques were tested but proved to be unsatisfactory for the intended application. Established internal gelation techniques for UO/sub 2/ spheres were applied with minor modifications to make 75% ThO/sub 2/-25% UO/sub 2/ spheres that sinter to diameters of 200 to 1400 ..mu..m (99% T.D.).

  7. Hollow Spheres in Composite Materials and Metallic Hollow Sphere Composites (MHSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeister, Erika; Molitor, Martin

    The newly developed metallic hollow spheres are used in combination with a polymeric matrix for producing metallic hollow-sphere-composites (MSHC), which have been developed for mechanical engineering applications in the “InnoZellMet” project.

  8. Tandem spheres in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf; Hornung, Hans G

    2009-01-01

    The problem of determining the forces acting on a secondary body when it is travelling at some point within the shocked region created by a hypersonic primary body is of interest in such situations as store or stage separation, re-entry of multiple vehicles, and atmospheric meteoroid fragmentation. The current work is concerned with a special case of this problem, namely that in which both bodies are spheres and are stationary with respect to one another. We first present an approximate analytical model of the problem; subsequently, numerical simulations are described and results are compared with those from the analytical model. Finally, results are presented from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel in which a newly-developed force-measurement technique was employed.

  9. Electric dipoles on the Bloch sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, Amar C.

    2015-03-01

    The time evolution of a two-level quantum mechanical system can be geometrically described using the Bloch sphere. By mapping the Bloch sphere evolution onto the dynamics of oscillating electric dipoles, we provide a physically intuitive link between classical electromagnetism and the electric dipole transitions of atomic and molecular physics.

  10. The Circle and Sphere as Great Equalizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, Steven

    1991-01-01

    From the equality of the ratios of the surface areas and volumes of a sphere and its circumscribed cylinder, the exploration of theorems relating the ratios of surface areas and volumes of a sphere and other circumscribed solids in three dimensions, and analogous questions relating two-dimensional concepts of perimeter and area is recounted. (MDH)

  11. The "Magical" Sphere: Uncovering the Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Bukleski, Miha

    2006-01-01

    A red sphere is seen at the bottom of a sealed glass tube filled with a colorless, transparent liquid. Holding the tube for a short period makes the sphere rise slowly from the bottom until it finally floats on the surface of the liquid. Instructions for preparing the demonstration are given, together with an explanation of the phenomenon. A…

  12. Impact into Coarse Grained Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Cintala, M.; Crawford, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Several experimental studies [1,2,3] indicate that differences in the grain size of the target relative to the projectile could influence the cratering process. Impacts into coarse sand grains of size comparable to the projectile show some discrepancies with existing relationships for crater growth [e.g. 4]. Similarly, targets of ne grained, uniform in diameter glass spheres show differences in crater depth, transient crater diameter, and volume of ejecta excavated as a function of grain size [2,3]. The purpose of this work is to continue investigating how the relative grain size may influence early time coupling between a projectile and target, with implications for subsequent ejecta excavation and crater growth. In previous efforts we used numerical techniques to focus on the propagation of shock waves in coarse, granular media emphasizing the influence of relative grain size on crater growth, ejecta production, cratering efficiency, target strength, and crater shape [5,6,7]. In this study, we use experimental techniques - in part as a reality check for the numerical studies - to report on how coarse grained targets might influence ejecta excavation and crater shape. This body of work possesses important implications for ejecta excavation and cratering efficiency on asteroids that may possess rubble pile-like structures, and on planets that may possess either pre-fractured surfaces or large-scale heterogeneities in shock impedance.

  13. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  14. Induced differentiation inhibits sphere formation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Craig, Brian T; Rellinger, Eric J; Alvarez, Alexandra L; Dusek, Haley L; Qiao, Jingbo; Chung, Dai H

    2016-08-19

    Neuroblastoma arises from the neural crest, the precursor cells of the sympathoadrenal axis, and differentiation status is a key prognostic factor used for clinical risk group stratification and treatment strategies. Neuroblastoma tumor-initiating cells have been successfully isolated from patient tumor samples and bone marrow using sphere culture, which is well established to promote growth of neural crest stem cells. However, accurate quantification of sphere-forming frequency of commonly used neuroblastoma cell lines has not been reported. Here, we show that MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines form spheres more frequently than non-MYCN-amplified cell lines. We also show that sphere formation is directly sensitive to cellular differentiation status. 13-cis-retinoic acid is a clinically used differentiating agent that induces a neuronal phenotype in neuroblastoma cells. Induced differentiation nearly completely blocked sphere formation. Furthermore, sphere formation was specifically FGF-responsive and did not respond to increasing doses of EGF. Taken together, these data suggest that sphere formation is an accurate method of quantifying the stemness phenotype in neuroblastoma. PMID:27297102

  15. Determination of the crystallographic parameters of cubic-to-tetragonal martensitic transformation using the infinitesimal deformation approach and wechsler, lieberman, and read theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navruz, N.

    2001-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to discuss the infinitesimal deformation (ID) approach’s application and practical applicability. Therefore, ID theory was reformulated and applied to the face centered cubic (fcc) to body centered tetragonal (bct) martensitic transformation for the case of the (110) [bar 110] slip system as the lattice invariant shear (LIS). The analytical solutions for the habit plane orientation, the magnitude of the lattice invariant shear, the orientation relation between parent and product phases, etc. were derived for fcc to bct martensitic transformation in an Fe-7 pct Al-2 pct C alloy. In order to compare with phenomenological theory’s results, crystallographic parameters were also calculated by using Wechsler, Lieberman, and Read (W-L-R) phenomenological theory. Agreement between the two results obtained from ID approach and W-L-R theory was found to be excellent.

  16. Flow around spheres by dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Fan, Xi Jun

    2006-10-01

    The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method is used to study the flow behavior past a sphere. The sphere is represented by frozen DPD particles while the surrounding fluids are modeled by simple DPD particles (representing a Newtonian fluid). For the surface of the sphere, the conventional model without special treatment and the model with specular reflection boundary condition proposed by Revenga et al. [Comput. Phys. Commun. 121-122, 309 (1999)] are compared. Various computational domains, in which the sphere is held stationary at the center, are investigated to gage the effects of periodic conditions and walls for Reynolds number (Re)=0.5 and 50. Two types of flow conditions, uniform flow and shear flow are considered, respectively, to study the drag force and torque acting on the stationary sphere. It is found that the calculated drag force imposed on the sphere based on the model with specular reflection is slightly lower than the conventional model without special treatment. With the conventional model the drag force acting on the sphere is in better agreement with experimental correlation obtained by Brown and Lawler [J. Environ. Eng. 129, 222 (2003)] for the case of larger radius up to Re of about 5. The computed torque also approaches the analytical Stokes value when Re <1. For a force-free and torque-free sphere, its motion in the flow is captured by solving the translational and rotational equations of motion. The effects of different DPD parameters (a, γ, and σ) on the drag force and torque are studied. It shows that the dissipative coefficient (γ) mainly affects the drag force and torque, while random and conservative coefficient have little influence on them. Furthermore the settling of a single sphere in square tube is investigated, in which the wall effect is considered. Good agreement is found with the experiments of Miyamura et al. [Int. J. Multiphase Flow 7, 31 (1981)] and lattice-Boltzmann simulation results of Aidun et al. [J. Fluid Mech

  17. Numerical Simulations of Falling Sphere Viscometry Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O Dwyer, L.; Kellogg, L. H.; Lesher, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The falling sphere technique based on Stokes' law is widely used to determine the viscosities of geologically relevant melts at high pressures. Stokes' law is valid when a rigid sphere falls slowly and steadily through a stationary and infinite Newtonian medium of uniform properties. High-pressure falling sphere experiments however, usually involve dropping a dense, refractory sphere through a liquid contained by a cylindrical capsule of finite size. The sphere velocity is influenced by the walls (Faxen correction) and ends of the capsule, and possible convective motion of the fluid. Efforts are made to minimize thermal gradients in laboratory experiments, but small temperature differences within the capsule can lead to convection complicating interpretation. We utilize GALE (Moresi et al., 2003;), a finite element particle-in-cell code, to examine these factors in numerical models of conditions similar to those of high-pressure experiments. Our modeling considers a three- dimensional box or cylinder containing a cluster of particles that represent the dense sphere in laboratory experiments surrounded by low viscosity particles representing the melt. GALE includes buoyancy forces, heat flow, and viscosity variations so our model can be used to assess the effects of the capsule's walls and ends, and the consequences of thermal gradients on the sphere's velocity and trajectory. Comparisons between our numerical simulations and real-time falling sphere experiments involving lower viscosity molten komatiite are made to assess the validity of Stokes' law with the standard Faxen correction included, and formulations considering end effects. The modeling also permits an evaluation of the uncertainties in recovering accurate liquid viscosities from Stokes' law when a dense sphere falls through a convecting low viscosity melt. It also allows us to assess acceleration to a terminal velocity that can provide constraints on melt viscosity in experiments in which the terminal

  18. The Proximity Force Approximation for the Casimir Energy of Plate-Sphere and Sphere-Sphere Systems in the Presence of One Extra Compactified Universal Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongbo

    2015-08-01

    The Casimir energies for plate-sphere system and sphere-sphere systems under PFA in the presence of one extra compactified universal dimension are analyzed. We find that the Casimir energy between a plate and a sphere in the case of sphere-based PFA is divergent. The Casimir energy of plate-sphere system in the case of plate-based PFA is finite and keeps negative. The extra-dimension corrections to the Casimir energy will be more manifest if the sphere is larger or farther away from the plate. It is shown that the negative Casimir energy for two spheres is also associated with the sizes of spheres and extra space. The larger spheres and the longer distance between them make the influence from the additional dimension stronger.

  19. Integrating Sphere Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Ben-Kish, Amit; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2010-03-01

    An integrating sphere is an optical multi-pass cavity that uses diffuse reflection to increase the optical path length. Typically applied in photometry and radiometry, integrating spheres have previously been used to detect trace gases and to cool and trap alkali-metal atoms. Here, we investigate the potential for integrating spheres to enhance optical absorption in optically thin alkali-metal vapor cells. In particular, we consider the importance of dielectric effects due to a glass container for the alkali-metal vapor. Potential applications include miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers, where multi-passing could reduce the operating temperature and power consumption.

  20. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  1. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  2. Superelastic carbon spheres under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meifen; Guo, Junjie; Xu, Bingshe

    2013-03-01

    We report a superelastic deformation behavior of carbon spheres by the in situ Raman spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The carbon spheres produced by arc discharging in toluene have a mean diameter of 200 nm and an onion-like multilayer graphitic structure. We find that the elastic coefficients, during both the compression and decompression processes, remain a constant up to 10 GPa, indicating a superior high-pressure structural stability. Such superelastic behavior is related to the isotropic and concentric configuration of carbon spheres and provides additional insight into improving the microscopic mechanical properties of small-scale particles.

  3. Supersymmetric cubic Galileons have ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Michael; Lehners, Jean-Luc; Ovrut, Burt A.

    2013-07-01

    Galileons are higher-derivative theories of a real scalar which nevertheless admit second-order equations of motion. They have interesting applications as dark energy models and in early universe cosmology, and have been conjectured to arise as descriptions of brane dynamics in string theory. In the present paper, we study the bosonic sector of globally N=1 supersymmetric extensions of the cubic Galileon Lagrangian in detail. Supersymmetry requires that the Galileon scalar now becomes paired with a second real scalar field. We prove that the presence of this second scalar causes the equations of motion to become higher than second order, thus leading to the appearance of ghosts. We also analyze the energy scales up to which, in an effective field theory description, the ghosts can be tamed.

  4. Separate spheres and indirect benefits

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Dan W

    2003-01-01

    On any plausible account of the basis for health care resource prioritization, the benefits and costs of different alternative resource uses are relevant considerations in the prioritization process. Consequentialists hold that the maximization of benefits with available resources is the only relevant consideration. Non-consequentialists do not reject the relevance of consequences of benefits and costs, but insist that other considerations, and in particular the distribution of benefits and costs, are morally important as well. Whatever one's particular account of morally justified standards for the prioritization of different health interventions, we must be able to measure those interventions' benefits and costs. There are many theoretical and practical difficulties in that measurement, such as how to weigh extending life against improving health and quality of life as well as how different quality of life improvements should be valued, but they are not my concern here. This paper addresses two related issues in assessing benefits and costs for health resource prioritization. First, should benefits be restricted only to health benefits, or include as well other non health benefits such as economic benefits to employers from reducing the lost work time due to illness of their employees? I shall call this the Separate Spheres problem. Second, should only the direct benefits, such as extending life or reducing disability, and direct costs, such as costs of medical personnel and supplies, of health interventions be counted, or should other indirect benefits and costs be counted as well? I shall call this the Indirect Benefits problem. These two issues can have great importance for a ranking of different health interventions by either a cost/benefit or cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) standard. PMID:12773217

  5. #4 Simulated Solar Sphere from Data - Interpolated

    NASA Video Gallery

    Rotating solar sphere made from a combination of imagery from the two STEREO spacecraft, together with simultaneous data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory.This movie is made from data taken on Jan...

  6. Science off the Sphere: Lenses and Vortices

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  7. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-02-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys.

  8. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  9. Entanglement entropy across a deformed sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezei, Márk

    2015-02-01

    I study the entanglement entropy (EE) across a deformed sphere in conformal field theories (CFTs). I show that the sphere (locally) minimizes the universal term in EE among all shapes. In the work of Allais and Mezei [Phys. Rev. D 91, 046002 (2015)] it was derived that the sphere is a local extremum, by showing that the contribution linear in the deformation parameter is absent. In this paper I demonstrate that the quadratic contribution is positive and is controlled by the coefficient of the stress tensor two-point function, CT. Such a minimization result contextualizes the fruitful relation between the EE of a sphere and the number of degrees of freedom in field theory. I work with CFTs with gravitational duals, where all higher curvature couplings are turned on. These couplings parametrize conformal structures in stress tensor n -point functions; hence I show the result for infinitely many CFT examples.

  10. Elastic spheres can walk on water

    PubMed Central

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C.; Jandron, Michael A.; Bower, Allan F.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  11. Elastic spheres can walk on water.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy C; Jandron, Michael A; Bower, Allan F; Truscott, Tadd T

    2016-01-01

    Incited by public fascination and engineering application, water-skipping of rigid stones and spheres has received considerable study. While these objects can be coaxed to ricochet, elastic spheres demonstrate superior water-skipping ability, but little is known about the effect of large material compliance on water impact physics. Here we show that upon water impact, very compliant spheres naturally assume a disk-like geometry and dynamic orientation that are favourable for water-skipping. Experiments and numerical modelling reveal that the initial spherical shape evolves as elastic waves propagate through the material. We find that the skipping dynamics are governed by the wave propagation speed and by the ratio of material shear modulus to hydrodynamic pressure. With these insights, we explain why softer spheres skip more easily than stiffer ones. Our results advance understanding of fluid-elastic body interaction during water impact, which could benefit inflatable craft modelling and, more playfully, design of elastic aquatic toys. PMID:26842860

  12. Catalytic, hollow, refractory spheres, conversions with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor); Kendall, Jr., James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Improved, heterogeneous, refractory catalysts are in the form of gas-impervious, hollow, thin-walled spheres (10) suitable formed of a shell (12) of refractory such as alumina having a cavity (14) containing a gas at a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure. The wall material may be itself catalytic or a catalytically active material coated onto the sphere as a layer (16), suitably platinum or iron, which may be further coated with a layer (18) of activator or promoter. The density of the spheres (30) can be uniformly controlled to a preselected value within .+-.10 percent of the density of the fluid reactant such that the spheres either remain suspended or slowly fall or rise through the liquid reactant.

  13. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  14. Science off the Sphere: Knitting Needles

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit uses knitting needles and water droplets to demonstrate physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between N...

  15. Science off the Sphere: Thin Film Physics

    NASA Video Gallery

    International Space Station Expedition 30 astronaut Don Pettit demonstrates physics in space for 'Science off the Sphere.' Through a partnership between NASA and the American Physical Society you c...

  16. Please comply: the water entry of soft spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Hurd, Randy; Fanning, Tate; Jandron, Michael; Rekos, John; Bower, Allan; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    The typical phenomena associated with sphere water impact are significantly altered when the sphere material is highly compliant rather than rigid. We describe the water impact physics of homogenous and hollow elastic spheres. The homogeneous spheres undergo large oscillatory deformations throughout entry that carve nested disturbances into the normally smooth air cavity, altering cavity shape and pinch off. Using an analytical model, we relate the maximum sphere deformation to the material properties and impact velocity. This characteristic deformation is used to reconcile the differences between cavities formed by compliant and rigid spheres. In addition to the nested disturbances seen with the homogeneous spheres, we observe azimuthal irregularities on the cavity during water entry of hollow elastic spheres. Based on experiments and finite-element modeling, we suggest that these disturbances are initiated by vibration mode shapes excited in the hollow spheres upon impact. For all sphere types, we compare the forces throughout water entry to the rigid sphere case.

  17. Approximating spheroid inductive responses using spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank

    2003-12-12

    The response of high permeability ({mu}{sub r} {ge} 50) conductive spheroids of moderate aspect ratios (0.25 to 4) to excitation by uniform magnetic fields in the axial or transverse directions is approximated by the response of spheres of appropriate diameters, of the same conductivity and permeability, with magnitude rescaled based on the differing volumes, D.C. magnetizations, and high frequency limit responses of the spheres and modeled spheroids.

  18. Hollow sphere ceramic particles for abradable coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.N.; Bader, N.F. III; Dorfman, M.R.

    1984-05-22

    A hollow sphere ceramic flame spray powder is disclosed. The desired constituents are first formed into agglomerated particles in a spray drier. Then the agglomerated particles are introduced into a plasma flame which is adjusted so that the particles collected are substantially hollow. The hollow sphere ceramic particles are suitable for flame spraying a porous and abradable coating. The hollow particles may be selected from the group consisting of zirconium oxide and magnesium zirconate.

  19. Liouville Quantum Gravity on the Riemann Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, François; Kupiainen, Antti; Rhodes, Rémi; Vargas, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we rigorously construct Liouville Quantum Field Theory on the Riemann sphere introduced in the 1981 seminal work by Polyakov. We establish some of its fundamental properties like conformal covariance under PSL{_2({C})}-action, Seiberg bounds, KPZ scaling laws, KPZ formula and the Weyl anomaly formula. We also make precise conjectures about the relationship of the theory to scaling limits of random planar maps conformally embedded onto the sphere.

  20. Inverse Magnus effect on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of rotating spheres in the subcritical Reynolds number (Re) regime by measuring the drag and lift forces on the sphere and the two-dimensional velocity in the wake. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at Re = 0 . 6 ×105 - 2 . 6 ×105 and the spin ratio (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 (no spin) - 0.5. The drag coefficient on a stationary sphere remains nearly constant at around 0.52. However, the magnitude of lift coefficient is nearly zero at Re < 2 . 0 ×105 , but rapidly increases to 0.3 and then remains constant with further increasing Reynolds number. On the other hand, with rotation, the lift coefficient shows negative values, called inverse Magnus effect, depending on the magnitudes of the Reynolds number and spin ratio. The velocity field measured from a particle image velocimetry (PIV) indicates that non-zero lift coefficient on a stationary sphere at Re > 2 . 0 ×105 results from the asymmetry of separation line, whereas the inverse Magnus effect for the rotating sphere results from the differences in the boundary-layer growth and separation along the upper and lower sphere surfaces. Supported by the WCU, Converging Research Center and Priority Research Centers Program, NRF, MEST, Korea.

  1. A Unit Cell Laboratory Experiment: Marbles, Magnets, and Stacking Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, David C.

    2011-01-01

    An undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory experiment introducing face-centered, body-centered, and simple cubic unit cells is presented. Emphasis is placed on the stacking arrangement of solid spheres used to produce a particular unit cell. Marbles and spherical magnets are employed to prepare each stacking arrangement. Packing…

  2. Generalized Vaidya spacetime for cubic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shan-Ming

    2016-03-01

    We present a kind of generalized Vaidya solution of a new cubic gravity in five dimensions whose field equations in spherically symmetric spacetime are always second order like the Lovelock gravity. We also study the thermodynamics of its spherically symmetric apparent horizon and get its entropy expression and generalized Misner-Sharp energy. Finally, we present the first law and second law hold in this gravity. Although all the results are analogous to those in Lovelock gravity, we in fact introduce the contribution of a new cubic term in five dimensions where the cubic Lovelock term is just zero.

  3. Terminal energy distribution of blast waves from bursting spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, A. A.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation results for the total energy delivered to the surroundings by the burst of an idealized massless sphere containing an ideal gas are presented. The logic development of various formulas for sphere energy is also presented. For all types of sphere bursts the fraction of the total initial energy available in the sphere that is delivered to the surroundings is shown to lie between that delivered for the constant pressure addition of energy to a source region and that delivered by isentropic expansion of the sphere. The relative value of E sub/Q increases at fixed sphere pressure/surrounding pressure as sphere temperature increases because the velocity of sound increases.

  4. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrea L.; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals’ endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  5. The Separate Spheres Model of Gendered Inequality.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrea L; Borgida, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Research on role congruity theory and descriptive and prescriptive stereotypes has established that when men and women violate gender stereotypes by crossing spheres, with women pursuing career success and men contributing to domestic labor, they face backlash and economic penalties. Less is known, however, about the types of individuals who are most likely to engage in these forms of discrimination and the types of situations in which this is most likely to occur. We propose that psychological research will benefit from supplementing existing research approaches with an individual differences model of support for separate spheres for men and women. This model allows psychologists to examine individual differences in support for separate spheres as they interact with situational and contextual forces. The separate spheres ideology (SSI) has existed as a cultural idea for many years but has not been operationalized or modeled in social psychology. The Separate Spheres Model presents the SSI as a new psychological construct characterized by individual differences and a motivated system-justifying function, operationalizes the ideology with a new scale measure, and models the ideology as a predictor of some important gendered outcomes in society. As a first step toward developing the Separate Spheres Model, we develop a new measure of individuals' endorsement of the SSI and demonstrate its reliability, convergent validity, and incremental predictive validity. We provide support for the novel hypotheses that the SSI predicts attitudes regarding workplace flexibility accommodations, income distribution within families between male and female partners, distribution of labor between work and family spheres, and discriminatory workplace behaviors. Finally, we provide experimental support for the hypothesis that the SSI is a motivated, system-justifying ideology. PMID:26800454

  6. SPHERES flight operations testing and execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Swati; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Nolet, Simon; Miller, David W.; Sell, Steven

    2009-10-01

    Synchronized Position Hold Engage Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) is a formation flight testing facility consisting of three satellites operating inside the International Space Station (ISS). The goal is to use the long term microgravity environment of the ISS to mature formation flight and docking algorithms. The operations processes of SPHERES have also matured over the course of the first seven test sessions. This paper describes the evolution of the SPHERES program operations processes from conception to implementation to refinement through flight experience. Modifications to the operations processes were based on experience and feedback from Marshall Space Flight Center Payload Operations Center, USAF Space Test Program office at Johnson Space Center, and the crew of Expedition 13 (first to operate SPHERES on station). Important lessons learned were on aspects such as test session frequency, determination of session success, and contingency operations. This paper describes the tests sessions; then it details the lessons learned, the change in processes, and the impact on the outcome of later test sessions. SPHERES had very successful initial test sessions which allowed for modification and tailoring of the operations processes to streamline the code delivery and to tailor responses based on flight experiences.

  7. Robotics Programming Competition Spheres, Russian Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Kukushkina, Natalia; Biryukova, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Spheres" such name was done to Russian part of the Zero Robotics project which is a student competition devoted to programming of SPHERES (SPHERES - Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites are the experimental robotics devices which are capable of rotation and translation in all directions, http://ssl.mit.edu/spheres/), which perform different operations on the board of International Space Station. Competition takes place online on http://zerorobotics.mit.edu. The main goal is to develop a program for SPHERES to solve an annual challenge. The end of the tournament is the real competition in microgravity on the board of ISS with a live broadcast. The Russian part of the tournament has only two years history but the problems, organization and specific are useful for the other educational projects especially for the international ones. We introduce the history of the competition, its scientific and educational goals in Russia and describe the participation of Russian teams in 2014 and 2015 tournaments. Also we discuss the organizational problems.

  8. Thermodynamic properties of non-conformal soft-sphere fluids with effective hard-sphere diameters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Tonalli; del Río, Fernando

    2012-01-28

    In this work we study a set of soft-sphere systems characterised by a well-defined variation of their softness. These systems represent an extension of the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential widely used in statistical mechanics of fluids. This type of soft spheres is of interest because they represent quite accurately the effective intermolecular repulsion in fluid substances and also because they exhibit interesting properties. The thermodynamics of the soft-sphere fluids is obtained via an effective hard-sphere diameter approach that leads to a compact and accurate equation of state. The virial coefficients of soft spheres are shown to follow quite simple relationships that are incorporated into the equation of state. The approach followed exhibits the rescaling of the density that produces a unique equation for all systems and temperatures. The scaling is carried through to the level of the structure of the fluids. PMID:22158949

  9. Electrostatic swelling of bicontinuous cubic lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Arwen I I; Barriga, Hanna M G; Parsons, Edward S; McCarthy, Nicola L C; Ces, Oscar; Law, Robert V; Seddon, John M; Brooks, Nicholas J

    2015-04-28

    Lipid bicontinuous cubic phases have attracted enormous interest as bio-compatible scaffolds for use in a wide range of applications including membrane protein crystallisation, drug delivery and biosensing. One of the major bottlenecks that has hindered exploitation of these structures is an inability to create targeted highly swollen bicontinuous cubic structures with large and tunable pore sizes. In contrast, cubic structures found in vivo have periodicities approaching the micron scale. We have been able to engineer and control highly swollen bicontinuous cubic phases of spacegroup Im3m containing only lipids by (a) increasing the bilayer stiffness by adding cholesterol and (b) inducing electrostatic repulsion across the water channels by addition of anionic lipids to monoolein. By controlling the composition of the ternary mixtures we have been able to achieve lattice parameters up to 470 Å, which is 5 times that observed in pure monoolein and nearly twice the size of any lipidic cubic phase reported previously. These lattice parameters significantly exceed the predicted maximum swelling for bicontinuous cubic lipid structures, which suggest that thermal fluctuations should destroy such phases for lattice parameters larger than 300 Å. PMID:25790335

  10. Physics of the granite sphere fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeijer, Jacco H.; der Weele, Ko van

    2014-11-01

    A striking example of levitation is encountered in the "kugel fountain" where a granite sphere, sometimes weighing over a ton, is kept aloft by a thin film of flowing water. In this paper, we explain the working principle behind this levitation. We show that the fountain can be viewed as a giant ball bearing and thus forms a prime example of lubrication theory. It is demonstrated how the viscosity and flow rate of the fluid determine (i) the remarkably small thickness of the film supporting the sphere and (ii) the surprisingly long time it takes for rotations to damp out. The theoretical results compare well with measurements on a fountain holding a granite sphere of one meter in diameter. We close by discussing several related cases of levitation by lubrication.

  11. Impact of a superhydrophobic sphere onto water.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2008-01-01

    When a water drop hits a superhydrophobic solid surface, it bounces off the substrate like an elastic ball. Here we show that when a tiny superhydrophobic solid sphere impacts with water, it can bounce off the free surface just as it impacts with an elastic membrane. The motion of a sinking sphere is analytically calculated by solving a potential flow whose free boundary is determined by the Young-Laplace equation. To find conditions under which the solid sphere should sink, bounce off, or oscillate upon impact with water, we construct simple scaling laws which are shown to agree well with experimentally found boundaries between the distinct impact behaviors in a regime map based on dimensionless parameters. PMID:17999546

  12. Geometrical characterization of hard-sphere systems.

    PubMed

    Richard, P; Oger, L; Troadec, J P; Gervois, A

    1999-10-01

    By using molecular dynamics simulations on a large number of hard spheres and the Voronoï tessellation we characterize hard-sphere systems geometrically at any packing fraction eta along the different branches of the phase diagram. Crystallization of disordered packings occurs only for a small range of packing fraction. For the other packing fractions the system behaves as either a fluid (stable or metastable) or a glass. We have studied the evolution of the statistics of the Voronoï tessellation during crystallization and characterized the apparition of order by an order parameter (Q(6)) built from spherical harmonics. PMID:11970312

  13. Strength Measurement of Ceramic Spheres Using a Diametrally Compressed "C-Sphere" Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Jadaan, Osama M.; Kirkland, Timothy Philip

    2007-01-01

    A "C-sphere" flexure strength specimen geometry was conceived and developed to measure the hoop tensile strength of bearing-grade silicon nitride (Si3N4) balls. Because such a strength can be measured, the important study of surface-located strength-limiting flaws in ceramic sphere is also enabled with this specimen. A slot is machined into the balls to a set depth to produce the C-sphere geometry. A simple, monotonically increasing uniaxial compressive force produces a hoop tensile stress at the C-sphere's outer surface that ultimately initiates fracture. The strength is determined using the combination of failure load, C-sphere geometry, and finite element analysis. Additionally, the stress field was used to determine C-sphere effective areas and effective volumes as a function of Weibull modulus. To demonstrate this new specimen, C-sphere flexure strength distributions were determined for three commercially available bearing-grade Si3N4 materials (NBD200, SN101C, and TSN-03NH), and differences among their characteristic strengths and Weibull moduli were found.

  14. Modified electrodes based on lipidic cubic phases.

    PubMed

    Bilewicz, Renata; Rowiński, Paweł; Rogalska, Ewa

    2005-04-01

    The lipidic cubic phase can be characterized as a curved bilayer forming a three-dimensional, crystallographical, well-ordered structure that is interwoven by aqueous channels. It provides a stable, well-organized environment in which diffusion of both water-soluble and lipid-soluble compounds can take place. Cubic phases based on monoacylglycerols form readily and attract our interest due to their ability to incorporate and stabilize proteins. Their lyotropic and thermotropic phase behaviour has been thoroughly investigated. At hydration over 20%, lipidic cubic phases Ia3d and Pn3m are formed. The latter is stable in the presence of excess water, which is important when the cubic phase is considered as an electrode-modifying material. Due to high viscosity, the cubic phases can be simply smeared over solid substrates such as electrodes and used to host enzymes and synthetic catalysts, leading to new types of catalytically active modified electrodes as shown for the determination of cholesterol, CO(2), or oxygen. The efficiency of transport of small hydrophilic molecules within the film can be determined by voltametry using two types of electrodes: a normal-size electrode working in the linear diffusion regime, and an ultramicroelectrode working under spherical diffusion conditions. This allows determining both the concentration and diffusion coefficient of the electrochemically active probe in the cubic phase. The monoolein-based cubic phase matrices are useful for immobilizing enzymes on the electrode surface (e.g., laccases from Trametes sp. and Rhus vernicifera were employed for monitoring dioxygen). The electronic contact between the electrode and the enzyme was maintained using suitable electroactive probes. PMID:15833697

  15. Cubical Shape Enhances the Interaction of Layer-by-Layer Polymeric Particles with Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jenolyn F; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Chen, Jun; Kuncewicz, Thomas; Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Godin, Biana

    2015-12-01

    Blood-borne objects display a nonspherical shape with in-flow dimensions much larger than the vascular endothelial fenestrations, yet, at the diseased state, are able to traverse through these fenestrations owing to their elasticity. The role of physical parameters including shape and elasticity in the behavior of objects found in the tumor microenvironment needs to be understood to ultimately enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side effects. In this study, sphere- and cube-shaped biocompatible elastic microparticles (EM) made via layer-by-layer assembly of hydrogen-bonded tannic acid/poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (TA/PVPON) as hollow polymer shells and their rigid core-shell precursors (RM) are explored. In contrast to rigid five-bilayer (TA/PVPON) core shells, hollow elastic shells are unrecognized by J774A.1 macrophages, yet interact with endothelial and breast cancer cells. Internalization of cubical shells is fivefold more efficient by HMVEC (human microvascular endothelial cells) and sixfold and 2.5-fold more efficient by MDA-MB-231 and by SUM159 (breast cancer cells), respectively, compared to spherical shells. The interaction of cubical (TA/PVPON)5 shells with endothelial cells is similar under 10 s(-1) (characteristic of tumor vasculature) and 100 s(-1) shear rate (normal vasculature) while it is decreased at 100 s(-1) shear rate for the spherical shells. Our data suggest that cubical geometry promotes interaction of particles with breast cancer cells, while elasticity prevents engulfment by phagocytic cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26424126

  16. Electromagnetic resonant modes of dielectric sphere bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Andueza, A. Pérez-Conde, J.; Sevilla, J.

    2015-05-28

    Sphere bilayers have been proposed as promising structures for electromagnetic management in photonic crystal devices. These arrangements are made of two intertwined subsets of spheres of different size and refractive index, one subset filling the interstitial sites of the other. We present a systematic study of the electromagnetic resonant modes of the bilayers, in comparison with those of the constituent subsets of spheres. Three samples were built with glass and Teflon spheres and their transmission spectra measured in the microwave range (10–25 GHz). Simulations with finite integration time-domain method are in good agreement with experiments. Results show that the bilayer presents the same resonances as one of the subsets but modified by the presence of the other in its resonant frequencies and in the electric field distributions. As this distortion is not very large, the number of resonances in a selected spectral region is determined by the dominant subset. The degree of freedom that offers the bilayer could be useful to fine tune the resonances of the structure for different applications. A map of modes useful to guide this design is also presented. Scale invariance of Maxwell equations allows the translation of these results in the microwave range to the visible region; hence, some possible applications are discussed in this framework.

  17. DNS of Swirling Flow Past a Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Keith; Ooi, Andrew; Chong, Min; Balachandar, S.

    2001-11-01

    Experimental investigations into the swirling flow past a sphere have revealed a range of surprising and complex flow phenomena. These results have advanced our understanding in applications such as particle entrainment and the combustion of fuel droplets. Renewed interest in this problem has been kindled by recent experimental observations. (Mattner et al. 2001, submitted for review to J. Fluid Mech.) This has motivated the development of a fully spectral direct numerical simulation of the three-dimensional time-dependent swirling flow past a sphere. The effect of swirl on the various transitions in the wake structure behind a sphere is unknown. The main objective of our study is to identify transitions that occur with increasing Reynolds number and swirl strength. Firstly, we show the effect of swirl strength on the axisymmetric sphere wake and drag. Then, using a three-dimensional simulation, we examine the effect of swirl on the time histories of the lift, drag and velocities. We hope to show some visualisations of the topology of the 3D wake flow using the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor.

  18. Steel Spheres and Skydiver--Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa Leme, J.; Moura, C.; Costa, Cintia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of open source video analysis software in the study of the relationship between the velocity of falling objects and time. We discuss an experiment in which a steel sphere falls in a container filled with two immiscible liquids. The motion is similar to that of a skydiver falling through air.

  19. Exact Interior Solutions for Charged Fluid Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, L. K.; Tikekar, R.; Sabu, M. C.

    1997-04-01

    A new method is discussed to obtain the interior solution of Einstein-Maxwell equations for a charged static sphere from a known particular solutions of a similar kind. Beginning with a charged fluid interior solution reported by Patel and Pandya [11], a new interior Reissner-Nordström metric is obtained using this method and physical aspects of it are extensively discussed.

  20. Conforming quadrilaterals meshes on the cubed sphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark A.; Levy, Michael Nathan; Overfelt, James Robert

    2010-08-01

    The cubed sphere geometry, obtained by inscribing a cube in a sphere and mapping points between the two surfaces using a gnomonic (central) projection, is commonly used in atmospheric models because it is free of polar singularities and is well-suited for parallel computing. Global meshes on the cubed-sphere typically project uniform (square) grids from each face of the cube onto the sphere, and if refinement is desired then it is done with non-conforming meshes - overlaying the area of interest with a finer uniform mesh, which introduces so-called hanging nodes on edges along the boundary of the fine resolution area. An alternate technique is to tile each face of the cube with quadrilaterals without requiring the quads to be rectangular. These meshes allow for refinement in areas of interest with a conforming mesh, providing a smoother transition between high and low resolution portions of the grid than non-conforming refinement. The conforming meshes are demonstrated in HOMME, NCAR's High Order Method Modeling Environment, where two modifications have been made: the dependence on uniform meshes has been removed, and the ability to read arbitrary quadrilateral meshes from a previously-generated file has been added. Numerical results come from a conservative spectral element method modeling a selection of the standard shallow water test cases.

  1. Metal-Matrix/Hollow-Ceramic-Sphere Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dean M.

    2011-01-01

    A family of metal/ceramic composite materials has been developed that are relatively inexpensive, lightweight alternatives to structural materials that are typified by beryllium, aluminum, and graphite/epoxy composites. These metal/ceramic composites were originally intended to replace beryllium (which is toxic and expensive) as a structural material for lightweight mirrors for aerospace applications. These materials also have potential utility in automotive and many other terrestrial applications in which there are requirements for lightweight materials that have high strengths and other tailorable properties as described below. The ceramic component of a material in this family consists of hollow ceramic spheres that have been formulated to be lightweight (0.5 g/cm3) and have high crush strength [40.80 ksi (.276.552 MPa)]. The hollow spheres are coated with a metal to enhance a specific performance . such as shielding against radiation (cosmic rays or x rays) or against electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, or a material to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the final composite material, and/or materials to mitigate any mismatch between the spheres and the matrix metal. Because of the high crush strength of the spheres, the initial composite workpiece can be forged or extruded into a high-strength part. The total time taken in processing from the raw ingredients to a finished part is typically 10 to 14 days depending on machining required.

  2. Spheres: from Ground Development to ISS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2016-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES National Lab Facility aboard ISS is managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. SPHERES has served to mature the adaptability of control algorithms of future formation flight missions in microgravity (6 DOF (Degrees of Freedom) / long duration microgravity), demonstrate key close-proximity formation flight and rendezvous and docking maneuvers, understand fault diagnosis and recovery, improve the field of human telerobotic operation and control, and lessons learned on ISS have significant impact on ground robotics, mapping, localization, and sensing in three-dimensions - among several other areas of study.

  3. Electromagnetic resonant modes of dielectric sphere bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andueza, A.; Pérez-Conde, J.; Sevilla, J.

    2015-05-01

    Sphere bilayers have been proposed as promising structures for electromagnetic management in photonic crystal devices. These arrangements are made of two intertwined subsets of spheres of different size and refractive index, one subset filling the interstitial sites of the other. We present a systematic study of the electromagnetic resonant modes of the bilayers, in comparison with those of the constituent subsets of spheres. Three samples were built with glass and Teflon spheres and their transmission spectra measured in the microwave range (10-25 GHz). Simulations with finite integration time-domain method are in good agreement with experiments. Results show that the bilayer presents the same resonances as one of the subsets but modified by the presence of the other in its resonant frequencies and in the electric field distributions. As this distortion is not very large, the number of resonances in a selected spectral region is determined by the dominant subset. The degree of freedom that offers the bilayer could be useful to fine tune the resonances of the structure for different applications. A map of modes useful to guide this design is also presented. Scale invariance of Maxwell equations allows the translation of these results in the microwave range to the visible region; hence, some possible applications are discussed in this framework.

  4. Propulsion of a two-sphere swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotsa, Daphne; Baldwin, Kyle; Hill, Richard; Bowley, Roger; Swift, Michael

    We describe experiments and simulations demonstrating the propulsion of a neutrally-buoyant macroscopic swimming robot that consists of a pair of spheres attached by a spring, immersed in a vibrating fluid. The vibration of the fluid induces relative motion of the spheres which, for sufficiently large amplitudes, can lead to motion of the center of mass of the two spheres. We find that the swimming speed obtained from both experiment and simulation agree and collapse onto a single curve if plotted as a function of the streaming Reynolds number, suggesting that the propulsion is related to streaming flows. There appears to be a critical onset value of the streaming Reynolds number for swimming to occur. We observe a change in the streaming flows as the Reynolds number increases, from that generated by two independent oscillating spheres to a collective flow pattern around the swimmer as a whole. The mechanism for swimming is traced to a strengthening of a jet of fluid in the wake of the swimmer.

  5. Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A; Ospino, J.

    2006-08-15

    We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

  6. The Sphere of Women in Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Robert

    This project is a unit of six lessons designed to study and understand the roles and expectations of women in the colonial period. The unit provides an historical perspective on those expectations, examines how both men and women viewed the sphere of women, and how enlightened thought on this topic began to emerge during this revolutionary time.…

  7. Life in the E-Sphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the survival of the human race in the Third Millennium. Considers environmental issues; shifting from a focus on economic growth to human development; the rate of technological change; the e-sphere, which goes beyond a global village to a global brain; technology in education and in health care; and educational reform. (LRW)

  8. Experimentation on recurrent sphere collision with Audacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Enoch Ming Wei; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-11-01

    Under the theme of collisions that occur repeatedly, we conducted easy and inexpensive experiments of rebounding spheres and Newton’s cradle with two spheres to determine the coefficients of restitution using the sound record feature in modern laptops and a free and open source software called Audacity. In the rebounding sphere experiment, the coefficients of restitution of the golf and ping pong balls used were found to be 0.727 ± 0.025 and 0.816 ± 0.041 respectively. With the Netwon’s cradle experiment, the coefficient of restitution of two steel sphere balls was found to be 0.987 ± 0.003. The contrasts in the results obtained from both experiments permit the operational principles of a pendulum to be emphasized, and engagements to be made to consider the transfer of kinetic energy in the form of vibrational energy of the bodies’ constituents. Using a one-dimensional two-mass model with spring and damper linkages to account for harmonic motions that occur during impact, we found it possible to perform a simple analysis to account for this, and how it can be linked to high energy transfer modes such as the phenomenon of resonance and impedance matching.

  9. Propulsion of a Two-Sphere Swimmer.

    PubMed

    Klotsa, Daphne; Baldwin, Kyle A; Hill, Richard J A; Bowley, R M; Swift, Michael R

    2015-12-11

    We describe experiments and simulations demonstrating the propulsion of a neutrally buoyant swimmer that consists of a pair of spheres attached by a spring, immersed in a vibrating fluid. The vibration of the fluid induces relative motion of the spheres which, for sufficiently large amplitudes, can lead to motion of the center of mass of the two spheres. We find that the swimming speed obtained from both experiment and simulation agree and collapse onto a single curve if plotted as a function of the streaming Reynolds number, suggesting that the propulsion is related to streaming flows. There appears to be a critical onset value of the streaming Reynolds number for swimming to occur. We observe a change in the streaming flows as the Reynolds number increases, from that generated by two independent oscillating spheres to a collective flow pattern around the swimmer as a whole. The mechanism for swimming is traced to a strengthening of a jet of fluid in the wake of the swimmer. PMID:26705658

  10. Structural forms of cubic BC2N

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hong; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Roundy, David; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2001-03-01

    Superhard cubic boron-carbonitrides (c-BC2N) are studied with the use of the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. The total energy, lattice constant, bulk and shear moduli, and electronic band structures as well as the electron density of states are calculated for all the possible c-BC2N structures in an eight-atom zinc-blende-structured cubic unit cell. The results obtained provide a plausible explanation for recent experimental observations as well as a possible path to synthesis of the materials.

  11. Quadratic-Like Dynamics of Cubic Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokh, Alexander; Oversteegen, Lex; Ptacek, Ross; Timorin, Vladlen

    2016-02-01

    A small perturbation of a quadratic polynomial f with a non-repelling fixed point gives a polynomial g with an attracting fixed point and a Jordan curve Julia set, on which g acts like angle doubling. However, there are cubic polynomials with a non-repelling fixed point, for which no perturbation results into a polynomial with Jordan curve Julia set. Motivated by the study of the closure of the Cubic Principal Hyperbolic Domain, we describe such polynomials in terms of their quadratic-like restrictions.

  12. Purely cubic action for string field theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, G. T.; Lykken, J.; Rohm, R.; Strominger, A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that Witten's (1986) open-bosonic-string field-theory action and a closed-string analog can be written as a purely cubic interaction term. The conventional form of the action arises by expansion around particular solutions of the classical equations of motion. The explicit background dependence of the conventional action via the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin operator is eliminated in the cubic formulation. A closed-form expression is found for the full nonlinear gauge-transformation law.

  13. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  14. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An eye sphere implant is a device intended to be implanted in the eyeball to occupy space following the...

  15. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An eye sphere implant is a device intended to be implanted in the eyeball to occupy space following the...

  16. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An eye sphere implant is a device intended to be implanted in the eyeball to occupy space following the...

  17. Generalized orbital angular momentum Poincaré sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithrabhanu, P.; Reddy, Salla Gangi; Anwar, Ali; Singh, R. P.

    2015-06-01

    We construct a orbital angular momentum (OAM) Poincaŕe sphere in which we can represent 2-D superposition states of arbitrary OAM. In addition, we represent the mixed states of OAM as non separable states inside the sphere. We also give an experimental set up to generate all points on this sphere.

  18. Bidirectional reflection effects in practical integrating spheres.

    PubMed

    Mahan, J R; Walker, J A; Stancil, M M

    2015-10-20

    Integrating spheres play a central role in radiometric instrument calibration, surface optical property measurement, and radiant source characterization. Our work involves a simulation, based on the Monte Carlo ray-trace (MCRT) of bidirectional reflections within a practical integrating sphere pierced with two viewing ports. We used data from the literature to create an empirical model for the bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRF) of Spectralon suitable for use in the MCRT environment. The ratio of power escaping through the two openings is shown to vary linearly with wall absorptivity for both diffuse and bidirectional reflections. The sensitivity of this ratio to absorptivity is shown to be less when reflections are weakly bidirectional. PMID:26560384

  19. Bond-order potential for magnetic body-centered-cubic iron and its transferability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Shen; Mrovec, M.; Vitek, V.

    2016-06-01

    We derived and thoroughly tested a bond-order potential (BOP) for body-centered-cubic (bcc) magnetic iron that can be employed in atomistic calculations of a broad variety of crystal defects that control structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of this technologically important metal. The constructed BOP reflects correctly the mixed nearly free electron and covalent bonding arising from the partially filled d band as well as the ferromagnetism that is actually responsible for the stability of the bcc structure of iron at low temperatures. The covalent part of the cohesive energy is determined within the tight-binding bond model with the Green's function of the Schrödinger equation determined using the method of continued fractions terminated at a sufficient level of the moments of the density of states. This makes the BOP an O (N ) method usable for very large numbers of particles. Only d d bonds are included explicitly, but the effect of s electrons on the covalent energy is included via their screening of the corresponding d d bonds. The magnetic part of the cohesive energy is included using the Stoner model of itinerant magnetism. The repulsive part of the cohesive energy is represented, as in any tight-binding scheme, by an empirical formula. Its functional form is physically justified by studies of the repulsion in face-centered-cubic (fcc) solid argon under very high pressure where the repulsion originates from overlapping s and p closed-shell electrons just as it does from closed-shell s electrons in transition metals squeezed into the ion core under the influence of the large covalent d bonding. Testing of the transferability of the developed BOP to environments significantly different from those of the ideal bcc lattice was carried out by studying crystal structures and magnetic states alternative to the ferromagnetic bcc lattice, vacancies, divacancies, self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), paths continuously transforming the bcc structure to

  20. Improved method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Rosencwaig, A.; Koo, J.C.; Dressler, J.L.

    An improved method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100..mu.. to about 500..mu.. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5 to 20..mu.. are described. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions.

  1. From Noncommutative Sphere to Nonrelativistic Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriglazov, Alexei A.

    2010-02-01

    Reparametrization invariant dynamics on a sphere, being parameterized by angular momentum coordinates, represents an example of noncommutative theory. It can be quantized according to Berezin-Marinov prescription, replacing the coordinates by Pauli matrices. Following the scheme, we present two semiclassical models for description of spin without use of Grassman variables. The first model implies Pauli equation upon the canonical quantization. The second model produces nonrelativistic limit of the Dirac equation implying correct value for the electron spin magnetic moment.

  2. Equilibrium configurations of degenerate fluid spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, P.G.

    1985-04-01

    Equilibrium configurations of degenerate fluid spheres which assume a polytropic form in the ultrahigh-density regime are considered. We show that analytic solutions more general than those of Misner and Zapolsky exist which possess the asymptotic equation of state. Simple expressions are derived which indicate this nature of the fluids in the extreme relativistic limit, and the stability of these interiors is considered in the asymptotic region.

  3. Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.; Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro )

    1989-09-01

    The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

  4. Integrating spheres for improved skin photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Glennie, Diana L; Farrell, Thomas J; Hayward, Joseph E; Patterson, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    The prescribed radiant exposures for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of superficial skin cancers are chosen empirically to maximize the success of the treatment while minimizing adverse reactions for the majority of patients. They do not take into account the wide range of tissue optical properties for human skin, contributing to relatively low treatment success rates. Additionally, treatment times can be unnecessarily long for large treatment areas if the laser power is not sufficient. Both of these concerns can be addressed by the incorporation of an integrating sphere into the irradiation apparatus. The light fluence rate can be increased by as much as 100%, depending on the tissue optical properties. This improvement can be determined in advance of treatment by measuring the reflectance from the tissue through a side port on the integrating sphere, allowing for patient-specific treatment times. The sphere is also effective at improving beam flatness, and reducing the penumbra, creating a more uniform light field. The side port reflectance measurements are also related to the tissue transport albedo, enabling an approximation of the penetration depth, which is useful for real-time light dosimetry. PMID:21054127

  5. Bidispersed Sphere Packing on Spherical Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy; Mascioli, Andrew; Burke, Christopher

    Packing problems on spherical surfaces have a long history, originating in the classic Thompson problem of finding the ground state configuration of charges on a sphere. Such packings contain a minimal number of defects needed to accommodate the curvature; this is predictable using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from knowledge of the topology of the surface and the local symmetry of the ordering. Famously, the packing of spherical particles on a sphere contains a 'scar' transition, where additional defects over those required by topology appear above a certain critical number of particles and self-organize into chains or scars. In this work, we study the packing of bidispersed packings on a sphere, and hence determine the interaction of bidispersity and curvature. The resultant configurations are nearly crystalline for low values of bidispersity and retain scar-like structures; these rapidly become disordered for intermediate values and approach a so-called Appollonian limit at the point where smaller particles can be entirely accommodated within the voids left by the larger particles. We connect our results with studies of bidispersed packings in the bulk and on flat surfaces from the literature on glassy systems and jamming. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  6. Broadband Electromagnetic Transparency by Graded Metamaterial Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Yu, K. W.

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated the scattering of electromagnetic waves from a radially inhomogeneous metamaterial sphere whose dielectric permittivity is described by the graded Drude model ɛs(r)=1-φp^2(r)/2̂. The radial position dependent plasma frequency depends on r as φp^2=1/2-c(r/r0)^n, where c and n are positive constants and r0 is the radius of the sphere. The electromagnetic field distribution has been calculated within the full-wave Mie scattering theory. When n=2, exact analytic solutions can be obtained in terms of confluent Heun function and confluent hypergeometric function of Kummer. This allows us to obtain the full-wave total scattering cross section analytically from the scattering field amplitudes. While the total scattering cross section Qs depends on both the graded plasma frequency profile and the frequency of the incident electromagnetic wave, it is found that Qs can achieve extremely small values over a broad frequency band and graded parameters. The analytic solutions allow us to assess the conditions for achieving broadband electromagnetic transparency in the metamaterial sphere and make tunable electromagnetic transparency feasible.

  7. Method for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Rosencwaig, Allen; Koo, Jackson C.; Dressler, John L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100.mu. to about 500.mu. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5-20.mu.. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions. In one embodiment, one of the temperature regions is lower than both the preceeding region and the subsequent region. One region utilizes a temperature of at least 200.degree. C. higher than the melting point of the glass-forming material in the solution and, for example, may be at least 3 times higher than the temperature of the preceeding region. In addition, there is a sharp temperature gradient between these regions. As each droplet of solution passes through a first region it forms into a gel membrane having a spherical shape and encapsulates the rest of the drop retained in the elastic outer surface and the water entrapped within diffuses rapidly through the thin gel membrane which causes more of the glass-forming material to go out of solution and is incorporated into the gel membrane causing it to grow in size and become hollow. thus produced hollow glass sphere has a sphericity, concentricity, and wall uniformity of better than 5%. The sphere is capable of retaining material of up to at least 100 atmospheres therein over long periods of time. In one embodiment.

  8. Rainbow Scattering by a Coated Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.; Jamison, J. Michael; Lin, Chih-Yang

    1994-01-01

    We examine the behavior of the first-order rainbow for a coated sphere by using both ray theory and Aden-Kerker wave theory as the radius of the core alpha(sub 12) and the thickness of the coating beta are varied. As the ratio beta/alpha(sub 12) increases from 10(sup -4) to 0.33, we find three classes of rainbow phenomena that cannot occur for a homogeneous-sphere rainbow. For beta/alpha(sub 12) approx less than 10(sup -3), the rainbow intensity is an oscillatory function of the coating thickness, for beta/alpha(sub 12) approx. 10(sup -2), the first-order rainbow breaks into a pair of twin rainbows, and for beta/alpha(sub 12) approx. 0.33, various rainbow-extinction transitions occur. Each of these effects is analyzed, and their physical interpretations are given. A Debye series decomposition of coated-sphere partial-wave scattering amplitudes is also performed and aids in the analysis.

  9. Rainbow scattering by a coated sphere.

    PubMed

    Lock, J A; Jamison, J M; Lin, C Y

    1994-07-20

    We examine the behavior of the first-order rainbow for a coated sphere by using both ray theory and Aden-Kerker wave theory as the radius of the core a(12) and the thickness of the coating δ are varied. As the ratio δ/a(12) increases from 10(-4) to 0.33, we find three classes of rainbow phenomena that cannot occur for a homogeneous-sphere rainbow. For δ/a(12) ≲ 10(-3), the rainbow intensity is an oscillatory function of the coating thickness, for δ/a(12) ≈ 10(-2), the first-order rainbow breaks into a pair of twin rainbows, and for δ/a(12) ≈ 0.33, various rainbow-extinction transitions occur. Each of these effects is analyzed, and their physical interpretations are given. A Debye series decomposition of coated-sphere partial-wave scattering amplitudes is also performed and aids in the analysis. PMID:20935838

  10. Captures of Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera:Tephritidae) and non-target insects on red spheres versus yellow spheres and panels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sticky red spheres can be used to capture western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae), but whether they capture more flies than yellow spheres and panels is poorly known. The objective of this study was to compare fly captures on red spheres versus yellow traps so...

  11. A monotonicity conjecture for real cubic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.P.; Galeeva, R.; Milnor, J.; Tresser, C.

    1993-12-01

    This will be an outline of work in progress. We study the conjecture that the topological entropy of a real cubic map depends ``monotonely`` on its parameters, in the sense that each locus of constant entropy in parameter space is a connected set. This material will be presented in more detail in a later paper.

  12. Sound velocity anisotropy in cubic crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Park, H. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Simple analytical expressions may be derived for sound velocities in cubic crystals by using lattice harmonics or functions which are invariant under the crystal symmetry operations. These expressions are in good agreement with the exact results for typical crystals such as metallic iron and potassium fluoride.

  13. Evaporative coating of a sphere from a point source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    To optimize the procedure for evaporating a metal film onto a sphere, calculations of the film thickness distribution for various motions of the sphere have been carried out. These calculations, including shadowing effects of sphere support rods, are presented in this paper. Also, an apparatus and procedure for the evaporative coating of a sphere are described. A comparison of measured thickness with the calculated values is made for one example of sphere motion. The implications of the calculated results for coating techniques are discussed.

  14. Random sphere packing model of heterogeneous propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochevets, Sergei Victorovich

    It is well recognized that combustion of heterogeneous propellants is strongly dependent on the propellant morphology. Recent developments in computing systems make it possible to start three-dimensional modeling of heterogeneous propellant combustion. A key component of such large scale computations is a realistic model of industrial propellants which retains the true morphology---a goal never achieved before. The research presented develops the Random Sphere Packing Model of heterogeneous propellants and generates numerical samples of actual industrial propellants. This is done by developing a sphere packing algorithm which randomly packs a large number of spheres with a polydisperse size distribution within a rectangular domain. First, the packing code is developed, optimized for performance, and parallelized using the OpenMP shared memory architecture. Second, the morphology and packing fraction of two simple cases of unimodal and bimodal packs are investigated computationally and analytically. It is shown that both the Loose Random Packing and Dense Random Packing limits are not well defined and the growth rate of the spheres is identified as the key parameter controlling the efficiency of the packing. For a properly chosen growth rate, computational results are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data. Third, two strategies are developed to define numerical samples of polydisperse heterogeneous propellants: the Deterministic Strategy and the Random Selection Strategy. Using these strategies, numerical samples of industrial propellants are generated. The packing fraction is investigated and it is shown that the experimental values of the packing fraction can be achieved computationally. It is strongly believed that this Random Sphere Packing Model of propellants is a major step forward in the realistic computational modeling of heterogeneous propellant of combustion. In addition, a method of analysis of the morphology of heterogeneous

  15. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  16. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  17. Cubic Polynomials with Rational Roots and Critical Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Shiv K.; Szymanski, Waclaw

    2010-01-01

    If you want your students to graph a cubic polynomial, it is best to give them one with rational roots and critical points. In this paper, we describe completely all such cubics and explain how to generate them.

  18. An intersecting chord method for minimum circumscribed sphere and maximum inscribed sphere evaluations of sphericity error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Liang, Lin; Liu, Dan

    2015-11-01

    As one of the Geometrical Product Specifications that are widely applied in industrial manufacturing and measurement, sphericity error can synthetically scale a 3D structure and reflects the machining quality of a spherical workpiece. Following increasing demands in the high motion performance of spherical parts, sphericity error is becoming an indispensable component in the evaluation of form error. However, the evaluation of sphericity error is still considered to be a complex mathematical issue, and the related research studies on the development of available models are lacking. In this paper, an intersecting chord method is first proposed to solve the minimum circumscribed sphere and maximum inscribed sphere evaluations of sphericity error. This new modelling method leverages chord relationships to replace the characteristic points, thereby significantly reducing the computational complexity and improving the computational efficiency. Using the intersecting chords to generate a virtual centre, the reference sphere in two concentric spheres is simplified as a space intersecting structure. The position of the virtual centre on the space intersecting structure is determined by characteristic chords, which may reduce the deviation between the virtual centre and the centre of the reference sphere. In addition,two experiments are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method with real datasets from the Cartesian coordinates. The results indicate that the estimated errors are in perfect agreement with those of the published methods. Meanwhile, the computational efficiency is improved. For the evaluation of the sphericity error, the use of high performance computing is a remarkable change.

  19. Absorption and scattering by bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres and their equivalent coated spheres.

    PubMed

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Sy, Ki Cheong; Pilon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the absorption and scattering cross sections and asymmetry factor of randomly oriented and optically soft bispheres, quadspheres, and circular rings of spheres, with either monodisperse or polydisperse monomers, can be approximated by an equivalent coated sphere with identical volume and average projected area. This approximation could also apply to the angle-dependent scattering matrix elements for monomer size parameter less than 0.1. However, it quickly deteriorated with increasing monomer number and/or size parameter. It was shown to be superior to previously proposed approximations considering a volume equivalent homogeneous sphere and a coated sphere with identical volume and surface area. These results provide a rapid and accurate way of predicting the radiation characteristics of bispheres, quadspheres, and rings of spheres representative of various unicellular and multicellular cyanobacteria considered for producing food supplements, biofuels, and fertilizers. They could also be used in inverse methods for retrieving the monomers' optical properties, morphology, and/or concentration. PMID:26366489

  20. Laser confocal radius measurement method for unpolished spheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhao, Weiqian; Qiu, Lirong; Yang, Shuai; Wang, Zhongyu

    2016-06-10

    A laser confocal radius measurement method for unpolished spheres (CRMUS) is proposed for measuring the radius of an unpolished sphere during optical sphere processing. CRMUS uses the laser confocal focusing technique to accurately identify the cat's eye and confocal positions of the unpolished sphere, and then uses the distance between the cat's eye and confocal positions measured by a distance measurement interferometer to derive the radius. The partially coherent optical theoretical model of the CRMUS derived indicates that the CRMUS is able to measure the radius of the unpolished sphere with a roughness of less than 0.15 μm. Using an unpolished sphere made of Schott BK7 as the test sphere, experimental results indicate that the CRMUS has a relative expanded uncertainty of less than 20 ppm. The CRMUS could greatly increase processing efficiency. PMID:27409012

  1. Fabrication and calibration of sensitively photoelastic biocompatible gelatin spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Henry; Ceniceros, Ericson; McCormick, Zephyr

    2013-11-01

    Photoelastic gelatin can be used to measure forces generated by organisms in complex environments. We describe manufacturing, storage, and calibration techniques for sensitive photoelastic gelatin spheres to be used in aqueous environments. Calibration yields a correlation between photoelastic signal and applied force to be used in future studies. Images for calibration were collected with a digital camera attached to a linear polariscope. The images were then processed in Matlab to determine the photoelastic response of each sphere. The effect of composition, gelatin concentration, glycerol concentration, sphere size, and temperature were all examined for their effect on signal response. The minimum detectable force and the repeatability of our calibration technique were evaluated for the same sphere, different spheres from the same fabrication batch, and spheres from different batches. The minimum force detectable is 10 μN or less depending on sphere size. Factors which significantly contribute to errors in the calibration were explored in detail and minimized.

  2. The compression of spheres coated with an aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Leung, E M; Oates, R J

    1999-04-01

    Tablets were compressed from commercial samples of Sugar Spheres NF, Sucrose NF, Corn Starch NF, as well as ground spheres and a physical mixture of ground sucrose plus cornstarch. Additional tablets were compressed from spheres that had been coated with a water-soluble cellulosic polymer solution followed by an aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion. Tableting parameters measured "in-die" included work of compression, peak offset time, tablet density, and Young's modulus. Following ejection, tensile strength was determined under diametrical loading. Dissolution of a marker contained in the water-soluble layer was determined for both compressed and uncompressed spheres. Porosities at peak pressure and peak offset times or tensile strength as functions of peak pressure did not differ between tablets compressed from pristine spheres or from ground spheres. Tablets compressed from spheres had higher values for porosity, tensile strength, and peak offset time than those compressed from sucrose or the sucrose: starch mixture. Values for work of compression were higher for tablets compressed from pristine spheres or from starch. This was attributed to the work required for particle deformation and for breaking of the spheres. The greatest elastic recovery during decompression was observed for tablets compressed from pristine spheres or starch. More brittle behavior was observed for tablets compressed from sucrose or the sucrose: starch mixture. Tablets compressed from ground spheres were more brittle than those compressed from the pristine spheres, indicating an effect due to grinding. Most mechanical properties of tablets compressed from the coated spheres were comparable to those of tablets compressed from uncoated spheres. An exception was diametric strain for tablets compressed from spheres coated with the aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion. These values increased since the plasticized ethylcellulose allowed greater distortion of the tablet before failure occurred. The dye

  3. Fear not the tectosphere (and other -spheres)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    Based on a highly unrepresentative sampling of the community, not unlike Fox news polls, it has been recognized that the use of words having the suffix "-sphere" is confused and often abused. Such words include lithosphere, asthenosphere, perisphere, tectosphere, and mesosphere. In addition, there appears to be equal confusion in the use of the related terms: mechanical boundary layer, thermal boundary layer, chemical boundary layer, low velocity zone, low viscosity zone, effective elastic thickness, etc. This confusion is not confined to beginning students of the Earth sciences but is also manifest in seasoned Earth scientists (including myself), that is, it is not uncommon to find a geochemist and a geophysicist with completely different definitions of "lithosphere" and "tectosphere", for example. In this poster, an attempt will be made to illustrate the concepts behind some of these terms using visual and verbal aids. One of the focuses, could be the concept of a tectosphere, which may go something like this: A Wise maN once said to me; That cOntinents float because they are light; Then said my dog - DiorITE; Oceans sInk because they are heavy; And so I ask, why miGht this be?; With a Laugh and a Bark, she says the oceans are cOld; And to test if she's rigHT; I stick a tHermometer in the continent's core; To my surprise coNtinents are cold, if not more; So something does not Jive; A parAdox has come alive; Perhaps you surMise that the story is not coMplete; Indeed, you may be right; BecausE under the contiNents lie Green rocks - PerIdotite!; InFertile as Hell and fortuitouslY light; Together they fOrm the TecToSphere; And this is why we are here; Fear not the TecToSphere.

  4. Diagnosis of a Poorly Performing Liquid Hydrogen Bulk Storage Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenn, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    There are two 850,000 gallon Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage spheres used to support the Space Shuttle Program; one residing at Launch Pad A and the other at Launch Pad B. The LH2 Sphere at Pad B has had a high boiloff rate since being brought into service in the 1960's. The daily commodity loss was estimated to be approximately double that of the Pad A sphere, and well above the minimum required by the sphere's specification. Additionally, after being re-painted in the late 1990's a "cold spot" appeared on the outer sphere which resulted in a poor paint bond, and mold formation. Thermography was used to characterize the area, and the boiloff rate was continually evaluated. All evidence suggested that the high boiloff rate was caused by an excessive heat leak into the inner sphere due to an insulation void in the annulus. Pad B was recently taken out of Space Shuttle program service which provided a unique opportunity to diagnose the sphere's poor performance. The sphere was drained and inerted, and then opened from the annular relief device on the top where a series of boroscoping operations were accomplished. Boroscoping revealed a large Perlite insulation void in the region of the sphere where the cold spot was apparent. Perlite was then trucked in and off-loaded into the annular void region until the annulus was full. The sphere has not yet been brought back into service.

  5. Free vibration of layered magnetoelectroelastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Heyliger, P R; Pan, E

    2016-08-01

    A discrete-layer model is presented and applied to the free vibration of layered anisotropic spheres with coupling among the elastic, electric, and magnetic fields. Through-thickness approximations in the radial direction are pre-integrated and combined with independent approximations in the azimuthal and circumferential directions to provide estimates of the natural frequencies for a variety of representative geometries. Results are in excellent agreement with existing analytical studies and additional results are presented for higher-order spheroidal modes. Predictions of the level of influence of magnetoelectric coupling are also given. PMID:27586731

  6. Soft Sphere Suspensions: Flow and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workamp, Marcel; Dijksman, Joshua A.

    We experimentally study the role of particle elasticity on the rheology of soft sphere suspensions. Experiments consist of custom designed particles with tuneable stiffness. These particles allow us to probe the role of elastic timescales, relaxation and anisotropy in a custom 3D printed shear cell. We find robust rheological features, such as a flow instability, that are not well captured by existing models for suspension flows. In addition, we find relaxation effects after shear even in the absence of shear or thermal fluctuations. We aim to integrate these findings in the emerging unified framework for structured fluids.

  7. Further Investigations of NIST Water Sphere Discrepancies

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.

    2001-01-11

    Measurements have been performed on a family of water spheres at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) facilities. These measurements are important for criticality safety studies in that, frequently, difficulties have arisen in predicting the reactivity of individually subcritical components assembled in a critical array. It has been postulated that errors in the neutron leakage from individual elements in the array could be responsible for these problems. In these NIST measurements, an accurate determination of the leakage from a fission spectrum, modified by water scattering, is available. Previously, results for 3-, 4-, and 5-in. diam. water-filled spheres, both with and without cadmium covers over the fission chambers, were presented for four fissionable materials: {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu. Results were also given for ''dry'' systems, in which the water spheres were drained of water, with the results corresponding to essentially measurements of unmoderated {sup 252}Cf spontaneous-fission neutrons. The calculated-to-experimental (C/E) values ranged from 0.94 to 1.01 for the dry systems and 0.93 to 1.05 for the wet systems, with experimental uncertainties ranging from 1.5 to 1.9%. These results indicated discrepancies that were clearly outside of the experimental uncertainties, and further investigation was suggested. This work updates the previous calculations with a comparison of the predicted C/E values with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI transport cross sections. Variations in the predicted C/E values that arise from the use of ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, ENDL92, and LLLDOS for the response fission cross sections are also tabulated. The use of both a 45-group NIST fission spectrum and a continuous-energy fission spectrum for {sup 252}Cf are evaluated. The use of the generalized-linear-least-squares (GLLSM) procedures to investigate the reported discrepancies in the water sphere results for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu

  8. Eddington capture sphere around luminous relativistic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, Maciek

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the interplay of gravity and radiation in a static, spherically symmetric spacetime. Because of the spacetime curvature, balance between radiation pressure from spherical star and effective force of gravity may be established in a particular distance from the star surface, on so-called Eddington capture sphere. This is in contrast with the Newtonian scenario, for which Eddington luminosity of the radiation assures gravity-radiation balance at any radius. We explore properties of this relativistic equilibrium and the dynamics of test particles under radiation influence in the strong gravity regime.

  9. Random packing of spheres in Menger sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-06-01

    Random packing of spheres inside fractal collectors of dimension 2 < d < 3 is studied numerically using Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper focuses mainly on the measurement of random packing saturation limit. Additionally, scaling properties of density autocorrelations in the obtained packing are analyzed. The RSA kinetics coefficients are also measured. Obtained results allow to test phenomenological relation between random packing saturation density and collector dimension. Additionally, performed simulations together with previously obtained results confirm that, in general, the known dimensional relations are obeyed by systems having non-integer dimension, at least for d < 3.

  10. Random packing of spheres in Menger sponge.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-06-01

    Random packing of spheres inside fractal collectors of dimension 2 < d < 3 is studied numerically using Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper focuses mainly on the measurement of random packing saturation limit. Additionally, scaling properties of density autocorrelations in the obtained packing are analyzed. The RSA kinetics coefficients are also measured. Obtained results allow to test phenomenological relation between random packing saturation density and collector dimension. Additionally, performed simulations together with previously obtained results confirm that, in general, the known dimensional relations are obeyed by systems having non-integer dimension, at least for d < 3. PMID:23758392

  11. Wavelets based on Hermite cubic splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejnová, Daniela; Černá, Dana; Finěk, Václav

    2016-06-01

    In 2000, W. Dahmen et al. designed biorthogonal multi-wavelets adapted to the interval [0,1] on the basis of Hermite cubic splines. In recent years, several more simple constructions of wavelet bases based on Hermite cubic splines were proposed. We focus here on wavelet bases with respect to which both the mass and stiffness matrices are sparse in the sense that the number of nonzero elements in any column is bounded by a constant. Then, a matrix-vector multiplication in adaptive wavelet methods can be performed exactly with linear complexity for any second order differential equation with constant coefficients. In this contribution, we shortly review these constructions and propose a new wavelet which leads to improved Riesz constants. Wavelets have four vanishing wavelet moments.

  12. Deposition Of Cubic BN On Diamond Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P.; Shing, Yuh-Han

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of polycrystalline, pure, cubic boron nitride (c-BN) formed on various substrates, according to proposal, by chemical vapor deposition onto interlayers of polycrystalline diamond. Substrate materials include metals, semiconductors, and insulators. Typical substrates include metal-cutting tools: polycrystalline c-BN coats advantageous for cutting ferrous materials and for use in highly oxidizing environments-applications in which diamond coats tend to dissolve in iron or be oxidized, respectively.

  13. Method of synthesizing cubic system boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzu, S.; Sumiya, H.; Degawa, J.

    1987-10-13

    A method is described for synthetically growing cubic system boron nitride crystals by using boron nitride sources, solvents for dissolving the boron nitride sources, and seed crystals under conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature for maintaining the cubic system boron nitride stable. The method comprises the following steps: preparing a synthesizing vessel having at least two chambers, arrayed in order in the synthesizing vessel so as to be heated according to a temperature gradient; placing the solvents having different eutectic temperatures in each chamber with respect to the boron nitride sources according to the temperature gradient; placing the boron nitride source in contact with a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively higher temperature and placing at least a seed crystal in a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively lower temperature; and growing at least one cubic system boron nitride crystal in each of the solvents in the chambers by heating the synthesizing vessel for establishing the temperature gradient while maintaining conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature.

  14. The hydrodynamics of an oscillating porous sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Jason R.; Carnie, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    We determine the hydrodynamics of a rigid, weakly permeable sphere undergoing translational oscillations in an incompressible Newtonian fluid. We check using homogenization and scaling arguments that the flow inside the sphere may be modeled by Darcy's law and that the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman (BJS) boundary condition still applies for oscillatory flows, provided the frequency of oscillation is not too high. The BJS boundary condition introduces a slip velocity and to leading order in ɛ=√k /a, where k is the particle permeability and a is the radius, the particle may be regarded as impermeable with a slip length independent of frequency. Under these circumstances we solve for the flow field, pressure distribution and drag explicitly and show their behavior for 0⩽ɛ⩽0.05 and frequencies relevant to electroacoustics (1-10 MHz). From the drag we find the leading order corrections due to particle permeability of the pseudo-steady drag, Basset force and added mass.

  15. Hydrodynamics of an oscillating sphere in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Hershberger, Robert

    2006-11-01

    We have studied the flow patterns and damping of a one inch steel ball oscillating in water. The suspension was a 128 cm copper wire which allowed electrical connection to the water bath providing visualization by means of the Baker (thymol blue) electrolytic technique. The ball could be set into motion by means of a linear motor arranged to oscillate in the horizontal direction at the top of the suspension. Alternatively the bob could be set in motion and allowed to decay freely. The range of Reynolds numbers based on the maximum velocity ranged from 376 to 820 and the Carpenter-Keulegan number from 1.46 to 3.20. The period of oscillation was 2.5 sec. For Reynolds numbers up to about 380 we observed a boundary layer on the ball with a suggestion of a laminar wake spreading from the equator in the direction of oscillation. At higher Reynolds numbers around 550 we began to see periodic structure developing on the wake. By Re=726 it is clear the disturbances are a series of vortex rings which form on the rear of the sphere during an oscillation, and leapfrog over the sphere and propagate away when the direction of oscillation is reversed. The significance of this experiment for quantum turbulence will be discussed.

  16. The physics of anisotropic spheres in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Krsna

    2001-11-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic pressure on the properties of spherically symmetric, gravitationally bound spheres. We consider the full general-relativistic and Newtonian treatment of this problem and obtain exact solutions for various forms of the equation of state connecting the radial and tangential pressures. It is shown that pressure anisotropy can have significant effects on the structure and properties of both Newtonian and general relativistic spheres. We show that it is possible for Newtonian spheres to have an infinite core pressure without requiring the radius to be infinite and that there exists stable anisotropic spheres with adiabatic exponents less than 4/3. For general relativistic spheres we demonstrate that the maximum value of 2M/R can approach unity (2M/R < 8/9 for isotropic spheres) and the surface redshift can be arbitrarily large.

  17. Photoelastic gelatin spheres for investigation of locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Ceniceros, Ericson; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; McCormick, Zephyr; Fu, Henry

    2014-11-01

    We describe a force measurement method in granular media which uses highly-sensitive photoelastic gelatin spheres and its application to measuring forces exerted as animals burrow through granular media. The method is applicable to both freshwater and marine organisms. We fabricate sensitively photoelastic gelatin spheres and describe a calibration method which relates forces applied to gelatin spheres with photoelastic signal. We show that photoelastic gelatin spheres can detect forces as small as 1 microNewton, and quantitatively measure forces with up to 60 microNewton precision, a two order of magnitude improvement compared to methods using plastic disks. Gelatin spheres can be fabricated with a range of sizes to investigate a variety of granular media. Finally, we used the calibrated gelatin spheres in a proof-of-principle experiment to measure forces during earthworm locomotion.

  18. Analysis of rainbow scattering by a chiral sphere.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qing-Chao; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Qu, Tan; Li, Zheng-Jun; Bai, Lu; Gong, Lei

    2013-09-23

    Based on the scattering theory of a chiral sphere, rainbow phenomenon of a chiral sphere is numerically analyzed in this paper. For chiral spheres illuminated by a linearly polarized wave, there are three first-order rainbows, with whose rainbow angles varying with the chirality parameter. The spectrum of each rainbow structure is presented and the ripple frequencies are found associated with the size and refractive indices of the chiral sphere. Only two rainbow structures remain when the chiral sphere is illuminated by a circularly polarized plane wave. Finally, the rainbows of chiral spheres with slight chirality parameters are found appearing alternately in E-plane and H-plane with the variation of the chirality. PMID:24104080

  19. Growth and characterization of cubic and non-cubic Ge nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Pradhan, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Maitra, T.; Nayak, A.; Bhunia, S.

    2016-05-01

    Germanium nanocrystals with tetragonal (ST-12) and diamond like cubic (Ge-I) phases have been selectively grown by controlling the ionization and electrostatic potential of Ge clusters in an ion cluster beam deposition system. Predominantly tetragonal nanocrystals were obtained when grown using neutral clusters. The percentage of cubic phase increased when grown by ionizing the clusters and accelerating them towards substrates by applying electrostatic bias in the range of 1.5 -2.5 kV. Raman spectroscopic measurement showed strong peak at 275 cm-1 and 300 cm-1 for tetragonal and cubic Ge nanocrystals, respectively. TEM measurements showed crystalline lattice fringes of both type of the nanocrystals. The selected area electron diffraction patterns showed (111) and (210) as the dominating lattice planes for tetragonal nanocrystals while the cubic phases had (111), (311) and (331) as the prominent lattice planes. The optical absorption edge redshifted from 1.75 to 1.55 eV as the percentage of the cubic phases increased in the NC composition in the composite film.

  20. Fano resonance in high-permittivity dielectric spheres.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianghong; Xiao, Gaobiao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an approximate model is presented to understand Fano resonance observed in the Mie scattering from a homogeneous dielectric sphere. By using the model, we can analyze the Fano parameters and resonance widths of the dielectric spheres with given lossless high-permittivity materials. An analytic condition for the occurrence of Fano resonance in the homogeneous spheres can be shown in the approximate model. PMID:27140783

  1. Hopf fibration and monopole connection over the contact quantum spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Ludwik; Zieliński, Bartosz

    2004-04-01

    Non-commutative geometry of quantised contact spheres introduced by Omori et al. in [J. Math. Soc. Jpn. 50 (1998) 915; Noncommutative 3-sphere as an Example of Noncommutative Contact Algebras, Banach Center Publications, vol. 40, 1997, pp. 329-334] is studied. In particular it is proven that these spheres form a non-commutative Hopf fibration in the sense of Hopf-Galois extensions. The monopole (strong) connection is constructed, and projectors describing projective modules of all monopole charges are computed.

  2. Meteoroid ablation spheres from deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bunch, T. E.; Hodge, P. W.; Kyte, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with an examination of spheres that are magnetically extracted from mid-Pacific abyssal clays that are up to half a million years old. The spheres are divided into three groups using their dominant mineralogy - namely, iron, glassy, and silicate. Most spheres were formed from particles that completely melted as they separated from their parent meteoroids during the ablation process. It is concluded that the mineralogy and composition of the deep-sea spheres are identical in many respects to the meteorite fusion crusts, laboratory-created ablation debris, and the ablated interplanetary dust particles in the stratospheric collection.

  3. Orbital dynamics of two electrically charged conducting spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K.; Meyer, Deseree A.; Atkins, Brad M.; Franks, Gavin A.; Fuchs, Joshua T.; Li, Lulu; Sliger, Chase W.; Thompson, Jennifer E.

    2010-10-01

    The similar forms of Coulomb's law of electrostatics and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two oppositely charged spheres can orbit each other by means of the electrostatic force. We demonstrate electrostatic binary orbits using two oppositely charged graphite coated Styrofoam® spheres. The experiment was conducted on the NASA aircraft Weightless Wonder which simulates weightless conditions. Videos of 23 orbital attempts were analyzed to investigate the dynamics and orbital stability of the two sphere system. The results support predictions of a recently developed theory that establishes criteria for stable orbits between two conducting, electrically charged spheres.

  4. Oil capture from a water surface by a falling sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Linda; McLaughlin, Clare; Witelski, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    When a spherical particle is dropped from rest into an oil lens that floats on top of a water surface, a portion of the oil adheres to the sphere. Once the sphere comes to rest at the subsurface, the oil forms a pendant drop that remains attached in equilibrium to the sphere effectively removing oil from the water surface. Best fit solutions of the Laplace equation to experimental profiles are used to investigate the parameter dependence of the radius of curvature and the filling and contact angles at the three-phase contact line of the pendant drop for spheres with different wetting properties, densities and radii. The volume of oil captured by a sphere increases with a sphere's mass and diameter. However, lighter and smaller spheres capture more oil relative to their own volume than do heavier and larger spheres (scaling with the sphere mass ~M - 0 . 544) and are thus more efficient at removing oil from a water surface. The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. DMS-0707755 and DMS-0968252.

  5. Porous Sphere in Stratified Environments: Entrainment and Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camassa, Roberto; Falcon, Claudia; Khatri, Shilpa; McLaughlin, Richard; UNC Joint Fluids Lab Team

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical, experimental, and numerical study of porous spheres falling in stratified fluids will be presented. The systematic justification of asymptotic regimes resulting in asymptotic models with ``heat bath'' boundary conditions for salinity are derived in low Reynolds number regimes. Violation of these asymptotic scalings will be discussed in the context of experiments and mathematical modeling. In particular the presence of a salt depletion or enrichment wake left behind by the settling, ab/de-sorbing sphere, and its competition with entrainment, will be presented and highlighted. Experimental results with microporous spheres as well calibrated manufactured drilled spheres will be compared. Supported by: NSF CMG, NSF RTG, ONR.

  6. Human postprandial gastric emptying of 1-3-millimeter spheres.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J H; Elashoff, J; Porter-Fink, V; Dressman, J; Amidon, G L

    1988-06-01

    Microspheres of pancreatin should empty from the stomachs of patients with pancreatic insufficiency as fast as food. The present study was undertaken in 26 healthy subjects to identify the size of spheres that would empty from the stomach with food and to determine whether different meals alter this size. Spheres of predefined sizes were labeled with 113mIn or 99mTc. Using a gamma-camera, we studied the concurrent gastric emptying of spheres labeled with 113mIn and of chicken liver labeled with 99mTc in 100-g, 154-kcal or 420-g, 919-kcal meals, or the concurrent emptying of 1-mm vs. larger spheres. One-millimeter spheres emptied consistently (p less than 0.01, paired t-test) faster than 2.4- or 3.2-mm spheres when ingested together with either the 420- or 100-g meals. Thus, in the 1-3-mm range of diameters, sphere size was a more important determinant of sphere emptying than meal size. Statistical analyses indicated that spheres 1.4 +/- 0.3 mm in diameter with a density of 1 empty at the same rate as 99mTc-liver. Our data indicate some commercially marketed microspheres of pancreatin will empty too slowly to be effective in digestion of food. PMID:3360258

  7. Human postprandial gastric emptying of 1-3-millimeter spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.H.; Elashoff, J.; Porter-Fink, V.; Dressman, J.; Amidon, G.L.

    1988-06-01

    Microspheres of pancreatin should empty from the stomachs of patients with pancreatic insufficiency as fast as food. The present study was undertaken in 26 healthy subjects to identify the size of spheres that would empty from the stomach with food and to determine whether different meals alter this size. Spheres of predefined sizes were labeled with /sup 113m/In or /sup 99m/Tc. Using a gamma-camera, we studied the concurrent gastric emptying of spheres labeled with /sup 113m/In and of chicken liver labeled with /sup 99m/Tc in 100-g, 154-kcal or 420-g, 919-kcal meals, or the concurrent emptying of 1-mm vs. larger spheres. One-millimeter spheres emptied consistently (p less than 0.01, paired t-test) faster than 2.4- or 3.2-mm spheres when ingested together with either the 420- or 100-g meals. Thus, in the 1-3-mm range of diameters, sphere size was a more important determinant of sphere emptying than meal size. Statistical analyses indicated that spheres 1.4 +/- 0.3 mm in diameter with a density of 1 empty at the same rate as /sup 99m/Tc-liver. Our data indicate some commercially marketed microspheres of pancreatin will empty too slowly to be effective in digestion of food.

  8. ISS Update: SPHERES with Telerobotics Project Manager Terry Fong

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Terry Fong, Telerobotics Project Manager, about how the Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, are ...

  9. Anomalous absorption, plasmonic resonances, and invisibility of radially anisotropic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallén, Henrik; Kettunen, Henrik; Sihvola, Ari

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the response of a sphere with radially anisotropic permittivity dyadic (RA sphere), in both the electrostatic and full electrodynamic settings. Depending on the values and signs of the permittivity components, the quasistatic polarizability of the RA sphere exhibits several very different interesting properties, including invisibility, field concentration, resonant singularities, and emergent losses. Special attention is given to the anomalous losses that appear in the case of certain hyperbolic anisotropy values. We show that their validity can be justified in a limiting sense by puncturing the sphere at the origin and adding a small imaginary part into the permittivity components. A hyperbolic RA sphere with very small intrinsic losses can thus have significant effective losses making it an effective absorber. With different choices of permittivities, the RA sphere could also perform as a cloak or a sensor. The Mie scattering results by an RA sphere are used to justify the quasistatic calculations. It is shown that in the small parameter limit the absorption efficiency of an RA sphere is nonzero for certain lossless hyperbolic anisotropies. The absorption and scattering efficiencies agree with the quasistatic calculations fairly well for spheres with size parameters up to 1/3.

  10. GRADIENT INDEX SPHERES BY THE SEQUENTIAL ACCRETION OF GLASS POWDERS

    SciTech Connect

    MARIANO VELEZ

    2008-06-15

    The Department of Energy is seeking a method for fabricating mm-scale spheres having a refractive index that varies smoothly and continuously from the center to its surface [1]. The fabrication procedure must allow the creation of a range of index profiles. The spheres are to be optically transparent and have a refractive index differential greater than 0.2. The sphere materials can be either organic or inorganic and the fabrication technique must be capable of scaling to low cost production. Mo-Sci Corporation proposed to develop optical quality gradient refractive index (GRIN) glass spheres of millimeter scale (1 to 2 mm diameter) by the sequential accretion and consolidation of glass powders. Other techniques were also tested to make GRIN spheres as the powder-accretion method produced non-concentric layers and poor optical quality glass spheres. Potential ways to make the GRIN spheres were (1) by "coating" glass spheres (1 to 2 mm diameter) with molten glass in a two step process; and (2) by coating glass spheres with polymer layers.

  11. Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T.gtoreq.600.degree. C.). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

  12. Shape-dependent electrocatalysis: formic acid electrooxidation on cubic Pd nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Iglesias, Francisco J; Arán-Ais, Rosa M; Solla-Gullón, José; Garnier, Emmanuel; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio; Feliu, Juan M

    2012-08-01

    The electrocatalytic properties of palladium nanocubes towards the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid were studied in H(2)SO(4) and HClO(4) solutions and compared with those of spherical Pd nanoparticles. The spherical and cubic Pd nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The intrinsic electrocatalytic properties of both nanoparticles were shown to be strongly dependent on the amount of metal deposited on the gold substrate. Thus, to properly compare the activity of both systems (spheres and nanocubes), the amount of sample has to be optimized to avoid problems due to a lower diffusion flux of reactants in the internal parts of the catalyst layer resulting in a lower apparent activity. Under the optimized conditions, the activity of the spheres and nanocubes was very similar between 0.1 and 0.35 V. From this potential value, the activity of the Pd nanocubes was remarkably higher. This enhanced electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the prevalence of Pd(100) facets in agreement with previous studies with Pd single crystal electrodes. The effect of HSO(4)(-)/SO(4)(2-) desorption-adsorption was also evaluated. The activity found in HClO(4) was significantly higher than that obtained in H(2)SO(4) in the whole potential range. PMID:22722609

  13. Carbonaceous spheres—an unusual template for solid metal oxide mesoscale spheres: Application to ZnO spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Patrinoiu, Greta; Calderón-Moreno, Jose Maria; Culita, Daniela C.; Birjega, Ruxandra; Ene, Ramona; Carp, Oana

    2013-06-15

    A green template route for the synthesis of mesoscale solid ZnO spheres was ascertained. The protocol involves a double coating of the carbonaceous spheres with successive layers of zinc-containing species by alternating a non-ultrasound and ultrasound-assisted deposition, followed by calcination treatments. The composites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy while the obtained ZnO spheres by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms and photoluminescence investigations. A growth mechanism of the solid spheres is advanced based on these results. While the spheres' diameters and the mean size values of ZnO are independent on deposition order, the surface area and the external porosity are fairly dependent. The photoluminescence measurements showed interesting emission features, with emission bands in the violet to orange region. The spheres present high photocatalytical activity towards the degradation of phenol under UV irradiation, the main reaction being its mineralization. - Graphical abstract: A novel and eco-friendly methodology for the synthesis of mesoscale solid ZnO spheres was developed. The protocol involves a double coating of the starch-derived carbonaceous spheres with successive layers of zinc-containing species by alternating a non-ultrasound and ultrasound-assisted deposition, followed by calcination treatments. - Highlights: • ZnO solid spheres are obtained via a template route using carbonaceous spheres. • Two-step coatings of interchangeable order are used as deposition procedure. • The coating procedure influences the porosity and surface area. • ZnO spheres exhibited interesting visible photoluminescence properties. • Solid spheres showed photocatalytical activity in degradation of phenol.

  14. Three-Dimensional Random Voronoi Tessellations: From Cubic Crystal Lattices to Poisson Point Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    We perturb the simple cubic (SC), body-centered cubic (BCC), and face-centered cubic (FCC) structures with a spatial Gaussian noise whose adimensional strength is controlled by the parameter α and analyze the statistical properties of the cells of the resulting Voronoi tessellations using an ensemble approach. We concentrate on topological properties of the cells, such as the number of faces, and on metric properties of the cells, such as the area, volume and the isoperimetric quotient. The topological properties of the Voronoi tessellations of the SC and FCC crystals are unstable with respect to the introduction of noise, because the corresponding polyhedra are geometrically degenerate, whereas the tessellation of the BCC crystal is topologically stable even against noise of small but finite intensity. Whereas the average volume of the cells is the intensity parameter of the system and does not depend on the noise, the average area of the cells has a rather interesting behavior with respect to noise intensity. For weak noise, the mean area of the Voronoi tessellations corresponding to perturbed BCC and FCC perturbed increases quadratically with the noise intensity. In the case of perturbed SCC crystals, there is an optimal amount of noise that minimizes the mean area of the cells. Already for a moderate amount of noise ( α>0.5), the statistical properties of the three perturbed tessellations are indistinguishable, and for intense noise ( α>2), results converge to those of the Poisson-Voronoi tessellation. Notably, 2-parameter gamma distributions constitute an excellent model for the empirical pdf of all considered topological and metric properties. By analyzing jointly the statistical properties of the area and of the volume of the cells, we discover that also the cells shape, measured by the isoperimetric quotient, fluctuates. The Voronoi tessellations of the BCC and of the FCC structures result to be local maxima for the isoperimetric quotient among space

  15. Unit quaternions and the Bloch sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, K. B.; Koch, D.

    2015-06-01

    The spinor representation of spin-1/2 states can equally well be mapped to a single unit quaternion, yielding a new perspective despite the equivalent mathematics. This paper first demonstrates a useable map that allows Bloch-sphere rotations to be represented as quaternionic multiplications, simplifying the form of the dynamical equations. Left-multiplications generally correspond to non-unitary transformations, providing a simpler (essentially classical) analysis of time-reversal. But the quaternion viewpoint also reveals a surprisingly large broken symmetry, as well as a potential way to restore it, via a natural expansion of the state space that has parallels to second order fermions. This expansion to ‘second order qubits’ would imply either a larger gauge freedom or a natural space of hidden variables.

  16. Orbifolds, defects and sphere partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosomichi, Kazuo

    2016-02-01

    Gauge theories in the presence of codimension two vortex defects are known to be related to the theories on orbifolds. By using this relation we study the localized path integrals of 2D {N}=(2,2) SUSY gauge theories with point-like vortex defects. We present a formula for the correlation functions of vortex defects inserted at the north and the south poles of squashed spheres. For Abelian gauge theories the correlators are locally constant as functions of the parameters of the defect, but exhibit discontinuity at some threshold values determined from the R-charges of the matter multiplets. For non-Abelian gauge groups the correlators depend non-trivially on the types of gauge symmetry breaking due to the defects.

  17. A Bonner Sphere Spectrometer for pulsed fields.

    PubMed

    Aza, E; Dinar, N; Manessi, G P; Silari, M

    2016-02-01

    The use of conventional Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS) in pulsed neutron fields (PNF) is limited by the fact that proportional counters, usually employed as the thermal neutron detectors, suffer from dead time losses and show severe underestimation of the neutron interaction rate, which leads to strong distortion of the calculated spectrum. In order to avoid these limitations, an innovative BSS, called BSS-LUPIN, has been developed for measuring in PNF. This paper describes the physical characteristics of the device and its working principle, together with the results of Monte Carlo simulations of its response matrix. The BSS-LUPIN has been tested in the stray neutron field at the CERN Proton Synchrotron, by comparing the spectra obtained with the new device, the conventional CERN BSS and via Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:25948828

  18. Mechanical Characterization of Partially Crystallized Sphere Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifpour, M.; Francois, N.; Vaez Allaei, S. M.; Senden, T.; Saadatfar, M.

    2014-10-01

    We study grain-scale mechanical and geometrical features of partially crystallized packings of frictional spheres, produced experimentally by a vibrational protocol. By combining x-ray computed tomography, 3D image analysis, and discrete element method simulations, we have access to the 3D structure of internal forces. We investigate how the network of mechanical contacts and intergranular forces change when the packing structure evolves from amorphous to near perfect crystalline arrangements. We compare the behavior of the geometrical neighbors (quasicontracts) of a grain to the evolution of the mechanical contacts. The mechanical coordination number Zm is a key parameter characterizing the crystallization onset. The high fluctuation level of Zm and of the force distribution in highly crystallized packings reveals that a geometrically ordered structure still possesses a highly random mechanical backbone similar to that of amorphous packings.

  19. Aging dynamics of colloidal hard sphere glasses.

    PubMed

    Martinez, V A; Bryant, G; van Megen, W

    2010-09-21

    We report the results of dynamic light scattering measurements of the coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) of glasses of colloidal hard spheres for several volume fractions and a range of scattering vectors around the primary peak of the static structure factor. The ISF shows a clear crossover from an initial fast decay to a slower nonstationary decay. Aging is quantified in several different ways. However, regardless of the method chosen, the perfect "aged" glass is approached in a power law fashion. In particular the coupling between the fast and slow decays, as measured by the degree of stretching of the ISF at the crossover, also decreases algebraically with waiting time. The nonstationarity of this coupling implies that even the fastest detectable processes are themselves nonstationary. PMID:20866156

  20. Preliminary Tests in the Supersonic Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John E.

    1947-01-01

    This report presents preliminary data obtained in the Langley supersonic sphere. The supersonic sphere is essentially a whirling mechanism enclosed in a steel shell which can be filled with either air or Freon gas. The test models for two-dimensional study are of propeller form having the same plan form and diameter but varying only in the airfoil shape and thickness ratio. Torque coefficients for the 16-006, 65-110, and the 15 percent thick ellipse models are presented, as well as pressure distributions on a circular-arc supersonic airfoil section having a maximum thickness of 10 percent chord at the 1/3-chord position. Torque coefficients were measured in both Freon and air on the 15 percent thick ellipse, and the data obtained in air and Freon are found to be in close agreement. The torque coefficients for the three previously mentioned models showed large differences in magnitude at tip Mach numbers above 1, the model with the thickest airfoil section having the largest torque coefficient. Pressure distribution on the previously mentioned circular-arc airfoil section are presented at Mach numbers of 0.69, 1.26, and 1.42. At Mach numbers of 1.26 and 1.42 the test section is in the mixed flow region where both subsonic and supersonic speeds occur on the airfoil. No adequate theory has been developed for this condition of mixed flow, but the experimental data have been compared with values of pressure based on Ackeret's theory. The experimental data obtained at a Mach number of 1.26 on the rear portion of the airfoil section agree fairly well with the values calculated by Ackeret's theory. At a Mach number of 1.42 a larger percentage of the airfoil is in supersonic flow, and the experimental data for the entire airfoil agree fairly well with the values obtained using Ackeret's theory.

  1. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  2. Craniofacial reconstruction using rational cubic ball curves.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R U; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  3. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  4. Orbital Motion of Electrically Charged Spheres in Microgravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Shubho; Andring, Kevin; Campbell, Desmond; Janeski, John; Keedy, Daniel; Quinn, Sean; Hoffmeister, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The similar mathematical forms of Coulomb's law and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two uniformly charged spheres should be able to orbit each other just as two uniform spheres of mass are known to do. In this paper we describe an experiment that we performed to demonstrate such an orbit. This is the first published account of a…

  5. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  6. 21 CFR 886.3320 - Eye sphere implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eye sphere implant. 886.3320 Section 886.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3320 Eye sphere implant. (a) Identification. An...

  7. The Essentialist Roots of the Public Sphere: A Feminist Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Cindy L.

    1996-01-01

    Explores the essentialist influences on the public sphere from a feminist perspective, suggesting that an essentialist ideology informs the public/private distinction. Argues that the public sphere is not strictly a result of historical changes or economic influences but is also dependent on an essentialist view of women and men. (PA)

  8. Torsional oscillations of a sphere in a Stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, F.; Thompson, A. B.; Mullin, T.

    2015-12-01

    The results of an experimental investigation into a sphere performing torsional oscillations in a Stokes flow are presented. A novel experimental set-up was developed, which enabled the motion of the sphere to be remotely controlled through application of an oscillatory magnetic field. The response of the sphere to the applied field was characterised in terms of the viscous, magnetic and gravitational torques acting on the sphere. A mathematical model of the system was developed, and good agreement was found between experimental, numerical and theoretical results. The flow resulting from the motion of the sphere was measured, and the fluid velocity was found to have an inverse square dependence on radial distance from the sphere. The good agreement between measurements and the analytical solutions for both fluid velocity and angular displacement of the sphere indicates that the flow may be considered Stokesian, thus providing an excellent basis for experimental and theoretical characterisation of hydrodynamic interactions between multiple oscillating spheres at low Reynolds number.

  9. Meteor ablation spheres from deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bunch, T. E.; Hodge, P. W.; Kyte, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Spheres from mid-Pacific abyssal clays (0 to 500,000 yrs old), formed from particles that completely melted and subsequently recrystallized as they separated from their meteoroid bodies, or containing relict grains of parent meteoroids that did not experience any melting were analyzed. The spheres were readily divided into three groups using their dominant mineralogy. The Fe-rich spheres were produced during ablation of Fe and metal-rich silicate meteoroids. The glassy spheres are considerably more Fe-rich than the silicate spheres. They consist of magnetite and an Fe glass which is relatively low in Si. Bulk compositions and relict grains are useful for determining the parent meteoroid types for the silicate spheres. Bulk analyses of recrystallized spheres show that nonvolatile elemental abundances are similar to chondrite abundances. Analysis of relict grains identified high temperature minerals associated with a fine-grained, low temperature, volatile-rich matrix. The obvious candidates for parent meteoroids of this type of silicate sphere is a carbonaceous chondrite.

  10. 49 CFR 1.23 - Spheres of primary responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spheres of primary responsibility. 1.23 Section 1.23 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Office of the Secretary § 1.23 Spheres of primary responsibility. (a) Secretary and Deputy Secretary. Overall planning, direction,...

  11. Experimental investigation of flow past a sphere with trip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rahul; Desai, Aditya; Kanti, Vivek; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-11-01

    The flow over a smooth sphere and a sphere with a trip was experimentally investigated in the Reynolds number range 1 × 105 to 5 × 105 through unsteady force measurements. The size of the trip is 1.5 percent of the diameter D of the sphere and measurements are made for its streamwise location from the stagnation point for 10, 20 and 30 degrees. The statistics of the drag and lateral forces were studied for a range of subcritical to supercritical Reynolds numbers to understand the effect of a trip on the critical flow regime of a sphere. Two different flow characteristics are observed over the sphere surface depending on the streamwise location of the trip. For subcritical Reynolds numbers, a significant mean side force is observed in the direction of the trip side of the sphere. On gradually increasing the Reynolds number, the flow over the sphere enters the critical regime and the direction of the side force reverses from the trip side to the non - trip side of the sphere which continues to be observed well within the early supercritical regime. The authors would like to thank the efforts put in by Mr. Sharad Saxena and Mr. Akhilesh Pal from National Wind Tunnel Facility, IIT - Kanpur in conducting the experiments.

  12. Regions of attraction between like-charged conducting spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekner, John

    2016-06-01

    Two positively charged conducting spheres have been shown to attract at close enough range, unless they have a charge ratio that would result from contact. We give analytical results for the charge ratio at which the cross-over between electrostatic attraction and repulsion occurs, as a function of the sphere separation.

  13. Social Justice and Education in the Public and Private Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Sally; Taylor, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the complex relationship between social justice and education in the public and private spheres. The politics of education is often presented as a battle between left and right, the state and the market. In this representation, the public and the private spheres are neatly aligned on either side of the line of battle, and…

  14. Squeeze flow between a sphere and a textured wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastel, T.; Mongruel, A.

    2016-02-01

    The motion of a millimetric sphere, translating in a viscous fluid towards a wettable textured wall, is investigated experimentally. The textures consist of square arrays of cylindrical or square micro-pillars, the height, width, and spacing of which are varied, keeping the periodicity small compared to the sphere radius. An interferometric device is used to measure the sphere vertical displacement, for distances between the sphere and the base of the pillars smaller than 0.1 sphere radius, and with a resolution of 200 nm. At a given distance from the top of the pillars, the sphere velocity is found to be significantly larger than the corresponding velocity for a smooth solid wall. A squeeze flow model of two adjacent fluid layers is developed in the lubrication approximation, one fluid layer having an effective viscosity that reflects the viscous dissipation through the array of pillars. The pressure field in the gap between the sphere and the textured surface is then used to obtain the drag force on the sphere and hence its velocity. Adjustment of the model to the velocity measurements yields the effective viscosity for a given texture. Finally, a correlation between the effective viscosity and the geometry of the pillar array is proposed.

  15. Segregation of Fluidized Binary Hard-Sphere Systems Under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul

    We have derived an analytic expression for the contact value of the local density of binary hard-sphere systems under gravity. We have obtained the crossover conditions for the Brazil-nut type segregation of binary hard-sphere mixtures and binary hard-sphere chain mixtures from the segregation criterion, where the segregation occurs when the density (or the pressure) of the small spheres at the bottom is higher than that of the large spheres, or vice versa. For the binary hard-sphere chain mixtures, the crossover condition for the segregation depends on the number of monomers composed of hard-sphere chains as well as the mass and the diameter of each species. The fundamental-measure theories (FMTs) and local density approximation (LDA) are employed to examine the crossover condition for the segregation of the gravity-induced hard-sphere mixtures. The calculated results show that the LDA does not explain the density oscillation near the bottom, whereas the modified fundamental-measure theory (MFMT) compares with molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Computational Analysis of Wake Field Flow between Multiple Identical Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Wesley; Greenslit, Morton; Klassen, Zach; Hastings, Jay; Matson, William

    2014-11-01

    It is well understood both that objects moving through a fluid perturb the motion of nearby objects in the same fluid and that some configurations of objects moving through a fluid have little inter-object perturbation, such as a flock of birds flying in a V-formation. However, there is presently no known method for predicting what configurations of objects will be stable while moving through a fluid. Previous work has failed to find such stable configurations because of the computational complexity of finding individual solutions. In this research, the motions of two spheres in water were simulated and combinations of those simulations were used to extrapolate the motions of multiple spheres and to find configurations where the lateral forces on each sphere were negligible and the vertical forces on each sphere were equivalent. Two and three sphere arrangements were simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics and Mathematica was used both to demonstrate that combinations of two sphere cases are identical to three sphere cases and to identify stable configurations of three or more spheres. This new approach is expected to simplify optimization of aerodynamic configurations and applications such as naval and aerospace architecture and racecar driving. Advisor.

  17. Dual-Purpose Millikan Experiment with Polystyrene Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, C. N.; Christensen, F. E.

    1975-01-01

    This procedure, using polystyrene spheres of specified diameter, renders the Millikan oil drop experiment more accurate than the conventional procedure of the polystyrene spheres, eliminates size estimation error, and removes the guesswork involved in assigning proper index integers to the observed charges. (MLH)

  18. Mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Meng; Yan Guojin; Hou Yonggai; Wang Chunhua

    2009-05-15

    NiO solid/hollow spheres with diameters about 100 nm have been successfully synthesized through thermal decomposition of nickel acetate in ethylene glycol at 200 deg. C. These spheres are composed of nanosheets about 3-5 nm thick. Introducing poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) surfactant to reaction system can effectively control the products' morphology. By adjusting the quantity of PVP, we accomplish surface areas-tunable NiO assembled spheres from {approx}70 to {approx}200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. Electrochemical tests show that NiO hollow spheres deliver a large discharge capacity of 823 mA h g{sup -1}. Furthermore, these hollow spheres also display a slow capacity-fading rate. A series of contrastive experiments demonstrate that the surface area of NiO assembled spheres has a noticeable influence on their discharge capacity. - Graphical abstract: The mesoscale assembly of NiO nanosheets into spheres have been achieved by a solvothermal method. N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms show the S{sub BET} of NiO is tunable. NiO spheres show large discharge capacity and slow capacity-fading rate.

  19. Seeded Synthesis of Monodisperse Core-Shell and Hollow Carbon Spheres.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Luz Karime; Blanco, Álvaro; Juárez, Beatriz H; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Monodisperse carbon spheres between 500 and 900 nm are hydrothermally synthesized from glucose on polystyrene seeds. Control over temperature, time, glucose concentration, and seed size yields hybrid spheres without aggregation and no additional spheres population. Pyrolysis transforms the hybrid into hollow carbon spheres preserving monodispersity. This approach provides a basis for functional carbon spheres applicable in photonics and energy storage. PMID:27337299

  20. Design of cubic-phase optical elements using subwavelength microstructures.

    PubMed

    Mirotznik, Mark S; van der Gracht, Joseph; Pustai, David; Mathews, Scott

    2008-01-21

    We describe a design methodology for synthesizing cubic-phase optical elements using two-dimensional subwavelength microstructures. We combined a numerical and experimental approach to demonstrate that by spatially varying the geometric properties of binary subwavelength gratings it is possible to produce a diffractive element with a cubic-phase profile. A test element was designed and fabricated for operation in the LWIR, approximately lambda=10.6 microm. Experimental results verify the cubic-phase nature of the element. PMID:18542199

  1. The phase behavior of linear and partially flexible hard-sphere chain fluids and the solubility of hard spheres in hard-sphere chain fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzún, Bernardo; van Westen, Thijs; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.

    2013-05-01

    The liquid crystal phase behavior of linear and partially flexible hard-sphere chain fluids and the solubility of hard spheres in hard-sphere chain fluids are studied by constant pressure Monte Carlo simulations. An extensive study on the phase behavior of linear fluids with a length of 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 20 beads is carried out. The phase behavior of partially flexible fluids with a total length of 8, 10, 14, and 15 beads and with different lengths for the linear part is also determined. A precise description of the reduced pressure and of the packing fraction change at the isotropic-nematic coexistence was achieved by performing long simulation runs. For linear fluids, a maximum in the isotropic to nematic packing fraction change is observed for a chain length of 15 beads. The infinite dilution solubility of hard spheres in linear and partially flexible hard-sphere chain fluids is calculated by the Widom test-particle insertion method. To identify the effect of chain connectivity and molecular anisotropy on free volume, solubility is expressed relative to that of hard spheres in a hard sphere fluid at same packing fraction as relative Henry's law constants. A linear relationship between relative Henry's law constants and packing fraction is observed for all linear fluids. Furthermore, this linearity is independent of liquid crystal ordering and seems to be independent of chain length for linear chains of 10 beads and longer. The same linear relationship was observed for the solubility of hard spheres in nematic forming partially flexible fluids for packing fractions up to a value slightly higher than the nematic packing fraction at the isotropic-nematic coexistence. At higher packing fractions, the small flexibility of these fluids seems to improve solubility in comparison with the linear fluids.

  2. Sampling theorems and compressive sensing on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Jason D.; Puy, Gilles; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Vandergheynst, Pierre; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Wiaux, Yves

    2011-09-01

    We discuss a novel sampling theorem on the sphere developed by McEwen & Wiaux recently through an association between the sphere and the torus. To represent a band-limited signal exactly, this new sampling theorem requires less than half the number of samples of other equiangular sampling theorems on the sphere, such as the canonical Driscoll & Healy sampling theorem. A reduction in the number of samples required to represent a band-limited signal on the sphere has important implications for compressive sensing, both in terms of the dimensionality and sparsity of signals. We illustrate the impact of this property with an inpainting problem on the sphere, where we show superior reconstruction performance when adopting the new sampling theorem.

  3. An integrating sphere to measure CD from difficult samples

    PubMed

    Castiglioni; Albertini

    2000-05-01

    Integrating spheres are widely used with UV-Vis and occasionally with infrared spectrophotometers to measure different types of samples, either in transmission mode (scattered transmission accessories) or in total/diffuse reflectance mode. We built a prototype sphere of the demountable type, which fits easily the sample compartment of a commercial CD spectropolarimeter, requiring neither any alignment nor the use of a dedicated photomultiplier. Samples can be inserted either at the sphere entrance (for scattered transmission mode) or in the center of the sphere (for total reflectance experiments). Selected experimental data are presented to evaluate sphere efficiency, its wavelength range and results with a single sample in different forms. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:10790200

  4. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  5. Optical pulse propagation via whispering gallery modes in glass spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, W.B.; Shaw, R.W.; Barnes, M.D.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1997-12-01

    Early in this century, Rayleigh showed that waves could propagate close to the wall of a spherical cavity with very little loss as long as the wavelength was small compared to the cavity circumference. The treatment was primarily for acoustic waves, modeling the whispering gallery effect, but he pointed out that electromagnetic waves should behave similarly. Study of the optical properties of dielectric spheres has received new interest with improvements in optical instrumentation and the emergency of new applications for high-Q resonators. It has recently been shown that optical pulses propagating in whispering gallery modes can be treated analogously to pulses in a fiber optic waveguide. Since the optical fields extend beyond the surface of the sphere, the sphere`s environment could alter propagation properties such as cavity ringdown time. The authors describe here some time and frequency-domain measurements of picosecond pulses in glass spheres of millimeter dimension and discuss potential analytical applications.

  6. Debye series for light scattering by a multilayered sphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Renxian; Han, Xiange; Jiang, Huifen; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2006-02-20

    We have derived the formula for the Debye-series decomposition for light scattering by a multilayered sphere. This formulism permits the mechanism of light scattering to be studied. An efficient algorithm is introduced that permits stable calculation for a large sphere with many layers. The formation of triple first-order rainbows by a three-layered sphere and single-order rainbows and the interference of different-order rainbows by a sphere with a gradient refractive index, are then studied by use of the Debye model and Mie calculation. The possibility of taking only one single mode or several modes for each layer is shown to be useful in the study of the scattering characteristics of a multilayered sphere and in the measurement of the sizes and refractive indices of particles. PMID:16523791

  7. Quantum states of two particles on concentric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezra, Gregory S.; Berry, R. Stephen

    1983-10-01

    The model of two particles on a sphere is extended to two particles on concentric spheres (POCS). The quantum states are found for two electrons, one on a sphere of radius 10 a.u. (simulating the shell n=3 in He) and the other, on spheres of 10, 15, 25, 50, and 100 a.u. The eigenvalues and densities ρ(θ12) exhibit a transition from collective, moleculelike behavior to independent-particle-like behavior with Russell-Saunders coupling. The parallel problem of two particles with electron masses interacting via a repulsive Gaussian potential is also treated and a similar transition from collective to independent-particle behavior found. The principal difference between the two cases is only the region of radius of the larger sphere where the transition occurs.

  8. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  9. Multiply charged monopoles in cubic dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Jaya, Sreejith; Powell, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The classical cubic dimer model is a 3D statistical mechanical system whose degrees of freedom are dimers that occupy the edges between nearest neighbour vertices of a cubic lattice. Dimer occupancies are subject to the local constraint that every vertex is associated with exactly one dimer. In the presence of an aligning interaction, it is known that the system exhibits an unconventional continuous thermal phase transition from a symmetry broken columnar phase to a Coulomb-phase. The transition is in the NCCP1 universality class, which also describes the Neel-VBS transition in the JQ model and the S =1/2 Heisenberg model with suppression of hedgehog defects. Using Monte-Carlo simulations of a pair of defects in a background of fluctuating dimers, we calculate the scaling exponents for fugacities of monopole defects of charge Q = 2 and 3 at this critical point. Our estimates suggest that Q = 3 monopoles are relevant and could therefore drive the JQ model away from the NCCP1 critical point on a hexagonal lattice.

  10. Enhancing the electromagnetic performance of Co through the phase-controlled synthesis of hexagonal and cubic Co nanocrystals grown on graphene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Guohua; Zhu, Jia; Ma, Shulan; Sun, Genban; Yang, Xiaojing

    2013-12-11

    Cobalt is a promising soft metallic magnetic material used for important applications in the field of absorbing stealth technology, especially for absorbing centimeter waves. However, it frequently presents a weak dielectric property because of its instability, aggregation, and crystallographic form. A method for enhancing the electromagnetic property of metal Co via phase-controlled synthesis of Co nanostructures grown on graphene (GN) networks has been developed. Hexagonal close-packed cobalt (α-Co) nanocrystals and face-centered cubic cobalt (β-Co) nanospheres with uniform size and high dispersion have been successfully assembled on GN nanosheets via a facile one-step solution-phase strategy under different reaction conditions in which the exfoliated graphite oxide (graphene oxide, GO) nanosheets were reduced along with the formation of Co nanocrystals. The as-synthesized Co/GN nanocomposites showed excellent microwave absorbability in comparison with the corresponding Co nanocrystals or GN, especially for the nanocomposites of GN and α-Co nanocrystals (the reflection loss is -47.5 dB at 11.9 GHz), which was probably because of the special electrical properties of the cross-linked GN nanosheets and the perfect electromagnetic match in their microstructure as well as the small particle size of Co nanocrystals. The approach is convenient and effective. Some magnetic metal or alloy materials can also be prepared via this route because of its versatility. PMID:24266516

  11. Recovering functions defined on the unit sphere by integration on a special family of sub-spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Yehonatan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to derive a reconstruction formula for the recovery of C1 functions, defined on the unit sphere {{{S}}}^{n - 1} , given their integrals on a special family of n - 2 dimensional sub-spheres. For a fixed point overline{a} strictly inside {{{S}}}^{n - 1} , each sub-sphere in this special family is obtained by intersection of {{{S}}}^{n - 1} with a hyperplane passing through overline{a} . The case overline{a} = 0 results in an inversion formula for the special case of integration on great spheres (i.e., Funk transform). The limiting case where pin {{{S}}}^{n - 1} and overline{a}→ p results in an inversion formula for the special case of integration on spheres passing through a common point in {{{S}}}^{n - 1}.

  12. Experimental study on combustion of a methane hydrate sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yokomori, Takeshi; Ohmura, Ryo; Ueda, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    The combustion behavior of a methane hydrate sphere under normal gravity is experimentally investigated. The initial diameter of the sphere is 20 mm. Variation in temperature at the center of the sphere ( T c) is measured with a K-type thermocouple at ignition temperatures ( T c,i) from 193 to 253 K at 20 K intervals. Variation in the near-surface temperature of the sphere ( T s) is measured at ignition temperatures ( T s,i) from 233 to 263 K at 10 K intervals. Two combustion phases are observed. When the hydrate is ignited, a stable flame envelope is formed around the sphere (phase 1). In phase 1, the surface of the sphere is dry. After a few seconds, water formed by dissociation of the methane hydrate appears on the surface and methane bubbles are formed by methane ejected from inside the sphere (phase 2), thus destabilizing the flame and causing local extinction. Methane bubbles move down along the surface and merge into a large methane bubble at the bottom of the sphere. This bubble bursts, releasing methane to form a temporary flame, and the water drops from the hydrate sphere. Water on the surface is cooled by the hydrate inside, and an ice shell confines the methane gas that dissociated inside the sphere. Because the dissociation occurs continuously inside the hydrate, the inner pressure gradually increases and at some instant, the ice cracks and methane gas is ejected from the cracks, which results in a micro-explosion with a flame. In phase 1, the surface temperature is below the freezing point of water, and so the surface remains dry and a stable flame envelope is formed; in phase 2, the surface temperature is above the freezing point, and so water appears on the surface. When the temperature at the center of the sphere is lower (193, 213, or 233 K), some methane hydrate remains even after flame extinction because heat transfer from the flame decreases in phase 2 as a result of local extinction. The diameter of the sphere decreases during combustion in

  13. On the preparation, characterization, and application of Janus spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jingqin

    Surface-anisotropic Janus particles are a new class of materials with interesting properties that have attracted great attention recently. There have been many reports on the manufacture of Janus particles. However, most of them employ the traditional high-cost vapor phase deposition to obtain an asymmetric surface modification of particles. In this thesis, a novel templating process is developed for the manufacturing of Janus spheres via the economic and mild electroless deposition (ELD) method. Templated micron- and submicron-sized polystyrene (PS) spheres are modified with a silver cap composed of 50-200 nm nanoparticles (NPs) through the ELD process. The deposits are found to be stable over time and under physical treatment. Further, the study determines that the substrate sphere curvature influences the ELD modification due to the functional group coverage and distribution as well as the size ratio of the substrate sphere to the NPs deposit. Gold, palladium and titanium oxide particles are successfully deposited onto PS spheres using the same templating process and nanoparticle synthesis methods from literatures in the electroless/wet chemical deposition. Modifications obtained with the ELD conditions studied exhibit a rough surface compared to the vapor-phase modified surfaces. The surface roughness is controlled by varying the ELD reaction conditions to adjust the amount of deposit and the size distribution of the NPs deposited. The assembly of Janus spheres with smooth caps produces planar 2-D structures while spheres with rougher caps tend to form 3-D cluster structures, implying that the surface morphology has an effect on the sphere-sphere interactions. The assembly of new dual-cap/mono-belt Janus particles prepared by combining the vapor phase and ELD processes confirms that the surface roughness influences the orientation of the Janus spheres during assembly. Janus spheres are then incorporated into electroactive polymers as fillers to enhance the

  14. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines. PMID:25375488

  15. C{sub 60}: Sphere or polyhedron?

    SciTech Connect

    Haddon, R.C.

    1997-02-19

    In the original publication on the subject, C{sub 60} was depicted with the aid of a soccer ball, but this representation soon gave way to the familiar line drawing of chemical bonds between nucleii. To a large extent the dichotomy in the representation of the fullerenes remains today, and it is the purpose of this paper to pose and address the question that appears in the title. Of course, in reality the answer is well-known, and neither the sphere nor the polyhedron represent C{sub 60}, which like other molecules exists as a collection of nuclei with an associated distribution of electron density. Nevertheless, it is of interest to consider which of these conventional representations is most relevant for the fullerenes and in particular the language most appropriate to the description of the shape of these molecules and the geometry of the carbon atoms. The analysis presented here shows that topology of the molecule is paramount, and hence, C{sub 60} (and the fullerenes) are best modeled as polyhedra. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Dynamics of hard sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. X.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective is to perform on homogeneous, fully equilibrated dispersions the full set of experiments characterizing the transition from fluid to solid and the properties of the crystalline and glassy solid. These include measurements quantifying the nucleation and growth of crystallites, the structure of the initial fluid and the fully crystalline solid, and Brownian motion of particles within the crystal, and the elasticity of the crystal and the glass. Experiments are being built and tested for ideal microgravity environment. Here we describe the ground based effort, which exploits a fluidized bed to create a homogeneous, steady dispersion for the studies. The differences between the microgravity environment and the fluidized bed is gauged by the Peclet number Pe, which measures the rate of convection/sedimentation relative to Brownian motion. We have designed our experiment to accomplish three types of measurements on hard sphere suspensions in a fluidized bed: the static scattering intensity as a function of angle to determine the structure factor, the temporal autocorrelation function at all scattering angles to probe the dynamics, and the amplitude of the response to an oscillatory forcing to deduce the low frequency viscoelasticity. Thus the scattering instrument and the colloidal dispersion were chosen such as that the important features of each physical property lie within the detectable range for each measurement.

  17. Measurement of Neutron Transmission Through Iron Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, T.N.; Grimes, S.M.; Wenner, M.T.; Haghighat, Alireza; Adams, James M.; Carlson, Allan D.

    2005-05-24

    We have measured the transmission of neutrons through iron spheres with several different neutron sources. The D(d,n) reaction and the 15N(n,p) reaction were found to be the best candidates for nearly monoenergetic sources at energies below 11 MeV. We have used a quasi monoenergetic source with 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.0-MeV deuterons incident on a deuteron gas cell and 5.1-MeV protons incident on a 15N gas cell. The Ohio University Beam Swinger Facility was used in these measurements. This allowed a single fixed detector in a well-shielded time-of-flight (TOF) tunnel to be used for measurements at all angles. This allows a great reduction in the background from room scattered neutrons. The detector, either NE-213 or lithium glass, was calibrated relative to the neutron spectrum from the B(d,n) or the Al(d,n) source reaction. These spectra have been measured relative to the primary neutron standard, 235U(n, f). The transmitted neutrons have been measured for all source reactions at several angles. The data will be reported as the number of neutrons versus time-of-flight since multiple scattering does not allow the energy to be determined accurately by time-of-flight. We have also measured the source reaction at several angles to enhance the modeling of the source spectrum.

  18. Universally optimal distribution of points on spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Henry; Kumar, Abhinav

    2007-01-01

    We study configurations of points on the unit sphere that minimize potential energy for a broad class of potential functions (viewed as functions of the squared Euclidean distance between points). Call a configuration sharp if there are m distances between distinct points in it and it is a spherical (2m-1) -design. We prove that every sharp configuration minimizes potential energy for all completely monotonic potential functions. Examples include the minimal vectors of the E_8 and Leech lattices. We also prove the same result for the vertices of the 600 -cell, which do not form a sharp configuration. For most known cases, we prove that they are the unique global minima for energy, as long as the potential function is strictly completely monotonic. For certain potential functions, some of these configurations were previously analyzed by Yudin, Kolushov, and Andreev; we build on their techniques. We also generalize our results to other compact two-point homogeneous spaces, and we conclude with an extension to Euclidean space.

  19. Forming MOFs into spheres by use of molecular gastronomy methods.

    PubMed

    Spjelkavik, Aud I; Aarti; Divekar, Swapnil; Didriksen, Terje; Blom, Richard

    2014-07-14

    A novel method utilizing hydrocolloids to prepare nicely shaped spheres of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed. Microcrystalline CPO-27-Ni particles are dispersed in either alginate or chitosan solutions, which are added dropwise to solutions containing, respectively, either divalent group 2 cations or base that act as gelling agents. Well-shaped spheres are immediately formed, which can be dried into spheres containing mainly MOF (>95 wt %). The spheronizing procedures have been optimized with respect to maximum specific surface area, shape, and particle density of the final sphere. At optimal conditions, well-shaped 2.5-3.5 mm diameter CPO-27-Ni spheres with weight-specific surface areas <10 % lower than the nonformulated CPO-27-Ni precursor, and having sphere densities in the range 0.8 to 0.9 g cm(-3) and particle crushing strengths above 20 N, can be obtained. The spheres are well suited for use in fixed-bed catalytic or adsorption processes. PMID:24964774

  20. Extrinsic Calibration of Camera Networks Using a Sphere

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Junzhi; Deboeverie, Francis; Slembrouck, Maarten; van Haerenborgh, Dirk; van Cauwelaert, Dimitri; Veelaert, Peter; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel extrinsic calibration method for camera networks using a sphere as the calibration object. First of all, we propose an easy and accurate method to estimate the 3D positions of the sphere center w.r.t. the local camera coordinate system. Then, we propose to use orthogonal procrustes analysis to pairwise estimate the initial camera relative extrinsic parameters based on the aforementioned estimation of 3D positions. Finally, an optimization routine is applied to jointly refine the extrinsic parameters for all cameras. Compared to existing sphere-based 3D position estimators which need to trace and analyse the outline of the sphere projection in the image, the proposed method requires only very simple image processing: estimating the area and the center of mass of the sphere projection. Our results demonstrate that we can get a more accurate estimate of the extrinsic parameters compared to other sphere-based methods. While existing state-of-the-art calibration methods use point like features and epipolar geometry, the proposed method uses the sphere-based 3D position estimate. This results in simpler computations and a more flexible and accurate calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is accurate, robust, flexible and easy to use. PMID:26247950

  1. Radar Imaging of Spheres in 3D using MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2003-01-21

    We have shown that multiple spheres can be imaged by linear and planar EM arrays using only one component of polarization. The imaging approach involves calculating the SVD of the scattering response matrix, selecting a subset of singular values that represents noise, and evaluating the MUSIC functional. The noise threshold applied to the spectrum of singular values for optimal performance is typically around 1%. The resulting signal subspace includes more than one singular value per sphere. The presence of reflections from the ground improves height localization, even for a linear array parallel to the ground. However, the interference between direct and reflected energy modulates the field, creating periodic nulls that can obscure targets in typical images. These nulls are largely eliminated by normalizing the MUSIC functional with the broadside beam pattern of the array. The resulting images show excellent localization for 1 and 2 spheres. The performance for the 3 sphere configurations are complicated by shadowing effects and the greater range of the 3rd sphere in case 2. Two of the three spheres are easily located by MUSIC but the third is difficult to distinguish from other local maxima of the complex imaging functional. Improvement is seen when the linear array is replace with a planar array, which increases the effective aperture height. Further analysis of the singular values and their relationship to modes of scattering from the spheres, as well as better ways to exploit polarization, should improve performance. Work along these lines is currently being pursued by the authors.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of oil-chitosan composite spheres.

    PubMed

    Huang, Keng-Shiang; Wang, Chih-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hui; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Lin, Yung-Sheng; Kung, Chao-Pin; Lin, I-Yin; Chang, Yi-Ching; Weng, Wei-Jie; Wang, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Oil-chitosan composite spheres were synthesized by encapsulation of sunflower seed oil in chitosan droplets, dropping into NaOH solution and in situ solidification. Hydrophilic materials (i.e., iron oxide nanoparticles) and lipophilic materials (i.e., rhodamine B or epirubicin) could be encapsulated simultaneously in the spheres in a one step process. The diameters of the prepared spheres were 2.48 ± 0.11 mm (pure chitosan spheres), 2.31 ± 0.08 mm (oil-chitosan composites), 1.49 ± 0.15 mm (iron-oxide embedded oil-chitosan composites), and 1.69 ± 0.1 mm (epirubicin and iron oxide encapsulated oil-chitosan composites), respectively. Due to their superparamagnetic properties, the iron-oxide embedded oil-chitosan composites could be guided by a magnet. A lipophilic drug (epirubicin) could be loaded in the spheres with encapsulation rate measured to be 72.25%. The lipophilic fluorescent dye rhodamine B was also loadable in the spheres with red fluorescence being observed under a fluorescence microscope. We have developed a novel approach to an in situ process for fabricating oil-chitosan composite spheres with dual encapsulation properties, which are potential multifunctional drug carriers. PMID:23681059

  3. Alternative approach of cell encapsulation by Volvox spheres.

    PubMed

    Teong, Benjamin; Manousakas, Ioannis; Chang, Shwu Jen; Huang, Han Hsiang; Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Kuo, Shyh Ming

    2015-10-01

    Volvox sphere is a bio-mimicking concept of a biomaterial structure design able to encapsulate chemicals, drugs and/or cells. The aim of this study was to prepare Volvox spheres encapsulating AML12 liver cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via a high voltage electrostatic field system. The results demonstrated that AML12 liver cells and MSCs could be successfully encapsulated into the inner spheres and the outer sphere of the Volvox spheres. The improved cell viability of MSCs was achieved by the addition of collagen and polyethylene glycol into the preparation components of the Volvox spheres. Collagen material potentially provides extracellular matrix-like structure for cell adhesion while polyethylene glycol provides a void/loose space for permeability of metabolites. The encapsulated MSCs were able to differentiate into hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells and express liver cell markers including albumin, alpha feto-protein and cytokeratin 18. The encapsulated cells secreted albumin to about 140 ng on day 14. Based on these observations, we conclude that Volvox spheres can be used as an alternative approach to encapsulate multiple types of cells, here AML12 hepatocyte cell line and MSCs. Nevertheless, efforts are still needed to improve the viability of the encapsulated cells and increase the differentiation of MSCs into functional liver cells. PMID:26117741

  4. Extrinsic Calibration of Camera Networks Using a Sphere.

    PubMed

    Guan, Junzhi; Deboeverie, Francis; Slembrouck, Maarten; van Haerenborgh, Dirk; van Cauwelaert, Dimitri; Veelaert, Peter; Philips, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel extrinsic calibration method for camera networks using a sphere as the calibration object. First of all, we propose an easy and accurate method to estimate the 3D positions of the sphere center w.r.t. the local camera coordinate system. Then, we propose to use orthogonal procrustes analysis to pairwise estimate the initial camera relative extrinsic parameters based on the aforementioned estimation of 3D positions. Finally, an optimization routine is applied to jointly refine the extrinsic parameters for all cameras. Compared to existing sphere-based 3D position estimators which need to trace and analyse the outline of the sphere projection in the image, the proposed method requires only very simple image processing: estimating the area and the center of mass of the sphere projection. Our results demonstrate that we can get a more accurate estimate of the extrinsic parameters compared to other sphere-based methods. While existing state-of-the-art calibration methods use point like features and epipolar geometry, the proposed method uses the sphere-based 3D position estimate. This results in simpler computations and a more flexible and accurate calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is accurate, robust, flexible and easy to use. PMID:26247950

  5. A smoothing algorithm using cubic spline functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E., Jr.; Price, J. M.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two algorithms are presented for smoothing arbitrary sets of data. They are the explicit variable algorithm and the parametric variable algorithm. The former would be used where large gradients are not encountered because of the smaller amount of calculation required. The latter would be used if the data being smoothed were double valued or experienced large gradients. Both algorithms use a least-squares technique to obtain a cubic spline fit to the data. The advantage of the spline fit is that the first and second derivatives are continuous. This method is best used in an interactive graphics environment so that the junction values for the spline curve can be manipulated to improve the fit.

  6. Black holes in a cubic Galileon universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, E.; Charmousis, C.; Lehébel, A.; Moskalets, T.

    2016-09-01

    We find and study the properties of black hole solutions for a subclass of Horndeski theory including the cubic Galileon term. The theory under study has shift symmetry but not reflection symmetry for the scalar field. The Galileon is assumed to have linear time dependence characterized by a velocity parameter. We give analytic 3-dimensional solutions that are akin to the BTZ solutions but with a non-trivial scalar field that modifies the effective cosmological constant. We then study the 4-dimensional asymptotically flat and de Sitter solutions. The latter present three different branches according to their effective cosmological constant. For two of these branches, we find families of black hole solutions, parametrized by the velocity of the scalar field. These spherically symmetric solutions, obtained numerically, are different from GR solutions close to the black hole event horizon, while they have the same de-Sitter asymptotic behavior. The velocity parameter represents black hole primary hair.

  7. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, P.A.; Fowler, V.L.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1984-12-21

    A simplified internal gelation process is claimed for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85/sup 0/C) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column. 3 figs.

  8. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  9. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon aerogel spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Liu, Fengshou

    2014-03-01

    Activated carbon aerogel spheres (A-CAS) were successfully prepared by imposing KOH activation on aerogel spheres. It was found that the activation treatment did not destroy the order of the surface of the carbon aerogel spheres (CAS), but it improved the pore structure and adsorption performance of the products. With increasing burn-off, the amount of mesopores first decreased and then increased, with the amount of micropores continuously increasing. The highest measured BET surface area and micropore surface area reached 1198 and 786 m2/g, respectively. The adsorption capacity of benzene organic vapour on the A-CAS is more than eight times as large as that on CAS.

  10. High pressure gas spheres for neutron and photon experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, G.; Petrich, D.; Käppeler, F.; Kaltenbaek, J.; Leugers, B.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-09-01

    High pressure gas spheres have been designed and successfully used in several nuclear physics experiments on noble gases. The pros and cons of this solution are the simple design and the high reliability versus the fact that the density is limited to 40-60% of liquid or solid gas samples. Originally produced for neutron capture studies at keV energies, the comparably small mass of the gas spheres were an important advantage, which turned out to be of relevance for other applications as well. The construction, performance, and operation of the spheres are described and examples for their use are presented.

  11. Potential Polymeric Sphere Construction Materials for a Spacecraft Electrostatic Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Smith, Trent; Williams, Martha; Youngquist, Robert; Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    An electrostatic shielding concept for spacecraft radiation protection under NASA s Exploration Systems Research and Technology Program was evaluated for its effectiveness and feasibility. The proposed shield design is reminiscent of a classic quadrupole with positively and negatively charged spheres surrounding the spacecraft. The project addressed materials, shield configuration, power supply, and compared its effectiveness to that of a passive shield. The report herein concerns the identification of commercially available materials that could be used in sphere fabrication. It was found that several materials were needed to potentially construct the spheres for an electrostatic shield operating at 300 MV.

  12. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model.

  13. Dendritic Growth of Hard-Sphere Crystals. Experiment 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Meyer, W. V.; Rogers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations of the disorder-order transition for colloidal hard spheres under microgravity revealed dendritic crystallites roughly 1-2 mm in size for samples in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Order-of-magnitude estimates rationalize the absence of large or dendritic crystals under normal gravity and their stability to annealing in microgravity. A linear stability analysis of the Ackerson and Schaetzel model for crystallization of hard spheres establishes the domain of instability for diffusion-limited growth at small supersaturations. The relationship between hard-sphere and molecular crystal growth is established and exploited to relate the predicted linear instability to the well-developed dendrites observed.

  14. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.; Fowler, Victor L.; Lloyd, Milton H.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified internal gelation process for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85.degree. C.) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column.

  15. Submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres synthesized by autocatalytic reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Yida . E-mail: denyda@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhao Ling; Liu Lei; Shen Bin; Hu Wenbin

    2005-10-06

    A facile method to fabricate submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres by autocatalyzing the redox reaction around a sacrificial colloidal particle surface is presented in this paper. The size distribution of these spheres can be controlled by regulating the concentration of the alkali solution. The hollow nickel particles were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The hollow spheres produced by this process may have potential applications in many fields, including chemistry, biotechnology and materials science.

  16. Lectures on the scattering of light. [by dielectric sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxon, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    The exact (Mie) theory for the scattering of a plane wave by a dielectric sphere is presented. Since this infinite series solution is computationally impractical for large spheres, another formulation is given in terms of an integral equation valid for a bounded, but otherwise general array of scatterers. This equation is applied to the scattering by a single sphere, and several methods are suggested for approximating the scattering cross section in closed form. A tensor scattering matrix is introduced, in terms of which some general scattering theorems are derived. The application of the formalism to multiple scattering is briefly considered.

  17. Simulation of flow past a sphere in a stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stadler, Matthew; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to simulate spatially-evolving flow past a sphere in a stratified fluid. The immersed boundary method is used to treat the sphere inside the domain. The main objective of this study is to characterize the near wake region. Statistics of interest include the drag coefficient, separation angle, Strouhal number, and the spatial evolution of the velocity fluctuations and the defect velocity. In addition to quantitative statistics, visualizations of the vortex structures in the wake will also be provided and discussed. Results are compared and contrasted with previous experimental and numerical data for unstratified and stratified flow past a sphere.

  18. Motion of a porous sphere in a spherical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.

    2005-08-01

    The creeping motion of a porous sphere at the instant it passes the center of a spherical container has been investigated. The Brinkman's model for the flow inside the porous sphere and the Stokes equation for the flow in the spherical container were used to study the motion. The stream function (and thus the velocity) and pressure (both for the flow inside the porous sphere and inside the spherical container) are calculated. The drag force experienced by the porous spherical particle and wall correction factor is determined. To cite this article: D. Srinivasacharya, C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  19. Ellipsometric study of cubic SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Shoemaker, Neil S.; Powell, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) was applied to cubic SiC. This technique gives absolute values of the refractive index (n) and the extinction coefficient (k) of a substrate and/or a thin film of unknown material. The samples were grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on p-type silicon. The substrate was aligned either on the (001) axis or 1 degree of (001). Several growth temperatures and growth durations were used. The samples were divided into two groups: (1) thick films of order 10 microns grown near optimal conditions of temperature, flow, and gas ratio; and (2) thin films of order 100 A grown at various temperatures. The ellipsometric results for samples in group 1 were analyzed using a two-phase model (substrate and ambient). Results show that for wavelengths in the visible, the refractive index of these CVD samples is equal to that reported for single crystal cubic SiC, within the experimental error, which is on the order of 1 percent. However, the extinction coefficient has a relatively large value, even above the band gap. The absorption is sample dependent and has a broad peak in the visible. The results for samples in group 2 were analyzed using a three-phase model (substrate, film, and ambient). The dielectric functions of the film, deducted from the measured n and k, were further analyzed using the effective medium approximation. The results show that the films contain 30 to 40 vol. percent amorphous silicon, i.e., silicon with only short-range order.

  20. Turbulent mixing in a precessing sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Susumu Shimizu, Masaki; Kawahara, Genta

    2014-11-15

    By numerically simulating turbulent flows at high Reynolds numbers in a precessing sphere, we propose a method to enhance the mixing of a fluid confined within a smooth cavity by its rotational motion alone. To precisely evaluate the mixing efficiency, we extend the quantification method proposed by Danckwerts [“The definition and measurement of some characteristics of mixtures,” Appl. Sci. Res. A 3, 279–296 (1952)] to the case in which only a finite number of fluid particle trajectories can be known. Our accurate numerical tracking of fluid particles in the flow, which is controlled by the Reynolds number (an indicator of the spin rate) and the Poincaré number (the precession rate), shows the following results. First, the mixing process on the time scale normalized by the spin period is independent of the Reynolds number as long as it is high enough for the flow to be developed turbulence. Second, fastest mixing is achieved under weak precession (Poincaré number ≈0.1); in such cases, perfect mixing requires only 10–15 spins of the container. Third, the power to sustain turbulence is a weakly increasing function of the Poincaré number, and the energy efficiency of the mixing is also maximized when the Poincaré number is about 0.1. Fourth, efficient mixing driven by the weak precession arises from the effective cooperation of complex large-scale flow and small-scale turbulence, which itself is sustained by the large-scale flow.

  1. Non-hard sphere thermodynamic perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-08-01

    A non-hard sphere (HS) perturbation scheme, recently advanced by the present author, is elaborated for several technical matters, which are key mathematical details for implementation of the non-HS perturbation scheme in a coupling parameter expansion (CPE) thermodynamic perturbation framework. NVT-Monte Carlo simulation is carried out for a generalized Lennard-Jones (LJ) 2n-n potential to obtain routine thermodynamic quantities such as excess internal energy, pressure, excess chemical potential, excess Helmholtz free energy, and excess constant volume heat capacity. Then, these new simulation data, and available simulation data in literatures about a hard core attractive Yukawa fluid and a Sutherland fluid, are used to test the non-HS CPE 3rd-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and give a comparison between the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT and other theoretical approaches. It is indicated that the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT is superior to other traditional TPT such as van der Waals/HS (vdW/HS), perturbation theory 2 (PT2)/HS, and vdW/Yukawa (vdW/Y) theory or analytical equation of state such as mean spherical approximation (MSA)-equation of state and is at least comparable to several currently the most accurate Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theories. It is discovered that three technical issues, i.e., opening up new bridge function approximation for the reference potential, choosing proper reference potential, and/or using proper thermodynamic route for calculation of fex - ref, chiefly decide the quality of the non-HS CPE TPT. Considering that the non-HS perturbation scheme applies for a wide variety of model fluids, and its implementation in the CPE thermodynamic perturbation framework is amenable to high-order truncation, the non-HS CPE 3rd-order or higher order TPT will be more promising once the above-mentioned three technological advances are established.

  2. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R. E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  3. Tidally Driven Dynamos in a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R.

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker & Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  4. Finding the Finite Groups of Symmetries of the Sphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senechal, Marjorie

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a way of extending the list of rotation groups to include all finite subgroups of symmetries of the sphere, up to conjugation in its full group. Included is Klein's method for enumeration of the finite subgroups. (KR)

  5. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    DOEpatents

    Pappano, Peter J; Rogers, Michael R

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  6. Analysis of integrating sphere performance for IR enhanced DT layering

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.B.,; Collins, G.W.

    1997-06-01

    Absorbed IR energy can supplement the beta decay energy from DT ice to improve the driving force toward uniform layers. A significant problem with this approach has been to deliver the added IR energy with sufficient uniformity to enhance rather than destroy the uniformity of the ice layers. Computer modeling has indicated that one can achieve {approximately}1% uniformity in the angular variation of the absorbed power using an integrating sphere containing holes large enough to allow external inspection of the ice layer uniformity. The power required depends on the integrating sphere size, a 25 mm diameter sphere requires {approximately}35 mW of IR to deposit as much energy in the ice as the 50 mW/cm{sup 3}(35 pW total) received from tritium decay in DT. Power absorbed in the plastic can cause unacceptable ice-layer non-uniformities for the integrating sphere design considered here.

  7. Mechanism of drag reduction by dimples on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; Jeon, Woo-Pyung; Choi, Haecheon

    2006-04-01

    In this Letter we present a detailed mechanism of drag reduction by dimples on a sphere such as golf-ball dimples by measuring the streamwise velocity above the dimpled surface. Dimples cause local flow separation and trigger the shear layer instability along the separating shear layer, resulting in the generation of large turbulence intensity. With this increased turbulence, the flow reattaches to the sphere surface with a high momentum near the wall and overcomes a strong adverse pressure gradient formed in the rear sphere surface. As a result, dimples delay the main separation and reduce drag significantly. The present study suggests that generation of a separation bubble, i.e., a closed-loop streamline consisting of separation and reattachment, on a body surface is an important flow-control strategy for drag reduction on a bluff body such as the sphere and cylinder.

  8. Packings of a charged line on a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas

    2008-12-01

    We find equilibrium configurations of open and closed lines of charge on a sphere, and track them with respect to varying sphere radius. Closed lines transition from a circle to a spiral-like shape through two low-wave-number bifurcations—“baseball seam” and “twist”—which minimize Coulomb energy. The spiral shape is the unique stable equilibrium of the closed line. Other unstable equilibria arise through tip-splitting events. An open line transitions smoothly from an arc of a great circle to a spiral as the sphere radius decreases. Under repulsive potentials with faster-than-Coulomb power-law decay, the spiral is tighter in initial stages of sphere shrinkage, but at later stages of shrinkage the equilibria for all repulsive potentials converge on a spiral with uniform spacing between turns. Multiple stable equilibria of the open line are observed.

  9. Jets generated by a sphere moving vertically in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Okino, Shinya; Nakamura, Shota; Akiyama, Shinsaku

    2013-11-01

    Unsteady development of buoyant jets generated by a sphere moving vertically at constant speeds in stratified fluids is investigated. Initially, the sphere simply drags light upper fluids or isopycnal surfaces as it goes down, as long as the molecular diffusion of density is negligible. In the succeeding period, molecular diffusion of density in the boundary layer on the sphere surface becomes increasingly significant, especially in the lower hemisphere. Then, the density is no longer conserved and a vertical jet starts from the rear/upper stagnation point of the sphere, since the fluid particle of altered but small density tends to go back to its original height. Strength and radius of those jets depend significantly on stratification (Froude number), as well as the Reynolds number and the Schmidt number. These mechanisms are investigated by numerical simulations and measurements by laser induced fluorescence (LIF).

  10. Liquid trampolines: droplets and spheres bouncing off soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbin, Laurent; Dubail, Jerome; Crotiere, Suzie; Quere, David

    2005-11-01

    We report on the impact of rigid spheres and liquid droplets on soap films. These systems exhibit a rich variety of dynamics including bouncing and adhesion. In the case of drop impact, at low speeds the drops bounce, while for intermediate speeds the drops can pass through the film without the film breaking. The bouncing can be analyzed using mechanical models. In the case of the impact of rigid spheres, by tuning the physical property of the surface of the impacting sphere, which may or may not be surrounded by a skin of oil, we experimentally observe two distinct regimes: the solid sphere can bounce off of the fluid film or get entrapped. In all cases the film can be considered an absorber of kinetic energy. Finally, the possibility of tuning the bounce of an object will be presented.

  11. Numerical simulation of negative Magnus force on a rotating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Flow characteristics and fluid force on a sphere rotating along with axis perpendicular to mean air flow were investigated using Large Eddy Simulation at two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 200,000. As a result of simulation, opposite flow characteristics around the sphere and displacement of the separation point were visualized depending on the Reynolds number even though the sphere rotates at the same rotation speed according to the Reynolds number. When Reynolds number is 10,000, flow characteristics agree with the flow field explained in the Magnus effect. However sphere rotates at the same rotation speed while increasing Reynolds number to 200,000, separation point moves in opposite direction and wake appears in the different direction. The reason of the negative Magnus force was discussed in terms of the boundary layer transition on the surface.

  12. Transport properties of highly asymmetric hard-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, Marcus N; Lue, Leo

    2009-04-28

    The static and dynamic properties of binary mixtures of hard spheres with a diameter ratio of sigma(B)/sigma(A)=0.1 and a mass ratio of m(B)/m(A)=0.001 are investigated using event driven molecular dynamics. The contact values of the pair correlation functions are found to compare favorably with recently proposed theoretical expressions. The transport coefficients of the mixture, determined from simulation, are compared to the predictions of the revised Enskog theory using both a third-order Sonine expansion and direct simulation Monte Carlo. Overall, the Enskog theory provides a fairly good description of the simulation data, with the exception of systems at the smallest mole fraction of larger spheres (x(A)=0.01) examined. A "fines effect" was observed at higher packing fractions, where adding smaller spheres to a system of large spheres decreases the viscosity of the mixture; this effect is not captured by the Enskog theory. PMID:19405594

  13. Transport properties of highly asymmetric hard-sphere mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannerman, Marcus N.; Lue, Leo

    2009-04-01

    The static and dynamic properties of binary mixtures of hard spheres with a diameter ratio of σB/σA=0.1 and a mass ratio of mB/mA=0.001 are investigated using event driven molecular dynamics. The contact values of the pair correlation functions are found to compare favorably with recently proposed theoretical expressions. The transport coefficients of the mixture, determined from simulation, are compared to the predictions of the revised Enskog theory using both a third-order Sonine expansion and direct simulation Monte Carlo. Overall, the Enskog theory provides a fairly good description of the simulation data, with the exception of systems at the smallest mole fraction of larger spheres (xA=0.01) examined. A "fines effect" was observed at higher packing fractions, where adding smaller spheres to a system of large spheres decreases the viscosity of the mixture; this effect is not captured by the Enskog theory.

  14. The role of attractive interactions in rod-sphere mixtures.

    PubMed

    Antypov, Dmytro; Cleaver, Douglas J

    2004-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study of binary mixtures of prolate Gay-Berne particles and Lennard-Jones spheres. Results are presented for three such rod-sphere systems which differ from each other only in the interaction between unlike particles. Both the mixing-demixing behavior and the transitions between the isotropic and any liquid crystalline phases are studied for each system, as a function of temperature and concentration ratio. For systems which show macroscopic demixing, the rod-sphere interaction is shown to give direct control over interfacial anchoring properties, giving rise to the possibility of micellar phase formation in the case of homeotropic anchoring. Additionally, it is shown that on incorporating high concentrations of spheres into a system of rods with weak demixing properties, microphase-separated structures can be induced, including bicontinuous and lamellar arrangements. PMID:15268056

  15. Dyadic Green's function of a cluster of spheres.

    PubMed

    Moneda, Angela P; Chrissoulidis, Dimitrios P

    2007-11-01

    The electric dyadic Green's function (dGf) of a cluster of spheres is obtained by application of the superposition principle, dyadic algebra, and the indirect mode-matching method. The analysis results in a set of linear equations for the unknown, vector, wave amplitudes of the dGf; that set is solved by truncation and matrix inversion. The theory is exact in the sense that no simplifying assumptions are made in the analytical steps leading to the dGf, and it is general in the sense that any number, position, size and electrical properties can be considered for the spheres that cluster together. The point source can be anywhere, even within one of the spheres. Energy conservation, reciprocity, and other tests prove that this solution is correct. Numerical results are presented for an electric Hertz dipole radiating in the presence of an array of rexolite spheres, which manifests lensing and beam-forming capabilities. PMID:17975570

  16. Aminated hollow silica spheres for electrochemical DNA biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Eda Yuhana; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor for e.coli determination based on aminated hollow silica was successfully developed. Aminated hollow silica spheres were prepared through the reaction of Tween 20 template and silica precursor. The template was removed by the thermal decomposition at 620°C. Hollow silica spheres were modified with (3-Aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) to form aminated hollow silica spheres.Aminated DNA probe were covalently immobilized on to the amine functionalized hollow silica spheres through glutaradehyde linkers. The formation hollow silica was characterized using FTIR and FESEM. A range of 50-300nm particle size obtained from FESEM micrograph. Meanwhile for the electrochemical study, a quasi-reversible system has been obtain via cyclic voltammetry (CV).

  17. Numerical Flow Visualization in Basic- and Hyper-Cluster Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Athavale, M. M.; Braun, M. J.; Lattime, S.

    1997-01-01

    Packed spherical particle beds have wide applications throughout the process industry and are usually analyzed using an appropriate combination of laminar and turbulent flows with empirically derived coefficients of which the Ergun (1952) relation is probably the best known. The 3-D complexity of the void distribution within the beds has precluded detailed studies of sphere clusters. Numerical modeling and flow vector visualization for the basic tetra- and hexa-sphere clusters and two hyper-sphere clusters are presented at two Reynolds numbers, 400 and 1200. Cutting planes are used to enable visualization of the complex flows generated within the sphere clusters and are discussed herein. The boundary conditions and flow fields for the simple clusters are also compared to the hyper-clusters with larger variations found for hexa-clusters.

  18. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST OF VACUUM SPHERES 168 AND 146 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST OF VACUUM SPHERES 168 AND 146 - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Supersonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  19. 2. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF VACUUM SPHERES 146 AND 168 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF VACUUM SPHERES 146 AND 168 - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Supersonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  20. Calculation of electromagnetic scattering by a large chiral sphere.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen-Sen; Shang, Qing-Chao; Li, Zheng-Jun

    2012-09-20

    Expressions of scattering coefficients for calculating scattering by large chiral spheres are derived by using logarithmic derivatives and ratios of Riccati-Bessel functions. The improved expressions can be easily applied to the case of an arbitrarily shaped beam incidence. A simplified expression of the scattered field in the far field is obtained for the case of x-polarized plane-wave incidence. To verify the correctness and accuracy of the theory and codes, our results are compared with those in literature and those calculated by Mie theory. Radar cross sections of a large chiral sphere are numerically studied. It is found that the rainbow phenomenon of a chiral sphere is very different from that of an isotropic sphere. PMID:23033039

  1. Effects of non-Lambertian surfaces on integrating sphere measurements.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, L M

    1996-07-01

    The effects of non-Lambertian scattering of the interior wall of an integrating sphere are examined through a sphere simulation model. The model employs Monte Carlo techniques. A sphere used for measurement of directional-hemispherical reflectance is modeled. The simulation allows sphere wall scattering to vary from perfectly Lambertian to perfectly specular in steps. The results demonstrate that significant measurement error can result as the scattering deviates from the Lambertian ideal. The error is found to be a strong function of the wall reflectance value as well: it is minimized for reflectances approaching 1.0 and increases as the reflectance value decreases to the minimum value examined of 0.5. The magnitudes of the errors associated with non-Lambertian scattering are also shown to be relatively independent of the specific field of view of the detector used in the measurement. PMID:21102753

  2. Scattering from a multilayered chiral sphere using an iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Qing-Chao; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Qu, Tan; Li, Zheng-Jun; Bai, Lu

    2016-04-01

    An iterative method for electromagnetic scattering from a multilayered chiral sphere is presented based on Lorenz-Mie regime. Electromagnetic fields in each region are expanded in terms of spherical vector wave functions. To calculate the scattering coefficients of the fields in outer space, an iterative form is constructed according to the coefficients equations obtained by the boundary condition on each layer. The iterative relations are expressed in forms of ratios and logarithmic derivatives of Riccati-Bessel functions, which can be calculated conveniently by their recurrence relations. The theory and codes are verified by comparing the scattered fields with those of a multilayered isotropic achiral sphere, and those of a single layered chiral sphere. Scattered fields of multilayered chiral spheres are presented and discussed, including a large sized case and a Gaussian beam incidence case.

  3. Prototype sphere-on-sphere silica particles for the separation of large biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Rodriguez-Aller, Marta; Cusumano, Alessandra; Hayes, Richard; Zhang, Haifei; Edge, Tony; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-01-29

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the possibilities offered by a prototype HPLC column packed with ∼2.5μm narrow size distribution sphere-on-sphere (SOS) silica particles bonded with C4 alkyl chains, for the analytical characterization of large biomolecules. The kinetic performance of this material was evaluated in both isocratic and gradient modes using various model analytes. The data were compared to those obtained on other widepore state-of-the-art fully core-shell and fully porous materials commonly employed to separate proteins moreover to a reference 5μm wide pore material that is still often used in QC labs. In isocratic mode, minimum reduced plate height values of hmin=2.6, 3.3 and 3.3 were observed on butylparaben, decapeptide and glucagon, respectively. In gradient elution mode, the SOS column performs very high efficiency when working with fast gradients. This prototype column was also comparable (and sometimes superior) to other widepore stationary phases, whatever the gradient time and flow rate, when analyzing the largest model protein, namely BSA. These benefits may be attributed to the SOS particle morphology, minimizing the intra-particle mass transfer resistance. Finally, the SOS column was also applied for the analytical characterization of commercial monoclonal antibody (mAb) and antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) samples. With these classes of proteins, the performance of SOS column was similar to the best widepore stationary phases available on the market. PMID:26755414

  4. SPHERES: From Ground Development to Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2015-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES Facility on ISS is managed and operated by the SPHERES National Lab Facility at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. To help make science a reality on the ISS, the SPHERES ARC team supports a Guest Scientist Program (GSP). This program allows anyone with new science the possibility to interface with the SPHERES team and hardware. In addition to highlighting the available SPHERES hardware on ISS and on the ground, this presentation will also highlight ground support, facilities, and resources available to guest researchers. Investigations on the ISS evolve through four main phases: Strategic, Tactical, Operations, and Post Operations. The Strategic Phase encompasses early planning beginning with initial contact by the Principle Investigator (PI) and the SPHERES program who may work with the PI to assess what assistance the PI may need. Once the basic parameters are understood, the investigation moves to the Tactical Phase which involves more detailed planning, development, and testing. Depending on the nature of the investigation, the tactical phase may be split into the Lab Tactical Phase or the ISS Tactical Phase due to the difference in requirements for the two destinations. The Operations Phase is when the actual science is performed; this can be either in the lab, or on the ISS. The Post Operations Phase encompasses data analysis and distribution, and generation of summary status and reports. The SPHERES Operations and Engineering teams at ARC is composed of

  5. The LED calibration system of the SPHERE-2 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Bonvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Podgrudkov, D. A.; Roganova, T. M.

    2016-04-01

    An absolute calibration method for the PMT mosaic used in the SPHERE-2 experiment is presented. The method is based on the relative calibration of all PMTs in the mosaic to a single stable PMT, incorporated in it, during each measurement event and subsequent absolute calibration of that single PMT using a known stable light source. The results of the SPHERE-2 detector PMTs calibration are presented and are discussed.

  6. Integrating sphere transmissometer for field measurement of leaf transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Dewitt, D. P.; Robinson, B. F.

    1987-12-01

    A simple field-rated transmissometer is described for rapidly determining the normal hemispherical transmittance T(0 deg, 2 pi) of leaves measured in situ in the four Landsat wavelength bands. The transmissometer requires direct solar illumination of the leaf sample. It collects the transmitted light with an integrating sphere and measures the collected light using a commercially available radiometer. The transmittances determined by the transmissometer are comparable with those measured by a labortory spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Metallic Hollow Sphere Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, O.; Motz, C.; Peterlik, H.; Puchegger, S.; Reger, N.; Pippan, R.

    2008-02-01

    Metallic foam was fabricated from 316L stainless steel spheres, where the bonding of the spheres was achieved by a sintering process. The mechanical behavior of a low-density material (0.3 g/cm3) with 2- and 4-mm sphere diameter and a high-density material (0.6 g/cm3) with 4-mm sphere diameter was investigated in compression and tension. The cell wall material of this hollow sphere structure (HSS) had different morphologies: dense and porous sintered walls were investigated. The cell wall morphology affects the Young’s modulus (stiffness) and the ductility of the HSS material. Defects, such as the cell wall porosity, lower the ductility of the material. Besides the quasi-static measurements, the HSS material was tested with a resonance frequency method (dynamic measurement), to obtain detailed information on the stiffness at different temperatures up to 700 °C. In-situ compression and tension tests were carried out to understand the deformation mechanisms on the scale of the single hollow spheres. The failure mechanisms in the vicinity of the sintering neck of the spheres was investigated. A doubling of the density leads to an increase of the plateau stress and the ultimate tensile stress of the material, whereas the ductility (strain to fracture) depended mainly on the cell wall morphology. Due to the mainly tensile loading of the cell walls in the vicinity of the sinter neck, the ultimate tensile strength doubled for the high-density HSS, in good agreement with theoretical considerations. In compression, the gain in the plateau stress was not as distinctive compared with the theoretical considerations assuming a bending dominated deformation. The influence of structural parameters, such as cell wall morphology, cell wall thickness, and sphere diameter, on the mechanical behavior is discussed.

  8. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E; Morrissey, Timothy G; Vuono, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  9. Rebound and jet formation of a fluid-filled sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killian, Taylor W.; Klaus, Robert A.; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates the impact dynamics of hollow elastic spheres partially filled with fluid. Unlike an empty sphere, the internal fluid mitigates some of the rebound through an impulse driven exchange of energy wherein the fluid forms a jet inside the sphere. Surprisingly, this occurs on the second rebound or when the free surface is initially perturbed. Images gathered through experimentation show that the fluid reacts more quickly to the impact than the sphere, which decouples the two masses (fluid and sphere), imparts energy to the fluid, and removes rebound energy from the sphere. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of acceleration, momentum and an energy method suggesting an optimal fill volume in the neighborhood of 30%. While the characteristics of the fluid (i.e., density, viscosity, etc.) affect the fluid motion (i.e., type and size of jet formation), the rebound characteristics remain similar for a given fluid volume independent of fluid type. Implications of this work are a potential use of similar passive damping systems in sports technology and marine engineering.

  10. Squeeze flow of a Carreau fluid during sphere impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, J.; Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    We present results from a combined numerical and experimental investigation into the squeeze flow induced when a solid sphere impacts onto a thin, ultra-viscous film of non-Newtonian fluid. We examine both the sphere motion through the liquid as well as the fluid flow field in the region directly beneath the sphere during approach to a solid plate. In the experiments we use silicone oil as the model fluid, which is well-described by the Carreau model. We use high-speed imaging and particle tracking to achieve flow visualisation within the film itself and derive the corresponding velocity fields. We show that the radial velocity either diverges as the gap between the sphere and the wall diminishes (Ztip → 0) or that it reaches a maximum value and then decays rapidly to zero as the sphere comes to rest at a non-zero distance (Ztip = Zmin) away from the wall. The horizontal shear rate is calculated and is responsible for significant viscosity reduction during the approach of the sphere. Our model of this flow, based on lubrication theory, is solved numerically and compared to experimental trials. We show that our model is able to correctly describe the physical features of the flow observed in the experiments.

  11. A new method for visualizing data on a sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hon, David

    1991-01-01

    A method for visualizing data on a globe or unit sphere is described. Information that is distributed over a sphere - global oceanographic or geographic measurements, all-sky astronomy observations, or any quantities that are best represented in spherical coordinates - can benefit from this technique. Retaining a better sense of the geometry and information content of the data, 3D graphics can provide an unobstructed view of the entire sphere, without undue deformation of its surface area. A 'parameterized ray trace' produces look-up tables (LUTs) that can be used for all visualizations. The ray-trace result shows one or more spheres with the data as a texture map and three reflecting rectangles that 'mirror' the far sides of the sphere(s) into view. The LUTs need only be created once. No special purpose hardware is required beyond a PC or workstation that supports color. Examples from astronomical and geophysical datasets, which are commonly displayed with an area deforming (2D) projection, are presented.

  12. Series reactions A → B → C on successive spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strieder, William; Saddawi, Salma

    2016-07-01

    The twin spherical harmonic expansion method with iterative solution of the coefficient equations is used to generate a rigorous analytical solution for the rate of series reaction, A → B → C, occurring, respectively, on two successive spheres of radius a1 and a2, a center-to-center distance d apart. To investigate the influences of the intersphere diffusion and geometry, diffusion-controlled reactions are considered. Results are presented as a series expansion of the dimensionless reaction rate R in terms of the dimensionless center-to-center sphere separation d bar (= d / (a1 +a2)) reciprocals, and for various sphere radius ratios γ (=a1 /a2) . When the sphere radius ratio γ is less than unity, a maximum in the series reaction rate is found for a d bar of about 1.05. Also an exact value of the series dimensionless reaction rate of ln2 is obtained in the limit γ → 0 (very large a2 or very small a1) for spheres in contact. Results suggest that the plots of reaction rates for contacting spheres can be extrapolated versus γ to the ln2 limit at γ → 0, and that the rate maximum effect is large in the γ → 0 limit.

  13. Motion of a Deformed Sphere with Slip in Creeping Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, Andre; Jia, Liping; Petty, Charles

    2004-11-01

    An analytical solution for the motion of a slightly deformed sphere in creeping flows with the assumption of slip on the particle surface is presented. Explicit expressions are obtained for the hydrodynamic force and torque exerted by the fluid on the deformed sphere. A perturbation method, based on previous work done by Brenner [1964] and Lamb[1945], is used to solve for the motion of a fluid influenced by the presence of a deformed sphere. Slip is assumed at the surface of the particle. Hydrodynamic force and torque exerted by the fluid on the deformed sphere are expressed explicitly for a translational and rotational deformed sphere. The equation governing the motion and orientation of a spheroid induced by homogenous flows is also presented. This evolution equation for the orientation of the spheroid is similar to the equation derived by Jeffery [1922]. Solutions of this equation show that the period of rotation of the particle with slip is longer than for the same particle without slip. Furthermore, when the slip coefficient is sufficiently low, the particle rotates to a fixed angle that corresponds to a quasi-steady state in the flow. REFERENCES Brenner, H. 1964 The Stokes resistance of a slightly deformed sphere. Chemical Engineering Science 19, 519-539 Jeffery, G.B.1922 The motion of ellipsoidal particles immersed in a viscous fluid. Proc. Soc. Lond. Math., 102, 161-179 Lamb, H. 1945 Hydrodynamics, sixth version, Dover, New York, U.S.A

  14. Solvation Sphere of I- and Br- in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    The solvation sphere of halides in water has been investigated using a combination of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis techniques. The results have indicated that I- and Br- both have an asymmetric, 8 water molecule primary solvation spheres. These spheres are identical, with the Br{sup -} sphere about .3 {angstrom} smaller than the I{sup -} sphere. This study utilized near-edge analysis to supplement EXAFS analysis which suffers from signal dampening/broadening due to thermal noise. This paper has reported on the solvation first sphere of I{sup -} and Br{sup -} in water. Using EXAFS and XANES analysis, strong models which describe the geometric configuration of water molecules coordinated to a central anion have been developed. The combination of these techniques has provided us with a more substantiated argument than relying solely on one or the other. An important finding of this study is that the size of the anion plays a smaller role than previously assumed in determining the number of coordinating water molecules Further experimental and theoretical investigation is required to understand why the size of the anion plays a minor role in determining the number of water molecules bound.

  15. Multiple scattering of a spherical acoustic wave from fluid spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. H.; Liu, A. Q.; Chen, H. L.; Chen, T. N.

    2006-02-01

    The multiple scattering of a spherical acoustic wave from an arbitrary number of fluid spheres is investigated theoretically. The tool to attack the multiple scattering problem is a kind of addition formulas for the spherical wave functions, which are presented in the paper, based on the bicentric expansion form of Green function in the spherical coordinates. For an arbitrary configuration of N fluid spheres, the kind of addition formulas permits the field expansions (all referred to the center of each sphere). With these the sound fields scattered by each sphere can be described by a set of N equations. The interactions between any two fluid spheres are taken into account in these equations exactly and their coefficients are coupled through double sums in the spherical wave functions. By truncating the infinite series in the equations depending on certain calculation accuracy and solving the coefficients matrix by using the Gauss-Seidel iteration method, we can obtain the scattered sound field by the configuration of the fluid spheres. Finally, the scattering calculations by using the kind of addition formulas are carried out.

  16. STRENGTH OF A C-SPHERE FLEXURE SPECIMEN

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, Wei; Jadaan, Osama M.; Lance, Michael J; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2007-01-01

    A 'C-Sphere' flexure strength specimen geometry was conceived and developed to measure a relevant strength of bearing-grade Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and to relate that to surface-located strength-limiting flaws and to ultimately link those flaw populations to rolling contact fatigue performance. A slot was machined into the balls to a set depth to produce the C-sphere geometry. C-sphere specimens were then diametrally compressed to produce a monotonically increasing flexure or hoop tensile stress at their surface that caused their fracture. The strength was determined using the combination of failure load, C-sphere geometry, and FEA, and the stress field was used to determine C-sphere effective areas and effective volumes as a function of Weibull modulus. A description of the specimen and the aforementioned analysis are provided and a comparison of C-sphere flexure strength distributions of two bearing grade Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials (NBD200 and SN101C) is given.

  17. Ellipsoids beat Spheres: Experiments with Candies, Colloids and Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikin, Paul

    2006-04-01

    How many gumballs fit in the glass sphere of a gumball machine? Scientists have been puzzling over problems like this since the Ancient Greeks. Yet it was only recently proven that the standard way of stacking oranges at a grocery store--with one orange on top of each set of three below--is the densist packing for spheres, with a packing fraction φ˜ 0.74. Random (amorphous) packings of spheres have a lower density, with φ ˜0.64. The density of crystalline and random packings of atoms is intimately related to the melting transition in matter. We have studied the crystal-liquid transition in spherical colloidal systems on earth and in microgravity. The simplest objects to study after spheres are squashed spheres -- ellipsoids. Surprisingly we find that ellipsoids can randomly pack more densely than spheres, up to φ˜0.68 - 0.71 for a shape close to that of M&M's^ Candies, and even approach φ˜0.75 for general ellipsoids. The higher density relates directly to the higher number of neighbors needed to prevent the more asymetric ellipsoid from rotating. We have also found the ellipsoids can be packed in a crystalline array to a density, φ˜.7707 which exceeds the highest previous packing. Our findings provide insights into granular materials, rigidity, crystals and glasses, and they may lead to higher quality ceramic materials.

  18. Biharmonic and f-biharmonic maps from a 2-sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze-Ping; Ou, Ye-Lin; Yang, Han-Chun

    2016-06-01

    We study biharmonic maps and f-biharmonic maps from the standard sphere (S2 ,g0) , the latter maps are equivalent to biharmonic maps from Riemann spheres (S2 ,f-1g0) . We proved that for rotationally symmetric maps between rotationally symmetric spaces, both biharmonicity and f-biharmonicity reduce to a 2nd order linear ordinary differential equation. As applications, we give a method to produce biharmonic maps and f-biharmonic maps from given biharmonic maps and we construct many examples of biharmonic and f-biharmonic maps from the standard sphere S2 and between two such spheres. Our examples include non-conformal proper biharmonic maps from Riemann spheres (S2 ,f-1g0) ⟶S2 and (S2 ,f-1g0) ⟶Sn, or non-conformal f-biharmonic maps from the standard spheres (S2 ,g0) ⟶S2 and (S2 ,g0) ⟶Sn with two singular points.

  19. Global Calibration of Multiple Cameras Based on Sphere Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junhua; He, Huabin; Zeng, Debing

    2016-01-01

    Global calibration methods for multi-camera system are critical to the accuracy of vision measurement. Proposed in this paper is such a method based on several groups of sphere targets and a precision auxiliary camera. Each camera to be calibrated observes a group of spheres (at least three), while the auxiliary camera observes all the spheres. The global calibration can be achieved after each camera reconstructs the sphere centers in its field of view. In the process of reconstructing a sphere center, a parameter equation is used to describe the sphere projection model. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation are carried out to analyze the factors that affect the calibration accuracy. Simulation results show that the parameter equation can largely improve the reconstruction accuracy. In the experiments, a two-camera system calibrated by our method is used to measure a distance about 578 mm, and the root mean squared error is within 0.14 mm. Furthermore, the experiments indicate that the method has simple operation and good flexibility, especially for the onsite multiple cameras without common field of view. PMID:26761007

  20. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic silicon carbide. Patent Application

    SciTech Connect

    Addamiano, A.

    1985-07-02

    This invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide crystals. More specifically, this invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). One object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of cubic SiC for high temperature electronic devices. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of highly pure, single crystal cubic SiC that is duplicable. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of large-area single-crystal wafers of cubic SiC. These and other objects of the present invention can be achieved by a method for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic Silicon Carbide (SiC) comprising the steps of etching silicon substrated having one mechanically polished face; depositing a thin buffer layer of cubic SiC formed by reaction between a heated Si substrate and a H2-C3H8 gas mixuture; and depositing SiC on the buffer layer at high temperature using H2+C3HY+SiH4 mixture.

  1. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Liu, Rui; Chuang, Yen -Jun; Dai, Sheng; Pan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSsmore » but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.« less

  2. Critical Masses for Unreflected Metal Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Wright, Richard Q

    2009-01-01

    Calculated critical masses of bare metal spheres for 28 actinide isotopes, using the SCALE/XSDRNPM one-dimensional, discrete-ordinates system, are presented. ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, and JENDL-3.3 cross sections were used in the calculations. Results are given for isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, californium, and for one isotope of einsteinium. Calculated k values for these same nuclides are also given. We show that, for non-threshold or low-threshold fission nuclides, a good approximation for the nuclide k is the value of nubar at 1 MeV. A plot of the critical mass versus k values is given for 19 nuclides with A-numbers between 232 and 250. The peaks in the critical mass curve (for seven nuclides) correspond to dips in the k curve. For the seven cases with the largest critical mass, six are even-even nuclides. Neptunium-237, with a critical mass of about 62.7 kg (ENDF/B-VI calculation), has an odd number of protons and an even number of neutrons. However, two cases with quite small critical masses, 232U and 236Pu, are also even-even. These two nuclides do not exhibit threshold fission behavior like most other even-even nuclides. The largest critical mass is 208.8 kg for 243Am and the smallest is 2.44 kg for 251Cf. The calculated k values vary from 1.5022 for 234U to 4.4767 for 251Cf. A correlation between the calculated critical mass (kg) and the fission spectrum averaged value of is given for the elements U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf. For each of the five elements, a fit to the data for that element is provided. In each case the fit employs a negative exponential of the form mass = exp(A + B ~ ln( ) The values of A and B are element dependent and vary slightly for each of the five elements. The method described here is mainly applicable for non-threshold fission nuclides (15 of the 28 nuclides considered in this paper). There are three exceptions, 238Pu, 244Cm, and 250Cf, which all exhibit threshold fission behavior.

  3. Hierarchical Nanotube-Constructed Porous TiO2-B Spheres for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yi; Wang, Hong-En; -Zhuan Huang, Shao; Jin, Jun; Wang, Chao; Yu, Yong; Li, Yu; Su, Bao-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchically structured porous TiO2-B spheres have been synthesized via a hydrothermal process using amorphous titania/oleylamine composites as a self-sacrificing template. The TiO2-B spheres are constructed by interconnected nanotubes and possess a high specific surface area of 295 m2 g-1. When evaluated as an anode material in lithium-half cells, the as-obtained TiO2-B material exhibits high and reversible lithium storage capacity of 270 mA h g-1 at 1 C (340 mA g-1), excellent rate capability of 221 mA h g-1 at 10 C, and long cycle life with over 70% capacity retention after 1000 cycles at 10 C. The superior electrochemical performance of TiO2-B material strongly correlates to the synergetic superiorities with a combination of TiO2-B polymorph, hierarchically porous structure, interconnected nanotubes and spherical morphology. Post-mortem structural analyses reveal some discrete cubic LiTiO2 nanodots formed on the outer surfaces of TiO2-B nanotubes, which might account for the slight capacity loss upon prolonged electrochemical cycling. PMID:26170081

  4. The raspberry model for hydrodynamic interactions revisited. I. Periodic arrays of spheres and dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Lukas P.; Peter, Toni; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2015-08-01

    The so-called "raspberry" model refers to the hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and Langevin molecular dynamics scheme for simulating the dynamics of suspensions of colloidal particles, originally developed by Lobaskin and Dünweg [New J. Phys. 6, 54 (2004)], wherein discrete surface points are used to achieve fluid-particle coupling. This technique has been used in many simulation studies on the behavior of colloids. However, there are fundamental questions with regards to the use of this model. In this paper, we examine the accuracy with which the raspberry method is able to reproduce Stokes-level hydrodynamic interactions when compared to analytic expressions for solid spheres in simple-cubic crystals. To this end, we consider the quality of numerical experiments that are traditionally used to establish these properties and we discuss their shortcomings. We show that there is a discrepancy between the translational and rotational mobility reproduced by the simple raspberry model and present a way to numerically remedy this problem by adding internal coupling points. Finally, we examine a non-convex shape, namely, a colloidal dumbbell, and show that the filled raspberry model replicates the desired hydrodynamic behavior in bulk for this more complicated shape. Our investigation is continued in de Graaf et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 084108 (2015)], wherein we consider the raspberry model in the confining geometry of two parallel plates.

  5. Effects of sphere size on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ductile iron-steel hollow sphere syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazegaran, Hamid; Kiani-Rashid, Ali-Reza; Khaki, Jalil Vahdati

    2016-06-01

    The effects of sphere size on the microstructural and mechanical properties of ductile iron-steel hollow sphere (DI-SHS) syntactic foams were investigated in this study. The SHSs were manufactured by fluidized-bed coating via the Fe-based commercial powder-binder suspension onto expanded polystyrene spheres (EPSs). Afterwards, the DI-SHS syntactic foams were produced via a sand-mold casting process. The microstructures of specimens were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The microscopic evaluations of specimens reveal distinct regions composed of the DI matrix, SHS shells, and compatible interface. As a result, the microstructures and graphite morphologies of the DI matrix depend on sphere size. When the sphere size decreases, the area fractions of cementite and graphite phases are observed to increase and decrease, respectively. Compression tests were subsequently conducted at ambient temperature on the DI-SHS syntactic foams. The results reveal that the compression behavior of the syntactic foams is enhanced with increasing sphere size. Furthermore, the compressed specimens demonstrate that microcracks start and grow from the interface region.

  6. Construction of adhesion maps for contacts between a sphere and a half-space: Considering size effects of the sphere.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Hanqing; Yang, Weixu

    2015-11-15

    Previous adhesion maps, such as the JG (Johnson-Greenwood) and YCG (Yao-Ciavarella-Gao) maps, are used to guide the selection of Bradley, DMT, M-D, JKR and Hertz models. However, when the size of the contact sphere decreases to the small scale, the applicability of JG and YCG maps is limited because the assumptions regarding the contact region profile, interaction between contact bodies and sphere shape in the classical models constituting these two maps are no longer valid. To avoid this limitation, in this paper, a new numerical model considering size effects of the sphere is established first and then introduced into the new adhesion maps together with the YGG (Yao-Guduru-Gao) model and Hertz model. Regimes of these models in the new map under a certain sphere radius are demarcated by the criteria related to the relative force differences and the ratio of contact radius to sphere radius. In addition, the approaches at pull-off, jump-in and jump-out for different Tabor parameters and sphere radii are provided in the new maps. Finally, to make the new maps more feasible, the numerical results of approaches, force and contact radius involved in the maps are formularized by using the piecewise fitting. PMID:26232732

  7. Radiation damage in cubic-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) can be used for nuclear applications as an inert matrix for actinide immobilization or transmutation. Indeed, the large amount of native oxygen vacancies leads to a high radiation tolerance of this material owing to defect recombination occurring in the atomic displacements cascades induced by fast neutron irradiation or ion implantations, as showed by Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Amorphization cannot be obtained in YSZ either by nuclear-collision or electronic-excitation damage, just like in urania. A kind of polygonization structure with slightly disoriented crystalline domains is obtained in both cases. In the first steps of damage, specific isolated point defects (like F+-type color centers) and point-defect clusters are produced by nuclear collisions with charged particles or neutrons. Further increase of damage leads to dislocation-loop formation, then to collapse of the dislocation network into a polygonization structure. For swift heavy ion irradiations, a similar polygonization structure is obtained above a threshold stopping power value of about 20-30 keV nm-1.

  8. Topological Oxide Insulator in Cubic Perovskite Structure

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hosub; Rhim, Sonny H.; Im, Jino; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of topologically protected conducting states with the chiral spin texture is the most prominent feature at the surface of topological insulators. On the application side, large band gap and high resistivity to distinguish surface from bulk degrees of freedom should be guaranteed for the full usage of the surface states. Here, we suggest that the oxide cubic perovskite YBiO3, more than just an oxide, defines itself as a new three-dimensional topological insulator exhibiting both a large bulk band gap and a high resistivity. Based on first-principles calculations varying the spin-orbit coupling strength, the non-trivial band topology of YBiO3 is investigated, where the spin-orbit coupling of the Bi 6p orbital plays a crucial role. Taking the exquisite synthesis techniques in oxide electronics into account, YBiO3 can also be used to provide various interface configurations hosting exotic topological phenomena combined with other quantum phases. PMID:23575973

  9. Topological Oxide Insulator in Cubic Perovskite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hosub; Rhim, Sonny H.; Im, Jino; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of topologically protected conducting states with the chiral spin texture is the most prominent feature at the surface of topological insulators. On the application side, large band gap and high resistivity to distinguish surface from bulk degrees of freedom should be guaranteed for the full usage of the surface states. Here, we suggest that the oxide cubic perovskite YBiO3, more than just an oxide, defines itself as a new three-dimensional topological insulator exhibiting both a large bulk band gap and a high resistivity. Based on first-principles calculations varying the spin-orbit coupling strength, the non-trivial band topology of YBiO3 is investigated, where the spin-orbit coupling of the Bi 6p orbital plays a crucial role. Taking the exquisite synthesis techniques in oxide electronics into account, YBiO3 can also be used to provide various interface configurations hosting exotic topological phenomena combined with other quantum phases.

  10. Smooth cubic commensurate oxides on gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Gaddy, Benjamin E.; LeBeau, James M.; Shelton, Christopher T.; Losego, Mark D.; Mita, Seiji; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Irving, Douglas L.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.

    2014-02-14

    Smooth, commensurate alloys of 〈111〉-oriented Mg{sub 0.52}Ca{sub 0.48}O (MCO) thin films are demonstrated on Ga-polar, c+ [0001]-oriented GaN by surfactant-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition. These are unique examples of coherent cubic oxide|nitride interfaces with structural and morphological perfection. Metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated on n-type GaN. A comparison of leakage current density for conventional and surfactant-assisted growth reveals a nearly 100× reduction in leakage current density for the surfactant-assisted samples. HAADF-STEM images of the MCO|GaN interface show commensurate alignment of atomic planes with minimal defects due to lattice mismatch. STEM and DFT calculations show that GaN c/2 steps create incoherent boundaries in MCO over layers which manifest as two in-plane rotations and determine consequently the density of structural defects in otherwise coherent MCO. This new understanding of interfacial steps between HCP and FCC crystals identifies the steps needed to create globally defect-free heterostructures.

  11. Triangulation of cubic panorama for view synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunxiao; Zhao, Yan; Wu, Falin

    2011-08-01

    An unstructured triangulation approach, new to our knowledge, is proposed to apply triangular meshes for representing and rendering a scene on a cubic panorama (CP). It sophisticatedly converts a complicated three-dimensional triangulation into a simple three-step triangulation. First, a two-dimensional Delaunay triangulation is individually carried out on each face. Second, an improved polygonal triangulation is implemented in the intermediate regions of each of two faces. Third, a cobweblike triangulation is designed for the remaining intermediate regions after unfolding four faces to the top/bottom face. Since the last two steps well solve the boundary problem arising from cube edges, the triangulation with irregular-distribution feature points is implemented in a CP as a whole. The triangular meshes can be warped from multiple reference CPs onto an arbitrary viewpoint by face-to-face homography transformations. The experiments indicate that the proposed triangulation approach provides a good modeling for the scene with photorealistic rendered CPs. PMID:21833101

  12. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings: Voronoi correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Michael A; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    We characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings by computing the Minkowski functionals (volume, surface area, and integrated mean curvature) of their associated Voronoi cells. The probability distribution functions of these functionals of Voronoi cells in MRJ sphere packings are qualitatively similar to those of an equilibrium hard-sphere liquid and partly even to the uncorrelated Poisson point process, implying that such local statistics are relatively structurally insensitive. This is not surprising because the Minkowski functionals of a single Voronoi cell incorporate only local information and are insensitive to global structural information. To improve upon this, we introduce descriptors that incorporate nonlocal information via the correlation functions of the Minkowski functionals of two cells at a given distance as well as certain cell-cell probability density functions. We evaluate these higher-order functions for our MRJ packings as well as equilibrium hard spheres and the Poisson point process. It is shown that these Minkowski correlation and density functions contain visibly more information than the corresponding standard pair-correlation functions. We find strong anticorrelations in the Voronoi volumes for the hyperuniform MRJ packings, consistent with previous findings for other pair correlations [A. Donev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 090604 (2005)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.090604], indicating that large-scale volume fluctuations are suppressed by accompanying large Voronoi cells with small cells, and vice versa. In contrast to the aforementioned local Voronoi statistics, the correlation functions of the Voronoi cells qualitatively distinguish the structure of MRJ sphere packings (prototypical glasses) from that of not only the Poisson point process but also the correlated equilibrium hard-sphere liquids. Moreover, while we did not find any perfect icosahedra (the locally densest possible structure in which a

  13. Phase behavior of mixtures of colloidal rods and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Marie Elizabeth

    In this thesis we study entropy driven order in mixtures of rods and spheres. Systems of rod-like particles, as pure systems, exhibit rich liquid crystalline phase behavior. We chose to work with aqueous suspensions of either TMV or fd virus particles, both rod-like lyotropic systems. We complicate the phase behavior by adding a second component, colloidal spheres (PEG/PEO, BSA, polystyrene latex, or Dextran). Our first paper explores the phase behavior of TMV mixed with BSA or PEO, mapping out a phase diagram based on optical microscopy observations. We found our qualitative observations of TMV mixtures to be consistent with theoretical models of the depletion force. The second paper extends our study of phase behavior to mixtures of fd virus and polystyrene latex spheres. We qualitatively observe bulk demixing for very small diameter added spheres and for very large diameter added spheres. In addition, we observed microphase separation morphologies, such as lamellar and columnar structures, which formed for fd mixed with polystyrene latex spheres 0.1 microns in diameter. All of these microphase samples were viewed with differential interference microscopy (a few samples were further investigated using electron microscopy). Both our data and theoretical calculations illustrated that 0.1 micron diameter spheres have a stabilizing effect on the smectic phase. Our final work focused on fd virus mixed with Dextran. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the effect of added polymer on the isotropic-cholesteric co-existence region. I-Ch samples were prepared and fd and Dextran concentrations were measured using a spectrophotometer. Several conditions were explored, including two different molecular weights of Dextran and a range of ionic strengths. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the I-Ch coexistence region widens with added Dextran with the polymer preferentially partioned into the isotropic phase.

  14. Tin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this effort was to develop a process for economically fabricating thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from conventional ceramic powders using dispersions. This process resulted in successful production of monosized spheres in the mm size range which were point contact bonded into foams. Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres of small (one to five millimeter) diameter have novel applications as high-temperature insulation and light structural materials when bonded into monolithic foams. During Phase 1 of this program the objective as to develop a process for fabricating thin-wall hollow spheres from powder slurries using the coaxial nozzle fabrication method. Based on the success during Phase 1, Phase 2 was revised to emphasize the assessment of the potential structural and insulation applications for the spheres and modeling of the sphere formation process was initiated. As more understanding developed, it was clear that to achieve successful structural application, the spheres had to be bonded into monolithic foams and the effort was further expanded to include both bonding into structures and finite element mechanical modeling which became the basis of Phase 3. Successful bonding techniques and mechanical modeling resulted but thermal conductivities were higher than desired for insulating activities. In addition, considerable interest had been express by industry for the technology. Thus the final Phase 4 concentrated on methods to reduce thermal conductivity by a variety of techniques and technology transfer through individualized visits. This program resulted in three Ph.D. theses and 10 M.S. theses and they are listed in the appropriate technical sections.

  15. Combustion of a Polymer (PMMA) Sphere in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann C.; Hamins, Anthony; Donnelly, Michelle K.

    1999-01-01

    A series of low gravity, aircraft-based, experiments was conducted to investigate the combustion of supported thermoplastic polymer spheres under varying ambient conditions. The three types of thermoplastic investigated were polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polypropylene (PP). and polystyrene (PS). Spheres with diameters ranging from 2 mm to 6.35 mm were tested. The total initial pressure varied from 0.05 MPa to 0. 15 MPa whereas the ambient oxygen concentration varied from 19 % to 30 % (by volume). The ignition system consisted of a pair of retractable energized coils. Two CCD cameras recorded the burning histories of the spheres. The video sequences revealed a number of dynamic events including bubbling and sputtering, as well as soot shell formation and break-up during combustion of the spheres at reduced gravity. The ejection of combusting material from the burning spheres represents a fire hazard that must be considered at reduced gravity. The ejection process was found to be sensitive to polymer type. All average burning rates were measured to increase with initial sphere diameter and oxygen concentration, whereas the initial pressure had little effect. The three thermoplastic types exhibited different burning characteristics. For the same initial conditions, the burning rate of PP was slower than PMMA, whereas the burning rate of PS was comparable to PMMA. The transient diameter of the burning thermoplastic exhibited two distinct periods: an initial period (enduring approximately half of the total burn duration) when the diameter remained approximately constant, and a final period when the square of the diameter linearly decreased with time. A simple homogeneous two-phase model was developed to understand the changing diameter of the burning sphere. Its value is based on a competition between diameter reduction due to mass loss from burning and sputtering, and diameter expansion due to the processes of swelling (density decrease with heating) and bubble growth

  16. March 20, 2012 Space Station Briefing: Cubic Satellite Deploy (Narrated)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, presented by Expedition 32 Lead Flight Director Dina Contella during the March 20, 2012 ISS Program and Science Overview Briefing, shows the deploy of small cubic satellites (often ...

  17. Monotonicity preserving splines using rational Ball cubic interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Wan Zafira Ezza Wan; Jamal, Ena; Ali, Jamaludin Md.

    2015-10-01

    In scientific application and Computer Aided Design (CAD), users usually need to generate a spline passing through a given set of data which preserves certain shape properties of the data such as positivity, monotonicity or convexity [1]. The required curves have to be a smooth shape-preserving interpolation. In this paper a rational cubic spline in Ball representation is developed to generate an interpolant that preserves monotonicity. In this paper to control the shape of the interpolant three shape parameters are introduced. The shape parameters in the description of the rational cubic interpolation are subjected to monotonicity constrained. The necessary and sufficient conditions of the rational cubic interpolation are derived and visually the proposed rational cubic interpolant gives a very pleasing result.

  18. March 20, 2012 Space Station Briefing: Cubic Satellite Deploy

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, presented by Expedition 32 Lead Flight Director Dina Contella during the March 20, 2012 ISS Program and Science Overview Briefing, shows the deploy of small cubic satellites (often ...

  19. Late-time attractor for the cubic nonlinear wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Szpak, Nikodem

    2010-08-15

    We apply our recently developed scaling technique for obtaining late-time asymptotics to the cubic nonlinear wave equation and explain the appearance and approach to the two-parameter attractor found recently by Bizon and Zenginoglu.

  20. The Coulombic Lattice Potential of Ionic Compounds: The Cubic Perovskites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents coulombic models representing the particles of a system by point charges interacting through Coulomb's law to explain coulombic lattice potential. Uses rubidium manganese trifluoride as an example of cubic perovskite structure. Discusses the effects on cluster properties. (CW)

  1. A highly ordered cubic mesoporous silica/graphene nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Wook; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2013-10-21

    A highly ordered cubic mesoporous silica (KIT-6)/graphene nanocomposite and 2D KIT-6 nanoflakes were synthesized using a novel synthesis methodology. The non-ionic triblock copolymer, P123, played a dual role as a structure-directing agent in the formation of the cubic mesoporous structure and as a cross-linking agent between mesoporous silica and graphene. The prepared (KIT-6)/graphene nanocomposite could act as a template for the preparation of mesoporous material/graphene nanocomposites. PMID:24057016

  2. Oblique impact of water-skipping elastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Truscott, Tadd; Hurd, Randy; Jandron, Michael; Bower, Allan

    2014-11-01

    Highly compliant elastic spheres possess remarkable water skipping capabilities. High-speed video reveals that, upon impact with the water, the balls create a cavity and deform significantly. The flattened spheres resemble skipping stones and this augmented geometry results in enhanced lift that causes the ball to launch back into the air. This deformation also excites elastic vibration modes within the sphere. A numerical model reveals that the vibrations are initiated by a stress concentration developed in the early moments of impact. In one mode, an elastic wave propagates around the sphere periphery and may impact the water surface, resulting in an energy loss from the sphere. Thus two timescales govern the success of skipping: the total collision time of impact must be less than the deformation time associated with material vibration. Using a simplified analytical model, we derive the expected scaling of each time in terms of a dimensionless ratio of material shear modulus to fluid inertia forces, G / ρU2 . Experiments over a range of parameters validate this scaling and result in a regime diagram that distinguishes different types of skipping. We identify critical relations for the material properties and impact conditions to achieve skipping.

  3. ORSPHERE: CRITICAL, BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-09-01

    In the early 1970’s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950’s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” (Reference 1) While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0. 0001 in. for non-spherical parts), masses (±0.01 g), and material data The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. A three part sphere was initially assembled with an average radius of 3.4665 in. and was then machined down to an average radius of 3.4420 in. (3.4425 in. nominal). These two spherical configurations were evaluated and judged to be acceptable benchmark experiments; however, the two experiments are highly correlated.

  4. Glass transition of dense fluids of hard and compressible spheres.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Ludovic; Witten, Thomas A

    2009-08-01

    We use computer simulations to study the glass transition of dense fluids made of polydisperse repulsive spheres. For hard particles, we vary the volume fraction, phi , and use compressible particles to explore finite temperatures, T>0 . In the hard sphere limit, our dynamic data show evidence of an avoided mode-coupling singularity near phi(MCT) is approximately 0.592; they are consistent with a divergence of equilibrium relaxation times occurring at phi(0) is approximately 0.635, but they leave open the existence of a finite temperature singularity for compressible spheres at volume fraction phi>phi(0). Using direct measurements and a scaling procedure, we estimate the equilibrium equation of state for the hard sphere metastable fluid up to phi(0), where pressure remains finite, suggesting that phi(0) corresponds to an ideal glass transition. We use nonequilibrium protocols to explore glassy states above phi(0) and establish the existence of multiple equations of state for the unequilibrated glass of hard spheres, all diverging at different densities in the range phi in [0.642, 0.664]. Glassiness thus results in the existence of a continuum of densities where jamming transitions can occur. PMID:19792128

  5. Fuel Fabrication for Surrogate Sphere-Pac Rodlet

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2005-07-19

    Sphere-pac fuel consists of a blend of spheres of two or three different size fractions contained in a fuel rod. The smear density of the sphere-pac fuel column can be adjusted to the values obtained for light-water reactor (LWR) pellets (91-95%) by using three size fractions, and to values typical of the fast-reactor oxide fuel column ({approx}85%) by using two size fractions. For optimum binary packing, the diameters of the two sphere fractions must differ by at least a factor of 7 (ref. 3). Blending of spheres with smaller-diameter ratios results in difficult blending, nonuniform loading, and lower packing fractions. A mixture of about 70 vol% coarse spheres and 30 vol% fine spheres is needed to obtain high packing fractions. The limiting smear density for binary packing is 86%, with about 82% achieved in practice. Ternary packing provides greater smear densities, with theoretical values ranging from 93 to 95%. Sphere-pac technology was developed in the 1960-1990 period for thermal and fast spectrum reactors of nearly all types (U-Th and U-Pu fuel cycles, oxide and carbide fuels), but development of this technology was most strongly motivated by the need for remote fabrication in the thorium fuel cycle. The application to LWR fuels as part of the DOE Fuel Performance Improvement Program did not result in commercial deployment for a number of reasons, but the relatively low production cost of existing UO{sub 2} pellet fuel is probably the most important factor. In the case of transmutation fuels, however, sphere-pac technology has the potential to be a lower-cost alternative while also offering great flexibility in tailoring the fuel elements to match the exact requirements of any particular reactor core at any given time in the cycle. In fact, the blend of spheres can be adjusted to offer a different composition for each fuel pin or group of pins in a given fuel element. Moreover, it can even provide a vertical gradient of composition in a single fuel pin. For

  6. Effect of surface heating on the drag crisis of sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Masaya; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Makoto

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of flow past a heated sphere are investigated at around critical Reynolds number in conditions using three-dimensional numerical simulation in which temperature dependence of fluid properties such as density and viscosity is exactly considered. Boussinesq approximation is no longer applicable due to large temperature difference adopted in this study. And the order of the buoyancy effect becomes relatively small compared to inertia effect in present Reynolds number region. The result shows that drag coefficient of the heated sphere in drag crisis region becomes larger than that of the unheated case and it increases up to the coefficient found in subcritical region. This is because the temperature difference between the sphere and ambient fluid strongly affects the flow separation points, resulting in small recovery of the pressure in the wake and reduction of the temporal fluctuation of the lift force acting on the sphere. These effects are considered to attribute to the temperature dependence of fluid properties in the vicinity of the sphere and effect on the transient of the boundary surface.

  7. Computational polymer physics: Hard-sphere chain in solvent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Avinash; Gavazzi, Daniel; Taylor, Mark

    2009-10-01

    In this work we present results for chain conformation in two simple chain-in-solvent systems constructed from hard-sphere monomers of diameter D. The first system consists of a flexible chain of fused hard spheres (i.e., bond length L=D) in a monomeric hard-sphere solvent. The second system consists of a flexible tangent hard-sphere chain (L=D) in a dimeric hard-sphere solvent with L=D. These systems are studied using Monte Carlo simulations which employ both single-site crankshaft and multi-site pivot moves to sample the configuration space of the chain. We report chain structure, in terms of site-site probability functions, as a function of solvent density. In all cases, increasing solvent density leads to an overall compression of the chain. At high solvent density the chain conformation is closely coupled to the local solvent structure and we speculate that incommensurate structures may lead to interesting conformational transitions.

  8. Hydrothermal Syntheses of Colloidal Carbon Spheres from Cyclodextrins

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Li Q.; Bae, In-Tae; Arey, Bruce W.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2008-09-18

    Colloidal carbon spheres have been prepared from aqueous alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrin (CD) solutions in closed systems under hydrothermal conditions at 160 oC. Both liquid and solid-state 13C NMR spectra taken for samples at different reaction times have been used to monitor the dehydration and carbonization pathways. CD slowly hydrolyzes to glucose and forms 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) followed by carbonization into colloidal carbon spheres. The isolated carbon spheres are 70-150 nm in diameter, exhibit a core-shell structure, and are comprised of a condensed core (C=C) peppered with resident chemical functionalities including carboxylate and hydroxyl groups. Evidence from 13C solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectra reveal that the evolving carbon spheres show a gradual increase in the amount of aromatic carbon as a function of reaction time and that the carbon spheres generated from gamma-CD contain significantly higher aromatic carbon than those derived from alpha- and beta-CD.

  9. The trajectories of spheres during agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Griess, G A; Harris, R A; Serwer, P

    1993-01-01

    To develop a physical description of the gel-induced retardation of spheres during gel electrophoresis, the microscopic motion of single electrically charged latex spheres is statistically quantified here, by digital image analysis. To obtain adequate resolution in space, comparatively large spheres, 240 nm in radius, are used. The following observations are made during electrophoresis in a 0.2% agarose gel at 22 degrees C: (a) When a comparatively high field (3.0 V cm-1) is used, inelastic collisions result in field-induced trapping of spheres; no elastic collisions are observed. (b) Reduction of the field from 3.0 to 0.0 V cm-1 results in reverse migration of previously trapped spheres. (c) In the absence of trapping, the electrical field does not cause an alteration in the tortuosity of motion (i.e. motion in a field-perpendicular direction). (d) When results are obtained for a constant time between images (0.2 s), gel-dependent deviations from a true random walk are not observed in the absence of trapping. (e) When results are obtained as a function of time between images, significant gel-dependent deviation from a random walk is observed. In the absence of trapping, the data presented here indicate that retardation is derived primarily from dissipative processes that are concentrated near gel fibers. However, steric effects have not yet been distinguished from hydrodynamic effects. PMID:8199223

  10. Theoretical elastic moduli for disordered packings of interconnected spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Lattuada, Marco; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    A theoretical model has been developed which provides analytical expressions for the elastic moduli of disordered isotropic ensembles of spheres interconnected by physical bonds. Young's and shear moduli have been derived assuming an ideal random isotropic network and the radial distribution function for disordered packings of spheres. The interparticle interactions are accounted for in terms of surface forces for the two distinct cases of perfectly rigid spheres and spheres deformable at contact. A theoretical expression is also derived in a similar way for the bulk or compressibility modulus. In this case, an atomistic approach has been followed based on the analogy with noble gas solids and colloidal crystals. Also in this case, disordered spatial distribution of the spheres is described statistically. For the case of colloidal aggregates, a total two-body mean-field interaction potential is used which includes the Born repulsion energy. This latter contribution plays an essential role in determining the compression behavior of systems of particles aggregated in the primary minimum of the potential well and, therefore, must not be neglected. Both the expression of the Young's modulus and that of the compressibility modulus derived in this work are found to be consistent with two distinct sets of experimental data which recently appeared in the literature.

  11. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  12. Acoustical imaging of spheres above a reflecting surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David; Berryman, James

    2003-04-01

    An analytical study using the MUSIC method of subspace imaging is presented for the case of spheres above a reflecting boundary. The field scattered from the spheres and the reflecting boundary is calculated analytically, neglecting interactions between spheres. The singular value decomposition of the response matrix is calculated and the singular vectors divided into signal and noise subspaces. Images showing the estimated sphere locations are obtained by backpropagating the noise vectors using either the free space Green's function or the Green's function that incorporates reflections from the boundary. We show that the latter Green's function improves imaging performance after applying a normalization that compensates for the interference between direct and reflected fields. We also show that the best images are attained in some cases when the number of singular vectors in the signal subspace exceeds the number of spheres. This is consistent with previous analysis showing multiple eigenvalues of the time reversal operator for spherical scatterers [Chambers and Gautesen, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109 (2001)]. [Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  13. Grid-Sphere Electrodes for Contact with Ionospheric Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H.; Poe, Garrett D.

    2010-01-01

    Grid-sphere electrodes have been proposed for use on the positively biased end of electrodynamic space tethers. A grid-sphere electrode is fabricated by embedding a wire mesh in a thin film from which a spherical balloon is formed. The grid-sphere electrode would be deployed from compact stowage by inflating the balloon in space. The thin-film material used to inflate the balloon is formulated to vaporize when exposed to the space environment. This would leave the bare metallic spherical grid electrode attached to the tether, which would present a small cross-sectional area (essentially, the geometric wire shadow area only) to incident neutral atoms and molecules. Most of the neutral particles, which produce dynamic drag when they impact a surface, would pass unimpeded through the open grid spaces. However, partly as a result of buildup of a space charge inside the grid-sphere, and partially, the result of magnetic field effects, the electrode would act almost like a solid surface with respect to the flux of electrons. The net result would be that grid-sphere electrodes would introduce minimal aerodynamic drag, yet have effective electrical-contact surface areas large enough to collect multiampere currents from the ionospheric plasma that are needed for operation of electrodynamic tethers. The vaporizable-balloon concept could also be applied to the deployment of large radio antennas in outer space.

  14. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-11-01

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  15. Observational Opportunities with the CUBIC Experiment on SAC-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Moskalenko, E. I.

    1996-12-01

    The CUBIC experiment on the SAC-B satellite is now collecting data on the Diffuse X-Ray Background and bright point sources over an energy range of 0.2 - 10 keV with energy resolution ranging from 40 - 160 eV over this bandpass. CUBIC observations, several of which are discussed in other posters at this session, provide 2 - 4 high quality spectra per week. CUBIC was built as a PI-class instrument, and at present data rights are divided between Penn State (90%) and Leicester University (10%). We present the observing plan for the first six months of CUBIC operations. We are currently collaborating with several astronomers who are not on the CUBIC team but have expressed interest in one or more of these targets. We invite additional collaborations on targets which are not currently assigned to a specific observer. In order to make these data more accessible to the astronomical community, we are proposing to institute a modest Guest Investigator program. If supported by ADP funding, this would permit observing requests from outside astronomers and would place a large fraction of the CUBIC data in a public archive at the HEASARC.

  16. The compressibility of cubic white and orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and simple cubic black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Simon M; Zaug, Joseph

    2010-03-10

    The effect of pressure on the crystal structure of white phosphorus has been studied up to 22.4 GPa. The ?alpha phase was found to transform into the alpha' phase at 0.87 +- 0.04 GPa with a volume change of 0.1 +- 0.3 cc/mol. A fit of a second order Birch- Murnaghan equation to the data gave Vo = 16.94 ? 0.08 cc/mol and Ko = 6.7 +- 0.5 GPa for the alpha phase and Vo = 16.4 +- 0.1 cc/mol and Ko = 9.1 +- 0.3 GPa for the alpha' phase. The alpha' phase was found to transform to the A17 phase of black phosphorus at 2.68 +- 0.34 GPa and then with increasing pressure to the A7 and then simple cubic phase of black phosphorus. A fit of a second order Birch-Murnaghan equation to our data combined with previous measurements gave Vo = 11.43 +- 0.05 cc/mol and Ko = 34.7 +- 0.5 GPa for the A17 phase, Vo = 9.62 +- 0.01 cc/mol and Ko = 65.0 +- 0.6 GPa for the A7 phase and , Vo = 9.23 +- 0.01 cc/mol and Ko = 72.5 +- 0.3 GPa for the simple cubic phase.

  17. On the shock response of cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.; Gray, G. T.; Millett, J. C. F.

    2009-11-01

    The response of four cubic metals to shock loading is reviewed in order to understand the effects of microstructure on continuum response. Experiments are described that link defect generation and storage mechanisms at the mesoscale to observations in the bulk. Four materials were reviewed; these were fcc nickel, the ordered fcc intermetallic Ni3Al, the bcc metal tantalum, and two alloys based on the intermetallic phase TiAl; Ti-46.5Al-2Cr-2Nb and Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb-1B. The experiments described are in two groups: first, equation of state and shear strength measurements using Manganin stress gauges and, second, postshock microstructural examinations and measurement of changes in mechanical properties. The behaviors described are linked through the description of time dependent plasticity mechanisms to the final states achieved. Recovered targets displayed dislocation microstructures illustrating processes active during the shock-loading process. Reloading of previously shock-prestrained samples illustrated shock strengthening for the fcc metals Ni and Ni3Al while showing no such effect for bcc Ta and for the intermetallic TiAl. This difference in effective shock hardening has been related, on the one hand, to the fact that bcc metals have fewer available slip systems that can operate than fcc crystals and to the observation that the lower symmetry materials (Ta and TiAl) both possess high Peierls stress and thus have higher resistances to defect motion in the lattice under shock-loading conditions. These behaviors, compared between these four materials, illustrate the role of defect generation, transport, storage, and interaction in determining the response of materials to shock prestraining.

  18. Polyimide nanocomposites based on cubic zirconium tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian Sharma, Gayathri

    2009-12-01

    In this research, cubic zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) was used as a filler to reduce the CTE of polyimides (PI), and the effect of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles on the bulk polymer properties was studied. Polyimides are high performance polymers with exceptional thermal stability, and there is a need for PIs with low CTEs for high temperature applications. The nanofiller, cubic ZrW2O8, is well known for its isotropic negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide temperature range from -272.7 to 777°C. The preparation of nanocomposites involved the synthesis of ZrW 2O8 nanofiller, engineering the polymer-filler interface using linker groups and optimization of processing strategies to prepare free-standing PI nanocomposite films. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles. Polyimide-ZrW2O8 interface interaction was enhanced by covalently bonding linker moieties to the surface of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. Specifically, ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles were functionalized with two different linker groups: (1) a short aliphatic silane, and (2) low molecular weight PI. The surface functionalization was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Reprecipitation blending was used to prepare the freestanding PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposite films with up to 15 volume% filler loading. SEM images showed the improvements in polymer-filler wetting behavior achieved using interface engineering. SEM images indicated that there was better filler dispersion in the PI matrix using reprecipitation blending, compared to the filler dispersion achieved in the nanocomposites prepared using conventional blending technique. The structure-property relationships in PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposites were investigated by studying the thermal degradation, glass transition, tensile and thermal expansion properties of the nanocomposites. The properties were studied as a function of filler loading and interface linker groups. Addition of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not

  19. Hypersonic vibrations of Ag@SiO2 (cubic core)-shell nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing Ya; Wang, Zhi Kui; Lim, Hock Siah; Ng, Ser Choon; Kuok, Meng Hau; Tran, Toan Trong; Lu, Xianmao

    2010-12-28

    The intriguing optical and catalytic properties of metal-silica core-shell nanoparticles, inherited from their plasmonic metallic cores together with the rich surface chemistry and increased stability offered by their silica shells, have enabled a wide variety of applications. In this work, we investigate the confined vibrational modes of a series of monodisperse Ag@SiO(2) (cubic core)-shell nanospheres synthesized using a modified Stöber sol-gel method. The particle-size dependence of their mode frequencies has been mapped by Brillouin light scattering, a powerful tool for probing hypersonic vibrations. Unlike the larger particles, the observed spheroidal-like mode frequencies of the smaller ones do not scale with inverse diameter. Interestingly, the onset of the deviation from this linearity occurs at a smaller particle size for higher-energy modes than for lower-energy ones. Finite element simulations show that the mode displacement profiles of the Ag@SiO(2) core-shells closely resemble those of a homogeneous SiO(2) sphere. Simulations have also been performed to ascertain the effects that the core shape and the relative hardness of the core and shell materials have on the vibrations of the core-shell as a whole. As the vibrational modes of a particle have a bearing on its thermal and mechanical properties, the findings would be of value in designing core-shell nanostructures with customized thermal and mechanical characteristics. PMID:21087022

  20. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model. PMID:27386951

  1. SILSS: SPHERE/IRDIS Long-Slit Spectroscopy pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    The ESO's VLT/SPHERE instrument includes a unique long-slit spectroscopy (LSS) mode coupled with Lyot coronagraphy in its infrared dual-band imager and spectrograph (IRDIS) for spectral characterization of young, giant exoplanets detected by direct imaging. The SILSS pipeline is a combination of the official SPHERE pipeline and additional custom IDL routines developed within the SPHERE consortium for the speckle subtraction and spectral extraction of a companion's spectrum; it offers a complete end-to-end pipeline, from raw data (science+calibrations) to a final spectrum of the companion. SILSS works on both the low-resolution (LRS) and medium-resolution (MRS) data, and allows correction for some of the known biases of the instrument. Documentation is included in the header of the main routine of the pipeline.

  2. Loop Integrands for Scattering Amplitudes from the Riemann Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Yvonne; Mason, Lionel; Monteiro, Ricardo; Tourkine, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    The scattering equations on the Riemann sphere give rise to remarkable formulas for tree-level gauge theory and gravity amplitudes. Adamo, Casali, and Skinner conjectured a one-loop formula for supergravity amplitudes based on scattering equations on a torus. We use a residue theorem to transform this into a formula on the Riemann sphere. What emerges is a framework for loop integrands on the Riemann sphere that promises to have a wide application, based on off-shell scattering equations that depend on the loop momentum. We present new formulas, checked explicitly at low points, for supergravity and super-Yang-Mills amplitudes and for n -gon integrands at one loop. Finally, we show that the off-shell scattering equations naturally extend to arbitrary loop order, and we give a proposal for the all-loop integrands for supergravity and planar super-Yang-Mills theory.

  3. Cermet sphere-pac concept for inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouchon, M. A.; Nakamura, M.; Hellwig, Ch.; Ingold, F.; Degueldre, C.

    2003-06-01

    In the inert matrix fuel concept, plutonium reprocessed from spent fuel is burned in an inert matrix, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia. Coming from wet reprocessing, the internal gelation can perform an easy micro-spheres production. Utilization of these particles in a sphere-pac realizes a direct fuel production. Besides being economical, this direct usage offers an almost dustless fabrication. One disadvantage of yttria-stabilized zirconia as matrix is its low thermal conductivity. A further reduction by the macroscopic structure of a sphere bed seems unacceptable. This can be eluded by the insertion of a highly conducting phase. Similar to the cermet concept with the embedment of ceramic fuel into metal, the infiltration of a fine metal fraction into a coarse ceramic fuel fraction is studied here. The initial thermal conductivity shows much higher calculated values and the sintering behaviour is also clearly enhanced compared to the pure ceramic bed.

  4. Probing the evolution and morphology of hard carbon spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Pol, Vilas G.; Wen, Jianguo; Lau, Kah Chun; Callear, Samantha; Bowron, Daniel T.; Lin, Chi-Kai; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Curtiss, Larry A.; David, William; Miller, Dean J.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2014-03-01

    Monodispersed hard carbon spheres can be synthesized quickly and reproducibly by autogenic reactions of hydrocarbon precursors, notably polyethylene (including plastic waste), at high temperature and pressure. The carbon microparticles formed by this reaction have a unique spherical architecture, with a dominant internal nanometer layered motif, and they exhibit diamond-like hardness and electrochemical properties similar to graphite. In the present study, in-situ monitoring by X-ray diffraction along with electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, neutron pair-distribution function analysis, and computational modeling has been used to elucidate the morphology and evolution of the carbon spheres that form from the autogenic reaction of polyethylene at high temperature and pressure. A mechanism is proposed on how polyethylene evolves from a linear chain-based material to a layered carbon motif. Heating the spheres to 2400-2800 °C under inert conditions increases their graphitic character, particularly at the surface, which enhances their electrochemical and tribological properties.

  5. Multishelled Metal Oxide Hollow Spheres: Easy Synthesis and Formation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjing; Wu, Guanglei; Ren, Yanyan; Li, Xinghua; Wang, Liuding

    2016-06-20

    Uniform multishelled NiO, Co3 O4 , ZnO, and Au@NiO hollow spheres were synthesized (NiO and Co3 O4 hollow spheres for the first time) by a simple shell-by-shell self-assembly allowing for tuning of the the size, thickness and shell numbers by controlling the heat treatment, glucose/metal salt molar ratio, and hydrothermal reaction time. These findings further the development of synthetic methodologies for multishelled hollow structures and could open up new opportunities for deeper understanding of the mechanisms of shell-by-shell self-assembly. Moreover, the double-shelled NiO hollow sphere exhibits a higher photocatalytic activity for degradation of methyl orange than its morphological counterparts. PMID:27164001

  6. Demixing in binary mixtures of apolar and dipolar hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarza, N. G.; Lomba, E.; Martín, C.; Gallardo, A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the demixing transition of mixtures of equal size hard spheres and dipolar hard spheres using computer simulation and integral equation theories. Calculations are carried out at constant pressure, and it is found that there is a strong correlation between the total density and the composition. The critical temperature and the critical total density are found to increase with pressure. The critical mole fraction of the dipolar component on the contrary decreases as pressure is augmented. These qualitative trends are reproduced by the theoretical approaches that on the other hand overestimate by far the value of the critical temperature. Interestingly, the critical parameters for the liquid-vapor equilibrium extrapolated from the mixture results in the limit of vanishing neutral hard sphere concentration agree rather well with recent estimates based on the extrapolation of charged hard dumbbell phase equilibria when dumbbell elongation shrinks to zero [G. Ganzenmüller and P. J. Camp, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 191104 (2007)].

  7. From Ewald sphere to Ewald shell in nonlinear optics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Huang, Cheng-Ping; Zhang, Chao; Hong, Xu-Hao; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Qin, Yi-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ewald sphere is a simple vector scheme to depict the X-ray Bragg diffraction in a crystal. A similar method, known as the nonlinear Ewald sphere, was employed to illustrate optical frequency conversion processes. We extend the nonlinear Ewald sphere to the Ewald shell construction. With the Ewald shell, a variety of quasi-phase-matching (QPM) effects, such as the collective envelope effect associated with multiple QPM resonances, the enhanced second- harmonic generation due to multiple reciprocal vectors etc., are suggested theoretically and verified experimentally. By rotating the nonlinear photonic crystal sample, the dynamic evolution of these QPM effects has also been observed, which agreed well with the Ewald shell model. PMID:27386951

  8. Loop Integrands for Scattering Amplitudes from the Riemann Sphere.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Yvonne; Mason, Lionel; Monteiro, Ricardo; Tourkine, Piotr

    2015-09-18

    The scattering equations on the Riemann sphere give rise to remarkable formulas for tree-level gauge theory and gravity amplitudes. Adamo, Casali, and Skinner conjectured a one-loop formula for supergravity amplitudes based on scattering equations on a torus. We use a residue theorem to transform this into a formula on the Riemann sphere. What emerges is a framework for loop integrands on the Riemann sphere that promises to have a wide application, based on off-shell scattering equations that depend on the loop momentum. We present new formulas, checked explicitly at low points, for supergravity and super-Yang-Mills amplitudes and for n-gon integrands at one loop. Finally, we show that the off-shell scattering equations naturally extend to arbitrary loop order, and we give a proposal for the all-loop integrands for supergravity and planar super-Yang-Mills theory. PMID:26430983

  9. The Sphere Anemometer - A Fast Alternative to Cup Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heißelmann, Hendrik; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    The main problem of cup anemometry is the different response time for increasing and decreasing wind velocities due to its moment of inertia. This results in an overestimation of wind speed under turbulent wind conditions, the so-called over-speeding. Additionally, routine calibrations are necessary due to the wear of bearings. Motivated by these problems the sphere anemometer, a new simple and robust sensor for wind velocity measurements without moving parts, was developed at the University of Oldenburg. In contrast to other known thrust-based sensors, the sphere anemometer uses the light pointer principle to detect the deflection of a bending tube caused by the drag force acting on a sphere mounted at its top. This technique allows the simultaneous determination of wind speed and direction via a two-dimensional position sensitive detector.

  10. Motion of spheres along a fluid-gas interface.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Bogdan; Ekiel-Jezewska, Maria L; Nägele, Gerhard; Wajnryb, Eligiusz

    2004-08-01

    A system of many spherical particles, suspended in a quiescent fluid and touching a planar free fluid-gas interface, is considered. Stick fluid boundary conditions at the sphere surfaces are assumed. The free surface boundary conditions are taken into account with the use of the method of images. For such a quasi-two-dimensional system, the one-sphere resistance operator is calculated numerically. Moreover, the corresponding friction and mobility tensors are constructed from irreducible multipole expansion. Finally, the long-distance terms of the two-sphere mobility tensor are evaluated explicitly up to the order of 1/r3, where r is the interparticle distance. Experiments which have motivated this work are outlined. PMID:15260785

  11. Burning molten metallic spheres: One class of ball lightning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Karl D.; Massey, Nathan

    2008-08-01

    Abrahamson and Dinniss [2000. Ball lightning caused by oxidation of nanoparticle networks from normal lightning strikes on soil. Nature 403, 519-521] proposed a theory of ball lighting in which silicon nanoparticles undergo slow oxidation and emit light. Paiva et al. [2007. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon. Physical Review Letters 98, 048501] reported that an electric arc to silicon produced long-lasting luminous white spheres showing many characteristics of ball lightning. We show experimentally that these consist of burning molten silicon spheres with diameters in the 0.1-1 mm range. The evidence of our experiments leads us to propose that a subset of ball lightning events may consist of macro-scale molten spheres of burning metallic materials likely to be ejected from a conventional lightning strike to earth.

  12. The viscosity of colloidal spheres in deionized suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    1987-12-01

    Viscosities of colloidal spheres, i.e., colloidal silica (diameter 8 and 45 nm) and monodisperse polystyrene latices (diameter 85 to 780 nm), are measured in deionized (``salt-free'') suspensions and in the presence of a small amount of NaCl. The reduced viscosities (specific viscosity divided by concentration) of deionized silica (diameter 8 nm) are much higher than would be expected by Einstein's prediction and decrease sharply with increasing concentration. A sharp peak is observed in the reduced viscosity vs concentration curves of deionized colloidal silica of 45 nm diameter and the deionized latex spheres. The peak corresponds to the transition between ``liquid-like'' and ``crystal-like'' structures. These results show that electrostatic intersphere repulsion and the elongated Debye-screening length around the colloidal spheres are essential to explain the extraordinary properties.

  13. Wavelets, ridgelets, curvelets on the sphere, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moudden, Y.; Abrial, P.; Starck, J.-L.

    2005-08-01

    Analyzing data mapped to the sphere as may occur in a range of applications in geophysics, medical imaging or astrophysics, requires specific tools. This paper describes new multiscale decompositions for spherical images namely the isotropic undecimated wavelet transform, the ridgelet transform and the curvelet transform each of which is invertible. Several applications are described. We show how these transforms can be used in denoising and especially in a Combined Filtering Method, which uses both the wavelet and the curvelet transforms, thus benefiting from the advantages of both transforms. An application to component separation from multichannel data mapped to the sphere is also described where we take advantage of the spatiospectral localization on the sphere provided by the spherical wavelet functions.

  14. Monte Carlo modeling of an integrating sphere reflectometer.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, Alexander V; Mekhontsev, Sergey N; Hanssen, Leonard M

    2003-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has been applied to numerical modeling of an integrating sphere designed for hemispherical-directional reflectance factor measurements. It is shown that a conventional algorithm of backward ray tracing used for estimation of characteristics of the radiation field at a given point has slow convergence for small source-to-sphere-diameter ratios. A newly developed algorithm that substantially improves the convergence by calculation of direct source-induced irradiation for every point of diffuse reflection of rays traced is described. The method developed is applied to an integrating sphere reflectometer for the visible and infrared spectral ranges. Parametric studies of hemispherical radiance distributions for radiation incident onto the sample center were performed. The deviations of measured sample reflectance from the actual reflectance as a result of various factors were computed. The accuracy of the results, adequacy of the reflectance model, and other important aspects of the algorithm implementation are discussed. PMID:12868822

  15. Absolute calibration of the RADSCAT scatterometer using precision spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. L.; Schroeder, L. C.; Mitchell, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Tests using precision sphere targets suspended from balloons were conducted to calibrate the received-power/transmitted-power tatio of the RADSCAT scatterometer. Comparisons were made of these measured results with theoretical return from spheres. The RADSCAT scatterometer measurements at 13.9 GHz should be corrected by -2.4 dB, and those at 9.3 GHz, by -4.3 dB. The techniques described should be generally applicable to calibration of scatterometers where measurement precision is of prime importance. Inferred from the magnitude of these RADSCAT corrections was the present state of technology in building precision scatterometers.

  16. Torque on a sphere inside a rotating cylinder.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, B.; Levinson, E.; Caswell, B.

    1972-01-01

    A circular cylinder of finite dimensions is made to rotate around a sphere fixed in the center of the cylinder. The couple on the sphere is measured over a wide range of rotational speeds for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For the Newtonian liquids a comparison of the experimental results is made with Collins' (1955) expansion of the couple as a series in even powers of the angular Reynolds number. For non-Newtonian liquids the apparatus proves to be extremely useful for an accurate determination of the zero shear rate viscosity using only a small amount of fluid.

  17. Mesoporous Trimetallic PtPdRu Spheres as Superior Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Ataee-Esfahani, Hamed; Li, Cuiling; Alshehri, Saad M; Ahamad, Tansir; Henzie, Joel; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-05-17

    Mesoporous Trimetallic PtPdRu Spheres with well-defined spherical morphology and uniformly sized pores were synthesized in an aqueous solution using ascorbic acid as the reducing agent and triblock copolymer F127 as the pore directing agent. These mesoporous PtPdRu spheres exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity compared to commercial Pt black, resulting in a ∼4.9 times improvement in mass activity for the methanol oxidation reaction. The excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability are due to the unique mesoporous architecture and electronic landscape between different elements. PMID:27072776

  18. Measurement of Blast Waves from Bursting Pressureized Frangible Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, E. D.; Baker, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale experiments were conducted to obtain data on incident overpressure at various distances from bursting pressurized spheres. Complete time histories of blast overpressure generated by rupturing glass spheres under high internal pressure were obtained using eight side-on pressure transducers. A scaling law is presented, and its nondimensional parameters are used to compare peak overpressures, arrival times, impulses, and durations for different initial conditions and sizes of blast source. The nondimensional data are also compared, whenever possible, with results of theoretical calculations and compiled data for Pentolite high explosive. The scaled data are repeatable and show significant differences from blast waves generated by condensed high-explosives.

  19. Quantum entropy for the fuzzy sphere and its monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Nirmalendu; Chandra, Nitin; Vaidya, Sachindeo

    2014-11-01

    Using generalized bosons, we construct the fuzzy sphere SF 2 and monopoles on SF 2 in a reducible representation of SU(2). The corresponding quantum states are naturally obtained using the GNS-construction. We show that there is an emergent nonabelian unitary gauge symmetry which is in the commutant of the algebra of observables. The quantum states are necessarily mixed and have non-vanishing von Neumann entropy, which increases monotonically under a bistochastic Markov map. The maximum value of the entropy has a simple relation to the degeneracy of the irreps that constitute the reducible representation that underlies the fuzzy sphere.

  20. Accelerated UV weathering device based on integrating sphere technology

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Joannie; Byrd, Eric; Embree, Ned; Garver, Jason; Dickens, Brian; Finn, Tom; Martin, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) weathering device based on integrating sphere technology has been designed, fabricated, and implemented for studying the accelerated weathering of polymers. This device has the capability of irradiating multiple test specimens with uniform, high intensity UV radiation while simultaneously subjecting them to a wide range of precisely and independently controlled temperature and relative humidity environments. This article describes the integrating sphere-based weathering system, its ability to precisely control temperature and relative humidity, and its ability to produce a highly uniform UV irradiance.

  1. Thermoinertial bouncing of a relativistic collapsing sphere: A numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A.; Barreto, W.

    2006-01-15

    We present a numerical model of a collapsing radiating sphere, whose boundary surface undergoes bouncing due to a decreasing of its inertial mass density (and, as expected from the equivalence principle, also of the 'gravitational' force term) produced by the 'inertial' term of the transport equation. This model exhibits for the first time the consequences of such an effect, and shows that under physically reasonable conditions this decreasing of the gravitational term in the dynamic equation may be large enough as to revert the collapse and produce a bouncing of the boundary surface of the sphere.

  2. Theoretical study of the freezing of polystyrene sphere suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical study of melting in aqueous suspensions of polystyrene spheres is presented. The Helmholtz free energies of the liquid and solid phase of the suspensions are calculated as functions of sphere number density and electrolyte concentrations. The results tend to show that the freezing curve of such suspensions is that of a conventional classical liquid with repulsive short-range interactions. The interactions can be treated satisfactorily within a slightly modified Debye-Hueckel approximation. The modifications include size correction and a correction for nonlinear screening. The results are confirmed by analogous calculations for the solid phase, and for the line along which liquid and solid free energies are equal.

  3. The Diverging Sphere and the Rib in Prompt Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; McGuire, E; Garza, R; Roeske, F; Vitello, P

    2002-05-03

    Steady state corner-turning in the rib is possible if R{sub 0}/R{sub 1} << 0.15, where R{sub 0} is the half-width and R{sub 1} the inner radius. For thicker ribs, the kinetics will further slow the turn. A steady state turn will have a symmetrical detonation front. The inverse radius relation appears to hold for the diverging sphere, at least for large radii. The reaction zone lengths for diverging spheres and ratesticks increase with the radius of curvature and are comparable.

  4. Nonlinear surface acoustic waves in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, Ronald Edward

    Model equations developed by Hamilton, Il'inskii, and Zabolotskaya [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 639-651 (1999)] are used to perform theoretical and numerical studies of nonlinear surface acoustic waves in a variety of nonpiezoelectric cubic crystals. The basic theory underlying the model equations is outlined, quasilinear solutions of the equations are derived, and expressions are developed for the shock formation distance and nonlinearity coefficient. A time-domain equation corresponding to the frequency-domain model equations is derived and shown to reduce to a time-domain equation introduced previously for Rayleigh waves [E. A. Zabolotskaya, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 91, 2569-2575 (1992)]. Numerical calculations are performed to predict the evolution of initially monofrequency surface waves in the (001), (110), and (111) planes of the crystals RbCl, KCl, NaCl, CaF2, SrF2, BaF2, C (diamond), Si, Ge, Al, Ni, Cu in the moverline 3m point group, and the crystals Cs-alum, NH4- alum, and K-alum in the moverline 3 point group. The calculations are based on measured second- and third- order elastic constants taken from the literature. Nonlinearity matrix elements which describe the coupling strength of harmonic interactions are shown to provide a powerful tool for characterizing waveform distortion. Simulations in the (001) and (110) planes show that in certain directions the velocity waveform distortion may change in sign, generation of one or more harmonies may be suppressed and shock formation postponed, or energy may be transferred rapidly to the highest harmonics and shock formation enhanced. Simulations in the (111) plane show that the nonlinearity matrix elements are generally complex-valued, which may lead to asymmetric distortion and the appearance of low frequency oscillations near the peaks and shocks in the velocity waveforms. A simple transformation based on the phase of the nonlinearity matrix is shown to provide a reasonable approximation of asymmetric waveform

  5. Neutron diffraction study of the atomic structure of cubic sodium-tungsten bronze (Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3}) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, I. V. Kalyukanov, A. I.; Volkov, V. L.; Ozerov, R. P.; Fykin, L. E.

    2011-05-15

    The atomic structure of a single crystal of one of four Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3} phases, which exist below 293 K, has been refined from neutron diffraction data (WWR-c reactor at the Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, Obninsk Branch; {lambda} = 1.168 Angstrom-Sign ; {lambda}/2 contribution < 0.8%; sin{theta}/{lambda} {<=} 0.810; T = 288 K; crystal sphere Empty-Set = 4.4 mm; cubic unit cell with a = 7.672 Angstrom-Sign , sp. gr. Im3, z = 8, {mu} = 1.9 mm{sup -1}). The Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3} atomic structure has been refined (198 independent reflections) taking into account the anisotropy of thermal vibrations (R{sub w} = 4.0%). The stoichiometric coefficient Na(0.69) is also refined. A structural distortion is revealed, which is characterized by the displacement of oxygen atoms (0, 0.2609(2), 0.2391(2)) from the ideal perovskite positions (0, 1/4, 1/4); this displacement doubles the ideal perovskite lattice period. The oxygen displacements can be described as rotations of oxygen octahedra by 3.58 Degree-Sign around the [111] direction. The structure remains cubic because the octahedra rotations with respect to all three perovskite cubic axes are identical.

  6. Investigations of superparamagnetism in magnesium ferrite nano-sphere synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique for hyperthermia application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Harinarayan; Sakamoto, Naonori; Aono, Hiromichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hisao; Wakiya, Naoki

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesized of magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4) nano-spheres by a single-step ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) technique from the aqueous metal nitrate precursor solution without any organic additives or post-annealing processes. The effects of different pyrolysis temperatures on the particles size, morphology and their superparamagnetic behavior have been investigated to evaluate the heat generation efficiency in an AC magnetic field. The X-ray powder diffraction spectra of MgFe2O4 nano-spheres synthesized at the pyrolysis temperatures of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C exhibited single phase cubic structure and obtained mean crystallite size (primary particles) of 4.05, 9.6, 15.97 and 31.48 nm, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirms that the particles consisted of aggregates of the primary crystallite had densely congested spherical morphology with extremely smooth surface appearance. Field emission electron microscopy (FESEM) reveals that the shape and size of the nano-spheres (secondary particles) does not change significantly but the degree of agglomeration between the secondary particles was reduced with increasing the pyrolysis temperature. The average size and size distribution of nano-spheres measured using electrophoretic scattering photometer have found very low polydispersity index (PDI) for all samples. The field dependent magnetization studies indicated superparamagnetic nature for the particles having crystallite size i.e. 4.05 and 9.6 nm and exhibited ferromagnetic nature for 15.97 and 31.48 nm. It is also demonstrated that, as the pyrolysis temperature increases, the saturation magnetization of the MgFe2O4 nanopowders increases due to enhancement of crystallites. The shift in Curie temperature is well described by the finite-size scaling formula. The magnetically loss heating values of selected samples in crystallite size of 9.6 and 15.97 nm were investigated by measuring the time dependent temperature

  7. Anisotropy effects in magnetic hyperthermia: A comparison between spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khurshid, H. E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Nemati, Z.; Phan, M. H.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H. E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Alonso, J.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.; Barandiarán, J. M.

    2015-05-07

    Spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, with different FeO:Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ratios, have been prepared by a thermal decomposition method to probe anisotropy effects on their heating efficiency. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanoparticles are composed of FeO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phases, with an average size of ∼20 nm. Magnetometry and transverse susceptibility measurements show that the effective anisotropy field is 1.5 times larger for the cubes than for the spheres, while the saturation magnetization is 1.5 times larger for the spheres than for the cubes. Hyperthermia experiments evidence higher values of the specific absorption rate (SAR) for the cubes as compared to the spheres (200 vs. 135 W/g at 600 Oe and 310 kHz). These observations point to an important fact that the saturation magnetization is not a sole factor in determining the SAR and the heating efficiency of the magnetic nanoparticles can be improved by tuning their effective anisotropy.

  8. Lattice matched crystalline substrates for cubic nitride semiconductor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed embodiments include methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and devices fabricated thereby. The methods include, but are not limited to, providing a substrate having a cubic crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter and growing a cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy layer on the cubic crystalline substrate by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The cubic crystalline group III-nitride alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter of the substrate (a). The group III-nitride alloy may be a cubic crystalline In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN alloy. The lattice parameter of the In.sub.xGa.sub.yAl.sub.1-x-yN or other group III-nitride alloy may be related to the substrate lattice parameter by (a')= 2(a) or (a')=(a)/ 2. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  9. Evolution of cubic membranes as antioxidant defence system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuru; Almsherqi, Zakaria A

    2015-08-01

    Possibly the best-characterized cubic membrane transition has been observed in the mitochondrial inner membranes of free-living giant amoeba (Chaos carolinense). In this ancient organism, the cells are able to survive in extreme environments such as lack of food, thermal and osmolarity fluctuations and high levels of reactive oxygen species. Their mitochondrial inner membranes undergo rapid changes in three-dimensional organization upon food depletion, providing a valuable model to study this subcellular adaptation. Our data show that cubic membrane is enriched with unique ether phospholipids, plasmalogens carrying very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we propose that these phospholipids may not only facilitate cubic membrane formation but may also provide a protective shelter to RNA. The potential interaction of cubic membrane with RNA may reduce the amount of RNA oxidation and promote more efficient protein translation. Thus, recognizing the role of cubic membranes in RNA antioxidant systems might help us to understand the adaptive mechanisms that have evolved over time in eukaryotes. PMID:26464785

  10. Evolution of cubic membranes as antioxidant defence system

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yuru; Almsherqi, Zakaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Possibly the best-characterized cubic membrane transition has been observed in the mitochondrial inner membranes of free-living giant amoeba (Chaos carolinense). In this ancient organism, the cells are able to survive in extreme environments such as lack of food, thermal and osmolarity fluctuations and high levels of reactive oxygen species. Their mitochondrial inner membranes undergo rapid changes in three-dimensional organization upon food depletion, providing a valuable model to study this subcellular adaptation. Our data show that cubic membrane is enriched with unique ether phospholipids, plasmalogens carrying very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we propose that these phospholipids may not only facilitate cubic membrane formation but may also provide a protective shelter to RNA. The potential interaction of cubic membrane with RNA may reduce the amount of RNA oxidation and promote more efficient protein translation. Thus, recognizing the role of cubic membranes in RNA antioxidant systems might help us to understand the adaptive mechanisms that have evolved over time in eukaryotes. PMID:26464785

  11. Optimizing packing fraction in granular media composed of overlapping spheres.

    PubMed

    Roth, Leah K; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-28

    What particle shape will generate the highest packing fraction when randomly poured into a container? In order to explore and navigate the enormous search space efficiently, we pair molecular dynamics simulations with artificial evolution. Arbitrary particle shape is represented by a set of overlapping spheres of varying diameter, enabling us to approximate smooth surfaces with a resolution proportional to the number of spheres included. We discover a family of planar triangular particles, whose packing fraction of ϕ ∼ 0.73 is among the highest experimental results for disordered packings of frictionless particles. We investigate how ϕ depends on the arrangement of spheres comprising an individual particle and on the smoothness of the surface. We validate the simulations with experiments using 3D-printed copies of the simplest member of the family, a planar particle consisting of three overlapping spheres with identical radius. Direct experimental comparison with 3D-printed aspherical ellipsoids demonstrates that the triangular particles pack exceedingly well not only in the limit of large system size but also when confined to small containers. PMID:26592541

  12. Elucidations on the Reciprocal Lattice and the Ewald Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foadi, J.; Evans, G.

    2008-01-01

    The reciprocal lattice is derived through the Fourier transform of a generic crystal lattice, as done previously in the literature. A few key derivations are this time handled in detail, and the connection with x-ray diffraction is clearly pointed out. The Ewald sphere is subsequently thoroughly explained and a few comments on its representation…

  13. Rowlinson’s concept of an effective hard sphere diameter

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Attention is drawn to John Rowlinson’s idea that the repulsive portion of the intermolecular interaction may be replaced by a temperature-dependent hard sphere diameter. It is this approximation that made the development of perturbation theory possible for realistic fluids whose intermolecular interactions have a steep, but finite, repulsion at short separations. PMID:20953320

  14. Determination of meteor flux distribution over the celestial sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Belkovich, O. I.; Filimonova, T. K.; Sidorov, V. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of determination of meteor flux density distribution over the celestial sphere is discussed. The flux density was derived from observations by radar together with measurements of angles of arrival of radio waves reflected from meteor trails. The role of small meteor showers over the sporadic background is shown.

  15. Interaction of two spheres settling in a linearly stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Matthieu; Toupoint, Clement; Ern, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    The settling dynamics of small objects in stratified fluids is important to understand the fate of the biomass in lakes or oceanic environments, for industrial applications such as waste-water disposal. More specifically, the interaction of two settling bodies is a fundamental problem recently studied numerically for spheres. Experimental results are needed for validation, especially at low and moderate values of the Reynolds number, for different values of the Froude number, the other parameter of interest. We present experimental results on the interaction of two spheres settling in a linearly stratified fluid. The settling dynamics is investigated by tracking their trajectories in three dimensions, using a pair of cameras imaging two perpendicular planes. Two typical cases are observed, the horizontal repulsion of particles initially aligned horizontally, and the Drafting-Kissing-Tumbling of spheres initially aligned vertically. The influence of the initial positions of the spheres, the Reynolds and Froude numbers, is investigated to quantify these effects and their robustness, in comparison to the dynamics in an homogeneous fluid.

  16. A nonstationary axially symmetric electromagnetic field in a moving sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestyak, V. A.; Tarlakovsky, D. V.

    2015-10-01

    Integral representations of series coefficients for components of an electromagnetic field with nuclei are formulated in the form of Green's functions. Approximate quasi-static analogs are used as these functions. An example of the translational motion of the sphere is presented. Explicit formulas for the components of the electromagnetic field are derived.

  17. Network and the Fragmentation of the Public Sphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassi, Sinikka

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on two main communication technology themes: debate on the contemporary cultural turn predicted by new technologies; and implications of that disputed turn for some core concepts of the public sphere. Presents a series of elemental analyses regarding whether the Internet strengthens the political model of representation and lobbyism rather…

  18. Passive control of a sphere by complex-shaped appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Olivieri, Stefano; Mazzino, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Appendages of various shapes and sizes (e.g. plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins) play an important role in dispersion and locomotion. In our previous work (Lacis, U. et al. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking. Nat. Commun. 5:5310, doi: 10.1038/ncomms6310, 2014), we showed that a free-falling cylinder with a splitter plate turns and drifts due to a symmetry-breaking instability (called inverted-pendulum instability or IPL). In other words, in a separated flow, the straight position of a short splitter plate is unstable and as a consequence a side force and a torque are induced on the cylinder. In this work, we seek the three-dimensional (3D) appendage shape (on a sphere at Re =200) that induces the largest drift of the sphere. We find that highly non-trivial shapes of appendages on a sphere increase the side force significantly compared to trivial shapes (such as an elliptic sheet). We also find that appendages may be designed to generate drift in either direction, that is, a free-falling sphere can drift either in the direction in which appendage is tilted or in the opposite direction depending on the particular geometry of the appendage. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind these optimal appendage shapes in the context of the IPL instability.

  19. Outer-Sphere Direction in Iridium C-H Borylation

    PubMed Central

    Roosen, Philipp C.; Kallepalli, Venkata A.; Chattopadhyay, Buddhadeb; Singleton, Daniel A.; Maleczka, Robert E.; Smith, Milton R.

    2013-01-01

    The NHBoc group affords ortho selective C–H borylations in arenes and alkenes. Experimental and computational studies support an outer sphere mechanism where the N–H proton hydrogen bonds to a boryl ligand oxygen. The regioselectivities are unique and complement those of directed ortho metalations. PMID:22703452

  20. Improved transmittance measurement with a magnesium oxide coated integrating sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. L.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Simple and convenient technique has been found for extending transmittance measurement capability of conventional magnesium oxide coated integrating sphere system at low (near ultraviolet) wavelengths. Technique can be used to determine effect of contaminants on window materials and can also be used for measurements on thermal control coatings and telescope mirrors.

  1. The Coulomb problem on a 3-sphere and Heun polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano; Yeghikyan, Vahagn

    2013-08-01

    The paper studies the quantum mechanical Coulomb problem on a 3-sphere. We present a special parametrization of the ellipto-spheroidal coordinate system suitable for the separation of variables. After quantization we get the explicit form of the spectrum and present an algebraic equation for the eigenvalues of the Runge-Lentz vector. We also present the wave functions expressed via Heun polynomials.

  2. The Coulomb problem on a 3-sphere and Heun polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Bellucci, Stefano; Yeghikyan, Vahagn

    2013-08-15

    The paper studies the quantum mechanical Coulomb problem on a 3-sphere. We present a special parametrization of the ellipto-spheroidal coordinate system suitable for the separation of variables. After quantization we get the explicit form of the spectrum and present an algebraic equation for the eigenvalues of the Runge-Lentz vector. We also present the wave functions expressed via Heun polynomials.

  3. Hydrodynamic capture of microswimmers into sphere-bound orbits.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke; Palacci, Jérémie; Braunschweig, Adam B; Shelley, Michael J; Zhang, Jun

    2014-03-21

    Self-propelled particles can exhibit surprising non-equilibrium behaviors, and how they interact with obstacles or boundaries remains an important open problem. Here we show that chemically propelled micro-rods can be captured, with little change in their speed, into close orbits around solid spheres resting on or near a horizontal plane. We show that this interaction between sphere and particle is short-range, occurring even for spheres smaller than the particle length, and for a variety of sphere materials. We consider a simple model, based on lubrication theory, of a force- and torque-free swimmer driven by a surface slip (the phoretic propulsion mechanism) and moving near a solid surface. The model demonstrates capture, or movement towards the surface, and yields speeds independent of distance. This study reveals the crucial aspects of activity–driven interactions of self-propelled particles with passive objects, and brings into question the use of colloidal tracers as probes of active matter. PMID:24800268

  4. Secondary Sphere Formation Enhances the Functionality of Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Jai; Lee, Ho-Jae; Youn, Seock-Won; Koh, Seok-Jin; Won, Joo-Yun; Chung, Yeon-Ju; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sae-Won; Lee, Eun Ju; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Hae-Young; Lee, Sang Hun; Ho, Won-Kyung; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Loss of cardiomyocytes impairs cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI). Recent studies suggest that cardiac stem/progenitor cells could repair the damaged heart. However, cardiac progenitor cells are difficult to maintain in terms of purity and multipotency when propagated in two-dimensional culture systems. Here, we investigated a new strategy that enhances potency and enriches progenitor cells. We applied the repeated sphere formation strategy (cardiac explant → primary cardiosphere (CS) formation → sphere-derived cells (SDCs) in adherent culture condition → secondary CS formation by three-dimensional culture). Cells in secondary CS showed higher differentiation potentials than SDCs. When transplanted into the infarcted myocardium, secondary CSs engrafted robustly, improved left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and reduced infarct sizes more than SDCs did. In addition to the cardiovascular differentiation of transplanted secondary CSs, robust vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) synthesis and secretion enhanced neovascularization in the infarcted myocardium. Microarray pathway analysis and blocking experiments using E-selectin knock-out hearts, specific chemicals, and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for each pathway revealed that E-selectin was indispensable to sphere initiation and ERK/Sp1/VEGF autoparacrine loop was responsible for sphere maturation. These results provide a simple strategy for enhancing cellular potency for cardiac repair. Furthermore, this strategy may be implemented to other types of stem/progenitor cell-based therapy. PMID:22713697

  5. Tangent Sphere Model. An Analog to Chemical Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Ethel L.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Tangent Sphere Model (TSM) in introducing chemical structure to beginning chemistry students at both the secondary school and college levels. Describes various applications of the use of such models, including instruction of the atom's kernel and valence electrons. (TW)

  6. "Sighting" the Public: Iconoclasm and Public Sphere Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnegan, Cara A.; Kang, Jiyeon

    2004-01-01

    This essay considers the ways that iconoclasm, or the will to control images and vision, appears in canonical and contemporary public sphere theory. John Dewey and Jurgen Habermas enact a paradoxical relation to visuality by repudiating a mass culture of images while preferring "good" images and vision. Yet even when advocating for good vision,…

  7. Superconducting Sphere in an External Magnetic Field Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sazonov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give the intelligible procedure for undergraduate students to grasp proof of the fact that the magnetic field outside the hollow superconducting sphere (superconducting shell) coincides with the field of a point magnetic dipole both when an uniform external magnetic field is applied as when a ferromagnetic sphere…

  8. The Polyakov relation for the sphere and higher genus surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menotti, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    The Polyakov relation, which in the sphere topology gives the changes of the Liouville action under the variation of the position of the sources, is also related in the case of higher genus to the dependence of the action on the moduli of the surface. We write and prove such a relation for genus 1 and for all hyperelliptic surfaces.

  9. Towards composite spheres as building blocks for structured molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lloyd L; Pellicane, Giuseppe

    2016-10-19

    In order to design a flexible molecular model that mimics the chemical moieties of a polyatomic molecule, we propose the 'composite-sphere' model that can assemble the essential elements to produce the structure of the target molecule. This is likened to the polymerization process where monomers assemble to form the polymer. The assemblage is built into the pair interaction potentials which can 'react' (figuratively) with selective pieces into various bonds. In addition, we preserve the spherical symmetries of the individual pair potentials so that the isotropic Ornstein-Zernike equation (OZ) for multi-component mixtures can be used as a theoretical framework. We first test our approach on generating a dumbbell molecule. An equimolar binary mixture of hard spheres and square-well spheres are allowed to react to form a dimer. As the bond length shrinks to zero, we create a site-site model of a Janus-like molecule with a repulsive moiety and an attractive moiety. We employ the zero-separation (ZSEP) closure to solve the OZ equations. The structure and thermodynamic properties are calculated at three isotherms and at several densities and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The close agreement achieved demonstrates that the ZSEP closure is a reliable theory for this composite-sphere fluid model. PMID:27546819

  10. A 4-Sphere With Noncentral Radius and its Instanton Sheaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirio, Lucio Simone; Pagani, Chiara

    2015-02-01

    We build an SU(2)-Hopf bundle over a quantum toric four-sphere whose radius is noncentral. The construction is carried out using local methods in terms of sheaves of Hopf-Galois extensions. The associated instanton bundle is presented and endowed with a connection with anti-self-dual curvature.

  11. Gravitation- And Conduction-Driven Melting In A Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    Simplifying assumptions lead to approximate closed-form solution. Theoretical paper discusses melting of solid sphere in spherical container. Develops mathematical model of melting process, based in part on simplifying assumptions like those used in theories of lubrication and film condensation. Resulting equation for melting speed as function of melting distance solved approximately in closed form.

  12. Dyadic Green's function of an eccentrically stratified sphere.

    PubMed

    Moneda, Angela P; Chrissoulidis, Dimitrios P

    2014-03-01

    The electric dyadic Green's function (dGf) of an eccentrically stratified sphere is built by use of the superposition principle, dyadic algebra, and the addition theorem of vector spherical harmonics. The end result of the analytical formulation is a set of linear equations for the unknown vector wave amplitudes of the dGf. The unknowns are calculated by truncation of the infinite sums and matrix inversion. The theory is exact, as no simplifying assumptions are required in any one of the analytical steps leading to the dGf, and it is general in the sense that any number, position, size, and electrical properties can be considered for the layers of the sphere. The point source can be placed outside of or in any lossless part of the sphere. Energy conservation, reciprocity, and other checks verify that the dGf is correct. A numerical application is made to a stratified sphere made of gold and glass, which operates as a lens. PMID:24690648

  13. FIRST Robotics, Gulfport High, StenniSphere, Bo Clarke, mentor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Bo Clarke, mentor for Gulfport High School's Team Fusion, offers strategy tips to students and coaches during the FIRST Robotics Competition kickoff held at StenniSphere on Jan. 7. Clarke is the lead building and infrastructure specialist for NASA's Shared Services Center at Stennis Space Center.

  14. Theory of the sphering of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Tong, P

    1968-02-01

    A rigorous mathematical solution of the sphering of a red blood cell is obtained under the assumptions that the red cells is a fluid-filled shell and that it can swell into a perfect sphere in an appropriate hypotonic medium. The solution is valid for finite strain of the cell membrane provided that the membrane is isotropic, elastic and incompressible. The most general nonlinear elastic stress-strain law for the membrane in a state of generalized plane stress is used. A necessary condition for a red cell to be able to sphere is that its extensional stiffness follow a specific distribution over the membrane. This distribution is strongly influenced by the surface tension in the cell membrane. A unique relation exists between the extensional stiffness, pressure differential, surface tension, and the ratio of the radius of the sphere to that of the undeformed red cell. The functional dependence of this stiffness distribution on various physical parameters is presented. A critique of some current literature on red cell mechanics is presented. PMID:5639934

  15. Fabrication of large area nanostructures with surface modified silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2014-03-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the CO stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  16. Temperature dependent surface modification of silica spheres with methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Jo, Dong-Hyun; Lim, Sae-Han; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Do-gyun

    2014-09-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the C=O stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  17. Can the Equivalent Sphere Model Approximate Organ Doses in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    For space radiation protection it is often useful to calculate dose or dose,equivalent in blood forming organs (BFO). It has been customary to use a 5cm equivalent sphere to. simulate the BFO dose. However, many previous studies have concluded that a 5cm sphere gives very different dose values from the exact BFO values. One study [1] . concludes that a 9 cm sphere is a reasonable approximation for BFO'doses in solar particle event environments. In this study we use a deterministic radiation transport [2] to investigate the reason behind these observations and to extend earlier studies. We take different space radiation environments, including seven galactic cosmic ray environments and six large solar particle events, and calculate the dose and dose equivalent in the skin, eyes and BFO using their thickness distribution functions from the CAM (Computerized Anatomical Man) model [3] The organ doses have been evaluated with a water or aluminum shielding of an areal density from 0 to 20 g/sq cm. We then compare with results from the equivalent sphere model and determine in which cases and at what radius parameters the equivalent sphere model is a reasonable approximation. Furthermore, we address why the equivalent sphere model is not a good approximation in some cases. For solar particle events, we find that the radius parameters for the organ dose equivalent increase significantly with the shielding thickness, and the model works marginally for BFO but is unacceptable for the eye or the skin. For galactic cosmic rays environments, the equivalent sphere model with an organ-specific constant radius parameter works well for the BFO dose equivalent, marginally well for the BFO dose and the dose equivalent of the eye or the skin, but is unacceptable for the dose of the eye or the skin. The ranges of the radius parameters are also being investigated, and the BFO radius parameters are found to be significantly, larger than 5 cm in all cases, consistent with the conclusion of

  18. Phase conversion from hexagonal CuS(y)Se(1-y) to cubic Cu(2-x)S(y)Se(1-y): composition variation, morphology evolution, optical tuning, and solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Yang, Xia; Yang, Qingdan; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2014-09-24

    In this work, we report a simple and low-temperature approach for the controllable synthesis of ternary Cu-S-Se alloys featuring tunable crystal structures, compositions, morphologies, and optical properties. Hexagonal CuS(y)Se(1-y) nanoplates and face centered cubic (fcc) Cu(2-x)S(y)Se(1-y) single-crystal-like stacked nanoplate assemblies are synthesized, and their phase conversion mechanism is well investigated. It is found that both copper content and chalcogen composition (S/Se atomic ratio) of the Cu-S-Se alloys are tunable during the phase conversion process. Formation of the unique single-crystal-like stacked nanoplate assemblies is resulted from oriented stacking coupled with the Ostwald ripening effect. Remarkably, optical tuning for continuous red shifts of both the band-gap absorption and the near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonance are achieved. Furthermore, the novel Cu-S-Se alloys are utilized for the first time as highly efficient counter electrodes (CEs) in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), showing outstanding electrocatalytic activity for polysulfide electrolyte regeneration and yielding a 135% enhancement in power conversion efficiency (PCE) as compared to the noble metal Pt counter electrode. PMID:25162581

  19. High-temperature fiber optic cubic-zirconia pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei; Pickrell, Gary R.; Wang, Anbo

    2005-12-01

    There is a critical need for pressure sensors that can operate reliably at high temperatures in many industrial segments such as in the combustion section of gas turbine engines for both transportation and power generation, coal gasifiers, coal fired boilers, etc. Optical-based sensors are particularly attractive for the measurement of a wide variety of physical and chemical parameters in high-temperature and high-pressure industrial environments due to their small size and immunity to electromagnetic interference. A fiber optic pressure sensor utilizing single-crystal cubic zirconia as the sensing element is reported. The pressure response of this sensor has been measured at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Additional experimental results show that cubic zirconia could be used for pressure sensing at temperatures over 1000 °C. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a novel cubic-zirconia sensor for pressure measurement at high temperatures.

  20. Use of Pom Pons To Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-07-01

    In general chemistry classes, students are introduced to the ways in which atoms are arranged in cubic crystal structures. Transposing the textbook illustrations into three dimensional structures is difficult for some students. This transitions is easier if a three dimensional model is available for examination. Several 3D models are cited. A quick to assemble, inexpensive, colorful, and durable alternative to these models and styrofoam balls is the use of olefin pom pons. Different sized pom pons can be used to demonstrate how the atomic radius will vary when comparing the different types of cubic crystal unit cells. Being made of a coarse material, pom pons can be stacked to illustrate different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. Pom pons make great atoms.