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1

Modeling Human Dynamics of Face-to-Face Interaction Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of interconversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents that perform a random walk in a two-dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

Starnini, Michele; Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

2013-04-01

2

Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks.  

PubMed

Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of interconversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents that perform a random walk in a two-dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks. PMID:23679648

Starnini, Michele; Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

2013-04-15

3

Research focus: Interactional aspects of spoken face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have a visionary goal: to learn enough about human face-to-face interaction that we are able to create an artificial conversational partner that is human-like. We take the opportunity here to present four new projects inaugurated in 2010, each adding pieces of the puzzle through a shared research focus: interactional aspects of spoken face-to-face communication.

J. Beskow; J. Edlund; J. Gustafson; M. Heldner; A. Hjalmarsson; D. House

2010-01-01

4

A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Electronic Peer-Mentoring: Interactions with Mentor Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study compared the relative impact of peer-mentoring that took place either face-to-face or through electronic chat. Proteges were 106 college freshmen randomly assigned to a senior college student mentor and to one of the two communication modes. Fifty-one mentors interacted with one of these proteges face-to-face and one solely…

Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.; Scielzo, Shannon A.; Yarbrough, Charyl S.; Rosopa, Patrick J.

2008-01-01

5

A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Electronic Peer-Mentoring: Interactions with Mentor Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study compared the relative impact of peer-mentoring that took place either face-to-face or through electronic chat. Proteges were 106 college freshmen randomly assigned to a senior college student mentor and to one of the two communication modes. Fifty-one mentors interacted with one of these proteges face-to-face and one solely…

Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.; Scielzo, Shannon A.; Yarbrough, Charyl S.; Rosopa, Patrick J.

2008-01-01

6

Supporting face-to-face communications through interactive toys space  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the design and implementation of a low-cost vision-based system called interactive toys environment that turns small toys-like objects into interactive tools acting as interfaces between the computer and its users (i.e. Human-Computer Interaction) and between users themselves (i.e. Human-Human Interaction). Group members collaboratively work or play by grasping and moving multiple physical objects (i.e. toys) on a

E. Kanjo; P. Astheimer; I. M. Marshall

2004-01-01

7

A comparison of face-to-face and electronic peer-mentoring: Interactions with mentor gender  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study compared the relative impact of peer-mentoring that took place either face-to-face or through electronic chat. Protégés were 106 college freshmen randomly assigned to a senior college student mentor and to one of the two communication modes. Fifty-one mentors interacted with one of these proteges face-to-face and one solely through electronic chat. Electronic chat resulted in less psychosocial

Kimberly A. Smith-Jentsch; Shannon A. Scielzo; Charyl S. Yarbrough; Patrick J. Rosopa

2008-01-01

8

A proposed study examining the effects of social networking use on face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although social networking tools have become pervasive, few studies have examined their potential downsides. In this proposed study, we examine the effects of Facebook on the friendship-making activities of college students. We hypothesize that increased social networking use will reduce the time that students spend face to face with their friends, as well as reduce the social connectedness with their

Mark A. Serva; Michelle Barineau

2011-01-01

9

Learning, Interactional, and Motivational Outcomes in One-to-One Synchronous Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Tutoring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Face-to-face (FTF) human-human tutoring has ranked among the most effective forms of instruction. However, because computer-mediated (CM) tutoring is becoming increasingly common, it is instructive to evaluate its effectiveness relative to face-to-face tutoring. Does the lack of spoken, face-to-face interaction affect learning gains and…

Siler, Stephanie Ann; VanLehn, Kurt

2009-01-01

10

An Interactive Table for Supporting Participation Balance in Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe an interactive table designed for supporting face-to-face collaborative learning. The table, Reflect, addresses the issue of unbalanced participation during group discussions. By displaying on its surface, a shared visualization of member participation, Reflect, is meant to encourage participants to avoid the extremes of over and underparticipation. We report on a user study that validates some of our hypotheses

Khaled Bachour; Frédéric Kaplan; Pierre Dillenbourg

2010-01-01

11

Pair Interactions and Mode of Communication: Comparing Face-to-Face and Computer Mediated Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In today's second language classrooms, students are often asked to work in pairs or small groups. Such collaboration can take place face-to-face, but now more often via computer mediated communication. This paper reports on a study which investigated the effect of the medium of communication on the nature of pair interaction. The study involved…

Tan, Lan Liana; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Storch, Neomy

2010-01-01

12

Discourse Management Strategies in Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Decision Making Interactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Compares discourse management strategies in face-to-face and computer-mediated interactions involving four decision-making tasks. Examines these issues in qualitative and quantitative analyses of data using an utterance-unit coding system to identify discourse functions. Finds that participants compensate for decreased efficiency by adopting…

Condon, Sherri L.; Cech, Claude G.

1996-01-01

13

Internet Communication versus Face-to-Face Interaction in Quality of Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study seeks to understand the role of the Internet in quality of life (QoL). Specifically, it examines the question of whether Internet communication serves, like face-to-face interactions, to enhance quality of life. It is hypothesized that the use of the Internet for interpersonal communication can improve quality of life among Internet…

Lee, Paul S. N.; Leung, Louis; Lo, Venhwei; Xiong, Chengyu; Wu, Tingjun

2011-01-01

14

The Benefits of Face-to-Face Interaction in the Online Freshman Composition Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article recommends that instructors of online freshman composition courses incorporate actual or simulated face-to-face meetings and one-on-one conferences into their curriculums in order to improve the sense of community in the online classroom, mitigate issues with accountability, encourage exploratory discussion, engage diverse learning styles, improve student-instructor interaction, and increase their efficiency as an instructor. With the support of literature,

Samuel B Howard

2009-01-01

15

The Collaborative Language Learning Attributes of Cyber Face-to-Face Interaction: The Perspectives of the Learner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article examines the degrees of collaborative language learning that were supported in cyber face-to-face interaction. The concept of "cyber face-to-face" is used here to encapsulate the kind of environment in which a combination of real-time oral/aural, visual, and text-based interaction happens simultaneously via the various features in an…

Wang, Yuping; Chen, Nian-Shing

2012-01-01

16

Experimental comparisons of face-to-face and anonymous real-time team competition in a networked gaming learning environment.  

PubMed

This study investigates the impact of anonymous, computerized, synchronized team competition on students' motivation, satisfaction, and interpersonal relationships. Sixty-eight fourth-graders participated in this study. A synchronous gaming learning system was developed to have dyads compete against each other in answering multiple-choice questions set in accordance with the school curriculum in two conditions (face-to-face and anonymous). The results showed that students who were exposed to the anonymous team competition condition responded significantly more positively than those in the face-to-face condition in terms of motivation and satisfaction at the 0.050 and 0.056 levels respectively. Although further studies regarding the effects of anonymous interaction in a networked gaming learning environment are imperative, the positive effects detected in this preliminary study indicate that anonymity is a viable feature for mitigating the negative effects that competition may inflict on motivation and satisfaction as reported in traditional face-to-face environments. PMID:18721101

Yu, Fu-Yun; Han, Chialing; Chan, Tak-Wai

2008-08-01

17

Engaging Students: Interactive Teaching Strategies for Face-to-Face and Online Classes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Have you ever experienced a lull in your classroom, virtual or face-to-face? What is it that teachers and learners bring to the face-to-face classroom that is difficult to replicate or support in an online environment and keep students engaged? \\

Phyllis Gimbel; Deborah Sheehy

2011-01-01

18

THE IMPACT OF TEAM EMPOWERMENT ON VIRTUAL TEAM PERFORMANCE: THE MODERATING ROLE OF FACE-TO-FACE INTERACTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the relationship between team empowerment and virtual team performance and the moderating role of the extent of face-to-face interaction using 35 sales and service virtual teams in a high-technology organization. Team empowerment was positively related to two independent assessments of virtual team performance— process improvement and customer satisfaction. Further, the number of face-to-face meetings moderated the relationship between

Bradley L. Kirkman; BENSON ROSEN; PAUL E. TESLUK; CRISTINA B. GIBSON

2004-01-01

19

Psychophysiological effects of emotional dissonance in a face-to-face service interaction.  

PubMed

Current research demonstrates that requirements to express emotions which are not genuinely felt in the particular situation (emotional dissonance) are associated with negative long and short-term effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate: (a) the psychophysiological short-term effects of emotional dissonance in a face-to-face service interaction and (b) the moderating role of gender and neuroticism. In total, 32 women and 27 men were instructed to play the role of a service employee, who had to interact with an angry and rude customer. Half of the sample was given information that the organization expected them to be friendly (emotional dissonance), the other half was told they were expected to act naturally and show their genuine feelings (no emotional dissonance). Subjective and behavioral responses revealed that participants in the "friendly" condition modulated their emotional expressions to a greater extent than those in the "naturally" condition. Participants in the "friendly" condition showed stronger systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses. Furthermore, hierarchical regression analyses yielded that gender and neuroticism partly moderated the association between emotional dissonance and participants' psychophysiological response. PMID:19787487

Hopp, Henrik; Rohrmann, Sonja; Zapf, Dieter; Hodapp, Volker

2010-07-01

20

Sound perfume: designing a wearable sound and fragrance media for face-to-face interpersonal interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sound and smell can sometimes generate stronger emotional feelings than words can. They can even sometimes awaken strong, long forgotten memories. The Sound Perfume system provides users with additional auditory and olfactory sensory inputs through a pair of glasses, to augment their unique identities and impressions to others during face-to-face interpersonal communication. When a user starts a conversation with another

Yongsoon Choi; Adrian David Cheok; Xavier Roman; Kenichi Sugimoto; Veronica Halupka

2011-01-01

21

Cross-cultural deception in social networking sites and face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deception research has been primarily studied from a Western perspective, so very little is known regarding how other cultures view deception. Cross-cultural deception research is important due to the escalation of cross-cultural communication. Therefore, this study proposes a framework for understanding the role Korean and American culture plays in deceptive behavior for both face-to-face (FTF) and computer-mediated communication (CMC). The

Carmen C. Lewis; Joey F. George

2008-01-01

22

Emmanuel Levinas & Paulo Freire: The Ethics of Responsibility for the Face-to-Face Interaction in the Virtual World  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The objective of this work is a reflection on the ethics of education on the net as a contribution to the face-to-face interaction in the virtual world. We think the ethics is a result of a process of responsible interchange with others. Two important thinkers of the last few decades, Emmanuel Levinas e Paulo Freire contribute each one with one's…

Gomez, Margarita Victoria

2009-01-01

23

EMMANUEL LEVINAS & PAULO FREIRE: THE ETHICS OF RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE FACE-TO-FACE INTERACTION IN THE VIRTUAL WORLD  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this work is a reflection on the ethics of education on the net as a contribution to the face-to-face interaction in the virtual world. We think the ethics is a result of a process of responsible interchange with others. Two important thinkers of the last few decades, Emmanuel Levinas e Paulo Freire contribute each one with one's

Margarita Victoria Gomez

2009-01-01

24

Reflect: An Interactive Table for Regulating Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

In face-to-face collaborative learning, unbalanced participation often leads to the undersirable result of some participants\\u000a experiencing lower learning outcomes than others. Providing feedback to the participants on the level of their participation\\u000a could have a positive effect on their ability to self-regulate, leading to a more balanced collaboration. We propose a new\\u000a approach for providing this feedback that takes the

Khaled Bachour; Frédéric Kaplan; Pierre Dillenbourg

2008-01-01

25

UbiTable: Impromptu Face-to-Face Collaboration on Horizontal Interactive Surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the mobility enabled by the plethora of technological tools such as laptops, PDA and cell phones, horizontal flat surfaces are still exten- sively used and much preferred for on-the-move face-to-face collaboration. Un- fortunately, when digital documents need to be shared during collaboration, people are still mostly constrained to display surfaces that have been designed for single users, such as

Chia Shen; Katherine Everitt; Kathleen Ryall

2003-01-01

26

Intentional and unintentional consequences of substituting face-to-face interaction with e-mail: An employee-based perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we undertake empirical research into e-mail communication in the workplace to provide organizations with practical information about how employees can effectively manage their e-mail interactions. We employ an interpretative, qualitative methodology to examine their views of e-mail. Specifically, we consider the interaction between this and traditional face-to-face (F2F) contact. The- oretical ideas are subject to empirical scrutiny

Paula O’Kane; Owen Hargie

2007-01-01

27

Poster: Physically-based natural hand and tangible AR interaction for face-to-face collaboration on a tabletop  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present an AR framework that allows natural hand and tangible AR interaction for physically-based interaction and environment awareness to support face-to-face collaboration using Microsoft Kinect. Our framework comprises of six major components: (1) marker tracking (2) depth acquisition (3) image processing (4) physics simulation (5) communication and (6) rendering. The resulting augmented environment supports occlusion, shadows,

Thammathip Piumsomboon; Adrian Clark; Atsushi Umakatsu; Mark Billinghurst

2012-01-01

28

Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Interaction: The Sequence of Dyadic States at 3, 6, and 9 Months  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three untested hypotheses are central to the theory of Brazelton and colleagues about the sequential structure of mother-infant face-to-face interaction: (1) Interactions begin with the mother’s positively eliciting her infant’s attention; (2) maternal positive expression precedes the onset of infant’s positive expression; and (3) when the infant becomes positive, the mother will remain positive until the infant again becomes disengaged.

Jeffrey F. Cohn; Edward Z. Tronick

1987-01-01

29

Mobilizing Homeless Youth for HIV Prevention: A Social Network Analysis of the Acceptability of a Face-to-Face and Online Social Networking Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth. Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F…

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Adhikari, Anamika Barman; Milburn, Norweeta G.

2012-01-01

30

Mobilizing Homeless Youth for HIV Prevention: A Social Network Analysis of the Acceptability of a Face-to-Face and Online Social Networking Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth. Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F…

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Adhikari, Anamika Barman; Milburn, Norweeta G.

2012-01-01

31

Live face-to-face interaction during fMRI: a new tool for social cognitive neuroscience  

PubMed Central

Cooperative social interaction is critical for human social development and learning. Despite the importance of social interaction, previous neuroimaging studies lack two fundamental components of everyday face-to-face interactions: contingent responding and joint attention. In the current studies, functional MRI data were collected while participants interacted with a human experimenter face-to-face via live video feed as they engaged in simple cooperative games. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in a live interaction with the experimenter (“Live”) or watched a video of the same interaction (“Recorded”). During the “Live” interaction, as compared to the Recorded conditions, greater activation was seen in brain regions involved in social cognition and reward, including the right temporo-parietal junction (rTPJ), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), right superior temporal sulcus (rSTS), ventral striatum, and amygdala. Experiment 2 isolated joint attention, a critical component of social interaction. Participants either followed the gaze of the live experimenter to a shared target of attention (“Joint Attention”) or found the target of attention alone while the experimenter was visible but not sharing attention (“Solo Attention”). The right temporo-parietal junction and right posterior STS were differentially recruited during Joint, as compared to Solo, attention. These findings suggest the rpSTS and rTPJ are key regions for both social interaction and joint attention. This method of allowing online, contingent social interactions in the scanner could open up new avenues of research in social cognitive neuroscience, both in typical and atypical populations.

Redcay, Elizabeth; Dodell-Feder, David; Pearrow, Mark J.; Mavros, Penelope L.; Kleiner, Mario; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Saxe, Rebecca

2010-01-01

32

A Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Basic Pharmacokinetics and the Significance of Face-to-Face Interaction  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess pharmacy students' attitudes towards a blended-learning pharmacokinetics course. Design Narrated visual presentations and animations that illustrated kinetic processes and guided students through the use of software programs used for calculations were created. Other learning techniques used included online self-assessment quizzes, practice problem sets, and weekly face-to-face problem-solving tutorials. Assessment A precourse questionnaire to assess students' level of enthusiasm towards the blended-learning course and to solicit any concerns they had was administered at the beginning of the course. A postcourse questionnaire that included the same 4 Likert-scale items from the precourse questionnaire and follow-up open-ended questions was administered. Individual changes in level of enthusiasm were compared for individuals who completed both the precourse and postcourse questionnaire. Students' concerns about the blended method of learning had decreased postcourse while their enthusiasm for the benefits of blended learning had increased. Conclusion Students' initial concerns about the blended learning experience were focused on their ability to communicate with the instructor about the online components, but shifted to their own time management skills at the end of the course. Face-to-face interactions with each other and with the instructor were more highly rated than online interactions in this course.

Holbrook, Jane

2010-01-01

33

From Chatterbots to Natural Interaction - Face to Face Communication with Embodied Conversational Agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY In this paper, we present a game of dice that combines multi-party communication with a tangible interface. The game has been used as a testbed to study typical conversational behav- ior patterns in interactions between human users and synthetic agents. In particular, we were interested in the question to what extent the interaction with the agent can be considered

Matthias Rehm; Elisabeth André

2005-01-01

34

The effects of physical deviance upon face-to-face interaction: The other side  

Microsoft Academic Search

Explored the behavioral output of 30 disabled male patients in interaction with a confederate appearing to be normal or disabled. Using a modified procedure of previous studies where it was found that physically normal persons contribute nonverbal cues of \\

Ronald J. Comer; Jane A. Piliavin

1972-01-01

35

Face-to-face emotion interaction studies in Down syndrome infants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infants with Down syndrome constitute an ideal population for analysing the development of emotional expression from the first months of life, due basically to the fact that this chromosomal alteration is identifiable from birth and results in well-known difficulties of cognitive development and in basic learning processes. Taking into account the functional aspects of facial expression during initial social interaction,

Fernando Carvajal; Jaime Iglesias

2002-01-01

36

Cognitive behavioural therapy: from face to face interaction to a broader contextual understanding of change.  

PubMed

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is increasingly used to address the emotional and interpersonal problems of people with ID. There is a limited but promising evidence base supporting this activity. However, these individuals face real and continuing challenges in their lives that have implications for their self and interpersonal perceptions. These adversities have implications for the adaptation of CBT. First, it may mean that characteristically negative perceptions may be more common and may be the result of a complex interaction with a truly aversive environment and should not simply be considered as cognitive distortions. Secondly, clients may have limited control over their everyday lives, with limited opportunity to negotiate change with their informal and formal sources of support. This review suggests that it is important to consider the interpersonal context of therapy both to ensure effective work within sessions and to enable real change in clients' everyday lives. The review draws upon Vygotsky's theory of the zone of proximal development and ecological models of change to consider the challenges of establishing collaborative relationships and the potential to use CBT within a broad psychosocial model. The aim is to offer a helpful framework for practitioners and to identify directions for future research. PMID:19627425

Jahoda, A; Dagnan, D; Stenfert Kroese, B; Pert, C; Trower, P

2009-07-20

37

Communication competence, social support, and depression among college students: a model of facebook and face-to-face support network influence.  

PubMed

This study examined the influence of the social networking site Facebook and face-to-face support networks on depression among (N = 361) college students. The authors used the Relational Health Communication Competence Model as a framework for examining the influence of communication competence on social support network satisfaction and depression. Moreover, they examined the influence of interpersonal and social integrative motives as exogenous variables. On the basis of previous work, the authors propose and test a theoretical model using structural equation modeling. The results indicated empirical support for the model, with interpersonal motives predicting increased face-to-face and computer-mediated competence, increased social support satisfaction with face-to-face and Facebook support, and lower depression scores. The implications of the findings for theory, key limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23030518

Wright, Kevin B; Rosenberg, Jenny; Egbert, Nicole; Ploeger, Nicole A; Bernard, Daniel R; King, Shawn

2012-10-03

38

Prosodic Modification and Vocal Adjustments in Mothers' Speech during Face-to-Face Interaction with Their Two- to Four-Month-Old Infants: A Double Video Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine 32 mothers' sensitivity to social contingency during face-to-face interaction with their two- to four-month-old infants in a closed circuit TV set-up. Prosodic qualities and vocal sounds in mother's infant-directed (ID) speech during sequences of live interaction were compared to sequences where expressive…

Braarud, Hanne Cecilie; Stormark, Kjell Morten

2008-01-01

39

Hard to "tune in": neural mechanisms of live face-to-face interaction with high-functioning autistic spectrum disorder  

PubMed Central

Persons with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are known to have difficulty in eye contact (EC). This may make it difficult for their partners during face to face communication with them. To elucidate the neural substrates of live inter-subject interaction of ASD patients and normal subjects, we conducted hyper-scanning functional MRI with 21 subjects with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) paired with typically-developed (normal) subjects, and with 19 pairs of normal subjects as a control. Baseline EC was maintained while subjects performed real-time joint-attention task. The task-related effects were modeled out, and inter-individual correlation analysis was performed on the residual time-course data. ASD–Normal pairs were less accurate at detecting gaze direction than Normal–Normal pairs. Performance was impaired both in ASD subjects and in their normal partners. The left occipital pole (OP) activation by gaze processing was reduced in ASD subjects, suggesting that deterioration of eye-cue detection in ASD is related to impairment of early visual processing of gaze. On the other hand, their normal partners showed greater activity in the bilateral occipital cortex and the right prefrontal area, indicating a compensatory workload. Inter-brain coherence in the right IFG that was observed in the Normal-Normal pairs (Saito et al., 2010) during EC diminished in ASD–Normal pairs. Intra-brain functional connectivity between the right IFG and right superior temporal sulcus (STS) in normal subjects paired with ASD subjects was reduced compared with in Normal–Normal pairs. This functional connectivity was positively correlated with performance of the normal partners on the eye-cue detection. Considering the integrative role of the right STS in gaze processing, inter-subject synchronization during EC may be a prerequisite for eye cue detection by the normal partner.

Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Saito, Daisuke N.; Koike, Takahiko; Hayashi, Masamichi J.; Izuma, Keise; Komeda, Hidetsugu; Ishitobi, Makoto; Omori, Masao; Munesue, Toshio; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Wada, Yuji; Sadato, Norihiro

2012-01-01

40

The study of emotional processes in communication: I. Measuring emotionalization in everyday face-to-face communicative interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The drawbacks of traditional research into emotional processes have led us to develop a set of methodologies for investigating\\u000a them in everyday face-to-face communication. The conceptual basis of these procedures is a model of the eliciting conditions\\u000a of emotional processes as well as a conceptualization of the emotional processes themselves. On the basis of the assumption\\u000a of conversation as a

Marie-Louise Käsermann; Andreas Altorfer; Klaus Foppa; Stefan Jossen; Heinrich Zimmermann

2000-01-01

41

Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth.Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F recruited online youth (OY) to participate in MySpace and Facebook communities where digital media was disseminated and discussed. The resulting social networks were assessed with respect to size, growth, density, relative centrality of positions and homophily of ties. Seven PL, 53 F2F and 103 OY created two large networks. After the first 50 F2F youth participated, online networks entered a rapid growth phase. OY were among the most central youth in these networks. Younger aged persons and females were disproportionately connected to like youth. The program appears highly acceptable to homeless youth. Social network analysis revealed which PL were the most critical to the program and which types of participants (younger youth and females) may require additional outreach efforts in the future.

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Barman Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G.

2012-01-01

42

Student Perceptions of the Instructor's Relational Characteristics, the Classroom Communication Experience, and the Interaction Involvement in Face-to-Face versus Video Conference Instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined student perceptions of the instructor's relational characteristics, classroom communication experience, and interaction involvement in courses taken face-to-face and in a video conference context. MANCOVA results showed significant differences between these contexts, with more negative student ratings of instructor immediacy and receptivity; classroom communication connectedness=mutuality, satisfaction, and quality; and interaction involvement occurring in the video conference classroom

Laura R. Umphrey; Jeffrey A. Wickersham; John C. Sherblom

2008-01-01

43

Social aspects of music and interactive technologies in facilitating face-to-face interactions in third places  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging communication technologies are fundamentally changing our social lives. The relationships between our new digital and traditional physical social activities are changing dynamically, continuously evolving, rapidly integrating with one another. This paper describes research motivation and work-in-progress towards an investigation of social aspects of music and interactive technologies within the context of 'third' places such as bars, cafes, clubs, etc.

Mayur Karnik

2011-01-01

44

Developing Students' Metacognitive Awareness in Asynchronous Learning Networks in Comparison to Face-to-Face Discussion Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main goal of the present study is to investigate empirically the effects of Asynchronic Learning Network (ALN) embedded within metacognitive instruction (META) on two components of metacognitive awareness: Knowledge about Cognition (KC) and Regulation of Cognition (RC). Participants were 202 tenth grade students: 102 students who studied under…

Michalsky, Tova; Zion, Michal; Mevarech, Zemira R.

2007-01-01

45

Friending, IMing, and Hanging Out Face-to-Face: Overlap in Adolescents' Online and Offline Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many new and important developmental issues are encountered during adolescence, which is also a time when Internet use becomes increasingly popular. Studies have shown that adolescents are using these online spaces to address developmental issues, especially needs for intimacy and connection to others. Online communication with its potential for interacting with unknown others, may put teens at increased risk. Two

Stephanie M. Reich; Kaveri Subrahmanyam; Guadalupe Espinoza

2012-01-01

46

Between Michel Foucault and Erving Goffman: between discourse in the abstract and face-to-face interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Michel Foucault's ‘archaeology’ and Erving Goffman's interpersonal sociology are complementary. Both are essential for understanding how classifications of people interact with the people classified, and hence for the author's studies of ‘making up people’. The paper begins by explaining how that project is rooted in an ‘existentialist’ conception of the person. It then uses Goffman's Asylums and Foucault's Folie et

Ian Hacking

2004-01-01

47

Speech and face-to-face communication - An introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This issue focuses on face-to-face speech communication. Research works have demonstrated that this communicative situation is essential to language acquisition and development (e.g. naming). Face-to-face communication is in fact much more than speaking and speech is greatly influenced both in substance and content by this essential form of communication.Face-to-face communication is multimodal: interacting involves multimodality and nonverbal communication to a

Marion Dohen; Jean-Luc Schwartz; Gérard Bailly

2010-01-01

48

EFFECTS OF MATERNAL DEPRESSION AND PANIC DISORDER ON MOTHER-INFANT INTERACTIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE FACE-TO-FACE STILL-FACE PARADIGM  

PubMed Central

The present study evaluated the interactive behavior of three groups of mothers and their 3-month-old infants in the Face-to-Face Still-Face paradigm. The mothers had either a clinical diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD, n = 33) with no comorbidity, a clinical diagnosis of panic disorder (PD, n = 13) with no comorbidity, or no clinical diagnosis (n = 48). The sample was selected to be at otherwise low social and medical risk, and all mothers with PD or MDD were in treatment. The findings indicated that (a) infants of mothers with PD or MDD displayed the traditional still-face and reunion effects described in previous research with nonclinical samples; (b) the 3-month-old infants in this study showed similar, but not identical, gender effects to those described for older infants; and (c) there were no patterns of maternal or infant interactive behavior that were unique to the PD, MDD, or control groups. These results are discussed in light of mothers’ risk status, receipt of treatment, severity of illness, and comorbidity of PD and MDD.

Weinberg, M. Katherine; Beeghly, Marjorie; Olson, Karen L.; Tronick, Edward

2011-01-01

49

Neural synchronization during face-to-face communication.  

PubMed

Although the human brain may have evolutionarily adapted to face-to-face communication, other modes of communication, e.g., telephone and e-mail, increasingly dominate our modern daily life. This study examined the neural difference between face-to-face communication and other types of communication by simultaneously measuring two brains using a hyperscanning approach. The results showed a significant increase in the neural synchronization in the left inferior frontal cortex during a face-to-face dialog between partners but none during a back-to-back dialog, a face-to-face monologue, or a back-to-back monologue. Moreover, the neural synchronization between partners during the face-to-face dialog resulted primarily from the direct interactions between the partners, including multimodal sensory information integration and turn-taking behavior. The communicating behavior during the face-to-face dialog could be predicted accurately based on the neural synchronization level. These results suggest that face-to-face communication, particularly dialog, has special neural features that other types of communication do not have and that the neural synchronization between partners may underlie successful face-to-face communication. PMID:23136442

Jiang, Jing; Dai, Bohan; Peng, Danling; Zhu, Chaozhe; Liu, Li; Lu, Chunming

2012-11-01

50

Conversational Argumentation in Decision Making: Chinese and U.S. Participants in Face-to-Face and Instant-Messaging Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates cultural and communication medium effects on conversational argumentation in a decision-making context. Chinese and U.S. participants worked in pairs on two decision-making tasks via face-to-face (FtF) and instant messaging (IM). The analyses showed that Chinese participants tended to engage in potentially more complex…

Stewart, Craig O.; Setlock, Leslie D.; Fussell, Susan R.

2007-01-01

51

Topicality and the structure of interactive talk in face?to?face seminar discussions: implications for research in distributed learning media  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the structure of topic movement within face?to?face postgraduate university seminar discussion forums through a conversation analytic approach. The analysis of 12 audio recordings of seminars showed that in spite of clear differences in the management style of sessions by seminar leaders there were important consistencies in their normative structure of participation. Previous research has shown that the

Will Gibson; Andy Hall; Peter Callery

2006-01-01

52

Gaze, conversational agents and face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe two series of experiments that examine audiovisual face-to-face interaction between naive human viewers and either a human interlocutor or a virtual conversational agent. The main objective is to analyze the interplay between speech activity and mutual gaze patterns during mediated face-to-face interactions. We first quantify the impact of deictic gaze patterns of our agent. We

Gérard Bailly; Stephan Raidt; Frédéric Elisei

2010-01-01

53

Face-to-face stacks of trinuclear gold(I) trihalides with benzene, hexafluorobenzene, and borazine: impact of aromaticity on stacking interactions.  

PubMed

The interplay of electrostatics, charge transfer, and dispersion forces contributing to the interaction energies in 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 binary stacks of the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) (X = F, Cl, Br, I) clusters with benzene, hexafluorobenzene, or borazine were investigated by employing a multitude of electronic structure computational techniques. The molecular and electronic structures, stabilities, bonding features, and magnetotropicity of [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](n)(L)(m) (X = halide; L = C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6); n, m ? 2) columnar binary stacks have been investigated by DFT calculations employing the M05-2X functional. The novel binary stacks could be considered as the building blocks of extended columnar supramolecular assemblies formulated as {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](C(6)H(6))}(?), {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](2)(C(6)F(6))}(?), and {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](B(3)N(3)H(6))(2)}(?). In all binary stacks, with a few exceptions, the plane of the alternating c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) and L (C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6)) stacking participants adopt an almost parallel face-to-face (pff) orientation. The observed trends in the intermolecular distances R in the [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](n)(L)(m) (X = halide; L = C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6); n, m ? 2) columnar binary stacks are explained by the diverse intermolecular interactions characterizing the stacks, since the three ligands L and the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) cyclic trinuclear clusters (CTCs) exhibit diverse physical properties being important determinants of the intermolecular interactions (consisting of covalent, electrostatic, and dispersion forces). The properties considered are the zz tensor components of quadrupole moment, Q(zz), polarizability, ?(zz), nucleus-independent chemical shift, NICS(zz)(1), along with the molecular electrostatic potential, MEP(0), and surface area (S). Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) at the revPBE-D3/TZ2P level revealed that the dominant term in the stacking interactions arises mainly from dispersion and electrostatic forces, while the contribution of covalent interactions are predicted to be small. On the other hand, charge decomposition analysis (CDA) illustrated very small charge transfer from the L stacking participants toward the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) clusters. Excellent linear correlations of the interaction energy, ?E(int), and its components (?E(disp), ?E(elstat), ?E(orb), and ?E(Pauli)) with calculated physical properties related to dispersion, covalent, and electrostatic forces have been established. The most important finding is the excellent linear relationship between ?E(int) and the NICS(zz)(1) magnetic criterion of aromaticity, indicating that ?E(int) is also affected by the coupling of the induced magnetic fields of the interacting stacking participants. The magnetotropicity of the binary stacks evaluated by the NICS(zz)-scan curves indicated an enhancement of the diatropicity in the space between the interacting inorganic and organic rings, probably due to the superposition of the diamagnetic ring currents of the interacting ring systems. The energy splitting in dimer (ESID) model was employed to estimate the charge transport of electrons and holes between the ligands L and the [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)] clusters in [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](L) 1:1 binary stacks. PMID:23270385

Tsipis, Athanassios C; Stalikas, Alexandros V

2012-12-27

54

When Peer-to-Peer comes Face-to-Face: Collaborative Peer-to-Peer Computing in Mobile Ad hoc Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper motivates and describes the notion of ad hoc mobile information systems. Such a system consists of a decentralized and self-organizing network of autonomous, mobile devices that interact as peers. Connectivity is determined by distance between devices; as hosts change their physical location they establish pair-wise peering relationships based on mutual proximity. We describe application scenarios for ad hoc

Gerd Kortuem; Jay Schneider; Dustin Preuitt; Thaddeus G. Cowan Thompson; Stephen Fickas; Zary Segall

2001-01-01

55

Virtual talking heads and ambiant face-to- face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe here our first effort for developing a virtual talking head able to engage a situated face-to-face interaction with a human partner. This paper concentrates on the low-level components of this interaction loop and the cognitive impact of the implementation of mutual attention and multimodal deixis on the communication task.

Gérard BAILLY; Frédéric ELISEI; Stephan RAIDT

2009-01-01

56

Face to Face: Cultivating Planned Giving Prospects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The most effective way to secure and promote gifts is seen as face-to-face contact. Some effective planned giving programs including visitation programs, book plate program, reunions, and use of donors as effective door-openers are described. Suggestions for how to encourage people to discuss their estates are provided. (MLW)|

Collier, Charles W.

1979-01-01

57

Developmental changes in mother-infant face-to-face communication: Birth to 3 months  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study documented the growth of the earliest form of face-to-face communication in 16 mother- infant dyads, videotaped weekly during a naturalistic face-to-face interaction, between 1 and 14 weeks, in 2 conditions: with the infant in the mother's arms and with the infant semi-reclined on a sofa. Results showed a curvilinear development of early face-to-face communication, with a significant increase

Manuela Lavelli; Alan Fogel

2002-01-01

58

Developmental Changes in Mother–Infant Face-to-Face Communication: Birth to 3 Months  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study documented the growth of the earliest form of face-to-face communication in 16 mother–infant dyads, videotaped weekly during a naturalistic face-to-face interaction, between 1 and 14 weeks, in 2 conditions: with the infant in the mother's arms and with the infant semi-reclined on a sofa. Results showed a curvilinear development of early face-to-face communication, with a significant increase occurring

Manuela Lavelli; Alan Fogel

2002-01-01

59

The Place of Face-to-Face Communication in Distributed Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most distributed work requires mediated communication, but the appropriate use of mediated, as compared with face-to-face communication, is not well understood. From our ethnographic research on workplace communication, we characterize unique aspects of face-to-face communication. Face to face communication supports touch, shared activities, eating and drinking together, as well as informal interactions and attention management. We argue that these activities

Bonnie A. Nardi; Steve Whittaker

2002-01-01

60

SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS AND THEIR LEARNING ENVIRONMENT: A COMPARISON OF INTERACTIVE TELEVISION, FACE-TO-FACE INSTRUCTION, AND THE TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Literature on social work student experiences in distance education is limited, as are studies of student experiences using valid comparison groups. This study compares three groups of students in a research methods course. One group took the course in a classroom from which interactive television (ITV) broadcasts originated; another group participated in the same section from a remote site; and

Helen E. Petracchi; Michael A. Patchner

2000-01-01

61

An Exploratory Comparison of the Roles of Representations in Face to Face and Online Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper reports an empirical study comparing the role of discourse and knowledge representations in face to face versus distance collaborative learning. The study reported in this paper compares Proximal (face to face) with Distal (synchronous collaboration via networked software) conditions. Two competing hypotheses were evaluated: (1) The influence of representations in the Distal condition could be weaker because of

Daniel D. Suthers; Christopher D. Hundhausen; Laura E. Girardeau

2003-01-01

62

Comparison of face-to-face and telephone consultations in primary care: qualitative analysis  

PubMed Central

Background There is evidence that telephone consultations in general practice are typically shorter than face-to-face consultations and that fewer problems are presented in them. Aim To compare the communicative practices of doctors and patients in face-to-face and telephone consultations, in order to understand the contrasts between the two consulting modes. Design of study Conversation analysis. Setting Eight NHS GP surgeries in Scotland. Method Transcription and conversation analysis of 32 face-to-face and 33 telephone consultations. Participants Eighteen GPs and 65 patients. Results There are no underlying contrasts between the communicative practices used in face-to-face and telephone consultations. Telephone consultations are typically used by patients to deal with a limited range of single-issue concerns, whereas a wide range of different problem types is dealt with in face-to-face consultations. Most telephone consultations for new problems lead to a face-to-face meeting rather than a diagnosis, making them shorter than equivalent face-to-face consultations. Interaction in telephone consultations is continuous and orderly, but in face-to-face consultations there are periods of silence that facilitate the introduction of additional topics, including social speech and rapport building. Doctors on the telephone are less likely to elicit additional concerns than in face-to-face consultations, and ask fewer questions when patients present self-diagnosed problems or describe problems with treatment. Conclusion Doctors in general practice do not substantially change their communicative behaviour on the telephone. Telephone consultations are shorter and include less problem disclosure than face-to-face meetings, partly because they are typically mono-topical and partly because of intrinsic differences between the two channels.

Hewitt, Heather; Gafaranga, Joseph; McKinstry, Brian

2010-01-01

63

The associations between young adults’ face-to-face prosocial behaviors and their online prosocial behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on the co-construction theory (Subrahmanyam, Smahel, & Greenfield, 2006), this study investigated the relationship between online and face-to-face prosocial behaviors among 493 (345 women) young adults (ages 18–25years). Findings indicated that face-to-face prosocial behaviors were positively associated with the engagement in online prosocial behaviors through social networking sites (e.g., Facebook, Myspace, Twitter), chat programs (e.g., Google Talk, AOL Instant

Michelle F. Wright; Yan Li

2011-01-01

64

Discourse About Ideas: Monitoring and Regulation in Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we analyze the collaborative activity of grade 5-6 students' as they work on computer-simulated physics problems. We compare two groups; both similarly supported in a basic science-discourse structure, but with that structure embedded in different contexts. The first context is face-to-face, small-group interactions; the second is face-to-face and CSILE (Computer Supported Intentional learning Environments) interactions. The CSILE

Andrew Cohen; Marlene Scardamalia

1998-01-01

65

Cocaine Exposure Is Associated with Subtle Compromises of Infants' and Mothers' Social-Emotional Behavior and Dyadic Features of Their Interaction in the Face-to-Face Still-Face Paradigm  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Prenatal cocaine and opiate exposure are thought to subtly compromise social and emotional development. The authors observed a large sample of 236 cocaine-exposed and 459 nonexposed infants (49 were opiate exposed and 646 nonexposed) with their mothers in the face-to-face still-face paradigm. Infant and maternal behaviors were microanalytically…

Tronick, E. Z.; Messinger, D. S.; Weinberg, M. K.; Lester, B. M.; LaGasse, L.; Seifer, R.; Bauer, C. R.; Shankaran, S.; Bada, H.; Wright, L. L.; Poole, K.; Liu, J.

2005-01-01

66

Pedagogical Characteristics of Online and Face-to-Face Classes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, many students have had experience with both face-to-face and online classes. We asked such students at 46 different universities in the United States to evaluate the pedagogical characteristics of their most recently completed face-to-face class and their most recently completed online class. The results show that students rate online classes as greatly superior to face-to-face classes in terms of

Karl Wuensch; Shahnaz Aziz; Erol Ozan; Masao Kishore; M. H. Nassehzadeh Tabrizi

2008-01-01

67

Pedagogical Characteristics of Online and Face-to-Face Classes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Currently, many students have had experience with both face-to-face and online classes. We asked such students at 46 different universities in the United States to evaluate the pedagogical characteristics of their most recently completed face-to-face class and their most recently completed online class. The results show that students rate online…

Wuensch, Karl; Aziz, Shahnaz; Ozan, Erol; Kishore, Masao; Tabrizi, M. H. Nassehzadeh

2008-01-01

68

The Impact of Increased Awareness While Face-to-Face  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents Second Messenger, a system of dynamic awareness displays that reveal speaker participation patterns in a face-to-face discussion. The system has been used by a variety of groups during face-to-face meetings, increasing individuals' awareness of their own and others' participation in discussions. Experimental results indicate that these displays influence the amount an individual participates in a discussion and

Joan Morris DiMicco; Katherine J. Hollenbach; Anna Pandolfo; Walter Bender

2007-01-01

69

The LEAD Project: Computer Support for Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The LEAD project stresses that one of the important challenges with regard to technology-enhanced learning is to develop effective\\u000a networked-computing support for face-to-face collaborative learning. To achieve this one has to gain a deeper understanding\\u000a of face-to-face collaborative learning and the technology that supports the communicative processes that are involved. The LEAD project will enhance state-of-the-art\\u000a research by studying this

Wouter Van Diggelen; Maarten Overdijk

2006-01-01

70

Cyborg Ontologies and the Lecturer's Voice: A Posthuman Reading of the "Face-to-Face"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lecture is often posited as the prototypical "face-to-face" educational encounter, seen as embodying key features of the pre-networked academy. These are implicitly characterised as forms of boundedness or impermeability, in terms of both the physical and temporal context, and the ontological status of the participants and the nature of the…

Gourlay, Lesley

2012-01-01

71

Comparison of Focus Groups on Cancer and Employment Conducted Face to Face or by Telephone  

PubMed Central

Findings from telephone focus groups have not been compared previously to findings from face-to-face focus groups. We conducted four telephone focus groups and five face-to-face focus groups in which a single moderator used the same open-ended questions and discussion facilitation techniques. This comparison was part of a larger study to gain a better understanding of employment experiences after diagnosis of gynecologic cancer. Offering the telephone option made it easier to recruit women from rural areas and geographically distant cities. Interaction between participants occurred in both types of focus group. Content analysis revealed that similar elements of the employment experience after cancer diagnosis were described by telephone and face-to-face participants. Participants disclosed certain emotionally sensitive experiences only in the telephone focus groups. Telephone focus groups provide useful data and can reduce logistical barriers to research participation. Visual anonymity might help some participants feel more comfortable discussing certain personal issues.

Frazier, Linda M.; Miller, Virginia A.; Horbelt, Douglas V.; Delmore, James E.; Miller, Brigitte E.; Paschal, Angelia M.

2010-01-01

72

Face-to-Face blog - Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery (NPG)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Online for less than a year, Face-to-Face is written by a team of National Portrait Gallery staff members with diverse responsibilities, from web design to curatorial. The blog is "dedicated to art, history, and the telling of American lives." There are four categories on Face-to-Face: Biography, Events, Exhibitions and News. "Biography" currently features an article series on presidential trivia, just in time for the election and "Exhibitions" provides coverage of current and recent exhibits, including "RECOGNIZE! Hip Hop and Contemporary Portraiture", "KATE" - celebrating Katherine Hepburn's 100th birthday, and the saga of the reinstallation of the painting Grant and His Generals by Ole Peter Hansen Balling, oil on canvas, 1865, when NPG re-opened in 2006 after 6 years of renovation. And of course, since it's a blog, interested readers can sign up for the RSS feed of Face-to-Face, so as not to miss a thing.

73

High-Resolution Measurements of Face-to-Face Contact Patterns in a Primary School  

PubMed Central

Background Little quantitative information is available on the mixing patterns of children in school environments. Describing and understanding contacts between children at school would help quantify the transmission opportunities of respiratory infections and identify situations within schools where the risk of transmission is higher. We report on measurements carried out in a French school (6–12 years children), where we collected data on the time-resolved face-to-face proximity of children and teachers using a proximity-sensing infrastructure based on radio frequency identification devices. Methods and Findings Data on face-to-face interactions were collected on Thursday, October 1st and Friday, October 2nd 2009. We recorded 77,602 contact events between 242 individuals (232 children and 10 teachers). In this setting, each child has on average 323 contacts per day with 47 other children, leading to an average daily interaction time of 176 minutes. Most contacts are brief, but long contacts are also observed. Contacts occur mostly within each class, and each child spends on average three times more time in contact with classmates than with children of other classes. We describe the temporal evolution of the contact network and the trajectories followed by the children in the school, which constrain the contact patterns. We determine an exposure matrix aimed at informing mathematical models. This matrix exhibits a class and age structure which is very different from the homogeneous mixing hypothesis. Conclusions We report on important properties of the contact patterns between school children that are relevant for modeling the propagation of diseases and for evaluating control measures. We discuss public health implications related to the management of schools in case of epidemics and pandemics. Our results can help define a prioritization of control measures based on preventive measures, case isolation, classes and school closures, that could reduce the disruption to education during epidemics.

Stehle, Juliette; Voirin, Nicolas; Barrat, Alain; Cattuto, Ciro; Isella, Lorenzo; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Quaggiotto, Marco; Van den Broeck, Wouter; Regis, Corinne; Lina, Bruno; Vanhems, Philippe

2011-01-01

74

Second messenger: increasing the visibility of minority viewpoints with a face-to-face collaboration tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the application Second Messenger, a tool for supporting face-to-face meetings and discussions. Second Messenger uses a speech-recognition engine as an input method and outputs filtered keywords from the group's conversation onto an interactive display. The goal of this interface is to improve the quality of a group discussion by increasing the visibility of diverse viewpoints.

Joan Morris DiMicco; Walter Bender

2004-01-01

75

Feedback interface for visible congruent facial expression: Towards better face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facial expressions are important in face-to-face communication between two individuals as expressions vary dynamically and provide impressions to observers. If facial expressions are congruent on both sides, consciously or unconsciously, a trust relationship is created and the individuals have positive impressions of each other. In this paper, psychological evaluation without direct interaction between individuals is practiced. The aim is to

Shumpei Hanibuchi; Kyoko Ito; Shogo Nishida

2010-01-01

76

IGlasses: an automatic wearable speech supplementin face-to-face communication and classroom situations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for language aids is pervasive in today's world. There are millions of individuals who have language and speech challenges, and these individuals require additional support for communication and language learning. We demonstrate technology to supplement common face-to-face language interaction to enhance intelligibility, understanding, and communication, particularly for those with hearing impairments. Our research is investigating how to automatically

Dominic W. Massaro; Miguel Á. Carreira-perpiñán; David J. Merrill; Cass Sterling; Stephanie Bigler; Elise Piazza; Marcus Perlman

2008-01-01

77

Comparing Asynchronous Online Discussions and Face-to-Face Discussions in a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study is to investigate the perceived differences between asynchronous online discussions and face-to-face discussions in a classroom setting. The students' reflections were analysed by following a qualitative research approach. The results showed that atmosphere, response, efficiency, interactivity and communication were the…

Wang, Qiyun; Woo, Huay Lit

2007-01-01

78

An Exploration of Online Environments Supporting Follow-Up to Face-to-Face Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study we examined the effects of online follow-up and online peer interaction following a face-to face professional development workshop on attitudes towards that professional development and completion of a professional development task. School librarians were invited to work online on a three page plan outlining interventions a library…

Green, Marybeth; Cifuentes, Lauren

2008-01-01

79

A Comparison of Organizational Structure and Pedagogical Approach: Online versus Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines online versus face-to-face organizational structure and pedagogy in terms of education and the teaching and learning process. The author distinguishes several important terms related to distance/online/e-learning, virtual learning and brick-and-mortar learning interactions and concepts such as asynchronous and synchronous…

McFarlane, Donovan A.

2011-01-01

80

Face-to-Face Play: Its Temporal Structure as Predictor of Socioaffective Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines three issues from study by Jaffe et al.: predictive nature of face-to-face play, the psychological present moment for infants, and the representation of the pragmatics of dialogue. Emphasizes value of the study for future work in social interaction. (DLH)

Stern, Daniel N.

2001-01-01

81

Virtual and Face-to-Face Learning: Meeting Points  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines how teaching within a traditional classroom benefits from insights and techniques developed through online teaching. A critical assumption underlining the presentation is that much online instruction will be performed by faculty members who, as part of their workload, also teach traditional face-to-face classes. It is important for distance learning advocates to identify and encourage synergistic feedback between

Paul Jay Edelson

82

Future Schools: Blending Face-to-Face and Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Hybrid schools" are schools that combine "face-to-face" education in a specific place with online instruction. In this article, the authors describe school models which offer a vision for what deeply integrated technology can mean for children's education, for the way schools are structured, and for the promise of greater efficiency amid a…

Schorr, Jonathan; McGriff, Deborah

2012-01-01

83

Face to Face Collaborative AR on Mobile Phones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile phones are an ideal platform for augmented reality. In this paper we describe how they can also be used to support face to face collaborative AR gaming. We have created a custom port of the ARToolKit library to the Symbian mobile phone operating system and then developed a sample collaborative AR game based on this. We describe the game

Anders Henrysson; Mark Billinghurst; Mark Ollila

2005-01-01

84

Teaching On-Line versus Face-to-Face.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Investigates and describes the current instructor experience of teaching college courses over the Web versus in face-to-face formats in terms of teaching strategies, social issues, and media effects. Discusses communication styles, relationship between students and instructors, instructor workload, and discussion patterns, and proposes a model…

Smith, Glenn Gordon; Ferguson, David; Caris, Mieke

2002-01-01

85

Face-to-Face Media Sharing Using Wireless Mobile Devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced personal wireless mobile devices, such as today's emerging smart phones, are capable computers that have the potential to enable individuals to share personal content, such as photographs, music, and video. Face to face sharing can be a satisfying and even emotional experience, yet it is not well supported by existing digital technologies, which typically isolate media into separate collections

Trevor Pering; David H. Nguyen; John Light; Roy Want

2005-01-01

86

Online Peer Review: An Alternative to Face-to-Face?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores whether online peer review can be a worthwhile alternative to face-to-face peer review. It was conducted in two pre-college English-as-a-Second-Language writing classes at a community college to examine students' responses in both modes of peer review, and to see whether online peer review could become a viable option.…

DiGiovanni, Elaine; Nagaswami, Girija

2001-01-01

87

Face to Face Communications in Multiplayer Online Games: A Real-Time System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiplayer online games (MOG) bring HCI into a new era of human-human interactions in computer world. Although current MOG\\u000a provide more interactivity and social interaction in the virtual world, natural facial expression as a key factor in emulating\\u000a face to face communications has been neglected by game designers. In this work, we propose a real-time automatic system to\\u000a recognize players’

Ce Zhan; Wanqing Li; Farzad Safaei; Philip Ogunbona

2007-01-01

88

Experiments Comparing Face-to-Face with Virtual Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on set of studies conducted over two years involving over 1000 students at two univers ities. The main study compares three conditions: conventional classroom lecture, a face-to-face collaborative learning technique called Tutored Video Instruction (TVI), and the virtual-world counterpart of TVI, Distributed Tutored Video Instruction (DTVI). The main study involved over 700 students in 6 courses. When using

Randall B. Smith; Michael J. Sipusic; Robert L. Pannoni

1999-01-01

89

Computer?based and Face?to?face Collaborative Argumentation in Secondary Schools in England and Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article focuses on the analysis of secondary school students’ argumentative interactions in England and Finland, within specific face?to?face and computer?based environments. We propose that a combination of learning environments, in conjunction with teacher input and support, is important for developing argumentation skills in the classroom. Face?to?face argumentation, in particular, offers ample opportunity for concentrating on the quality (through deeper

Lia Litosseliti; Miika Marttunen; Leena Laurinen; Timo Salminen

2005-01-01

90

Real-Time Decision Making in Multimodal Face-to-Face Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. ABSTRACT This paper describes an architecture and mechanism for simulating real-time decision making as observed in full-duplex, multimodal face-to-face interaction between humans. The work bridges between multimodal perception and multimodal action generation and allows flexible implementation of multimodal, full- duplex, conversational characters. It is part of a broad computational model of psychosocial dialogue skills called Ymir . The architecture

1998-01-01

91

Communication patterns in computer mediated versus face-to-face group problem solving  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research has shown that when group problem solving is computer mediated, communications become more task oriented with clearer\\u000a role expectations, while face-to-face communications are more cohesive and personal. None of this research has examined those\\u000a patterns of interactions in terms of the problem solving activities engaged. In this study, we compared the perceptions of\\u000a participants, the nature of the comments

David H. Jonassen; Hyug Kwon

2001-01-01

92

Encouraging Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning through the Use of Handheld Computers in the Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a To achieve the maximum benefit, a collaborative learning activity in the classroom requires effective coordination, synchronization,\\u000a face-to-face communication, negotiation, interactivity, and participant mobility conditions. In this paper, we perform a usability\\u000a analysis on a specific collaborative learning activity and identify several problems with fulfilling these conditions. A second\\u000a usability analysis shows how these problems can be solved with a Mobile

Gustavo Zurita; Miguel Nussbaum; Mike Shaples

2003-01-01

93

Social anxiety and technology: Face-to-face communication versus technological communication among teens  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined teens’ use of socially interactive technologies (SITs), such as online social sites, cell phones\\/text messaging, and instant messaging (IM), and the role that social anxiety plays on how teens communicate with others (technologically or face-to-face). Participants included 280 high school students from a large western city. On average, 35–40% of teens reported using cell phones\\/text messaging and

Tamyra Pierce

2009-01-01

94

The Computational Simulation of Multimodal, Face-to-Face Communication Constrained by Physical Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionIn face-to-face interaction, interlocutors often use several modes of articulation simultaneously.An interlocutor's communication will often be multimodal even when he or she knows the otherinterlocutors cannot perceive all of the modes of communication (e.g., people often gesture whilespeaking on the telephone). Our present inquiry --- which incorporates computational modeling inconjunction with the analysis of, and comparison to empirical data ---

Melanie Baljko

2000-01-01

95

Real-time decision making in multimodal face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. ABSTRACT This paper describes an architecture and mechanism for simulating real-time decision making as observed in full-duplex, multimodal face-to-face interaction between humans. The work bridges between multimodal perception and multimodal action generation and allows flexible implementation of multimodal, fullduplex, conversational characters. It is part of a broad computational model of psychosocial dialogue skills called Ymir. The architecture has been

Kristinn R. Thórisson

1998-01-01

96

Electronic and face-to-face communication in maintaining social relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the spectacular spread of wired and wireless communication technologies\\u000asuch as the Internet and mobile phone have been discussed extensively in the academic\\u000aliterature, knowledge of the interactions among face-to-face (F2F) and electronic\\u000acommunication modes and their implications for travel behavior is rather limited. The\\u000asame is true for knowledge about factors influencing the choice for these types of

T. Tillema; M. J. Dijst; T. Schwanen

2007-01-01

97

Exploring presentation styles in higher education teaching and research situations: distance and face-to-face  

Microsoft Academic Search

Universities are increasingly using advanced video-conferencing environments to interact for teaching and research purposes at a distance and in situations that combine distant participants with those face-to-face. Those who use these technologies expect professional development support to do so but we do not yet have a comprehensive research platform on which to base this support. The research described here sought

Kerry Shephard; Karen Knightbridge

2011-01-01

98

Modeling Face-to-Face Communication using the Sociometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge of how people interact is important in many disciplines, e.g. organizational behavior, social network analysis, information diffusion and knowledge management applications. We are developing methods to automatically and unobtrusively learn the social network structures that arise within human groups based on wearable sensors. At present researchers mainly have to rely on questionnaires, surveys or diaries in order to obtain

Tanzeem Choudhury; Alex Pentland

2003-01-01

99

Performances of interleaved and Face to Face integrated magnetic transformers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, most of integrated transformers are fabricated without magnetic core. In order to reduce the size and to improve their performances, we were interested in the study of integrated transformers based of thin ferrite films. Interleaved and Face to Face structures were simulated using the Ansoft HFSS simulator over a wide range of frequency (up to 100MHz). A high frequency electrical model has been defined to determine the main characteristics of the transformer and particularly the inter­winding capacitance and coupling factor between primary and secondary windings. The simulation results allowed us to determine the geometrical dimensions of these structures in order to optimize the magnetic coupling coefficient and to minimize inter­ winding capacitance.

Youssouf, K.; Kahlouche, F.; Youssouf, M.; Capraro, S.; Chatelon, J. P.; Siblini, A.; Rousseau, J. J.

2013-01-01

100

Developmental Changes in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication: Birth to 3 Months.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Investigated development of face-to-face communication in infants between 1 and 14 weeks old and their mothers. Found a curvilinear development of early face-to-face communication, with increases occurring between weeks 4 and 9. When placed on a sofa, infants' face-to-face communication was longer than when they were held. Girls spent a longer…

Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

2002-01-01

101

The integration of distance learning via internet and face to face learning: Why face to face learning is required in distance learning via internet?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distance learning via internet includes an important processing in many fields. The rate and the contribution of face to face learning on e-learning integrate important meanings in this learning process. Because of that reason distance learning is required to use mostly the facilities of face to face learning. Distance learning has a vital role in the process of e-learning's

A. Marsap; M. Narin

2009-01-01

102

The focus is on me? — Fokus-gruppe: Von face to face zu online  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract  Focus group is an interview-technique, which uses the interaction of people to undergo their opinions and attitudes. It is\\u000a popular in market-research, politics and technology assessment. The possibility to conduct it online enhances its attractivity.\\u000a The synchronous mode is quite similar to the face-to-face group but there are a couple of new things to put on: the used technology,\\u000a the

Angelika Volst

2003-01-01

103

Making the Jump to Hybrid Space: Employing Face-to-Face and Online Modalities in a Special Event Planning Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Every quarter at California State University East Bay, a special event-planning course is offered in a hybrid format (face-to-face and online) and uses interactive Problem-Based Learning (PBL) activities designed to challenge and inspire intellectual growth. The PLB method is different in that students are not only receivers of knowledge but are…

Fortune, Mary F.

2012-01-01

104

Making the Jump to Hybrid Space: Employing Face-to-Face and Online Modalities in a Special Event Planning Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Every quarter at California State University East Bay, a special event-planning course is offered in a hybrid format (face-to-face and online) and uses interactive Problem-Based Learning (PBL) activities designed to challenge and inspire intellectual growth. The PLB method is different in that students are not only receivers of knowledge but are…

Fortune, Mary F.

2012-01-01

105

Analysis of similarities and differences of a training programme delivered through two different methods: face to face and e- learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overall objective of this research was to find similarities and differences of a training programme delivered through two different methods: face to face and e-learning. This paper focuses on three variables of the learning process: theoretical content, the activities and the teacher\\/student interaction. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methodologies was used, through questionnaires, interviews and focus groups. Three

L. Alonso Díaz; F. Blázquez Entonado

2006-01-01

106

Content and Processes in Problem-Based Learning: A Comparison of Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|There has been an increasing interest in the use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in problem-based learning. One line of research has been to introduce synchronous, or simultaneous, communication attempting to create text-based digital real-time interaction. Compared with face-to-face (F2F) communication, CMC may be a poorer medium…

Stromso, H. I.; Grottum, P.; Lycke, K. H.

2007-01-01

107

Face-to-Face and at a Distance: The Mediation of Guidance and Counselling through the New Technologies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reexamines the assumption that counseling interactions should be face-to-face, whereas other activities of guidance can be supported by the computer. Contends that human relationships will change but not necessarily diminish with computer use. Draws comparisons about ways in which open and distance learning have brought a reexamination of what is…

Tait, Alan

1999-01-01

108

An evaluation of remote communication versus face-to-face in clinical dental education.  

PubMed

Distance learning and internet-based delivery of educational content are becoming very popular as an alternative to real face-to-face delivery. Clinical-based discussions still remain greatly face-to-face despite the advancement of remote communication and internet sharing technology. In this study we have compared three communication modalities between a learner and educator: audio and video using voice over internet protocol (VoIP) alone [AV]; audio and video VoIP with the addition of a three dimensional virtual artefact [AV3D] and physical face-to-face [FTF]. Clinical case discussions based on fictitious patients were held between a 'learner' and an 'expert' using the three communication modalities. The learner presented a clinical scenario to the experts, with the aid of a prop (partially dentate cast, digitised for AV3D), to obtain advice on the management of the clinical case. Each communication modality was tested in timed exercises in a random order among one of three experts (senior clinical restorative staff) and a learner (from a cohort of 15 senior clinical undergraduate students) all from the School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield. All learners and experts used each communication modality in turn with no prior training. Video recording and structured analysis were used to ascertain learner behaviour and levels of interactivity. Evaluation questionnaires were completed by experts and learners immediately after the experiment to ascertain effectiveness of information exchange and barriers/facilitators to communication. The video recordings showed that students were more relaxed with AV and AV3D than FTF (p = 0.01). The evaluation questionnaires showed that students felt they could provide (p = 0.03) and obtain (p = 0.003) more information using the FTF modality, followed by AV and then AV3D. Experts also ranked FTF better than AV and AV3D for providing (p = 0.012) and obtaining (p = 0) information to/from the expert. Physical face-to-face learning is a more effective communication modality for clinical case-based discussions between a learner and an expert. Remote, internet-based discussions enable a more relaxed discussion environment. The effectiveness of 3D supported internet-based communication is dependent upon a robust and simple to use interface, along with some prior training. PMID:22446272

Martin, N; Lazalde, O Martínez; Stokes, C; Romano, D

2012-03-23

109

Applying the scholarship of teaching and learning: student perceptions, behaviours and success online and face?to?face  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares student perceptions, learning behaviours and success in online and face?to?face versions of a Principles of Microeconomics course. It follows a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) approach by using a cycle of empirical analysis, reflection and action to improve the learning experience for students. The online course design involves 58 interactive narrated online modules, interactive online quizzes

Agi Horspool; Carsten Lange

2010-01-01

110

Why Use the Online Environment with Face-to-Face Students? Insights from Early Adopters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study illustrates the convergence of two teaching and learning media, face-to-face and online, as reflective lecturers seek to address the limitations of a single medium. Innovative university lecturers at a large Western Australia university were interviewed about their use of online environments with face-to-face students. The interview…

Bunker, Alison; Vardi, Iris

111

Researcher and Researched: The Phenomenology of Change from Face-to-Face to Online Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Online instruction, courses, and degree programs are rising in popularity in higher education and corporations. Novice and experienced instructors face increased demands from administrators and students to teach online, in a higher education environment long noted for face-to-face, residence-based instruction. Viewing the shift from face-to-face

Crawley, Frank E.; Fewell, Martha D.; Sugar, William A.

2009-01-01

112

Online or Face to Face? A Comparison of Two Methods of Training Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Online courses offer benefits over face-to-face courses such as accessibility, affordability, and flexibility. Literature assessing the effectiveness of face-to-face and online courses is growing, but findings remain inconclusive. This study compared evaluations completed by professionals who had taken a research update short course either face…

Dillon, Kristin; Dworkin, Jodi; Gengler, Colleen; Olson, Kathleen

2008-01-01

113

Examining the Roles of the Facilitator in Online and Face-to-Face PD Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Online teacher professional development has become an alternative to face-to-face professional development. Such a shift from face-to-face to online professional development, however, brings new challenges for professional development facilitators, whose roles are crucial in orchestrating teacher learning. This paper is motivated by the need to…

Park, Gina; Johnson, Heather; Vath, Richard; Kubitskey, Beth; Fishman, Barry

2013-01-01

114

Web-Based vs. Face-to-Face MBA Classes: A Comparative Assessment Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The challenges of online learning include ensuring that the learning outcomes are at least as robust as in the face-to-face sections of the same course. At the University of Baltimore, both online sections and face-to-face sections of core MBA courses are offered. Once admitted to the MBA, students are free to enroll in any combination of…

Brownstein, Barry; Brownstein, Deborah; Gerlowski, Daniel A.

2008-01-01

115

"No Significant Distance" between Face-to-Face and Online Instruction: Evidence from Principles of Economics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes an experiment focused on measuring and explaining differences in students learning between online and face-to-face modes of instruction in college level principles of economics courses. Our results indicate that students in face-to-face sections scored better on the Test of Understanding College Economics (TUCE) than students…

Coates, Dennis; Humphreys, Brad, R.; Kane, John; Vachris, Michelle, A.

2004-01-01

116

FACE-TO-FACE COMMUNICATION WITH COMPUTER AGENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

While computers are becoming more intelligent, current interaction methods, such as keyboards, mice and windows, still limit human-computer interaction to tool-level manipulation. Bringing a communication paradigm to the computer seems a worthy goal, in particular communication that people use every day to interact with each other. This work begins to attack this issue by examining some of the variables that

Kristinn R. Thórisson

1994-01-01

117

A decision support system for face-to-face groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several recent trends have converged to make the concept of Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS) important at this time. This paper describes the design, development, and testing of one GDSS tool as an initial step toward building a compre hensive system. A network of microcomputers was used to implement this tool, then the author studied its use by a large

L. Floyd Lewis

1987-01-01

118

Technology Appropriation in Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies in computer supported collaborative learning frequently under-expose the interaction between students and technology. To gain more insight in the way student groups interact with educational technology, we examine how students 'appropriate' this technology. The notion of technology appropriation implies a process of social construction in which the actions and thoughts of the user are shaped by the technology, while

Maarten Overdijk; Wouter Van Diggelen

2006-01-01

119

Stability and Transitions in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication During the First 6 Months: A Microhistorical Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the authors attempted to unravel the relational, dynamical, and historical nature of mother-infant communication during the first 6 months. Thirteen mothers and their infants were videotaped weekly from 4 to 24 weeks during face-to-face interactions. Three distinct patterns of mother-infant communication were identified: symmetrical, asymmetrical, and unilateral. Guided by a dynamic systems perspective, the authors explored the

Hui-Chin Hsu; Alan Fogel

2003-01-01

120

The effect of interviewer personality, skills and attitudes on respondent co-operation with face-to-face surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the role of interviewers experience, attitudes, personality traits and inter-personal skills in determining survey co-operation. We take the perspective that these characteristics influence interviewers behaviour and hence influence the doorstep interaction between interviewer and sample member. We use a large sample of 842 face-to-face interviewers working for a major survey institute and analyse co-operation outcomes for over

Peter Lynn; Jennifer Sinibaldi; Sarah Tipping

2011-01-01

121

The Differential Effects of Face-to-Face and Computer Interview Modes  

PubMed Central

Objectives. This study assessed the differential effects of face-to-face interviewing and audio-computer assisted self-interviewing (audio-CASI) on categories of questions. Methods. Syringe exchange program participants (n = 1417) completed face-to-face interviews or audio-CASI. The questionnaire was categorized into the groups “stigmatized behaviors,” “neutral behaviors,” and “psychological distress.” Interview modes were compared for questions from each category. Results. Audio-CASI elicited more frequent reporting of “stigmatized behaviors” than face-to-face interviews. Face-to-face interviewing elicited more frequent reporting of “psychological distress” than audio-CASI. Conclusions. Responding to potentially sensitive questions should not be seen as merely “providing data,” but rather as an activity with complex motivations. These motivations can include maintaining social respect, obtaining social support, and altruism. Ideally, procedures for collecting self-report data would maximize altruistic motivation while accommodating the other motives.

Newman, Jessica Clark; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Turner, Charles F.; Gribble, Jay; Cooley, Phillip; Paone, Denise

2002-01-01

122

A comparison of two Native American Navigator formats: face-to-face and telephone.  

PubMed

The study was designed to test the relative effectiveness of a Navigator intervention delivered face-to-face or by telephone to urban Native American women. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using a design that included a pretest, random assignment to face-to-face or telephone group, and posttest. The Social Cognitive Theory-based intervention was a tailored education program developed to address individual risk factors for breast cancer. At posttest, self-reported mammograms in the past year increased from 29% to 41.3% in the telephone group and from 34.4% to 45.2% in the face-to-face group. There was no difference in change from pretest to posttest between the telephone and face-to-face groups. Navigators can be effective in increasing adherence to recommendations for screening mammography among urban American Indian women. PMID:16327748

Dignan, Mark B; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Hariton, Judy; Harjo, Lisa; Rattler, Terri; Lee, Rose; Mason, Mondi

2005-11-01

123

Synergies and Competition Between Life in Cyberspace and Face-to-Face Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper questions three common assumptions (1) that electronic forums will certainly strengthen pre-existing face-to-face territorial (and other intact) communities; (2) electronic forum will replace them with comparably pro-social forms and (3) \\

Rob Kling

1996-01-01

124

Preliminary Study on Knowledge Activity Element of the Team Face to Face Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge work efficiency is becoming a serious worldwide problem, and more attention should be paid to improve the team knowledge work efficiency. Face to face communication is important link of the team knowledge work. Use for reference on \\

Li Su; Shuping Yi

2012-01-01

125

Comparing the roles of representations in face-to-face and online computer supported collaborative learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract We report an empirical study comparing,the role of discourse and knowledge,representations (graphical evidence mapping) in face to face versus distance collaborative learning. Our prior work comparing,alternate knowledge,representations in face-to-face collaborative learning situations has shown that differences between representationalnotations can translate into differences in the focus of learners' discourse and collaborative activities. The study reported in this paper compares Proximal

Daniel D. Suthers; Christopher D. Hundhausen; Laura E. Girardeau

2003-01-01

126

A Comparative Study on Student Perceptions of Face-to-Face Learning and Online Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to understand students'perceptions of the effectiveness of online and face-to-face learning for a graduate course. 93 Phd students who took the course of Planning And Assessment In Education on the basis of face-to-face learning and 76 Phd students who took the same course on online basis at Anadolu University in Turkey were requested to state their

GURHAN CAN; MUSTAFA SAGLAM; BAHADIR ERISTI; DILRUBA KURUM

2007-01-01

127

Talents and Innovative Regions: exploring the Importance of Face-to-Face Communication and Buzz  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper argues that face-to-face communication and buzz are becoming increasingly important in the regionalizing le arning economy. This reflects the importance of inn ovations as a means of enhancing regional competitiveness. While concurring with the new streams of literature in geography highlighting the importance of face-to-face and buzz, it is argued that this lite rature is misleading on three

Bjørn Asheim; Jan Vang

2005-01-01

128

A comparative evaluation of TV video telephony with webcam and face to face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared user expectations and post-experience value judgments of TV based video calling with Personal Computer (PC)\\/webcam and face to face communications experiences. Eighteen same gender participant pairs carried out three tasks requiring visual and verbal communications within each condition. Results of the System Usability Scale (SUS) indicated significant differences between all conditions with F2F (face to face) and

David J. Wheatley; Santosh Basapur

2009-01-01

129

Examination of program exposure across intervention delivery modes: face-to-face versus internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There has been increasing interest in the ability of the internet to produce behaviour change. The focus of this study was to describe program exposure across three intervention groups from a randomised trial (RT) comparing traditional face-to-face, internet-mediated (combined internet plus face-to-face), and internet-only program delivery. METHODS: Baseline and immediately post-intervention survey data, and exposure rates from participants that

Rebekah M Steele; W Kerry Mummery; Trudy Dwyer

2007-01-01

130

Face to face with the white rabbit - sharing ideas in Second Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

The popular virtual world, second life, presents a number of opportunities and limitations for the sharing of ideas in the information economy. In this paper we ask the question, dasiato what extent can second life simulate an actual face-to-face meeting?psila Many authors have written that tacit knowledge transfer requires face-to-face meetings, however, virtual reality technology can provide tools that enable

Peter Rive; M. Billinghurst; A. Thomassen; Marcia Lyons

2008-01-01

131

HYBRID LEARNING: BALANCING FACE-TO-FACE AND ONLINE CLASS SESSIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper raises the question: What is the appropriate proportion for face-to-face and online sessions when courses are taught in a hybrid learning format? Proportions of online and face-to- face sessions in six institutions that utilize hybrid learning format were reviewed. The review indicates a loosely defined proportion between the two formats, with ratios varying from 75% online and 25%

Srinithya Ranganathan; Solomon Negash; Marlene V. Wilcox

2007-01-01

132

Infants’ sensitivity to social contingency: a “double video” study of face-to-face communication between 2- and 4-month-olds and their mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infants’ and mothers’ gaze during three sequences of live face-to-face interaction were compared to sequences where their interaction was set out of phase, by presenting either the infant or the mother with a replay of their partners’ behavior during earlier live interaction in a closed circuit TV setup. There was a significant interaction between sequence and foci of the infants’

Kjell Morten Stormark; Hanne C Braarud

2004-01-01

133

Determinants of Engagement in Face-to-Face and Online Patient Support Groups  

PubMed Central

Background Although peer-to-peer contact might empower patients in various ways, studies show that only a few patients actually engage in support groups. Objective The objective of our study was to explore factors that facilitate or impede engagement in face-to-face and online peer support, using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Methods A questionnaire was completed by 679 patients being treated for arthritis, breast cancer, or fibromyalgia at two Dutch regional hospitals. Results Our results showed that only a minority of the patients engaged in organized forms of peer support. In total 10% (65/679) of the respondents had engaged in face-to-face meetings for patients in the past year. Only 4% (30/679) of the respondents had contact with peers via the Internet in the past year. Patients were more positive about face-to-face peer support than about online peer support (P < .001). In accordance with the Theory of Planned Behavior, having a more positive attitude (P < .01) and feeling more supported by people in the social environment (P < .001) increased the intention to participate in both kinds of peer support. In addition, perceived behavioral control (P = .01) influenced the intention to participate in online peer support. Nevertheless, the intention to engage in face-to-face and online peer support was only modestly predicted by the Theory of Planned Behavior variables (R 2 = .33 for face-to-face contact and R 2 = .26 for online contact). Conclusion Although Health 2.0 Internet technology has significantly increased opportunities for having contact with fellow patients, only a minority seem to be interested in organized forms of peer contact (either online or face-to-face). Patients seem somewhat more positive about face-to-face contact than about online contact.

Van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Taal, Erik; Smit, Willem M; Bernelot Moens, Hein J; Van de Laar, Mart AFJ

2011-01-01

134

20 CFR 266.6 - Information to be submitted by a representative payee-applicant; face-to-face interview.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...representative payee-applicant; face-to-face interview. 266.6 Section 266.6 Employees...representative payee-applicant; face-to-face interview. Before the Board selects a representative...Board may also conduct a face-to-face interview with the payee-applicant....

2013-04-01

135

The effects of teamwork on individual learning and perceptions of team performance : A comparison of face-to-face and online project settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – In light of contradictory research findings, the purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effects of team setting (face-to-face or online) on the relationship that team member affect and interaction processes have on individual team source learning, and at the team level on the relationship between group cohesiveness and perceived team performance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Students enrolled

Ethlyn A. Williams; Stephanie L. Castro

2010-01-01

136

A Predictive Study of Learner Satisfaction and Outcomes in Face-to-Face, Satellite Broadcast, and Live Video-Streaming Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study was conducted to assess the predictive relationships among delivery mode (DM), self-perceived learner-to-teacher interaction, self-rated computer skill, prior distance learning experience, and learners' satisfaction and outcomes. Participants were enrolled in courses which used three different DMs: face-to-face, satellite broadcasting,…

Abdous, M'hammed; Yen, Cherng-Jyh

2010-01-01

137

A Predictive Study of Learner Satisfaction and Outcomes in Face-to-Face, Satellite Broadcast, and Live Video-Streaming Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted to assess the predictive relationships among delivery mode (DM), self-perceived learner-to-teacher interaction, self-rated computer skill, prior distance learning experience, and learners' satisfaction and outcomes. Participants were enrolled in courses which used three different DMs: face-to-face, satellite broadcasting,…

Abdous, M'hammed; Yen, Cherng-Jyh

2010-01-01

138

Increasing Students' Perceived Sociopolitical Empowerment through Online and Face-to-Face Community Psychology Seminars  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Community psychology theorists underline the importance of promoting sociopolitical empowerment, but few studies have been conducted on the evaluation of the efficacy of empowering programs among university students. The authors report two studies: the first, with 216 psychology majors, compared the efficacy of face-to-face and online community…

Francescato, Donata; Solimeno, Andrea; Mebane, Minou Ella; Tomai, Manuela

2009-01-01

139

Student Learning and Instructor Investment in Online and Face-to-Face Natural Resources Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Substantial growth in online education in the United States has prompted questions on the levels of student learning and satisfaction achieved and the amount of instructor time investment required in the online environment compared to the face-to-face (F2F) environment. To date, very few have studied these measurements in science courses, and…

Wuellner, Melissa R.

2013-01-01

140

Instructor Time and Effort in Online and Face-to-Face Teaching: Lessons Learned  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results in past studies comparing teaching time and effort in online and face-to-face (FTF) teaching environments have been inconsistent. This research study compares the instructional time and effort it took the authors to teach the same course online and FTF in their respective universities. The authors hypothesize that it takes more time to teach online courses. The results of the

Wanda L. Worley; Lee S. Tesdell

2009-01-01

141

MATHEMATICAL INTIMACY WITHIN BLENDED AND FACE-TO-FACE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oftentimes, learning mathematics involves using technology as a conscious attempt to understand the material in a new and accessible mode, to increase performance, and to expand one's knowledge regardless of the level of training. While comparative assessments of students' performances in blended and face-to-face environments are essential, the authors of this paper analyze students' mathematical intimacy and flow experiences, as

Oana Radu

142

Online Versus Face-to-Face Accommodations Among College Students With Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although both the number of online learning opportunities and students with disabilities in higher education has increased over the last two decades, students with disabilities may be overlooked. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes toward requesting accommodations in the online learning environment among college students with disabilities compared with requesting accommodations in the face-to-face learning environment. Accommodations

Lucy Barnard-Brak; Tracey Sulak

2010-01-01

143

Computer Self-Efficacy, Anxiety, and Learning in Online versus Face to Face Medium  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this research is to examine the relationships between changes to computer self-efficacy (CSE) and computer anxiety and the impact on performance on computer-related tasks in both online and face-to-face mediums. While many studies have looked at these factors individually, relatively few have included multiple measures of these…

Hauser, Richard; Paul, Ravi; Bradley, John

2012-01-01

144

DISCOURSE AND PARTICIPATION IN ESL FACE-TO-FACE AND WRITTEN ELECTRONIC CONFERENCES  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was a comparative investigation of face-to-face and written electronic conferences. The participants were advanced English as a second language (hereafter: ESL) students. The two types of conferences were compared in terms of textual features and participation. There was no statistically significant difference in the total number of words that students produced in an equivalent amount of time in

Michael Fitze

145

Writing as Involvement: A Case for Face-to-Face Classroom Talk in a Computer Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The abandonment of face-to-face voice conversations in favor of the use of electronic conversations in composition classes is an issue to be interrogated. In a recent push to "prepare students for the 21st century," teachers are asked to teach computer applications in the humanities--and composition teachers, who will teach writing in computer…

Berggren, Anne G.

146

Computer-Supported and Face-to-Face Collaboration on Design Tasks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The issue of how people's discourse is affected by computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) tools and shared workspaces was explored by examining collaboration on shared design tasks. Pairs of 28 less experienced and 28 more experienced engineering design students undertook a computer-assisted design task, either face-to-face (FtF) or…

Anderson, Tony; Sanford, Alison; Thomson, Avril; Ion, William

2007-01-01

147

An Experiment Comparing HBSE Graduate Social Work Classes: Face-to-Face and at a Distance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article describes a quasi-experimental comparison of two master's level social work classes delivering content on human behavior in the social environment. One class, delivered face-to-face, was largely synchronous. The other class, delivered using distance technologies, was more asynchronous than the first. The authors hypothesized that…

Woehle, Ralph; Quinn, Andrew

2009-01-01

148

Faculty Best Practices Using Blended Learning in E-Learning and Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presenting a higher education case study from Mexico: "Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey" (ITESM-CCM) College, Mexico city campus, describing faculty best and worst practices using a blended learning approach in e-learning and face-to-face instruction. The article comments on conceptual definitions of blended learning,…

Mortera-Gutierrez, Fernando

2006-01-01

149

A Study of Face-to-Face and Online Teaching Philosophies in Canada and Australia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The perspectives of instructors who teach both online and face-to-face in a higher education context have been compared in this study. The differences and similarities between their approaches, and the influences each modality has on the other have been explored, as well as possible differences in organizational cultures between the groups, who…

Stacey, Elizabeth; Wiesenberg

2007-01-01

150

The University Student Experience of Face-to-Face and Online Discussions: Coherence, Reflection and Meaning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports on an investigation into learning through discussions by undergraduate social work students. Second-year students studying psychology for social work experienced discussions began with face-to-face tutorials, and then continued for some time after online. This study used closed-ended questionnaires to investigate what students…

Ellis, Robert A.; Goodyear, Peter; O'Hara, Agi; Prosser, Michael

2007-01-01

151

Assessing the Measurement Invariance of Relational Maintenance Behavior When Face-to-Face and Online  

Microsoft Academic Search

This investigation examined whether five relational maintenance behavior types, assessed via Stafford and Canary's (1991) Relational Maintenance Strategy Measure (RMSM), differ across face-to-face communication and instant messaging. Little's (1997) sequential tests suggested measurement invariance across these communicative contexts. Methodologically, these results commend the RMSM as a statistically sound tool for future online communication research.

Andrew M. Ledbetter

2010-01-01

152

Attitudes of Middle School Students: Learning Online Compared to Face to Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Education in an online setting is an increasingly popular method of instruction. Previous studies comparing college or high school student performance in online and face-to-face courses found, in most cases, similar achievement between conditions. However, research is lacking regarding middle school students' academic performance and attitudes…

Edwards, Clayton; Rule, Audrey

2013-01-01

153

The temporal structure of face-to-face communication between mothers and infants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Videotaped 37 infants in face-to-face play with their mothers at 6, 13, and 26 wks of age. Analysis proceeded at 3 levels: (a) Ss' periods of attention toward the mothers significantly overlapped with the mothers' facially expressive behavior, especially as Ss grew older. Whereas the total proportion of time looking at mothers decreased, the time looking at them while they

Kenneth Kaye; Alan Fogel

1980-01-01

154

Knowledge Sharing through Face-To-Face Communication and Labour Productivity: Evidence from British Workplaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate whether the adoption by workplaces of human resources management (HRM) practices that enhance face-to-face communication (FTFC) among employees is associated with productivity gains. The analysis is based on a nationally representative sample of over 500 British trading establishments drawn from the linked 2004 Workplace Employment Relations Survey and Annual Business Inquiry, for which objective measures of labour productivity

Sergio Salis; Allan M. Williams

155

Facial Expression Synthesis Based on Natural Voice for Virtual Face-to-Face Communication with Machine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Basic research to a virtual face-to-face communication environment between an operator and a machine is presented. In this system, a human natural face appears on the display of machine and can talk to a operator with natural voice and natural face expressions. A face expression synthesis scheme driven by natural voice is presented. Voice includes not only linguistic information but

Shigeo Morishima; Hiroshi Harashima

1993-01-01

156

A Comparative Study of Computer Conferencing and Face-to-Face Communications in Systems Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes a study that investigated the use of computer conferencing and face-to-face communications to support the work of student teams in a systems analysis project. Compares differences in decision quality, teams' confidence in the group decision, and teams' satisfaction with the overall decision process. (Author/LRW)|

Sumner, Mary; Hostetler, Dennis

2002-01-01

157

Analysis and synthesis of realistic eye movement in face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

During face-to-face conversation, human eyes always rotate irregularly. Therefore, it is essential to synthesize such complex eye movements for the achievement of realistic human facial animation. In the conversation, there are two kinds of eye movements, Saccades and Fixation Eye Movements (FEMs). Saccade is a relatively large scale motion in eye movements compared with FEMs' smaller one. Gu et al

Tomoyori Iwao; Daisuke Mima; Hiroyuki Kubo; Akinobu Maejima; Shigeo Morishima

2012-01-01

158

Online or Face-to-Face? Students' Experiences and Preferences in E-Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Which aspects of e-learning courses do students experience as being favorable for learning? When do students prefer online or face-to-face learning components? These questions were the subject of a research study in a sample of 2196 students from 29 Austrian universities. The students completed a questionnaire on their experiences attending an…

Paechter, Manuela; Maier, Brigitte

2010-01-01

159

Comparing Role-Playing Activities in Second Life and Face-to-Face Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared student performances in role-playing activities in both a face-to-face (FTF) environment and a virtual 3D environment, Second Life (SL). We found that students produced a similar amount of communication in the two environments, but the communication styles were different. In SL role-playing activities, students took more…

Gao, Fei; Noh, Jeongmin J.; Koehler, Matthew J.

2009-01-01

160

Comparing Role-Playing Activities in Second Life and Face-to-Face Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study compared student performances in role-playing activities in both a face-to-face (FTF) environment and a virtual 3D environment, Second Life (SL). We found that students produced a similar amount of communication in the two environments, but the communication styles were different. In SL role-playing activities, students took more…

Gao, Fei; Noh, Jeongmin J.; Koehler, Matthew J.

2009-01-01

161

Two Peas in a Pod? A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Web Based Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study compared student learning outcomes and student perceptions of and satisfaction with the learning process between two sections of the same class--a web-based section and a traditional face-to-face (f2f) section. Using a quasi-experimental design, students were randomly assigned to the two course sections. Group equivalency was…

Mentzer, Gale; Cryan, JohnRobert; Teclehaimanot, Berhane

2007-01-01

162

Correlates of Student Preference for Online Instruction over Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In order to examine current online course delivery systems, the authors created and conducted a survey that examined both face-to-face (FTF) and online education (OE) classes offered at 46 universities and some community colleges in the United States, as well as at some foreign universities. Students were asked whether they preferred FTF or OE…

Kishore, Masao; Tabrizi, M. H. Nassehzadeh; Ozan, Erol; Aziz, Shahnaz; Wuensch, Karl L.

2009-01-01

163

Technology Confidence, Competence and Problem Solving Strategies: Differences within Online and Face-to-Face Formats  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study identified the problem solving strategies used by students within a university course designed to teach pre-service teachers educational technology, and whether those strategies were influenced by the format of the course (i.e., face-to-face computer lab vs. online). It also examined to what extent the type of problem solving strategies…

Peterson, Sharon L.; Palmer, Louann Bierlein

2011-01-01

164

Comparing face-to-face meetings, nominal groups, Delphi and prediction markets on an estimation task  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted laboratory experiments for analyzing the accuracy of three structured approaches (nominal groups, Delphi, and prediction markets) relative to traditional face-to-face meetings (FTF). We recruited 227 participants (11 groups per method) who were required to solve a quantitative judgment task that did not involve distributed knowledge. This task consisted of ten factual questions, which required percentage estimates. While we

Andreas Graefe; J. Scott Armstrong

2011-01-01

165

Comparing Student Learning Outcomes in Face-to-Face and Online Course Delivery  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Since the advent of fully online delivery of college-level coursework, a number of issues has preoccupied administrators, educators, and researchers with regard to student learning outcomes or performance vis-a-vis face-to-face delivery. The present study does not seek to demonstrate or to discover which mode of delivery is "superior" or…

Sussman, Stephen; Dutter, Lee

2010-01-01

166

Writing as Involvement: A Case for Face-to-Face Classroom Talk in a Computer Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The abandonment of face-to-face voice conversations in favor of the use of electronic conversations in composition classes is an issue to be interrogated. In a recent push to "prepare students for the 21st century," teachers are asked to teach computer applications in the humanities--and composition teachers, who will teach writing in computer…

Berggren, Anne G.

167

Finding the Perfect Blend: A Comparative Study of Online, Face-to-Face, and Blended Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As distance learning evolved, course designers and teachers quickly recognized the value of integrating online features into the classroom. The result was blended learning, a combination of online and face-to-face components. This complex and dynamic new form of education has raised many questions about the role of computer-mediated communication…

Pearcy, Agnes Goz

2009-01-01

168

Satisfaction of Supervisory Working Alliance: Distance versus Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an attempt to determine the differences between the perceptions of distance and face-to-face faculty supervision, this research surveyed 190 master's-level counseling students regarding their supervisory working alliance and supervision satisfaction. It also explored the differences between the perceptions of practicum- and internship-level…

Dickens, Angelia Dawn Holland

2010-01-01

169

Stuck on you: Face-to-face arousal and gaze aversion in Williams syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction. During face-to-face questioning typically developing children and adults use gaze aversion (GA), away from their questioner, when thinking. GA increases with question difficulty and improves the accuracy of responses. We investigate whether individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), associated with hypersociability and atypical face gaze, use GA to manage cognitive load and whether physiological arousal is associated with looking at

Gwyneth Doherty-Sneddon; Deborah M. Riby; Lesley Calderwood; Leanne Ainsworth

2009-01-01

170

A Comparison of Student Evaluations of Teaching between Online and Face-to-Face Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature contains indications of a bias in student evaluations of teaching (SET) against online instruction compared to face-to-face instruction. The present case study consists of content analysis of anonymous student responses to open-ended SET questions submitted by 534 students enrolled in 82 class sections taught by 41 instructors, one…

Kelly, Henry F.; Ponton, Michael K.; Rovai, Alfred P.

2007-01-01

171

From face-to-face teaching to online distance education classes: some challenges and surprises  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many educators in higher education are now delivering their courses online. For some however this move was initially a reluctant one as it was difficult to perceive how their face-to-face classes could be successfully transported into the online medium. This paper describes the journey of one academic who took on the challenge ofdeveloping a knowledge building online distance education community.

Jan Turbill

2002-01-01

172

Face-to-Face or Distance Training: Two Different Approaches To Motivate SMEs to Learn.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Two approaches to training for small/medium-sized enterprises were compared: a British distance learning program and an Irish program offering face-to-face training for micro-enterprises. Both used constructivist, collaborative, and reflective methods. Advantages and disadvantages of each approach were identified. (SK)|

Lawless, Naomi; Allan, John; O'Dwyer, Michele

2000-01-01

173

Examination of program exposure across intervention delivery modes: face-to-face versus internet  

PubMed Central

Background There has been increasing interest in the ability of the internet to produce behaviour change. The focus of this study was to describe program exposure across three intervention groups from a randomised trial (RT) comparing traditional face-to-face, internet-mediated (combined internet plus face-to-face), and internet-only program delivery. Methods Baseline and immediately post-intervention survey data, and exposure rates from participants that commenced the RT were included (n = 192). Exposure was defined as either face-to-face attendance, website usage, or a combination of both for the internet-mediated group. Characteristics of participants who were exposed to at least 75% of the program material were explored. Descriptive analysis and logistical regression were used to examine differences between groups for program exposure. Results All groups showed decrease in program exposure over time. Differences were also observed (?2 = 10.37, p < 0.05), between intervention groups. The internet-mediated (OR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.13–5.1) and internet-only (OR = 2.96, 95% CI 1.38–6.3) groups were more likely to have been exposed to at least 75% of the program compared to the face-to-face group. Participants with high physical activity self-efficacy were 1.82 (95% CI 1.15–2.88) times more likely to have been exposed to 75% of the program, and those allocated to the face-to-face group were less likely to have attended 75% of the face-to-face sessions if they were classified as obese (OR = 0.21 95% CI 0.04–0.96). Conclusion These results suggest that the internet groups were as effective as the face-to-face delivery mode in engaging participants in the program material. However, different delivery methods may be more useful to different sub-populations. It is important to explore which target groups that internet-based programs are best suited, in order to increase their impact.

Steele, Rebekah M; Mummery, W Kerry; Dwyer, Trudy

2007-01-01

174

Interdyad Differences in Early Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication: Real-Time Dynamics and Developmental Pathways.  

PubMed

A microgenetic research design with a multiple case study method and a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses was used to investigate interdyad differences in real-time dynamics and developmental change processes in mother-infant face-to-face communication over the first 3 months of life. Weekly observations of 24 mother-infant dyads with analyses performed dyad by dyad showed that most dyads go through 2 qualitatively different developmental phases of early face-to-face communication: After a phase of mutual attentiveness, mutual engagement begins in Weeks 7-8, with infant smiling and cooing bidirectionally linked with maternal mirroring. This gives rise to sequences of positive feedback that, by the 3rd month, dynamically stabilizes into innovative play routines. However, when there is a lack of bidirectional positive feedback between infant and maternal behaviors, and a lack of permeability of the early communicative patterns to incorporate innovations, the development of the mutual engagement phase is compromised. The findings contribute both to theories of relationship change processes and to clinical work with at-risk mother-infant interactions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23527490

Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

2013-03-25

175

A common key generation technique based on similarity of received signal strength for secure wireless face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

A spread of short-range and infrastructure-less wireless communication devices increases opportunities for temporarily exchanging information in a face-to-face style, called wireless face-to-face communication. In such wireless communication, a critical issue with secure information exchange is encryption key sharing without the aid of any centralized administration. In this paper, we propose a novel key sharing technique for wireless face-to-face communications. The

T. Honda; A. Noda; Y. Arakawa; S. Tagashira; T. Kitasuka; T. Kitaguchi; N. Tsumura; A. Fukuda

2010-01-01

176

Internet versus face-to-face therapy: emotional self-disclosure issues for young adults.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to compare differences in emotional self-disclosure between young adult Internet users who prefer face-to-face therapy to those who prefer Internet therapy. A convenience sample of 328 was recruited from Facebook to complete an online survey. A total of 263 preferred face-to-face therapy (F2FT) while 65 preferred Internet therapy (IT). Significant differences were found with the F2FT group willing to disclose emotions of depression, jealously, anxiety, and fear to a therapist more frequently than the IT group. The majority reported a preference for F2FT over IT. Recommendations for future professional practice and research are included. PMID:19742368

Rogers, Vickie L; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Wykle, May L; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

2009-10-01

177

Knowing Your Place: Self-Perceptions of Status in Face-to-Face Groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Status is the prominence, respect, and influence individuals enjoy in the eyes of others. Theories of positive illusions suggest that individuals form overly positive perceptions of their status in face-to-face groups. In contrast, the authors argue that individuals' perceptions of their status are highly accurate—that is, they closely match the group's perception of their status—because forming overly positive status self-perceptions

Cameron Anderson; Sanjay Srivastava; Jennifer S. Beer; Sandra E. Spataro; Jennifer A. Chatman

2006-01-01

178

Face-to-face and online collaboration: appreciating rules and adding complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports how 6-8 year-old children build, play and share video-games in an animated programming environment. Children program their games using rules as creative tools in the construction process. While working both face-to-face and remotely on their games, we describe how they can collaboratively come to explain phenomena arising from programmed or 'system' rules. Focusing on one illustrative case

Richard Noss; Celia Hoyles; Jean-Luc Gurtner; Ross Adamson; Sarah Lowe

2002-01-01

179

Computer-Supported and Face-to-Face Collaboration on Design Tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of how people's discourse is affected by computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) tools and shared workspaces was explored by examining collaboration on shared design tasks. Pairs of 28 less experienced and 28 more experienced engineering design students undertook a computer-assisted design task, either face-to-face (FtF) or remotely. The CSCW medium provided views of interlocutors' faces and upper body plus

Tony Anderson; Alison Sanford; Avril Thomson; William Ion

2007-01-01

180

Face-to-face versus computer-mediated communication in a primary school setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer-mediated communication is increasingly being used to support cooperative problem solving and decision making in schools. Despite the large body of literature on cooperative or collaborative learning, few studies have explicitly compared peer learning in face-to-face (FTF) versus computer-mediated communication (CMC) situations. In the present study, the effects of the use of cooperative FTF groups versus and CMC groups on

Henny van der Meijden; Simon Veenman

2005-01-01

181

An Open Architecture for Face-to-Face Learning and Its Benefits  

Microsoft Academic Search

We already had the opportunity to present our category-based concept for the support of face-to-face learning during the last symposium. In the meantime, we made further experiences that contributed to the refinement of our concept and given publication. Our last paper served to present the technical basis of our concept for the development of an open architecture and is recommended

Georg Turban; Max Mühlhäuser

2006-01-01

182

Online or face-to-face? Students' experiences and preferences in e-learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Which aspects of e-learning courses do students experience as being favorable for learning? When do students prefer online or face-to-face learning components? These questions were the subject of a research study in a sample of 2196 students from 29 Austrian universities. The students completed a questionnaire on their experiences attending an e-learning course, on their perceived achievements, and on their

Manuela Paechter; Brigitte Maier

2010-01-01

183

ICT in Teacher Education: Developing Key Competencies in Face-to-Face and Distance Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper reports the training of 56 Teachers in ICT and Education Course. This course included one week face-to-face and\\u000a seven weeks in distance learning. Students developed several ICT competencies during theses weeks, reporting its use in their\\u000a classes. A characterization of the subjects’ digital literacy is presented, as well as their participation in chat sessions\\u000a and in the forum,

Ana A. Carvalho

184

Need On-line Distant Learning Be Inferior to Face-to-face Learning?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although some people argue that e-learning could never be as educationally effective as face-to-face learning, this paper discusses some potential benefits of on-line distant learning in comparison with traditional learning. First, on-line distant learning is capable of creating a sense of unity just as classroom learning. Second, text-based on-line learning provides a barrier-free environment. Third, movie-based on-line learning would interest

Yukari Makino

185

A comparison of nonresponse in mail, telephone, and face-to-face surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports a meta-analysis of 45 studies that explicitly compare the response obtained using a mail, telephone or face-to-face survey. The data analysis uses a generalized hierarchical linear model. Sampling procedure (e.g., local convenience sample, random general sample), saliency of topic, and research organization (university, government versus market research) had an effect on the response. On the average, the

Joop J. Hox; Edith D. De Leeuw

1994-01-01

186

Telephone vs Face-to-Face Interviews for Quantitative Food Frequency Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To develop and test a quantitative food frequency method for administration by telephone.Design A comparison study of telephone and face-to-face interviews was conducted among a representative sample of the five major ethnic groups in Oahu, Hawaii. Two interviews were administered 4 to 6 months apart by trained interviewers using identical questionnaires and color photographs of food items showing three

LI-CHING LYU; JEAN H HANKIN; LUCY Q LIU; LYNNE R WILKENS; JAMES H LEE; MARC T GOODMAN; LAURENCE N KOLONEL

1998-01-01

187

Cost-Effectiveness of Face-to-Face Smoking Cessation Interventions: A Dynamic Modeling Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo estimate the cost-effectiveness of five face-to-face smoking cessation interventions (i.e., minimal counseling by a general practitioner (GP) with, or without nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), intensive counseling with NRT, or bupropion, and telephone counseling) in terms of costs per quitter, costs per life-year gained, and costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained.

Talitha L. Feenstra; Heleen H. Hamberg-van Reenen; Rudolf T. Hoogenveen; Maureen P. M. H. Rutten-van Mölken

2005-01-01

188

Face-to-face communication: Is it really necessary in a digitizing world?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many predictions regarding the extinction of face-to-face communication have themselves begun to disappear. While emerging information technologies are substantially altering the face of business communication, close-quarter discussion and debate remain important, as evidenced in the productivity of the medium and what we have recently learned about social behavior. Still, the possibility of dramatic change cannot be completely discounted. If technology

Alan R. Winger

2005-01-01

189

Learning from Each Other: Online and Face to Face Communities of Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a reflection and analysis of the similarities and differences in the development process of virtual and face to face Communities of Practice (CoP). A qualitative and quantitative analysis of various CoPs with a total community membership in excess of 300,000 is used as a basis for reflection and understanding. The authors advocate that CoP managers need to

Ed MITCHELL; Patricia WOLF; Abdul Samad

190

Effects of group task pressure on perceptions of email and face-to-face communication effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper adds to a growing group systems literature in the area of task-technology fit by investigating effects of group task pressure on perceptions of media effectiveness. A quasi-experiment was conducted using long-term participants in low-and high-level group task pressure treatments. Following treatment, participants rated email and face-to-face communication effectiveness on four task dimensions based on the well-known McGrath group

E. Vance Wilson; James R. Connolly

2001-01-01

191

Unilateral face-to-face communication in ultimatum bargaining - A video experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is commonly accepted that face-to-face communication induces cooperation. The experiment disentangles communication and social effect (replication of Roth, 1995) and examines the components of the social effect with the help of unilateral communication. Results suggest that separate processes, both of a strategic and of an affective-social nature may induce cooperative outcomes in ultimatum bargaining with pre-play communication, depending on

Carsten Schmidt

2004-01-01

192

Knowledge Sharing through Face-to-Face Communication and Labour Productivity: Evidence from British Workplaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractWe investigate whether the adoption by workplaces of human resources management (HRM) practices that enhance face-to-face communication (FTFC) among employees is associated with productivity gains. The analysis is based on a nationally representative sample of over 500 British trading establishments drawn from the linked 2004 Workplace Employment Relations Survey and Annual Business Inquiry, for which objective measures of labour productivity

Sergio Salis; Allan M. Williams

2010-01-01

193

A Linguistic Approach to Studying Quality of Face-to-Face Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bringing together concepts from previous research in linguistics, social psychology and service quality, this paper explores new grounds in the pursuit of an approach for studying quality in face-to-face communication in service encounters. Audio and video recordings are used to study communication by transcribing verbal and non-verbal behaviour in the recorded activities. It is believed that contextual characteristics are the

Marten Den Haring; Jan Mattsson

1999-01-01

194

Some consequences of e-mail vs. face-to-face communication in experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

As more and more social science experiments are being run on computers, the question of whether these new laboratory instruments affect outcomes is increasingly important. We examine whether the mode of communication in experiments has any effect on the choices made by individuals. We find that the effects of `e-mail' vs. face-to-face communication vary with the nature of the decisions

Norman Frohlich; Joe Oppenheimer

1998-01-01

195

The impacts of Computer-Mediated Communication and Face-to-Face Communication in actual organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract There are various kinds of studies ,about characteristics of CMC ,(Computer-Mediated Communication). But many ,of them ,are experimental ,studies and compare ,CMC with Face-to-Face (FTF) communication. Therefore, people in each condition for the experiment (CMC or FTF) are allowed to have communication using only onemedium. However, in actual work conditions, people use not only CMC or FTF but both

Tsuneki Mukahi; Masaaki Nakamura; Gail Corbitt

196

Contacts with agreements: Towards face-to-face communication modelingContacts with agreements  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   In this paper a random matching model is elaborated to characterize bilateral interregional human face-to-face contacts.\\u000a The bilateral contacts can be realized only when both parties agree to meet each other. Thus, mutual agreement is the core\\u000a of our contact modeling. Spatial distribution of bilateral contacts can be described as the results of random matching by\\u000a potential meeting partners.

Kiyoshi Kobayashi; John R. Roy; Kei Fukuyama

1998-01-01

197

Visualization of knowledge-creation process using face-to-face communication data  

Microsoft Academic Search

No firm can survive without building a mechanism to create knowledge in the 21st century. The knowledge-creation theory by Nonaka has successfully generalized a knowledge-creation process in an organization. However, nobody has found a quantitative method for evaluating the process. This paper proposes a technique of visualizing the knowledge-creation process by plotting graphs of face-to-face contact time and number of

S. Tsuji; N. Sato; K. Yano; R. Otsuka; N. Moriwaki; K. Ara; Y. Wakisaka; N. Ohkubo; M. Hayakawa; Y. Horry

2009-01-01

198

A comparative study of computer conferencing and face-to-face communications in systems design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of computer conferencing and face-to-face communications to support the work of student teams in a systems analysis project. The study compares the differences in decision quality associated with the projects accomplished by these teams, such team's confidence in the group decision, and each team's satisfaction with the overall decision process.The

Mary Sumner; Dennis Hostetler

2000-01-01

199

Study on Remote Collaborative System for Face-to-face Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we study on face-to-face communication technology in remote collaborative environment by the volume communication\\u000a technology. We proposed a system that can determine whether or not local user’s face is turned for user in remote site by\\u000a estimation of the face direction with video image captured from camera. The advantage of our system is a simple, and special

Mitsugu Miyazaki; Norihisa Segawa; Yasuo Ebara; Koji Koyamada; Yoshihiko Abe; Jun Sawamoto

200

Distraction in older drivers – A face-to-face interview study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of older drivers’ engagement in distracting activities while driving is largely unexplored. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in the city of Braunschweig, Germany, comparing a sample of older drivers (n=205) to a group of middle-aged drivers (n=209). The drivers were interviewed on their engagement in distracting activities during the last half an hour of their driving trip, including the

Julia Fofanova; Mark Vollrath

201

Can face-to-face patient education be replaced by computer-based patient education?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In plastic surgery patient education is important but time consuming. It can be performed face-to-face or it can be computer based. In order to examine the merits of computer-based patient education, a research of the literature was carried out. The results of this search show that computer-based education is of great potential benefit. Especially in retaining information, informed consent and

B. J. Keulers; P. H. M. Spauwen

2003-01-01

202

Interest in Behavioral and Psychological Treatments Delivered Face-to-Face, by Telephone, and by Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the acceptability of internet and telephone treatments, or what factors might influence patient interest\\u000a in receiving treatments via these media. This study examined the level of interest in face-to-face, telephone, and internet\\u000a treatment and factors that might influence that interest. Six hundred fifty-eight primary care patients were surveyed. Among\\u000a patients interested in some form of behavioral

David C. Mohr; Juned Siddique; Joyce Ho; Jenna Duffecy; Ling Jin; J. Konadu Fokuo

2010-01-01

203

Integrating face?to?face and online teaching: academics' role concept and teaching choices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports and analyses data from a longitudinal qualitative research study which is investigating the changing teaching self?concept of university lecturers who combine online and face?to?face teaching. The first phase of this collective case study research has focused on the experiences of five ‘early adopter’ university lecturers during and following one teaching semester. The themes which have emerged across

Kim McShane

2004-01-01

204

Aligning Chips Face-to-Face for Dense Capacitive and Optical Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a new method that precisely self-aligns face-to-face semiconductor chips or wafers to enable communication between the chips using electromagnetic waves. Our alignment mechanism takes advantage of miniaturized versions of two of nature's idealized shapes: an inverse pyramidal shape defined by a self-terminating wet-etch process in silicon and micro-spheres with radii accurate to submicron accuracy. This approach allows chips

John E. Cunningham; Ashok V. Krishnamoorthy; Ivan Shubin; Xuezhe Zheng; Mehdi Asghari; Dazeng Feng; James G. Mitchell

2010-01-01

205

Computer-mediated instruction: a comparison of online and face-to-face collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the effects of collaboration mode and group composition during a computer-mediated collaborative (CMC)\\u000a program. Six intact sections of a computer literacy course were assigned to either a face-to-face or a virtual, online collaboration\\u000a treatment condition. Groups consisted of homogeneous lower-ability, homogeneous higher-ability, or heterogeneous-ability pairs.\\u000a The study examined the effects of collaboration mode and group composition on

Jeremy I. Tutty; James D. Klein

2008-01-01

206

Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Groups: Who Makes Riskier Decisions?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although a significant body of research has focused on understanding the effect of media differences on group behaviors and processes, little is known about how media differences influence groups' risk-taking behaviors. This study reports on a laboratory experiment designed to understand the effects of the group communication environment (face-to-face or computer-mediated) on group risk-taking behaviors while subjects performed a hidden

Joseph S. Valacich; Saonee Sarker; Jamie Pratt; Mike Groomer

2002-01-01

207

77 FR 40411 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods...SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods...Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

2012-07-09

208

77 FR 47166 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods...SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods...Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

2012-08-07

209

Counting to 20: Online Implementation of a Face-to-Face, Elementary Mathematics Methods Problem-Solving Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study describes implementation of the same problem-solving activity in both online and face-to-face environments. The activity, done in the first class period or first module of a K-2 mathematics methods course, was initially used in a face-to-face class and then adapted later for use in an online class. While the task was originally…

Schwartz, Catherine Stein

2012-01-01

210

Engineering Students' Conceptions of and Approaches to Learning through Discussions in Face-to-Face and Online Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study focused on students' conceptions of and approaches to learning through face-to-face and online discussions. The study setting was a course in which students (N = 110) worked in small teams and in which team discussions took place both face-to-face and online. The design of the study involved a combination of in-depth interviews and…

Ellis, Robert A.; Goodyear, Peter; Calvo, Rafael A.; Prosser, Michael

2008-01-01

211

A Comparison of Face-to-Face or Internet-Delivered Physical Activity Intervention on Targeted Determinants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the equivalency testing results of a 12-week behavior change program on targeted determinates of physical activity (PA) and self-reported health status. Participants (n = 192) were randomized to face-to-face, combined Internet and face-to-face, and Internet-only groups. Equivalency testing was used to examine differences and…

Steele, Rebekah M.; Mummery, W. K.; Dwyer, Trudy

2009-01-01

212

Stability and transitions in mother-infant face-to-face communication during the first 6 months: a microhistorical approach.  

PubMed

In this study the authors attempted to unravel the relational, dynamical, and historical nature of mother-infant communication during the first 6 months. Thirteen mothers and their infants were videotaped weekly from 4 to 24 weeks during face-to-face interactions. Three distinct patterns of mother-infant communication were identified: symmetrical, asymmetrical, and unilateral. Guided by a dynamic systems perspective, the authors explored the stability of and transitions between these communication patterns. Findings from event history analysis showed that (a) there are regularly recurring dyadic communication patterns in early infancy, (b) these recurring patterns show differential stabilities and likelihoods of transitions, (c) dynamic stability in dyadic communication is shaped not only by individual characteristics (e.g., infant sex and maternal parity) but also by the dyad's communication history, and (d) depending on their recency, communication histories varying in temporal proximity exert differential effects on the self-organization processes of a dyadic system. PMID:14584985

Hsu, Hui-Chin; Fogel, Alan

2003-11-01

213

Computer-mediated and face-to-face communication in metastatic cancer support groups.  

PubMed

Objective: To compare the experiences of women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in computer-mediated and face-to-face support groups. Method: Interviews from 18 women with MBC, who were currently in computer-mediated support groups (CMSGs), were examined using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The CMSGs were in an asynchronous mailing list format; women communicated exclusively via email. All the women were also, or had previously been, in a face-to-face support group (FTFG). Results: CMSGs had both advantages and drawbacks, relative to face-to-face groups (FTFGs), for this population. Themes examined included convenience, level of support, intimacy, ease of expression, range of information, and dealing with debilitation and dying. CMSGs may provide a sense of control and a greater level of support. Intimacy may take longer to develop in a CMSG, but women may have more opportunities to get to know each other. CMSGs may be helpful while adjusting to a diagnosis of MBC, because women can receive support without being overwhelmed by physical evidence of disability in others or exposure to discussions about dying before they are ready. However, the absence of nonverbal cues in CMSGs also led to avoidance of topics related to death and dying when women were ready to face them. Agendas for discussion, the presence of a facilitator or more time in CMSGs may attenuate this problem. Significance of results: The findings were discussed in light of prevailing research and theories about computer-mediated communication. They have implications for designing CMSGs for this population. PMID:23768772

Vilhauer, Ruvanee P

2013-06-17

214

Hypnotic prescription without face to face contact: A report from French family medicine.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Guidelines suggest a review of hypnotic prescriptions every four weeks for zopiclone, zolpidem and zaleplon ('Z-drugs'). The lack of face-to-face consultation between the physician and the patient increases the potential of misuse and resultant dependence. Objectives: To determine the proportion of long-term hypnotic Z-drug prescription issued without face-to-face consultation, and factors associated with such practice. Method: Audit based on an extract of data from the French health insurance database in two French departments. Long-term Z-drug prescriptions by general practitioners (GPs) were analysed over a one-year period, regardless of the association of the prescription with a reimbursed consultation. Main factors considered were patient characteristics (gender, age, socioeconomic status, suffering from a chronic disease) and physician characteristics (gender, age, location of the practice, patient list size). Results: Overall, 67 256 long-term Z-drug prescriptions were reviewed. Of these, 23 107 (34.4%) were not associated with a consultation. Only 17% (95%CI: 16-18%) of long-term hypnotic consumers attended a consultation on all the dates noted on the prescription. Z-drug prescriptions were more likely to be prescribed in a consultation if the patient had a chronic illness (P < 0.0001), a low socioeconomic status (P < 0.0001), was less than 45 or over 65 years old (P < 0.0001), or visited a psychiatrist during the same year (P < 0.0001). Having a longer patient list or practising in a rural area were physician characteristics associated with non-adherent Z-drug prescription (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Prescribing Z-drug hypnotics without a face-to-face consultation was frequent, especially in middle-aged patients without co-morbidity who were not seen by a psychiatrist. PMID:23514138

Rat, Cédric; Werner, Erik L; Pivette, Jacques; Senand, Rémy; Nguyen, Jean-Michel

2013-03-20

215

A model for production, perception, and acquisition of actions in face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of action as basic motor control unit for goal-directed movement behavior has been used primarily for private\\u000a or non-communicative actions like walking, reaching, or grasping. In this paper, literature is reviewed indicating that this\\u000a concept can also be used in all domains of face-to-face communication like speech, co-verbal facial expression, and co-verbal\\u000a gesturing. Three domain-specific types of actions,

Bernd J. Kröger; Stefan Kopp; Anja Lowit

2010-01-01

216

76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and Clarifications Related to Home Health AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

2011-07-12

217

Effects of Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Constructive Controversy on Social Interdependence, Motivation, and Achievement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cooperative learning capitalizes on the relational processes by which peers promote learning, yet it remains unclear whether these processes operate similarly in face-to-face and online settings. This study addresses this issue by comparing face-to-face and computer-mediated versions of constructive controversy, a cooperative learning procedure designed to create intellectual conflict among students. One hundred and one undergraduates were randomly assigned to

Cary J. Roseth; Andy J. Saltarelli; Chris R. Glass

2011-01-01

218

Rapport in Conflict Resolution: Accounting for How Face-to-Face Contact Fosters Mutual Cooperation in Mixed-Motive Conflicts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose that face-to-face contact fosters the development of rapport and thereby helps negotiators coordinate on mutually beneficial settlements in mixed-motive conflicts. Specifically, we investigate whether, in a cooperative climate, negotiators' visual access to each other's nonverbal behavior fosters a dyadic state of rapport that facilitates mutual cooperation. Experiment 1 manipulated whether negotiators stood face-to-face or side-by-side (unable to see

Aimee L. Drolet; Michael W. Morris

2000-01-01

219

Measuring Ecoshock and Affective Learning: A Comparison of Student Responses to Online and Face-to-Face Learning Ecologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 12-item ecoshock index was developed and tested to measure differences in university students' responses to online and face-to-face learning ecologies. The index yielded promising internal reliability scores in pilot testing and experimental conditions. Construct validity was supported with evidence from within-subjects experimental comparisons (N = 49) showing that ecoshock was significantly higher in online conditions than face-to-face conditions as

David L. San Jose; Tom Kelleher

2009-01-01

220

AIDS and behavioural risk factors in women in inner city Baltimore: a comparison of telephone and face to face surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVE--The study aimed to investigate the influence the mode of administration of a questionnaire (telephone or face to face) on reports of sexual behaviour and attitudes of HIV risk among woman of reproductive age. DESIGN--Two cross sectional surveys--one, a modified random digit dialing telephone survey, the second, a face to face street sample--were carried out by the same interviewers

M Nebot; D D Celentano; L Burwell; A Davis; M Davis; M Polacsek; J Santelli

1994-01-01

221

The Potential of Internet Mobilization: An Experimental Study on the Effect of Internet and Face-to-Face Mobilization Efforts  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, voluntary associations and political organizations have increasingly relied on Internet-based mobilization campaigns, replacing traditional forms of face-to-face recruitment and mobilization. Within the literature, one can observe an intensive debate about the possible consequences of this transition. Most importantly, the question is whether political mobilization through the Internet is just as effective as mobilization in a face-to-face setting.

Marc Hooghe; Sara Vissers; Dietlind Stolle; Valérie-Anne Mahéo

2010-01-01

222

A Preliminary Comparison Study of Online and Face-to-Face Counseling: Client Perceptions of Three Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This preliminary study examined the similarities and differences between online and face-to-face counseling with regard to general mental health, working alliance, and social presence. Participants included 50 current counseling clients (37 face-to-face, 13 online) who all were recruited through online mediums. Results indicated that online counseling clients perceived a significantly stronger working alliance on the total Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form

Courtney Holmes; Victoria Foster

2012-01-01

223

Controlled Trial of Worksite Health Education through Face-to-Face Counseling vs. E-mail on Drinking Behavior Modification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Controlled Trial of Worksite Health Education Through Face-to-Face Counseling vs. E- mail on Drinking Behavior Modification: Ikuno ARAKI, et al. Department of Medicine & Occupational Health, ExxonMobil Yugen Kaisha—This study examined the effectiveness of a traditional face-to-face health education and e-mail health education on alcohol usage among male workers in comparison with a control group. Male workers at a manufacturing

Ikuno Araki; Hideki Hashimoto; Keiko Kono; Hideaki Matsuki; Eiji Yano

2006-01-01

224

Patient Reactions to Vital Sign Measures: Comparing Home Monitoring Technology to Face-to-Face Delivery  

PubMed Central

Increasingly home health agencies are using home-based technologies to monitor vital signs of chronically ill patients. Patients receive measurements such as blood pressure and weight that indicate risks to their health. Cognitive reactions to risk measures have been studied for face-to-face delivery; however, it is unknown whether the same reactions exist with technology delivery. Reported in this article are study results of a comparative content expert analysis of reactions to technology-delivered health-risk measures. Results suggest that patients have the similar reactions but may be more likely to just accept, without evaluating or considering threats to their health. As home telemonitoring applications continue to evolve, care must be taken avoid creating passive patients and develop best practices that use technology to encourage beneficial self-care behaviors.

Shea, Kimberly; Chamoff, Breanna

2012-01-01

225

An evaluation of face-to-face mentoring vs. electronic mentoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a variety of mentoring methods on students' attitudes toward science, academic performance and retention of classroom science material. Subjects for the research were seventy-one biology students at Brevard Community College located in Cocoa, Florida. Two NASA mentors provided real world applications of academic concepts being learned in an introductory biology class. The mentors worked with one class via videoconferencing and with another class in a face-to-face mode. A third class served as a control group. The study took place in the fall, 2001. Results indicated students' attitudes toward science changed over time, with the mentored classes having the higher interest scores on four of five interest subscales. The electronically mentored class had the highest mean on three of the five interest subscales. Student performance was also positively affected in the mentored classes. No significant increased retention of assigned science material was found.

Buckingham, Gregg A.

226

Towards a Model of Interactivity in Alternative Media: A Multilevel Analysis of Audiences and Producers in a New Social Movement Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research utilized multilevel analysis to explore interactive alternative media production in a new social movement network. Interviews with audiences, local producers, and global producers provide evidence of interactivity between local audiences and local producers and between local producers and global producers. The local audiences provided encouragement to local producers through face-to-face interactions that aided in the establishment of organizational

Joshua D. Atkinson

2008-01-01

227

Closed-loop dialog model of face-to-face communication with a photo-real virtual human  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe an advanced Human Computer Interaction (HCI) model that employs photo-realistic virtual humans to provide digital media users with information, learning services and entertainment in a highly personalized and adaptive manner. The system can be used as a computer interface or as a tool to deliver content to end-users. We model the interaction process between the user and the system as part of a closed loop dialog taking place between the participants. This dialog, exploits the most important characteristics of a face-to-face communication process, including the use of non-verbal gestures and meta communication signals to control the flow of information. Our solution is based on a Virtual Human Interface (VHI) technology that was specifically designed to be able to create emotional engagement between the virtual agent and the user, thus increasing the efficiency of learning and/or absorbing any information broadcasted through this device. The paper reviews the basic building blocks and technologies needed to create such a system and discusses its advantages over other existing methods.

Kiss, Bernadette; Benedek, Balázs; Szijárto, Gábor; Takács, Barnabás

2004-01-01

228

Virtual collaboration: face-to-face versus videoconference, audioconference, and computer-mediated communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As we increase our reliance on mediated communication, it is important to be aware the media's influence on group processes and outcomes. A review of 40+ years of research shows that all media-videoconference, audioconference, and computer-mediated communication--change the context of the communication to some extent, reducing cues used to regulate and understand conversation, indicate participants' power and status, and move the group towards agreement. Text-based computer-mediated communication, the "leanest" medum, reduces status effects, domination, and consensus. This has been shown useful in broadening the range of inputs and ideas. However, it has also been shown to increase polarization, deindividuation, and disinhibition, and the time to reach a conclusion. For decision-making tasks, computer-mediated communication can increase choice shift and the likelihood of more risky or extreme decisions. In both videoconference and audioconference, participants cooperate less with linked collaborators, and shift their opinions toward extreme options, compared with face-to-face collaboration. In videoconference and audioconference, local coalitions can form where participants tend to agree more with those in the same room than those on the other end of the line. There is also a tendency in audioconference to disagree with those on the other end of the phone. This paper is a summary of a much more extensive forthcoming report; it reviews the research literature and proposes strategies to leverage the benefits of mediated communication while mitigating its adverse effects.

Wainfan, Lynne; Davis, Paul K.

2004-08-01

229

Computational studies of face-to-face porphyrin catalyzed reduction of dioxygen.  

SciTech Connect

We are investigating the use of face-to-face porphyrin (FTF) materials as potential oxygen reduction catalysts in fuel cells. The FTF materials were popularized by Anson and Collman, and have the interesting property that varying the spacing between the porphyrin rings changes the chemistry they catalyze from a two-electron reduction of oxygen to a four-electron reduction of oxygen. Our goal is to understand how changes in the structure of the FTF materials lead to either two-electron or four-electron reductions. This understand of the FTF catalysis is important because of the potential use of these materials as fuel cell electrocatalysts. Furthermore, the laccase family of enzymes, which has been proposed as an electrocatalytic enzyme in biofuel cell applications, also has family members that display either two-electron or four electron reduction of oxygen, and we believe that an understanding of the structure-function relationships in the FTF materials may lead to an understanding of the behavior of laccase and other enzymes. We will report the results of B3LYP density functional theory studies with implicit solvent models of the reduction of oxygen in several members of the cobalt FTF family.

Ingersoll, David T.; Muller, Richard Partain, Dr.

2004-08-01

230

Face to Face Interaction with an Intelligent Virtual Agent: The Effect on Learning Tactical Picture Compilation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Learning a process control task, such as tactical picture compilation in the Navy, is difficult, because the students have\\u000a to spend their limited cognitive resources both on the complex task itself and the act of learning. In addition to the resource\\u000a limits, motivation can be reduced when learning progress is slow. Intelligent Virtual Agents may help to improve tutoring\\u000a systems

Willem A. Van Doesburg; Rosemarijn Looije; Willem A. Melder; Mark A. Neerincx

2008-01-01

231

Individual Differences among Depressed Mothers and Their Infants during Face-to-Face Interactions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study was designed to investigate whether depressed mothers would show a predominantly negative affect or fail to provide a positive frame of experience for their babies. Two field studies of depressed mothers and their infants were conducted. A subgroup of 13 subjects and their babies from a larger project conducted in Cambridge…

Cohn, Jeffrey F.

232

Measurement and meaning of head movements in everyday face-to-face communicative interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methodological approaches in which data on nonverbal behavior are collected usually involve interpretative methods in which\\u000a raters must identify a set of defined categories of behavior. However, present knowledge about the qualitative aspects of\\u000a head movement behavior calls for recording detailed transcriptions of behavior. These records are a prerequisite for investigating\\u000a the function and meaning of head movement patterns. A

Andreas Altorfer; Stefan Jossen; Othmar Würmle; Marie-Louise Käsermann; Klaus Foppa; Heinrich Zimmermann

2000-01-01

233

Effect of Feedback during Lecture Style Delivery Both in a Face-to-Face Classroom & during a Distance Education Television Session in a Developing Country like Bangladesh without the Use of Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distance education lectures aired over national television without means of interactivity has had very little success in providing open university style of education in a developing country like Bangladesh. This paper explores some effects of providing feedback to students on their participation in a distance education scenario and in a normal face-to-face classroom situation. The techniques applied do not make

Yousuf M. Islam; Zillur Rahman; Shafiq Shamsur Razzaq; M. A. Sayed; S. Zaman

2006-01-01

234

Hybrid literacy: Face-to-face and online learning in a high school English language arts class  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology as a tool to mediate cognition and to facilitate social relationships YN8 is advancing at a rapid pace. Schools cannot afford to remain idle; they must consider the best ways in which to incorporate online learning into their curricula. The spirit of this study, therefore, was to understand how online and face-to-face learning was infused in what is described

Mark Gerard Cacciatore

2010-01-01

235

Designing for Difference: An Exploration of the Cultural Differences between Face-to-Face and Online Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses data from a range of evaluative research carried out at Edge Hill to explore the differences and similarities between face-to-face learning and online learning. Whilst there are many similarities, the design and tutoring of online learning appears more complex and demanding for both students and tutors. Part of the reason for this is the cultural differences that

Andrew Sackville; Cathy Sherratt; Lindsey Martin; Mark Schofield; John Davey; Simone Kruger

236

A Comparison of Online and Face-to-face Learning in Undergraduate Finance and Economic Policy Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY This paper addresses some of the questions about the effects of technology on student learning. Using data from students enrolled in a Canadian business school during the 2005 summer term, we compare the performance of online and face-to-face students in two different undergraduate courses: Economic Problems and Policy Analysis and Basic Corporate Finance. When controlling for a potential selection

JACQUES RAYNAULD; HEC Montréal

237

Are the Functions of Teachers in e-Learning and Face-to-Face Learning Environments Really Different?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main purpose of this study is not to compare online and traditional face-to-face instruction merely to prove which one is better, but rather it aims to highlight some of the possible risks and strengths which may help to improve the role of teachers in both methods. The scene consisted of various thematic blocks from a training programme, with teachers

Laura Alonso Díaz; Florentino Blázquez Entonado

2009-01-01

238

The effects of online and face to face problem based learning environments in mathematics education on student's academic achievement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims at finding out the effects of the online and face to face problem based learning environments in mathematics education on student's academic achievement. The study was conducted at Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies, Faculty of Education, Hacettepe University. The subjects were 42 freshman students attending to this department at the Autumn term of 2006-2007 academic

Fatih Gürsul; Hafize Keser

2009-01-01

239

Assessing Student Perceptions of the Community of Inquiry Model through Group Collaboration via Online and Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this mixed-method study was to assess student perceptions of teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence, measured by the Community of Inquiry Scale (Arbaugh et al., 2008), through group collaboration via online and face-to-face instruction. Thirty-seven teacher education students participated in this…

Huang, Hui-Wen

2011-01-01

240

How and What University Students Learn through Online and Face-to-Face Discussion: Conceptions, Intentions and Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports a phenomenographic investigation into students' experiences of learning through discussion--both online and face to face (F2F). The study context was a second-year undergraduate course in psychology for social work in which the teacher had designed discussion tasks to begin in F2F mode and to continue online. A combination of…

Ellis, Robert A.; Goodyear, P.; Prosser, M.; O'Hara, A.

2006-01-01

241

Assessing Student Perceptions of the Community of Inquiry Model through Group Collaboration via Online and Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this mixed-method study was to assess student perceptions of teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence, measured by the Community of Inquiry Scale (Arbaugh et al., 2008), through group collaboration via online and face-to-face instruction. Thirty-seven teacher education students participated in this…

Huang, Hui-Wen

2011-01-01

242

Native and Non-Native Speakers in Online and Face-to-Face Discussions: Leveling the Playing Field  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigated the role of native language in the context of online versus face-to-face learning environments. Findings from a mixed-methods analysis revealed that native language was a factor in distinguishing among the learning opportunities in these two classes. Data for the online course were 10 archived asynchronous discussions on…

Hlas, Anne Cummings; Schuh, Kathy L.; Alessi, Stephen M.

2008-01-01

243

Applying the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Student Perceptions, Behaviours and Success Online and Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study compares student perceptions, learning behaviours and success in online and face-to-face versions of a Principles of Microeconomics course. It follows a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) approach by using a cycle of empirical analysis, reflection and action to improve the learning experience for students. The online course…

Horspool, Agi; Lange, Carsten

2012-01-01

244

Blending Synchronous Face-to-Face and Computer-Supported Cooperative Learning in a Hybrid Doctoral Seminar  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Online education is often assumed to be synonymous with asynchronous instruction, existing apart from or supplementary to face-to-face instruction in traditional bricks-and-mortar classrooms. However, expanding access to computer-mediated communication technologies now make new models possible, including distance learners synchronous online…

Roseth, Cary; Akcaoglu, Mete; Zellner, Andrea

2013-01-01

245

Seeing through the Screen: Is Evaluative Feedback Communicated More Effectively in Face-to-Face or Computer-Mediated Exchanges?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes a study of college students that examined how the use of computer mediated communication affected the transmission of performance and interpersonal appraisal information. Examined whether interpersonal judgments obtained through face-to-face communication resulted in greater positivity, but compromised accuracy, relative to…

Hebert, Brenda G.; Vorauer, Jacquie D.

2003-01-01

246

MBTI Personality Type and Other Factors that Relate to Preference for Online versus Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Online college classes are being offered at a rate that far exceeds the growth of overall higher education classes. However, much can still be learned about how to create a better online classroom environment by determining why a large percentage of students continue to prefer face-to-face classes. One factor among many that may have an influence…

Harrington, Rick; Loffredo, Donald A.

2010-01-01

247

The Efficacy of Computer-Assisted Instruction Versus Face-to-Face Instruction in Academic Libraries: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies examining the comparative efficacy of face-to-face and computer assisted library instruction were reviewed. Differences in study methodology and lack of quality made meta-analysis impossible; however, the two methods appear to be equally effective for teaching basic library skills. More research needs to be done to confirm this finding.

Li Zhang; Erin M. Watson; Laura Banfield

2007-01-01

248

Integrating Blog and Face-to-Face Instruction into an ESP Course: English for Hospitality and Tourism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the rapid growth of international trade and globalization, English language has been emphasized in Asia countries, thus professionals with a good command of English has become essential and important. This study aimed to establish a blended model combining face-to-face (F2F) instruction for English for Specific Purposes (ESP) course: English…

Shih, Ru-Chu

2012-01-01

249

Bringing Group-Level Personality to the Electronic Realm: A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Virtual Contexts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the increasing popularity of virtual teams in organizations, very little is known about how personality traits may differentiate effective virtual teams from effective face-to-face teams. This paper sought to examine if extraversion, oppenness to experience, and an individual's predisposition to be a team player would be differentially related to team performance and team cohesion based on whether the teams

Rhiannon MacDonnell; Thomas ONeill; Theresa Kline; Laura Hambley

2009-01-01

250

A Meta-Analytic and Qualitative Review of Online versus Face-to-Face Problem-Based Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional strategy that is poised for widespread application in the current, growing, on-line digital learning environment. While enjoying a track record as a defensible strategy in face-to-face learning settings, the research evidence is not clear regarding PBL in on-line environments. A review of the…

Jurewitsch, Brian

2012-01-01

251

Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Presentation of Course Content in an Introductory Special Education Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Instructional content was presented differently in two introductory special education course sections. In a face-to-face (f2f) section, the instructor met with students on regularly scheduled days and times and presented content in person. In the other section, content was presented using enhanced podcasts, consisting of the instructor narrating…

Thompson, James R.; Klass, Patricia H.; Fulk, Barbara M.

2012-01-01

252

Learning through Face-to-Face and Online Discussions: Associations between Students' Conceptions, Approaches and Academic Performance in Political Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports on research investigating student experiences of learning through face-to-face and online discussions in a political science course in a large Australian university. Using methodologies from relational research into university student learning, the study investigates associations between key aspects of student learning focusing…

Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Ellis, Robert; Goodyear, Peter; Piggott, Leanne

2010-01-01

253

MBTI personality type and other factors that relate to preference for online versus face-to-face instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online college classes are being offered at a rate that far exceeds the growth of overall higher education classes. However, much can still be learned about how to create a better online classroom environment by determining why a large percentage of students continue to prefer face-to-face classes. One factor among many that may have an influence on preference is personality

Rick Harrington; Donald A. Loffredo

2010-01-01

254

Comparing Costs of Telephone versus Face-to-Face Extended Care Programs for the Management of Obesity in Rural Settings  

PubMed Central

Background A major challenge following successful weight loss is continuing the behaviors required for long-term weight maintenance. This challenge may be exacerbated in rural areas with limited local support resources. Objective This study describes and compares program costs and cost-effectiveness for 12-month extended care lifestyle maintenance programs following an initial 6-month weight loss program. Design A 1-year prospective controlled randomized clinical trial. Participants/Setting The study included 215 female participants age 50 or older from rural areas who completed an initial 6-month lifestyle program for weight loss. The study was conducted from June 1, 2003, to May 31, 2007. Intervention The intervention was delivered through local Cooperative Extension Service offices in rural Florida. Participants were randomly-assigned to a 12-month extended care program using either individual telephone counseling (n=67), group face-to-face counseling (n=74), or a mail/control group (n=74). Main Outcome Measures Program delivery costs, weight loss, and self-reported health status were directly assessed through questionnaires and program activity logs. Costs were estimated across a range of enrollment sizes to allow inferences beyond the study sample. Statistical Analyses Performed Non-parametric and parametric tests of differences across groups for program outcomes were combined with direct program cost estimates and expected value calculations to determine which scales of operation favored alternative formats for lifestyle maintenance. Results Median weight regain during the intervention year was 1.7 kg for participants in the face-to-face format, 2.1 kg for the telephone format, and 3.1 kg for the mail/control format. For a typical group size of 13 participants, the face-to-face format had higher fixed costs, which translated into higher overall program costs ($420 per participant) when compared to individual telephone counseling ($268 per participant) and control ($226 per participant) programs. While the net weight lost after the 12-month maintenance program was higher for the face-to-face and telephone programs compared to the control group, the average cost per expected kilogram of weight lost was higher for the face-to-face program ($47/kg) compared to the other two programs (approximately $33/kg for telephone and control). Conclusions Both the scale of operations and local demand for programs are important considerations in selecting a delivery format for lifestyle maintenance. In this study, the telephone format had a lower cost, but similar outcomes compared to the face-to-face format.

Radcliff, Tiffany A.; Bobroff, Linda B.; Lutes, Lesley D.; Durning, Patricia E.; Daniels, Michael J.; Limacher, Marian C.; Janicke, David M.; Martin, A. Daniel; Perri, Michael G.

2012-01-01

255

Do Iconic Hand Gestures Really Contribute to the Communication of Semantic Information in a Face-to-Face Context?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has shown that iconic gestures are effective at communicating semantic information, particularly about the\\u000a size and relative position of objects. However, the conclusions of these experiments have been somewhat limited by the fact\\u000a that the methodology has typically involved presenting gesture–speech samples on video rather than in an actual face-to-face\\u000a context. Because these different viewing conditions can impact

Judith Holler; Heather Shovelton; Geoffrey Beattie

2009-01-01

256

Co-Speech Gesture Mimicry in the Process of Collaborative Referring During Face-to-Face Dialogue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mimicry has been observed regarding a range of nonverbal behaviors, but only recently have researchers started to investigate\\u000a mimicry in co-speech gestures. These gestures are considered to be crucially different from other aspects of nonverbal behavior\\u000a due to their tight link with speech. This study provides evidence of mimicry in co-speech gestures in face-to-face dialogue,\\u000a the most common forum of

Judith Holler; Katie Wilkin

2011-01-01

257

Blended online and face-to-face learning: A pilot project in the Faculty of Education, Eduardo Mondlane University  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is about the introduction of blended online and face-to-face learning to the Faculty of Education at Eduardo Mondlane University (EMU) in Mozambique. The main objective of the intervention was to explore the use of a course management system (CMS) within a flexible, student-centred teaching and learning strategy. The author selected two courses, developed an implementation plan, and designed

Xavier Muianga; Eduardo Mondlane

258

Influences of AR-Supported Simulation on Learning Effectiveness in Face-to-face Collaborative Learning for Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Augmented Reality (AR), using a mixture of the virtual and physical world, has been recognized as a promising environment for improving the quality of collaboration in educational domains. To identify how an AR-supported simulation affects collaborative learning, this study compared collaborative learning effectiveness between the conditions of AR-supported and traditional face-to-face collaborative learning for Physics. The findings revealed that collaborative

Nai Li; Yuan Xun Gu; Leanne Chang; Henry Been-Lirn Duh

2011-01-01

259

CarettaKids: a system for supporting children's face-to-face collaborative learning by integrating personal and shared spaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a new system called CarettaKids that supports face-to-face collaborative learning by children. CarettaKids uses a sensing board based on the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology to support collaboration in a shared space, and the Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) device to support activity in personal spaces. We also introduced this system into an actual classroom environment to evaluate its

Akiko Deguchi; Masanori Sugimoto; Tomokazu Yamamoto; Etsuji Yamaguchi; Fusako Kusunoki; Takao Seki; Shigenori Inagaki; Sanae Tachibana; Yuichiro Takeuchi

2006-01-01

260

The relationship between electronic and face-to-face communication and its implication for alternative workplace strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many individuals who have no or limited experience of using electronic communication technologies (ECTs), e.g. telephone, fax, voice, and e-mail are concerned that media like e-mail are a limited, if not poor, way of communicating, and that they cannot replace face-to-face communication. Reports on research examining how relatively sophisticated ECT users use ECTs to communicate, and how electronic communication may

David P. Young

1995-01-01

261

Self-Esteem, Interpersonal Risk, and Preference for E-Mail to Face-To-Face Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

The media choices made by high and low self-esteem Internet users was studied using web- based methodology (n = 265). Participants were asked to rank four media (face-to-face, e-mail, letter, and telephone) in order of preference across four different communication scenarios designed to pose an interpersonal risk. The level of interpersonal risk posed by two of the scenarios (asking for

Adam N. Joinson

2004-01-01

262

Face-to-Face Communication in an Office SettingThe Effects of Position, Proximity, and Exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of hierarchical relationships and physical arrangements on face-to-face communication in an office environment were investigated. Mutual exposure, physical distance between offices, chain-of-command distance, and status distance were compared as predictors of communication time. A path model was developed using exposure as a mediating variable between the distance measures and communication time. Exposure was a sufficient predictor of communication.

G. LAWRENCE ZAHN

1991-01-01

263

Distributed face-to-face communication in bottom-up driven technology management-a model for optimizing communication topologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the communication process in software development organizations has been recognized as the key element to improve the development performance. The paper analyses how different communication topologies-who talks directly to whom and who is informed only via third persons-result in different communication costs and different communication efficiencies. The paper presents a simple cost and efficiency model for face-to-face communication. Based

G. Kubasa; M. Heiss

2002-01-01

264

Procedural Justice and Identification with Virtual Teams: The Moderating Role of Face-to-Face Meetings and Geographical Dispersion  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the previously unstudied relationship between procedural justice and identification within virtual teams,\\u000a with a particular focus on how two features of virtual teams, namely frequency of face-to-face meetings and geographical dispersion,\\u000a moderate that relationship. We argue that these two variables are sources of uncertainty, which in turn makes virtual team\\u000a members more sensitive to perceptions of procedural fairness

Marko Hakonen; Jukka Lipponen

2008-01-01

265

Assessing Liability for Sexual Harassment: Reactions of Potential Jurors to Email Versus Face-to-Face Incidents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates reactions of potential jurors to sexual harassment incidents. Email and face-to-face incidents are\\u000a compared to determine the importance of context on decision-making. The paper considers juror decision-making for both guilt\\u000a and level of award to randomly assigned scenarios involving multiple levels of harassment. Results found that email harassment\\u000a was perceived more harshly, consistent with a context-based hypothesis.

Robyn A. Berkley; David M. Kaplan

2009-01-01

266

Experiences from implementing a face-to-face educational game for iPhone\\/iPod Touch  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a location-aware educational game for the iPhone\\/iPod Touch platform. The game, KnowledgeWar, is a quiz game where students can challenge each other in face-to-face or remote knowledge battles. The game contains a game lobby where players can see all who are connected, and the physical distance to them. The paper describes our experiences from developing KnowledgeWar and

Alf Inge Wang; Bian Wu; Sveinung Kval Bakken

2010-01-01

267

A Comparison Between Online and Face-to-Face Instruction of an Applied Curriculum in Behavioral Intervention in Autism (BIA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Behavioral Intervention in Autism (BIA) is a four-course, internet-based curriculum designed to provide early intervention personnel and parents with comprehensive,training in behavioral intervention. This paper presents findings from field-testing of the first two courses in the curriculum series. Students enrolled in either an online or face-to-face version of the courses were asked by an external evaluator to complete three

Michelle D. Weissman; Beth Sulzer-Azaroff; Richard Fleming; Charles Hamad

268

Alternative Approaches to Tax Risk and Tax Avoidance: analysis of a face-to-face corporate survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes the results of a survey of views of large businesses regarding recent UK Government initiatives aimed at modifying taxpayer behaviour and tackling what is perceived by the tax authorities acting on behalf of Government to be unacceptable\\/aggressive tax avoidance. Specifically, it examines the views of tax directors obtained from face-to-face interviews conducted in spring 2008 with representatives

Judith Freedman; Geoffrey Loomer; John Vella

2008-01-01

269

Validation of a Questionnaire to Assess Self-Reported Colorectal Cancer Screening Status Using Face-to-Face Administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-developed colorectal cancer screening\\u000a questionnaire. Methods We conducted 36 cognitive interviews and made iterative changes to the questionnaire to improve comprehension. The revised\\u000a questionnaire was administered face-to-face to 201 participants. The primary outcome was agreement between questionnaire responses\\u000a and medical records for whether or

Deborah A. Fisher; Corrine I. Voils; Cynthia J. Coffman; Janet M. Grubber; Tara K. Dudley; Sally W. Vernon; John H. Bond; Dawn Provenzale

2009-01-01

270

Faculty Teaching Time: A Comparison of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Graduate Nursing Courses  

PubMed Central

Web-based education brings a new dimension to the issue of measuring faculty workload. Current literature reflects instructor concerns related to the time required to teach web-based courses (McAlpine, Lockerbie, Ramsay & Beaman 2002; Sellani & Harrington, 2002; Smith, Ferguson & Caris, 2001). This descriptive, comparative study seeks to determine the time required to teach web-based graduate nursing courses and compare that to teaching similar courses in the face-to-face setting. Utilizing time records previously collected as part of a federally funded grant, data from 11 web-based and five face-to-face graduate level nursing courses were analyzed. Although a statistically significant difference in teaching time requirements was not demonstrated, several interesting trends did appear. Examples include differences related to preparation time and the division of teacher time while teaching web-based as opposed to face-to-face courses. Future research and continued data collection related to faculty workload and time usage will be needed as web-based courses become a growing part of graduate nursing education.

Andersen, Katherine M; Avery, Melissa D

2008-01-01

271

Faculty teaching time: a comparison of web-based and face-to-face graduate nursing courses.  

PubMed

Web-based education brings a new dimension to the issue of measuring faculty workload. Current literature reflects instructor concerns related to the time required to teach web-based courses (McAlpine, Lockerbie, Ramsay & Beaman 2002; Sellani & Harrington, 2002; Smith, Ferguson & Caris, 2001). This descriptive, comparative study seeks to determine the time required to teach web-based graduate nursing courses and compare that to teaching similar courses in the face-to-face setting. Utilizing time records previously collected as part of a federally funded grant, data from 11 web-based and five face-to-face graduate level nursing courses were analyzed. Although a statistically significant difference in teaching time requirements was not demonstrated, several interesting trends did appear. Examples include differences related to preparation time and the division of teacher time while teaching web-based as opposed to face-to-face courses. Future research and continued data collection related to faculty workload and time usage will be needed as web-based courses become a growing part of graduate nursing education. PMID:18241197

Andersen, Katherine M; Avery, Melissa D

2008-01-30

272

The Effects of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Discussion on Computer Engineering Majors' Performance on the Karnaugh Map  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigates the different effects of web-based and face-to-face discussion on computer engineering majors' performance using the Karnaugh map in digital logic design. Pretest and posttest scores for two treatment groups (web-based discussion and face-to-face discussion) and a control group were compared and subjected to covariance…

Hung, Yen-Chu

2011-01-01

273

A Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Foreign Policy: Student Experiences of Learning through Face-to-Face and Online Discussion and Their Relationship to Academic Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents research on students' experiences of learning through a blend of face-to-face and online discussion. The participants in our study were students enrolled in a foreign policy course at a major Australian university. Students' conceptions of learning through discussion, and their approaches to both face-to-face and online…

Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Ellis, Robert A.; Goodyear, Peter; Piggott, Leanne

2011-01-01

274

Instruments to Explore Blended Learning: Modifying a Method to Analyse Online Communication for the Analysis of Face-to-Face Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the complex practice of today's blended learning, educators need to be able to evaluate both online and face-to-face communication in order to get the full picture of what is going on in blended learning scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of a practical instrument for analysing face-to-face

de Leng, Bas A.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Donkers, H. H. L. M.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

2010-01-01

275

Instruments to Explore Blended Learning: Modifying a Method to Analyse Online Communication for the Analysis of Face-to-Face Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In the complex practice of today's blended learning, educators need to be able to evaluate both online and face-to-face communication in order to get the full picture of what is going on in blended learning scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of a practical instrument for analysing face-to-face

de Leng, Bas A.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Donkers, H. H. L. M.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

2010-01-01

276

Dynamic Infant-Parent Affect Coupling during the Face-to-Face and Still-Face Paradigm: Inter- and Intra-Dyad Differences  

PubMed Central

We examined dynamic infant-parent affect coupling using the Face-to-Face/Still-Face (FFSF) paradigm. The sample included 20 infants whose older siblings had been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD-sibs), and 18 infants with comparison siblings (COMP-sibs). A series of extended autoregressive models was used to represent the self-regulation and interactive dynamics of infants and parents during FFSF. Significant bidirectional affective coupling was found between infants and parents, with the former serving as the “leading members” of the dyads. Further analysis of within-dyad dynamics revealed ongoing changes in concurrent infant-parent linkages both within and across different FFSF episodes. The importance of considering both inter- and intra-dyad differences is discussed.

Chow, Sy-Miin; Haltigan, John D.; Messinger, Daniel S.

2010-01-01

277

Direct Face-to-Face Communication Between Real and Virtual Humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interaction in graphical systems is becoming more and more multimodal. Use of the conventional mode of 2D widget-mouse or keyboard interaction is not very natural for many applications. For the comfort of disabled persons who may not be able to use the hand input devices, it is necessary to explore means for interactive controls for them. In this paper, we

Nadia Magnenat Thalmann; Prem Kalra; Igor Sunday Pandzic

1995-01-01

278

Conversational Analysis as an Analytical Tool for Face-to-Face and Online Conversations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some learning scientists are beginning to investigate social and cultural aspects of learning by examining the interactions between a learner and the environment as well as with other people in the learning environment. This article proposes conversational analysis (CA) as a tool to analyze interactions between learners and instructors in…

Tan, Seng-Chee; Tan, Aik-Ling

2006-01-01

279

Design and Methods for a Comparative Effectiveness Pilot Study: Virtual World vs. Face-to-Face Diabetes Self-Management  

PubMed Central

Background Type 2 diabetes (diabetes) is a serious threat to public health in the United States and disproportionally affects many racial/ethnic minority groups, including African Americans. Limited access to treatment and high attrition rates further contribute to health disparities in diabetes-related morbidity and mortality among minorities. Greater opportunities for increasing access and decreasing barriers to treatment are needed. Technology-based interventions have potential for accomplishing this goal but evidence of feasibility and potential effectiveness is lacking, especially for populations that traditionally have limited educational attainment and low computer literacy. Objective This paper describes the design and methods of a pilot randomized clinical trial that will compare the feasibility and potential efficacy of delivering a diabetes self-management intervention via a virtual world vs. a face-to-face format. Methods Study participants (n=100) will be African American women with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes recruited from primary care practices and affiliated health centers at a large safety net hospital in Massachusetts. Participants will be randomized into a virtual world-based (VW) intervention condition or a face-to-face control condition. Both conditions provide the same theory-based curriculum and equivalent exposure to the self-management program (eight group sessions), and both will be delivered by a single intervention team (a dietitian and a diabetes educator). Assessments will be conducted at baseline and 4 months. Feasibility will be determined by evaluating the degree to which participants engage in the VW-based intervention compared to face to face (number of sessions completed). Potential efficacy will be determined by comparing change in physiological (glycemic control) and behavioral (self-reported dietary intake, physical activity, blood glucose self-monitoring, and medication adherence) outcomes between the experimental and control groups. Results The primary outcomes of interest are feasibility of the VW intervention and its potential efficacy on glucose control and diabetes self-management behaviors, compared to the face-to-face condition. Analysis will use a two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for changes in variable distribution. P values will be calculated using binomial tests for proportions and t tests for continuous variables. Conclusions If the intervention is found to be feasible and promising, it will be tested in a larger RCT.

Heyden, Robin; Mejilla, Roanne; Rizzo DePaoli, Maria; Veerappa, Chetty; Wiecha, John M

2012-01-01

280

Insect Telepresence: Using Robotic Tele-Embodiment to Bring Insects Face-to-Face with Humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Insect Telepresence project combines expertise from the robotics and human-computer interaction communities to create a robot exhibit that enables telepresence in scale. The underlying mission of this work is educational: to promote appreciation for insect life and small-scale complexity through exploration of live insect colonies. In this article we describe the robot hardware and software used to bring students

Stacy All; Illah R. Nourbakhsh

2001-01-01

281

An examination of the effects of a wearable display on informal face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wearable computers have the potential to support our memory, facilitate our creativity, our communication and augment our physical senses [15] but, like email and cell-phones, they also have the potential to interrupt, displace or downgrade our social interactions. This paper presents the results of a simple laboratory-based study which examines the impact of a xybernaut head-mounted Shimadzu display on conversation

Gerard Mcatamney; Caroline Parker

2006-01-01

282

Autistic Traits and Brain Activation during Face-to-Face Conversations in Typically Developed Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAutism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, restricted interests, and repetitive behaviours. The severity of these characteristics is posited to lie on a continuum that extends into the general population. Brain substrates underlying ASD have been investigated through functional neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, fMRI has methodological constraints for studying brain

Masashi Suda; Yuichi Takei; Yoshiyuki Aoyama; Kosuke Narita; Noriko Sakurai; Masato Fukuda; Masahiko Mikuni; Grainne M. McAlonan

2011-01-01

283

Comparison of Internet and Face-to-Face Delivery of a Group Body Image and Disordered Eating Intervention for Women: A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased access to therapy for body dissatisfaction and disordered eating is required. This pilot study compared a group intervention delivered face-to-face or synchronously over the Internet. Women with body dissatisfaction and disordered eating were randomly assigned to a face-to-face (N = 19) or Internet (N = 21) group. Body dissatisfaction, disordered eating, and psychological variables were assessed at baseline, post-intervention,

Emma K. Gollings; Susan J. Paxton

2006-01-01

284

Instruments to explore blended learning: Modifying a method to analyse online communication for the analysis of face-to-face communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the complex practice of today's blended learning, educators need to be able to evaluate both online and face-to-face communication in order to get the full picture of what is going on in blended learning scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of a practical instrument for analysing face-to-face communication that is in alignment

Bas A. de Leng; Diana H. J. M. Dolmans; Arno M. M. Muijtjens; Cees P. M. van der Vleuten

2010-01-01

285

TELEPHONE VERSUS FACE-TO-FACE INTERVIEWING OF NATIONAL PROBABILITY SAMPLES WITH LONG QUESTIONNAIRES COMPARISONS OF RESPONDENT SATISFICING AND SOCIAL DESIRABILITY RESPONSE BIAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last 50 years have seen a gradual replacement of face-to-face interviewing with telephone interviewing as the dominant mode of survey data collection in the United States. But some of the most expensive and large-scale nationally funded, long-term survey re- search projects involving national area-probability samples and long questionnaires retain face-to-face interviewing as their mode. In this article, we propose

ALLYSON L. HOLBROOK; MELANIE C. GREEN; JON A. KROSNICK

286

Non-response to a life course socioeconomic position indicator in surveillance: comparison of telephone and face-to-face modes  

PubMed Central

Background Measurement of socioeconomic position (SEP) over the life course in population health surveillance systems is important for examining differences in health and illness between different population groups and for monitoring the impact of policies and interventions aimed at reducing health inequities and intergenerational disadvantage over time. While face-to-face surveys are considered the gold standard of interviewing techniques, computer-assisted telephone interviewing is often preferred for cost and convenience. This study compared recall of parents' highest level of education in telephone and face-to-face surveys. Methods Questions about father's and mother's highest education level were included in two representative population health surveys of South Australians aged 18 years and over in Spring 2004. A random sample selected from the electronic white pages (EWP) responded to a computer-assisted telephone interview (n = 2999), and a multistage clustered area sample responded to a face-to-face interview (n = 2893). A subsample of respondents in the face-to-face sample who owned a telephone that was listed in the EWP (n = 2206) was also compared to the telephone interview sample. Results The proportion of respondents who provided information about their father's and mother's highest education level was significantly higher in the face-to-face interview (86.3% and 87.8%, respectively) than in the telephone interview (80.4% and 79.9%, respectively). Recall was also significantly higher in the subsample of respondents in the face-to-face interview who had a telephone that was listed in the EWP. Those with missing data for parents' education were more likely to be socioeconomically disadvantaged regardless of the survey mode. Conclusion While face-to-face interviewing obtained higher item response rates for questions about parents' education, survey mode did not appear to influence the factors associated with having missing data on father's or mother's highest education level.

Chittleborough, Catherine R; Taylor, Anne W; Baum, Fran E; Hiller, Janet E

2008-01-01

287

Differential distribution and lateralization of infant gestures and their relation to maternal gestures in the Face-to-Face Still-Face paradigm.  

PubMed

We examined whether there are differences in the lateralization of expressive gestures in infants during normal and stressful interactions with their mothers and the relations between their gestures. Thirty full-term 6-12 month-old infants were videotaped during the Face-to-Face Still-Face paradigm. We coded the occurrence and lateralization of infant self-directed and other-directed gestures and maternal proximal and distal gestures. Infant self-directed gestures increased from the Play to Still-Face episode and decreased from the Still-Face to Reunion episode. Other-directed gestures decreased from the Play to Still-Face and increased from the Still-Face to Reunion episode. During the Still-Face, self-directed gestures were predominantly performed with the left side of the body. Maternal gestures were not lateralized, but there was a prevalence of distal gestures in the Play and Reunion episodes of the paradigm. Left-sided infant other-directed gestures and left-sided maternal gestures were associated with each other. The findings highlight a differential utilization and lateralization of self- and other-directed gestures related to context and the stress experienced by the infant as well as to maternal gestures. These results are suggestive of a brain asymmetry, but an asymmetry related to emotional engagement and stress regulation. PMID:22982284

Montirosso, Rosario; Cozzi, Patrizia; Tronick, Ed; Borgatti, Renato

2012-09-13

288

CBT4BN versus CBTF2F: Comparison of Online versus Face-To-FaceTreatment for Bulimia Nervosa  

PubMed Central

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is currently the “gold standard” for treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN), and is effective for approximately 40–60% of individuals receiving treatment; however, the majority of individuals in need of care do not have access to CBT. New strategies for service delivery of CBT and for maximizing maintenance of treatment benefits are critical for improving our ability to treat BN. This clinical trial is comparing an Internet-based version of CBT (CBT4BN) in which group intervention is conducted via therapeutic chat group with traditional group CBT (CBTF2F) for BN conducted via face-to-face therapy group. The purpose of the trial is to determine whether manualized CBT delivered via the Internet is not inferior to the gold standard of manualized group CBT. In this two-site randomized controlled trial, powered for non-inferiority analyses, 180 individuals with BN are being randomized to either CBT4BN or CBTF2F. We hypothesize that CBT4BN will not be inferior to CBTF2F and that participants will value the convenience of an online intervention. If not inferior, CBT4BN may be a cost-effective approach to service delivery for individuals requiring treatment for BN.

Bulik, Cynthia M.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Zerwas, Stephanie; Levine, Michele D.; Hofmeier, Sara; Trace, Sara E.; Hamer, Robert M.; Zimmer, Benjamin; Moessner, Markus; Kordy, Hans

2012-01-01

289

Face-to-Face Annealing Process of Cu2ZnSnS4 Thin Films Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films were deposited by the spray pyrolysis method. Copper(II) acetate monohydrate, zinc(II) acetate dihydrate, tin(II) chloride dihydrate, sodium trihydrate, and pure sulfur powder were used as the starting materials of spray pyrolysis solutions, and N,N-dimethylformamide and monoethanolamine were used as the solvent and the stabilizer, respectively. The solution was coated on a Mo-coated soda lime glass substrate and after coating solutions, the films were annealed in a N2 gas atmosphere at 360, 440, and 520 °C with or without placing two films face-to-face. It was found that the face-to-face annealing process prevented losses of S and Sn during the annealing process and the samples annealed with another precursor placed face-to-face at 440 and 520 °C showed narrow and large X-ray diffraction peaks and large grains in the surface images.

Tanaka, Kunihiko; Kato, Minoru; Goto, Koichi; Nakano, Yuya; Uchiki, Hisao

2012-10-01

290

Research and development of a training approach combining face-to-face and on-line instruction for improving the technology skills and self-efficacy of science teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A training environment for the technology professional development of science teachers was developed that incorporated three components: an online multimedia tutorial website, an interactive WebCT-based collaboration area, and a weekly face-to-face training session. The research design incorporated a pilot study in June 2000 and a main study in October--November 2000. Journal-writing and paired work approaches were used to help develop an atmosphere of collegiality and collaboration. Participant K--12 science teachers showed significant gains in both technology skills and Internet teaching self-efficacy when measured in a pre- and post-test manner.

Giza, Brian Humphrey

2001-10-01

291

Audio computer assisted self interview and face to face interview modes in assessing response bias among STD clinic patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Audio computer assisted self interview (ACASI) may minimise social desirability bias in the ascertainment of sensitive behaviours. The aim of this study was to describe the difference in reporting risk behaviour in ACASI compared to a face to face interview (FFI) among public sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic attendees. Study design: Randomly selected patients attending a public STD clinic in Baltimore, Maryland, sequentially took an ACASI formatted risk behaviour assessment followed by an FFI conducted by a single clinician, with both interview modalities surveying sexual and drug use behaviours. Binary responses were compared using the sign test, and categorical responses were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test to account for repeated measures. Results: 671 (52% men, mean age 30 years, 95% African American) of 795 clinic attendees screened consented to participate. Subjects affirmed sensitive sexual behaviours such as same sex contact (p = 0.012), receptive rectal sexual exposure (p<0.001), orogenital contact (p<0.001), and a greater number of sex partners in the past month (p<0.001) more frequently with ACASI than with an FFI. However, there were no differences in participant responses to questions on use of illicit drugs or needle sharing. Conclusions: Among STD clinic patients, reporting of sensitive sexual risk behaviours to clinicians was much more susceptible to social desirability bias than was reporting of illegal drug use behaviours. In STD clinics where screening of sexual risk is an essential component of STD prevention, the use of ACASI may be a more reliable assessment method than traditional FFI.

Ghanem, K; Hutton, H; Zenilman, J; Zimba, R; Erbelding, E

2005-01-01

292

Friending, IMing, and Hanging out Face-to-Face: Overlap in Adolescents' Online and Offline Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many new and important developmental issues are encountered during adolescence, which is also a time when Internet use becomes increasingly popular. Studies have shown that adolescents are using these online spaces to address developmental issues, especially needs for intimacy and connection to others. Online communication with its potential for…

Reich, Stephanie M.; Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2012-01-01

293

Does the Method of Instruction Matter? An Experimental Examination of Information Literacy Instruction in the Online, Blended, and Face-to-Face Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The researchers, a librarian and a faculty member, collaborated to investigate the effectiveness of delivery methods in information literacy instruction. The authors conducted a field experiment to explore how face-to-face, online, and blended learning instructional formats influenced students' retention of information literacy skills. Results…

Anderson, Karen; May, Frances A.

2010-01-01

294

Integrating Cloud-Based Strategies and Tools in Face-to-Face Training Sessions to Increase the Impact of Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article is based on the premise that face-to-face training can be augmented with cloud-based technology tools, to potentially extend viable training supports as higher education staff and faculty implement new content/skills in their jobs and classrooms. There are significant benefits to harnessing cloud-based tools that can facilitate both…

Gradel, Kathleen; Edson, Alden J.

2012-01-01

295

Learner Outcomes and Satisfaction: A Comparison of Live Video-Streamed Instruction, Satellite Broadcast Instruction, and Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the final grade and satisfaction level differences among students taking specific courses using three different methods: face-to-face in class, via satellite broadcasting at remote sites, and via live video-streaming at home or at work. In each case, the same course was taught by the same instructor in all three delivery…

Abdous, M'hammed; Yoshimura, Miki

2010-01-01

296

The Effect of Self-Directed Learning Readiness on Achievement Comparing Face-to-Face and Two-Way Distance Learning Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|126 Taiwanese college students were assessed by examining how students' educational background, their self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their prior success in classes impact their academic achievement differently in face-to-face and a two-way distance learning environment. Results indicated that regardless of the instructional delivery…

Hsu, Yu-Chiung; Shiue, Ya-Ming

2005-01-01

297

Which Is More Effective in Educating Teachers to Work with Children with Autism: An Online or Face-to-Face Format of Instruction?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an online format of instruction versus a face-to-face format of instruction in order to determine which format of instruction is most effective in educating teachers to work with students with autism spectrum disorders. Given the current rise in students with autism being served in…

Robbins, Lisa A.

2010-01-01

298

The impact of distance learning on interpersonal communication satisfaction: A comparison of online and face-to-face community college classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of distance learning on interpersonal communication satisfaction in the community college classroom is examined from both a communication perspective and an enrollment management perspective. Using the hyperpersonal communication theory for direction, the findings of this study revealed that there was no significant difference in overall interpersonal communication satisfaction between the online and face-to-face formats. However, older students experienced

Denise Marcella Casey

2004-01-01

299

Developmental Changes in the Relationship Between the Infant's Attention and Emotion During Early Face-to-Face Communication: The 2-Month Transition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Weekly observations documented developmental changes in mother-infant face-to-face communication between birth and 3 months. Developmental trajectories for each dyad of the duration of infant facial expressions showed a change from the dominance of Simple Attention (without other emotion expressions) to active and emotionally positive forms of…

Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

2005-01-01

300

Evaluating College Students' Evaluations of a Professor's Teaching Effectiveness across Time and Instruction Mode (Online vs. Face-to-Face) Using a Multilevel Growth Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Aims: Do college students' ratings of a professor's teaching effectiveness suggest that a professor's teaching improves with time? Does anything predict which instructors receive the highest ratings or improve the fastest? And, importantly, do the correlates of change differ across face-to-face and online courses? Methods: I used data from 10,392…

Carle, Adam C.

2009-01-01

301

The Effects of Choice on Student Persistence, Academic Satisfaction, and Performance in Both Online and Face-to-Face Adult Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The researcher examined the effects of online (OL) and face-to-face (FTF) course modality choice, as a motivational component, on students. self-selection of courses. A naturally occurring control and treatment group comparison design was employed. The participants were 435 college students (200 OL and 235 FTF) who attended an accredited private…

DeCosta, James William

2010-01-01

302

Learner Outcomes and Satisfaction: A Comparison of Live Video-Streamed Instruction, Satellite Broadcast Instruction, and Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the final grade and satisfaction level differences among students taking specific courses using three different methods: face-to-face in class, via satellite broadcasting at remote sites, and via live video-streaming at home or at work. In each case, the same course was taught by the same instructor in all three delivery…

Abdous, M'hammed; Yoshimura, Miki

2010-01-01

303

Exercise Motivation of College Students in Online, Face-to-Face, and Blended Basic Studies Physical Activity and Wellness Course Delivery Formats  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess exercise motivation among college students self-selected into 4 online (OL) and face-to-face (F2F) basic studies' physical activity and wellness course delivery formats. Participants/Methods: Out of 1,037 enrolled students during the Spring 2009 semester, 602 responded online to demographic…

Sidman, Cara Lynn; Fiala, Kelly Ann; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

2011-01-01

304

Comparison of Knowledge and Attitudes Using Computer-Based and Face-to-Face Personal Hygiene Training Methods in Food Processing Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-based training is increasingly favored by food companies for training workers due to convenience, self-pacing ability, and ease of use. The objectives of this study were to determine if personal hygiene training, offered through a computer-based method, is as effective as a face-to-face method in knowledge acquisition and improved…

Fenton, Ginger D.; LaBorde, Luke F.; Radhakrishna, Rama B.; Brown, J. Lynne; Cutter, Catherine N.

2006-01-01

305

Comparison of Knowledge and Attitudes Using Computer-Based and Face-to-Face Personal Hygiene Training Methods in Food Processing Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Computer-based training is increasingly favored by food companies for training workers due to convenience, self-pacing ability, and ease of use. The objectives of this study were to determine if personal hygiene training, offered through a computer-based method, is as effective as a face-to-face method in knowledge acquisition and improved…

Fenton, Ginger D.; LaBorde, Luke F.; Radhakrishna, Rama B.; Brown, J. Lynne; Cutter, Catherine N.

2006-01-01

306

Effect of Telephone-Administered vs Face-to-face Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Adherence to Therapy and Depression Outcomes Among Primary Care Patients  

PubMed Central

Context Primary care is the most common site for the treatment of depression. Most depressed patients prefer psychotherapy over antidepressant medications, but access barriers are believed to prevent engagement in and completion of treatment. The telephone has been investigated as a treatment delivery medium to overcome access barriers, but little is known about its efficacy compared with face-to-face treatment delivery. Objective To examine whether telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (T-CBT) reduces attrition and is not inferior to face-to-face CBT in treating depression among primary care patients. Design, Setting, and Participants A randomized controlled trial of 325 Chicago-area primary care patients with major depressive disorder, recruited from November 2007 to December 2010. Interventions Eighteen sessions of T-CBT or face-to-face CBT. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was attrition (completion vs non-completion) at posttreatment (week 18). Secondary outcomes included masked interviewer-rated depression with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D) and self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Results Significantly fewer participants discontinued T-CBT (n=34; 20.9%) compared with face-to-face CBT (n=53; 32.7%; P=.02). Patients showed significant improvement in depression across both treatments (P<.001). There were no significant treatment differences at posttreatment between T-CBT and face-to-face CBT on the Ham-D (P=.22) or the PHQ-9 (P=.89). The intention-to-treat posttreatment effect size on the Ham-D was d=0.14 (90% CI,-0.05 to 0.33), and for the PHQ-9 it was d=?0.02 (90% CI,-0.20 to 0.17). Both results were within the inferiority margin of d=0.41, indicating that T-CBT was not inferior to face-to-face CBT. Although participants remained significantly less depressed at 6-month follow-up relative to baseline (P<.001), participants receiving face-to-face CBT weresignificantly less depressed than those receiving T-CBT on the Ham-D (difference,2.91; 95% CI, 1.20-4.63;P<.001) and the PHQ-9 (difference, 2.12; 95% CI, 0.68-3.56; P=.004). Conclusions Among primary care patients with depression, providing CBT over the telephone compared with face-to-face resulted in lower attrition and close to equivalent improvement in depression at posttreatment. At 6-month follow-up, patients remained less depressed relative to baseline; however, those receiving face-to-face CBT were less depressed than those receiving T-CBT. These results indicate that T-CBT improves adherence compared with face-to-face delivery, but at the cost of some increased risk of poorer maintenance of gains after treatment cessation.

Mohr, David C.; Ho, Joyce; Duffecy, Jenna; Reifler, Douglas; Sokol, Lesile; Burns, Nichelle Nicole; Jin, Ling; Siddique, Juned

2013-01-01

307

The working alliance in a randomized controlled trial comparing online with face-to-face cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression  

PubMed Central

Background Although numerous efficacy studies in recent years have found internet-based interventions for depression to be effective, there has been scant consideration of therapeutic process factors in the online setting. In face-to face therapy, the quality of the working alliance explains variance in treatment outcome. However, little is yet known about the impact of the working alliance in internet-based interventions, particularly as compared with face-to-face therapy. Methods This study explored the working alliance between client and therapist in the middle and at the end of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for depression. The participants were randomized to an internet-based treatment group (n = 25) or face-to-face group (n = 28). Both groups received the same cognitive behavioral therapy over an 8-week timeframe. Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) post-treatment and the Working Alliance Inventory at mid- and post- treatment. Therapists completed the therapist version of the Working Alliance Inventory at post-treatment. Results With the exception of therapists' ratings of the tasks subscale, which were significantly higher in the online group, the two groups' ratings of the working alliance did not differ significantly. Further, significant correlations were found between clients' ratings of the working alliance and therapy outcome at post-treatment in the online group and at both mid- and post-treatment in the face-to-face group. Correlation analysis revealed that the working alliance ratings did not significantly predict the BDI residual gain score in either group. Conclusions Contrary to what might have been expected, the working alliance in the online group was comparable to that in the face-to-face group. However, the results showed no significant relations between the BDI residual gain score and the working alliance ratings in either group. Trial registration ACTRN12611000563965

2011-01-01

308

Comparing Learners' State Anxiety during Task-Based Interaction in Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The construct of anxiety is often believed to be the affective factor with the greatest potential to pervasively affect the learning process (Horwitz, 2001), and recent research has demonstrated that anxiety can mediate whether learners are able to notice feedback and subsequently produce output (Sheen, 2008). In order to reduce the negative…

Baralt, Melissa; Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura

2011-01-01

309

Open Sound Control: an enabling technology for musical networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since telecommunication can never equal the richness of face-to-face interaction on its own terms, the most interesting examples of networked music go beyond the paradigm of musicians playing together in a virtual room. The Open Sound Control protocol has facilitated dozens of such innovative networked music projects. First the protocol itself is described, followed by some theoretical limits on communication

MATTHEW WRIGHT

2005-01-01

310

Breakeven, Cost Benefit, Cost Effectiveness, and Willingness to Pay for Web-Based Versus Face-to-Face Education Delivery for Health Professionals  

PubMed Central

Background The introduction of Web-based education and open universities has seen an increase in access to professional development within the health professional education marketplace. Economic efficiencies of Web-based education and traditional face-to-face educational approaches have not been compared under randomized controlled trial conditions. Objective To compare costs and effects of Web-based and face-to-face short courses in falls prevention education for health professionals. Methods We designed two short courses to improve the clinical performance of health professionals in exercise prescription for falls prevention. One was developed for delivery in face-to-face mode and the other for online learning. Data were collected on learning outcomes including participation, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, and change in practice, and combined with costs, savings, and benefits, to enable a break-even analysis from the perspective of the provider, cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the health service, and cost-benefit analysis from the perspective of the participant. Results Face-to-face and Web-based delivery modalities produced comparable outcomes for participation, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, and change in practice. Break-even analysis identified the Web-based educational approach to be robustly superior to face-to-face education, requiring a lower number of enrollments for the program to reach its break-even point. Cost-effectiveness analyses from the perspective of the health service and cost-benefit analysis from the perspective of the participant favored face-to-face education, although the outcomes were contingent on the sensitivity analysis applied (eg, the fee structure used). Conclusions The Web-based educational approach was clearly more efficient from the perspective of the education provider. In the presence of relatively equivocal results for comparisons from other stakeholder perspectives, it is likely that providers would prefer to deliver education via a Web-based medium. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN): 12610000135011; http://www.anzctr.org.au/trial_view.aspx?id=335135 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/668POww4L)

Haas, Romi; Keating, Jenny L; Molloy, Elizabeth; Jolly, Brian; Sims, Jane; Morgan, Prue; Haines, Terry

2012-01-01

311

Application of three-dimensional discrete element face-to-face contact model with fissure water pressure to stability analysis of landslide in Panluo iron mine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three-dimensional discrete element face-to-face contact model with fissure water pressure is established in this paper and\\u000a the model is used to simulate three-stage process of landslide under fissure water pressure in the opencast mine, according\\u000a to the actual state of lands lide in Panluo iron mine where landslide happened in 1990 and was fathered in 1999. The calculation\\u000a results show

Lei Zhang; Zuoan Wei; Xiaoyu Liu; Shihai Li

2005-01-01

312

A COMPARISON OF FACE-TO-FACE AND DISTANCE COACHING PRACTICES: COACHES' PERCEPTIONS OF THE ROLE OF THE WORKING ALLIANCE IN PROBLEM RESOLUTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationship between working alliance and problem resolution, among other variables, from the perspective of 102 coaches with psychology or counseling backgrounds. Results of the analyses suggested that coaches' perceptions of the working alliance were positively associated with problem resolution in both face-to-face and distance (e.g., phone) coaching. No significant differences were found in working alliance or

Rhonda M. Berry; Jeffrey S. Ashby; Philip B. Gnilka; Kenneth B. Matheny

2011-01-01

313

The design and implementation of a holistic training model for language teacher education in a cyber face-to-face learning environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports a qualitative investigation that examines the design and implementation of a holistic teacher training model in a cyber face-to-face language learning context. To this end, this study first proposes an e-training model called the Practice, Reflection and Collaboration (PRC) model, and discusses the rationale and theoretical framework underpinning each key component of the model. This is followed

Yuping Wang; Nian-Shing Chen; Mike Levy

2010-01-01

314

A course is a course is a course: Factor invariance in student evaluation of online, blended and face-to-face learning environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors compared the underlying student response patterns to an end-of-course rating instrument for large student samples in online, blended and face-to-face courses. For each modality, the solution produced a single factor that accounted for approximately 70% of the variance. The correlations among the factors across the class formats showed that they were identical. The authors concluded that course modality

Charles Dziuban; Patsy Moskal

2011-01-01

315

Attitudes of students towards the use of a Learning Management System (LMS) in a face-to-face learning mode of instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development and use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in education has led to most universities incorporating elements of online learning into their traditional classrooms via the use of a Learning Management System (LMS) (Burrell-Ihlow 2009, Angeli 2005, Salisbury and Ellis 2003). However, it is not known how well students who are used to traditional face-to-face learning environments and

Desmond Wesley Govender

2010-01-01

316

Physical and digital proximity: emerging ways of health care in face-to-face and telemonitoring of heart-failure patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of telehealth-care technologies profoundly changes existing practices of care. This paper aims to enhance our understanding of these changes by providing a comparative study of health-care services for heart-failure patients based on face-to-face contacts in a policlinic (department of a health care facility treating outpatients) and remote consultations at a telehealth-care centre. I will show how changes that

Nelly Oudshoorn

2009-01-01

317

Media Use, Face-to-Face Communication, Media Multitasking, and Social Well-Being Among 8- to 12YearOld Girls  

Microsoft Academic Search

An online survey of 3,461 North American girls ages 8–12 conducted in the summer of 2010 through Discovery Girls magazine examined the relationships between social well-being and young girls' media use—including video, video games, music listening, reading\\/homework, e-mailing\\/posting on social media sites, texting\\/instant messaging, and talking on phones\\/video chatting—and face-to-face communication. This study introduced both a more granular measure of

Roy Pea; Clifford Nass; Lyn Meheula; Marcus Rance; Aman Kumar; Holden Bamford; Matthew Nass; Aneesh Simha; Benjamin Stillerman; Steven Yang; Michael Zhou

2012-01-01

318

Developmental Changes in the Relationship Between the Infant's Attention and Emotion During Early Face-to-Face Communication: The 2Month Transition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Weekly observations documented developmental changes in mother-infant face-to-face communication between birth and 3 months. Developmental trajectories for each dyad of the duration of infant facial expressions showed a change from the dominance of Simple Attention (without other emotion expressions) to active and emotionally positive forms of attention to the mother toward the end of the 2nd month. The results support

Manuela Lavelli; Alan Fogel

2005-01-01

319

Comparison of Knowledge and Attitudes Using Computer-based and Face-to-Face Personal Hygiene Training Methods in Food Processing Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer-based training is increasingly favored by food companies for training workers due to convenience, self-pacing ability, and ease of use. The objectives of this study were to determine if personal hygiene training, offered through a computer-based method, is as effective as a face-to-face method in knowledge acquisition and improved attitude toward food safety. Employees from four food processing facilities (n

Ginger D. Fenton; Luke F. LaBorde; Rama B. Radhakrishna; J. Lynne Brown; Catherine N. Cutter

2006-01-01

320

Promoting retention and successful completion on Masters courses in education: a study comparing e?tuition using asynchronous conferencing software with face?to?face tuition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the influence of e?tuition using an asynchronous written conferencing package, FirstClass, upon retention and success rates for Masters?level courses in a distance learning programme as compared with similar courses that were supported in a traditional manner using face?to?face tuition. The paper investigates the common assumption that the use of e?tuition might negatively influence both retention and success

Paul Knight

2007-01-01

321

Randomized trial comparing computer-delivered and face-to-face personalized feedback interventions for high-risk drinking among college students.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the efficacy of two brief personalized feedback interventions (PFIs) using identical feedback and motivational interviewing strategies aimed at reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems to two control conditions among a sample of high-risk drinking college students. Students (N = 152) were randomly assigned to a computer-delivered PFI with a video interviewer, a face-to-face PFI with a live interviewer, a comprehensive assessment condition, or a minimal assessment-only condition. At 10 weeks posttreatment, the face-to-face PFI significantly reduced weekly drinking quantity and peak and typical blood alcohol concentration compared with the comprehensive assessment and minimal assessment-only conditions (d values ranged from 0.32 to 0.61). No significant between-group differences were evidenced for the computer-delivered PFI condition, although effect sizes were comparable to other college drinking studies using computer-delivered interventions (d values ranged from 0.20 to 0.27). Results provide further support for the use of a face-to-face PFI to help reduce college students' alcohol consumption and suggest that a video interviewer in the context of a computer-delivered PFI is likely a helpful but not necessarily a complete substitute for a live interviewer. PMID:22197301

Wagener, Theodore L; Leffingwell, Thad R; Mignogna, Joe; Mignogna, Melissa R; Weaver, Cameron C; Cooney, Nathaniel J; Claborn, Kasey R

2011-12-23

322

Online Health Social Networks and Patient Health Decision Behavior: A Research Agenda  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients and health care practitioners alike are using the Internet and specifically online health social networks to gain access to knowledge and social support that they could not obtain as quickly or efficiently from their traditional face-to-face social networks. Given concerns about the quality of information available on the Internet and the differences between social interaction online and offline, it

Cory Allen Heidelberger; Omar F. El-Gayar; Surendra Sarnikar

2011-01-01

323

A Comparison between Face-to-Face Tutored Video Instruction (TVI) and Distributed Tutored Video Instruction (DTVI)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tutored Video Instruction (TVI) is a collaborative learning methodology in which a small group of students studies a videotape of a lecture. We constructed a fully virtual version of TVI called Distributed Tutored Video Instruction (DTVI), in which each student has a networked computer with audio microphone-headset and video camera to support communication within the group. In this report, we

Michael J. Sipusic; Robert L. Pannoni; Randall B. Smith; John Dutra; James F. Gibbons; William R. Sutherland

324

Closed Loop Dialog Model of Face-to-Face Communication with a Photo-Real Virtual Human  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe an advanced Human Computer Interaction (HCI) model that employs photo-realistic virtual humans to provide digital media users with information, learning services and entertainment in a highly personalized and adaptive manner. The system can be used as a computer interface or as a tool to deliver content to end -users. We model the interaction process between the user and

Bernadette Kiss; Balázs Benedek; Gábor Szijártó; Barnabás Takács

325

Closed-loop dialog model of face-to-face communication with a photo-real virtual human  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe an advanced Human Computer Interaction (HCI) model that employs photo-realistic virtual humans to provide digital media users with information, learning services and entertainment in a highly personalized and adaptive manner. The system can be used as a computer interface or as a tool to deliver content to end-users. We model the interaction process between the user and the

Bernadette Kiss; Balázs Benedek; Gábor Szijárto; Barnabás Takács

2004-01-01

326

Physical activity indicators in adults from a state capital in the South of Brazil: a comparison between telephone and face-to-face surveys.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to compare estimates of prevalence of physical activity indicators and associated sociodemographic factors obtained from telephone and face-to-face interviews with adults. Data from a cross-sectional populationbased survey of adults living in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil was compared to data collected through the telephonic system VIGITEL. There was no significant difference between the results from telephone interviews (n = 1,475) and face-to-face interviews (n = 1,720) with respect to prevalence of sufficient leisure time physical activity (19.3% versus 15.5%, respectively), sufficient leisure time and/or commuting physical activity (35.1% versus 29.1%, respectively) and physical inactivity (16.2% versus 12.6%, respectively). Some differences were observed with respect to the sociodemographic factors associated with leisure time and/or commuting physical activity and physical inactivity. The two techniques yielded generally similar results with respect to prevalence and sociodemographic factors associated to physical activity indicators. PMID:24127105

Del Duca, Giovâni Firpo; Nahas, Markus Vinicius; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Hallal, Pedro Curi; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Peres, Marco Aurélio

2013-10-01

327

Telephone consultations in place of face to face out-patient consultations for patients discharged from hospital following surgery: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Routine follow-up following uncomplicated surgery is being delivered by telephone in some settings. Telephone consultations may be preferable to patients and improve outpatient resource use. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of telephone consultations with face to face follow-up consultations, in patients discharged from hospital following surgery. Methods Seven electronic databases (including Medline, Embase and PsycINFO) were searched from inception to July 2011. Comparative studies of any design in which routine follow-up via telephone was compared with face to face consultation in patients discharged from hospital after surgery were included. Study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal were performed independently by two reviewers with consensus reached by discussion and involvement of a third reviewer where necessary. Results Five papers (four studies; 865 adults) met the inclusion criteria. The studies were of low methodological quality and reported dissimilar outcomes precluding any formal synthesis. Conclusions There has been very little comparative evaluation of different methods of routine follow-up care in patients discharged from hospital following surgery. Further work is needed to establish a role for telephone consultation in this patient group.

2013-01-01

328

Electronic [re]constitution of groups: Group dynamics from face-to-face to an online setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors work as online tutors for a BSc (Hons) physiotherapy programme at Coventry University in the United Kingdom. This\\u000a paper represents a stage in our developing understanding, over a 3 year period, of the impact of group dynamics on online\\u000a interaction among physiotherapy students engaged in sharing with their peers their first experiences of clinical practice.\\u000a The literature exploring online

Lynn Clouder; Jayne Dalley; Julian Hargreaves; Sally Parkes; Julie Sellars; Jane Toms

2006-01-01

329

Cobalamin-Independent Methionine Synthase (MetE): A Face-to-Face Double Barrel that Evolved by Gene Duplication  

SciTech Connect

Cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to L-homocysteine (Hcy) without using an intermediate methyl carrier. Although MetE displays no detectable sequence homology with cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH), both enzymes require zinc for activation and binding of Hcy. Crystallographic analyses of MetE from T. maritima reveal an unusual dual-barrel structure in which the active site lies between the tops of the two ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrels. The fold of the N-terminal barrel confirms that it has evolved from the C-terminal polypeptide by gene duplication; comparisons of the barrels provide an intriguing example of homologous domain evolution in which binding sites are obliterated. The C-terminal barrel incorporates the zinc ion that binds and activates Hcy. The zinc-binding site in MetE is distinguished from the (Cys){sub 3}Zn site in the related enzymes, MetH and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, by its position in the barrel and by the metal ligands, which are histidine, cysteine, glutamate, and cysteine in the resting form of MetE. Hcy associates at the face of the metal opposite glutamate, which moves away from the zinc in the binary E {center_dot} Hcy complex. The folate substrate is not intimately associated with the N-terminal barrel; instead, elements from both barrels contribute binding determinants in a binary complex in which the folate substrate is incorrectly oriented for methyl transfer. Atypical locations of the Hcy and folate sites in the C-terminal barrel presumably permit direct interaction of the substrates in a ternary complex. Structures of the binary substrate complexes imply that rearrangement of folate, perhaps accompanied by domain rearrangement, must occur before formation of a ternary complex that is competent for methyl transfer.

Pejcha, Robert; Ludwig, Martha L. (Michigan)

2010-03-08

330

Is guided self-help as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy for depression and anxiety disorders? A systematic review and meta-analysis of comparative outcome studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Although guided self-help for depression and anxiety disorders has been examined in many studies, it is not clear whether it is equally effective as face-to-face treatments. Method We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which the effects of guided self-help on depression and anxiety were compared directly with face-to-face psychotherapies for depression and anxiety disorders. A systematic

P. Cuijpers; T. Donker; A. van Straten; J. Li; G. Andersson

2010-01-01

331

Models, Entropy and Information of Temporal Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temporal social networks are characterized by heterogeneous duration of contacts, which can either follow a power-law distribution, such as in face-to-face interactions, or a Weibull distribution, such as in mobile-phone communication. Here we model the dynamics of face-to-face interaction and mobile phone communication by a reinforcement dynamics, which explains the data observed in these different types of social interactions. We quantify the information encoded in the dynamics of these networks by the entropy of temporal networks. Finally, we show evidence that human dynamics is able to modulate the information present in social network dynamics when it follows circadian rhythms and when it is interfacing with a new technology such as the mobile-phone communication technology.

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Márton; Bianconi, Ginestra

332

Temporal lobe and inferior frontal gyrus dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia during face-to-face conversation: A near-infrared spectroscopy study.  

PubMed

Schizophrenia (SC) is marked by poor social-role performance and social-skill deficits that are well reflected in daily conversation. Although the mechanism underlying these impairments has been investigated by functional neuroimaging, technical limitations have prevented the investigation of brain activation during conversation in typical clinical situations. To fill this research gap, this study investigated and compared frontal and temporal lobe activation in patients with SC during face-to-face conversation. Frontal and temporal lobe activation in 29 patients and 31 normal controls (NC) (n = 60) were measured during 180-s conversation periods by using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The grand average values of oxyhemoglobin concentration ([oxy-Hb]) changes during task performance were analyzed to determine their correlation with clinical variables and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) subscores. Compared to NCs, patients with SC exhibited decreased performance in the conversation task and decreased activation in both the temporal lobes and the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) during task performance, as indicated by the grand average of [oxy-Hb] changes. The decreased activation in the left temporal lobe was negatively correlated with the PANSS disorganization and negative symptoms subscores and that in the right IFG was negatively correlated with illness duration, PANSS disorganization, and negative symptom subscores. These findings indicate that brain dysfunction in SC during conversation is related to functional deficits in both the temporal lobes and the right IFG and manifests primarily in the form of disorganized thinking and negative symptomatology. PMID:23978395

Takei, Yuichi; Suda, Masashi; Aoyama, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Miho; Sakurai, Noriko; Narita, Kosuke; Fukuda, Masato; Mikuni, Masahiko

2013-08-23

333

Weight management by phone conference call: A comparison with a traditional face-to-face clinic. Rationale and design for a randomized equivalence trial  

PubMed Central

State-of-the-art treatment for weight management consists of a behavioral intervention to facilitate decreased energy intake and increased physical activity. These interventions are typically delivered face-to-face (FTF) by a health educator to a small group of participants. There are numerous barriers to participation in FTF clinics including availability, scheduling, the expense and time required to travel to the clinic site, and possible need for dependent care. Weight management clinics delivered by conference call have the potential to diminish or eliminate these barriers. The conference call approach may also reduce burden on providers, who could conduct clinic groups from almost any location without the expenses associated with maintaining FTF clinic space. A randomized trial will be conducted in 395 overweight/obese adults (BMI 25–39.9 kg/m2) to determine if weight loss (6 months) and weight maintenance (12 months) are equivalent between weight management interventions utilizing behavioral strategies and pre-packaged meals delivered by either a conference call or the traditional FTF approach. The primary outcome, body weight, will be assessed at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Secondary outcomes including waist circumference, energy and macronutrient intake, and physical activity and will be assessed on the same schedule. In addition, a cost analysis and extensive process evaluation will be completed.

Lambourne, Kate; Washburn, Richard A.; Gibson, Cheryl; Sullivan, Debra K.; Goetz, Jeannine; Lee, Robert; Smith, Bryan K.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

2012-01-01

334

Assessment of HIV-related risky behaviour: a comparative study of face-to-face interviews and polling booth surveys in the general population of Cotonou, Benin.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES: During the 2008 HIV prevalence survey carried out in the general population of Cotonou, Benin, face-to-face interviews (FTFI) were used to assess risky behaviours for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). We compared sexual behaviours reported in FTFI with those reported in polling booth surveys (PBS) carried out in parallel in an independent random sample of the same population. METHODS: In PBS, respondents grouped by gender and marital status answered simple questions by putting tokens with question numbers in a green box (affirmative answers) or a red box (negative answers). Both boxes were placed inside a private booth. For each group and question, data were gathered together by type of answer. The structured and gender-specific FTFI guided by trained interviewers included all questions asked during PBS. Pearson ?(2) or Fisher's exact test was used to compare FTFI and PBS according to affirmative answers. RESULTS: Overall, respondents reported more stigmatised behaviours in PBS than in FTFI: the proportions of married women and men who reported ever having had commercial sex were 17.4% and 41.6% in PBS versus 1.8% and 19.6% in FTFI, respectively. The corresponding proportions among unmarried women and men were 16.1% and 25.5% in PBS versus 3.9% and 13.0% in FTFI, respectively. The proportion of married women who reported having had extramarital sex since marriage was 23.6% in PBS versus 4.6% in FTFI. CONCLUSIONS: PBS are suitable to monitor reliable HIV/STI risk behaviours. Their use should be expanded in behavioural surveillance. PMID:23723251

Béhanzin, Luc; Diabaté, Souleymane; Minani, Isaac; Lowndes, Catherine M; Boily, Marie-Claude; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Anagonou, Séverin; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Buvé, Anne; Alary, Michel

2013-05-30

335

Social interactions model and adaptability of human behavior.  

PubMed

Human social networks evolve on the fast timescale of face-to-face interactions and of interactions mediated by technology such as a telephone calls or video conferences. The resulting networks have a strong dynamical component that changes significantly the properties of dynamical processes. In this paper we study a general model of pairwise human social interaction intended to model both face-to-face interactions and mobile-phone communication. We study the distribution of durations of social interactions in within the model. This distribution in one limit is a power-law, for other values of the parameters of the model this distribution is given by a Weibull function. Therefore the model can be used to model both face-to-face interactions data, where the distribution of duration has been shown to be fat-tailed, and mobile-phone communication data where the distribution of duration is given by a Weibull distribution. The highly adaptable social interaction model propose in this paper has a very simple algorithmic implementation and can be used to simulate dynamical processes occurring in dynamical social interaction networks. PMID:22194724

Zhao, Kun; Bianconi, Ginestra

2011-12-20

336

Social Interactions Model and Adaptability of Human Behavior  

PubMed Central

Human social networks evolve on the fast timescale of face-to-face interactions and of interactions mediated by technology such as a telephone calls or video conferences. The resulting networks have a strong dynamical component that changes significantly the properties of dynamical processes. In this paper we study a general model of pairwise human social interaction intended to model both face-to-face interactions and mobile-phone communication. We study the distribution of durations of social interactions in within the model. This distribution in one limit is a power-law, for other values of the parameters of the model this distribution is given by a Weibull function. Therefore the model can be used to model both face-to-face interactions data, where the distribution of duration has been shown to be fat-tailed, and mobile-phone communication data where the distribution of duration is given by a Weibull distribution. The highly adaptable social interaction model propose in this paper has a very simple algorithmic implementation and can be used to simulate dynamical processes occurring in dynamical social interaction networks.

Zhao, Kun; Bianconi, Ginestra

2011-01-01

337

Assessing Problem Solving Strategy Differences within Online and Face-to-Face Courses and Their Relationship to Pre-Service Teachers' Competence and Confidence for Integrating Technology into Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This quantitative research study identifies the problem solving strategies pre-service teachers use in learning specific technology skills within an educational technology methods class which is offered both online and face to face. It also examines how such strategies differ by the format of this course, and to what extent these strategies…

Peterson, Sharon L.

2010-01-01

338

Interacting neural networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several scenarios of interacting neural networks which are trained either in an identical or in a competitive way are solved analytically. In the case of identical training each perceptron receives the output of its neighbor. The symmetry of the stationary state as well as the sensitivity to the used training algorithm are investigated. Two competitive perceptrons trained on mutually exclusive learning aims and a perceptron which is trained on the opposite of its own output are examined analytically. An ensemble of competitive perceptrons is used as decision-making algorithms in a model of a closed market (El Farol Bar problem or the Minority Game. In this game, a set of agents who have to make a binary decision is considered.); each network is trained on the history of minority decisions. This ensemble of perceptrons relaxes to a stationary state whose performance can be better than random.

Metzler, R.; Kinzel, W.; Kanter, I.

2000-08-01

339

Sampling and coverage issues of telephone surveys used for collecting health information in Australia: results from a face-to-face survey from 1999 to 2008  

PubMed Central

Background To examine the trend of "mobile only" households, and households that have a mobile phone or landline telephone listed in the telephone directory, and to describe these groups by various socio-demographic and health indicators. Method Representative face-to-face population health surveys of South Australians, aged 15 years and over, were conducted in 1999, 2004, 2006, 2007 and 2008 (n = 14285, response rates = 51.9% to 70.6%). Self-reported information on mobile phone ownership and usage (1999 to 2008) and listings in White Pages telephone directory (2006 to 2008), and landline telephone connection and listings in the White Pages (1999 to 2008), was provided by participants. Additional information was collected on self-reported health conditions and health-related risk behaviours. Results Mobile only households have been steadily increasing from 1.4% in 1999 to 8.7% in 2008. In terms of sampling frame for telephone surveys, 68.7% of South Australian households in 2008 had at least a mobile phone or landline telephone listed in the White Pages (73.8% in 2006; 71.5% in 2007). The proportion of mobile only households was highest among young people, unemployed, people who were separated, divorced or never married, low income households, low SES areas, rural areas, current smokers, current asthma or people in the normal weight range. The proportion with landlines or mobiles telephone numbers listed in the White Pages telephone directory was highest among older people, married or in a defacto relationship or widowed, low SES areas, rural areas, people classified as overweight, or those diagnosed with arthritis or osteoporosis. Conclusion The rate of mobile only households has been increasing in Australia and is following worldwide trends, but has not reached the high levels seen internationally (12% to 52%). In general, the impact of mobile telephones on current sampling frames (exclusion or non-listing of mobile only households or not listed in the White Pages directory) may have a low impact on health estimates obtained using telephone surveys. However, researchers need to be aware that mobile only households are distinctly different to households with a landline connection, and the increase in the number of mobile-only households is not uniform across all groups in the community. Listing in the White Pages directory continues to decrease and only a small proportion of mobile only households are listed. Researchers need to be aware of these telephone sampling issues when considering telephone surveys.

2010-01-01

340

Superstructure-dependent optical and electrical properties of an unusual face-to-face, pi-stacked, one-dimensional assembly of dehydrobenzo[12]annulene in the crystalline state.  

PubMed

To develop a novel pi-conjugated molecule-based supramolecular assembly, we designed and synthesized trisdehydrotribenzo[12]annulene ([12]DBA) derivative 2 with three carboxyl groups at the periphery. Recrystallization of 2 from DMSO gave a crystal of the solvate 23 DMSO. Crystallographic analysis revealed, to our surprise, that a face-to-face pi-stacked one-dimensional (1D) assembly of 2 was achieved and that the DMSO molecule played a significant role as a "structure-dominant element" in the crystal. This is the first example of [12]DBA to stack completely orthogonal to the columnar axis. To reveal its superstructure-dependent optical and electrical properties, 2 and its parent molecule 1, which crystallizes in a herringbone fashion, were subjected to fluorescence spectroscopic analysis and charge-carrier mobility measurements in crystalline states. The 1D stacked structure of 2 provides a red-shifted, broadened, weakened fluorescence profile (lambda(max) = 545 nm, phi(F) = 0.01), compared to 1 (lambda(max) = 491 nm, phi(F) = 0.12), due to strong interactions between the p orbitals of the stacked molecules. The charge-carrier mobility of the single crystal of 23 DMSO, as well as 1, was determined by flash photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (FP-TRMC) measurements. The single crystal of 23 DMSO revealed significantly-anisotropic charge mobility (sigma(mu) = 1.5x10(-1) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) along the columnar axis (crystallographic c axis). This value is 12 times larger than that along the orthogonal axis (the a axis). PMID:18399533

Hisaki, Ichiro; Sakamoto, Yuu; Shigemitsu, Hajime; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Miyata, Mikiji; Seki, Shu; Saeki, Akinori; Tagawa, Seiichi

2008-01-01

341

Is There a Role for Social Networking Sites in Education?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace have become popular among millions of users including students of all ages. There are ongoing discussions over the potential of these sites to support teaching and learning, particularly to complement traditional or online classroom activities. This paper explores whether social networking have a place in teaching and learning by investigating how students use these sites and whether they find opportunities to discuss study related activities with their peers. Two small scale studies were carried out in a face-to-face undergraduate course in Singapore and students enrolled in a face-to-face Master’s programme in Brazil. Data were collected using surveys and interviews; findings were mixed. Many of the Brazilian students used social networking sites to both socialize and discuss their studies while the Singaporean students used such sites for social interactions only. The paper discusses these differences and offers suggestions for further research.

Santos, Ieda M.; Hammond, Michael; Durli, Zenilde; Chou, Shiao-Yuh

342

The Clinical Effectiveness of Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy With Face-to-Face Therapist Support for Depressed Primary Care Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Most patients with mild to moderate depression receive treatment in primary care, but despite guideline recommendations, structured psychological interventions are infrequently delivered. Research supports the effectiveness of Internet-based treatment for depression; however, few trials have studied the effect of the MoodGYM program plus therapist support. The use of such interventions could improve the delivery of treatment in primary care. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of a guided Web-based intervention for mild to moderate depression, which could be suitable for implementation in general practice. Methods Participants (N=106) aged between 18 and 65 years were recruited from primary care and randomly allocated to a treatment condition comprising 6 weeks of therapist-assisted Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or to a 6-week delayed treatment condition. The intervention included the Norwegian version of the MoodGYM program, brief face-to-face support from a psychologist, and reminder emails. The primary outcome measure, depression symptoms, was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Secondary outcome measures included the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and the EuroQol Group 5-Dimension Self-Report Questionnaire (EQ-5D). All outcomes were based on self-report and were assessed at baseline, postintervention, and at 6-month follow-up. Results Postintervention measures were completed by 37 (71%) and 47 (87%) of the 52 participants in the intervention and 54 participants in the delayed treatment group, respectively. Linear mixed-models analyses revealed a significant difference in time trends between the groups for the BDI-II, (P=.002), for HADS depression and anxiety subscales (P<.001 and P=.001, respectively), and for the SWLS (P<.001). No differential group effects were found for the BAI and the EQ-5D. In comparison to the control group, significantly more participants in the intervention group experienced recovery from depression as measured by the BDI-II. Of the 52 participants in the treatment program, 31 (60%) adhered to the program, and overall treatment satisfaction was high. The reduction of depression and anxiety symptoms was largely maintained at 6-month follow-up, and positive gains in life satisfaction were partly maintained. Conclusions The intervention combining MoodGYM and brief therapist support can be an effective treatment of depression in a sample of primary care patients. The intervention alleviates depressive symptoms and has a significant positive effect on anxiety symptoms and satisfaction with life. Moderate rates of nonadherence and predominately positive evaluations of the treatment also indicate the acceptability of the intervention. The intervention could potentially be used in a stepped-care approach, but remains to be tested in regular primary health care. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000257066; http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/trial.aspx?trialid=ACTRN12610000257066 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Ie3YhIZa).

Lillevoll, Kjersti R; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Wilsgaard, Tom; Eisemann, Martin; Waterloo, Knut; Kolstrup, Nils

2013-01-01

343

Deneyim E?itli?ine Dayali ?nternet Temelli ve Yüz Yüze Ö?renme Sistemlerinin Ö?renci Ba?arisi Açisindan Kar?ila?tirilmasi Comparisons of Internet-Based and Face-to-Face Learning Systems Based on \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this research, two experimental groups that are equal according to learning experiences, each included 30 subjects, are created. Pre-Test Values of the students from different instruction systems compared to the Corrected Post-Test Values and Permanence Average Values showed a significant difference in favor of face-to-face learning. In Internet-Based Learning System, the permanence of the knowledge learned by the students

G. Ü. Gazi

344

To take or not to take? The future of distance learning: A quasi-experiment comparison of the effectiveness of Internet-based distance learning versus face-to-face classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Purpose. This research study compared Internet-based distance learning versus face-to-face classroom using traditional undergraduate and continuing education adult students. The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of Internet-based distance learning. The study examined whether there was any significant difference between an Internet-based distance-learning course and a face-to-face classroom course. Moreover, the study examined whether continuing-education adult students performed higher in Internet-based distance learning than traditional undergraduate students. Methodology. Seventy-three subjects participated in the study. A pretest/posttest nonequivalent quasi-experimental design was used. The study tested a total of sixteen research questions, thirteen hypotheses, and sixteen null hypotheses. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), an independent-sample t-test, and a paired sample t-test were used for the data analysis. Findings. The findings indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between Internet-based distance learning and face-to-face classroom environment. Continuing-education adult and traditional undergraduate students performed equally in Internet-based distance learning.

Boghikian-Whitby, Seta

345

Entropy of Dynamical Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Human dynamical social networks encode information and are highly adaptive. To characterize the information encoded in the fast dynamics of social interactions, here we introduce the entropy of dynamical social networks. By analysing a large dataset of phone-call interactions we show evidence that the dynamical social network has an entropy that depends on the time of the day in a typical week-day. Moreover we show evidence for adaptability of human social behavior showing data on duration of phone-call interactions that significantly deviates from the statistics of duration of face-to-face interactions. This adaptability of behavior corresponds to a different information content of the dynamics of social human interactions. We quantify this information by the use of the entropy of dynamical networks on realistic models of social interactions.

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Marton; Bianconi, Ginestra

2011-01-01

346

Entropy of dynamical social networks.  

PubMed

Human dynamical social networks encode information and are highly adaptive. To characterize the information encoded in the fast dynamics of social interactions, here we introduce the entropy of dynamical social networks. By analysing a large dataset of phone-call interactions we show evidence that the dynamical social network has an entropy that depends on the time of the day in a typical week-day. Moreover we show evidence for adaptability of human social behavior showing data on duration of phone-call interactions that significantly deviates from the statistics of duration of face-to-face interactions. This adaptability of behavior corresponds to a different information content of the dynamics of social human interactions. We quantify this information by the use of the entropy of dynamical networks on realistic models of social interactions. PMID:22194809

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Márton; Bianconi, Ginestra

2011-12-16

347

Exploring the Potential of Rehearsal via Automatized Structured Tasks versus Face-to-Face Pair Work to Facilitate Pragmatic and Oral Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research has uncovered ways to improve communicative competence, including task-based learner-learner interaction (e.g., R. Ellis, 2003) and task planning (e.g., Mochizuki and Ortega, 2008). Teacher-guided planning particularly increases the benefits of learner-learner interaction (Foster and Skehan, 1999). One component of communicative…

Sydorenko, Tetyana V.

2011-01-01

348

Exploring the Potential of Rehearsal via Automatized Structured Tasks versus Face-to-Face Pair Work to Facilitate Pragmatic and Oral Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Past research has uncovered ways to improve communicative competence, including task-based learner-learner interaction (e.g., R. Ellis, 2003) and task planning (e.g., Mochizuki and Ortega, 2008). Teacher-guided planning particularly increases the benefits of learner-learner interaction (Foster and Skehan, 1999). One component of communicative…

Sydorenko, Tetyana V.

2011-01-01

349

Educational Use of Social Networking Technology in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study explored how social networking technology can be used to supplement face-to-face courses as a means of enhancing students' sense of community and, thus, to promote classroom communities of practice in the context of higher education. Data were collected from 67 students who enrolled in four face-to-face courses at two public…

Hung, Hsiu-Ting; Yuen, Steve Chi-Yin

2010-01-01

350

Interaction Patterns of Nurturant Support Exchanged in Online Health Social Networking  

PubMed Central

Background Expressing emotion in online support communities is an important aspect of enabling e-patients to connect with each other and expand their social resources. Indirectly it increases the amount of support for coping with health issues. Exploring the supportive interaction patterns in online health social networking would help us better understand how technology features impacts user behavior in this context. Objective To build on previous research that identified different types of social support in online support communities by delving into patterns of supportive behavior across multiple computer-mediated communication formats. Each format combines different architectural elements, affecting the resulting social spaces. Our research question compared communication across different formats of text-based computer-mediated communication provided on the MedHelp.org health social networking environment. Methods We identified messages with nurturant support (emotional, esteem, and network) across three different computer-mediated communication formats (forums, journals, and notes) of an online support community for alcoholism using content analysis. Our sample consisted of 493 forum messages, 423 journal messages, and 1180 notes. Results Nurturant support types occurred frequently among messages offering support (forum comments: 276/412 messages, 67.0%; journal posts: 65/88 messages, 74%; journal comments: 275/335 messages, 82.1%; and notes: 1002/1180 messages, 84.92%), but less often among messages requesting support. Of all the nurturing supports, emotional (ie, encouragement) appeared most frequently, with network and esteem support appearing in patterns of varying combinations. Members of the Alcoholism Community appeared to adapt some traditional face-to-face forms of support to their needs in becoming sober, such as provision of encouragement, understanding, and empathy to one another. Conclusions The computer-mediated communication format may have the greatest influence on the supportive interactions because of characteristics such as audience reach and access. Other factors include perception of community versus personal space or purpose of communication. These results lead to a need for further research.

Yang, Christopher C

2012-01-01

351

Web-based Versus Face-to-Face Learning of Diabetes Management: The Results of a Comparative Trial of Educational Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: Relatively little is known about the effectiveness of Web-based learning (WBL) in medical education and how it compares to conventional methods. This study examined the influence of an interactive, online curriculum in a third-year medical school family medicine clerkship on students' ability to create a management plan for a patient newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. We

John M. Wiecha; V. K. Chetty; Timothy Pollard; Peter F. Shaw

352

Differences in Learning Styles and Satisfaction between Traditional Face-to-Face and Online Web-Based Sport Management Studies Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Each student has a unique learning style or individual way of perceiving, interacting, and responding to a learning environment. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the prevalence of learning styles among undergraduate Sport Management Studies (SMS) students at California University of Pennsylvania (Cal U). Learning style…

West, Ellen Jo

2010-01-01

353

I Reach Faster When I See You Look: Gaze Effects in Human-Human and Human-Robot Face-to-Face Cooperation.  

PubMed

Human-human interaction in natural environments relies on a variety of perceptual cues. Humanoid robots are becoming increasingly refined in their sensorimotor capabilities, and thus should now be able to manipulate and exploit these social cues in cooperation with their human partners. Previous studies have demonstrated that people follow human and robot gaze, and that it can help them to cope with spatially ambiguous language. Our goal is to extend these findings into the domain of action, to determine how human and robot gaze can influence the speed and accuracy of human action. We report on results from a human-human cooperation experiment demonstrating that an agent's vision of her/his partner's gaze can significantly improve that agent's performance in a cooperative task. We then implement a heuristic capability to generate such gaze cues by a humanoid robot that engages in the same cooperative interaction. The subsequent human-robot experiments demonstrate that a human agent can indeed exploit the predictive gaze of their robot partner in a cooperative task. This allows us to render the humanoid robot more human-like in its ability to communicate with humans. The long term objectives of the work are thus to identify social cooperation cues, and to validate their pertinence through implementation in a cooperative robot. The current research provides the robot with the capability to produce appropriate speech and gaze cues in the context of human-robot cooperation tasks. Gaze is manipulated in three conditions: Full gaze (coordinated eye and head), eyes hidden with sunglasses, and head fixed. We demonstrate the pertinence of these cues in terms of statistical measures of action times for humans in the context of a cooperative task, as gaze significantly facilitates cooperation as measured by human response times. PMID:22563315

Boucher, Jean-David; Pattacini, Ugo; Lelong, Amelie; Bailly, Gerrard; Elisei, Frederic; Fagel, Sascha; Dominey, Peter Ford; Ventre-Dominey, Jocelyne

2012-05-03

354

I Reach Faster When I See You Look: Gaze Effects in Human-Human and Human-Robot Face-to-Face Cooperation  

PubMed Central

Human–human interaction in natural environments relies on a variety of perceptual cues. Humanoid robots are becoming increasingly refined in their sensorimotor capabilities, and thus should now be able to manipulate and exploit these social cues in cooperation with their human partners. Previous studies have demonstrated that people follow human and robot gaze, and that it can help them to cope with spatially ambiguous language. Our goal is to extend these findings into the domain of action, to determine how human and robot gaze can influence the speed and accuracy of human action. We report on results from a human–human cooperation experiment demonstrating that an agent’s vision of her/his partner’s gaze can significantly improve that agent’s performance in a cooperative task. We then implement a heuristic capability to generate such gaze cues by a humanoid robot that engages in the same cooperative interaction. The subsequent human–robot experiments demonstrate that a human agent can indeed exploit the predictive gaze of their robot partner in a cooperative task. This allows us to render the humanoid robot more human-like in its ability to communicate with humans. The long term objectives of the work are thus to identify social cooperation cues, and to validate their pertinence through implementation in a cooperative robot. The current research provides the robot with the capability to produce appropriate speech and gaze cues in the context of human–robot cooperation tasks. Gaze is manipulated in three conditions: Full gaze (coordinated eye and head), eyes hidden with sunglasses, and head fixed. We demonstrate the pertinence of these cues in terms of statistical measures of action times for humans in the context of a cooperative task, as gaze significantly facilitates cooperation as measured by human response times.

Boucher, Jean-David; Pattacini, Ugo; Lelong, Amelie; Bailly, Gerard; Elisei, Frederic; Fagel, Sascha; Dominey, Peter Ford; Ventre-Dominey, Jocelyne

2012-01-01

355

Comparing differences in teacher learning and involvement in water quality activities with the use of a Web tutorial and with face-to-face instruction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The integration of technology into the K--12 classroom has become a key focus in the last several years. However, teachers are often left out of this integration process, and subsequently training in the use of the technologies in a classroom setting is often minimal in nature. Teachers are left on their own as they struggle to integrate technology into their curriculum. Web-based professional development has the potential to alleviate both time and place constraints teachers often confront when trying to attend traditional professional programs to upgrade their technology skills. This study focuses on 70 upper elementary, middle, and high school teachers who volunteered to take part in this study in which a web-based tutorial was used as a tool for professional development and data collection. A comparison of settings allowed these teachers to participate in one of three ways: (1) in a workshop-type setting with an instructional leader; (2) in a workshop-type setting with a facilitator; and (3) on the web without an instructional leader or informal peer interaction. All the groups used the same web-based tutorial on water quality monitoring for instructional purposes. Research data included pretest and post-test measurement from all three groups as well as their analysis of a known water sample. The Microcomputer Utilization in Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (MUTEBI) was administered to all the participants as a measurement of self-efficacy beliefs as they relate to the use of computers in science teaching. In addition to the quantitative data collected, qualitative data was also compiled. The results of the study indicate that all the participants were equal in terms of knowledge acquisition, but may have derived "unanticipated benefits" from interaction with their peers in the workshop-type settings. The results also indicate that as teachers' self-rating of computer expertise increased, their scores on the Microcomputer Utilization in Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (MUTEBI) increased as well.

Cleveland, April Jones

356

Gaze Aversion during Social Style Interactions in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Williams Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|During face-to-face interactions typically developing individuals use gaze aversion (GA), away from their questioner, when thinking. GA is also used when individuals with autism (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS) are thinking during question-answer interactions. We investigated GA strategies during face-to-face social style interactions with…

Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa; Riby, Deborah M.

2013-01-01

357

Face to face with the social brain.  

PubMed

Recent comparative evidence suggests that anthropoid primates are the only vertebrates to exhibit a quantitative relationship between relative brain size and social group size. In this paper, I attempt to explain this pattern with regard to facial expressivity and social bonding. I hypothesize that facial motor control increases as a secondary consequence of neocortical expansion owing to cortical innervation of the facial motor nucleus. This is supported by new analyses demonstrating correlated evolution between relative neocortex size and relative facial nucleus size. I also hypothesize that increased facial motor control correlates with enhanced emotional expressivity, which provides the opportunity for individuals to better gauge the trustworthiness of group members. This is supported by previous evidence from human psychology, as well as new analyses demonstrating a positive relationship between allogrooming and facial nucleus volume. I suggest new approaches to the study of primate facial expressivity in light of these hypotheses. PMID:22641828

Dobson, Seth

2012-07-01

358

Face-to-Face with Feelings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mask-making with simple art materials can be used to reinforce elementary students' reading, writing, and interpersonal skills. The article describes a mask-making project that connected fourth graders with language, literature, and self-expression. (SM)

Murray, Wendy

1994-01-01

359

FACE TO FACE WITH THE PAST  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 2008, the Dilmun Bioarchaeology Project has analyzed the human skeletal remains and artifacts that Peter B. Cornwall excavated from Bahrain in the 1940s, now held in the Hearst Museum of Anthropology. One mode of interpretation and dissemination pursued by the DBP team is forensic facial reconstruction. The subject of the first reconstruction is a twelve- to fifteen-year-old male who

Alexis T. Boutin; Gloria L. Nusse; Sabrina B. Sholts; Benjamin W. Porter

2012-01-01

360

Face to Face with Phineas Gage  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present here a reproduction of a daguerreotype of Phineas Gage that came into our possession more than 30 years ago. It is, as far as we know, the only image of this famous patient. We describe how we identified the subject in the image, describe how daguerreotypes are made and set out our comparisons of the image with the

Jack Wilgus; Beverly Wilgus

2009-01-01

361

Face to face with Phineas Gage.  

PubMed

We present here a reproduction of a daguerreotype of Phineas Gage that came into our possession more than 30 years ago. It is, as far as we know, the only image of this famous patient. We describe how we identified the subject in the image, describe how daguerreotypes are made and set out our comparisons of the image with the Phineas Gage life mask and tamping iron held in the Warren Anatomical Museum, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. PMID:20183215

Wilgus, Jack; Wilgus, Beverly

2009-07-01

362

Face to Face with Oral Isotretinoin  

PubMed Central

Oral isotretinoin, available in the United States for four decades, has been used for the treatment of recalcitrant nodular and deep inflammatory acne vulgaris. This drug revolutionized the management of patients affected by severe inflammatory disease due to its ability to markedly induce acne clearance coupled with prolonged durations of remission after completion of a course of therapy, usually over approximately five months. Over time, it has become recognized that prolonged remission correlates with achieving a threshold cumulative exposure range of approximately 120 to 150 mg/kg of oral isotretinoin. Lesser exposures have demonstrated a higher risk of earlier recurrence of acne vulgaris and a greater likelihood that the patient will require retreatment. As the oral bioavailability of oral isotretinoin is variable, and highly dependent on administration with food, it is very conceivable that earlier relapse may occur if patients have often ingested oral isotretinoin on an empty stomach, thus leading to lesser actual cumulative drug exposure despite the daily dose administered. This article provides an overview on the dosing of oral isotretinoin, reported data on factors that influence relapse after oral isotretinoin therapy, and the potential impact of coadministration with food.

Del Rosso, James Q.

2012-01-01

363

Critical damping in a kinetic interaction network  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a kinetic interaction network, signals are emitted through motion. Natural examples include bird flocks, fish schools, and robot teams. A kinetic interaction network transmits information about external cues quickly and accurately. Analysis of a one-dimensional interaction network reveals a bound on the algebraic connectivity above which the transient response is overdamped. A critically damped response, the fastest and most

Derek A. Paley; Ajay K. Baharani

2010-01-01

364

Challenges for Researchers Investigating Contraceptive Use and Pregnancy Intentions of Young Women Living in Urban and Rural Areas of Australia: Face-to-Face Discussions to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Survey  

PubMed Central

Background It is imperative to understand how to engage young women in research about issues that are important to them. There is limited reliable data on how young women access contraception in Australia especially in rural areas where services may be less available. Objective This paper identifies the challenges involved in engaging young Australian women aged 18-23 years to participate in a web-based survey on contraception and pregnancy and ensure their ongoing commitment to follow-up web-based surveys. Methods A group of young women, aged 18-23 years and living in urban and rural New South Wales, Australia, were recruited to participate in face-to-face discussions using several methods of recruitment: direct contact (face-to-face, telephone or email) and snowball sampling by potential participants inviting their friends. All discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Twenty young women participated (urban, n=10: mean age 21.6 years; rural, n=10: 20.0 years) and all used computers or smart phones to access the internet on a daily basis. All participants were concerned about the cost of internet access and utilized free access to social media on their mobile phones. Their willingness to participate in a web-based survey was dependent on incentives with a preference for small financial rewards. Most participants were concerned about their personal details and survey responses remaining confidential and secure. The most appropriate survey would take up to 15 minutes to complete, be a mix of short and long questions and eye-catching with bright colours. Questions on the sensitive topics of sexual activity, contraception and pregnancy were acceptable if they could respond with “I prefer not to answer”. Conclusions There are demographic, participation and survey design challenges in engaging young women in a web-based survey. Based on our findings, future research efforts are needed to understand the full extent of the role social media and incentives play in the decision of young women to participate in web-based research.

Herbert, Danielle L; Loxton, Deborah; Bateson, Deborah; Weisberg, Edith

2013-01-01

365

Effectiveness of a telephone delivered and a face-to-face delivered counseling intervention for smoking cessation in patients with coronary heart disease: a 6-month follow-up.  

PubMed

Smoking cessation interventions for cardiac patients need improvement given their weak effects on long-term abstinence rates and low compliance by nurses to implementation. This study tested the effectiveness of two smoking cessation interventions against usual care in cardiac patients, and conditional effects for patients' motivation to quit and socio-economic status (SES). An experimental study was conducted from 2009 to 2012 for which Dutch cardiac patient smokers were assigned to: usual care (UC; n = 245), telephone counseling (TC; n = 223) or face-to-face counseling (FC; n = 157). The three groups were comparable at baseline and had smoked on average 21 cigarettes a day before hospitalization. After six months, interviews occurred to assess self-reported smoking status. Patients in the TC and FC group had significantly higher smoking abstinence rates than patients in the UC group (p ? 0.05 at all times). Regression analysis further revealed significant conditional effects of the interventions on smoking abstinence in patients with lower SES, with a larger effect for TC than FC when compared to UC. These findings suggest that intensive counseling is effective in increasing short-term abstinence rates, particularly in patients with lower SES. Future studies need to investigate how patients with higher SES can profit equally from these type of interventions. PMID:23760610

Berndt, Nadine; Bolman, Catherine; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan; Mudde, Aart; Candel, Math; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

2013-06-13

366

Measuring specialization in species interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Network analyses of plant-animal interactions hold valuable biological information. They are often used to quantify the degree of specialization between partners, but usually based on qualitative indices such as 'connectance' or number of links. These measures ignore interaction frequencies or sampling intensity, and strongly depend on network size. RESULTS: Here we introduce two quantitative indices using interaction frequencies to

Nico Blüthgen; Florian Menzel; Nils Blüthgen

2006-01-01

367

Avatars & interaction in gaming: Dysfunctional Interaction or a Practice of Players 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPG) you act and react on other players avatars in ways that resembl es face-to-face interaction. At the same time, the avatar-interaction is restricted in the technological-embedded environment. Research indicates problems concerning interaction inside these worlds, namely whether the systems resemble ordinary human face-to-face interaction in an adequate way. The assumed insuffi cient

Ulrika Bennerstedt

2007-01-01

368

Targeting and tinkering with interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological interaction networks have been in the scientific limelight for nearly a decade. Increasingly, the concept of network biology and its various applications are becoming more commonplace in the community. Recent years have seen networks move from pretty pictures with limited application to solid concepts that are increasingly used to understand the fundamentals of biology. They are no longer merely

Robert B Russell; Patrick Aloy

2008-01-01

369

Socializing electronics: Secure interactions in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks help us to follow friends and family daily lives. Home devices are rich in user's information so they are appropriate platforms to deploy social network applications. This article addresses two main requirements: content must be adapted to different devices and user's privacy must be respected. To enable social network interaction in home environments and to overcome privacy problems

Daniel Díaz-Sánchez; Andrés Marín; Florina Almenárez; Alberto Cortés

2010-01-01

370

A simple model for studying interacting networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many specific physical networks (e.g., internet, power grid, interstates), have been characterized in considerable detail, but in isolation from each other. Yet, each of these networks supports the functions of the others, and so far, little is known about how their interactions affect their structure and functionality. To address this issue, we consider two coupled model networks. Each network is relatively simple, with a fixed set of nodes, but dynamically generated set of links which has a preferred degree, ?. In the stationary state, the degree distribution has exponential tails (far from ?), an attribute which we can explain. Next, we consider two such networks with different ?'s, reminiscent of two social groups, e.g., extroverts and introverts. Finally, we let these networks interact by establishing a controllable fraction of cross links. The resulting distribution of links, both within and across the two model networks, is investigated and discussed, along with some potential consequences for real networks.

Liu, Wenjia; Jolad, Shivakumar; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, R. K. P.

2011-03-01

371

Vulnerability of networks of interacting Markov chains.  

PubMed

The concept of vulnerability is introduced for a model of random, dynamical interactions on networks. In this model, known as the influence model, the nodes are arranged in an arbitrary network, while the evolution of the status at a node is according to an internal Markov chain, but with transition probabilities that depend not only on the current status of that node but also on the statuses of the neighbouring nodes. Vulnerability is treated analytically and numerically for several networks with different topological structures, as well as for two real networks--the network of infrastructures and the EU power grid--identifying the most vulnerable nodes of these networks. PMID:20368242

Kocarev, L; Zlatanov, N; Trajanov, D

2010-05-13

372

Measuring specialization in species interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Background Network analyses of plant-animal interactions hold valuable biological information. They are often used to quantify the degree of specialization between partners, but usually based on qualitative indices such as 'connectance' or number of links. These measures ignore interaction frequencies or sampling intensity, and strongly depend on network size. Results Here we introduce two quantitative indices using interaction frequencies to describe the degree of specialization, based on information theory. The first measure (d') describes the degree of interaction specialization at the species level, while the second measure (H2') characterizes the degree of specialization or partitioning among two parties in the entire network. Both indices are mathematically related and derived from Shannon entropy. The species-level index d' can be used to analyze variation within networks, while H2' as a network-level index is useful for comparisons across different interaction webs. Analyses of two published pollinator networks identified differences and features that have not been detected with previous approaches. For instance, plants and pollinators within a network differed in their average degree of specialization (weighted mean d'), and the correlation between specialization of pollinators and their relative abundance also differed between the webs. Rarefied sampling effort in both networks and null model simulations suggest that H2' is not affected by network size or sampling intensity. Conclusion Quantitative analyses reflect properties of interaction networks more appropriately than previous qualitative attempts, and are robust against variation in sampling intensity, network size and symmetry. These measures will improve our understanding of patterns of specialization within and across networks from a broad spectrum of biological interactions.

Bluthgen, Nico; Menzel, Florian; Bluthgen, Nils

2006-01-01

373

CABIN: Collective Analysis of Biological Interaction Networks  

SciTech Connect

The importance of understanding biological interaction networks has fueled the development of numerous interaction data generation techniques, databases and prediction tools. However not all prediction tools and databases predict interactions with one hundred percent accuracy. Generation of high confidence interaction networks formulates the first step towards deciphering unknown protein functions, determining protein complexes and inventing drugs. The CABIN: Collective Analysis of Biological Interaction Networks software is an exploratory data analysis tool that enables analysis and integration of interactions evidence obtained from multiple sources, thereby increasing the confidence of computational predictions as well as validating experimental observations. CABIN has been written in JavaTM and is available as a plugin for Cytoscape – an open source network visualization tool.

Singhal, Mudita; Domico, Kelly O.

2007-06-01

374

Human interaction system = intelligence network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term security network intelligence is widely used in the field of communication security network. A number of new and potentially concepts and products based on the concept of security network intelligence have been introduced, including smart flows, intelligent routing, and intelligent Web switching. Many intelligent systems focus on a specific security service, function, or device, and do not provide

R. Volner

2008-01-01

375

Dynamic network analysis of protein interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Network approaches have recently become a popular tool to study complex systems such as cellular metabolism and protein interactions. A substantial number of analyses of the protein interaction network (PIN) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have considered this network as a static entity, not taking the network's dynamic nature into account. Here, we examine the time-variation of gene regulation superimposed on the PIN by defining mRNA expression profiles throughout the cell cycle as node weights. To characterize these network dynamics, we have both developed a set of novel network measures as well as studied previously published measures for weighted networks. We expect that our approach will provide a deeper understanding of protein regulation during the cell cycle.

Almaas, Eivind; Deri, Joya

2007-03-01

376

The interaction between multiplex community networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multiplex community networks, consisting of several different types of simplex networks and interconnected among them, are ubiquitous in the real world. In this paper, we carry out a quantitative discussion on the interaction among these diverse simplex networks. First, we define two measures, mutual-path-strength and proximity-node-density, based on twoplex community networks and then propose an impact-strength-index (ISI) to describe the influence of a simplex network on the other one. Finally, we apply the measure ISI to make an explanation for the challenge system of social relations from the viewpoint of network theory. Numerical simulations show that the measure ISI can describe the interaction between multiplex community networks perfectly.

Hao, Junjun; Cai, Shuiming; He, Qinbin; Liu, Zengrong

2011-03-01

377

Statistical physics of interacting neural networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent results on the statistical physics of time series generation and prediction are presented. A neural network is trained on quasi-periodic and chaotic sequences and overlaps to the sequence generator as well as the prediction errors are calculated numerically. For each network there exists a sequence for which it completely fails to make predictions. Two interacting networks show a transition to perfect synchronization. A pool of interacting networks shows good coordination in the minority game-a model of competition in a closed market. Finally, as a demonstration, a perceptron predicts bit sequences produced by human beings.

Kinzel, Wolfgang; Metzler, Richard; Kanter, Ido

2001-12-01

378

Understanding latent interactions in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Popular online social networks (OSNs) like Facebook and Twitter are changing the way users communicate and interact with the Internet. A deep understanding of user interactions in OSNs can provide important insights into questions of human social behavior, and into the design of social platforms and applications. However, recent studies have shown that a majority of user interactions on OSNs

Jing Jiang; Christo Wilson; Xiao Wang; Peng Huang; Wenpeng Sha; Yafei Dai; Ben Y. Zhao

2010-01-01

379

Broadband networks for interactive telemedical applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using off-the-shelf hardware components and a specially developed high-end software communication system (WinVicos) satellite networks for interactive telemedicine have been designed and developed. These networks allow for various telemedical applications, like intraoperative teleconsultation, second opinioning, teleteaching, telementoring, etc.. Based on the successful GALENOS network, several projects are currently being realized: MEDASHIP (Medical Assistance for Ships); DELTASS (Disaster Emergency Logistic Telemedicine

Georgi Graschew; Theo A. Roelofs; Stefan Rakowsky; Peter M. Schlag

2002-01-01

380

POLYSACCHARIDES: MOLECULES, CLUSTERS, NETWORKS AND INTERACTIONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This paper reviews the structural organization of polysaccharides with respect to molecules, clusters (aggregates), networks and interactions. As for proteins, different levels of structural organization exist for polysaccharides. The primary structure describes the covalent sequence of monosaccha...

381

Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

2010-03-01

382

Unraveling spurious properties of interaction networks with tailored random networks.  

PubMed

We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erdös-Rényi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way interaction networks are derived from empirical data. Through an exemplary investigation of multichannel electroencephalographic recordings of epileptic seizures--known for their complex spatial and temporal dynamics--we show that such random networks help to distinguish network properties of interdependence structures related to seizure dynamics from those spuriously induced by the applied methods of analysis. PMID:21850239

Bialonski, Stephan; Wendler, Martin; Lehnertz, Klaus

2011-08-05

383

Interactive view-dependent rendering over networks.  

PubMed

For a client-server based view-dependent rendering system, the overhead of view-dependent rendering and the network latency are major obstacles in achieving interactivity. In this paper, we first present a multiresolution hierarchy traversal management strategy to control the overhead of view-dependent rendering for low-capacity clients. Then we propose a predictive parallel strategy to overcome the network latency for client-server based view-dependent multiresolution rendering systems. Our solution is to make the client process and the server process run in parallel, using the rendering time to cover the network latency. For networks with long round-trip times, we manage to overlap the network latency for one frame with the rendering time for multiple frames. View-parameters prediction is incorporated to make the parallelism of the client and the server feasible. In order to maintain an acceptable view-dependent rendering quality in the network environment, we develop a synchronization mechanism and a dynamic adjustment mechanism to handle the transient network slowdowns and the changes of the network condition. Our experimental results, in comparison with the sequential method, show that our predictive parallel approach can achieve an interactive frame rate while keeping an acceptable rendering quality for large triangle models over networks with relatively long round-trip times. PMID:18369265

Zheng, Zhi; Prakash, Edmond; Chan, Tony K Y

384

Video interactions in online video social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article characterizes video-based interactions that emerge from YouTube's video response feature, which allows users to discuss themes and to provide reviews for products or places using much richer media than text. Based on crawled data covering a representative subset of videos and users, we present a characterization from two perspectives: the video response view and the interaction network view.

Fabrício Benevenuto; Tiago Rodrigues; Virgilio Almeida; Jussara M. Almeida; Keith W. Ross

2009-01-01

385

Evolutionary Rate in the Protein Interaction Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-throughput screens have begun to reveal the protein interaction network that underpins most cellular functions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. How the organization of this network affects the evolution of the proteins that compose it is a fundamental question in molecular evolution. We show that the connectivity of well-conserved proteins in the network is negatively correlated with their rate of evolution. Proteins with more interactors evolve more slowly not because they are more important to the organism, but because a greater proportion of the protein is directly involved in its function. At sites important for interaction between proteins, evolutionary changes may occur largely by coevolution, in which substitutions in one protein result in selection pressure for reciprocal changes in interacting partners. We confirm one predicted outcome of this process-namely, that interacting proteins evolve at similar rates.

Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Scharfe, Curt; Feldman, Marcus W.

2002-04-01

386

Evaluating interactivity and presence in an online distance learning system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new online distance learning system was created by an interdisciplinary team comprised of computer science, graphics, networking, security, and educational science faculty and graduate students to research, implement, and assess the ability to extend a face-to-face classroom to accommodate remotely located students. Comprised of a face-to-face classroom setting with remote students' images projected on the wall of the classroom,

Melissa J. Dark; Cindy S. York; Voicu Popescu; Cristina Nita-Rotaru

2007-01-01

387

Maternal Interactive Behaviour in Early Infancy and Later Attachment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evolutionary considerations (cf. MacDonald, 1992) suggest that emotional closeness and security of attachment address different functional systems. We assume that maternal sensitivity during early face-to-face interactions is related to later emotional closeness, whereas the contingency of maternal reactions towards the infant’s signals is related to later security of attachment. Forty-three mother-infant dyads were videotaped at home during face-to-face interactions when

Susanne Völker; Heidi Keller; Arnold Lohaus; Martina Cappenberg; Athanasios Chasiotis

1999-01-01

388

BIND - The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND; http:\\/\\/binddb.org) is a database designed to store full descriptions of interactions, molecular complexes and pathways. Development of the BIND 2.0 data model has led to the incorporation of virtually all components of molecular mechanisms including interactions between any two molecules composed of proteins, nucleic acids and small molecules. Chemical reactions, photochemical activation and conformational

Gary D. Bader; Ian Donaldson; Cheryl Wolting; B. F. Francis Ouellette; Tony Pawson; Christopher W. V. Hogue

2001-01-01

389

Delivering interactive multimedia documents over networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A family of applications that consists of interactive multimedia documents, such as electronic magazines and interactive TV shows, is examined and the links between application architecture, user behavior, and network performance are investigated. The kinds of application-specific information that influence the end-to-end quality of service are discussed. The architecture and dynamics of the interactive document in terms of presentation objects

Shoshana Loeb

1992-01-01

390

Reactions of the cationic diruthenium carbonyl complex [Ru 2(?-dppm) 2(CO) 4(?,? 2-O 2CMe)] + with bidentate ligands; intramolecularly assisted stereospecific synthesis via the second-sphere face-to-face ?–? stacking interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reactions of the diruthenium carbonyl complexes [Ru2(?-dppm)2(CO)4(?,?2-O2CMe)]X (X=BF4? (1a) or PF6? (1b)) with neutral or anionic bidentate ligands (L,L) afford a series of the diruthenium bridging carbonyl complexes [Ru2(?-dppm)2(?-CO)2(?2-(L,L))2]Xn ((L,L)=acetate (O2CMe), 2,2?-bipyridine (bpy), acetylacetonate (acac), 8-quinolinolate (quin); n=0, 1, 2). Apparently with coordination of the bidentate ligands, the bound acetate ligand of [Ru2(?-dppm)2(CO)4(?,?2-O2CMe)]+ either migrates within the same complex

Kom-Bei Shiu; Shih-Wei Jean; Yu Wang; Gene-Hsiang Lee

2002-01-01

391

Modularization of Protein Interaction Networks by Incorporating Gene Ontology Annotations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent computational analyses of protein interaction networks have attempted to understand cellular organizations, processes and functions. However, they have encountered difficulties due to unreliable interaction data and the complexity of the networks. In this paper, we propose the integration of protein interaction networks with gene ontology annotations for assessing the reliability of current protein-protein interaction data. The interaction reliability can

Young-rae Cho; Woochang Hwang; Aidong Zhang

2007-01-01

392

Broadband networks for interactive telemedical applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using off-the-shelf hardware components and a specially developed high-end software communication system (WinVicos) satellite networks for interactive telemedicine have been designed and developed. These networks allow for various telemedical applications, like intraoperative teleconsultation, second opinioning, teleteaching, telementoring, etc.. Based on the successful GALENOS network, several projects are currently being realized: MEDASHIP (Medical Assistance for Ships); DELTASS (Disaster Emergency Logistic Telemedicine Advanced Satellites Systems) and EMISPHER (Euro-Mediterranean Internet-Satellite Platform for Health, medical Education and Research).

Graschew, Georgi; Roelofs, Theo A.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Schlag, Peter M.

2002-08-01

393

Evolution of biomolecular networks — lessons from metabolic and protein interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite only becoming popular at the beginning of this decade, biomolecular networks are now frameworks that facilitate many discoveries in molecular biology. The nodes of these networks are usually proteins (specifically enzymes in metabolic networks), whereas the links (or edges) are their interactions with other molecules. These networks are made up of protein–protein interactions or enzyme–enzyme interactions through shared metabolites

Takuji Yamada; Peer Bork

2009-01-01

394

From networks of protein interactions to networks of functional dependencies  

PubMed Central

Background As protein-protein interactions connect proteins that participate in either the same or different functions, networks of interacting and functionally annotated proteins can be converted into process graphs of inter-dependent function nodes (each node corresponding to interacting proteins with the same functional annotation). However, as proteins have multiple annotations, the process graph is non-redundant, if only proteins participating directly in a given function are included in the related function node. Results Reasoning that topological features (e.g., clusters of highly inter-connected proteins) might help approaching structured and non-redundant understanding of molecular function, an algorithm was developed that prioritizes inclusion of proteins into the function nodes that best overlap protein clusters. Specifically, the algorithm identifies function nodes (and their mutual relations), based on the topological analysis of a protein interaction network, which can be related to various biological domains, such as cellular components (e.g., peroxisome and cellular bud) or biological processes (e.g., cell budding) of the model organism S. cerevisiae. Conclusions The method we have described allows converting a protein interaction network into a non-redundant process graph of inter-dependent function nodes. The examples we have described show that the resulting graph allows researchers to formulate testable hypotheses about dependencies among functions and the underlying mechanisms.

2012-01-01

395

Work, Friendship, and Media Use for Information Exchange in a Networked Organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use a social network approach to examine how work and friendship ties in a university research group were associated with the kinds of media used for different kinds of information exchange. The use of electronic mail, unscheduled face-to-face encounters, and sched- uled face-to-face meetings predominated for the ex- change of six kinds of information: Receiving Work, Giv- ing Work,

Caroline Haythornthwaite; Barry Wellman

1998-01-01

396

Interaction and Non-InteractionBased Network Eects in Technology Adoption  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network eects and benefits for communication technologies are often modeled as depending on the total number of subscribers in a network. Since people often only communicate with a small subset of existing users in a network, assuming dependence on the entire network assumes that there are non-interaction based network eects. A potential adopter can receive a non-interaction based network benefit

Catherine Tucker

397

Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle.  

PubMed

Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach. PMID:23209009

Scherl, Andre; Dethleffsen, Kathrin; Meyer, Michael

2012-12-01

398

Predicting the Fission Yeast Protein Interaction Network  

PubMed Central

A systems-level understanding of biological processes and information flow requires the mapping of cellular component interactions, among which protein–protein interactions are particularly important. Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is a valuable model organism for which no systematic protein-interaction data are available. We exploited gene and protein properties, global genome regulation datasets, and conservation of interactions between budding and fission yeast to predict fission yeast protein interactions in silico. We have extensively tested our method in three ways: first, by predicting with 70–80% accuracy a selected high-confidence test set; second, by recapitulating interactions between members of the well-characterized SAGA co-activator complex; and third, by verifying predicted interactions of the Cbf11 transcription factor using mass spectrometry of TAP-purified protein complexes. Given the importance of the pathway in cell physiology and human disease, we explore the predicted sub-networks centered on the Tor1/2 kinases. Moreover, we predict the histidine kinases Mak1/2/3 to be vital hubs in the fission yeast stress response network, and we suggest interactors of argonaute 1, the principal component of the siRNA-mediated gene silencing pathway, lost in budding yeast but preserved in S. pombe. Of the new high-quality interactions that were discovered after we started this work, 73% were found in our predictions. Even though any predicted interactome is imperfect, the protein network presented here can provide a valuable basis to explore biological processes and to guide wet-lab experiments in fission yeast and beyond. Our predicted protein interactions are freely available through PInt, an online resource on our website (www.bahlerlab.info/PInt).

Pancaldi, Vera; Sarac, Omer S.; Rallis, Charalampos; McLean, Janel R.; Prevorovsky, Martin; Gould, Kathleen; Beyer, Andreas; Bahler, Jurg

2012-01-01

399

Exploring drug combinations in genetic interaction network  

PubMed Central

Background Drug combination that consists of distinctive agents is an attractive strategy to combat complex diseases and has been widely used clinically with improved therapeutic effects. However, the identification of efficacious drug combinations remains a non-trivial and challenging task due to the huge number of possible combinations among the candidate drugs. As an important factor, the molecular context in which drugs exert their functions can provide crucial insights into the mechanism underlying drug combinations. Results In this work, we present a network biology approach to investigate drug combinations and their target proteins in the context of genetic interaction networks and the related human pathways, in order to better understand the underlying rules of effective drug combinations. Our results indicate that combinatorial drugs tend to have a smaller effect radius in the genetic interaction networks, which is an important parameter to describe the therapeutic effect of a drug combination from the network perspective. We also find that drug combinations are more likely to modulate functionally related pathways. Conclusions This study confirms that the molecular networks where drug combinations exert their functions can indeed provide important insights into the underlying rules of effective drug combinations. We hope that our findings can help shortcut the expedition of the future discovery of novel drug combinations.

2012-01-01

400

Change in mother-infant interactive behavior: Relations to change in the mother, the infant, and the social context  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines relations between change in mother-infant interaction and change in parental and infant traits. Forty-seven mother-infant dyads were observed at 3 months in face-to-face interaction and at 9 months in two play situations, face-to-face social play and exploratory play interaction. Following Belsky's (1984) “determinants of parenting” model, changes in maternal anxiety, infant temperament, and spousal support were assessed.

Shmuel H. Erlich

1997-01-01

401

Invariant properties in coevolutionary networks of plant-animal interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant-animal mutualistic networks are interaction webs consisting of two sets of entities, plant and animal species, whose evolutionary dynamics are deeply influenced by the outcomes of the interactions, yielding a diverse array of coevolutionary processes. These networks are two-mode networks sharing many common properties with others such as food webs, social, and abiotic networks. Here we describe generalized patterns in

Pedro Jordano

2003-01-01

402

Global Mapping of the Yeast Genetic Interaction Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A genetic interaction network containing ~1000 genes and ~4000 interactions was mapped by crossing mutations in 132 different query genes into a set of ~4700 viable gene yeast deletion mutants and scoring the double mutant progeny for fitness defects. Network connectivity was predictive of function because interactions often occurred among functionally related genes, and similar patterns of interactions tended to identify components of the same pathway. The genetic network exhibited dense local neighborhoods; therefore, the position of a gene on a partially mapped network is predictive of other genetic interactions. Because digenic interactions are common in yeast, similar networks may underlie the complex genetics associated with inherited phenotypes in other organisms.

Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Lesage, Guillaume; Bader, Gary D.; Ding, Huiming; Xu, Hong; Xin, Xiaofeng; Young, James; Berriz, Gabriel F.; Brost, Renee L.; Chang, Michael; Chen, YiQun; Cheng, Xin; Chua, Gordon; Friesen, Helena; Goldberg, Debra S.; Haynes, Jennifer; Humphries, Christine; He, Grace; Hussein, Shamiza; Ke, Lizhu; Krogan, Nevan; Li, Zhijian; Levinson, Joshua N.; Lu, Hong; Ménard, Patrice; Munyana, Christella; Parsons, Ainslie B.; Ryan, Owen; Tonikian, Raffi; Roberts, Tania; Sdicu, Anne-Marie; Shapiro, Jesse; Sheikh, Bilal; Suter, Bernhard; Wong, Sharyl L.; Zhang, Lan V.; Zhu, Hongwei; Burd, Christopher G.; Munro, Sean; Sander, Chris; Rine, Jasper; Greenblatt, Jack; Peter, Matthias; Bretscher, Anthony; Bell, Graham; Roth, Frederick P.; Brown, Grant W.; Andrews, Brenda; Bussey, Howard; Boone, Charles

2004-02-01

403

Cooperative tertiary interaction network guides RNA folding  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Non-coding RNAs form unique three-dimensional structures, which perform many biochemical and regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting and native PAGE. Double and triple mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on native state stability. Instead, formation of core and peripheral structural motifs are cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native topology of the ribozyme. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses non-native structures and makes the search for the native state more efficient. We suggest that cooperativity in non-coding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures that promote a unique fold despite a rugged energy landscape.

Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, Robert M.; Woodson1, Sarah A.

2012-01-01

404

Species abundance and asymmetric interaction strength in ecological networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The strength of interactions among species in a network tends to be highly asymmetric. We evaluate the hypothesis that this asymmetry results from the distribution of abundance among species, so that species interactions occur randomly among individuals. We used a database on mutualistic and antagonistic bipartite quantitative interaction networks. We show that across all types of networks asymmetry was correlated

Diego P. Vázquez; Carlos J. Melián; Neal M. Williams; Nico Blüthgen; Boris R. Krasnov; Robert Poulin

2007-01-01

405

The Influences of Network Interpersonal Interaction among College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to explore the characteristics and the effects of interpersonal interaction based on network among college students. The development of internet facilitates the deep change of college students in all aspects, especially in the interpersonal interaction. Based on the definition of the network interpersonal interaction, the current paper summarized the characteristics of network communication

Qin Xuemei; Nan Hua

2010-01-01

406

Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ongoing study of the structure, function, and evolution of individual activity within lab groups is introduced. This study makes extensive use of techniques from social network analysis. These techniques allow rigorous quantification and hypothesis-testing of the interactions inherent in social groups and the impact of intrinsic characteristics of individuals on their social interactions. As these techniques are novel within the physics education research community, an overview of their meaning and application is given. We then present preliminary results from videotaped laboratory groups involving mixed populations of traditional and non-traditional students in an introductory algebra-based physics course.

Warren, Aaron R.

2008-10-01

407

Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An ongoing study of the structure, function, and evolution of individual activity within lab groups is introduced. This study makes extensive use of techniques from social network analysis. These techniques allow rigorous quantification and hypothesis-testing of the interactions inherent in social groups and the impact of intrinsic characteristics of individuals on their social interactions. As these techniques are novel within the physics education research community, an overview of their meaning and application is given. We then present preliminary results from videotaped laboratory groups involving mixed populations of traditional and non-traditional students in an introductory algebra-based physics course.

Warren, Aaron R.

2009-01-24

408

Casimir interactions between crosslinkers in semiflexible networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The equilibrium phase behavior of solutions of semiflexible filaments such as F-actin and cross-linking proteins is complex. As a function of both crosslinker density and the preferred filament crossing angle imposed by the cross-linker, one may observe a plethora of complex ordered phases in addition to bundles. Simulations report both the formation lamellar network structures and the aggregation of cross-linkers in thermal equilibrium. These complex phases result from an effective interaction between cross-linkers mediated by the filaments to which they are bound. In this talk, we explore interactions between labile cross-linking proteins bound to semiflexible filaments mediated by the effect of crosslinking on the thermal fluctuation spectrum the filaments involved. Such fluctuation induced interactions are of the Casimir type, which we study using a path integral formulation of the partition function of the crosslinked filaments. We also make predictions for the spatial organization of crosslinkers along semiflexible filaments and in complex semiflexible networks based on this Casimir interaction.

Kachan, Devin; Bruinsma, Robijn; Levine, Alex

2013-03-01

409

Global Mapping of the Yeast Genetic Interaction Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

A genetic interaction network containing ~1000 genes and ~4000 interactions was mapped by crossing mutations in 132 different query genes into a set of ~4700 viable gene yeast deletion mutants and scoring the double mutant progeny for fitness defects. Network connectivity was predictive of function because interactions often occurred among functionally related genes, and similar patterns of interactions tended to

Amy Hin Yan Tong; Guillaume Lesage; Gary D. Bader; Huiming Ding; Hong Xu; Xiaofeng Xin; James Young; Gabriel F. Berriz; Renee L. Brost; Michael Chang; YiQun Chen; Xin Cheng; Gordon Chua; Helena Friesen; Debra S. Goldberg; Jennifer Haynes; Christine Humphries; Grace He; Shamiza Hussein; Lizhu Ke; Nevan Krogan; Zhijian Li; Joshua N. Levinson; Hong Lu; Patrice Ménard; Christella Munyana; Ainslie B. Parsons; Owen Ryan; Raffi Tonikian; Tania Roberts; Anne-Marie Sdicu; Jesse Shapiro; Bilal Sheikh; Bernhard Suter; Sharyl L. Wong; Lan V. Zhang; Hongwei Zhu; Christopher G. Burd; Sean Munro; Chris Sander; Jasper Rine; Jack Greenblatt; Matthias Peter; Anthony Bretscher; Graham Bell; Frederick P. Roth; Grant W. Brown; Brenda Andrews; Howard Bussey; Charles Boone

2004-01-01

410

The Networked Teacher: How New Teachers Build Social Networks for Professional Support. Series on School Reform  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|New teachers need support from their peers and mentors to locate resources, information, new ideas, emotional support, and inspiration. This timely book explains the research and theory behind social networks (face-to-face and online), describes what effective social networking for educators looks like, reveals common obstacles that new teachers…

Baker-Doyle, Kira J.

2011-01-01

411

Functional modules by relating protein interaction networks and gene expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genes and proteins are organized on the basis of their particular mutual relations or according to their interactions in cellular and genetic networks. These include metabolic or signaling pathways and protein interaction, regulatory or co-expression net- works. Integrating the information from the different types of networks may lead to the notion of a func- tional network and functional modules. To

Sabine Tornow; H. W. Mewes

2003-01-01

412

Reduction of interaction delays in networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Delayed interactions are a common property of coupled natural systems and therefore arise in a variety of different applications. For instance, signals in neural or laser networks propagate at finite speed giving rise to delayed connections. Such systems are often modeled by delay differential equations with discrete delays. In realistic situations, these delays are not identical on different connections. We show that by a componentwise timeshift transformation it is often possible to reduce the number of different delays and simplify the models without loss of information. We identify dynamic invariants of this transformation, determine its capabilities to reduce the number of delays and interpret these findings in terms of the topology of the underlying graph. In particular, we show that networks with identical sums of delay times along the fundamental semicycles are dynamically equivalent and we provide a normal form for these systems. We illustrate the theory using a network motif of coupled Mackey-Glass systems with 8 different time delays, which can be reduced to an equivalent motif with three delays.

Lücken, L.; Pade, J. P.; Knauer, K.; Yanchuk, S.

2013-07-01

413

Spinning Multiple Social Networks for Semantic Web  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are important for the Semantic Web. Several means can be used to obtain social networks: using social networking services, aggregating Friend- of-a-Friend (FOAF) documents, mining text informa- tion on the Web or in e-mail messages, and observing face-to-face communication using sensors. Integrating multiple social networks is a key issue for further uti- lization of social networks in the

Yutaka Matsuo; Masahiro Hamasaki; Yoshiyuki Nakamura; Takuichi Nishimura; Kôiti Hasida; Hideaki Takeda; Junichiro Mori; Danushka Bollegala; Mitsuru Ishizuka

2006-01-01

414

Linguistic Analysis of Face-to-Face Interviews with Patients with An Explicit Request for Euthanasia, their Closest Relatives, and their Attending Physicians: the Use of Modal Verbs in Dutch.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: The literature, field research, and daily practice stress the need for adequate communication in palliative care. Although language is of the utmost importance in communication, linguistic analysis of end-of-life discussions is scarce. AIMS: Our aim is 2-fold: We want to determine what the use of 4 significant Dutch modal verbs expressing volition, obligation, possibility, and permission reveals about the concept of unbearable suffering and about physicians' communicative style. METHODS: We quantitatively (TextStat) and qualitatively (bottom-up approach) analyzed the use of the modal verbs in 15 interviews, with patients requesting euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, their physicians, and their closest relatives. RESULTS: An essential element of unbearable suffering is the patient's incapacity to perform certain tasks. Further, the physician's preference for particular modal verbs reveals whether his attitude toward patients is more or less patronizing and more or less appreciative. CONCLUSIONS: Linguistic analysis can help medical professionals to better understand their communicative skills, styles, and approach to patients in end-of-life situations. We have shown how linguistic analysis can contribute to a better understanding of physician-patient interaction. Moreover, we have illustrated the usefulness of interdisciplinary research in the medical domain. PMID:23692255

Dieltjens, Sylvain M; Heynderickx, Priscilla C; Dees, Marianne K; Vissers, Kris C

2013-05-22

415

Interaction networks: From protein functions to drug discovery. A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most genes, proteins and other components carry out their functions within a complex network of interactions and a single molecule can affect a wide range of other cell components. A global, integrative, approach has been developed for several years, including protein–protein interaction networks (interactomes). In this review, we describe the high-throughput methods used to identify new interactions and to build

E. Chautard; N. Thierry-Mieg; S. Ricard-Blum

2009-01-01

416

Regions and Interaction Networks: An Institutional-Materialist Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

We contend that interaction networks are far superior to cultural area and regional approaches for bounding human social systems. This article discusses methodological and conceptual issues in bounding human social systems and their interactions with the natural environment and examines several recent innovations in information technology that facilitate the study of interaction networks.

Christopher Chase-Dunn; Andrew Jorgenson

2003-01-01

417

Recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction data has made it possible to understand the basic components and organization of cell machinery from the network level. The arising challenge is how to analyze such complex interacting data to reveal the principles of cellular organization, processes and functions. Many studies have shown that clustering protein interaction network is an effective approach

Jianxin Wang; Min Li; Youping Deng; Yi Pan

2010-01-01

418

VANLO - Interactive visual exploration of aligned biological networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Protein-protein interaction (PPI) is fundamental to many biological processes. In the course of evolution, biological networks such as protein-protein interaction networks have developed. Biological networks of different species can be aligned by finding instances (e.g. proteins) with the same common ancestor in the evolutionary process, so-called orthologs. For a better understanding of the evolution of biological networks, such aligned

Steffen Brasch; Lars Linsen; Georg Fuellen

2009-01-01

419

Classroom Climate and Learning Effectiveness Comparison for Physical and Cyber F2F Interaction in Holistic-Blended Learning Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A holistic-blended learning environment has been developed in which physical face-to-face, cyber face-to-face and cyber asynchronous blended models are synthesized into one holistic-blended learning model. Such a model enables teachers and learners to do two-way interaction asynchronously and synchronously no matter whether they are in physical space or cyber space. The aim of this research is to explore whether significant

Nian-shing Chen; Kinshuk; Chun-wang Wei; Yi-ru Chen; Yu-chun Wang

2007-01-01

420

Implications ofcomputer networking and the internet for nurse education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper sets out the history ofcomputer networking and its use in nursing and health care education, and places this in its wider historical and social context. The increasing availability and use of computer networks and the Internet are producing a changing climate in education as well as in health care. Moves away from traditional face-to-face teaching with a campus

Rod Ward

1997-01-01

421

Can anonymity network increase the utilitarian in personal moral decision?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internet is playing an increasing role in shifting the source of moral standards from face-to-face communities to online virtual networks. The virtual internet erodes our ability to act in concert with locally defined moral standards. To investigate whether network anonymity could increase the utilitarian in personal moral dilemma choice, using personal moral dilemmas as probes, 30 participants made these

Qi Li; Yunhong Zhang; Mi Shi; Jing Luo

2010-01-01

422

The Development of Trust in Close Friendships formed within Social Network Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this research we focus on the importance of trust within close friendships formed within social network sites and explain how trust is built within those relationships without face to face contact. An online questionnaire of 254 social network site users found that trust within close social network site friendships was very important and is built through a series of

Shankaron Gambi; Will Reader

2008-01-01

423

Percolation on Interdependent Networks with a Fraction of Antagonistic Interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, the percolation transition has been characterized on interacting networks both in presence of interdependent interactions and in presence of antagonistic interactions. Here we characterize the phase diagram of the percolation transition in two Poisson interdependent networks with a percentage q of antagonistic nodes. We show that this system can present a bistability of the steady state solutions, and both discontinuous and continuous phase transitions. In particular, we observe a bistability of the solutions in some regions of the phase space also for a small fraction of antagonistic interactions 0< q<0.4. Moreover, we show that a fraction q> q c =2/3 of antagonistic interactions is necessary to strongly reduce the region in phase-space in which both networks are percolating. This last result suggests that interdependent networks are robust to the presence of antagonistic interactions. Our approach can be extended to multiple networks, and to complex boolean rules for regulating the percolation phase transition.

Zhao, Kun; Bianconi, Ginestra

2013-09-01

424

Students' perceptions of face-to-face pseudostuttering experience.  

PubMed

Students' perceptions of simulating stuttering in public were obtained in order to quantify students' increased understanding of stuttering. 34 women and 2 men (M age=30.0 yr., SD=9.0) majoring in communication disorders participated. All were graduate students enrolled in their first class in fluency disorders. None had previous experience with individuals who stuttered. Participants completed a questionnaire before and after the experiment and discussed these experiences with the group. Responses to 39 questions using a 5-pt. Likert-type scale were analyzed for students' preparation, feelings, attitudes, and perception of listeners' reactions. Participants recounted both positive and negative experiences gaining understanding of and empathy for people who stutter, changing erroneous perceptions and broadening perspective of the disorder. Participants reported that the roundtable discussion contributed to their learning. Assigning students to simulate stuttering in public and participate in a follow-up discussion is an effective evidence-based teaching practice. PMID:19235424

Lohman, Patricia

2008-12-01

425

Technology-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Intergenerational Programming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elderly computer novices received 1-on-1 e-mail training, which enabled them to communicate electronically with elementary school-aged pen-pals. A traditional intergenerational visiting program was conducted concurrently. Program evaluation revealed that the intergenerational visiting program was rated favorably by 88% of the participating seniors and the intergenerational e-mail program was rated favorably by 57% of the seniors. Yet, only 6 (out of

Marcia S. Marx; Jiska Cohen-Mansfield; Karine Renaudat; Alexander Libin; Khin Thein

2005-01-01

426

Face-to-face collaborative learning supported by mobile phones  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of handheld computers in educational contexts has increased considerably in recent years and their value as a teaching tool has been confirmed by many positive experiences, particular within collaborative learning systems (Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning [MCSCL]). The cost of the devices has hindered widespread use in schools, however, and cell phones have emerged as an attractive alternative.

Alejandro Echeverría; Miguel Nussbaum; Juan Felipe Calderón; Claudio Bravo; Cristián Infante; Andrea Vásquez

2009-01-01

427

Face-to-face collaborative learning supported by mobile phones  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of handheld computers in educational contexts has increased considerably in recent years and their value as a teaching tool has been confirmed by many positive experiences, particular within collaborative learning systems (Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning [MCSCL]). The cost of the devices has hindered widespread use in schools, however, and cell phones have emerged as an attractive alternative.

Alejandro Echeverría; Miguel Nussbaum; Juan Felipe Calderón; Claudio Bravo; Cristián Infante; Andrea Vásquez

2011-01-01

428

Face to Face: U.S.-Soviet Summitry. Discussion Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document is the discussion guide for a four part video/print series designed to contribute to the understanding of the U.S.-Soviet relationship and the summitry process which has become such a visible part of it. Each of the four 30-minute programs interweaves archival material with informal discussions by distinguished scholars about…

Weinstein, Allen, Ed.

429

Students and State Legislators--Face-to-Face!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides information on how the Region 11 Vocational Center in Concord, New Hampshire, arranged a State Legislature Day. This project involved legislators visiting the Vocational Center and observing its programs. Shares several positive results from this outreach program. (CH)

Addario, Sharon

1987-01-01

430

User interface requirements for face to face groupware  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the user interface of the Capture Lab, a computer-supported meeting room that has been in operation since late 1987. One goal of the Capture Lab design is to support meetings of business people (who are often novice computer users) without requiring an additional person to serve as a computer technician or facilitator. This paper discusses the user

Mary Elwart-Keys; David Halonen; Marjorie Horton; Robert Kass; Paul Scott

1990-01-01

431

Future Schools: Blending Face-to-Face and Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article describes school models that offer a vision for what deeply integrated technology can mean for children's education, for the way schools are structured, and for the promise of greater efficiency amid a lengthy economic downturn. This is much more than simply taking a class online. Already, millions of children take one or more online…

Schorr, Jonathan; McGriff, Deborah

2011-01-01

432

Face to Face: U.S.-Soviet Summitry. Discussion Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is the discussion guide for a four part video/print series designed to contribute to the understanding of the U.S.-Soviet relationship and the summitry process which has become such a visible part of it. Each of the four 30-minute programs interweaves archival material with informal discussions by distinguished scholars about…

Weinstein, Allen, Ed.

433

Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online education has emerged in the 21st century as a popular alternative to traditional education. Proponents argue that online education provides opportunities for learners that they would otherwise do without (Beard & Harper, 2002; Hay, Peltier, & Drago, 2004). Opponents (see, for example, Hay et al., 2004) have argued, however, that the loss…

Beck, Victoria Simpson

2010-01-01

434

Online and Face-to-Face Training: A Cost Matrix  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online instruction gains an increasing presence due to associated benefits, including the ability to disregard geographical and time constraints, and the belief that online training is more cost efficient. This paper provides a discussion of issues to be faced by HRD professionals who intend to move the training environment online in response to…

Jeffcoat Bartley, Sharon; Golek, Jennifer H.

2004-01-01

435

A Program in Community Relations: Face-to-Face Confrontations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the sources of conflict in our urban centers today is the distrust that exists between the community and the police. In an effort to improve relations between community members and the police, so that both groups might work together more effectively in solving community problems, the Houston Cooperative Crime Prevention Program was…

Hanson, Philip G.; O'Connell, Walter E.

436

The MUSE project face to face with reality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation instrument built for ESO (European Southern Observatory) to be installed in Chile on the VLT (Very Large Telescope). The MUSE project is supported by a European consortium of 7 institutes. After the critical turning point of shifting from the design to the manufacturing phase, the MUSE project has now completed the realization of its different sub-systems and should finalize its global integration and test in Europe. To arrive to this point many challenges had to be overcome, many technical difficulties, non compliances or procurements delays which seemed at the time overwhelming. Now is the time to face the results of our organization, of our strategy, of our choices. Now is the time to face the reality of the MUSE instrument. During the design phase a plan was provided by the project management in order to achieve the realization of the MUSE instrument in specification, time and cost. This critical moment in the project life when the instrument takes shape and reality is the opportunity to look not only at the outcome but also to see how well we followed the original plan, what had to be changed or adapted and what should have been.

Caillier, P.; Accardo, M.; Adjali, L.; Anwand, H.; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, D.; Brotons, L.; Capoani, L.; Daguisé, E.; Dupieux, M.; Dupuy, C.; François, M.; Glindemann, A.; Gojak, D.; Hansali, G.; Hahn, T.; Jarno, A.; Kelz, A.; Koehler, C.; Kosmalski, J.; Laurent, F.; Le Floch, M.; Lizon, J.-L.; Loupias, M.; Manescau, A.; Migniau, J. E.; Monstein, C.; Nicklas, H.; Parès, L.; Pécontal-Rousset, A.; Piqueras, L.; Reiss, R.; Remillieux, A.; Renault, E.; Rupprecht, G.; Streicher, O.; Stuik, R.; Valentin, H.; Vernet, J.; Weilbacher, P.; Zins, G.

2012-09-01

437

Verbmobil - Translation of Face-To-Face Dialogs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Verbmobil is a long-term project on the translation of spontaneous language in negotiation dialogs. We describe the goals of the project, the chosen discourse domains and the initial project schedule. We discuss some of the distinguishing features of Verbmobil and introduce the notion of translation on demand and variable depth of processing in speech translation. Finally, the role of anytime

Wolfgang Wahlster

1993-01-01

438

Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning Supported by Mobile Phones  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The use of handheld computers in educational contexts has increased considerably in recent years and their value as a teaching tool has been confirmed by many positive experiences, particular within collaborative learning systems (Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning [MCSCL]). The cost of the devices has hindered widespread use in…

Echeverria, Alejandro; Nussbaum, Miguel; Calderon, Juan Felipe; Bravo, Claudio; Infante, Cristian; Vasquez, Andrea

2011-01-01

439

Face to Face: Stories from the Aftermath of Infamy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the wake of 9/11, many Muslims around the United States faced a backlash of resentment and anger. This groundswell of emotion was not without parallel, as Japanese and Japanese-Americans faced a similar reaction after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. The Independent Television Service has developed this Web site to bring a human face to the experiences of Muslims and Japanese people in the United States by collecting these powerful interviews from members of both groups. On the site, visitors can listen to stories from older Japanese-Americans talk about their experiences on the West Coast after Pearl Harbor, and the experiences of Muslims, both young and old. The interviews are divided into thematic sections, such as "Fear," "Internment," "Identity," and "Being American." At another section of the site, visitors can respond to the stories, and a glossary of terms is also provided as background material. Overall, this site serves as a fine educational tool, and for those looking for a number of perspectives on the experience of living in America.

440

Face to Face: From Real Humans to Realistic Facial Animation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a system for photo-realistic facial model- ing and animation, which includes several tools that fa- cilitate necessary tasks such as mesh processing, texture registration, and assembling of facial components. The resulting head model reflects the anatomical structure of the human head including skull, skin, and muscles. Semi- automatic generation of high-quality models from scan data for physics-based animation

Irene Albrecht; Hitoshi Yamauchi; Hans-Peter Seidel

441

Technology as small group face-to-face Collaborative Scaffolding  

Microsoft Academic Search

a b s t r a c t There is a wealth of evidence that collaboration between learners can enhance the outcomes for all con- cerned. This supports the theorization of learning as a socio-cultural practice, framed by Vygotsky and developed by other researchers such as Rogoff, Lave and Wenger. However, there is also evidence that working collaboratively may not

Miguel Nussbaum; Claudio Alvarez; Angela Mcfarlane; Florencia Gomez; Susana Claro; Darinka Radovic

2009-01-01

442

Online or Face-to-Face? Which Class to Take  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Online classes are a viable option in today's educational landscape, but are they right for your school and students? This article reviews the status of online education, 21st century skills, best practices in online education, and online classes as experienced by a middle school student and parent. (Contains 2 figures.)|

Cramer, Susan; Cramer, Steven

2008-01-01

443

User interactions in social networks and their implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are popular platforms for interaction, com- munication and collaboration between friends. Researchers have recently proposed an emerging class of applications that leverage relationships from social networks to improve security and performance in applications such as email, web browsing and overlay routing. While these applications of- ten cite social network connectivity statistics to supporttheir designs, researchers in psychology and

Christo Wilson; Bryce Boe; Alessandra Sala; Krishna P. N. Puttaswamy; Ben Y. Zhao

2009-01-01

444

Dynamic interactions of proteins in complex networks  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in techniques such as NMR and EPR spectroscopy have enabled the elucidation of how proteins undergo structural changes to act in concert in complex networks. The three minireviews in this series highlight current findings and the capabilities of new methodologies for unraveling the dynamic changes controlling diverse cellular functions. They represent a sampling of the cutting-edge research presented at the 17th Meeting of Methods in Protein Structure Analysis, MPSA2008, in Sapporo, Japan, 26-29 August, 2008 (http://www.iapsap.bnl.gov). The first minireview, by Christensen and Klevit, reports on a structure-based yeast two-hybrid method for identifying E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that interact with the E3 BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer ligase to generate either mono- or polyubiquitinated products. This method demonstrated for the first time that the BRCA1/BARD1 E3 can interact with 10 different E2 enzymes. Interestingly, the interaction with multiple E2 enzymes displayed unique ubiquitin-transfer properties, a feature expected to be common among other RING and U-box E3s. Further characterization of new E3 ligases and the E2 enzymes that interact with them will greatly enhance our understanding of ubiquitin transfer and facilitate studies of roles of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins in protein processing and trafficking. Stein et al., in the second minireview, describe recent progress in defining the binding specificity of different peptide-binding domains. The authors clearly point out that transient peptide interactions mediated by both post-translational modifications and disordered regions ensure a high level of specificity. They postulate that a regulatory code may dictate the number of combinations of domains and post-translational modifications needed to achieve the required level of interaction specificity. Moreover, recognition alone is not enough to obtain a stable complex, especially in a complex cellular environment. Increasing evidence indicates that disordered domains can acquire structural features that modulate the binding and strength of the signaling cascade. Whereas the first two minireviews describe ways in which protein interactions are modulated, the third, by Tompa, focuses on the importance of protein disorder in a subset of amyloid proteins. It is apparent that within this group, part of the polypeptide chain remains disordered during amyloid formation. Moreover, the disordered segments have different amino acid composition and physicochemical characteristics, which suggests that they may play a role in amyloid stability. The disordered region may serve as a linker to connect the ordered core and a globular domain, maintaining the stability and structure of the globular domain and minimizing protein refolding upon amyloid formation. As techniques in protein chemistry advance, we are learning more and more about the mechanisms that regulate and are regulated by protein interactions. The three minireviews in this series offer a glimpse of the complex dynamics fundamental to protein-protein interactions. In the future, we expect that the knowledge gained will help to augment our ability to control complex pathologies and treat diverse diseases states.

Appella, E.; Anderson, C.

2009-10-01

445

Global diffusion of interactive networks: The impact of culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet and other interactive networks are diffusing across the globe at rates that vary from country to country. Typically, economic and market structure variables are used to explain these differences. The addition of culture to these variables will provide a more robust understanding of the differences in Internet and interactive network diffusion. Existing analyses that identify culture as a

Carleen F. Maitland

1999-01-01

446

Bilingual lexical interactions in an unsupervised neural network model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons can develop in our network when the

Xiaowei Zhao; Ping Li

2010-01-01

447

How people in virtual groups and communities (fail to) interact  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 4 different research projects taking place in our department, students, teachers, researchers, policymakers and policemen are communicating and interacting through shared electronic work spaces between face to face meetings. The students interact about their studies in pedagogy. The teachers, researchers and policymakers interact about ICT in higher education. The researchers are from different universities all over Europe and interact

P. Robert-Jan Simons; Wilfried Admiraal; Sanne Akkerman; Jurjen van de Groep; M. de Laat; J. van der Pol

2003-01-01

448

Missing and spurious interactions and the reconstruction of complex networks.  

PubMed

Network analysis is currently used in a myriad of contexts, from identifying potential drug targets to predicting the spread of epidemics and designing vaccination strategies and from finding friends to uncovering criminal activity. Despite the promise of the network approach, the reliability of network data is a source of great concern in all fields where complex networks are studied. Here, we present a general mathematical and computational framework to deal with the problem of data reliability in complex networks. In particular, we are able to reliably identify both missing and spurious interactions in noisy network observations. Remarkably, our approach also enables us to obtain, from those noisy observations, network reconstructions that yield estimates of the true network properties that are more accurate than those provided by the observations themselves. Our approach has the potential to guide experiments, to better characterize network data sets, and to drive new discoveries. PMID:20018705

Guimerà, Roger; Sales-Pardo, Marta

2009-12-14

449

Human-computer interaction system design and implementation in network  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, based on the research of the existing network human-computer interaction systems, a new network human-computer interaction sub-system design method is proposed. This method can not only overcome the shortcomings of the existing human-computer interaction systems, but also can provide users a standard and friendly interface, allowing users to master a variety of text retrieval operations without special

Changchun Pan

2010-01-01

450

Characterization and modeling of protein protein interaction networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent availability of high-throughput gene expression and proteomics techniques has created an unprecedented opportunity for a comprehensive study of the structure and dynamics of many biological networks. Global proteomic interaction data, in particular, are synthetically represented as undirected networks exhibiting features far from the random paradigm which has dominated past effort in network theory. This evidence, along with the advances in the theory of complex networks, has triggered an intense research activity aimed at exploiting the evolutionary and biological significance of the resulting network's topology. Here we present a review of the results obtained in the characterization and modeling of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae protein interaction networks obtained with different experimental techniques. We provide a comparative assessment of the topological properties and discuss possible biases in interaction networks obtained with different techniques. We report on dynamical models based on duplication mechanisms that cast the protein interaction networks in the family of dynamically growing complex networks. Finally, we discuss various results and analysis correlating the networks’ topology with the biological function of proteins.

Colizza, Vittoria; Flammini, Alessandro; Maritan, Amos; Vespignani, Alessandro

2005-07-01

451

Socioeconomic networks with long-range interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a modified version of a model previously proposed by Jackson and Wolinsky to account for communication of information and allocation of goods in socioeconomic networks. In the model, the utility function of each node is given by a weighted sum of contributions from all accessible nodes. The weights, parametrized by the variable ? , decrease with distance. We introduce a growth mechanism where new nodes attach to the existing network preferentially by utility. By increasing ? , the network structure evolves from a power-law to an exponential degree distribution, passing through a regime characterized by shorter average path length, lower degree assortativity, and higher central point dominance. In the second part of the paper we compare different network structures in terms of the average utility received by each node. We show that power-law networks provide higher average utility than Poisson random networks. This provides a possible justification for the ubiquitousness of scale-free networks in the real world.

Carvalho, Rui; Iori, Giulia

2008-07-01

452

Interaction Wearable Computer with Networked Virtual Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this research is to propose a technique to integrate the mobile reality system into the legacy networked virtual\\u000a environment. This research composes of two essential research domains, one is networked virtual environment (NVE) and the\\u000a other is mobile computing. With the proposed technique, a user can use a mobile device to join a networked virtual environment\\u000a and

Jiung-yao Huang; Ming-chih Tung; Huan-chao Keh; Ji-jen Wu; Kun-hang Lee; Chung-hsien Tsai

2009-01-01

453

Virtual Team Interactions in Networked Multimedia Games Case: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the findings of the ethnographical research concentrating on multiplayer games. The overall goal is to study the interaction in these networked multimedia environments. The focus is in finding out how the player teams interact and whether the current games provide enough possibilities for team interaction, either inside the game world or supported by real world communication. The

Tony Manninen

454

Computer-mediated interactions through English for Elite Police Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of English for Elite Police Network program is to provide an interactive platform for trainees, instructors, police experts and other participants so as to enhance interests as well as efficiency in professional English learning and training. Computer-mediated interactions are strengthened in both police English learning and policing skills training through role-playing, discussing and interacting in scenarios which enable

Zhongwen Liu

2011-01-01

455

Integrating physical and genetic maps: from genomes to interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Physical and genetic mapping data have become as important to network biology as they once were to the Human Genome Project. Integrating physical and genetic networks currently faces several challenges: increasing the coverage of each type of network; establishing methods to assemble individual interaction measurements into contiguous pathway models; and annotating these pathways with detailed functional information. A particular challenge involves reconciling the wide variety of interaction types that are currently available. For this purpose, recent studies have sought to classify genetic and physical interactions along several complementary dimensions, such as ordered versus unordered, alleviating versus aggravating, and first versus second degree.

Beyer, Andreas; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Ideker, Trey

2009-01-01

456

Essential Proteins Discovery from Weighted Protein Interaction Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identifying essential proteins is important for understanding the minimal requirements for cellular survival and development. Fast growth in the amount of available protein-protein interactions has produced unprecedented opportunities for detecting protein essentiality on network level. A series of centrality measures have been proposed to discover essential proteins based on network topology. However, most of them treat all interactions equally and are sensitive to false positives. In this paper, six standard centrality measures are redefined to be used in weighted network. A new method for weighing protein-protein interactions is proposed based on the combination of logistic regression-based model and function similarity. The experimental results on yeast network show that the weighting method can improve the performance of centrality measures considerably. More essential proteins are discovered by the weighted centrality measures than by the original centrality measures used in unweighted network. Even about 20% improvements are obtained from closeness centrality and subgraph centrality.

Li, Min; Wang, Jianxin; Wang, Huan; Pan, Yi

457

Characterization and evolutionary analysis of protein-protein interaction networks.  

PubMed

While researchers have known the importance of the protein-protein interaction for decades, recent innovations in large-scale screening techniques have caused a shift in the paradigm of protein function analysis. Where the focus was once on the individual protein, attention is now directed to the surrounding network of protein associations. As protein interaction networks can provide useful insights into the potential function of and phenotypes associated with proteins, the increasing availability of large-scale protein interaction data suggests that molecular biologists can extract more meaningful hypotheses through examination of these large networks. Further, increasing availability of high-quality protein interaction data in multiple species has allowed interpretation of the properties of networks (i.e., the presence of hubs and modularity) from an evolutionary perspective. In this chapter, we discuss major previous findings derived from analyses of large-scale protein interaction data, focusing on approaches taken by landmark assays in evaluating the structure and evolution of these networks. We then outline basic techniques for protein interaction network analysis with the goal of pointing out the benefits and potential limitations of these approaches. As the majority of large-scale protein interaction data has been generated in budding yeast, literature described here focuses on this important model organism with references to other species included where possible. PMID:22399467

Musso, Gabriel; Emili, Andrew; Zhang, Zhaolei

2012-01-01

458

Protein interaction network related to Helicobacter pylori infection response  

PubMed Central

AIM: To understand the complex reaction of gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) in a systematic manner using a protein interaction network. METHODS: The expression of genes significantly changed on microarray during H pylori infection was scanned from the web literary database and translated into proteins. A network of protein interactions was constructed by searching the primary interactions of selected proteins. The constructed network was mathematically analyzed and its biological function was examined. In addition, the nodes on the network were checked to determine if they had any further functional importance or relation to other proteins by extending them. RESULTS: The scale-free network showing the relationship between inflammation and carcinogenesis was constructed. Mathematical analysis showed hub and bottleneck proteins, and these proteins were mostly related to immune response. The network contained pathways and proteins related to H pylori infection, such as the JAK-STAT pathway triggered by interleukins. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-?B, TLR4, and other proteins known to function as core proteins of immune response were also found. These immune-related proteins interacted on the network with pathways and proteins related to the cell cycle, cell maintenance and proliferation, and transcription regulators such as BRCA1, FOS, REL, and zinc finger proteins. The extension of nodes showed interactions of the immune proteins with cancer-related proteins. One extended network, the core network, a summarized form of the extended network, and cell pathway model were constructed. CONCLUSION: Immune-related proteins activated by H pylori infection interact with proto-oncogene proteins. The hub and bottleneck proteins are potential drug targets for gastric inflammation and cancer.

Kim, Kyu Kwang; Kim, Han Bok

2009-01-01

459

Growing up with Social Networks and Online Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This presentation examines child and adolescent social networking with an emphasis on how this unprecedented form of communication can be used to contribute to healthy growth and development. Most literature about child and adolescent relationships reflects yesterday's world, a time when face-to-face encounters were the only concern. Students saw…

Strom, Paris; Strom, Robert

2012-01-01

460

Discussion Tool Effects on Collaborative Learning and Social Network Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigated the social network structure of booking officers at the Honolulu Police Department and how the introduction of an online discussion tool affected knowledge about operation of a booking module. Baseline data provided evidence for collaboration among officers in the same district using e-mail, telephone and face-to-face

Tomsic, Astrid; Suthers, Daniel D.

2006-01-01

461

Adolescents' and Emerging Adults' Social Networking Online: Homophily or Diversity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|More than half of all online American adolescents and emerging adults have created personal profiles for social networking on the Internet. Does homophily in their offline friendships extend online? Drawing mainly on research of face-to-face friendship, we collected data from the public spaces, called "walls," of 129 young Americans ages 16 to 19…

Mazur, Elizabeth; Richards, Lacey

2011-01-01

462

Discussion Tool Effects on Collaborative Learning and Social Network Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the social network structure of booking officers at the Honolulu Police Department and how the introduction of an online discussion tool affected knowledge about operation of a booking module. Baseline data provided evidence for collaboration among officers in the same district using e-mail, telephone and face-to-face media…

Tomsic, Astrid; Suthers, Daniel D.

2006-01-01

463

Teachers' Support with Ad-Hoc Collaborative Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Efforts to improve the educational process must focus on those most responsible for implementing it: the teachers. It is with them in mind that we propose a face-to-face computer-supported collaborative learning system that uses wirelessly networked hand-held computers to create an environment for helping students assimilate and transfer…

Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Lpez, X.; Rodrguez, P.; Santelices, R.; Rosas, R.; Marianov, V.

2005-01-01

464

Adolescents' and Emerging Adults' Social Networking Online: Homophily or Diversity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than half of all online American adolescents and emerging adults have created personal profiles for social networking on the Internet. Does homophily in their offline friendships extend online? Drawing mainly on research of face-to-face friendship, we collected data from the public spaces, called "walls," of 129 young Americans ages 16 to 19…

Mazur, Elizabeth; Richards, Lacey

2011-01-01

465

Recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

The increasing availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction data has made it possible to understand the basic components and organization of cell machinery from the network level. The arising challenge is how to analyze such complex interacting data to reveal the principles of cellular organization, processes and functions. Many studies have shown that clustering protein interaction network is an effective approach for identifying protein complexes or functional modules, which has become a major research topic in systems biology. In this review, recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks will be presented in detail. The predictions of protein functions and interactions based on modules will be covered. Finally, the performance of different clustering methods will be compared and the directions for future research will be discussed.

2010-01-01

466

Model of mobile agents for sexual interactions networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a novel model to simulate real social networks of complex interactions, based in a system of colliding particles (agents). The network is build by keeping track of the collisions and evolves in time with correlations which emerge due to the mobility of the agents. Therefore, statistical features are a consequence only of local collisions among its individual agents. Agent dynamics is realized by an event-driven algorithm of collisions where energy is gained as opposed to physical systems which have dissipation. The model reproduces empirical data from networks of sexual interactions, not previously obtained with other approaches.

González, M. C.; Lind, P. G.; Herrmann, H. J.

2006-02-01

467

Towards an understating of signal transduction protein interaction networks.  

PubMed

Protein network analysis has witnessed a number of advancements in the past for understanding molecular characteristics for important network topologies in biological systems. The signaling pathway regulates cell cycle progression and anti-apoptotic molecules. This pathway is also involved in maintaining cell survival by modulating the activity of apoptosis through RAS, P13K, AKT and BAD activities. The importance of protein-protein interactions to improve usability of the interactome by scoring and ranking interaction data for proteins in signal transduction networks is illustrated using available data and resources. PMID:22715315

Kaladhar, Dowluru Svgk; Sai, Potladurthi Chandra; Rao, Padmanabhuni V Nageswara; Chaitanya, Amajala Krishna; Rao, Duddukuri Govinda; Rao, Vadlapudi Varahala; Reddy, Erva Rajeswara; Kumar, Sudabattula Vijaya; Kumar, Divyakolu Vinod

2012-05-15

468

Towards an understating of signal transduction protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Protein network analysis has witnessed a number of advancements in the past for understanding molecular characteristics for important network topologies in biological systems. The signaling pathway regulates cell cycle progression and anti-apoptotic molecules. This pathway is also involved in maintaining cell survival by modulating the activity of apoptosis through RAS, P13K, AKT and BAD activities. The importance of protein-protein interactions to improve usability of the interactome by scoring and ranking interaction data for proteins in signal transduction networks is illustrated using available data and resources.

Kaladhar, Dowluru SVGK; Sai, Potladurthi Chandra; Rao, Padmanabhuni V Nageswara; chaitanya, Amajala Krishna; Rao, Duddukuri Govinda; Rao, Vadlapudi Varahala; Reddy, Erva Rajeswara; kumar, Sudabattula Vijaya; Kumar, Divyakolu Vinod

2012-01-01

469

The Firm's Management of Social Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consumer choice is influenced in a direct and meaningful way by the actions taken by others. These “actions” range from face-to-face recommendations from a friend to the passive observation of what a stranger is wearing. We refer to the set of such contexts as “social interactions” (SI). We believe that at least some of the SI effects are partially within

David Godes; Dina Mayzlin; Yubo Chen; Sanjiv Das; Chrysanthos Dellarocas; Bruce Pfeiffer; Barak Libai; Subrata Sen; Mengze Shi; Peeter Verlegh

2005-01-01

470

Modeling the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Epidemics seldom occur as isolated phenomena. Typically, two or more viral agents spread within the same host population and may interact dynamically with each other. We present a general model where two viral agents interact via an immunity mechanism as they propagate simultaneously on two networks connecting the same set of nodes. By exploiting a correspondence between the propagation dynamics and a dynamical process performing progressive network generation, we develop an analytical approach that accurately captures the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks. The formalism allows for overlay networks with arbitrary joint degree distribution and overlap. To illustrate the versatility of our approach, we consider a hypothetical delayed intervention scenario in which an immunizing agent is disseminated in a host population to hinder the propagation of an undesirable agent (e.g., the spread of preventive information in the context of an emerging infectious disease).

Marceau, Vincent; Noël, Pierre-André; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Dubé, Louis J.

2011-08-01

471

Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction  

PubMed Central

Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

Escalera, Sergio; Baro, Xavier; Vitria, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

472

The balance of weak and strong interactions in genetic networks.  

PubMed

Genetic interactions are being quantitatively characterized in a comprehensive way in several model organisms. These data are then globally represented in terms of genetic networks. How are interaction strengths distributed in these networks? And what type of functional organization of the underlying genomic systems is revealed by such distribution patterns? Here, I found that weak interactions are important for the structure of genetic buffering between signaling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, and that the strength of the association between two genes correlates with the number of common interactors they exhibit. I also determined that this network includes genetic cascades balancing weak and strong links, and that its hubs act as particularly strong genetic modifiers; both patterns also identified in Saccharomyces cerevisae networks. In yeast, I further showed a relation, although weak, between interaction strengths and some phenotypic/evolutionary features of the corresponding target genes. Overall, this work demonstrates a non-random organization of interaction strengths in genetic networks, a feature common to other complex networks, and that could reflect in this context how genetic variation is eventually influencing the phenotype. PMID:21347355

Poyatos, Juan F

2011-02-10

473

Behavioural phenotype affects social interactions in an animal network  

PubMed Central

Animal social networks can be extremely complex and are characterized by highly non-random interactions between group members. However, very little is known about the underlying factors affecting interaction preferences, and hence network structure. One possibility is that behavioural differences between individuals, such as how bold or shy they are, can affect the frequency and distribution of their interactions within a network. We tested this using individually marked three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and found that bold individuals had fewer overall interactions than shy fish, but tended to distribute their interactions more evenly across all group members. Shy fish, on the other hand, tended to associate preferentially with a small number of other group members, leading to a highly skewed distribution of interactions. This was mediated by the reduced tendency of shy fish to move to a new location within the tank when they were interacting with another individual; bold fish showed no such tendency and were equally likely to move irrespective of whether they were interacting or not. The results show that animal social network structure can be affected by the behavioural composition of group members and have important implications for understanding the spread of information and disease in social groups.

Pike, Thomas W; Samanta, Madhumita; Lindstrom, Jan; Royle, Nick J

2008-01-01

474

Brain network interactions in auditory, visual and linguistic processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the paper, we discuss the importance of network interactions between brain regions in mediating performance of sensorimotor and cognitive tasks, including those associated with language processing. Functional neuroimaging, especially PET and fMRI, provide data that are obtained essentially simultaneously from much of the brain, and thus are ideal for enabling one to assess interregional functional interactions. Two ways to

Barry Horwitz; Allen R. Braun

2004-01-01

475

Hub Promiscuity in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Hubs are proteins with a large number of interactions in a protein-protein interaction network. They are the principal agents in the interaction network and affect its function and stability. Their specific recognition of many different protein partners is of great interest from the structural viewpoint. Over the last few years, the structural properties of hubs have been extensively studied. We review the currently known features that are particular to hubs, possibly affecting their binding ability. Specifically, we look at the levels of intrinsic disorder, surface charge and domain distribution in hubs, as compared to non-hubs, along with differences in their functional domains.

Patil, Ashwini; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki

2010-01-01

476

Peer Interaction in the Televised Class: A Contextual Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on classroom behavior suggests that students in traditional (face-to-face) classrooms engage in a variety of interactions with their peers, and that these interactions are not always confined to fulfilling the teacher's agenda. Less attention has been given to understanding the characteristics of unofficial classroom subcultures in televised classes where there is no teacher physically present. This qualitative study used

Jane Jorgenson; Bela Joshi; Richard Monroe

1996-01-01

477

Constructing an Interactive Environment for Faculty Instructional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes a novel interactive platform for faculty development, particularly focusing on transmitting some subtle teaching experiences, e.g., interaction with students inside and outside of class, face to face and via the Internet. This work examined two outstanding instructional faculties at the National Central University, including…

Lin, Shinn-Rong; Liu, Chia-wen; Wu, Yi-Chin; Teng, Hsiao-Ting

2007-01-01

478

A network of protein–protein interactions in yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

A global analysis of 2,709 published interactions between proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been performed, enabling the establishment of a single large network of 2,358 interactions among 1,548 proteins. Proteins of known function and cellular location tend to cluster together, with 63% of the interactions occurring between proteins with a common functional assignment and 76% occurring between proteins

Benno Schwikowski; Peter Uetz

2000-01-01

479

Functionally guided alignment of protein interaction networks for module detection  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Functional module detection within protein interaction networks is a challenging problem due to the sparsity of data and presence of errors. Computational techniques for this task range from purely graph theoretical approaches involving single networks to alignment of multiple networks from several species. Current network alignment methods all rely on protein sequence similarity to map proteins across species. Results: Here we carry out network alignment using a protein functional similarity measure. We show that using functional similarity to map proteins across species improves network alignment in terms of functional coherence and overlap with experimentally verified protein complexes. Moreover, the results from functional similarity-based network alignment display little overlap (<15%) with sequence similarity-based alignment. Our combined approach integrating sequence and function-based network alignment alongside graph clustering properties offers a 200% increase in coverage of experimental datasets and comparable accuracy to current network alignment methods. Availability: Program binaries and source code is freely available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/bioinfo/resources Contact: ali@stats.ox.ac.uk Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

Ali, Waqar; Deane, Charlotte M.

2009-01-01

480

Synthesis of resource conservation network with sink–source interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a mathematical model for the synthesis of resource conservation networks with interception placement.\\u000a A comprehensive superstructure that incorporates all possible network configurations is used to facilitate the formulation.\\u000a The synthesis task involves the allocation and interception of process sources to satisfy process sinks and environmental\\u000a constraints. In particular, the interaction between the sinks and sources is addressed

Cheng-Liang Chen; Jui-Yuan Lee; Denny Kok Sum Ng; Dominic Chwan Yee Foo

2010-01-01

481

Motifs, themes and thematic maps of an integrated Saccharomyces cerevisiae interaction network  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Large-scale studies have revealed networks of various biological interaction types, such as protein-protein interaction, genetic interaction, transcriptional regulation, sequence homology, and expression correlation. Recurring patterns of interconnection, or 'network motifs', have revealed biological insights for networks containing either one or two types of interaction. RESULTS: To study more complex relationships involving multiple biological interaction types, we assembled an

Lan V Zhang; Oliver D King; Sharyl L Wong; Debra S Goldberg; Amy HY Tong; Guillaume Lesage; Brenda Andrews; Howard Bussey; Charles Boone; Frederick P Roth

2005-01-01

482

Topology and static response of interaction networks in molecular biology  

PubMed Central

We introduce a mathematical framework describing static response of networks occurring in molecular biology. This formalism has many similarities with the Laplace–Kirchhoff equations for electrical networks. We introduce the concept of graph boundary and we show how the response of the biological networks to external perturbations can be related to the Dirichlet or Neumann problems for the corresponding equations on the interaction graph. Solutions to these two problems are given in terms of path moduli (measuring path rigidity with respect to the propagation of interaction along the graph). Path moduli are related to loop products in the interaction graph via generalized Mason–Coates formulae. We apply our results to two specific biological examples: the lactose operon and the genetic regulation of lipogenesis. Our applications show consistency with experimental results and in the case of lipogenesis check some hypothesis on the behaviour of hepatic fatty acids on fasting.

Radulescu, Ovidiu; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Siegel, Anne; Veber, Philippe; Le Borgne, Michel

2005-01-01

483

Statistical networks emerging from link-node interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a network model, where the nodes and links are interacting statistical variables. Each node can be in one of two states (Ising variable), the like nodes tend to link, while the linked nodes tend to be in the same state. The network structure is determined by an effective potential generated by the quickly relaxing nodes, and is measurable via the statistical features of the nodes. For low temperatures the nodes get spontaneously ordered inducing the connectivity enhancement, link-link correlations and clustering. The giant component of the network does appear via a first-order percolation transition leading to bistability and hysteresis.

Allahverdyan, A. E.; Petrosyan, K. G.

2006-09-01

484

Constructing the angiome: a global angiogenesis protein interaction network  

PubMed Central

Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing microvessels. Excessive and insufficient angiogenesis have been associated with many diseases including cancer, age-related macular degeneration, ischemic heart, brain, and skeletal muscle diseases. A comprehensive understanding of angiogenesis regulatory processes is needed to improve treatment of these diseases. To identify proteins related to angiogenesis, we developed a novel integrative framework for diverse sources of high-throughput data. The system, called GeneHits, was used to expand on known angiogenesis pathways to construct the angiome, a protein-protein interaction network for angiogenesis. The network consists of 478 proteins and 1,488 interactions. The network was validated through cross validation and analysis of five gene expression datasets from in vitro angiogenesis assays. We calculated the topological properties of the angiome. We analyzed the functional enrichment of angiogenesis-annotated and associated proteins. We also constructed an extended angiome with 1,233 proteins and 5,726 interactions to derive a more complete map of protein-protein interactions in angiogenesis. Finally, the extended angiome was used to identify growth factor signaling networks that drive angiogenesis and antiangiogenic signaling networks. The results of this analysis can be used to identify genes and proteins in different disease conditions and putative targets for therapeutic interventions as high-ranked candidates for experimental validation.

Rivera, Corban G.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Bader, Joel S.

2012-01-01

485

Drug interaction networks: an introduction to translational and clinical applications.  

PubMed

This article introduces fundamental concepts to guide the analysis and interpretation of drug-target interaction networks. An overview of the generation and integration of interaction networks is followed by key strategies for extracting biologically meaningful information. The article highlights how this information can enable novel translational and clinically motivated applications. Important advances for the discovery of new treatments and for the detection of adverse drug effects are discussed. Examples of applications and findings originating from cardiovascular research are presented. The review ends with a discussion of crucial challenges and opportunities. PMID:22977007

Azuaje, Francisco

2012-09-12

486

Networked Interactive Video for Group Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The National Computing Centre (NCC) has developed an interactive video training system for the Scottish Police College to help train police supervisory officers in crowd control at major spectator events, such as football matches. This approach involves technology-enhanced training in a group-learning environment, and may have significant impact…

Eary, John

2008-01-01

487

Interacting networks as models of cultural change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advances in transport technologies for people, commodities, and information increase the possibilities of interaction among individuals who belong to previously separate cultural communities, and this tends to result in the emergence of a global culture. Which factors accelerate or slow down the emergence of a single culture in two previously separated groups of individuals when there are new opportunities of

Federico Cecconi; Daniele Caligiore; Gianluca Baldassarre; Domenico Parisi

2007-01-01

488

Applying Wireless Technologies to Build a Highly Interactive Learning Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tries to apply wireless technologies to build a highly interactive environment. For this purpose, this study first identifies four types of interaction between the members in the technology-embedded classroom contexts, including: (1) face-to-face interaction; (2) computer-mediated interaction; (3) human-computer interaction; and (4) personal device supported simultaneous group interaction. In our analysis, each type of interaction above has its

Tzu-chien Liu; Hsue-yie Wang; Jen-kai Liang; Tak-wai Chan; Jie-chi Yang

2002-01-01

489

Social Networks and Participation in Social Activities at a New Senior Center: Reaching Out to Older Adults Who Could Benefit the Most  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined social network characteristics associated with older adults' intentions to participate and actual participation in social activities at a new senior center. Face-to-face interviews (N?=?126) were conducted prior to the opening of a senior center in the participants' community. Measures included social network characteristics, social support, social connectedness, and demographic characteristics. Actual participation was assessed approximately 14 months

Sato Ashida; Catherine A. Heaney

2008-01-01

490

"I'll See You on IM, Text, or Call You": A Social Network Approach of Adolescents' Use of Communication Media  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study explores some possibilities of social network analysis for studying adolescents' communication patterns. A full network analysis was conducted on third-grade high school students (15 year olds, 137 students) in Belgium. The results pointed out that face-to-face communication was still the most prominent way for information to flow…

Van Cleemput, Katrien

2010-01-01

491

Social network interactions among mentally ill persons in community housing: research issues and agenda  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses social network interactions among individuals who have been hospitalized with mental illness and who currently reside in different types of community housing programmes. First, a conceptualisation of social networks that focuses on network interactions, both supportive and non-supportive, between network interactions may be more important influences on successful or unsuccessful adaptation of current and former psychiatric patients

G. B. Hall; G. B. Nelson; D. Squire; R. Walsh

1992-01-01

492

GINI: From ISH Images to Gene Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Accurate inference of molecular and functional interactions among genes, especially in multicellular organisms such as Drosophila, often requires statistical analysis of correlations not only between the magnitudes of gene expressions, but also between their temporal-spatial patterns. The ISH (in-situ-hybridization)-based gene expression micro-imaging technology offers an effective approach to perform large-scale spatial-temporal profiling of whole-body mRNA abundance. However, analytical tools for discovering gene interactions from such data remain an open challenge due to various reasons, including difficulties in extracting canonical representations of gene activities from images, and in inference of statistically meaningful networks from such representations. In this paper, we present GINI, a machine learning system for inferring gene interaction networks from Drosophila embryonic ISH images. GINI builds on a computer-vision-inspired vector-space representation of the spatial pattern of gene expression in ISH images, enabled by our recently developed system; and a new multi-instance-kernel algorithm that learns a sparse Markov network model, in which, every gene (i.e., node) in the network is represented by a vector-valued spatial pattern rather than a scalar-valued gene intensity as in conventional approaches such as a Gaussian graphical model. By capturing the notion of spatial similarity of gene expression, and at the same time properly taking into account the presence of multiple images per gene via multi-instance kernels, GINI is well-positioned to infer statistically sound, and biologically meaningful gene interaction networks from image data. Using both synthetic data and a small manually curated data set, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in network building. Furthermore, we report results on a large publicly available collection of Drosophila embryonic ISH images from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project, where GINI makes novel and interesting predictions of gene interactions. Software for GINI is available at http://sailing.cs.cmu.edu/Drosophila_ISH_images/

Puniyani, Kriti; Xing, Eric P.

2013-01-01

493

GINI: From ISH Images to Gene Interaction Networks.  

PubMed

Accurate inference of molecular and functional interactions among genes, especially in multicellular organisms such as Drosophila, often requires statistical analysis of correlations not only between the magnitudes of gene expressions, but also between their temporal-spatial patterns. The ISH (in-situ-hybridization)-based gene expression micro-imaging technology offers an effective approach to perform large-scale spatial-temporal profiling of whole-body mRNA abundance. However, analytical tools for discovering gene interactions from such data remain an open challenge due to various reasons, including difficulties in extracting canonical representations of gene activities from images, and in inference of statistically meaningful networks from such representations. In this paper, we present GINI, a machine learning system for inferring gene interaction networks from Drosophila embryonic ISH images. GINI builds on a computer-vision-inspired vector-space representation of the spatial pattern of gene expression in ISH images, enabled by our recently developed [Formula: see text] system; and a new multi-instance-kernel algorithm that learns a sparse Markov network model, in which, every gene (i.e., node) in the network is represented by a vector-valued spatial pattern rather than a scalar-valued gene intensity as in conventional approaches such as a Gaussian graphical model. By capturing the notion of spatial similarity of gene expression, and at the same time properly taking into account the presence of multiple images per gene via multi-instance kernels, GINI is well-positioned to infer statistically sound, and biologically meaningful gene interaction networks from image data. Using both synthetic data and a small manually curated data set, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in network building. Furthermore, we report results on a large publicly available collection of Drosophila embryonic ISH images from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project, where GINI makes novel and interesting predictions of gene interactions. Software for GINI is available at http://sailing.cs.cmu.edu/Drosophila_ISH_images/ PMID:24130465

Puniyani, Kriti; Xing, Eric P

2013-10-10

494

Ecological interaction and phylogeny, studying functionality on composed networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a class of composed networks that are formed by two tree networks, TP and TA, whose end points touch each other through a bipartite network B. We explore this network using a functional approach. We are interested in how much the topology, or the structure, of TX (X=A or P) determines the links of B. This composed structure is a useful model in evolutionary biology, where TP and TA are the phylogenetic trees of plants and animals that interact in an ecological community. We make use of ecological networks of dispersion of fruits, which are formed by frugivorous animals and plants with fruits; the animals, usually birds, eat fruits and disperse their seeds. We analyse how the phylogeny of TX determines or is correlated with B using a Monte Carlo approach. We use the phylogenetic distance among elements that interact with a given species to construct an index ? that quantifies the influence of TX over B. The algorithm is based on the assumption that interaction matrices that follows a phylogeny of TX have a total phylogenetic distance smaller than the average distance of an ensemble of Monte Carlo realisations. We find that the effect of phylogeny of animal species is more pronounced in the ecological matrix than plant phylogeny.

Cruz, Claudia P. T.; Fonseca, Carlos Roberto; Corso, Gilberto

2012-02-01

495

Optimizing a global alignment of protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Motivation: The global alignment of protein interaction networks is a widely studied problem. It is an importa