These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Empirical temporal networks of face-to-face human interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ever increasing adoption of mobile technologies and ubiquitous services allows to sense human behavior at unprecedented level of details and scale. Wearable sensors, in particular, open up a new window on human mobility and proximity in a variety of indoor environments. Here we review stylized facts on the structural and dynamical properties of empirical networks of human face-to-face proximity, measured in three different real-world contexts: an academic conference, a hospital ward, and a museum exhibition. First, we discuss the structure of the aggregated contact networks, that project out the detailed ordering of contact events while preserving temporal heterogeneities in their weights. We show that the structural properties of aggregated networks highlight important differences and unexpected similarities across contexts, and discuss the additional complexity that arises from attributes that are typically associated with nodes in real-world interaction networks, such as role classes in hospitals. We then consider the empirical data at the finest level of detail, i.e., we consider time-dependent networks of face-to-face proximity between individuals. To gain insights on the effects that causal constraints have on spreading processes, we simulate the dynamics of a simple susceptible-infected model over the empirical time-resolved contact data. We show that the spreading pathways for the epidemic process are strongly affected by the temporal structure of the network data, and that the mere knowledge of static aggregated networks leads to erroneous conclusions about the transmission paths on the corresponding dynamical networks.

Barrat, A.; Cattuto, C.; Colizza, V.; Gesualdo, F.; Isella, L.; Pandolfi, E.; Pinton, J.-F.; Ravà, L.; Rizzo, C.; Romano, M.; Stehlé, J.; Tozzi, A. E.; Van den Broeck, W.

2013-09-01

2

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1130251 MINING FACE-TO-FACE INTERACTION NETWORKS  

E-print Network

data on the face-to-face interaction networks, tonal conversational variation and physical proximityElectronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1130251 1 MINING FACE-TO-FACE INTERACTION School of Management lynnwu@mit.edu Ben Waber MIT Media Laboratory bwaber@media.mit.edu Sinan Aral NYU

3

Facebook and MySpace: complement or substitute for face-to-face interaction?  

PubMed

Previous studies have claimed that social-networking sites are used as a substitute for face-to-face interaction, resulting in deteriorating relationship quality and decreased intimacy among its users. The present study hypothesized that this type of communication is not a substitute for face-to-face interaction; rather, that it is an extension of communication with face-to-face partners. A survey was administered to examine the use of Facebook and MySpace in this regard among 183 college students. The study confirmed that Facebook and MySpace do act as an extension of face-to-face interaction, but that some users do tend to rely on Facebook and MySpace for interpersonal communication more than face-to-face interaction. PMID:21329446

Kujath, Carlyne L

2011-01-01

4

Effectiveness of Link Prediction for Face-to-Face Behavioral Networks  

PubMed Central

Research on link prediction for social networks has been actively pursued. In link prediction for a given social network obtained from time-windowed observation, new link formation in the network is predicted from the topology of the obtained network. In contrast, recent advances in sensing technology have made it possible to obtain face-to-face behavioral networks, which are social networks representing face-to-face interactions among people. However, the effectiveness of link prediction techniques for face-to-face behavioral networks has not yet been explored in depth. To clarify this point, here we investigate the accuracy of conventional link prediction techniques for networks obtained from the history of face-to-face interactions among participants at an academic conference. Our findings were (1) that conventional link prediction techniques predict new link formation with a precision of 0.30–0.45 and a recall of 0.10–0.20, (2) that prolonged observation of social networks often degrades the prediction accuracy, (3) that the proposed decaying weight method leads to higher prediction accuracy than can be achieved by observing all records of communication and simply using them unmodified, and (4) that the prediction accuracy for face-to-face behavioral networks is relatively high compared to that for non-social networks, but not as high as for other types of social networks. PMID:24339956

Tsugawa, Sho; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

2013-01-01

5

What's in a crowd? Analysis of face-to-face behavioral networks Lorenzo Isella a  

E-print Network

networks Face-to-face proximity Information spreading Behavioral social networks Complex networks a b s t r et al., 2004; Balcan et al., 2009). Mobile devices such as cell phones make it possibleWhat's in a crowd? Analysis of face-to-face behavioral networks Lorenzo Isella a , Juliette Stehle

Barrat, Alain

6

Pervasive Sensing to Model Political Opinions in Face-to-Face Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposure and adoption of opinions in social networks are important questions in education, business, and government. We de- scribe a novel application of pervasive computing based on using mobile phone sensors to measure and model the face-to-face interactions and subsequent opinion changes amongst undergraduates, during the 2008 US presidential election campaign. We nd that self-reported political discussants have characteristic interaction

Anmol Madan; Katayoun Farrahi; Daniel Gatica-Perez

2011-01-01

7

Pervasive Sensing to Model Political Opinions in Face-to-Face Networks  

E-print Network

of social web applications has generated copious amounts of data about how people behave and interact-world, face-to-face interactions. To model the adoption of these behav- iors, we need fine-grained data about face-to-face interactions between people, i.e. who talks to whom, when, where, and how often, as well

8

A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Electronic Peer-Mentoring: Interactions with Mentor Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study compared the relative impact of peer-mentoring that took place either face-to-face or through electronic chat. Proteges were 106 college freshmen randomly assigned to a senior college student mentor and to one of the two communication modes. Fifty-one mentors interacted with one of these proteges face-to-face and one solely…

Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.; Scielzo, Shannon A.; Yarbrough, Charyl S.; Rosopa, Patrick J.

2008-01-01

9

Supporting face-to-face communications through interactive toys space  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the design and implementation of a low-cost vision-based system called interactive toys environment that turns small toys-like objects into interactive tools acting as interfaces between the computer and its users (i.e. Human-Computer Interaction) and between users themselves (i.e. Human-Human Interaction). Group members collaboratively work or play by grasping and moving multiple physical objects (i.e. toys) on a

E. Kanjo; P. Astheimer; I. M. Marshall

2004-01-01

10

Social interactions across media: Interpersonal communication on the Internet, telephone and face-to-face  

E-print Network

Two studies were conducted in this investigation to compare college students’ interpersonal interaction online, face-to-face, and on the telephone. Our first study, a communication diary, assessed the relative amount of ...

Baym, Nancy K.; Zhang, Yan Bing; Lin, Mei-Chen

2004-06-01

11

Triadic closure mechanism in face-to-face and online social relationship networks  

E-print Network

In this work we analyze two experimental datasets comprising time-resolved social interactions. The first correspond to direct face-to-face encounters in a closed gathering, while the second correspond to online friendship relations in a massive social network. Beyond its dissimilar characteristics, we show the constraining effect played by triadic closure mechanism on the evolution of both time-cumulative networks. We propose a model for social networks growth based on triadic closure and random connection mechanisms. As opposed to the usual network growth algorithms, our model introduces nodes and edges growth in a decoupled fashion. We derive analytical results and perform extensive numerical simulations in regimes with and without population growth. Finally, we show that our model reproduces the main topological features of both time-cumulative social networks.

Medus, A D

2013-01-01

12

A comparison of face-to-face and electronic peer-mentoring: Interactions with mentor gender  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study compared the relative impact of peer-mentoring that took place either face-to-face or through electronic chat. Protégés were 106 college freshmen randomly assigned to a senior college student mentor and to one of the two communication modes. Fifty-one mentors interacted with one of these proteges face-to-face and one solely through electronic chat. Electronic chat resulted in less psychosocial

Kimberly A. Smith-Jentsch; Shannon A. Scielzo; Charyl S. Yarbrough; Patrick J. Rosopa

2008-01-01

13

Internet Communication Versus Face-to-face Interaction in Quality of Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study seeks to understand the role of the Internet in quality of life (QoL). Specifically, it examines the question of\\u000a whether Internet communication serves, like face-to-face interactions, to enhance quality of life. It is hypothesized that\\u000a the use of the Internet for interpersonal communication can improve quality of life among Internet users, just like face-to-face\\u000a communication in everyday life.

Paul S. N. LeeLouis; Louis Leung; Venhwei Lo; Chengyu Xiong; Tingjun Wu

2011-01-01

14

Animated Pedagogical Agents: Face-to-Face Interaction in Interactive Learning Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have witnessed the birth of a new paradigm for learning environments: animated pedagogical agents. These lifelike autonomous characters cohabit learning environments with students to create rich, face-to-face learning interactions. This opens up exciting new possibilities; for example, agents can demonstrate complex tasks, employ locomotion and gesture to focus students' attention on the most salient aspect of the task

W. Lewis Johnson; Jeff W. Rickel; James C. Lester

2000-01-01

15

Spoken Interaction in Online and Face-to-Face Language Tutorials  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While interaction in online language learning in the area of written computer-mediated communication is well researched, studies focusing on interaction in synchronous online audio environments remain scarce. For this reason, this paper seeks to map the nature and level of interpersonal interaction in both online and the face-to-face language…

Heins, Barbara; Duensing, Annette; Stickler, Ursula; Batstone, Carolyn

2007-01-01

16

Learning, Interactional, and Motivational Outcomes in One-to-One Synchronous Computer-mediated versus Face-to-Face Tutoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract. Face-to-face (FTF) human-human,tutoring has ranked among,the most effective forms of instruction. However, because computer-mediated (CM) tutoring is becoming increasingly common, it is instructive to evaluate its effectiveness relative to face-to-face tutoring. Does the lack of spoken, face-to-face interaction affect learning gains and motivation? In this study, pairs of undergraduate students and tutors worked on physics problems either face-to-face or

Stephanie Siler; Kurt Vanlehn

2009-01-01

17

Learning, Interactional, and Motivational Outcomes in One-to-One Synchronous Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Tutoring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Face-to-face (FTF) human-human tutoring has ranked among the most effective forms of instruction. However, because computer-mediated (CM) tutoring is becoming increasingly common, it is instructive to evaluate its effectiveness relative to face-to-face tutoring. Does the lack of spoken, face-to-face interaction affect learning gains and…

Siler, Stephanie Ann; VanLehn, Kurt

2009-01-01

18

Social Sensing: Obesity, Unhealthy Eating and Exercise in Face-to-Face Networks  

E-print Network

Social Sensing: Obesity, Unhealthy Eating and Exercise in Face-to-Face Networks Anmol Madan MIT-behaviors, i.e., exposure to peers that are obese, are inactive, have unhealthy dietary habits and those in the midst of a global obesity epidemic, with over a billion overweight and over 300 million clinically obese

19

Social sensing: Obesity, unhealthy eating and exercise in face-to-face networks  

E-print Network

What is the role of face-to-face interactions in the diffusion of health-related behaviors- diet choices, exercise habits, and long-term weight changes? We use co-location and communication sensors in mass-market mobile ...

Madan, Anmol Prem Prakash

20

Internet Communication versus Face-to-Face Interaction in Quality of Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to understand the role of the Internet in quality of life (QoL). Specifically, it examines the question of whether Internet communication serves, like face-to-face interactions, to enhance quality of life. It is hypothesized that the use of the Internet for interpersonal communication can improve quality of life among Internet…

Lee, Paul S. N.; Leung, Louis; Lo, Venhwei; Xiong, Chengyu; Wu, Tingjun

2011-01-01

21

Are you friendly or just polite? Analysis of smiles in spontaneous face-to-face interactions  

E-print Network

Are you friendly or just polite? ­ Analysis of smiles in spontaneous face-to-face interactions Mohammed (Ehsan) Hoque1 , Louis-Philippe Morency2 , Rosalind W. Picard1 1 MIT Media Lab, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. {mehoque, picard}@media.mit.edu 2 Institute for Creative Technologies, University

22

Nonverbal behavior during face-to-face social interaction in schizophrenia: a review.  

PubMed

Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia display social cognitive deficits. However, little is known about patients' nonverbal communication during their social encounters with others. This review identified 17 studies investigating nonverbal communication in patients' unscripted face-to-face interactions, addressing a) nonverbal differences between patients and others, b) nonverbal behavior of the patients' partners, c) the association between nonverbal behavior and symptoms, and d) the association between nonverbal behavior and social outcomes. Patients displayed fewer nonverbal behaviors inviting interaction, with negative symptoms exacerbating this pattern. Positive symptoms were associated with heightened nonverbal behavior. Patients' partners changed their own nonverbal behavior in response to the patient. Reduced prosocial behaviors, inviting interaction, were associated with poorer social outcomes. The evidence suggests that patients' nonverbal behavior, during face-to-face interaction, is influenced by patients symptoms and impacts the success of their social interactions. PMID:24375212

Lavelle, Mary; Healey, Patrick G T; McCabe, Rosemarie

2014-01-01

23

Effects of Office Layout on Job Satisfaction, Productivity and Organizational Commitment as Transmitted through Face-to-Face Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Face-to-face communication is important to job satisfaction, productivity and organizational commitment. Organizations can manipulate the workspace to promote these interactions and thereby enhance these outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the office layout on face-to-face interactions, the effects of face-to-face interactions on the outcomes, and to note any effects of the office layout on

Leah R Wolfeld

2010-01-01

24

Link Prediction and the Role of Stronger Ties in Networks of Face-to-Face Proximity  

E-print Network

Understanding the structures why links are formed is an important and prominent research topic. In this paper, we therefore consider the link prediction problem in face-to-face contact networks, and analyze the predictability of new and recurring links. Furthermore, we study additional influence factors, and the role of stronger ties in these networks. Specifically, we compare neighborhood-based and path-based network proximity measures in a threshold-based analysis for capturing temporal dynamics. The results and insights of the analysis are a first step onto predictability applications for human contact networks, for example, for improving recommendations.

Scholz, Christoph; Stumme, Gerd

2014-01-01

25

The Benefits of Face-to-Face Interaction in the Online Freshman Composition Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article recommends that instructors of online freshman composition courses incorporate actual or simulated face-to-face meetings and one-on-one conferences into their curriculums in order to improve the sense of community in the online classroom, mitigate issues with accountability, encourage exploratory discussion, engage diverse learning styles, improve student-instructor interaction, and increase their efficiency as an instructor. With the support of literature,

Samuel B Howard

2009-01-01

26

Interplay between Telecommunications and Face-to-Face Interactions: A Study Using Mobile Phone Data  

PubMed Central

In this study we analyze one year of anonymized telecommunications data for over one million customers from a large European cellphone operator, and we investigate the relationship between people's calls and their physical location. We discover that more than 90% of users who have called each other have also shared the same space (cell tower), even if they live far apart. Moreover, we find that close to 70% of users who call each other frequently (at least once per month on average) have shared the same space at the same time - an instance that we call co-location. Co-locations appear indicative of coordination calls, which occur just before face-to-face meetings. Their number is highly predictable based on the amount of calls between two users and the distance between their home locations - suggesting a new way to quantify the interplay between telecommunications and face-to-face interactions. PMID:21765888

Calabrese, Francesco; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.; Ratti, Carlo

2011-01-01

27

SocioPhone: Everyday Face-to-Face Interaction Monitoring Platform Using Multi-Phone Sensor Fusion  

E-print Network

is an integral part of human life; everyday, people dine with family, have meetings with colleagues, and spendSocioPhone: Everyday Face-to-Face Interaction Monitoring Platform Using Multi-Phone Sensor Fusion-to-face interaction monitoring. Face-to- face interaction, especially conversation, is a fundamental part of everyday

28

The Collaborative Language Learning Attributes of Cyber Face-to-Face Interaction: The Perspectives of the Learner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the degrees of collaborative language learning that were supported in cyber face-to-face interaction. The concept of "cyber face-to-face" is used here to encapsulate the kind of environment in which a combination of real-time oral/aural, visual, and text-based interaction happens simultaneously via the various features in an…

Wang, Yuping; Chen, Nian-Shing

2012-01-01

29

Experimental comparisons of face-to-face and anonymous real-time team competition in a networked gaming learning environment.  

PubMed

This study investigates the impact of anonymous, computerized, synchronized team competition on students' motivation, satisfaction, and interpersonal relationships. Sixty-eight fourth-graders participated in this study. A synchronous gaming learning system was developed to have dyads compete against each other in answering multiple-choice questions set in accordance with the school curriculum in two conditions (face-to-face and anonymous). The results showed that students who were exposed to the anonymous team competition condition responded significantly more positively than those in the face-to-face condition in terms of motivation and satisfaction at the 0.050 and 0.056 levels respectively. Although further studies regarding the effects of anonymous interaction in a networked gaming learning environment are imperative, the positive effects detected in this preliminary study indicate that anonymity is a viable feature for mitigating the negative effects that competition may inflict on motivation and satisfaction as reported in traditional face-to-face environments. PMID:18721101

Yu, Fu-Yun; Han, Chialing; Chan, Tak-Wai

2008-08-01

30

Live face-to-face interaction during fMRI: A new tool for social cognitive neuroscience  

E-print Network

Cooperative social interaction is critical for human social development and learning. Despite the importance of social interaction, previous neuroimaging studies lack two fundamental components of everyday face-to-face ...

Kleiner, Mario

31

THE IMPACT OF TEAM EMPOWERMENT ON VIRTUAL TEAM PERFORMANCE: THE MODERATING ROLE OF FACE-TO-FACE INTERACTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the relationship between team empowerment and virtual team performance and the moderating role of the extent of face-to-face interaction using 35 sales and service virtual teams in a high-technology organization. Team empowerment was positively related to two independent assessments of virtual team performance— process improvement and customer satisfaction. Further, the number of face-to-face meetings moderated the relationship between

Bradley L. Kirkman; BENSON ROSEN; PAUL E. TESLUK; CRISTINA B. GIBSON

2004-01-01

32

Shape and size effects in ?-? interactions: face-to-face dimers.  

PubMed

The shape and size effects in ?–? interactions of face-to-face dimers are discussed, by taking three typical groups of ?-systems with different shapes (wave-linear, WL; ladder-shaped, LS; and regular-hexagonal, RH) and sizes (2 to 216 ?-electrons) as samples, and carrying out a series of static scanning forcefield calculations. These effects are: (1) for differently shaped ?-systems with a same quantity of ?-electrons, the denser ?-electrons lead to the stronger ?–? interactions; (2) the interaction orientation, such as the interplanar distance, is controlled by not only van der Waals (vdW) but also electrostatic potential, even though the former is much stronger and has more contributions to total interaction energy than the latter. Furthermore, these interplanar distances are in a range determined by only monomer shapes, i.e., 3.6–4.1 Å for WL, 3.5–3.7 Å for LS, and 3.4–3.7 Å for RH; (3) a centroid-centroid distance corresponding to the global lowest vdW potential point of a dimer with two identical monomers is only determined by the monomer shape, i.e., 3.6, 3.5, and 3.4 Å, for WL, LS, and RH, respectively; (4) rotation will change the interaction energy when both two monomers with big sizes and low symmetries, and vice versa. PMID:20645299

Zhang, Chaoyang

2011-01-15

33

Face-to-face interactions in self-organizing distributed teams 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract We explore the role of face-to-face meetings in the life of distributed teams using data from Free\\/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) development teams. Such distributed teams are part of many organizations’ new vision of management in the 21st century. Practitioner research has suggested the need for face-to-face meetings when a team is formed, but few studies have considered the

Kevin Crowston; James Howison; Chengetai Masango; U. Yeliz Eseryel

34

Application of network properties and signal strength to identify face-to-face links in an electronic dataset  

E-print Network

Understanding how people interact and socialize is important in many contexts, from disease control to urban planning. Datasets that capture this specific aspect of human life have increased in size and availability over the last few years. We have yet to understand, however, to what extent such electronic datasets may serve as a valid proxy for real life face-to-face interactions. For an observational dataset, gathered by mobile phones, we attack the problem of identifying transient and non-important links, as well as how to highlight important interactions. Using the Bluetooth signal strength parameter to distinguish between observations, we demonstrate that weak links, compared to strong links, have a lower probability of being observed at later times, while such links--on average--also have lower link-weights and a lower probability of sharing an online friendship. Further, the role of link-strength is investigated in relation to social network properties.

Sekara, Vedran

2014-01-01

35

Face-to-face interactions in self-organizing distributed teams 1 Kevin Crowston, James Howison, Chengetai Masango and U. Yeliz Eseryel  

E-print Network

1 Face-to-face interactions in self-organizing distributed teams 1 Kevin Crowston, James Howison to the research. #12;2 Face-to-face interactions in self-organizing distributed teams Abstract We explore the role of face-to-face meetings in the life of distributed teams using data from Free/Libre Open Source Software

Crowston, Kevin

36

Investigating Face-to-Face Peer Interaction Patterns in a Collaborative Web Discovery Task: The Bene?ts of a Shared Display  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mobile computers are now increasingly applied to facilitate face-to-face collaborative learning. However, the factors affecting face-to-face peer interactions are complex as they involve rich communication media. In particular, non-verbal interactions are necessary to convey critical communication messages in face-to-face communication. Through…

Chung, C-W.; Lee, C-C.; Liu, C-C.

2013-01-01

37

Sound perfume: designing a wearable sound and fragrance media for face-to-face interpersonal interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sound and smell can sometimes generate stronger emotional feelings than words can. They can even sometimes awaken strong, long forgotten memories. The Sound Perfume system provides users with additional auditory and olfactory sensory inputs through a pair of glasses, to augment their unique identities and impressions to others during face-to-face interpersonal communication. When a user starts a conversation with another

Yongsoon Choi; Adrian David Cheok; Xavier Roman; Kenichi Sugimoto; Veronica Halupka

2011-01-01

38

Basic components of a face-to-face interaction with a conversational agent: mutual attention and deixis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a series of experiments that involve a face-to-face interaction between an embodied conversational agent (ECA) and a human interlocutor. The main challenge is to provide the interlocutor with implicit and explicit signs of mutual interest and attention and of the awareness of environmental conditions in which the interaction takes place. A video realistic talking head with independent head

Stephan Raidt; Gérard Bailly; Frédéric Elisei

2005-01-01

39

Icebreaker T-shirt: a Wearable Device for Easing Face-to-Face Interaction Nanda Khaorapapong, Matthew Purver  

E-print Network

Icebreaker T-shirt: a Wearable Device for Easing Face-to-Face Interaction Nanda Khaorapapong of Icebreaker T-shirt with results from an experiment with shy users. 1. Introduction Initiating a conversation is a common challenge for shy people; here, we introduce the Icebreaker T-shirt, intended to be worn in real

Purver, Matthew

40

Emmanuel Levinas & Paulo Freire: The Ethics of Responsibility for the Face-to-Face Interaction in the Virtual World  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this work is a reflection on the ethics of education on the net as a contribution to the face-to-face interaction in the virtual world. We think the ethics is a result of a process of responsible interchange with others. Two important thinkers of the last few decades, Emmanuel Levinas e Paulo Freire contribute each one with one's…

Gomez, Margarita Victoria

2009-01-01

41

Do collaboratories mean the end of face-to-face interactions? An evidence from the ISEE project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientific collaboration encompasses two main issues: knowledge sharing and trust. Geographical distance has an impact on both. Our purpose is to test the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) sophistication on remote collaboration: do collaboratories mean the end of face-to-face interactions? We first analyse the importance of geographical proximity with regard to knowledge transfer and trust. For both, we

Emilie-Pauline Gallié; Renelle Guichard

2005-01-01

42

Reflect: An Interactive Table for Regulating Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

In face-to-face collaborative learning, unbalanced participation often leads to the undersirable result of some participants\\u000a experiencing lower learning outcomes than others. Providing feedback to the participants on the level of their participation\\u000a could have a positive effect on their ability to self-regulate, leading to a more balanced collaboration. We propose a new\\u000a approach for providing this feedback that takes the

Khaled Bachour; Frédéric Kaplan; Pierre Dillenbourg

2008-01-01

43

UbiTable: Impromptu Face-to-Face Collaboration on Horizontal Interactive Surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the mobility enabled by the plethora of technological tools such as laptops, PDA and cell phones, horizontal flat surfaces are still exten- sively used and much preferred for on-the-move face-to-face collaboration. Un- fortunately, when digital documents need to be shared during collaboration, people are still mostly constrained to display surfaces that have been designed for single users, such as

Chia Shen; Katherine Everitt; Kathleen Ryall

2003-01-01

44

Intentional and unintentional consequences of substituting face-to-face interaction with e-mail: An employee-based perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we undertake empirical research into e-mail communication in the workplace to provide organizations with practical information about how employees can effectively manage their e-mail interactions. We employ an interpretative, qualitative methodology to examine their views of e-mail. Specifically, we consider the interaction between this and traditional face-to-face (F2F) contact. The- oretical ideas are subject to empirical scrutiny

Paula O’Kane; Owen Hargie

2007-01-01

45

Infant responses to adult happy and sad vocal and facial expressions during face-to-face interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined 5-month-olds’ responses to adult facial versus vocal displays of happy and sad expressions during face-to-face social interactions in three experiments. Infants interacted with adults in either happy-sad-happy or happy-happy-happy sequences. Across experiments, either facial expressions were present while presence\\/absence of vocal expressions was manipulated or visual access to facial expressions was blocked but vocal expressions were present throughout.

Barbara D’Entremont; Darwin Muir

1999-01-01

46

The interplay between telecommunications and face-to-face interactions - an initial study using mobile phone data  

E-print Network

In this study we analyze one year of anonymized telecommunications data for over one million customers from a large European cellphone operator, in order to investigate the relationship between people's calls and their physical location. We discover that more than 90% of users who have called each other have also shared the same space (cell tower), even if they live far apart. Moreover, we find that 69% of users who call each other frequently (at least once per month on average) have shared the same space at the same time - an instance that we call co-location. Co-locations appear highly indicative of coordination calls, which occur just before face-to-face meetings. Their number is highly predictable based on the amount of calls between two users and the distance between their home locations - suggesting a new way to quantify the interplay between telecommunications and face-to-face interactions.

Calabrese, Francesco; Blondel, Vincent D; Ratti, Carlo

2011-01-01

47

Social evolution : opinions and behaviors in face-to-face networks  

E-print Network

Exposure to new ideas and opinions, and their diffusion within social networks, are important questions in education, business, and government. However until recently there has been no method to automatically capture ...

Madan, Anmol P. (Anmol Prem Prakash)

2010-01-01

48

Analyzing and Modeling Gaze during Face-to-Face Interaction Stephan Raidt, Grard Bailly & Frdric Elisei  

E-print Network

tested the capability of our animated talking head [2] to direct the attention of a human observer of another person [5]. During interaction it is important to the organization of discourse such as beginning as well as facial animation. Human- computer interaction is mainly focused on the dialog component

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Face-to-face emotion interaction studies in Down syndrome infants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infants with Down syndrome constitute an ideal population for analysing the development of emotional expression from the first months of life, due basically to the fact that this chromosomal alteration is identifiable from birth and results in well-known difficulties of cognitive development and in basic learning processes. Taking into account the functional aspects of facial expression during initial social interaction,

Fernando Carvajal; Jaime Iglesias

2002-01-01

50

Generality of a Theory of Collective Induction: Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Interaction, Amount of Potential Information, and Group versus Member Choice of Evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to assess the generality of a theory of collective induction that has previously been supported for face-to-face interaction (Laughlin and Hollingshead, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 1995), three experiments compared face-to-face and computer-mediated interaction for four-person groups for three successive rule induction problems. The predictions of the theory fit the obtained probabilities of group hypotheses for distributions

Patrick R. Laughlin; John S. Chandler; Ellen I. Shupe; Vicki J. Magley; Lorne G. Hulbert

1995-01-01

51

Look Who's Talking: Pre-Verbal Infants' Perception of Face-to-Face and Back-to-Back Social Interactions  

PubMed Central

Four-, 6-, and 11-month old infants were presented with movies in which two adult actors conversed about everyday events, either by facing each other or looking in opposite directions. Infants from 6 months of age made more gaze shifts between the actors, in accordance with the flow of conversation, when the actors were facing each other. A second experiment demonstrated that gaze following alone did not cause this difference. Instead the results are consistent with a social cognitive interpretation, suggesting that infants perceive the difference between face-to-face and back-to-back conversations and that they prefer to attend to a typical pattern of social interaction from 6 months of age. PMID:21833226

Augusti, Else-Marie; Melinder, Annika; Gredeback, Gustaf

2010-01-01

52

The effect of computer-mediated communication (CMC) interaction on L2 vocabulary acquisition: A comparison study of CMC interaction and face-to-face interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the differential effects of CMC interaction (both text-chat and voice-chat) and face-to-face interactions on university level of ESL students' vocabulary acquisition. More specifically, this study examines (a) whether learners engage in negotiated interaction when they encounter new lexical items, (b) whether CMC interaction help learners acquire new lexical items productively, (c) whether there are any special features

Ju-young Lee

2009-01-01

53

Communication competence, social support, and depression among college students: a model of facebook and face-to-face support network influence.  

PubMed

This study examined the influence of the social networking site Facebook and face-to-face support networks on depression among (N = 361) college students. The authors used the Relational Health Communication Competence Model as a framework for examining the influence of communication competence on social support network satisfaction and depression. Moreover, they examined the influence of interpersonal and social integrative motives as exogenous variables. On the basis of previous work, the authors propose and test a theoretical model using structural equation modeling. The results indicated empirical support for the model, with interpersonal motives predicting increased face-to-face and computer-mediated competence, increased social support satisfaction with face-to-face and Facebook support, and lower depression scores. The implications of the findings for theory, key limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23030518

Wright, Kevin B; Rosenberg, Jenny; Egbert, Nicole; Ploeger, Nicole A; Bernard, Daniel R; King, Shawn

2013-01-01

54

Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth.Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F recruited online youth (OY) to participate in MySpace and Facebook communities where digital media was disseminated and discussed. The resulting social networks were assessed with respect to size, growth, density, relative centrality of positions and homophily of ties. Seven PL, 53 F2F and 103 OY created two large networks. After the first 50 F2F youth participated, online networks entered a rapid growth phase. OY were among the most central youth in these networks. Younger aged persons and females were disproportionately connected to like youth. The program appears highly acceptable to homeless youth. Social network analysis revealed which PL were the most critical to the program and which types of participants (younger youth and females) may require additional outreach efforts in the future. PMID:22247453

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Barman Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G.

2012-01-01

55

Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention.  

PubMed

The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth.Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F recruited online youth (OY) to participate in MySpace and Facebook communities where digital media was disseminated and discussed. The resulting social networks were assessed with respect to size, growth, density, relative centrality of positions and homophily of ties. Seven PL, 53 F2F and 103 OY created two large networks. After the first 50 F2F youth participated, online networks entered a rapid growth phase. OY were among the most central youth in these networks. Younger aged persons and females were disproportionately connected to like youth. The program appears highly acceptable to homeless youth. Social network analysis revealed which PL were the most critical to the program and which types of participants (younger youth and females) may require additional outreach efforts in the future. PMID:22247453

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Barman Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G

2012-04-01

56

Friending, IMing, and hanging out face-to-face: overlap in adolescents' online and offline social networks.  

PubMed

Many new and important developmental issues are encountered during adolescence, which is also a time when Internet use becomes increasingly popular. Studies have shown that adolescents are using these online spaces to address developmental issues, especially needs for intimacy and connection to others. Online communication with its potential for interacting with unknown others, may put teens at increased risk. Two hundred and fifty-one high school students completed an in-person survey, and 126 of these completed an additional online questionnaire about how and why they use the Internet, their activities on social networking sites (e.g., Facebook, MySpace) and their reasons for participation, and how they perceive these online spaces to impact their friendships. To examine the extent of overlap between online and offline friends, participants were asked to list the names of their top interaction partners offline and online (Facebook and instant messaging). Results reveal that adolescents mainly use social networking sites to connect with others, in particular with people known from offline contexts. While adolescents report little monitoring by their parents, there was no evidence that teens are putting themselves at risk by interacting with unknown others. Instead, adolescents seem to use the Internet, especially social networking sites, to connect with known others. While the study found moderate overlap between teens' closest online and offline friends, the patterns suggest that adolescents use online contexts to strengthen offline relationships. PMID:22369341

Reich, Stephanie M; Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2012-03-01

57

Mutual touch during mother-infant face-to-face still-face interactions: influences of interaction period and infant birth status.  

PubMed

Contact behaviours such as touch, have been shown to be influential channels of nonverbal communication between mothers and infants. While existing research has examined the communicative roles of maternal or infant touch in isolation, mutual touch, whereby touching behaviours occur simultaneously between mothers and their infants, has yet to be examined. The present study was designed to investigate mutual touch during face-to-face interactions between mothers and their 5½-month-old fullterm (n=40), very low birth weight/preterm (VLBW/preterm; n=40) infants, and infants at psychosocial risk (n=41). Objectives were to examine: (1) how the quantitative and qualitative aspects of touch employed by mothers and their infants varied across the normal periods of the still-face (SF) procedure, and (2) how these were associated with risk status. Mutual touch was systematically coded using the mother-infant touch scale. Interactions were found to largely consist of mutual touch and one-sided touch plus movement, highlighting that active touching is pervasive during mother-infant interactions. Consistent with the literature, while the SF period did not negatively affect the amount of mutual touch engaged in for mothers and their fullterm infants and mothers and their infants at psychosocial risk, it did for mothers and their VLBW/preterm infants. Together, results illuminate how both mothers and infants participate in shaping and co-regulating their interactions through the use of touch and underscore the contribution of examining the influence of birth status on mutual touch. PMID:24793734

Mantis, Irene; Stack, Dale M; Ng, Laura; Serbin, Lisa A; Schwartzman, Alex E

2014-08-01

58

Developing Students' Metacognitive Awareness in Asynchronous Learning Networks in Comparison to Face-to-Face Discussion Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main goal of the present study is to investigate empirically the effects of Asynchronic Learning Network (ALN) embedded within metacognitive instruction (META) on two components of metacognitive awareness: Knowledge about Cognition (KC) and Regulation of Cognition (RC). Participants were 202 tenth grade students: 102 students who studied under…

Michalsky, Tova; Zion, Michal; Mevarech, Zemira R.

2007-01-01

59

Cyclicity and Stability in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Interaction: A Comment on Cohn and Tronick (1988).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers an explanation of why Cohn and Tronick's (1988) result replicates that of Kaye and Fogel (1980) in spite of important differences in the way interactive behavior is conceptualized, coded, and treated statistically. Suggests that stochastic variability in onset times has profound implications for the understanding of interaction process and…

Fogel, Alan

1988-01-01

60

ExamNet asynchronous learning network: augmenting face-to-face courses with student-developed exam questions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates how students' attitude and performance are affected by using an asynchronous learning network (ALN) to augment exams in a traditional lecture\\/lab course. Students used the ExamNet ALN to create, critique, and revise a database of questions that subsequently was drawn upon for course exams. Overall, students considered ExamNet to be useful and important in understanding course material,

E. Vance Wilson

2004-01-01

61

Do Handheld Devices Facilitate Face-to-Face Collaboration? Handheld Devices with Large Shared Display Groupware to Facilitate Group Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One-to-one computing environments change and improve classroom dynamics as individual students can bring handheld devices fitted with wireless communication capabilities into the classrooms. However, the screens of handheld devices, being designed for individual-user mobile application, limit promotion of interaction among groups of learners. This…

Liu, Chen-Chung; Kao, L.-C.

2007-01-01

62

Face-to-Face Interactions in Unacquainted Female-Male Dyads: How Do Girls and Boys Behave?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined adolescents' verbal and nonverbal behavior in 30 female-male dyads. All behaviors were coded. Analysis of videotaped interactions revealed more similarities between girls and boys than differences, although gender distinctions were evident in speaking time and in smiling. Results focus on developmental and contextual accounts of…

Kolaric, Giselle C.; Galambos, Nancy L.

1995-01-01

63

Between Michel Foucault and Erving Goffman: between discourse in the abstract and face-to-face interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Michel Foucault's ‘archaeology’ and Erving Goffman's interpersonal sociology are complementary. Both are essential for understanding how classifications of people interact with the people classified, and hence for the author's studies of ‘making up people’. The paper begins by explaining how that project is rooted in an ‘existentialist’ conception of the person. It then uses Goffman's Asylums and Foucault's Folie et

Ian Hacking

2004-01-01

64

Face-To-Face Communicative Avatar Driven by Voice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently computer can make cyberspace to walk through by an interactive virtual reality technique. An avatar in cyberspace can bring us a virtual face-to-face communication environment. In this paper we realize an avatar which has a real face in cyberspace to construct a multi-user communication system by voice transmission through network. Voice from microphone is transmitted and analyzed, then mouth

Shigeo Morishima; Tatsuo Yotsukura

1999-01-01

65

Face to Face with Ants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Imagine being the size of an ant. Be careful - a face-to-face encounter with an ant would be scary and potentially life-threatening! But, if you avoided being eaten, you could learn a lot about ant anatomy from a close-up view. Ants have many body parts that are normally hard to see without a magnifying glass or microscope. And each structure has its own special function.

Biology

2009-09-22

66

Face-to-Face Interaction Compared With Video Watching on Use of Physical Activity in Peripheral Arterial Disease: A Pilot Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies have defined the association of physician-patient communication with physical activity levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease. We hypothesized that a face-to-face intervention versus video watching would improve physical activity levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease. The authors conducted a randomized trial involving 2 interventions. The face-to-face intervention included a brief dialogue with patients to understand their

Tracie C. Collins; Patricia N. Krueger; Tony L. Kroll; Barbara F. Sharf

2009-01-01

67

Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Interaction in Japan and the United States: A Laboratory Comparison Using 3-Month-Old Infants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers in both countries responded contingently to infant behaviors but differed in type and timing of responses to infants. Concludes that findings have implications for understanding the role of the face-to-face period in human development and the way in which cultural differences in interpersonal communicative style may guide the development…

Fogel, Alan; And Others

1988-01-01

68

Conversational Argumentation in Decision Making: Chinese and U.S. Participants in Face-to-Face and Instant-Messaging Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates cultural and communication medium effects on conversational argumentation in a decision-making context. Chinese and U.S. participants worked in pairs on two decision-making tasks via face-to-face (FtF) and instant messaging (IM). The analyses showed that Chinese participants tended to engage in potentially more complex…

Stewart, Craig O.; Setlock, Leslie D.; Fussell, Susan R.

2007-01-01

69

Topicality and the Structure of Interactive Talk in Face-to-Face Seminar Discussions: Implications for Research in Distributed Learning Media  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the structure of topic movement within face-to-face postgraduate university seminar discussion forums through a conversation analytic approach. The analysis of 12 audio recordings of seminars showed that in spite of clear differences in the management style of sessions by seminar leaders there were important consistencies in…

Gibson, Will; Hall, Andy; Callery, Peter

2006-01-01

70

Organizational context and face-to-face interaction: Influences on the development of trust and collaborative behaviors in computer-mediated groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using adaptive structuration theory as a framework [DeSanctis, G., & Poole, M. S. (1994). Capturing the complexity in advanced technology use: Adaptive structuration theory. Organization Science, 5(2), 121–147], we examined the influence of organizational context (competitive versus cooperative) and introductory meeting communication medium (face-to-face versus electronic) on the development of trust and collaborative behaviors of dyads communicating electronically. Based on

N. Sharon Hill; Kathryn M. Bartol; Paul E. Tesluk; Gosia A. Langa

2009-01-01

71

Conversational Argumentation in Decision Making: Chinese and U.S. Participants in Face-to-Face and Instant-Messaging Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates cultural and communication medium effects on conversational argumentation in a decision-making context. Chinese and U.S. participants worked in pairs on two decision-making tasks via face-to-face (FtF) and instant messaging (IM). The analyses showed that Chinese participants tended to engage in potentially more complex argumentation, whereas U.S. participants tended to utilize proportionally more statements of claims and statements

Craig O. Stewart; Leslie D. Setlock; Susan R. Fussell

2007-01-01

72

Face-to-face stacks of trinuclear gold(I) trihalides with benzene, hexafluorobenzene, and borazine: impact of aromaticity on stacking interactions.  

PubMed

The interplay of electrostatics, charge transfer, and dispersion forces contributing to the interaction energies in 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 binary stacks of the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) (X = F, Cl, Br, I) clusters with benzene, hexafluorobenzene, or borazine were investigated by employing a multitude of electronic structure computational techniques. The molecular and electronic structures, stabilities, bonding features, and magnetotropicity of [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](n)(L)(m) (X = halide; L = C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6); n, m ? 2) columnar binary stacks have been investigated by DFT calculations employing the M05-2X functional. The novel binary stacks could be considered as the building blocks of extended columnar supramolecular assemblies formulated as {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](C(6)H(6))}(?), {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](2)(C(6)F(6))}(?), and {[c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](B(3)N(3)H(6))(2)}(?). In all binary stacks, with a few exceptions, the plane of the alternating c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) and L (C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6)) stacking participants adopt an almost parallel face-to-face (pff) orientation. The observed trends in the intermolecular distances R in the [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](n)(L)(m) (X = halide; L = C(6)H(6), C(6)F(6), B(3)N(3)H(6); n, m ? 2) columnar binary stacks are explained by the diverse intermolecular interactions characterizing the stacks, since the three ligands L and the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) cyclic trinuclear clusters (CTCs) exhibit diverse physical properties being important determinants of the intermolecular interactions (consisting of covalent, electrostatic, and dispersion forces). The properties considered are the zz tensor components of quadrupole moment, Q(zz), polarizability, ?(zz), nucleus-independent chemical shift, NICS(zz)(1), along with the molecular electrostatic potential, MEP(0), and surface area (S). Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) at the revPBE-D3/TZ2P level revealed that the dominant term in the stacking interactions arises mainly from dispersion and electrostatic forces, while the contribution of covalent interactions are predicted to be small. On the other hand, charge decomposition analysis (CDA) illustrated very small charge transfer from the L stacking participants toward the c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3) clusters. Excellent linear correlations of the interaction energy, ?E(int), and its components (?E(disp), ?E(elstat), ?E(orb), and ?E(Pauli)) with calculated physical properties related to dispersion, covalent, and electrostatic forces have been established. The most important finding is the excellent linear relationship between ?E(int) and the NICS(zz)(1) magnetic criterion of aromaticity, indicating that ?E(int) is also affected by the coupling of the induced magnetic fields of the interacting stacking participants. The magnetotropicity of the binary stacks evaluated by the NICS(zz)-scan curves indicated an enhancement of the diatropicity in the space between the interacting inorganic and organic rings, probably due to the superposition of the diamagnetic ring currents of the interacting ring systems. The energy splitting in dimer (ESID) model was employed to estimate the charge transport of electrons and holes between the ligands L and the [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)] clusters in [c-Au(3)(?(2)-X)(3)](L) 1:1 binary stacks. PMID:23270385

Tsipis, Athanassios C; Stalikas, Alexandros V

2013-01-18

73

Comparative Analysis of Online vs. Face-to-Face Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This empirical study compared a graduate online course with an equivalent course taught in a traditional face-to-face format. Comparisons included student ratings of instructor and course quality; assessment of course interaction, structure, and support; and learning outcomes such as course grades and student self-assessment of ability to perform…

Johnson, Scott D.; Aragon, Steven R.; Shaik, Najmuddin; Palma-Rivas, Nilda

74

Face to Face Communications in Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It has been reported that human face-to-face communications in space are compromised by facial edema, variations in the orientations of speakers and listeners, and background noises that are encountered in the shuttle and in space stations. To date, nearly all reports have been anecdotal or subjective, in the form of post-flight interviews or questionnaires; objective and quantitative data are generally lacking. Although it is acknowledged that efficient face-to-face communications are essential for astronauts to work safely and effectively, specific ways in which the space environment interferes with non-linguistic communication cues are poorly documented. Because we have only a partial understanding of how non-linguistic communication cues may change with mission duration, it is critically important to obtain objective data, and to evaluate these cues under well-controlled experimental conditions.

Cohen, Malcolm M.; Davon, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

1999-01-01

75

The Place of Face-to-Face Communication in Distributed Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most distributed work requires mediated communication, but the appropriate use of mediated, as compared with face-to-face communication, is not well understood. From our ethnographic research on workplace communication, we characterize unique aspects of face-to-face communication. Face to face communication supports touch, shared activities, eating and drinking together, as well as informal interactions and attention management. We argue that these activities

Bonnie A. Nardi; Steve Whittaker

2002-01-01

76

The impact of professional isolation on teleworker job performance and turnover intentions: does time spent teleworking, interacting face-to-face, or having access to communication-enhancing technology matter?  

PubMed

Although the teleworking literature continues to raise concerns regarding the adverse consequences of professional isolation, researchers have not examined its impact on work outcomes. Consequently, the authors first examine professional isolation's direct impact on job performance and turnover intentions among teleworkers and then investigate the contingent role of 3 salient work-mode-related factors. Survey data from a matched sample of 261 professional-level teleworkers and their managers revealed that professional isolation negatively impacts job performance and, contrary to expectations, reduces turnover intentions. Moreover, professional isolation's impact on these work outcomes is increased by the amount of time spent teleworking, whereas more face-to-face interactions and access to communication-enhancing technology tend to decrease its impact. On the basis of these findings, an agenda for future research on professional isolation is offered that takes into account telework's growing popularity as a work modality. PMID:19025257

Golden, Timothy D; Veiga, John F; Dino, Richard N

2008-11-01

77

Cocaine Exposure Is Associated with Subtle Compromises of Infants' and Mothers' Social-Emotional Behavior and Dyadic Features of Their Interaction in the Face-to-Face Still-Face Paradigm  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prenatal cocaine and opiate exposure are thought to subtly compromise social and emotional development. The authors observed a large sample of 236 cocaine-exposed and 459 nonexposed infants (49 were opiate exposed and 646 nonexposed) with their mothers in the face-to-face still-face paradigm. Infant and maternal behaviors were microanalytically…

Tronick, E. Z.; Messinger, D. S.; Weinberg, M. K.; Lester, B. M.; LaGasse, L.; Seifer, R.; Bauer, C. R.; Shankaran, S.; Bada, H.; Wright, L. L.; Poole, K.; Liu, J.

2005-01-01

78

Time to meet face-to-face and device-to-device  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an analysis of mobile face-to-face meeting support systems that reveal the consequences duration has for interaction through and with this technology in public places. Particularly we argue that there are privacy issues at stake. We base our arguments on empirical research concerning public interaction and disclosure of personal information there, seeing that face-to-face support systems add something to

Oskar Juhlin; Mattias Östergren

2006-01-01

79

Productive Management CommunicationOnline and Face-to-Face  

Microsoft Academic Search

This case study examined employees’ perceptions about the types of information management could productively communicate through electronic communication to augment face-to-face contact with employees. The benefits of effective face-to-face communication between managers and staff are widely appreciated; however, the costs associated with this mode of communication require organizations to make decisions about when scarce resources should be allocated for face-to-face

Virginia W. Kupritz; Eva Cowell

2011-01-01

80

Group judgment processes and outcomes in video-conferencing vs. face-to-face groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groups of size three completed an estimation task by interacting either face-to face or via a video-conferencing system. Results show significant differences were found in the confidence attached by groups to their decisions. Compared to face-to face groups, video-conferencing groups showed smaller increases in confidence in their decisions, especially if they were instructed to discuss their beliefs and assumptions underlying

Janet A. Sniezek; Marcus Crede

2002-01-01

81

Voicing on Virtual and Face to Face Discussion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents and discusses findings of a study conducted on pre-service teachers' experiences in virtual and face to face discussions. Technology has brought learning nowadays beyond the classroom context or time zone. The learning context and process no longer rely solely on face to face communications in the presence of a teacher.…

Yamat, Hamidah

2013-01-01

82

Face to Face or Mediated Communication? Personality Makes a Difference  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neuroticism and extraversion are considered to have consistent behavioral reaction patterns. Personality traits have been measured in a survey (N=214) which subsequently examined the preference for mediated communication versus face to face communication in eight social scenarios and general preference statements. The results were as predicted, where stable extraverts were more likely to prefer face to face contact over mediated

David Karemaker

83

All in due time: The development of trust in computer-mediated and face-to-face teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the development of trust and cooperation in computer-mediated and face-to-face teams. Fifty-two, three-person teams worked on a mixed-motive task over a 3-week period using computer-mediated or face-to-face interaction. Results showed that trust started lower in computer-mediated teams but increased to levels comparable to those in face-to-face teams over time. Furthermore, this pattern of results also held for

Jeanne M. Wilson; Susan G. Straus; Bill McEvily

2006-01-01

84

Tobacco cessation education for pharmacists: Face-to-face presentations versus live webinars.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To assess the perceived effectiveness of tobacco cessation continuing education for pharmacists in face-to-face presentation versus live webinar modalities. METHODS A continuing pharmacy education (CPE) activity, Do Ask, Do Tell: A Practical Approach to Smoking Cessation, was offered in face-to-face and live webinar modalities. Following the activity, participants completed a brief questionnaire that assessed the anticipated impact of the activity on their smoking cessation counseling practices. RESULTS Of the 1,088 CPE participants, 819 (75%) attended a face-to-face presentation and 269 (25%) participated in a live webinar. Posttraining self-rated ability to address tobacco use was similar between groups ( P = 0.38), and both the face-to-face and live webinar groups reported a significant difference between pre- and posttraining abilities ( P < 0.05 for both groups). Attendees of the face-to-face presentation reported higher likelihoods of providing each of the individual tasks required to provide an effective, brief tobacco cessation intervention ( P < 0.05 for each task). CONCLUSION These data suggest that more value exists in face-to-face education than live webinars when personal and interactive skills are the focus of the activity. PMID:24407740

Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Hoch, Matthew A; Vitale, Frank M; Wahl, Kimberly R; Corelli, Robin L; de Moor, Carl

2014-01-01

85

Buzz: Face-To-Face Contact and the Urban Economy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper argues that existing models of urban concentrations are incomplete unless grounded in the most fundamental aspect of proximity; face-to-face contact. Face-to-face contact has four main features: it is an efficient communication technology; it can help solve incentive problems; it can facilitate socialization and learning; and it provides psychological motivation. We discuss each of these features in turn, and

Michael Storper; Anthony J. Venables

2002-01-01

86

Conversational analysis as an analytical tool for face?to?face and online conversations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some learning scientists are beginning to investigate social and cultural aspects of learning by examining the interactions between a learner and the environment as well as with other people in the learning environment. This article proposes conversational analysis (CA) as a tool to analyze interactions between learners and instructors in face?to?face and online environments. It illustrates the potential of CA

2006-01-01

87

Cyborg Ontologies and the Lecturer's Voice: A Posthuman Reading of the "Face-to-Face"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lecture is often posited as the prototypical "face-to-face" educational encounter, seen as embodying key features of the pre-networked academy. These are implicitly characterised as forms of boundedness or impermeability, in terms of both the physical and temporal context, and the ontological status of the participants and the nature of the…

Gourlay, Lesley

2012-01-01

88

Face-to-Face blog - Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery (NPG)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Online for less than a year, Face-to-Face is written by a team of National Portrait Gallery staff members with diverse responsibilities, from web design to curatorial. The blog is "dedicated to art, history, and the telling of American lives." There are four categories on Face-to-Face: Biography, Events, Exhibitions and News. "Biography" currently features an article series on presidential trivia, just in time for the election and "Exhibitions" provides coverage of current and recent exhibits, including "RECOGNIZE! Hip Hop and Contemporary Portraiture", "KATE" - celebrating Katherine Hepburn's 100th birthday, and the saga of the reinstallation of the painting Grant and His Generals by Ole Peter Hansen Balling, oil on canvas, 1865, when NPG re-opened in 2006 after 6 years of renovation. And of course, since it's a blog, interested readers can sign up for the RSS feed of Face-to-Face, so as not to miss a thing.

89

A Comparison of Organizational Structure and Pedagogical Approach: Online versus Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines online versus face-to-face organizational structure and pedagogy in terms of education and the teaching and learning process. The author distinguishes several important terms related to distance/online/e-learning, virtual learning and brick-and-mortar learning interactions and concepts such as asynchronous and synchronous…

McFarlane, Donovan A.

2011-01-01

90

Decision Accuracy in Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Decision-Making Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in the way organizations are structured and advances in communication technologies are two factors that have altered the conditions under which group decisions are made. Decisions are increasingly made by teams that have a hierarchical structure and whose members have different areas of expertise. In addition, many decisions are no longer made via strictly face-to-face interaction. The present study

Jennifer Hedlund; Daniel R. Ilgen; John R. Hollenbeck

1998-01-01

91

IGlasses: an automatic wearable speech supplementin face-to-face communication and classroom situations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for language aids is pervasive in today's world. There are millions of individuals who have language and speech challenges, and these individuals require additional support for communication and language learning. We demonstrate technology to supplement common face-to-face language interaction to enhance intelligibility, understanding, and communication, particularly for those with hearing impairments. Our research is investigating how to automatically

Dominic W. Massaro; Miguel Á. Carreira-perpiñán; David J. Merrill; Cass Sterling; Stephanie Bigler; Elise Piazza; Marcus Perlman

2008-01-01

92

Factors defining face-to-face interruptions in the office environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an on-going investigation on in ter- ruptions in the office caused by face-to-face inter ac- tions between knowledge workers. The study aims to identify opportunities for interactive solutions th at will support both, the interrupters and the interrupted. The study involves contextual interviews and observatio ns of how administrative assistants manage interruptio ns.

Agnieszka Matysiak Szóstek; Panos Markopoulos

2006-01-01

93

Future Schools: Blending Face-to-Face and Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Hybrid schools" are schools that combine "face-to-face" education in a specific place with online instruction. In this article, the authors describe school models which offer a vision for what deeply integrated technology can mean for children's education, for the way schools are structured, and for the promise of greater efficiency amid a…

Schorr, Jonathan; McGriff, Deborah

2012-01-01

94

Developing leadership skills: online versus face-to-face  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper seeks to present final results from an exploratory research project that aimed to compare and contrast the effectiveness of different delivery modes (especially online as opposed to face-to-face) when developing leadership skills in established managers. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This study sought to identify whether perceptions of the effectiveness of different delivery modes are statistically related to a

David Silbergh; Kate Lennon

2006-01-01

95

Personality Differences between Online and Face-to-Face Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online (n=40) and face-to-face (n=60) adult learners completed the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire and a survey of class experience. Online students rated themselves as more introverted, serious, and shy; less independent; and more tough minded. Results showed how personality characteristics may be a factor in predicting attrition from online…

MacGregor, Cynthia J.

2002-01-01

96

SPACE: Vision and Reality: Face to Face. Proceedings Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The proceedings of the 11th National Space Symposium entitled 'Vision and Reality: Face to Face' is presented. Technological areas discussed include the following sections: Vision for the future; Positioning for the future; Remote sensing, the emerging era; space opportunities, Competitive vision with acquisition reality; National security requirements in space; The world is into space; and The outlook for space. An appendice is also attached.

1995-01-01

97

Experiments Comparing Face-to-Face with Virtual Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on set of studies conducted over two years involving over 1000 students at two univers ities. The main study compares three conditions: conventional classroom lecture, a face-to-face collaborative learning technique called Tutored Video Instruction (TVI), and the virtual-world counterpart of TVI, Distributed Tutored Video Instruction (DTVI). The main study involved over 700 students in 6 courses. When using

Randall B. Smith; Michael J. Sipusic; Robert L. Pannoni

1999-01-01

98

Developmental differences between distributed and face-to-face groups in electronically supported meeting environments: An exploratory investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This longitudinal pilot study compared the developmental patterns of groups in three types of electronically supported meeting modes: face-to-face, dispersed-synchronous, and dispersed-asynchronous. The modes differed primarily in interactivity, channel capacity, and synchronicity. Comparisons were made along several behavioral and socio-technical dimensions which influence the group development process. Face-to-face groups tended to exhibit more effective leadership and coordination competence over time

Kelly Burke; Laku Chidambaram

1995-01-01

99

Interpersonal Sensitivity in Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Conversations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were designed to assess the impact of computer-mediated communication (CMC) on the development of dominant\\/subordinate status roles and on the accuracy of interpersonal perceptions during dyadic, text-based conversations. Results comparing face-to-face (FtF) and synchronous CMC interactions indicated: (a) that dyads established dominant\\/subordinate roles in both communicative environments, although these roles were more clearly differentiated in the CMC interactions;

Eliane M. Boucher; Jeffrey T. Hancock; Philip J. Dunham

2008-01-01

100

Encouraging Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning through the Use of Handheld Computers in the Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a To achieve the maximum benefit, a collaborative learning activity in the classroom requires effective coordination, synchronization,\\u000a face-to-face communication, negotiation, interactivity, and participant mobility conditions. In this paper, we perform a usability\\u000a analysis on a specific collaborative learning activity and identify several problems with fulfilling these conditions. A second\\u000a usability analysis shows how these problems can be solved with a Mobile

Gustavo Zurita; Miguel Nussbaum; Mike Shaples

2003-01-01

101

Communication patterns in computer mediated versus face-to-face group problem solving  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research has shown that when group problem solving is computer mediated, communications become more task oriented with clearer\\u000a role expectations, while face-to-face communications are more cohesive and personal. None of this research has examined those\\u000a patterns of interactions in terms of the problem solving activities engaged. In this study, we compared the perceptions of\\u000a participants, the nature of the comments

David H. Jonassen; Hyug Kwon

2001-01-01

102

Social anxiety and technology: Face-to-face communication versus technological communication among teens  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined teens’ use of socially interactive technologies (SITs), such as online social sites, cell phones\\/text messaging, and instant messaging (IM), and the role that social anxiety plays on how teens communicate with others (technologically or face-to-face). Participants included 280 high school students from a large western city. On average, 35–40% of teens reported using cell phones\\/text messaging and

Tamyra Pierce

2009-01-01

103

Student case groups: electronic groups versus face-to-face groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines the effectiveness of teaching business cases using collaborative groups of students. A quasi-experiment was conducted in which a class of students was randomly placed in face-to-face groups and given a case with questions to answer collectively. Then for a different case, these same students were randomly assigned to electronic case groups. The electronic groups conducted all their group interactions

Mary R. Lind

1996-01-01

104

Blended Instruction: Student Perceptions of Communications Technology in Face-to-Face Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blended instruction is becoming more commonplace in higher education. Students not only attend classes, meeting face-to-face with each other and their instructors, but they also can communicate electronically outside of class meetings using course management tools such as WebCT, BlackBoard, Angel, and the like. There has been a considerable amount of research on human interaction and communication in online distance

Yun-Jo An; Theodore Frick

105

Group judgment processes and outcomes in video-conferencing versus face-to-face groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two hundred and eighty-two participants formed 94 groups of size three and completed an estimation task by interacting either face-to-face or via a video-conferencing system. Results showed significant differences across conditions with regard to the confidence attached by groups to their decisions, the degree to which groups were able to improve upon the best individually arrived at decision, and the

Marcus Credé; Janet A Sniezek

2003-01-01

106

Modeling Face-to-Face Communication using the Sociometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge of how people interact is important in many disciplines, e.g. organizational behavior, social network analysis, information diffusion and knowledge management applications. We are developing methods to automatically and unobtrusively learn the social network structures that arise within human groups based on wearable sensors. At present researchers mainly have to rely on questionnaires, surveys or diaries in order to obtain

Tanzeem Choudhury; Alex Pentland

2003-01-01

107

Comparisons of Internet-Based and Face-to-Face Learning Systems Based on "Equivalency of Experiences" According to Students' Academic Achievements and Satisfactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to determine whether "equivalent learning experiences" ensure equivalency, in the Internet-based and face-to-face interaction methods on learning results and student satisfaction. In the experimental process of this study, the effect of the Internet-based and face-to-face learning on the equivalency in learning…

Karatas, Sercin; Simsek, Nurettin

2009-01-01

108

A Comparison between the Occurrence of Pauses, Repetitions and Recasts under Conditions of Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Communication: A Preliminary Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compares pauses, repetitions and recasts in matched task interactions under face-to-face and computer-mediated conditions. Six first-year English undergraduates at a Turkish University took part in Skype-based voice chat with a native speaker and face-to-face with their instructor. Preliminary quantitative analysis of transcripts showed…

Cabaroglu, Nese; Basaran, Suleyman; Roberts, Jon

2010-01-01

109

Automatic Motherese Detection for Face-to-Face Interaction Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with emotional speech detection in home movies. In this study, we focus on infant-directed speech also called\\u000a “motherese” which is characterized by higher pitch, slower tempo, and exaggerated intonation. In this work, we show the robustness\\u000a of approaches to automatic discrimination between infant-directed speech and normal directed speech. Specifically, we estimate\\u000a the generalization capability of two feature

Ammar Mahdhaoui; Mohamed Chetouani; Cong Zong; Raquel Sofia Cassel; Catherine Saint-georges; Marie-christine Laznik; Sandra Maestro; Fabio Apicella; Filippo Muratori; David Cohen

2008-01-01

110

Developmental Changes in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication: Birth to 3 Months.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated development of face-to-face communication in infants between 1 and 14 weeks old and their mothers. Found a curvilinear development of early face-to-face communication, with increases occurring between weeks 4 and 9. When placed on a sofa, infants' face-to-face communication was longer than when they were held. Girls spent a longer…

Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

2002-01-01

111

Content and Processes in Problem-Based Learning: A Comparison of Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been an increasing interest in the use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in problem-based learning. One line of research has been to introduce synchronous, or simultaneous, communication attempting to create text-based digital real-time interaction. Compared with face-to-face (F2F) communication, CMC may be a poorer medium…

Stromso, H. I.; Grottum, P.; Lycke, K. H.

2007-01-01

112

Stability and Transitions in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication during the First 6 Months: A Microhistorical Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study the authors attempted to unravel the relational, dynamical, and historical nature of mother-infant communication during the first 6 months. Thirteen mothers and their infants were videotaped weekly from 4 to 24 weeks during face-to-face interactions. Three distinct patterns of mother-infant communication were identified: symmetrical,…

Hsu, Hui-Chin; Fogel, Alan

2003-01-01

113

Making the Jump to Hybrid Space: Employing Face-to-Face and Online Modalities in a Special Event Planning Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Every quarter at California State University East Bay, a special event-planning course is offered in a hybrid format (face-to-face and online) and uses interactive Problem-Based Learning (PBL) activities designed to challenge and inspire intellectual growth. The PLB method is different in that students are not only receivers of knowledge but are…

Fortune, Mary F.

2012-01-01

114

Non-face-to-face physical activity interventions in older adults: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Physical activity is effective in preventing chronic diseases, increasing quality of life and promoting general health in older adults, but most older adults are not sufficiently active to gain those benefits. A novel and economically viable way to promote physical activity in older adults is through non-face-to-face interventions. These are conducted with reduced or no in-person interaction between intervention provider and program participants. The aim of this review was to summarize the scientific literature on non-face-to-face physical activity interventions targeting healthy, community dwelling older adults (? 50 years). A systematic search in six databases was conducted by combining multiple key words of the three main search categories "physical activity", "media" and "older adults". The search was restricted to English language articles published between 1st January 2000 and 31st May 2013. Reference lists of relevant articles were screened for additional publications. Seventeen articles describing sixteen non-face-to-face physical activity interventions were included in the review. All studies were conducted in developed countries, and eleven were randomized controlled trials. Sample size ranged from 31 to 2503 participants, and 13 studies included 60% or more women. Interventions were most frequently delivered via print materials and phone (n=11), compared to internet (n=3) and other media (n=2). Every intervention was theoretically framed with the Social Cognitive Theory (n=10) and the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change (n=6) applied mostly. Individual tailoring was reported in 15 studies. Physical activity levels were self-assessed in all studies. Fourteen studies reported significant increase in physical activity. Eight out of nine studies conducted post-intervention follow-up analysis found that physical activity was maintained over a longer time. In the six studies where intervention dose was assessed the results varied considerably. One study reported that 98% of the sample read the respective intervention newsletters, whereas another study found that only 4% of its participants visited the intervention website more than once. From this review, non-face-to-face physical activity interventions effectively promote physical activity in older adults. Future research should target diverse older adult populations in multiple regions while also exploring the potential of emerging technologies. PMID:24612748

Müller, Andre Matthias; Khoo, Selina

2014-01-01

115

Effectiveness of integrating case studies in online and face-to-face instruction of pathophysiology: a comparative study.  

PubMed

Due to growing demand from students and facilitated by innovations in educational technology, institutions of higher learning are increasingly offering online courses. Subjects in the hard sciences, such as pathophysiology, have traditionally been taught in the face-to-face format, but growing demand for preclinical science courses has compelled educators to incorporate online components into their classes to promote comprehension. Learning tools such as case studies are being integrated into such courses to aid in student interaction, engagement, and critical thinking skills. Careful assessment of pedagogical techniques is essential; hence, this study aimed to evaluate and compare student perceptions of the use of case studies in face-to-face and fully online pathophysiology classes. A series of case studies was incorporated into the curriculum of a pathophysiology class for both class modes (online and face to face). At the end of the semester, students filled out a survey assessing the effectiveness of the case studies. Both groups offered positive responses about the incorporation of case studies in the curriculum of the pathophysiology class. This study supports the argument that with proper use of innovative teaching tools, such as case studies, online pathophysiology classes can foster a sense of community and interaction that is typically only seen with face-to-face classes, based on student responses. Students also indicated that regardless of class teaching modality, use of case studies facilitates student learning and comprehension as well as prepares them for their future careers in health fields. PMID:23728138

Saleh, Suha M; Asi, Yara M; Hamed, Kastro M

2013-06-01

116

Face-to-Face or Not-to-Face: A Technology Preference for Communication.  

PubMed

Abstract This study employed the Model of Technology Preference (MTP) to explain the relationship of the variables as the antecedents of behavioral intention to adopt a social networking site (SNS) for communication. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to SNS account users using paper-based and web-based surveys that led to 514 valid responses. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The results show that two out of three attributes of the attribute-based preference (ATRP) affect attitude-based preference (ATTP). The data support the hypotheses that perceived enjoyment and social presence are predictors of ATTP. In this study, the findings further indicated that ATTP has no relationship with the behavioral intention of using SNS, but it has a relationship with the attitude of using SNS. SNS development should provide features that ensure enjoyment and social presence for users to communicate instead of using the traditional face-to-face method of communication. PMID:25405782

Jaafar, Noor Ismawati; Darmawan, Bobby; Mohamed Ariffin, Mohd Yahya

2014-11-01

117

Examining the Roles of the Facilitator in Online and Face-to-Face PD Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online teacher professional development has become an alternative to face-to-face professional development. Such a shift from face-to-face to online professional development, however, brings new challenges for professional development facilitators, whose roles are crucial in orchestrating teacher learning. This paper is motivated by the need to…

Park, Gina; Johnson, Heather; Vath, Richard; Kubitskey, Beth; Fishman, Barry

2013-01-01

118

Online or Face to Face? A Comparison of Two Methods of Training Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online courses offer benefits over face-to-face courses such as accessibility, affordability, and flexibility. Literature assessing the effectiveness of face-to-face and online courses is growing, but findings remain inconclusive. This study compared evaluations completed by professionals who had taken a research update short course either face to…

Dillon, Kristin; Dworkin, Jodi; Gengler, Colleen; Olson, Kathleen

2008-01-01

119

Comparing Student Outcomes in Blended and Face-to-Face Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on a study of student outcomes in a pair of matched courses, one taught face-to-face and one taught in a blended format, in which students completed most of the work online but met several times face-to-face. Learning objectives, course content, and pedagogical approaches were identical but the mode of instruction was…

Roscoe, Douglas D.

2012-01-01

120

Can Face-to-Face Mobilization Boost Student Voter Turnout? Results of a Campus Field Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

American colleges and universities have an expanding role to play in nurturing political engagement as more youth attend college. Given low voter turnout among college students yet growing experimental evidence that face-to-face mobilization can boost turnout, the experiment reported in this article examined the impact of a face-to-face college…

Hill, David; Lachelier, Paul

2014-01-01

121

The Impact of Face-to-Face Orientation on Online Retention: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student retention in online education is a concern for students, faculty and administration. Retention rates are 20% lower in online courses than in traditional face-to-face courses. As part of an integration and engagement strategy, a face-to-face orientation was added to an online undergraduate business information systems course to examine its…

Ali, Radwan; Leeds, Elke M.

2009-01-01

122

Second Messenger: Increasing the Visibility of Minority Viewpoints with a Face-to-face Collaboration Tool  

E-print Network

processing, face-to-face conversations. 1. INTRODUCTION Second Messenger is an application that augmentsSecond Messenger: Increasing the Visibility of Minority Viewpoints with a Face-to-face Collaboration Tool Joan Morris DiMicco, Walter Bender MIT Media Lab 20 Ames St Cambridge, MA 02139 USA +1 617

123

Modeling Face-to-Face Communication using the Sociometer  

E-print Network

to automatically and unobtrusively learn the social network structures that arise within human groups based the success and effectiveness of a work group or an organization as a whole. Can we identify the differences for being able to automatically study how different groups within social or business institutions connect

124

Food consumer science post-graduate courses: comparison of face-to-face versus online delivery systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to compare face-to-face versus online course delivery systems in the area of food consumption and to analyse the students' expectations and experiences. It aims to analyse the following dimensions: general expectations, learning organization and interactions in students' discourses. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The methodology adopted is of interpretative nature using semi-structured qualitative interviews. An

Ana Pinto de Moura; Luís Miguel Cunha; Ulisses Miranda Azeiteiro; Luísa Aires; Pedro Graça; Maria Daniel Vaz de Almeida

2010-01-01

125

WHEN IS FREQUENT FACE-TO-FACE CONTACT NECESSARY IN INNOVATION? A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TWO DISTRIBUTED PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper combines the concept of technological modularity from the product-development literature with the concept of brokers from literature about communities of practice to explain why some innovation project teams require frequent face-to-face interactions to efficiently co-create new technologies, whereas others do not. The explanation is explored through a comparative case-study analysis of two distributed product-development projects in the European

Jarle Hildrum

2007-01-01

126

Stability and Transitions in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication During the First 6 Months: A Microhistorical Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the authors attempted to unravel the relational, dynamical, and historical nature of mother-infant communication during the first 6 months. Thirteen mothers and their infants were videotaped weekly from 4 to 24 weeks during face-to-face interactions. Three distinct patterns of mother-infant communication were identified: symmetrical, asymmetrical, and unilateral. Guided by a dynamic systems perspective, the authors explored the

Hui-Chin Hsu; Alan Fogel

2003-01-01

127

Effects of face-to-face restorative justice on victims of crime in four randomized, controlled trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing use of restorative justice provides a major opportunity for experimental criminology and evidence-based policy. Face-to-face meetings led by police officers between crime victims and their offenders are predicted to reduce the harm to victims caused by the crime. This prediction is derived not only from the social movement for restorative justice, but also from the microsociology of interaction

Lawrence W. Sherman; Heather Strang; Caroline Angel; Daniel Woods; Geoffrey C. Barnes; Sarah Bennett; Nova Inkpen; Meredith Rossner

2005-01-01

128

Taking it out of context: collaborating within and across cultures in face-to-face settings and via instant messaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

As new communications media foster international collaborations, we would be remiss in overlooking cultural differences when assessing them. In this study, 24 pairs in three cultural groupings--American-American (AA), Chinese-Chinese (CC) and American-Chinese (AC) --worked on two decision-making tasks, one face-to-face and the other via IM. Drawing upon prior research, we predicted differences in conversational efficiency, conversational content, interaction quality, persuasion,

Leslie D. Setlock; Susan R. Fussell; Christine Neuwirth

2004-01-01

129

Ideology, Attitude Change, and Deliberation in Small Face-to-Face Groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has found that face-to-face deliberation can result in aggregate shifts in participants' political views. What is less well known is how such attitude changes vary depending on individual attributes and the nature of a group's deliberation. The present study extends prior research by exploring the relationship between participant ideology and attitude change in small, face-to-face groups. To test

John Gastil; Laura Black; Kara Moscovitz

2008-01-01

130

An evaluation of remote communication versus face-to-face in clinical dental education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distance learning and internet-based delivery of educational content are becoming very popular as an alternative to real face-to-face delivery. Clinical-based discussions still remain greatly face-to-face despite the advancement of remote communication and internet sharing technology. In this study we have compared three communication modalities between a learner and educator: audio and video using voice over internet protocol (VoIP) alone [AV];

O. Martínez Lazalde; C. Stokes; D. Romano; N. Martin

2012-01-01

131

COMPARING FACE-TO-FACE AND ELECTRONIC DISCUSSION IN THE SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSROOM  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the supposed benefits of computer-mediated communication is that it can result in more equal participation among students. This study tested that claim by comparing equality of student participation in two modes: face-to-face discussion and electronic discussion. In a counter-balanced, repeated measures study, small groups of ESL students conducted discussion face-to-face and electronically. Amount of participation was calculated per

Mark Warschauer

1978-01-01

132

Delivering Graduate Marketing Education: An Analysis of Face-to-Face versus Distance Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marketing education may be delivered through a number of different methods from face-to-face to distance education. This study analyzes MBA student perceptions and preferences with regard to face-to-face versus distance education methods for delivering a course in marketing management. The results indicate that consistent course structure can be developed across delivery formats but that some pedagogical adjustments may be required

Thomas G. Ponzurick; Karen Russo France; Cyril M. Logar

2000-01-01

133

When Topics are Controversial: Is it Better to Discuss Them Face-to-Face or Online?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten students in a graduate-level course on Historical and Policy Perspectives in Higher Education held face-to-face and online discussions on five controversial topics: diversity, academic freedom, political tolerance, affirmative action, and gender. Upon completion of each discussion, they assessed their comfort, honesty, concern for others’ feelings, similarity of feelings to others, and willingness to disagree and then compared the face-to-face

Katrina A. Meyer

2006-01-01

134

FACE-TO-FACE VERSUS THREADED DISCUSSIONS: THE ROLE OF TIME AND HIGHER-ORDER THINKING  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares the experiences of students in face-to-face (in class) discussions with threaded discussions and also evaluates the threaded discussions for evidence of higher-order thinking. Students were enrolled in graduate-level classes that used both modes (face-to-face and online) for course-related discussions; their end-of-course evaluations of both experiences were grouped for analysis and themes constructed based on their comments. Themes

Katrina A. Meyer

2003-01-01

135

Face to Face or E-Learning in Turkish EFL Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This purpose of this study was to understand e-learners and face to face learners' views towards learning English through e-learning in vocational higher school context and to determine the role of academic achievement and gender in e-learning and face to face learning. This study was conducted at a state-run university in 2012-2013 academic…

Solak, Ekrem; Cakir, Recep

2014-01-01

136

Evaluation of the IRORI: A CyberSpace that Catalyzes Face-to-Face Informal Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of face-to-face informal communication is well recognized. The 'irori' is a Japanese-traditional little sitting space or room with a fire burning which affords relaxation and intimacy among a family. We, adopting the 'irori' as a metaphor, have designed and developed a cyber-space called IRORI as an IT-based space that catalyzes face-to-face informal communication among members of a small

Masao Usuki; Kozo Sugiyama; Kazushi Nishimoto; Takashi Matsubara

2004-01-01

137

Determinants of Engagement in Face-to-Face and Online Patient Support Groups  

PubMed Central

Background Although peer-to-peer contact might empower patients in various ways, studies show that only a few patients actually engage in support groups. Objective The objective of our study was to explore factors that facilitate or impede engagement in face-to-face and online peer support, using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Methods A questionnaire was completed by 679 patients being treated for arthritis, breast cancer, or fibromyalgia at two Dutch regional hospitals. Results Our results showed that only a minority of the patients engaged in organized forms of peer support. In total 10% (65/679) of the respondents had engaged in face-to-face meetings for patients in the past year. Only 4% (30/679) of the respondents had contact with peers via the Internet in the past year. Patients were more positive about face-to-face peer support than about online peer support (P < .001). In accordance with the Theory of Planned Behavior, having a more positive attitude (P < .01) and feeling more supported by people in the social environment (P < .001) increased the intention to participate in both kinds of peer support. In addition, perceived behavioral control (P = .01) influenced the intention to participate in online peer support. Nevertheless, the intention to engage in face-to-face and online peer support was only modestly predicted by the Theory of Planned Behavior variables (R 2 = .33 for face-to-face contact and R 2 = .26 for online contact). Conclusion Although Health 2.0 Internet technology has significantly increased opportunities for having contact with fellow patients, only a minority seem to be interested in organized forms of peer contact (either online or face-to-face). Patients seem somewhat more positive about face-to-face contact than about online contact. PMID:22155649

Van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Taal, Erik; Smit, Willem M; Bernelot Moens, Hein J; Van de Laar, Mart AFJ

2011-01-01

138

Learning Gains in Introductory Astronomy: Online Can Be as Good as Face-to-Face  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universities and even high schools are moving more and more to online instruction as a cost-effective way to reach more students with fewer resources. This naturally raises the question: Can online learning be effective? (The question is not "Is online learning effective?" because just like face-to-face instruction, online instruction includes a diverse array of techniques.) In this paper I compare online and flipped face-to-face versions of an introductory astronomy course. Both versions were designed around student-centered learning principles, but the specific implementation of these principles varied according to the strengths of each type of instruction. Normalized Hake gains on the Star Properties Concept Inventory (SPCI) were quite similar for both classes: 56% and 58% for the online and flipped face-to-face versions, respectively. The gains obtained by students with low pre-test scores were as good as the ones achieved by students with high pre-test scores.

Margoniner, Vera

2014-05-01

139

System for Supporting Web-based Public Debate Using Transcripts of Face-to-Face Meeting  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We propose a public debate support system through iterative alternation of face-to-face meetings and Web-based debates. Web-based\\u000a facilitation of public debates is suitable for complementary question and answering when the debate in face-to-face meetings\\u000a is insufficient due to time restriction. Since transcripts of public meetings tend to be lengthy and specialized, sharing\\u000a public concerns among citizens and stakeholders requires much

Shun Shiramatsu; Jun Takasaki; Tatiana Zidrasco; Tadachika Ozono; Toramatsu Shintani; Hiroshi G. Okuno

2010-01-01

140

The effects of teamwork on individual learning and perceptions of team performance : A comparison of face-to-face and online project settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – In light of contradictory research findings, the purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effects of team setting (face-to-face or online) on the relationship that team member affect and interaction processes have on individual team source learning, and at the team level on the relationship between group cohesiveness and perceived team performance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Students enrolled

Ethlyn A. Williams; Stephanie L. Castro

2010-01-01

141

Faculty Best Practices Using Blended Learning in E-Learning and Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presenting a higher education case study from Mexico: "Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey" (ITESM-CCM) College, Mexico city campus, describing faculty best and worst practices using a blended learning approach in e-learning and face-to-face instruction. The article comments on conceptual definitions of blended learning,…

Mortera-Gutierrez, Fernando

2006-01-01

142

Combining Face-to-Face Learning with Online Learning in Virtual Worlds  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on the development of videogame-like applications in a 3D virtual environment as a complement to the face-to-face teaching and learning. With the changing role of teaching and learning and the increasing use of "blended learning," instructors are increasingly expected to explore new ways to attend to the needs of their students.…

Berns, Anke; Gonzalez-Pardo, Antonio; Camacho, David

2012-01-01

143

Two Peas in a Pod? A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Web Based Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared student learning outcomes and student perceptions of and satisfaction with the learning process between two sections of the same class--a web-based section and a traditional face-to-face (f2f) section. Using a quasi-experimental design, students were randomly assigned to the two course sections. Group equivalency was…

Mentzer, Gale; Cryan, JohnRobert; Teclehaimanot, Berhane

2007-01-01

144

Computer Self-Efficacy, Anxiety, and Learning in Online versus Face to Face Medium  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research is to examine the relationships between changes to computer self-efficacy (CSE) and computer anxiety and the impact on performance on computer-related tasks in both online and face-to-face mediums. While many studies have looked at these factors individually, relatively few have included multiple measures of these…

Hauser, Richard; Paul, Ravi; Bradley, John

2012-01-01

145

Psychotherapy Using Distance Technology: A Comparison of Face-to-Face, Video, and Audio Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared selected process and outcome variables across 3 modes of psychotherapy: face-to-face, real-time video conference, and 2-way audio (analogous to telephone). Results from 80 randomly assigned clients suggested that differences in process and outcome among the 3 treatments were small and clinically promising in comparison with the…

Day, Susan X; Schneider, Paul L.

2002-01-01

146

Shifting Focus: From Books to Laptops to Face-to-Face Discussion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contemporary innovations in education tend to be information based or computer driven. A complete curriculum, however, needs flexibility in order to foster skills for shifting from one context to another. Face-to-face skills play an important role in the governance of democratic societies, and "having a good understanding" of something involves…

Heim, Michael

2009-01-01

147

Comparison of Novice Programmers' Performances: Blended versus Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of blended learning on novices' understandings of the introductory programming. A quasi-experimental design with participants of preservice computer and instructional technologies teachers, one control group (CG, N =64) and one experimental group (EG, N=61) who received the course 11 weeks. While face-to-face…

Cakiroglu, Unal

2012-01-01

148

Online or Face-to-Face? Experimenting with Different Techniques in Teacher Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper illustrates a 5-year case study (from 2001 to 2005) regarding a course in educational technology that involved from 100 to 150 student teachers per year for a total of more than 500 trainees. Since the first version of the course, which was entirely based on a face-to-face approach, computer mediated collaborative learning techniques…

Delfino, Manuela; Persico, D.

2007-01-01

149

Factors for Effective Learning Groups in Face-to-Face and Virtual Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the literature related to creating effective learning groups in face-to-face and virtual environments for distance education using research from cooperative learning, computer-mediated communication, organizational development, and group dynamics. Highlights include creating the groups, structuring the learning activities, and facilitating…

Graham, Charles R.

2002-01-01

150

Silence or Knowing in IT-Facilitated Face-to-Face Meetings  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing proportion of work in organizations has shifted from repetitive, structured, individually focused activities to what is now known as knowledge work. This has been accompanied by a stronger need for collaboration and coordination as well as new information technology (IT) tools. It has changed the nature of face-to-face meetings and the ways in which IT can support them.

Arjan Raven; Omar A. El Sawy

2012-01-01

151

Professional Staff Committee MINUTES December 11, 2008 FACE-TO-FACE  

E-print Network

Professional Staff Committee MINUTES December 11, 2008 FACE-TO-FACE LOCATION Student Union TIME 12 a significant hardship on some employees and urged the committee to make it a priority to communicate for benefits to be reinstated when the state's economic conditions improve. B. Minutes for the November meeting

Hemmers, Oliver

152

Professional Staff Committee MINUTES 9/10/09 FACE-TO-FACE  

E-print Network

, HWB 102 G. ROUNDTABLE H. Judy expressed concern about communication of health benefit changesProfessional Staff Committee MINUTES 9/10/09 FACE-TO-FACE LOCATION HWB TIME Noon CHAIR Shellie to help votes. C. Subcommitte Updates a. Communications i. Name change from "pro staff" to "administrative

Hemmers, Oliver

153

Professional Staff Committee MINUTES 6/11/2009 FACE-TO-FACE  

E-print Network

Professional Staff Committee MINUTES 6/11/2009 FACE-TO-FACE LOCATION Student Union TIME CHAIR it and take 1-day a month in 2010. v. Classified benefits will be paid on original base salary, implementation/questions/concerns/ongoing communication M. Review action items ROUNDTABLE N. Any updates/questions/concerns ACTION ITEMS PERSON

Hemmers, Oliver

154

The Impact of Online Discussion on Face-to-Face Discussion and Academic Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to research the effects of online discussion on face-to-face (F2F) classroom participation and academic achievement for 18 public high school students in a senior English class. The teacher used a variety of data collection including surveys, test scores, journal reflections, and teacher observations to study the…

Yu, Serena W.

2009-01-01

155

Favourable conditions for effective and efficient learning in a blended face-to-face\\/online method  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses a blended face-to-face\\/online teaching delivery model that aims to make effective and efficient learning possible for students. It connects the practice of the model with Ramsden's six key principles of effective teaching and offers seven 'favourable conditions' the author considers necessary for the model to achieve its aims.

Rachael M Field

156

Knowledge Sharing through Face-To-Face Communication and Labour Productivity: Evidence from British Workplaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate whether the adoption by workplaces of human resources management (HRM) practices that enhance face-to-face communication (FTFC) among employees is associated with productivity gains. The analysis is based on a nationally representative sample of over 500 British trading establishments drawn from the linked 2004 Workplace Employment Relations Survey and Annual Business Inquiry, for which objective measures of labour productivity

Sergio Salis; Allan M. Williams

157

Post-Adoption Face-to-Face Contact with Birth Parents: Prospective Adopters' Views  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The trend in adoption since the 1960s has been away from secrecy and towards greater openness; contact through an intermediary, and direct contact by letter, is now widely accepted. More controversial is the challenge of face-to-face contact with birth parents, and social workers involved in the decision-making process find themselves having to…

Turkington, Selina; Taylor, Brian J.

2009-01-01

158

Adapting a Face-to-Face Role-Playing Simulation for Online Play  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The rapid acceleration of online course offerings presents a design challenge for instructors who want to take materials developed for face-to-face settings and adapt them for asynchronous online usage. Broadcast lectures are relatively easy to transfer, but adapting content is harder when classes use small-group discussions, as in role-playing or…

Bos, Nathan; Shami, N. Sadat

2006-01-01

159

Group Speech Therapy in Individuals With Parkinson Disease: Face-to-Face Versus Telemedicine  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of group speech therapy for individuals with Parkinson Disease (IWPD) in general and to compare outcomes of group treatment delivered face-to-face (FtF) versus delivery via telemedicine (TM...

Wilson, Kristel Renee

2008-07-31

160

Brief alcohol intervention with college student drinkers: face-to-face versus computerized feedback.  

PubMed

Research has demonstrated that brief interventions featuring personalized feedback can be used to decrease alcohol use among heavy-drinking college students. The current study investigated the efficacy of face-to-face and computer delivered interventions relative to an assessment-only control condition. The content of the personalized feedback was identical across the face-to-face and computerized conditions. There were 84 at-risk students assessed before, and 4 weeks after, the delivery of the interventions. The results suggest that both face-to-face and computerized interventions were equally successful in reducing the quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption, and that both interventions were more effective than the control condition. Participants also rated both interventions as acceptable, although the face-to-face intervention was given a more favorable rating. These initial results suggest that computerized interventions can be used to efficiently reduce alcohol use among college students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:19290702

Butler, Leon H; Correia, Christopher J

2009-03-01

161

Teacher Language in ESL Face-to-Face and Written Electronic Discussions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This repeated-measures, counter-balanced study reports on a comparison of quantity and quality of one teacher's language in face-to-face (FTF) and written electronic (WE) discussions with advanced English as a Subsequent Language (ESL) students. Transcripts from the two types of discussions were compared for complexity of teacher input and the…

Fitze, Michael; McGarrell, Hedy M.

2008-01-01

162

Time Usage during Face-to-Face and Synchronous Distance Music Lessons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared face-to-face and videoconference private music lessons of one saxophone and two tuba students. One value of this study is the magnitude of the data analysis. More than 28,800 frames of digital video and verbatim scripts of all lessons were analyzed for time spent engaged in sequential patterns of instruction, performance, focus…

Orman, Evelyn K.; Whitaker, Jennifer A.

2010-01-01

163

Predicting Outcome of Face-to-Face and Telephone Counselling for Occupational Stress  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present study was to investigate predictors of outcome of counselling, using mean change scores of three outcome measures, at treatment completion and at 4-months follow-up, in a randomised trial of face-to-face (n = 30) versus telephone counselling (n = 30) for occupational stress. Factors associated with treatment outcome were…

Karatzias, Thanos; Chouliara, Zoe; Power, Kevin; Kilfedder, Catherine

2011-01-01

164

Writing as Involvement: A Case for Face-to-Face Classroom Talk in a Computer Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The abandonment of face-to-face voice conversations in favor of the use of electronic conversations in composition classes is an issue to be interrogated. In a recent push to "prepare students for the 21st century," teachers are asked to teach computer applications in the humanities--and composition teachers, who will teach writing in computer…

Berggren, Anne G.

165

ICT in Teacher Education: Developing Key Competencies in Face-to-Face and Distance Learning  

E-print Network

ICT in Teacher Education: Developing Key Competencies in Face-to-Face and Distance Learning Ana A. This paper reports the training of 56 Teachers in ICT and Education Course. This course included one week content while incorporating technology concepts and skills" (p. 1) [2]. The ICT and Education Course

Boyer, Edmond

166

Insect Telepresence: Using robotic tele-embodiment to bring insects face to face with humans  

E-print Network

Insect Telepresence: Using robotic tele-embodiment to bring insects face to face with humans Stacy The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania illah@ri.cmu.edu Abstract The Insect: to promote appreciation for insect life and small-scale complexity through exploration of live insect

Nourbakhsh, Illah

167

Comparison of Power Relations within Electronic and Face-to-Face Classroom Discussions: A Case Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online discussions and transcriptions of face-to-face discussions by graduate students (14 online, 14 on campus) were analyzed. Technical support was not available 24 hours a day to online students who were predominantly women. Online discussions were more student-to-student, classroom discussions student-to-teacher. The analysis suggests how…

Jeris, Laurel

2002-01-01

168

Finding Support in Moodle: A Face-to-Face Chemistry Course for Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this paper was to know the students' perceptions of using online support in a chemistry course. To achieve this objective, a qualitative research was conducted over a chemistry course that was imparted in a face-to-face modality using a LMS (learning management system) for on-line support. The supports available in the LMS were forums,…

de Vega, Carolina Armijo; McAnally-Salas, Lewis

2011-01-01

169

Affinities, Seeing and Feeling Like Family: Exploring Why Children Value Face-to-Face Contact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines face-to-face contact as a way in which children practise, imagine and constitute their closest relationships. Based on the findings of a qualitative school-based study, the article shows that children regard "seeing" as a family and relational practice that enables them to feel connected to and develop affinities with others.…

Davies, Hayley

2012-01-01

170

Academic Help-Seeking in Online and Face-to-Face Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article compares actual help-seeking frequencies across online and face-to-face learning environments. It also examines strategies enacted by nursing students when they faced academic difficulties, reasons for help-seeking avoidance, and the relationship between the frequency of asking questions and achievement. Participants were nursing…

Mahasneh, Randa A.; Sowan, Azizeh K.; Nassar, Yahya H.

2012-01-01

171

Correlates of Student Preference for Online Instruction over Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to examine current online course delivery systems, the authors created and conducted a survey that examined both face-to-face (FTF) and online education (OE) classes offered at 46 universities and some community colleges in the United States, as well as at some foreign universities. Students were asked whether they preferred FTF or OE…

Kishore, Masao; Tabrizi, M. H. Nassehzadeh; Ozan, Erol; Aziz, Shahnaz; Wuensch, Karl L.

2009-01-01

172

Undergraduate Student Outcomes: A Comparison of Online and Face-to-Face Courses  

E-print Network

of the Online Comparative Outcomes Sub- Committee to date includes the following: 1. Continuing and ProfessionalUndergraduate Student Outcomes: A Comparison of Online and Face-to-Face Courses Report from on Online Learning Martha L. A. Stassen, Academic Planning and Assessment, Chair Marilyn Blaustein

Schweik, Charles M.

173

Grade Performance of Face-to-Face versus Online Agricultural Economics Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online course offerings have been growing at a rapid pace in post-secondary education. An ordered probit model is estimated to analyze the effects of online vs. face-to-face course format in achieving specific letter grades. An upper-division agricultural economics course taught over 9 years using both formats is used for the analysis. For a…

Greenway, Gina A.; Makus, Larry D.

2014-01-01

174

Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Communities, A Comparative Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses the perspectives of sociology and computer science to compare face-to-face (f2f) and computer-mediated communications (CMC) from the viewpoint of their respective abilities to form and sustain communities. Identifies a third type of community--a hybrid--that is based on a combination of f2f and CMC or offline and online communications. (AEF)

Etzioni, Amitai; Etzioni, Oren

1999-01-01

175

Overcoming Student Resistance to Group Work: Online Versus Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared student group work experiences in online (OL) versus face-to-face (f2f) sections of the same graduate course, over three years, to determine what factors influence student group work experiences and how do these factors play out in f2f versus OL environments. Surveys and student journals suggest that communication issues,…

Smith, Glenn Gordon; Sorensen, Chris; Gump, Andrew; Heindel, Allen J.; Caris, Mieke; Martinez, Christopher D.

2011-01-01

176

Face-to-Face versus Online Tutoring Support in Humanities Courses in Distance Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The experiences of students taking the same courses in the humanities by distance learning were compared when tutorial support was provided conventionally (using limited face-to-face sessions with some contact by telephone and email) or online (using a combination of computer-mediated conferencing and email). The Course Experience Questionnaire…

Richardson, John T. E.

2009-01-01

177

Interdyad differences in early mother-infant face-to-face communication: real-time dynamics and developmental pathways.  

PubMed

A microgenetic research design with a multiple case study method and a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses was used to investigate interdyad differences in real-time dynamics and developmental change processes in mother-infant face-to-face communication over the first 3 months of life. Weekly observations of 24 mother-infant dyads with analyses performed dyad by dyad showed that most dyads go through 2 qualitatively different developmental phases of early face-to-face communication: After a phase of mutual attentiveness, mutual engagement begins in Weeks 7-8, with infant smiling and cooing bidirectionally linked with maternal mirroring. This gives rise to sequences of positive feedback that, by the 3rd month, dynamically stabilizes into innovative play routines. However, when there is a lack of bidirectional positive feedback between infant and maternal behaviors, and a lack of permeability of the early communicative patterns to incorporate innovations, the development of the mutual engagement phase is compromised. The findings contribute both to theories of relationship change processes and to clinical work with at-risk mother-infant interactions. PMID:23527490

Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

2013-12-01

178

Internet versus face-to-face therapy: emotional self-disclosure issues for young adults.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to compare differences in emotional self-disclosure between young adult Internet users who prefer face-to-face therapy to those who prefer Internet therapy. A convenience sample of 328 was recruited from Facebook to complete an online survey. A total of 263 preferred face-to-face therapy (F2FT) while 65 preferred Internet therapy (IT). Significant differences were found with the F2FT group willing to disclose emotions of depression, jealously, anxiety, and fear to a therapist more frequently than the IT group. The majority reported a preference for F2FT over IT. Recommendations for future professional practice and research are included. PMID:19742368

Rogers, Vickie L; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Wykle, May L; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

2009-10-01

179

Two Peas in a Pod? A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Web Based Classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared student learning outcomes and student perceptions of and satisfaction with the learning process between two sections of the same class-a web-based section and a traditional face-to-face (f2f) section. Using a quasi-experimental design, students were randomly assigned to the two course sections. Group equivalency was established using an instrument designed to determine learning preferences and both versions of

Gale Mentzer; JohnRobert Cryan; Berhane Teclehaimanot

2007-01-01

180

Development of a face-to-face meeting capture and indexing process  

Microsoft Academic Search

A face-to-face (F2F) meeting capture and indexing process could provide an internal feedback mechanism so that results can be monitored against change interventions decided at product lifecycle management (PLM) or performance development review (PDR) meetings. It could also assist people who do not currently have the knowledge or authority to act on what was discussed to share and reflect on

Barry Andrew Piorkowski; Richard David Evans; James Xiaoyu Gao

2011-01-01

181

Face-to-face and Computer-mediated Peer Review in EFL Writing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the use of face-to-face peer review (FFPR) and computer- mediated peer review (CMPR) in an Asian English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) academic writing context. The participants were 33 English majors from a uni- versity of science and technology in Taiwan, a new type of school offering 2-year associate degree programs in foreign language studies. Our study contributes to the research

Mei-ching Ho; Sandra J. Savignon

182

Documenting English Syntactic Development in Face-to-Face Signed Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors explored the face-to-face English competence of five students who were participating in a larger study of teachers' use of English-based signing. Using case studies, the authors report on the students' development of English-based signing at the beginning and end of their involvement in this 4-year study. Grammatical forms similar in English and American Sign Language (ASL) were initially

C. Tane Akamatsu; David A. Stewart; Betsy Jane Becker

2000-01-01

183

Application of computer conferencing in the electronic extensions of face-to-face symposia and congresses  

Microsoft Academic Search

An electronic extension of a face-to-face symposium or a congress enables people to participate in the symposium from their home countries. Using a terminal linked to a computer-based messaging or conferencing system, a participant can read and discuss abstracts of papers and posters presented at a symposium, and can conduct asynchronous discussions with the participants gathered at the symposium venue.

Eng-Leong Foo; Carl-Göran Hedén

1987-01-01

184

Contemplating Electronic Mediation: What Makes CBOT Face-to-Face Trading Work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Designing a computer-mediated communication system to replace a face-to-face (f-2-f) process is a complex undertaking. It is necessary to determine which of the behaviors are critical to the operation of the process and which are inefficiencies to eliminate. This requires that behaviors be understood in terms of their intent or function within the goal structure of the process. We explore

Catalina Danis; Alison Lee

185

A comparative study of computer conferencing and face-to-face communications in systems design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of computer conferencing and face-to-face communications to support the work of student teams in a systems analysis project. The study compares the differences in decision quality associated with the projects accomplished by these teams, such team's confidence in the group decision, and each team's satisfaction with the overall decision process.The

Mary Sumner; Dennis Hostetler

2000-01-01

186

Computer-mediated instruction: a comparison of online and face-to-face collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the effects of collaboration mode and group composition during a computer-mediated collaborative (CMC)\\u000a program. Six intact sections of a computer literacy course were assigned to either a face-to-face or a virtual, online collaboration\\u000a treatment condition. Groups consisted of homogeneous lower-ability, homogeneous higher-ability, or heterogeneous-ability pairs.\\u000a The study examined the effects of collaboration mode and group composition on

Jeremy I. Tutty; James D. Klein

2008-01-01

187

Knowing Your Place: Self-Perceptions of Status in Face-to-Face Groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Status is the prominence, respect, and influence individuals enjoy in the eyes of others. Theories of positive illusions suggest that individuals form overly positive perceptions of their status in face-to-face groups. In contrast, the authors argue that individuals' perceptions of their status are highly accurate—that is, they closely match the group's perception of their status—because forming overly positive status self-perceptions

Cameron Anderson; Sanjay Srivastava; Jennifer S. Beer; Sandra E. Spataro; Jennifer A. Chatman

2006-01-01

188

Stress-prevention in secondary schools: online- versus face-to-face-training  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the evaluation of an internet-delivered stress-prevention program for adolescents as a possible alternative for school-based implementation of mental health promotion. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 904 adolescents in grades eight and nine were assigned to four treatment conditions (online-training in school, online-training via internet from home, school-based face-to-face training,

Mirko Fridrici; Arnold Lohaus

2009-01-01

189

The Use of Course Web Sites in Traditional Face-to-Face Instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of technology in university and college classrooms has increased in recent years including the use of course Web sites as a supplement to face-to-face instruction (Green, 2000). Despite this increase, limited attention has been given to the development and use of course Web sites. This study explores students' use and perceived helpfulness of supplemental course Web sites (i.e.,

Sharon M. Ballard

2002-01-01

190

NEGOTIATING COMMON GROUND IN COMPUTER-MEDIATED VERSUS FACE-TO-FACE DISCUSSIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

To explore the impact of the communication medium on building common ground, this article presents research comparing learner use of reception strategies in traditional face-to-face (FTF) and in synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC). Reception strategies, such as reprises, hypothesis testing and forward inferencing provide evidence of comprehension and thus serve to establish common ground among participants. A number of factors, including

Ilona Vandergriff

2006-01-01

191

Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Groups: Who Makes Riskier Decisions?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although a significant body of research has focused on understanding the effect of media differences on group behaviors and processes, little is known about how media differences influence groups' risk-taking behaviors. This study reports on a laboratory experiment designed to understand the effects of the group communication environment (face-to-face or computer-mediated) on group risk-taking behaviors while subjects performed a hidden

Joseph S. Valacich; Saonee Sarker; Jamie Pratt; Mike Groomer

2002-01-01

192

Group judgment processes and outcomes in video-conferencingversus face-to-face g roups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two hundred and eighty-two participants formed 94 groups of size three and completed an estimation task by interactingeither face-to-face or via a video-conferencingsystem. Results showed significant differences across conditions with regard to the confidence attached by groups to their decisions, the degree to which groups were able to improve upon the best individually arrived at decision, and the self-reported enjoyment

Marcus Cred; Janet A. Sniezekb

193

DEICTIC ROLES OF EXTERNAL REPRESENTATIONS IN FACE-TO-FACE AND ONLINE COLLABORATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research explores how shared, learner-constructed representations serve as resources for conversation in face-to-face and online situations. An important role of shared representations in collaborative learning is to facilitate the ease of reference to previously introduced ideas. Complex ideas are more easily expressed when their component ideas can be indicated with simple gestures. Yet gesture does not have the same

D. SUTHERS; L. GIRARDEAU; C. HUNDHAUSEN

2003-01-01

194

Computer-Supported and Face-to-Face Collaboration on Design Tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of how people's discourse is affected by computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) tools and shared workspaces was explored by examining collaboration on shared design tasks. Pairs of 28 less experienced and 28 more experienced engineering design students undertook a computer-assisted design task, either face-to-face (FtF) or remotely. The CSCW medium provided views of interlocutors' faces and upper body plus

Tony Anderson; Alison Sanford; Avril Thomson; William Ion

2007-01-01

195

Comparison of Student Initiatives in Keyboard-to-Keyboard and Face-to-Face Tutoring Sessions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although human one-on-one tutoring has been shown to be a much more effective method of education than regular classroom teaching, it is very labor intensive, so many desire to construct intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) to mimic human face-to-face tutoring without the limitations of human resources. Most existing ITSs communicate via keyboard input. In this paper, we classify student initiatives in

Jie Zhao; Jung Hee Kim; Martha W. Evens

2003-01-01

196

An Advanced Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy Course Blending Online and Face-to-Face Instruction  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the effectiveness of online instruction in a cardiology pharmacotherapy elective. Design Eight drug-focused lectures and 6 introductory presentations were added to a cardiology pharmacotherapy course. Students completed an online quiz after each online drug-focused lecture and scores were compared to quizzes taken at the beginning and end of the course, as well as on a cardiology advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). For online introductory presentations, students completed a quiz at the beginning of the next face-to-face session. A survey was conducted at the end of the course to obtain student feedback. Assessment Compared to baseline scores, student learning was demonstrated after online drug-focused lectures by higher quiz scores attained immediately after completing the lecture, at the end of the course, and at the beginning of the APPE. Furthermore, students performed better on quizzes at the beginning of face-to-face sessions if they first completed an online introductory presentation. Students expressed strong support for the online components of the course. Conclusions A blended learning environment with online and face-to-face instruction is an effective way to teach a cardiology pharmacotherapy elective. The online component of this course was well received by students, improved student preparation before attending class, and appeared to enhance long-term cardiovascular drug knowledge. PMID:19564994

2009-01-01

197

ConnectDots: Visualizing Social Network Interaction for Improved Social Decision Making  

E-print Network

used for communication and their pre-existing sociality models (Fisk, A.P., 1991). When evaluating of interaction with members of one's social network and the frequency of use of different media types. Once communicated face to face or through written correspondence. This new group of interaction media has spawned

Gooch, Bruce

198

Effects of Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Constructive Controversy on Social Interdependence, Motivation, and Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cooperative learning capitalizes on the relational processes by which peers promote learning, yet it remains unclear whether these processes operate similarly in face-to-face and online settings. This study addresses this issue by comparing face-to-face and computer-mediated versions of "constructive controversy", a cooperative learning procedure…

Roseth, Cary J.; Saltarelli, Andy J.; Glass, Chris R.

2011-01-01

199

Close Encounters in a Pediatric Ward: Measuring Face-to-Face Proximity and Mixing Patterns with Wearable  

E-print Network

Close Encounters in a Pediatric Ward: Measuring Face-to- Face Proximity and Mixing Patterns.5 meters, and a time resolution of 20 seconds. The study was conducted in a general pediatrics hospital, Cattuto C, Colizza V, et al. (2011) Close Encounters in a Pediatric Ward: Measuring Face-to-Face Proximity

Barrat, Alain

200

Statistical Mechanics of Temporal and Interacting Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last ten years important breakthroughs in the understanding of the topology of complexity have been made in the framework of network science. Indeed it has been found that many networks belong to the universality classes called small-world networks or scale-free networks. Moreover it was found that the complex architecture of real world networks strongly affects the critical phenomena defined on these structures. Nevertheless the main focus of the research has been the characterization of single and static networks. Recently, temporal networks and interacting networks have attracted large interest. Indeed many networks are interacting or formed by a multilayer structure. Example of these networks are found in social networks where an individual might be at the same time part of different social networks, in economic and financial networks, in physiology or in infrastructure systems. Moreover, many networks are temporal, i.e. the links appear and disappear on the fast time scale. Examples of these networks are social networks of contacts such as face-to-face interactions or mobile-phone communication, the time-dependent correlations in the brain activity and etc. Understanding the evolution of temporal and multilayer networks and characterizing critical phenomena in these systems is crucial if we want to describe, predict and control the dynamics of complex system. In this thesis, we investigate several statistical mechanics models of temporal and interacting networks, to shed light on the dynamics of this new generation of complex networks. First, we investigate a model of temporal social networks aimed at characterizing human social interactions such as face-to-face interactions and phone-call communication. Indeed thanks to the availability of data on these interactions, we are now in the position to compare the proposed model to the real data finding good agreement. Second, we investigate the entropy of temporal networks and growing networks , to provide a new framework to quantify the information encoded in these networks and to answer a fundamental problem in network science: how complex are temporal and growing networks. Finally, we consider two examples of critical phenomena in interacting networks. In particular, on one side we investigate the percolation of interacting networks by introducing antagonistic interactions. On the other side, we investigate a model of political election based on the percolation of antagonistic networks. The aim of this research is to show how antagonistic interactions change the physics of critical phenomena on interacting networks. We believe that the work presented in these thesis offers the possibility to appreciate the large variability of problems that can be addressed in the new framework of temporal and interacting networks.

Zhao, Kun

201

Correlation between Ferroelectricity and Grain Structures of Face-to-Face Annealed Strontium Bismuth Tantalate Thin Films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The correlation between ferroelectricity and grain structures of sol-gel-derived strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) thin films prepared by face-to-face annealing were investigated. In face-to-face annealing, an SBT film is directly placed, with the film side down, on an other SBT film during the crystallization process. The remanent polarization value of a face-to-face-annealed SBT film was 21 ?C/cm2 at an annealing temperature of 750°C, while it was 7 ?C/cm2 in the film prepared without face-to-face annealing. It was found from cross-sectional transmission electron microscope images that the SBT films prepared by face-to-face annealing were composed of dense, and of uniform layers corresponding to the annealing cycles, while the films prepared without face-to-face annealing were composed of randomly packed irregular grains. These results suggest that the improvement in ferroelectricity of the face-to-face annealed SBT films is due to the formation of dense, uniform layers.

Aizawa, Koji; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

2000-11-01

202

A Hybrid Astronomy Course - The Best of Face-to-Face and Online Pedagogy to Create a Very Effective General Astronomy Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hybrid course formally integrates the best pedagogical practices in a face-to-face class with the unique opportunities and flexibility inherent in an on-line class. I will describe a general astronomy course "The Universe in Ten Weeks" that was developed as a hybrid astronomy course at Cal Poly Pomona. Students interacted on a daily basis in discussions and observations. Class meetings were enormously productive and active. The instructor has daily feedback and came to class knowing the issues and questions that the students faced in their reading and on-line discussions. He knew before the face-to-face class meetings what conceptual challenges the students faced and what they wanted to research further. I will describe many of the techniques as well as the syllabus that made this class so successful for student learning.

Bhavsar, Suketu P.

2013-01-01

203

On the Cutting Edge: Face-to-Face and Virtual Professional Development for Current and Future Geoscience Faculty  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the Cutting Edge, a comprehensive, discipline-wide professional development program for current and future geoscience faculty, aims to develop a geoscience professoriate committed to high-quality instruction based on currency in scientific knowledge, good pedagogic practice, and research on learning. Our program provides an integrated workshop series and online teaching resources. Since 2002, we have offered more than 80 face-to-face workshops, virtual workshops and webinars, and hybrid events. Participants come from two-year colleges and four-year colleges and universities. The workshop series is designed to address the needs of faculty in all career stages at the full spectrum of institutions and covering the breadth of the geoscience curriculum. We select timely and compelling topics and create opportunities of interest to faculty. We offer workshops on course design, new geoscience research and pedagogical topics, core geoscience curriculum topics, and introductory courses as well as workshops for early career faculty and for future faculty. Our workshops are designed to model good teaching practice. We set workshop goals that guide workshop planning and evaluation. Workshops are interactive, emphasize participant learning, provide opportunities for participants to interact and share experience/knowledge, provide good resources, give participants time to reflect and to develop action plans, and help transform their ideas about teaching. We emphasize the importance of adaptation in the context of their specific situations. For virtual workshops and webinars we use icebreakers and other structured interactions to build a comfortable workshop community; promote interaction through features on webinar software, chat-aided question and answer, small-group synchronous interactions, and/or discussion boards; plan detailed schedules for workshop events; use asynchronous discussions and recordings of synchronous events given that participants are busy with their daily commitments; and provide sufficient technical support for participants and leaders. The importance of making the workshop useful and immediately applicable does not diminish with virtual events. One key lesson is the need to be purposeful with virtual communication strategies; the discussion boards, chat-aided discussion, and small group interactions need a specific focus, purpose, or product. Both face-to-face and virtual workshops that appear to flow spontaneously reflect extensive planning, a clear understanding of the program and its objectives by everyone involved, and realistic estimates for how long activities will really take. The workshop content and structures that we have developed result in high rates of satisfaction by participants.

Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Iverson, E. A.; Kirk, K. B.; Beane, R. J.; McConnell, D.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.

2011-12-01

204

76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and Clarifications Related to Home Health AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

2011-07-12

205

Comparison of the accuracy of patients' recall of the content of telephone and face-to-face consultations: an exploratory study.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND To comply with an action plan patients need to recall information accurately. Little is known about how well patients recall consultations, particularly telephone consultations increasingly used to triage acute problems. PURPOSE OF STUDY This was an exploratory study to measure how accurately patients recall the content of face-to-face and telephone consultations and what factors may be associated with accurate recall. STUDY DESIGN In Scotland in 2008, the advice (diagnoses; management plan(s); and safety-netting arrangements) given in audio recorded face-to-face and telephone consultations was compared with the advice recalled by patients at interview approximately 13 days later. Patients also performed a memory test. Interactions were sought between accurate recall, consultation type, and factors postulated to influence recall. RESULTS Ten general practitioners (GPs) and 175 patients participated; 144 (82%) patients were interviewed. Patients recalled most important components of telephone and face-to-face consultations equally accurately or with only minor errors. Overall, patients presenting multiple problems (p<0.001), with brain injury (p<0.01) or low memory score (p<0.01) had reduced recall. GPs rarely used strategies to improve recall; however, these were not associated with improved recall. CONCLUSIONS Contrary to previous hospital based research, patients tended to remember important components of both face-to-face and telephone consultations-perhaps reflecting the familiar, less anxiety provoking environment of primary care. The unsuccessful use of strategies to improve recall may reflect selective use in cognitively impaired patients. Clinicians should compensate for situations where recall is poorer such as patients presenting multiple problems or with brain injury. Patients might be advised to restrict the number of problems they present in any one consultation. PMID:21378007

McKinstry, Brian; Watson, Philip; Elton, Robert A; Pinnock, Hilary; Kidd, Gillian; Meyer, Barbara; Logie, Robert; Sheikh, Aziz

2011-06-01

206

Development in Electronically-Supported Groups: A Preliminary Longitudinal Study of Distributed and Face-to-Face Meetings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This longitudinal pilot study compared the developmental patterns of groups in three different electronically supported meeting modes: face-to-face, dispersed-synchronous and dispersed-asynchronous. Comparisons along several behavioral and socio-technical dimensions which influence the group development process indicate that face-to-face groups experience more effective leadership and coordination competence over time compared to the distributed groups. However, dispersed groups did not differ from their

Kelly Burke; Laku Chidambaram

1994-01-01

207

A comparative analysis of the development of organizational and group identification in virtual and face-to-face groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation examines the development of identification for multiple targets over time in face-to-face and virtual groups. Participants were students from a satellite campus of a large Midwestern university, who were randomly assigned into groups differed by face-to-face (n = 105) and virtual (n = 96) mode of communication. Participants completed a brainstorming task over a six-week period that concerned

Michael E Reardon

2003-01-01

208

New Product Development Decision-Making Effectiveness: Comparing Individuals, Face-To-Face Teams, and Virtual Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 411 subjects participated in two decision-making experiments in order to examine the effectiveness of new product development project continuation decisions. In Study 1, individual versus face-to-face team decision-making effectiveness was com- pared. Study 2, an extension of Study 1, compared the new product development deci- sion-making effectiveness of individuals, face-to-face teams, and virtual teams. A virtual team

Jeffrey B. Schmidt; Mitzi M. Montoya-Weiss; Anne P. Massey

2001-01-01

209

An Empirical Investigation of How Trust, Cohesion, and Performance Vary in Virtual and Face-to-Face Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

As technology improves, more teams are meeting virtually. In this study, we analyze how individual levels of trust, cohesion, output, outcome satisfaction, and process satisfaction differ in virtual and face-to-face teams completing different tasks. A controlled experiment in which business students were randomly assigned to either a virtual or face-to-face team, completing either an intellective or a preference task, was

Kimberly A. Furumo; John Michael Pearson

2006-01-01

210

Rapport in Conflict Resolution: Accounting for How Face-to-Face Contact Fosters Mutual Cooperation in Mixed-Motive Conflicts  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose that face-to-face contact fosters the development of rapport and thereby helps negotiators coordinate on mutually beneficial settlements in mixed-motive conflicts. Specifically, we investigate whether, in a cooperative climate, negotiators' visual access to each other's nonverbal behavior fosters a dyadic state of rapport that facilitates mutual cooperation. Experiment 1 manipulated whether negotiators stood face-to-face or side-by-side (unable to see

Aimee L. Drolet; Michael W. Morris

2000-01-01

211

The Role of Face-to-Face Meetings in Technology-Supported Self-Organizing Distributed Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine the role of face-to-face meetings in the context of technology-supported self-organizing distributed (or virtual teams), specifically free\\/libre open source software (FLOSS) development teams. Based on a qualitative inductive analysis of data from interviews and observations at FLOSS conferences, we identify a variety of settings in which developers meet face-to-face, and we point out the activities performed in these

Kevin Crowston; James Howison; Chengetai Masango; U. Yeliz Eseryel

2007-01-01

212

Patient Reactions to Vital Sign Measures: Comparing Home Monitoring Technology to Face-to-Face Delivery  

PubMed Central

Increasingly home health agencies are using home-based technologies to monitor vital signs of chronically ill patients. Patients receive measurements such as blood pressure and weight that indicate risks to their health. Cognitive reactions to risk measures have been studied for face-to-face delivery; however, it is unknown whether the same reactions exist with technology delivery. Reported in this article are study results of a comparative content expert analysis of reactions to technology-delivered health-risk measures. Results suggest that patients have the similar reactions but may be more likely to just accept, without evaluating or considering threats to their health. As home telemonitoring applications continue to evolve, care must be taken avoid creating passive patients and develop best practices that use technology to encourage beneficial self-care behaviors. PMID:22337499

Shea, Kimberly; Chamoff, Breanna

2012-01-01

213

Closed-loop dialog model of face-to-face communication with a photo-real virtual human  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe an advanced Human Computer Interaction (HCI) model that employs photo-realistic virtual humans to provide digital media users with information, learning services and entertainment in a highly personalized and adaptive manner. The system can be used as a computer interface or as a tool to deliver content to end-users. We model the interaction process between the user and the system as part of a closed loop dialog taking place between the participants. This dialog, exploits the most important characteristics of a face-to-face communication process, including the use of non-verbal gestures and meta communication signals to control the flow of information. Our solution is based on a Virtual Human Interface (VHI) technology that was specifically designed to be able to create emotional engagement between the virtual agent and the user, thus increasing the efficiency of learning and/or absorbing any information broadcasted through this device. The paper reviews the basic building blocks and technologies needed to create such a system and discusses its advantages over other existing methods.

Kiss, Bernadette; Benedek, Balázs; Szijárto, Gábor; Takács, Barnabás

2004-01-01

214

Blending Face-to-Face and Distance Learning Methods in Adult and Career-Technical Education. Practice Application Brief No. 23.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both face-to-face and distance learning methods are currently being used in adult education and career and technical education. In theory, the advantages of face-to-face and distance learning methods complement each other. In practice, however, both face-to-face and information and communications technology (ICT)-based distance programs often rely…

Wonacott, Michael E.

215

Towards a Model of Interactivity in Alternative Media: A Multilevel Analysis of Audiences and Producers in a New Social Movement Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research utilized multilevel analysis to explore interactive alternative media production in a new social movement network. Interviews with audiences, local producers, and global producers provide evidence of interactivity between local audiences and local producers and between local producers and global producers. The local audiences provided encouragement to local producers through face-to-face interactions that aided in the establishment of organizational

Joshua D. Atkinson

2008-01-01

216

Student Success in Face-to-Face and Online Sections of Biology Courses at a Community College in East Tennessee  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine if there were significant differences in student success in face-to-face and online biology courses as categorized by gender, major, and age; and as measured by lecture grades, lab grades, and final course grades. The data used for analyses included data from 170 face-to-face sections and 127 online sections from a biology course during the fall and spring semesters beginning fall 2008 through spring 2011. Researchers have reported mixed findings in previous studies juxtaposing online and face-to-face course delivery formats, from no significant differences to differences in grades, learning styles, and satisfaction levels. Four research questions guided this study with data analysis involving t-tests for independent groups and chi-square tests. This researcher noted significant differences in the results of this study: grades, success rates by gender, success rates by health and nonhealth majors, and nontraditional age (?25) success rate were higher for students in the face-to-face courses; and the attrition rate was higher for students in the online course sections. There was no significant difference found in the success rate for traditional age (<25) students in the face-to-face sections compared to those in the online sections.

Garman, Deanna Essington

217

Weight-related Beliefs, Behaviors, and Social Networks of Obese, Young Adult African- American Women: Implications for Healthy Weight Interventions  

E-print Network

overweight/obese females, and exhibited positive social support behaviors. Social networks included positive, negative, and non-positive relationships. Social support for weight loss is shared among network members through face-to-face interactions, phone...

Rollins, Brandy 1982-

2012-12-10

218

Virtual collaboration: face-to-face versus videoconference, audioconference, and computer-mediated communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As we increase our reliance on mediated communication, it is important to be aware the media's influence on group processes and outcomes. A review of 40+ years of research shows that all media-videoconference, audioconference, and computer-mediated communication--change the context of the communication to some extent, reducing cues used to regulate and understand conversation, indicate participants' power and status, and move the group towards agreement. Text-based computer-mediated communication, the "leanest" medum, reduces status effects, domination, and consensus. This has been shown useful in broadening the range of inputs and ideas. However, it has also been shown to increase polarization, deindividuation, and disinhibition, and the time to reach a conclusion. For decision-making tasks, computer-mediated communication can increase choice shift and the likelihood of more risky or extreme decisions. In both videoconference and audioconference, participants cooperate less with linked collaborators, and shift their opinions toward extreme options, compared with face-to-face collaboration. In videoconference and audioconference, local coalitions can form where participants tend to agree more with those in the same room than those on the other end of the line. There is also a tendency in audioconference to disagree with those on the other end of the phone. This paper is a summary of a much more extensive forthcoming report; it reviews the research literature and proposes strategies to leverage the benefits of mediated communication while mitigating its adverse effects.

Wainfan, Lynne; Davis, Paul K.

2004-08-01

219

Face-to-face or face-to-screen? Undergraduates' opinions and test performance in classroom vs. online learning  

PubMed Central

As electronic communication becomes increasingly common, and as students juggle study, work, and family life, many universities are offering their students more flexible learning opportunities. Classes once delivered face-to-face are often replaced by online activities and discussions. However, there is little research comparing students' experience and learning in these two modalities. The aim of this study was to compare undergraduates' preference for, and academic performance on, class material and assessment presented online vs. in traditional classrooms. Psychology students (N = 67) at an Australian university completed written exercises, a class discussion, and a written test on two academic topics. The activities for one topic were conducted face-to-face, and the other online, with topics counterbalanced across two groups. The results showed that students preferred to complete activities face-to-face rather than online, but there was no significant difference in their test performance in the two modalities. In their written responses, students expressed a strong preference for class discussions to be conducted face-to-face, reporting that they felt more engaged, and received more immediate feedback, than in online discussion. A follow-up study with a separate group (N = 37) confirmed that although students appreciated the convenience of completing written activities online in their own time, they also strongly preferred to discuss course content with peers in the classroom rather than online. It is concluded that online and face-to-face activities can lead to similar levels of academic performance, but that students would rather do written activities online but engage in discussion in person. Course developers could aim to structure classes so that students can benefit from both the flexibility of online learning, and the greater engagement experienced in face-to-face discussion.

Kemp, Nenagh; Grieve, Rachel

2014-01-01

220

User Behavior, Social Networking, and Playing Style in Online and Face to Face Bridge Communities  

E-print Network

- tionality. For example, gamers participating in the BBO Fans community combine online bridge play investi- gate and contrast these aspects for two bridge communities, BBO Fans (online) and Locomotiva. In this work we analyze and compare two communities of bridge players, Locomotiva and BBO Fans. The online

Kuzmanov, Georgi

221

An Analysis of Social Gaming Networks in Online and Face to Face Bridge Communities  

E-print Network

- tionality. For example, gamers participating in the BBO Fans community combine online bridge play. In this work we investigate and contrast these aspects for two bridge communities, BBO Fans (online and compare two communities of bridge players, Locomotiva and BBO Fans. In contrast to many other social

Langendoen, Koen

222

Interplay between Telecommunications and Face-to-Face Interactions: A Study Using Mobile Phone Data  

E-print Network

In this study we analyze one year of anonymized telecommunications data for over one million customers from a large European cellphone operator, and we investigate the relationship between people's calls and their physical ...

Calabrese, Francesco

223

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: From Face to Face Interaction to a Broader Contextual Understanding of Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is increasingly used to address the emotional and interpersonal problems of people with ID. There is a limited but promising evidence base supporting this activity. However, these individuals face real and continuing challenges in their lives that have implications for their self and interpersonal perceptions.…

Jahoda, A.; Dagnan, D.; Kroese, B. Stenfert; Pert, C.; Trower, P.

2009-01-01

224

Fostering Face to Face Oral Interaction through Webquests: A Case Study in ESP for Tourism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Webquests have been used for some time to research a variety of topics. According to Lacina (2007), a webquest is an inquiry-based technology activity designed by Bernie Dodge and Tom March in which information is usually drawn from the Internet, and is a powerful instructional exercise both for teachers and students.Webquests enhance personal and…

Laborda, Jesus Garcia

2010-01-01

225

A longitudinal experiment on relational tone in computer-mediated and face to face interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prior experiments on computer-mediated communication have suggested depersonalizing effects of the medium, while field studies report warmer personal relations. Past research is criticized for failing to incorporate temporal and developmental perspectives on social information processing and relational development, and for omitting nonverbal cues in comparisons between conditions. 192 coders evaluated relational communication of 16 computer-mediated and 16 traditional groups over

Joseph B. Walther

1992-01-01

226

Comparison of therapeutic interactions between face to face and telemediated communication conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature on therapeutic applications of electronic communication media (telephone and computer messaging) was reviewed. Wellens' (1986) psychological distancing model was used to conceptualize media in terms of available channels of communication (bandwidth). The literature on interpersonal distancing and research in common psychotherapeutic factors were reviewed in order to complete the foundation for experimental hypotheses addressing the effects of reduced

Eva Szeli

1994-01-01

227

The architecture of innovation: Tracking face-to-face interactions with ubicomp technologies  

E-print Network

of Cambridge, Cambridge (UK) 2School of Engineering & Digital Arts, University of Kent (UK)? 3Telefonica Research, Barcelona (Spain)? 4Yahoo Labs, Barcelona (Spain)? 5Microsoft Research, Cambridge (UK) (Dated: June 27, 2014) The layouts of the buildings we live... over the lunch hour (12-1pm). We further investigate the importance of lunchtime for inter-group contact by comparing the pro- portion of contact pairs that are between individuals from different groups in all of the data for each building...

Brown, Chloe; Efstratiou, Christos; Leontiadis, Ilias; Quercia, Daniele; Mascolo, Cecilia; Scott, James; Key, Peter

2014-01-01

228

Atypical brain activation patterns during a face-to-face joint attention game in adults with autism spectrum disorder.  

PubMed

Joint attention behaviors include initiating one's own and responding to another's bid for joint attention to an object, person, or topic. Joint attention abilities in autism are pervasively atypical, correlate with development of language and social abilities, and discriminate children with autism from other developmental disorders. Despite the importance of these behaviors, the neural correlates of joint attention in individuals with autism remain unclear. This paucity of data is likely due to the inherent challenge of acquiring data during a real-time social interaction. We used a novel experimental set-up in which participants engaged with an experimenter in an interactive face-to-face joint attention game during fMRI data acquisition. Both initiating and responding to joint attention behaviors were examined as well as a solo attention (SA) control condition. Participants included adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (n = 13), a mean age- and sex-matched neurotypical group (n = 14), and a separate group of neurotypical adults (n = 22). Significant differences were found between groups within social-cognitive brain regions, including dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) and right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), during the RJA as compared to SA conditions. Region-of-interest analyses revealed a lack of signal differentiation between joint attention and control conditions within left pSTS and dMPFC in individuals with ASD. Within the pSTS, this lack of differentiation was characterized by reduced activation during joint attention and relative hyper-activation during SA. These findings suggest a possible failure of developmental neural specialization within the STS and dMPFC to joint attention in ASD. PMID:22505330

Redcay, Elizabeth; Dodell-Feder, David; Mavros, Penelope L; Kleiner, Mario; Pearrow, Mark J; Triantafyllou, Christina; Gabrieli, John D; Saxe, Rebecca

2013-10-01

229

Effect of Feedback during Lecture Style Delivery Both in a Face-to-Face Classroom & during a Distance Education Television Session in a Developing Country like Bangladesh without the Use of Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distance education lectures aired over national television without means of interactivity has had very little success in providing open university style of education in a developing country like Bangladesh. This paper explores some effects of providing feedback to students on their participation in a distance education scenario and in a normal face-to-face classroom situation. The techniques applied do not make

Yousuf M. Islam; Zillur Rahman; Shafiq Shamsur Razzaq; M. A. Sayed; S. Zaman

2006-01-01

230

Blending Synchronous Face-to-Face and Computer-Supported Cooperative Learning in a Hybrid Doctoral Seminar  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online education is often assumed to be synonymous with asynchronous instruction, existing apart from or supplementary to face-to-face instruction in traditional bricks-and-mortar classrooms. However, expanding access to computer-mediated communication technologies now make new models possible, including distance learners synchronous online…

Roseth, Cary; Akcaoglu, Mete; Zellner, Andrea

2013-01-01

231

Instructional Strategies for Face-to-Face, Internet-Based, and Hybrid Education: An Action Oriented Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of the Internet and the rapid growth of educational software, high schools are applying new instructional strategies with their students, including online and hybrid education. Hybrid education combines face-to-face encounters with online methods; students attend classroom sessions with their teachers and peers, and they engage…

Naffziger, Loren Benjamin

2012-01-01

232

Technology, Group Process, and Group Outcomes: Testing the Connections in Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Groups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the effect of communication media on group processes and the consequent effect of processes on group cohesiveness, satisfaction, and productivity using mediated regression analysis. Supports previous findings about group outcomes by showing that communication media groups expressed lower cohesiveness than did face-to-face groups. (AEF)

Straus, Susan G.

1997-01-01

233

A Retrospective Look at Replacing Face-to-Face Embryology Instruction with Online Lectures in a Human Anatomy Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Embryology is integrated into the Clinically Oriented Anatomy course at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine. Before 2008, the same instructor presented embryology in 13 face-to-face lectures distributed by organ systems throughout the course. For the 2008 and 2009 offerings of the course, a hybrid embryology…

Beale, Elmus G.; Tarwater, Patrick M.; Lee, Vaughan H.

2014-01-01

234

Are the Functions of Teachers in e-Learning and Face-to-Face Learning Environments Really Different?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main purpose of this study is not to compare online and traditional face-to-face instruction merely to prove which one is better, but rather it aims to highlight some of the possible risks and strengths which may help to improve the role of teachers in both methods. The scene consisted of various thematic blocks from a training programme, with teachers

Laura Alonso Díaz; Florentino Blázquez Entonado

2009-01-01

235

iGlasses: An Automatic Wearable Speech Supplement in Face-to-Face Communication and Classroom Situations  

E-print Network

iGlasses: An Automatic Wearable Speech Supplement in Face-to-Face Communication and Classroom. Categories and Subject Descriptors J.4 [Computer Applications]: Social and Behavioral Sciences ­ Psychology,000 deaf, hard of hearing, and speech-language impairment children enrolled in Special Education [1

Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

236

The role of face-to-face meetings in technology-supported self-organizing distributed teams1  

E-print Network

, and organizational boundaries with links strengthened by webs of communication technologies". However1 The role of face-to-face meetings in technology-supported self- organizing distributed teams1 Communications 1 This research was partially supported by NSF Grants 03-41475, 04­14468 and 05- 27457. Earlier

Crowston, Kevin

237

A Comparison of Online and Face-To-Face Instruction in an Undergraduate Foundations of American Education Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the similarities and differences for one course, Foundations of American Education, when offered in traditional face-to- face and online formats. The data analysis used both qualitative and quantitative measures. Several conclusions were reached: (a) for the course to be effective, the time that must be allotted for online teaching will remain an issue that instructors may struggle

Barbara Slater Stern

2004-01-01

238

In face-to-face communication, sensory information from the face as well as from the voice contributes to the  

E-print Network

In face-to-face communication, sensory information from the face as well as from the voice benefit, the benefit is larger to the degree that the two sources contain complementary rather than just to result in an audiovisual benefit. What has been neglected in these efforts is that information about

Massaro, Dominic

239

Hybrid structures: Faculty use and perception of web-based courseware as a supplement to face-to-face instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The researchers examined responses from 862 faculty members at 38 institutions nationwide using the blackboard Learning Management System (LMS) to supplement their face-to-face instruction. The four research questions addressed the primary uses that faculty make of blackboard, perceptions that faculty have of how certain blackboard features enhance or elevate (or might enhance or elevate) their assessment of student work and

Robert Woods; Jason D. Baker; Dave Hopper

2004-01-01

240

From Face-to-Face to e-Mentoring: Does the "e" Add Any Value for Mentors?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For many years, face-to-face peer mentoring has been a feature of learning support provided to first-year undergraduate students at one university in the UK. Building on the success of these initiatives, a scheme has been developed at this institution in which first-year undergraduates are mentored by second- and third-year students through a…

Shrestha, Celayne Heaton; May, Steve; Edirisingha, Palitha; Burke, Linda; Linsey, Tim

2009-01-01

241

Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Presentation of Course Content in an Introductory Special Education Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Instructional content was presented differently in two introductory special education course sections. In a face-to-face (f2f) section, the instructor met with students on regularly scheduled days and times and presented content in person. In the other section, content was presented using enhanced podcasts, consisting of the instructor narrating…

Thompson, James R.; Klass, Patricia H.; Fulk, Barbara M.

2012-01-01

242

Translating Knowledge through Blended Learning: A Comparative Analysis of Face-to-Face and Blended Learning Methods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is a comparative analysis of the impact of traditional face-to-face training contrasted with a blended learning approach, as it relates to improving skills, knowledge and attitudes for enhancing practices for achieving improved employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. The study included two intervention groups: one…

Golden, Thomas P.; Karpur, Arun

2012-01-01

243

Integrating Blog and Face-to-Face Instruction into an ESP Course: English for Hospitality and Tourism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the rapid growth of international trade and globalization, English language has been emphasized in Asia countries, thus professionals with a good command of English has become essential and important. This study aimed to establish a blended model combining face-to-face (F2F) instruction for English for Specific Purposes (ESP) course: English…

Shih, Ru-Chu

2012-01-01

244

The Challenges of Blending a Face-to-Face Laboratory Experience with a Televised Distance Education Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the practical challenges faced by instructors who must blend a face-to-face laboratory experience into a distance education course. This issue is discussed in the context of an ongoing kinesiology and health course that includes a mandatory physical activity laboratory experience. The challenges that have arisen around this…

LeDrew, June; Cummings-Vickaryous, Bonnie

2010-01-01

245

MODULE 2: TEACHING & ASSESSMENT Selection of face-to-face sessions, technology workshops and/or online activities: May  

E-print Network

Collaborative Projects & Assignments Pedagogy Options ­ complete in GauchoSpace · Assessment: in your own timeMODULE 2: TEACHING & ASSESSMENT Selection of face-to-face sessions, technology workshops and Associate's skills and confidence in teaching and assessing student learning in their Summer Sessions course

Akhmedov, Azer

246

The Effect of Face-to-Face Teaching on Student Knowledge and Satisfaction in an Undergraduate Neuroanatomy Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The total number of anatomy teaching hours has declined in medical courses worldwide. Conversely, face-to-face teaching in undergraduate neuroanatomy at Macquarie University increased by 50% in 2011. Our aim was to investigate whether this influenced student performance and overall satisfaction with the course. One hundred eighty-one students…

Whillier, Stephney; Lystad, Reidar P.

2013-01-01

247

Performance Gaps between Online and Face-to-Face Courses: Differences across Types of Students and Academic Subject Areas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a dataset containing nearly 500,000 courses taken by over 40,000 community and technical college students in Washington State, this study examines the performance gap between online and face-to-face courses and how the size of that gap differs across student subgroups and academic subject areas. While all types of students in the study…

Xu, Di; Jaggars, Shanna S.

2014-01-01

248

Students' Feelings of and Desire for Sense of Community in Face-to-Face and Online Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, face-to-face (FTF) and online students' (N = 198) feelings of and desire for sense of community (SOC) in their courses were compared. In support of previous research, FTF students felt more SOC than online students. However, overall, relatively few students (FTF or online) expressed desire for SOC. Additionally, regression analyses…

Drouin, Michelle; Vartanian, Lesa Rae

2010-01-01

249

Connectivity: A Framework for Understanding Effective Language Teaching in Face-to-Face and Online Learning Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is an exploratory paper that uses the construct of connectivity to examine the nature of effective language teaching and learning in both face-to-face and online learning environments. Broader in scope than Siemens' notion of connectivism, the term connectivity accommodates both transmission approaches to teaching and learning and social…

Senior, Rose

2010-01-01

250

The Influence of Learning Style Preferences on Student Success in Online vs. Face-to-Face Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared the relationship between learning style preferences and learner success of students in an online graduate level instructional design course with an equivalent face-to-face course. Comparisons included motivation maintenance, task engagement, and cognitive controls. Results revealed significant relationships between preferences…

Aragon, Steven R.; Johnson, Scott D.; Shaik, Najmuddin

251

Applying the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Student Perceptions, Behaviours and Success Online and Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compares student perceptions, learning behaviours and success in online and face-to-face versions of a Principles of Microeconomics course. It follows a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) approach by using a cycle of empirical analysis, reflection and action to improve the learning experience for students. The online course…

Horspool, Agi; Lange, Carsten

2012-01-01

252

A Comparison of a Sociocultural and Chronological Approach to Music Appreciation in Face-to-Face and Online Instructional Formats  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether differences exist with regard to music achievement, music self-concept, or student course satisfaction among students enrolled in four different sections of an undergraduate music appreciation course taught from chronological or sociocultural approaches in online or face-to-face formats.…

Eakes, Kevin

2009-01-01

253

A comparison of student performance in human development classes using three different modes of delivery: Online, face-to-face, and combined  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem. The dual purposes of this research were to determine if there is a difference in student performance in three Human Development classes when the modes of delivery are different and to analyze student perceptions of using Web-based learning as all or part of their course experience. Procedures. Data for this study were collected from three Human Development courses taught at Drake University. Grades from five essays, projects, and overall grades were used in the three classes and analyzed using a single factor analysis of variance to determine if there was a significant difference. Content analysis was used on the evaluation comments of the participants in the online and combined classes to determine their perceptions of Web-based learning. Findings. The single factor analysis of variance measuring student performance showed no significant difference among the online, face-to-face, and combined scores at the .05 level of significance, however, the difference was significant at the .06. The content analysis of the online and combined course showed the three major strengths of learning totally or partly online to be increased comfort in using the computer, the quality of the overall experience, and convenience in terms of increased access to educational opportunities. The barriers included lack of human interaction and access to the professor. Conclusions. The study indicates that Web-based learning is a viable option for postsecondary educational delivery in terms of student performance and learning. On the average, performance is at least as good as performance in traditional face-to-face classrooms. Improved performance, however, is contingent on adequate access to equipment, faculty skill in teaching using a new mode of delivery, and the personality of the student. The convenient access to educational opportunities and becoming more comfortable with technology are benefits that were important to these two groups. Web-based learning is not for everyone, but Web-assisted learning may be. It has the potential to reach a population of students who otherwise would not have access to postsecondary education. Recommendations. Technology in the twenty-first century will continue to explode and impact our lives. Universities and colleges have the potential to reach a more diverse population, but face-to-face learning will always have value. Consideration must be given to how technology and the use of Web-based learning can be used in varying degrees to meet the needs of students. Classes in the future should have some expected component of navigation and productive use of online learning. Web classes vary from totally online to mostly face-to-face, but all students in the twenty-first century should be expected to know and use this powerful educational resource.

Kalsow, Susan Christensen

1999-11-01

254

Comparing Costs of Telephone versus Face-to-Face Extended Care Programs for the Management of Obesity in Rural Settings  

PubMed Central

Background A major challenge following successful weight loss is continuing the behaviors required for long-term weight maintenance. This challenge may be exacerbated in rural areas with limited local support resources. Objective This study describes and compares program costs and cost-effectiveness for 12-month extended care lifestyle maintenance programs following an initial 6-month weight loss program. Design A 1-year prospective controlled randomized clinical trial. Participants/Setting The study included 215 female participants age 50 or older from rural areas who completed an initial 6-month lifestyle program for weight loss. The study was conducted from June 1, 2003, to May 31, 2007. Intervention The intervention was delivered through local Cooperative Extension Service offices in rural Florida. Participants were randomly-assigned to a 12-month extended care program using either individual telephone counseling (n=67), group face-to-face counseling (n=74), or a mail/control group (n=74). Main Outcome Measures Program delivery costs, weight loss, and self-reported health status were directly assessed through questionnaires and program activity logs. Costs were estimated across a range of enrollment sizes to allow inferences beyond the study sample. Statistical Analyses Performed Non-parametric and parametric tests of differences across groups for program outcomes were combined with direct program cost estimates and expected value calculations to determine which scales of operation favored alternative formats for lifestyle maintenance. Results Median weight regain during the intervention year was 1.7 kg for participants in the face-to-face format, 2.1 kg for the telephone format, and 3.1 kg for the mail/control format. For a typical group size of 13 participants, the face-to-face format had higher fixed costs, which translated into higher overall program costs ($420 per participant) when compared to individual telephone counseling ($268 per participant) and control ($226 per participant) programs. While the net weight lost after the 12-month maintenance program was higher for the face-to-face and telephone programs compared to the control group, the average cost per expected kilogram of weight lost was higher for the face-to-face program ($47/kg) compared to the other two programs (approximately $33/kg for telephone and control). Conclusions Both the scale of operations and local demand for programs are important considerations in selecting a delivery format for lifestyle maintenance. In this study, the telephone format had a lower cost, but similar outcomes compared to the face-to-face format. PMID:22818246

Radcliff, Tiffany A.; Bobroff, Linda B.; Lutes, Lesley D.; Durning, Patricia E.; Daniels, Michael J.; Limacher, Marian C.; Janicke, David M.; Martin, A. Daniel; Perri, Michael G.

2012-01-01

255

Feasibility of an online and a face-to-face version of a self-management program for young adults with a rheumatic disease: experiences of young adults and peer leaders  

PubMed Central

Background Based on the self-efficacy theory, an online and a face-to-face self-management programs ‘Challenge your Arthritis’ for young adults with a rheumatic disease have recently been developed. These two courses are led by young peer leaders. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of the online and face-to-face self-management program. Methods Feasibility was evaluated on items of perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, user-acceptance, and adherence to both programs in young adults and peer leaders. Additional analyses of interactions on the e-Health applications, discussion board and chat board, were conducted. Results Twenty-two young adults with a diagnosed rheumatic disease participated in the study: 12 young adults followed the online program and 10 followed the face-to-face program. Both programs appeared to be feasible, especially in dealing with problems in daily life, and the participants indicated the time investment as ‘worthwhile’. In using the online program, no technical problems occurred. Participants found the program easy to use, user friendly, and liked the ‘look and feel’ of the program. Conclusions Both the online and the face-to-face versions of a self-management program. ‘Challenge your arthritis’ were found to be feasible and well appreciated by young adults with a rheumatic disease. Because these programs are likely to be a practical aid to health practices, a randomized controlled study to investigate the effects on patient outcomes is planned. PMID:24666817

2014-01-01

256

Procedural Justice and Identification with Virtual Teams: The Moderating Role of Face-to-Face Meetings and Geographical Dispersion  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the previously unstudied relationship between procedural justice and identification within virtual teams,\\u000a with a particular focus on how two features of virtual teams, namely frequency of face-to-face meetings and geographical dispersion,\\u000a moderate that relationship. We argue that these two variables are sources of uncertainty, which in turn makes virtual team\\u000a members more sensitive to perceptions of procedural fairness

Marko Hakonen; Jukka Lipponen

2008-01-01

257

Co-Speech Gesture Mimicry in the Process of Collaborative Referring During Face-to-Face Dialogue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mimicry has been observed regarding a range of nonverbal behaviors, but only recently have researchers started to investigate\\u000a mimicry in co-speech gestures. These gestures are considered to be crucially different from other aspects of nonverbal behavior\\u000a due to their tight link with speech. This study provides evidence of mimicry in co-speech gestures in face-to-face dialogue,\\u000a the most common forum of

Judith Holler; Katie Wilkin

2011-01-01

258

Face-to-Face and Video-Mediated Communication: A Comparison of Dialogue Structure and Task Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examined communication and task performance in face-to-face, copresent, and video-mediated communication (VMC). Study 1 showed that when participants in a collaborative problem-solving task could both see and hear each other, the structure of their dialogues differed compared with dialogues obtained when they only heard each other. The audio-only conversations had more words, and these extra utterances often provided

Gwyneth Doherty-Sneddon; Anne Anderson; Claire OMalley; Steve Langton; Simon Garrod; Vicki Bruce

1997-01-01

259

Telemedicine and PTSD Assessment of Veterans: A Study of Equivalence Between Videoconferencing (VTC) and Face-to-Face (FTF) Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Telemedicine systems use telecommunications technology to provide health care services to clients with distance barriers to providers. This is relevant for America’s veterans who require services for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but find that these specialty services are not always available locally. This study compared a face-to-face (FTF) Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) interview and a videoconferencing (VTC) administration of the

Carole Porcari

2006-01-01

260

Asynchronous Computer-mediated Communication versus Face-to-face Collaboration: Results on Student Learning, Quality and Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there has been more than a decade of literature on computer-mediated communication in education, the research has been unclear as to whether it is an effective replacement for face-to-face (FtF) collaboration. This study sought to add to this body of research by exploring the effects of two modes of collaboration on student groups. Following a repeated-measures experimental design, each

Rosalie J. Ocker; Gayle J. Yaverbaum

1999-01-01

261

The Efficacy of Behavior Modeling: A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Asynchronous Software-Training Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

In face-to-face software-training settings, the behavior-modeling method has been shown to be more effective than either instruction-based or exploration- based methods. Yet, in online asynchronous software- training settings the behavior-modeling method may not be superior. This study provides evidence as to the relative effectiveness of these three software-training methods for the online asynchronous environment. A field experiment was conducted adapting

Charlie C. Chen; Terry Ryan; Lorne Olfman

2004-01-01

262

Faculty Teaching Time: A Comparison of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Graduate Nursing Courses  

PubMed Central

Web-based education brings a new dimension to the issue of measuring faculty workload. Current literature reflects instructor concerns related to the time required to teach web-based courses (McAlpine, Lockerbie, Ramsay & Beaman 2002; Sellani & Harrington, 2002; Smith, Ferguson & Caris, 2001). This descriptive, comparative study seeks to determine the time required to teach web-based graduate nursing courses and compare that to teaching similar courses in the face-to-face setting. Utilizing time records previously collected as part of a federally funded grant, data from 11 web-based and five face-to-face graduate level nursing courses were analyzed. Although a statistically significant difference in teaching time requirements was not demonstrated, several interesting trends did appear. Examples include differences related to preparation time and the division of teacher time while teaching web-based as opposed to face-to-face courses. Future research and continued data collection related to faculty workload and time usage will be needed as web-based courses become a growing part of graduate nursing education. PMID:18241197

Andersen, Katherine M; Avery, Melissa D

2008-01-01

263

Self-esteem, interpersonal risk, and preference for e-mail to face-to-face communication.  

PubMed

The media choices made by high and low self-esteem Internet users were studied using web-based methodology (n = 265). Participants were asked to rank four media (face-to-face, e-mail, letter, and telephone) in order of preference across four different communication scenarios designed to pose an interpersonal risk. The level of interpersonal risk posed by two of the scenarios (asking for a pay rise and asking for a date) were also experimentally manipulated by randomly allocating participants to a 25%, 50%, or 75% chance of rejection. Low self-esteem users (LSE) showed a significant preference toward e-mail communication compared to high self-esteem users (HSE). This pattern was reversed for face-to-face preferences. Similarly, a greater chance of rejection in a scenario led to e-mail being preferred to face-to-face communication. The results are discussed in light of both the strategic use of different media and the motivated Internet user. PMID:15331035

Joinson, Adam N

2004-08-01

264

The Effects of Health Education through Face To Face Teaching and Educational Movies, on Suburban Women in Childbearing Age  

PubMed Central

Background: The aim of the study was to compare the effects of ‘face-to-face education’ and ‘educational movies’ on ‘knowledge’ and ‘practice’ of women of child-bearing-age, in terms of health-care during pregnancy and during infancy in a suburban region near Tehran City, Iran. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, the sample included 873 married women. Questionnaires for knowledge and practice assessment were designed. The women were assigned to three groups: control (group I), face-to-face education (group II), and educational movie (group III). Knowledge questionnaires were completed before and immediately after intervention. Practice questionnaires were completed before and three months after intervention. Both questionnaires consisted of two types of questions: type A (concerning infant care issues) and type B (concerning prenatal health care). Results: There was a significant difference in post-test knowledge between groups I and II and between groups I and III, but not between groups II and III. In terms of post-test practice, the changes were determined for every individual question, and significantly, better results were seen in group II, especially concerning type B questions. Conclusion: Face to face education lead to better practice than educational movies. In addition, significantly better practice occurred regarding child health care issues rather than prenatal issues in both groups. Realistic and tangible issues, those easy to practice, and with little or no economical burden imposed on the family, progressed from the knowledge state to the practice state more successfully in both groups. PMID:23113010

Vameghi, R; Mohammad, K; Karimloo, M; Soleimani, F; Sajedi, F

2010-01-01

265

AIDS and behavioural risk factors in women in inner city Baltimore: a comparison of telephone and face to face surveys.  

PubMed Central

STUDY OBJECTIVE--The study aimed to investigate the influence the mode of administration of a questionnaire (telephone or face to face) on reports of sexual behaviour and attitudes of HIV risk among woman of reproductive age. DESIGN--Two cross sectional surveys--one, a modified random digit dialing telephone survey, the second, a face to face street sample--were carried out by the same interviewers using similar questionnaires in the same neighbourhoods. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS--Two socially deprived, inner city neighbourhoods of Baltimore City were assessed in early 1990 before a community health intervention was carried out in one of them. Women between 17 and 35 years were surveyed. MAIN RESULTS--Altogether 775 and 416 women in the target age group were interviewed by telephone and face to face methods: the response rates were 66.4% and 77% respectively. Telephone respondents tended to be older, had more education, were more often married, were less likely to live in subsidised housing, and were more likely to report HIV testing. The proportions of respondents who reported a previous abortion and had had a surgical sterilisation were higher among the telephone respondents (34.7% v 24.1% and 26.4% v 20.6%, respectively). With regard to sexual risk behaviour, the only statistically significant differences were found in the proportion who reported having used drugs (10.6% of the face to face v 2.4% of the telephone sample) or alcohol (30.5% v 16.3%) at last sexual intercourse. The observed method effect on these variables remained unchanged after adjusting for age, education, employment, and marital status. This effect was even stronger for a subgroup of face to face respondents who reported not having a telephone at home. The adjusted odds ratios for reporting alcohol consumption and use of drugs at the last sexual encounter in this group compared with the telephone respondents were 3.7 (2.1, 6.6) and 14.1 (5.7, 34.5) respectively. CONCLUSIONS--Despite the socioeconomic bias associated with the mode of data collection, there are only a few differences between the telephone and personal survey methods in reports of sexual behaviour. These differences are mostly concentrated in young women (under 20 years), and in a particularly socioeconomically deprived subgroup identified through telephone ownership. PMID:7964343

Nebot, M; Celentano, D D; Burwell, L; Davis, A; Davis, M; Polacsek, M; Santelli, J

1994-01-01

266

The Effects of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Discussion on Computer Engineering Majors' Performance on the Karnaugh Map  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the different effects of web-based and face-to-face discussion on computer engineering majors' performance using the Karnaugh map in digital logic design. Pretest and posttest scores for two treatment groups (web-based discussion and face-to-face discussion) and a control group were compared and subjected to covariance…

Hung, Yen-Chu

2011-01-01

267

The Role of Focus Group Venue: A Comparative Study of Face-to-Face, Telephone, and Internet Video-Based Venues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the equivalence or non-inferiority for comparisons of telephone focus group venue to face-to-face focus group venue, Internet video-based focus group venue to face-to-face focus group venue, and Internet video-based focus group venue to telephone focus group venue. Research questions examined the…

Gothberg, June E.

2012-01-01

268

A Comparison of the Effectiveness of a Game Informed Online Learning Activity and Face to Face Teaching in Increasing Knowledge about Managing Aggression in Health Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study compared the impact of face to face teaching with a short online game informed learning activity on health participants' knowledge about, and confidence in, managing aggressive situations. Both forms of teaching resulted in a significant increase in participants' knowledge and confidence. Face to face training led to…

McKenzie, Karen

2013-01-01

269

Conversational Analysis as an Analytical Tool for Face-to-Face and Online Conversations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some learning scientists are beginning to investigate social and cultural aspects of learning by examining the interactions between a learner and the environment as well as with other people in the learning environment. This article proposes conversational analysis (CA) as a tool to analyze interactions between learners and instructors in…

Tan, Seng-Chee; Tan, Aik-Ling

2006-01-01

270

'The right direction'. Primary-care docs see promise in CMS' proposed pay for non face-to-face work.  

PubMed

The CMS has proposed paying physicians for managing patients apart from face-to-face office visits. Among the details under consideration are requiring practices to use an electronic health-record system that supports access to care, care coordination, care management and communications. "It's a step in the right direction. The devil will be in the details and, if the burden of documentation is so high, people may choose not to spend their time doing it," says Dr. Matt Handley, physician and medical director for quality at the Group Health Cooperative. PMID:24044227

Robeznieks, Andis

2013-07-15

271

Social Evolution: Opinions and Behaviors in Face-to-Face Anmol Madan  

E-print Network

information flux between physical symptoms (i.e., common colds, influenza), measured beha, in realistic scenarios (Musher, NEJM, 2003), since it requires data about both symptoms and social interactions

272

Task Analysis Based Methodology for the Design of Face to Face Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper shows how Task Analysis can be a powerful tool for the design of collaborative applications supported by wirelessly\\u000a interconnected handhelds. We define a methodology for the design of such activities. It basically consists in performing a\\u000a Task Analysis on an Interaction Model to obtain the set of all possible interactions between actors. Then a class of activities\\u000a is

Maria Francisca Capponi; Miguel Nussbaum; María Ester Lagos

2006-01-01

273

TELEPHONE VERSUS FACE-TO-FACE INTERVIEWING OF NATIONAL PROBABILITY SAMPLES WITH LONG QUESTIONNAIRES COMPARISONS OF RESPONDENT SATISFICING AND SOCIAL DESIRABILITY RESPONSE BIAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last 50 years have seen a gradual replacement of face-to-face interviewing with telephone interviewing as the dominant mode of survey data collection in the United States. But some of the most expensive and large-scale nationally funded, long-term survey re- search projects involving national area-probability samples and long questionnaires retain face-to-face interviewing as their mode. In this article, we propose

ALLYSON L. HOLBROOK; MELANIE C. GREEN; JON A. KROSNICK

274

A comparison of student achievement in Eco 3401 (Quantitative Business Tools I) delivered through video streaming versus face-to- face lecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates whether there is a difference in student learning in a quantitative business course taught through video streaming with the option of going to a face-to-face lecture, compared to the same course taught only through face-to-face lecture. This topic has been the subject of research in recent years because of the importance of this new tool in the

Tarek Buhagiar; Robert Potter

275

Face to Face  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over evolutionary time, humans have developed a selective sensitivity to features in the human face that convey information\\u000a on sex, age, emotions, and intentions. This ability might not only be applied to our conspecifics nowadays, but also to other\\u000a living objects (i.e., animals) and even to artificial structures, such as cars. To investigate this possibility, we asked\\u000a people to report

Sonja Windhager; Dennis E. Slice; Katrin Schaefer; Elisabeth Oberzaucher; Truls Thorstensen; Karl Grammer

2008-01-01

276

HOW LOCALITY, FREQUENCY OF COMMUNICATION AND INTERNET USAGE AFFECT MODES OF COMMUNICATION WITHIN CORE SOCIAL NETWORKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of ways that people communicate with their social networks has changed dramatically in the last 50 years. Traditionally, the local community was the basis for people's social interactions; most of people's closest friends resided locally and face-to-face communication was the predominant mode of communication. Yet, today face-to-face meetings are no longer the primary way to communicate as one

Michael J. Stern

2008-01-01

277

Yukiko Nakano, Gabe Reinstein, Tom Stocky, Justine Cassell. (2003) "Towards a Model of Face-to-Face Grounding." Proceedings of Association for Computational Linguistics. July 7-12, Sapporo, Japan.  

E-print Network

a Model of Face-to-Face Grounding Yukiko I. Nakano/ Gabe Reinstein Tom Stocky Justine Cassell MIT Media to face-to-face conversation with an embodied conversational agent. This paper addresses these issues face-to-face conversation [580] S: Go to the fourth floor, [590] S: hang a left, [600] S: hang another

Cassell, Justine

278

Guided Internet-based vs. face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychiatric and somatic disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been tested in many research trials, but to a lesser extent directly compared to face-to-face delivered cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of trials in which guided ICBT was directly compared to face-to-face CBT. Studies on psychiatric and somatic conditions were included. Systematic searches resulted in 13 studies (total N=1053) that met all criteria and were included in the review. There were three studies on social anxiety disorder, three on panic disorder, two on depressive symptoms, two on body dissatisfaction, one on tinnitus, one on male sexual dysfunction, and one on spider phobia. Face-to-face CBT was either in the individual format (n=6) or in the group format (n=7). We also assessed quality and risk of bias. Results showed a pooled effect size (Hedges' g) at post-treatment of -0.01 (95% CI: -0.13 to 0.12), indicating that guided ICBT and face-to-face treatment produce equivalent overall effects. Study quality did not affect outcomes. While the overall results indicate equivalence, there are still few studies for each psychiatric and somatic condition and many conditions for which guided ICBT has not been compared to face-to-face treatment. Thus, more research is needed to establish equivalence of the two treatment formats. PMID:25273302

Andersson, Gerhard; Cuijpers, Pim; Carlbring, Per; Riper, Heleen; Hedman, Erik

2014-10-01

279

Close encounters in a pediatric ward: measuring face-to-face proximity and mixing patterns with wearable sensors  

E-print Network

Nosocomial infections place a substantial burden on health care systems and represent a major issue in current public health, requiring notable efforts for its prevention. Understanding the dynamics of infection transmission in a hospital setting is essential for tailoring interventions and predicting the spread among individuals. Mathematical models need to be informed with accurate data on contacts among individuals. We used wearable active Radio-Frequency Identification Devices to detect face-to-face contacts among individuals with a spatial resolution of about 1.5 meters, and a time resolution of 20 seconds. The study was conducted in a general pediatrics hospital ward, during a one-week period, and included 119 participants. Nearly 16,000 contacts were recorded during the study, with a median of approximately 20 contacts per participants per day. Overall, 25% of the contacts involved a ward assistant, 23% a nurse, 22% a patient, 22% a caregiver, and 8% a physician. The majority of contacts were of brief ...

Isella, L; Barrat, A; Cattuto, C; Colizza, V; Broeck, W Van den; Gesualdo, F; Pandolfi, E; Ravà, L; Rizzo, C; Tozzi, A E; 10.1371/journal.pone.0017144

2011-01-01

280

Assessing knowledge of human papillomavirus and collecting data on sexual behavior: computer assisted telephone versus face to face interviews  

PubMed Central

Background Education campaigns seeking to raise awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) and promoting HPV vaccination depend on accurate surveys of public awareness and knowledge of HPV and related sexual behavior. However, the most recent population-based studies have relied largely on computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI) as opposed to face to face interviews (FTFI). It is currently unknown how these survey modes differ, and in particular whether they attract similar demographics and therefore lead to similar overall findings. Methods A comprehensive survey of HPV awareness and knowledge, including sexual behavior, was conducted among 3,045 Singaporean men and women, half of whom participated via CATI, the other half via FTFI. Results Overall levels of awareness and knowledge of HPV differed between CATI and FTFI, attributable in part to demographic variations between these survey modes. Although disclosure of sexual behavior was greater when using CATI, few differences between survey modes were found in the actual information disclosed. Conclusion Although CATI is a cheaper, faster alternative to FTFI and people appear more willing to provide information about sexual behavior when surveyed using CATI, thorough assessments of HPV awareness and knowledge depend on multiple survey modes. PMID:19930668

2009-01-01

281

A Randomized Controlled Trial of COMPASS Web-Based and Face-to-Face Teacher Coaching in Autism  

PubMed Central

Objective Most children with autism rely on schools as their primary source of intervention, yet research has suggested that teachers rarely use evidence-based practices. To address the need for improved educational outcomes, a previously tested consultation intervention called the Collaborative Model for Promoting Competence and Success (COMPASS; Ruble, Dalrymple, & McGrew, 2010; Ruble, Dalrymple, & McGrew, 2012) was evaluated in a 2nd randomized controlled trial, with the addition of a web-based group. Method Forty-nine teacher–child dyads were randomized into 1 of 3 groups: (1) a placebo control (PBO) group, (2) COMPASS followed by face-to-face (FF) coaching sessions, and (3) COMPASS followed by web-based (WEB) coaching sessions. Three individualized goals (social, communication, and independence skills) were selected for intervention for each child. The primary outcome of independent ratings of child goal attainment and several process measures (e.g., consultant and teacher fidelity) were evaluated. Results Using an intent-to-treat approach, findings replicated earlier results with a very large effect size (d = 1.41) for the FF group and a large effect size (d = 1.12) for the WEB group relative to the PBO group. There were no differences in overall change across goal domains between the FF and WEB groups, suggesting the efficacy of videoconferencing technology. Conclusions COMPASS is effective and results in improved educational outcomes for young children with autism. Videoconferencing technology, as a scalable tool, has promise for facilitating access to autism specialists and bridging the research-to-practice gap. PMID:23438314

Ruble, Lisa A.; McGrew, John H.; Toland, Michael D.; Dalrymple, Nancy J.; Jung, Lee Ann

2013-01-01

282

Friending, IMing, and Hanging out Face-to-Face: Overlap in Adolescents' Online and Offline Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many new and important developmental issues are encountered during adolescence, which is also a time when Internet use becomes increasingly popular. Studies have shown that adolescents are using these online spaces to address developmental issues, especially needs for intimacy and connection to others. Online communication with its potential for…

Reich, Stephanie M.; Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2012-01-01

283

Team Trust in Online Education: Assessing and Comparing Team-Member Trust in Online Teams versus Face-to-Face Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trust is a key factor in enabling effective team performance and, in online teams, needs to be built quickly and early. As universities expand their online offerings students are increasingly working in online teams. Understanding how trust development may differ in online teams versus face-to-face can have implications for online education…

Beranek, Peggy M.; French, Monique L.

2011-01-01

284

The Effects of Choice on Student Persistence, Academic Satisfaction, and Performance in Both Online and Face-to-Face Adult Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The researcher examined the effects of online (OL) and face-to-face (FTF) course modality choice, as a motivational component, on students. self-selection of courses. A naturally occurring control and treatment group comparison design was employed. The participants were 435 college students (200 OL and 235 FTF) who attended an accredited private…

DeCosta, James William

2010-01-01

285

Developmental Changes in the Relationship Between the Infant's Attention and Emotion During Early Face-to-Face Communication: The 2-Month Transition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Weekly observations documented developmental changes in mother-infant face-to-face communication between birth and 3 months. Developmental trajectories for each dyad of the duration of infant facial expressions showed a change from the dominance of Simple Attention (without other emotion expressions) to active and emotionally positive forms of…

Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

2005-01-01

286

Impact on Clinical Behavior of Face-to-Face Continuing Medical Education Blended with Online Spaced Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Spaced education (SE) is a novel, evidence-based form of online learning. We investigated whether an SE program following a face-to-face continuing medical education (CME) course could enhance the course's impact on providers' clinical behaviors. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted from March 2009 to April 2010,…

Shaw, Timothy; Long, Andrea; Chopra, Sanjiv; Kerfoot, B. Price

2011-01-01

287

Integrating Cloud-Based Strategies and Tools in Face-to-Face Training Sessions to Increase the Impact of Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is based on the premise that face-to-face training can be augmented with cloud-based technology tools, to potentially extend viable training supports as higher education staff and faculty implement new content/skills in their jobs and classrooms. There are significant benefits to harnessing cloud-based tools that can facilitate both…

Gradel, Kathleen; Edson, Alden J.

2012-01-01

288

Exercise Motivation of College Students in Online, Face-to-Face, and Blended Basic Studies Physical Activity and Wellness Course Delivery Formats  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess exercise motivation among college students self-selected into 4 online (OL) and face-to-face (F2F) basic studies' physical activity and wellness course delivery formats. Participants/Methods: Out of 1,037 enrolled students during the Spring 2009 semester, 602 responded online to demographic…

Sidman, Cara Lynn; Fiala, Kelly Ann; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

2011-01-01

289

Face-to-Face versus Computer-Mediated Discussion of Teaching Cases: Impacts on Preservice Teachers' Engagement, Critical Analyses, and Self-Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two frequently-used discussion protocols were investigated as part of a program to implement teaching cases in undergraduate educational psychology classes designed for preservice teachers. One protocol involved synchronous face-to-face (FTF) discussion of teaching cases, which occurred in class after students had individually completed written…

PytlikZillig, Lisa M.; Horn, Christy A.; Bruning, Roger; Bell, Stephanie; Liu, Xiongyi; Siwatu, Kamau O.; Bodvarsson, Mary C.; Kim, Doyoung; Carlson, Deborah

2011-01-01

290

Effectiveness of Online Instruction: Differences in Measured Student Outcomes Online versus Face-to-Face Instruction at the High School Level  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been an exponential growth in online courses offered at the high school level but little evidence as to whether they are as effective as face-to-face courses. It has become critical to understand and evaluate the effectiveness of online education in order to reap the benefits and reduce the drawbacks of contrasting learning modes. The…

Langenhorst, Don G.

2012-01-01

291

Evaluating College Students' Evaluations of a Professor's Teaching Effectiveness across Time and Instruction Mode (Online vs. Face-to-Face) Using a Multilevel Growth Modeling Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aims: Do college students' ratings of a professor's teaching effectiveness suggest that a professor's teaching improves with time? Does anything predict which instructors receive the highest ratings or improve the fastest? And, importantly, do the correlates of change differ across face-to-face and online courses? Methods: I used data from 10,392…

Carle, Adam C.

2009-01-01

292

Attitudes toward Face-to-Face and Online Counseling: Roles of Self-Concealment, Openness to Experience, Loss of Face, Stigma, and Disclosure Expectations among Korean College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined attitudes toward face-to-face (f2f) and online counseling among 228 Korean college students. In addition, it tested a hypothesized model proposing that general propensities (i.e., self-concealment, openness to experience, and loss of face) would influence counseling-specific expectations (i.e., self-stigma and disclosure…

Bathje, Geoff J.; Kim, Eunha; Rau, Ellen; Bassiouny, Muhammad Adam; Kim, Taehoon

2014-01-01

293

Does the Computer Make a Difference? Computerized versus Face-to-Face versus Self-Report Assessment of Alcohol, Drug and Tobacco Use.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared histories of alcohol, drug, and tobacco use obtained by computerized interview, face-to-face interview, and self-report in clients (N=150) from an addiction treatment center. Multivariate analyses revealed no important differences. The computerized interview was rated less friendly but faster and more interesting. (Author/JAC)

Skinner, Harvey A.; Allen, Barbara A.

1983-01-01

294

Learner Outcomes and Satisfaction: A Comparison of Live Video-Streamed Instruction, Satellite Broadcast Instruction, and Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the final grade and satisfaction level differences among students taking specific courses using three different methods: face-to-face in class, via satellite broadcasting at remote sites, and via live video-streaming at home or at work. In each case, the same course was taught by the same instructor in all three delivery…

Abdous, M'hammed; Yoshimura, Miki

2010-01-01

295

The Influence of Setting on Findings Produced in Qualitative Health Research: A Comparison between Face-to-Face and Online Discussion Groups about HIV\\/AIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors focus their analysis in this article on online focus groups (FGs), in an attempt to describe how the setting shapes the conversational features of the discussion and influences data construction. Starting from a review of current dominant viewpoints, they compare face-to-face discussion groups with different formats of online FGs about AIDS, from a discourse analysis perspective. They conducted

Guendalina Graffigna; A. C. Bosio

296

Why Do Rape Survivors Volunteer for Face-to-Face Interviews? A Meta-Study of Victims' Reasons for and Concerns about Research Participation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is growing interest in understanding how different research methods are perceived by victims of violence and what survivors will reveal to researchers (termed "meta-research" or "meta-studies"). The purpose of this project was to conduct a qualitative meta-study on why rape survivors chose to participate in community-based, face-to-face…

Campbell, Rebecca; Adams, Adrienne E.

2009-01-01

297

Re-Searching Secondary Teacher Trainees in Distance Education and Face-to-Face Mode: Study of Their Background Variables, Personal Characteristics and Academic Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present investigation was conducted to describe and compare the background variables, personal characteristics and academic performance of secondary teacher trainees in distance education and face-to-face mode. The results indicated that teacher trainees in distance education differed from their counterparts in age, marital status, sex and…

Garg, Mamta; Gakhar, Sudesh

2011-01-01

298

A Course Is a Course Is a Course: Factor Invariance in Student Evaluation of Online, Blended and Face-to-Face Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors compared the underlying student response patterns to an end-of-course rating instrument for large student samples in online, blended and face-to-face courses. For each modality, the solution produced a single factor that accounted for approximately 70% of the variance. The correlations among the factors across the class formats showed…

Dziuban, Charles; Moskal, Patsy

2011-01-01

299

Manual Actions of Nine- to Fifteen-Week-Old Human Infants during Face-to-Face Interaction with their Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents evidence that the manual actions of infants as young as nine weeks of age may occur in relation to their facial expression, gaze direction, and vocalization. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for the ontogeny of nonverbal communicative gestures. (Author/RH)

Fogel, Alan; Hannan, Thomas E.

1985-01-01

300

The MonAMI Reminder: a spoken dialogue system for face-to-face interaction Jonas Beskow1  

E-print Network

and disabled people who are going to use them. The project involves 4 FU centres (Feasibility and Usability and disabled people in organising and initiating their daily activities. Based on deep interviews with age, and persons with permanent disabilities of all ages. They often find ICT services

Beskow, Jonas

301

Mixing Face-to-Face and Online Interactions in a Leadership Development Programme: A Blended Action Learning Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research was to explore the use of ICT to support leadership learning within an education context. Leadership development opportunities that encourage reflection, the development of self-awareness, the sharing of practice, and that support the transfer of learning back to the workplace are challenging to fit into the life of…

Thornton, Kate; Yoong, Pak

2011-01-01

302

Face-to-Face and Synchronous Interactive Videoconferencing Instruction: Learning Experiences of Educators Enrolled in an Autism Certificate Program  

E-print Network

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was once considered a rare and severe disability (low incidence), but today individuals with ASD are educated in every academic environment, with 89% spending a portion of their day in the general education setting...

Swanson, Terri Cooper

2013-05-31

303

The Role of Instructor Interactivity in Promoting Critical Thinking in Online and Face-to-Face Classrooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current rise in online learning programs mandates that postsecondary faculty examine means of transferring successful, established critical thinking instructional strategies from the traditional classroom into the online environment. Theoretical arguments support, and even favor, the use of asynchronous learning technologies to promote students' critical thinking skills. The purpose of the current study is to examine students' application of critical

B. Jean Mandernach; Krista D. Forrest; Jamie L. Babutzke; Lanay R. Manker

2009-01-01

304

Effect of Telephone-Administered vs Face-to-face Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Adherence to Therapy and Depression Outcomes Among Primary Care Patients  

PubMed Central

Context Primary care is the most common site for the treatment of depression. Most depressed patients prefer psychotherapy over antidepressant medications, but access barriers are believed to prevent engagement in and completion of treatment. The telephone has been investigated as a treatment delivery medium to overcome access barriers, but little is known about its efficacy compared with face-to-face treatment delivery. Objective To examine whether telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (T-CBT) reduces attrition and is not inferior to face-to-face CBT in treating depression among primary care patients. Design, Setting, and Participants A randomized controlled trial of 325 Chicago-area primary care patients with major depressive disorder, recruited from November 2007 to December 2010. Interventions Eighteen sessions of T-CBT or face-to-face CBT. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was attrition (completion vs non-completion) at posttreatment (week 18). Secondary outcomes included masked interviewer-rated depression with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D) and self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Results Significantly fewer participants discontinued T-CBT (n=34; 20.9%) compared with face-to-face CBT (n=53; 32.7%; P=.02). Patients showed significant improvement in depression across both treatments (P<.001). There were no significant treatment differences at posttreatment between T-CBT and face-to-face CBT on the Ham-D (P=.22) or the PHQ-9 (P=.89). The intention-to-treat posttreatment effect size on the Ham-D was d=0.14 (90% CI,-0.05 to 0.33), and for the PHQ-9 it was d=?0.02 (90% CI,-0.20 to 0.17). Both results were within the inferiority margin of d=0.41, indicating that T-CBT was not inferior to face-to-face CBT. Although participants remained significantly less depressed at 6-month follow-up relative to baseline (P<.001), participants receiving face-to-face CBT weresignificantly less depressed than those receiving T-CBT on the Ham-D (difference,2.91; 95% CI, 1.20-4.63;P<.001) and the PHQ-9 (difference, 2.12; 95% CI, 0.68-3.56; P=.004). Conclusions Among primary care patients with depression, providing CBT over the telephone compared with face-to-face resulted in lower attrition and close to equivalent improvement in depression at posttreatment. At 6-month follow-up, patients remained less depressed relative to baseline; however, those receiving face-to-face CBT were less depressed than those receiving T-CBT. These results indicate that T-CBT improves adherence compared with face-to-face delivery, but at the cost of some increased risk of poorer maintenance of gains after treatment cessation. PMID:22706833

Mohr, David C.; Ho, Joyce; Duffecy, Jenna; Reifler, Douglas; Sokol, Lesile; Burns, Nichelle Nicole; Jin, Ling; Siddique, Juned

2013-01-01

305

Comparative Effectiveness of Cognitive Therapies Delivered Face-to-Face or over the Telephone: An Observational Study Using Propensity Methods  

PubMed Central

Objectives To compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of face-to-face (FTF) with over-the-telephone (OTT) delivery of low intensity cognitive behavioural therapy. Design Observational study following SROBE guidelines. Selection effects were controlled using propensity scores. Non-inferiority comparisons assessed effectiveness. Setting IAPT (improving access to psychological therapies) services in the East of England. Participants 39,227 adults referred to IAPT services. Propensity score strata included 4,106 individuals; 147 pairs participated in 1?1 matching. Intervention Two or more sessions of computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Main outcome measures Patient-reported outcomes: Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depression; Generalised Anxiety Disorder questionnaire (GAD-7); Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). Differences between groups were summarised as standardised effect sizes (ES), adjusted mean differences and minimally important difference for PHQ-9. Cost per session for OTT was compared with FTF. Results Analysis of covariance controlling for number of assessments, provider site, and baseline PHQ-9, GAD-7 and WSAS indicated statistically significantly greater reductions in scores for OTT treatment with moderate (PHQ-9: ES: 0.14; GAD-7: ES: 0.10) or small (WSAS: ES: 0.03) effect sizes. Non-inferiority in favour of OTT treatment for symptom severity persisted as small to moderate effects for all but individuals with the highest symptom severity. In the most stringent comparison, the one-to-one propensity matching, adjusted mean differences in treatment outcomes indicated non-inferiority between OTT versus FTF treatments for PHQ-9 and GAD-7, whereas the evidence was moderate for WSAS. The per-session cost for OTT was 36.2% lower than FTF. Conclusions The clinical effectiveness of low intensity CBT-based interventions delivered OTT was not inferior to those delivered FTF except for people with more severe illness where FTF was superior. This provides evidence for better targeting of therapy, efficiencies for patients, cost savings for services and greater access to psychological therapies for people with common mental disorders. PMID:23028436

Hammond, Geoffrey C.; Croudace, Tim J.; Radhakrishnan, Muralikrishnan; Lafortune, Louise; Watson, Alison; McMillan-Shields, Fiona; Jones, Peter B.

2012-01-01

306

Designing a Self-Contained Group Area Network for Ubiquitous Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of studies have evidenced that handheld devices are appropriate tools to facilitate face-to-face collaborative learning effectively because of the possibility of ample social interactions. Group Area Network, or GroupNet, proposed in this paper, uses handheld devices to fill the gap between Local Area Network and Body Area Network

Chen, Nian-Shing; Kinshuk; Wei, Chun-Wang; Yang, Stephen J. H.

2008-01-01

307

Breakeven, Cost Benefit, Cost Effectiveness, and Willingness to Pay for Web-Based Versus Face-to-Face Education Delivery for Health Professionals  

PubMed Central

Background The introduction of Web-based education and open universities has seen an increase in access to professional development within the health professional education marketplace. Economic efficiencies of Web-based education and traditional face-to-face educational approaches have not been compared under randomized controlled trial conditions. Objective To compare costs and effects of Web-based and face-to-face short courses in falls prevention education for health professionals. Methods We designed two short courses to improve the clinical performance of health professionals in exercise prescription for falls prevention. One was developed for delivery in face-to-face mode and the other for online learning. Data were collected on learning outcomes including participation, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, and change in practice, and combined with costs, savings, and benefits, to enable a break-even analysis from the perspective of the provider, cost-effectiveness analysis from the perspective of the health service, and cost-benefit analysis from the perspective of the participant. Results Face-to-face and Web-based delivery modalities produced comparable outcomes for participation, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, and change in practice. Break-even analysis identified the Web-based educational approach to be robustly superior to face-to-face education, requiring a lower number of enrollments for the program to reach its break-even point. Cost-effectiveness analyses from the perspective of the health service and cost-benefit analysis from the perspective of the participant favored face-to-face education, although the outcomes were contingent on the sensitivity analysis applied (eg, the fee structure used). Conclusions The Web-based educational approach was clearly more efficient from the perspective of the education provider. In the presence of relatively equivocal results for comparisons from other stakeholder perspectives, it is likely that providers would prefer to deliver education via a Web-based medium. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN): 12610000135011; http://www.anzctr.org.au/trial_view.aspx?id=335135 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/668POww4L) PMID:22469659

Haas, Romi; Keating, Jenny L; Molloy, Elizabeth; Jolly, Brian; Sims, Jane; Morgan, Prue; Haines, Terry

2012-01-01

308

A Social Network Analysis Comparison of an Experienced and a Novice Instructor in Online Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The most productive learning experience for students whether online or in face-to-face classes can often be the interaction among students and with an instructor. Online teaching and Social Network Analysis (SNA) offer the opportunity to examine intellectual social networking and strategies that promotes student interaction which can enhance…

Fidalgo, Patricia; Thormann, Joan

2012-01-01

309

Open Sound Control: an enabling technology for musical networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since telecommunication can never equal the richness of face-to-face interaction on its own terms, the most interesting examples of networked music go beyond the paradigm of musicians playing together in a virtual room. The Open Sound Control protocol has facilitated dozens of such innovative networked music projects. First the protocol itself is described, followed by some theoretical limits on communication

MATTHEW WRIGHT

2005-01-01

310

Comparison of face-to-face versus email guided self-help for binge eating: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Guided self-help is a recommended first-step treatment for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and atypical variants of these disorders. Further research is needed to compare guided self-help that is delivered face-to-face versus via email. Methods/Design This clinical trial uses a randomised, controlled design to investigate the effectiveness of providing guided self-help either face-to-face or via e-mail, also using a delayed treatment control condition. At least 17 individuals are required per group, giving a minimum N of 51. Discussion Symptom outcomes will be assessed and estimates of cost-effectiveness made. Results are proposed to be disseminated locally and internationally (through submission to conferences and peer-reviewed journals), and will hopefully inform local service provision. The trial has been approved by an ethics review board and was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01832792 on 9 April 2013. PMID:24886555

2014-01-01

311

Can Blending Face-To-Face Teaching With E-Learning Support the Development of Phase 4 Apprentices in Mathematics: a Formative Evaluation Research Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis is a formative evaluation research study_ Its purpose is to establish if\\u000ablending face--to-face and e-leaming delivery methods can support the development of\\u000aPhase 4 apprentice plumbers in mathematics in the Department of Construction Skills in\\u000athe Dublin Institute of Technology. The study also included the design, development\\u000aand evaluation of a mathematics web site called Plumatics 4

Peter Hinch

2006-01-01

312

Attitudes of students towards the use of a Learning Management System (LMS) in a face-to-face learning mode of instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development and use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in education has led to most universities incorporating elements of online learning into their traditional classrooms via the use of a Learning Management System (LMS) (Burrell-Ihlow 2009, Angeli 2005, Salisbury and Ellis 2003). However, it is not known how well students who are used to traditional face-to-face learning environments and

Desmond Wesley Govender

2010-01-01

313

Choosing Wisely: A Comparison of Online, Televised, and Face-to-Face Instructional Methods on Knowledge Acquisition of Broadcast Audience Concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Selecting an appropriate course content delivery method is a challenge educators face. Are online, televised, and face-to-face forms of instruction equally effective? Is any method superior in fostering knowledge acquisition? An experiment using students from three sections of a mass communication survey course utilized these instructional methods to teach students about radio audience measurement. Evaluations of the pre- and post-test

Karie Hollerbach; Bruce Mims

2007-01-01

314

Exercise Motivation of College Students in Online, Face-to-Face, and Blended Basic Studies Physical Activity and Wellness Course Delivery Formats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess exercise motivation among college students self-selected into 4 online (OL) and face-to-face (F2F) basic studies’ physical activity and wellness course delivery formats. Participants\\/Methods: Out of 1,037 enrolled students during the Spring 2009 semester, 602 responded online to demographic questions and to the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire, which assessed exercise motivation

Cara Lynn Sidman; Kelly Ann Fiala; Michelle Lee D’Abundo

2011-01-01

315

Comparison of computer-based instruction with face-to-face lecture during an in-service training program for Cooperative Extension Service educators  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service (CES) could effectively use computer-based instruction (CBI) to deliver in-service training. The guiding research questions of this study were: (1) Does achievement increase through the use of CBI compared with face-to-face lecture instruction? (2) Does CBI decrease the time required for Agriculture and Natural Resources

David LaDon Swann

1999-01-01

316

Comparison of the accuracy of patients' recall of the content of telephone and face-to-face consultations: an exploratory study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTo comply with an action plan patients need to recall information accurately. Little is known about how well patients recall consultations, particularly telephone consultations increasingly used to triage acute problems.Purpose of studyThis was an exploratory study to measure how accurately patients recall the content of face-to-face and telephone consultations and what factors may be associated with accurate recall.Study designIn Scotland

Brian McKinstry; Philip Watson; Robert A Elton; Hilary Pinnock; Gillian Kidd; Barbara Meyer; Robert Logie; Aziz Sheikh

2011-01-01

317

Media Use, Face-to-Face Communication, Media Multitasking, and Social Well-Being Among 8- to 12YearOld Girls  

Microsoft Academic Search

An online survey of 3,461 North American girls ages 8–12 conducted in the summer of 2010 through Discovery Girls magazine examined the relationships between social well-being and young girls' media use—including video, video games, music listening, reading\\/homework, e-mailing\\/posting on social media sites, texting\\/instant messaging, and talking on phones\\/video chatting—and face-to-face communication. This study introduced both a more granular measure of

Roy Pea; Clifford Nass; Lyn Meheula; Marcus Rance; Aman Kumar; Holden Bamford; Matthew Nass; Aneesh Simha; Benjamin Stillerman; Steven Yang; Michael Zhou

2012-01-01

318

Education Innovation: Case Studies in e-Learning and Face-to-Face Teaching in Higher Education: What is the Best?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Education innovation is here to stay. This chapter gives the results of a study of the application of information and communication technology to advanced teaching and learning activities. It is strategically important that the technology opens up new ways of teaching and learning. The purpose of this chapter is firstly to identify the typical advanced teaching and learning activities/functions that can be applied in e-Learning and face-to-face teaching and learning. Case studies were selected from a group of teachers who have already been involved in both teaching modes for some years and thus have experience in blended teaching and learning. A number of teaching activities/functions were seen as positive in their application in the e-Learning situation. Those that stand out are peer review and collaboration, promotion of reflection and stimulation of critical and creative thinking, team teaching, promotion of discovery/extension of knowledge, and problematization of the curriculum. In face-to-face teaching and learning, inviting engagement, how to come to know, involving metaphors and analogies, teaching that connects to learning, inspire change, promote understanding, and others stand out. As seen by the teachers in the case studies, both e-Learning and face-to-face teaching and learning are seen as complementary to each other. We define this view as blended teaching and learning.

Boon, J. A.

319

Model reproduces individual, group and collective dynamics of human contact networks  

E-print Network

Empirical data on the dynamics of human face-to-face interactions across a variety of social venues have recently revealed a number of context-independent structural and temporal properties of human contact networks. This universality suggests that some basic mechanisms may be responsible for the unfolding of human interactions in the physical space. Here we discuss a simple model that reproduces the empirical distributions for the individual, group and collective dynamics of face-to-face contact networks. The model describes agents that move randomly in a two-dimensional space and tend to stop when meeting "attractive" peers, and reproduces accurately the empirical distributions.

Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

2014-01-01

320

Establishing New Friendships-from Face-to-Face to Facebook: A Case Study of College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facebook, the largest social networking site in terms of registered users, has attracted the attention of many researchers. However, most studies on Facebook focus on the relationships between personalities and user behaviors, and few studies have examined how Facebook influences the establishment of friendship in real life. Therefore, this study undertakes a case study of 36 college students, and applies

Bau-Min Tu; Hsiao-Chi Wu; Chingcha Hsieh; Pin-Hung Chen

2011-01-01

321

Development and Initial Evaluation of an Internet-Based Support System for Face-to-Face Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Proof of Concept Study  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence-based psychological treatments, such as cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), have been found to be effective in treating several anxiety and mood disorders. Nevertheless, issues regarding adherence are common, such as poor patient compliance on homework assignments and therapists’ drifting from strictly evidence-based CBT. The development of Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) has been intensive in the past decade and results show that guided ICBT can be as effective as face-to-face CBT but also indicate a need to integrate the two forms of CBT delivery. Objective In this study, we developed and tested a new treatment format in which ICBT and face-to-face therapy were blended. We designed a support system accessible via the Internet (using a computer or an Apple iPad) for patients and therapists delivering CBT face-to-face. The support system included basic CBT components and a library of interventions gathered from existing ICBT manuals. Methods The study involved 15 patients with mild to moderate anxiety or depression (or both). Eight therapists conducted the treatments. All participants were interviewed after the nine-week intervention. Further, patients provided self-reports on clinical measures pre- and post-trial, as well as at a 12-month follow-up. Results A reduction was found in symptom scores across all measures. The reliable change index ranged from 60% to 87% for depression and anxiety. Large effect sizes (Cohen’s d) ranging from 1.62 (CI 95% 0.59-2.66) to 2.43 (CI 95% 1.12-3.74) were found. There were no missing data and no treatment dropouts. In addition, the results had been maintained at the 12-month follow-up. Qualitative interviews revealed that the users perceived the support system as beneficial. Conclusions The results suggest that modern information technology can effectively blend with face-to-face treatments and be used to facilitate communication and structure in therapy, thus reducing therapist drift. PMID:24326065

2013-01-01

322

Cognitive-behavioral therapy in depressed primary care patients with co-occurring problematic alcohol use: effect of telephone-administered vs. face-to-face treatment-a secondary analysis.  

PubMed

This secondary analysis of a larger study compared adherence to telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy (T-CBT) vs. face-to-face CBT and depression outcomes in depressed primary care patients with co-occurring problematic alcohol use. To our knowledge, T-CBT has never been directly compared to face-to-face CBT in such a sample of primary care patients. Participants were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to face-to-face CBT or T-CBT for depression. Participants receiving T-CBT (n = 50) and face-to-face CBT (n = 53) were compared at baseline, end of treatment (week 18), and three-month and six-month follow-ups. Face-to-face CBT and T-CBT groups did not significantly differ in age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, educational level, severity of depression, antidepressant use, and total score on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Face-to-face CBT and T-CBT groups were similar on all treatment adherence outcomes and depression outcomes at all time points. T-CBT and face-to-face CBT had similar treatment adherence and efficacy for the treatment of depression in depressed primary care patients with co-occurring problematic alcohol use. When targeting patients who might have difficulties in accessing care, primary care clinicians may consider both types of CBT delivery when treating depression in patients with co-occurring problematic alcohol use. PMID:25052784

Kalapatapu, Raj K; Ho, Joyce; Cai, Xuan; Vinogradov, Sophia; Batki, Steven L; Mohr, David C

2014-01-01

323

Electronic [Re]Constitution of Groups: Group Dynamics from Face-to-Face to an Online Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors work as online tutors for a BSc (Hons) physiotherapy programme at Coventry University in the United Kingdom. This paper represents a stage in our developing understanding, over a 3 year period, of the impact of group dynamics on online interaction among physiotherapy students engaged in sharing with their peers their first experiences…

Clouder, Lynn; Dalley, Jayne; Hargreaves, Julian; Parkes, Sally; Sellars, Julie; Toms, Jane

2006-01-01

324

Augmenting Real-world Social Networking with Vibrotactile Display  

E-print Network

8EU UK dcox@leanmeanfightingmachine .co.uk Matthew Purver Interaction, Media and Communication] ­ to our knowledge, none of this research focuses on augmenting face-to-face communication in social eventsAugmenting Real-world Social Networking with Vibrotactile Display Abstract This paper discusses

Purver, Matthew

325

Electronic [re]constitution of groups: Group dynamics from face-to-face to an online setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors work as online tutors for a BSc (Hons) physiotherapy programme at Coventry University in the United Kingdom. This\\u000a paper represents a stage in our developing understanding, over a 3 year period, of the impact of group dynamics on online\\u000a interaction among physiotherapy students engaged in sharing with their peers their first experiences of clinical practice.\\u000a The literature exploring online

Lynn Clouder; Jayne Dalley; Julian Hargreaves; Sally Parkes; Julie Sellars; Jane Toms

2006-01-01

326

Cobalamin-Independent Methionine Synthase (MetE): A Face-to-Face Double Barrel That Evolved by Gene Duplication  

PubMed Central

Cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to L-homocysteine (Hcy) without using an intermediate methyl carrier. Although MetE displays no detectable sequence homology with cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH), both enzymes require zinc for activation and binding of Hcy. Crystallographic analyses of MetE from T. maritima reveal an unusual dual-barrel structure in which the active site lies between the tops of the two (??)8 barrels. The fold of the N-terminal barrel confirms that it has evolved from the C-terminal polypeptide by gene duplication; comparisons of the barrels provide an intriguing example of homologous domain evolution in which binding sites are obliterated. The C-terminal barrel incorporates the zinc ion that binds and activates Hcy. The zinc-binding site in MetE is distinguished from the (Cys)3Zn site in the related enzymes, MetH and betaine–homocysteine methyltransferase, by its position in the barrel and by the metal ligands, which are histidine, cysteine, glutamate, and cysteine in the resting form of MetE. Hcy associates at the face of the metal opposite glutamate, which moves away from the zinc in the binary E·Hcy complex. The folate substrate is not intimately associated with the N-terminal barrel; instead, elements from both barrels contribute binding determinants in a binary complex in which the folate substrate is incorrectly oriented for methyl transfer. Atypical locations of the Hcy and folate sites in the C-terminal barrel presumably permit direct interaction of the substrates in a ternary complex. Structures of the binary substrate complexes imply that rearrangement of folate, perhaps accompanied by domain rearrangement, must occur before formation of a ternary complex that is competent for methyl transfer. PMID:15630480

2005-01-01

327

Supporting More Inclusive Learning with Social Networking: A Case Study of Blended Socialised Design Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a qualitative case study of socialised blended learning, using a social network platform to investigate the level of literacies and interactions of students in a blended learning environment of traditional face-to-face design studio and online participatory teaching. Using student and staff feedback, the paper examines the use…

Rodrigo, Russell; Nguyen, Tam

2013-01-01

328

Predicting complete loss to follow-up after a health-education program: number of absences and face-to-face contact with a researcher  

PubMed Central

Background Research on health-education programs requires longitudinal data. Loss to follow-up can lead to imprecision and bias, and complete loss to follow-up is particularly damaging. If that loss is predictable, then efforts to prevent it can be focused on those program participants who are at the highest risk. We identified predictors of complete loss to follow-up in a longitudinal cohort study. Methods Data were collected over 1 year in a study of adults with chronic illnesses who were in a program to learn self-management skills. Following baseline measurements, the program had one group-discussion session each week for six weeks. Follow-up questionnaires were sent 3, 6, and 12 months after the baseline measurement. A person was classified as completely lost to follow-up if none of those three follow-up questionnaires had been returned by two months after the last one was sent. We tested two hypotheses: that complete loss to follow-up was directly associated with the number of absences from the program sessions, and that it was less common among people who had had face-to-face contact with one of the researchers. We also tested predictors of data loss identified previously and examined associations with specific diagnoses. Using the unpaired t-test, the U test, Fisher's exact test, and logistic regression, we identified good predictors of complete loss to follow-up. Results The prevalence of complete loss to follow-up was 12.2% (50/409). Complete loss to follow-up was directly related to the number of absences (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval: 1.78; 1.49-2.12), and it was inversely related to age (0.97; 0.95-0.99). Complete loss to follow-up was less common among people who had met one of the researchers (0.51; 0.28-0.95) and among those with connective tissue disease (0.29; 0.09-0.98). For the multivariate logistic model the area under the ROC curve was 0.77. Conclusions Complete loss to follow-up after this health-education program can be predicted to some extent from data that are easy to collect (age, number of absences, and diagnosis). Also, face-to-face contact with a researcher deserves further study as a way of increasing participation in follow-up, and health-education programs should include it. PMID:22032732

2011-01-01

329

A flexible copper(I)-complexed [4]rotaxane containing two face-to-face porphyrinic plates that behaves as a distensible receptor.  

PubMed

A new cyclic [4]rotaxane composed of two flexible bis-macrocycles and two rigid axles is described. Each bis-macrocycle consists of two rings attached to antipodal meso positions of a central Zn porphyrin through single C-C bonds. Each ring incorporates a 2,9-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline chelation site. The axles contain two coplanar bidentate sites derived from the 2,2'-bipyridine motif. The building blocks were assembled by using a one-pot threading-and-stoppering reaction, which afforded the [4]rotaxane in 50% yield. The "gathering-and-threading" effect of copper(I) was utilised in the formation of a [4]pseudorotaxane, which was immediately converted to the corresponding [4]rotaxane by a quadruple CuAAC stoppering reaction. The rotaxane contains two face-to-face zinc porphyrins, which allowed the coordination of ditopic guest substrates. The rotaxane host showed remarkable flexibility and was able to adjust its conformation to the guest size. It can be distended and accommodate rod-like guests of 2.6 to 15.8 Å in length. PMID:22674865

Roche, Cécile; Sour, Angélique; Sauvage, Jean-Pierre

2012-07-01

330

Models, Entropy and Information of Temporal Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temporal social networks are characterized by heterogeneous duration of contacts, which can either follow a power-law distribution, such as in face-to-face interactions, or a Weibull distribution, such as in mobile-phone communication. Here we model the dynamics of face-to-face interaction and mobile phone communication by a reinforcement dynamics, which explains the data observed in these different types of social interactions. We quantify the information encoded in the dynamics of these networks by the entropy of temporal networks. Finally, we show evidence that human dynamics is able to modulate the information present in social network dynamics when it follows circadian rhythms and when it is interfacing with a new technology such as the mobile-phone communication technology.

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Márton; Bianconi, Ginestra

331

The Interaction between Information and Intonation Structure: Prosodic Marking of Theme and Rheme  

E-print Network

investigated this relationship empirically using natural face-to-face conversations. The current study explores this relation using a large corpus of face-to-face conversations on a map navigation task. In this task dialogue-human face-to-face conversation, relatively little is understood about their interaction and alignment

332

ACT Internet-based vs face-to-face? A randomized controlled trial of two ways to deliver Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depressive symptoms: An 18-month follow-up.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate two interventions based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for depressive symptoms: A face-to-face treatment (ACT group) was compared to a guided self-help treatment delivered via the Internet consisting of two assessment sessions (pre and post) and an ACT-based Internet program (iACT). Outpatients experiencing at least mild depressive symptoms were randomized to either approach. The iACT treatment group received access to an ACT-based Internet program and supportive web-based contact over a period of 6 weeks. The face-to-face group received ACT-based treatment once a week over the same period of time. In both groups, the results showed a significant effect on depression symptomatology, and general wellbeing after treatment and at the 18-month follow-up. However, the data indicated that the iACT group changed differently regarding depressive symptoms and wellbeing as compared to the face-to face ACT group. Results showed large pre-treatment to 18-month follow-up within-group effect sizes for all symptom measures in the iACT treatment group (1.59-2.08), and for most outcome measures in the face-to-face ACT group (1.12-1.37). This non-inferiority study provides evidence that guided Internet-delivered ACT intervention can be as effective as ACT-based face-to-face treatment for outpatients reporting depressive symptoms, and it may offer some advantages over a face-to-face intervention. PMID:25127179

Lappalainen, Päivi; Granlund, Anna; Siltanen, Sari; Ahonen, Suvi; Vitikainen, Minna; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

2014-10-01

333

Interactive Weather Information Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Offered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Interactive Weather Information Network (IWIN) is a collection of interactive weather maps and satellite images that is updated every five seconds. Visitors can see cloud cover animation loops, NEXRAD Radar images of precipitation, a map of all current weather fronts, and an interactive national map to see information about any particular state. Other information on the site includes a listing of any active weather warnings, a link for world weather data, and more, making this a must-see site for all those users interested in the most current weather happenings anywhere.

2002-01-01

334

Assessment of HIV related risky behaviour: a comparative study of face-to-face interviews and Polling Booth Surveys in the general population of Cotonou, Benin  

PubMed Central

Objectives During the 2008 HIV prevalence survey carried out in the general population of Cotonou, Benin, face-to-face interviews (FTFI) were used to assess risky behaviours for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). We compared sexual behaviours reported in FTFI with those reported in polling booth surveys (PBS) carried out in parallel in an independent random sample of the same population. Methods In PBS, respondents grouped by gender and marital status answered simple questions by putting tokens with question numbers in a green box (affirmative answers) or a red box (negative answers). Both boxes were placed inside a private booth. For each group and question, data were gathered together by type of answer. The structured and gender-specific FTFI guided by trained interviewers included all questions asked during the PBS.. Pearson chi-square or Fisher’s exact test were used to compare FTFI and PBS according to affirmative answers. Results Overall, respondents reported more stigmatized behaviours in PBS than in FTFI: the proportions of both married women and men who reported ever having had commercial sex were 17.4% and 41.6% in PBS versus 1.8% and 19.6% in FTFI, respectively. The corresponding proportions among unmarried women and men were 16.1% and 25.5% in PBS versus 3.9% and 13.0% in FTFI, respectively. The proportion of married women who reported having had extramarital sex since marriage was 23.6% in PBS versus 4.6% in FTFI. Conclusion Polling booth surveys are suitable to monitor reliable HIV/STI risk behaviours. Their use should be expanded in behavioural surveillance. PMID:23723251

BEHANZIN, Luc; DIABATE, Souleymane; MINANI, Isaac; LOWNDES, Catherine M.; BOILY, Marie-Claude; LABBE, Annie-Claude; ANAGONOU, Severin; ZANNOU, Djimon Marcel; BUVE, Anne; ALARY, Michel

2013-01-01

335

Assessing Problem Solving Strategy Differences within Online and Face-to-Face Courses and Their Relationship to Pre-Service Teachers' Competence and Confidence for Integrating Technology into Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This quantitative research study identifies the problem solving strategies pre-service teachers use in learning specific technology skills within an educational technology methods class which is offered both online and face to face. It also examines how such strategies differ by the format of this course, and to what extent these strategies and/or…

Peterson, Sharon L.

2010-01-01

336

Stakeholders’ perspectives on access-to-medicines policy and research priorities in Latin America and the Caribbean: face-to-face and web-based interviews  

PubMed Central

Background This study aims to rank policy concerns and policy-related research issues in order to identify policy and research gaps on access to medicines (ATM) in low- and middle-income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), as perceived by policy makers, researchers, NGO and international organization representatives, as part of a global prioritization exercise. Methods Data collection, conducted between January and May 2011, involved face-to-face interviews in El Salvador, Colombia, Dominican Republic, and Suriname, and an e-mail survey with key-stakeholders. Respondents were asked to choose the five most relevant criteria for research prioritization and to score policy/research items according to the degree to which they represented current policies, desired policies, current research topics, and/or desired research topics. Mean scores and summary rankings were obtained. Linear regressions were performed to contrast rankings concerning current and desired policies (policy gaps), and current and desired research (research gaps). Results Relevance, feasibility, and research utilization were the top ranked criteria for prioritizing research. Technical capacity, research and development for new drugs, and responsiveness, were the main policy gaps. Quality assurance, staff technical capacity, price regulation, out-of-pocket payments, and cost containment policies, were the main research gaps. There was high level of coherence between current and desired policies: coefficients of determination (R2) varied from 0.46 (Health system structure; r = 0.68, P <0.01) to 0.86 (Sustainable financing; r = 0.93, P <0.01). There was also high coherence between current and desired research on Rational selection and use of medicines (r = 0.71, P <0.05, R2 = 0.51), Pricing/affordability (r = 0.82, P <0.01, R2 = 0.67), and Sustainable financing (r = 0.76, P <0.01, R2 = 0.58). Coherence was less for Health system structure (r = 0.61, P <0.01, R2 = 0.38). Conclusions This study combines metrics approaches, contributing to priority setting methodology development, with country and regional level stakeholder participation. Stakeholders received feedback with the results, and we hope to have contributed to the discussion and implementation of ATM research and policy priorities in LAC. PMID:24965383

2014-01-01

337

Interacting neural networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several scenarios of interacting neural networks which are trained either in an identical or in a competitive way are solved analytically. In the case of identical training each perceptron receives the output of its neighbor. The symmetry of the stationary state as well as the sensitivity to the used training algorithm are investigated. Two competitive perceptrons trained on mutually exclusive learning aims and a perceptron which is trained on the opposite of its own output are examined analytically. An ensemble of competitive perceptrons is used as decision-making algorithms in a model of a closed market (El Farol Bar problem or the Minority Game. In this game, a set of agents who have to make a binary decision is considered.); each network is trained on the history of minority decisions. This ensemble of perceptrons relaxes to a stationary state whose performance can be better than random.

Metzler, R.; Kinzel, W.; Kanter, I.

2000-08-01

338

A Conversation-Analytic Investigation of Disorganized Speech in Face-to-Face Interactions with Individuals Diagnosed with Schizophrenia: Why Methodology Matters  

E-print Network

disorder, disorganization, and communication failure perspectives. Journal of Abnormal Psychology,disorder and cohesion and reference performance. Journal of Abnormal Psychology,disorder and referential communication disturbances in schizophrenia. Journal of Abnormal Psychology,

Isaac, Adrienne

2013-01-01

339

Discrete versus Scaling Approaches to the Description of Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Interaction: Convergent Validity and Divergent Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responds to Fogel's (1988) concerns about the validity and preferred uses of scaled monadic phases and introduces a note of caution about prematurely concluding that stochastic organization alone is of significance to development. (RH)

Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Tronick, Edward Z.

1988-01-01

340

Face-to-face and Edge-to-face Pi-Pi Interactions in a Synthetic DNA with a Stilbenediether Linker  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic conjugates possessing bis(2-hydroxyethyl)stilbene-4,4'-diether linkers (Sd2) form the most stable DNA hairpins reported to date. Factors that affect stability are length and flexibility of the linkers and {pi}-stacking of the stilbene moiety on the adjacent base pair. The crystal structure of the hairpin d(GT{sub 4}G)-Sd2-d(CA{sub 4}C) was determined at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. The conformations of the two molecules in the asymmetric unit differ both in the linker and the stem portions. One of them shows a planar stilbene that is stacked on the adjacent G:C base pair. The other displays considerable rotation between the phenyl rings and an unprecedented edge-to-face orientation of stilbene and base pair. The observation of considerable variations in the conformation of the Sd moiety in the crystal structure allows us to exclude restriction of motion as the reason for the absence of Sd photoisomerization in the hairpins. Conformational differences in the stem portion of the two hairpin molecules go along with different Mg{sup 2+} binding modes. Most remarkable among them is the sequence-specific coordination of a metal ion in the narrow A-tract minor groove. The crystal structure provides unequivocal evidence that a fully hydrated Mg{sup 2+} ion can penetrate the narrow A-tract minor groove, causing the groove to further contract. Overall, the structural data provide a better understanding of the origins of hairpin stability and their photochemical behavior in solution.

Egli, M.; Tereshko, V.; Murshudov, G.N.; Sanishvili, R.; Liu, X.; Lewis, F.D.

2010-03-05

341

The Clinical Effectiveness of Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy With Face-to-Face Therapist Support for Depressed Primary Care Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Most patients with mild to moderate depression receive treatment in primary care, but despite guideline recommendations, structured psychological interventions are infrequently delivered. Research supports the effectiveness of Internet-based treatment for depression; however, few trials have studied the effect of the MoodGYM program plus therapist support. The use of such interventions could improve the delivery of treatment in primary care. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of a guided Web-based intervention for mild to moderate depression, which could be suitable for implementation in general practice. Methods Participants (N=106) aged between 18 and 65 years were recruited from primary care and randomly allocated to a treatment condition comprising 6 weeks of therapist-assisted Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or to a 6-week delayed treatment condition. The intervention included the Norwegian version of the MoodGYM program, brief face-to-face support from a psychologist, and reminder emails. The primary outcome measure, depression symptoms, was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Secondary outcome measures included the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and the EuroQol Group 5-Dimension Self-Report Questionnaire (EQ-5D). All outcomes were based on self-report and were assessed at baseline, postintervention, and at 6-month follow-up. Results Postintervention measures were completed by 37 (71%) and 47 (87%) of the 52 participants in the intervention and 54 participants in the delayed treatment group, respectively. Linear mixed-models analyses revealed a significant difference in time trends between the groups for the BDI-II, (P=.002), for HADS depression and anxiety subscales (P<.001 and P=.001, respectively), and for the SWLS (P<.001). No differential group effects were found for the BAI and the EQ-5D. In comparison to the control group, significantly more participants in the intervention group experienced recovery from depression as measured by the BDI-II. Of the 52 participants in the treatment program, 31 (60%) adhered to the program, and overall treatment satisfaction was high. The reduction of depression and anxiety symptoms was largely maintained at 6-month follow-up, and positive gains in life satisfaction were partly maintained. Conclusions The intervention combining MoodGYM and brief therapist support can be an effective treatment of depression in a sample of primary care patients. The intervention alleviates depressive symptoms and has a significant positive effect on anxiety symptoms and satisfaction with life. Moderate rates of nonadherence and predominately positive evaluations of the treatment also indicate the acceptability of the intervention. The intervention could potentially be used in a stepped-care approach, but remains to be tested in regular primary health care. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000257066; http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/trial.aspx?trialid=ACTRN12610000257066 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Ie3YhIZa). PMID:23916965

Lillevoll, Kjersti R; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Wilsgaard, Tom; Eisemann, Martin; Waterloo, Knut; Kolstrup, Nils

2013-01-01

342

Network Physiology: Mapping Interactions Between Networks of Physiologic Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The human organism is an integrated network of interconnected and interacting organ systems, each representing a separate regulatory network. The behavior of one physiological system (network) may affect the dynamics of all other systems in the network of physiologic networks. Due to these interactions, failure of one system can trigger a cascade of failures throughout the entire network. We introduce a systematic method to identify a network of interactions between diverse physiologic organ systems, to quantify the hierarchical structure and dynamics of this network, and to track its evolution under different physiologic states. We find a robust relation between network structure and physiologic states: every state is characterized by specific network topology, node connectivity and links strength. Further, we find that transitions from one physiologic state to another trigger a markedly fast reorganization in the network of physiologic interactions on time scales of just a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. This reorganization in network topology occurs simultaneously and globally in the entire network as well as at the level of individual physiological systems, while preserving a hierarchical order in the strength of network links. Our findings highlight the need of an integrated network approach to understand physiologic function, since the framework we develop provides new information which can not be obtained by studying individual systems. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

343

Is There a Role for Social Networking Sites in Education?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace have become popular among millions of users including students of all ages. There are ongoing discussions over the potential of these sites to support teaching and learning, particularly to complement traditional or online classroom activities. This paper explores whether social networking have a place in teaching and learning by investigating how students use these sites and whether they find opportunities to discuss study related activities with their peers. Two small scale studies were carried out in a face-to-face undergraduate course in Singapore and students enrolled in a face-to-face Master’s programme in Brazil. Data were collected using surveys and interviews; findings were mixed. Many of the Brazilian students used social networking sites to both socialize and discuss their studies while the Singaporean students used such sites for social interactions only. The paper discusses these differences and offers suggestions for further research.

Santos, Ieda M.; Hammond, Michael; Durli, Zenilde; Chou, Shiao-Yuh

344

To take or not to take? The future of distance learning: A quasi-experiment comparison of the effectiveness of Internet-based distance learning versus face-to-face classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Purpose. This research study compared Internet-based distance learning versus face-to-face classroom using traditional undergraduate and continuing education adult students. The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of Internet-based distance learning. The study examined whether there was any significant difference between an Internet-based distance-learning course and a face-to-face classroom course. Moreover, the study examined whether continuing-education adult students performed higher in Internet-based distance learning than traditional undergraduate students. Methodology. Seventy-three subjects participated in the study. A pretest/posttest nonequivalent quasi-experimental design was used. The study tested a total of sixteen research questions, thirteen hypotheses, and sixteen null hypotheses. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), an independent-sample t-test, and a paired sample t-test were used for the data analysis. Findings. The findings indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between Internet-based distance learning and face-to-face classroom environment. Continuing-education adult and traditional undergraduate students performed equally in Internet-based distance learning.

Boghikian-Whitby, Seta

345

Entropy of dynamical social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dynamical social networks are evolving rapidly and are highly adaptive. Characterizing the information encoded in social networks is essential to gain insight into the structure, evolution, adaptability and dynamics. Recently entropy measures have been used to quantify the information in email correspondence, static networks and mobility patterns. Nevertheless, we still lack methods to quantify the information encoded in time-varying dynamical social networks. In this talk we present a model to quantify the entropy of dynamical social networks and use this model to analyze the data of phone-call communication. We show evidence that the entropy of the phone-call interaction network changes according to circadian rhythms. Moreover we show that social networks are extremely adaptive and are modified by the use of technologies such as mobile phone communication. Indeed the statistics of duration of phone-call is described by a Weibull distribution and is significantly different from the distribution of duration of face-to-face interactions in a conference. Finally we investigate how much the entropy of dynamical social networks changes in realistic models of phone-call or face-to face interactions characterizing in this way different type human social behavior.

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Marton; Bianconi, Ginestra

2012-02-01

346

Information flow in interaction networks.  

PubMed

Interaction networks, consisting of agents linked by their interactions, are ubiquitous across many disciplines of modern science. Many methods of analysis of interaction networks have been proposed, mainly concentrating on node degree distribution or aiming to discover clusters of agents that are very strongly connected between themselves. These methods are principally based on graph-theory or machine learning. We present a mathematically simple formalism for modelling context-specific information propagation in interaction networks based on random walks. The context is provided by selection of sources and destinations of information and by use of potential functions that direct the flow towards the destinations. We also use the concept of dissipation to model the aging of information as it diffuses from its source. Using examples from yeast protein-protein interaction networks and some of the histone acetyltransferases involved in control of transcription, we demonstrate the utility of the concepts and the mathematical constructs introduced in this paper. PMID:17985991

Stojmirovi?, Aleksandar; Yu, Yi-Kuo

2007-10-01

347

Exploring the Potential of Rehearsal via Automatized Structured Tasks versus Face-to-Face Pair Work to Facilitate Pragmatic and Oral Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research has uncovered ways to improve communicative competence, including task-based learner-learner interaction (e.g., R. Ellis, 2003) and task planning (e.g., Mochizuki and Ortega, 2008). Teacher-guided planning particularly increases the benefits of learner-learner interaction (Foster and Skehan, 1999). One component of communicative…

Sydorenko, Tetyana V.

2011-01-01

348

Global Nomads' Network and Mobile Sociality: Exploring New Media Uses on the Move  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the convergence of communication and travel and the emergence of a mobile and network sociality, through investigating new communication practices based on the internet and mobile phone enacted by backpackers while on the move. These global nomads produce and maintain mobile spaces of sociality, founded on a complex intersection of face-to-face interaction and mediated communication, co-presence and

Giovanna Mascheroni

2007-01-01

349

Interacting epidemics on overlay networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interaction between multiple pathogens spreading on networks connecting a given set of nodes presents an ongoing theoretical challenge. Here, we aim to understand such interactions by studying bond percolation of two different processes on overlay networks of arbitrary joint degree distribution. We find that an outbreak of a first pathogen providing immunity to another one spreading subsequently on a second network connecting the same set of nodes does so most effectively if the degrees on the two networks are positively correlated. In that case, the protection is stronger the more heterogeneous the degree distributions of the two networks are. If, on the other hand, the degrees are uncorrelated or negatively correlated, increasing heterogeneity reduces the potential of the first process to prevent the second one from reaching epidemic proportions. We generalize these results to cases where the edges of the two networks overlap to arbitrary amount, or where the immunity granted is only partial. If both processes grant immunity to each other, we find a wide range of possible situations of coexistence or mutual exclusion, depending on the joint degree distribution of the underlying networks and the amount of immunity granted mutually. These results generalize the concept of a coexistence threshold and illustrate the impact of large-scale network structure on the interaction between multiple spreading agents.

Funk, Sebastian; Jansen, Vincent A. A.

2010-03-01

350

Web-based Versus Face-to-Face Learning of Diabetes Management: The Results of a Comparative Trial of Educational Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: Relatively little is known about the effectiveness of Web-based learning (WBL) in medical education and how it compares to conventional methods. This study examined the influence of an interactive, online curriculum in a third-year medical school family medicine clerkship on students' ability to create a management plan for a patient newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. We

John M. Wiecha; V. K. Chetty; Timothy Pollard; Peter F. Shaw

351

Differences in Learning Styles and Satisfaction between Traditional Face-to-Face and Online Web-Based Sport Management Studies Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each student has a unique learning style or individual way of perceiving, interacting, and responding to a learning environment. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the prevalence of learning styles among undergraduate Sport Management Studies (SMS) students at California University of Pennsylvania (Cal U). Learning style…

West, Ellen Jo

2010-01-01

352

I Reach Faster When I See You Look: Gaze Effects in Human-Human and Human-Robot Face-to-Face Cooperation.  

PubMed

Human-human interaction in natural environments relies on a variety of perceptual cues. Humanoid robots are becoming increasingly refined in their sensorimotor capabilities, and thus should now be able to manipulate and exploit these social cues in cooperation with their human partners. Previous studies have demonstrated that people follow human and robot gaze, and that it can help them to cope with spatially ambiguous language. Our goal is to extend these findings into the domain of action, to determine how human and robot gaze can influence the speed and accuracy of human action. We report on results from a human-human cooperation experiment demonstrating that an agent's vision of her/his partner's gaze can significantly improve that agent's performance in a cooperative task. We then implement a heuristic capability to generate such gaze cues by a humanoid robot that engages in the same cooperative interaction. The subsequent human-robot experiments demonstrate that a human agent can indeed exploit the predictive gaze of their robot partner in a cooperative task. This allows us to render the humanoid robot more human-like in its ability to communicate with humans. The long term objectives of the work are thus to identify social cooperation cues, and to validate their pertinence through implementation in a cooperative robot. The current research provides the robot with the capability to produce appropriate speech and gaze cues in the context of human-robot cooperation tasks. Gaze is manipulated in three conditions: Full gaze (coordinated eye and head), eyes hidden with sunglasses, and head fixed. We demonstrate the pertinence of these cues in terms of statistical measures of action times for humans in the context of a cooperative task, as gaze significantly facilitates cooperation as measured by human response times. PMID:22563315

Boucher, Jean-David; Pattacini, Ugo; Lelong, Amelie; Bailly, Gerrard; Elisei, Frederic; Fagel, Sascha; Dominey, Peter Ford; Ventre-Dominey, Jocelyne

2012-01-01

353

Dynamic and interacting complex networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of dynamic and interacting complex networks. The mapping of various social and physical phenomena to complex networks has been a rich field in the past few decades. Subjects as broad as petroleum engineering, scientific collaborations, and the structure of the internet have all been analyzed in a network physics context, with useful and universal results. In the first chapter we introduce basic concepts in networks, including the two types of network configurations that are studied and the statistical physics and epidemiological models that form the framework of the network research, as well as covering various previously-derived results in network theory that are used in the work in the following chapters. In the second chapter we introduce a model for dynamic networks, where the links or the strengths of the links change over time. We solve the model by mapping dynamic networks to the problem of directed percolation, where the direction corresponds to the time evolution of the network. We show that the dynamic network undergoes a percolation phase transition at a critical concentration pc, that decreases with the rate r at which the network links are changed. The behavior near criticality is universal and independent of r. We find that for dynamic random networks fundamental laws are changed: i) The size of the giant component at criticality scales with the network size N for all values of r, rather than as N2/3 in static network, ii) In the presence of a broad distribution of disorder, the optimal path length between two nodes in a dynamic network scales as N1/2, compared to N1/3 in a static network. The third chapter consists of a study of the effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible individuals protect themselves by disconnecting their links to infected neighbors with probability w and reconnecting them to other susceptible individuals chosen at random. Starting from a single infected individual, we show by an analytical approach and simulations that there is a phase transition at a critical rewiring (quarantine) threshold wc separating a phase (w < wc) where the disease reaches a large fraction of the population from a phase (w > wc) where the disease does not spread out. We find that in our model the topology of the network strongly affects the size of the propagation and that wc increases with the mean degree and heterogeneity of the network. We also find that wc is reduced if we perform a preferential rewiring, in which the rewiring probability is proportional to the degree of infected nodes. In the fourth chapter, we study epidemic processes on interconnected network systems, and find two distinct regimes. In strongly-coupled network systems, epidemics occur simultaneously across the entire system at a critical value betac. In contrast, in weakly-coupled network systems, a mixed phase exists below betac where an epidemic occurs in one network but does not spread to the coupled network. We derive an expression for the network and disease parameters that allow this mixed phase and verify it numerically. Public health implications of communities comprising these two classes of network systems are also mentioned.

Dickison, Mark E.

354

Romantic relationship stages and social networking sites: uncertainty reduction strategies and perceived relational norms on facebook.  

PubMed

Abstract Due to their pervasiveness and unique affordances, social media play a distinct role in the development of modern romantic relationships. This study examines how a social networking site is used for information seeking about a potential or current romantic partner. In a survey, Facebook users (N=517) were presented with Facebook behaviors categorized as passive (e.g., reading a partner's profile), active (e.g., "friending" a common third party), or interactive (e.g., commenting on the partner's wall) uncertainty reduction strategies. Participants reported how normative they perceived these behaviors to be during four possible stages of relationship development (before meeting face-to-face, after meeting face-to-face, casual dating, and exclusive dating). Results indicated that as relationships progress, perceived norms for these behaviors change. Sex differences were also observed, as women perceived passive and interactive strategies as more normative than men during certain relationship stages. PMID:25314128

Fox, Jesse; Anderegg, Courtney

2014-11-01

355

Gaze Aversion during Social Style Interactions in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Williams Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During face-to-face interactions typically developing individuals use gaze aversion (GA), away from their questioner, when thinking. GA is also used when individuals with autism (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS) are thinking during question-answer interactions. We investigated GA strategies during face-to-face social style interactions with…

Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa; Riby, Deborah M.

2013-01-01

356

Face to Face with Oral Isotretinoin  

PubMed Central

Oral isotretinoin, available in the United States for four decades, has been used for the treatment of recalcitrant nodular and deep inflammatory acne vulgaris. This drug revolutionized the management of patients affected by severe inflammatory disease due to its ability to markedly induce acne clearance coupled with prolonged durations of remission after completion of a course of therapy, usually over approximately five months. Over time, it has become recognized that prolonged remission correlates with achieving a threshold cumulative exposure range of approximately 120 to 150 mg/kg of oral isotretinoin. Lesser exposures have demonstrated a higher risk of earlier recurrence of acne vulgaris and a greater likelihood that the patient will require retreatment. As the oral bioavailability of oral isotretinoin is variable, and highly dependent on administration with food, it is very conceivable that earlier relapse may occur if patients have often ingested oral isotretinoin on an empty stomach, thus leading to lesser actual cumulative drug exposure despite the daily dose administered. This article provides an overview on the dosing of oral isotretinoin, reported data on factors that influence relapse after oral isotretinoin therapy, and the potential impact of coadministration with food. PMID:23198008

Del Rosso, James Q.

2012-01-01

357

Face to face with Phineas Gage.  

PubMed

We present here a reproduction of a daguerreotype of Phineas Gage that came into our possession more than 30 years ago. It is, as far as we know, the only image of this famous patient. We describe how we identified the subject in the image, describe how daguerreotypes are made and set out our comparisons of the image with the Phineas Gage life mask and tamping iron held in the Warren Anatomical Museum, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. PMID:20183215

Wilgus, Jack; Wilgus, Beverly

2009-07-01

358

Face to Face with Distance Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Begins with a tribute to Professor G. Ram Reddy (founder of Indira Gandhi National Open University), then focuses on the challenges for India of education in the coming decades. Highlights include global problems that future generations will inherit; educational investment needs; a new group of educational clients; skills needed in the 21st…

Dhanarajan, Gajaraj

1997-01-01

359

Face to Face in Costa Rica  

Microsoft Academic Search

While still in the midst of their study abroad experiences, students at Linfield College write reflective essays. Their essays address issues of cultural similarity and difference, compare lifestyles, mores, norms, and habits between their host countries and home, and examine changes in perceptions about their host countries and the United States. In this essay, Felicia Weller describes her observations during

Felicia Weller

2010-01-01

360

Learners Need Face-to-Face Advice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In January the 157 Group launched a policy paper making the case for professional careers guidance. With the launch of the National Careers Service in April, information, advice and guidance is a hot topic within the education and skills sector and one that is regularly debated. The combination of policy changes, including the introduction of…

Sedgmore, Lynne

2012-01-01

361

Statistical analysis of protein interaction network topology  

E-print Network

Complex networks arise in diverse areas of natural and social sciences and network topology is a key determinant of such systems. In this work we investigate the protein-protein interaction network of the KSHV herpesvirus, ...

Dong, Yu-An, 1974-

2005-01-01

362

Interacting with Embodied Agents in Public Environments Addolorata Cavalluzzi, Berardina De Carolis, Sebastiano Pizzutilo and Giovanni Cozzolongo  

E-print Network

exhibit many of the properties of humans in face-to-face conversation, including the ability to provide of human face-to-face conversation. In particular, ability to provide a natural multimodal interaction may interact in a socially engaging conversation like with a human companion. Embodied Conversational

Bari, Università degli Studi di

363

Interactive Network Performance: a dream worth dreaming?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper questions and examines the validity and future of interactive network performance. The history of research in the area is described as well as experiments with our own system. Our custom-built networked framework, known as GIGAPOPR, transfers high-quality audio, video and MIDI data over a network connection to enable live musical performances to occur in two or more distinct

AJAY KAPUR; GE WANG; PHILIP DAVIDSON; PERRY R. COOK

2005-01-01

364

Alignment-free protein interaction network comparison  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Biological network comparison software largely relies on the concept of alignment where close matches between the nodes of two or more networks are sought. These node matches are based on sequence similarity and/or interaction patterns. However, because of the incomplete and error-prone datasets currently available, such methods have had limited success. Moreover, the results of network alignment are in general not amenable for distance-based evolutionary analysis of sets of networks. In this article, we describe Netdis, a topology-based distance measure between networks, which offers the possibility of network phylogeny reconstruction. Results: We first demonstrate that Netdis is able to correctly separate different random graph model types independent of network size and density. The biological applicability of the method is then shown by its ability to build the correct phylogenetic tree of species based solely on the topology of current protein interaction networks. Our results provide new evidence that the topology of protein interaction networks contains information about evolutionary processes, despite the lack of conservation of individual interactions. As Netdis is applicable to all networks because of its speed and simplicity, we apply it to a large collection of biological and non-biological networks where it clusters diverse networks by type. Availability and implementation: The source code of the program is freely available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/proteins/resources. Contact: w.ali@stats.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161230

Ali, Waqar; Rito, Tiago; Reinert, Gesine; Sun, Fengzhu; Deane, Charlotte M.

2014-01-01

365

Targeting and tinkering with interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biological interaction networks have been in the scientific limelight for nearly a decade. Increasingly, the concept of network biology and its various applications are becoming more commonplace in the community. Recent years have seen networks move from pretty pictures with limited application to solid concepts that are increasingly used to understand the fundamentals of biology. They are no longer merely

Robert B Russell; Patrick Aloy

2008-01-01

366

Comparison of Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview and Face-To-Face Interview Methods in Eliciting HIV-Related Risks among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Men Who Inject Drugs in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Introduction Face-to-face (FTF) interviews are the most frequently used means of obtaining information on sexual and drug injecting behaviours from men who have sex with men (MSM) and men who inject drugs (MWID). However, accurate information on these behaviours may be difficult to elicit because of sociocultural hostility towards these populations and the criminalization associated with these behaviours. Audio computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) is an interviewing technique that may mitigate social desirability bias in this context. Methods This study evaluated differences in the reporting of HIV-related risky behaviours by MSM and MWID using ACASI and FTF interviews. Between August and September 2010, 712 MSM and 328 MWID in Nigeria were randomized to either ACASI or FTF interview for completion of a behavioural survey that included questions on sensitive sexual and injecting risk behaviours. Data were analyzed separately for MSM and MWID. Logistic regression was run for each behaviour as a dependent variable to determine differences in reporting methods. Results MSM interviewed via ACASI reported significantly higher risky behaviours with both women (multiple female sexual partners 51% vs. 43%, p?=?0.04; had unprotected anal sex with women 72% vs. 57%, p?=?0.05) and men (multiple male sex partners 70% vs. 54%, p?0.001) than through FTF. Additionally, they were more likely to self-identify as homosexual (AOR: 3.3, 95%CI:2.4–4.6) and report drug use in the past 12 months (AOR:40.0, 95%CI: 9.6–166.0). MWID interviewed with ACASI were more likely to report needle sharing (AOR:3.3, 95%CI:1.2–8.9) and re-use (AOR:2.2, 95%CI:1.2–3.9) in the past month and prior HIV testing (AOR:1.6, 95%CI 1.02–2.5). Conclusion The feasibility of using ACASI in studies and clinics targeting key populations in Nigeria must be explored to increase the likelihood of obtaining more accurate data on high risk behaviours to inform improved risk reduction strategies that reduce HIV transmission. PMID:24416134

Adebajo, Sylvia; Obianwu, Otibho; Eluwa, George; Vu, Lung; Oginni, Ayo; Tun, Waimar; Sheehy, Meredith; Ahonsi, Babatunde; Bashorun, Adebobola; Idogho, Omokhudu; Karlyn, Andrew

2014-01-01

367

Measuring specialization in species interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Background Network analyses of plant-animal interactions hold valuable biological information. They are often used to quantify the degree of specialization between partners, but usually based on qualitative indices such as 'connectance' or number of links. These measures ignore interaction frequencies or sampling intensity, and strongly depend on network size. Results Here we introduce two quantitative indices using interaction frequencies to describe the degree of specialization, based on information theory. The first measure (d') describes the degree of interaction specialization at the species level, while the second measure (H2') characterizes the degree of specialization or partitioning among two parties in the entire network. Both indices are mathematically related and derived from Shannon entropy. The species-level index d' can be used to analyze variation within networks, while H2' as a network-level index is useful for comparisons across different interaction webs. Analyses of two published pollinator networks identified differences and features that have not been detected with previous approaches. For instance, plants and pollinators within a network differed in their average degree of specialization (weighted mean d'), and the correlation between specialization of pollinators and their relative abundance also differed between the webs. Rarefied sampling effort in both networks and null model simulations suggest that H2' is not affected by network size or sampling intensity. Conclusion Quantitative analyses reflect properties of interaction networks more appropriately than previous qualitative attempts, and are robust against variation in sampling intensity, network size and symmetry. These measures will improve our understanding of patterns of specialization within and across networks from a broad spectrum of biological interactions. PMID:16907983

Bluthgen, Nico; Menzel, Florian; Bluthgen, Nils

2006-01-01

368

Interaction network among functional drug groups  

PubMed Central

Background More attention has been being paid to combinatorial effects of drugs to treat complex diseases or to avoid adverse combinations of drug cocktail. Although drug interaction information has been increasingly accumulated, a novel approach like network-based method is needed to analyse that information systematically and intuitively Results Beyond focussing on drug-drug interactions, we examined interactions between functional drug groups. In this work, functional drug groups were defined based on the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System. We defined criteria whether two functional drug groups are related. Then we constructed the interaction network of drug groups. The resulting network provides intuitive interpretations. We further constructed another network based on interaction sharing ratio of the first network. Subsequent analysis of the networks showed that some features of drugs can be well described by this kind of interaction even for the case of structurally dissimilar drugs. Conclusion Our networks in this work provide intuitive insights into interactions among drug groups rather than those among single drugs. In addition, information on these interactions can be used as a useful source to describe mechanisms and features of drugs. PMID:24555875

2013-01-01

369

Nathan Eagle and Alex Pentland, "Social Network Computing", Ubicomp 2003: Ubiquitous Computing, Springer-Verlag Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2864, pp. 289-296, 2003.  

E-print Network

a face-to-face interaction. Even outside the context of meetings, informal face-to-face conversations Eagle and Alex (Sandy) Pentland MIT Media Lab, 20 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02319 {nathan, sandy@media.mit.edu} http://www.media.mit.edu Abstract. A ubiquitous wearable computing infrastructure is now firmly en

370

Point process modeling for directed interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network data often take the form of repeated interactions between senders and receivers tabulated over time. A primary question to ask of such data is which traits and behaviors are predictive of interaction. To answer this question, a model is introduced for treating directed interactions as a multivariate point process: a Cox multiplicative intensity model using covariates that depend on

Patrick O. Perry; Patrick J. Wolfe

2010-01-01

371

Understanding latent interactions in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Popular online social networks (OSNs) like Facebook and Twitter are changing the way users communicate and interact with the Internet. A deep understanding of user interactions in OSNs can provide important insights into questions of human social behavior, and into the design of social platforms and applications. However, recent studies have shown that a majority of user interactions on OSNs

Jing Jiang; Christo Wilson; Xiao Wang; Peng Huang; Wenpeng Sha; Yafei Dai; Ben Y. Zhao

2010-01-01

372

SocialCircuits : a platform for measuring social interaction using smartphones  

E-print Network

SocialCircuits is a platform capable of measuring the face-to-face and phone-based communication network of a real-world community. This platform uses commodity mobile phones to measure social ties between individuals, and ...

Chronis, lolanthe (lolanthe K.)

2010-01-01

373

Eavesdropping: audience interaction in networked audio performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eavesdropping is an internet-based, interactive audio system that explores network mediated, musical performance in shared public spaces. The project aims to develop an environment which increases audience interaction and connectedness in a localized, computer-controlled performance. The system is a client-server architecture made of three components: (1) an audio preparation interface, (2) an interactive performance interface, and (3) a machine learning-based

Jack Stockholm; Philippe Pasquier

2008-01-01

374

Campus Recruitment. Prepare. Network. Stand out  

E-print Network

& leadership) One on one meetings (campus hosts) *Build rapport with Recruiting Manager- let us help you #12 Resume Networking · The Importance of Networking · Online vs. Face to Face Networking · Campus Host Program Upcoming Networking Events · Deloitte National Leadership Conference (DNLC) · Summer Socials

Seldin, Jonathan P.

375

Measuring large-scale social networks with high resolution. WORKING PAPER  

E-print Network

This paper describes the deployment of a large study designed to collect data about human interactions with unprecedented temporal resolution and depth, both in terms of duration and number of distinct channels. To collect this data, we use state-of-the-art smartphones as social sensors. We collect data on face-to-face interactions, telecommunication, social networks, geolocation, and background information for a densely connected and coherent population of 1,000 individuals. From a basic science perspective, our motivation is to advance the understanding of highly connected social systems. Building from our densely sampled system, we are interested understanding what working on subsamples implies for results on social network analysis; we explore this topic by comparing single-channel information with our layered picture of interactions. In terms of network science, we aim to expand our understanding of the dynamics of the social network, how it changes over time, and the causes and implications of the proce...

Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Cuttone, Andrea; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Lehmann, Sune

2014-01-01

376

Point process modeling for directed interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network data often take the form of repeated interactions between senders and\\u000areceivers tabulated over time. Rather than reducing these data to binary ties,\\u000aa model is introduced for treating directed interactions as a multivariate\\u000apoint process: a Cox multiplicative intensity model using covariates that\\u000adepend on the history of the process. Consistency and asymptotic normality are\\u000aproved for the

Patrick O. Perry; Patrick J. Wolfe

2010-01-01

377

Interactive Models for Supporting Networked Organisations  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper presents a novel approach to the development and operation of dynamic networked organization. The approach is based\\u000a on the idea of using interactive models. Interactive models are visual models of enterprise aspects that can be viewed, traversed,\\u000a analyzed, simulated, adapted and executed by industrial users as part of their work. The approach was developed in the EXTERNAL-project,\\u000a where

John Krogstie; Håvard D. Jørgensen

2004-01-01

378

Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach.

Peter M Thule (Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center); Kathrin Dethleffsen (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität); Michael Meyer (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität)

2012-12-01

379

Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle.  

PubMed

Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach. PMID:23209009

Scherl, Andre; Dethleffsen, Kathrin; Meyer, Michael

2012-12-01

380

Understanding Protein-protein Interaction Networks  

E-print Network

by Prof. Hanah Margalit and Prof. Nir Friedman i #12;Abstract All living organisms consist of living cells com- plexes of varying sizes, modifying one another and transporting other proteins information. However, application of this model to the entire interaction network would require creation

Friedman, Nir

381

Educational Instruction via Interactive Video Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perceptions of secondary educators were examined regarding delivery of educational programs via interactive video networks (IVN). The population included all agricultural education instructors, principals, and superintendents employed in public secondary schools having an agricultural education program during the 1990-91 school year in a…

Swan, Michael K.; Brehmer, Jeffery

382

Educational Instruction via Interactive Video Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to survey responses from 201 of 247 public secondary agricultural instructors, principals, and superintendents, they consider interactive video networks appropriate for high schools and are interested in inservice training. Cost is the greatest obstacle by a 3-1 margin. Instructors have more negative attitudes than principals or…

Swan, Michael K.; Brehmer, Jeffery

1994-01-01

383

Inferring microbial interaction networks based on consensus similarity network fusion.  

PubMed

With the rapid accumulation of high-throughput metagenomic sequencing data, it is possible to infer microbial species relations in a microbial community systematically. In recent years, some approaches have been proposed for identifying microbial interaction network. These methods often focus on one dataset without considering the advantage of data integration. In this study, we propose to use a similarity network fusion (SNF) method to infer microbial relations. The SNF efficiently integrates the similarities of species derived from different datasets by a cross-network diffusion process. We also introduce consensus k-nearest neighborhood (Ck-NN) method instead of k-NN in the original SNF (we call the approach CSNF). The final network represents the augmented species relationships with aggregated evidence from various datasets, taking advantage of complementarity in the data. We apply the method on genus profiles derived from three microbiome datasets and we find that CSNF can discover the modular structure of microbial interaction network which cannot be identified by analyzing a single dataset. PMID:25326827

Jiang, XingPeng; Hu, XiaoHua

2014-11-01

384

Network Compression as a Quality Measure for Protein Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

With the advent of large-scale protein interaction studies, there is much debate about data quality. Can different noise levels in the measurements be assessed by analyzing network structure? Because proteomic regulation is inherently co-operative, modular and redundant, it is inherently compressible when represented as a network. Here we propose that network compression can be used to compare false positive and false negative noise levels in protein interaction networks. We validate this hypothesis by first confirming the detrimental effect of false positives and false negatives. Second, we show that gold standard networks are more compressible. Third, we show that compressibility correlates with co-expression, co-localization, and shared function. Fourth, we also observe correlation with better protein tagging methods, physiological expression in contrast to over-expression of tagged proteins, and smart pooling approaches for yeast two-hybrid screens. Overall, this new measure is a proxy for both sensitivity and specificity and gives complementary information to standard measures such as average degree and clustering coefficients. PMID:22719828

Royer, Loic; Reimann, Matthias; Stewart, A. Francis; Schroeder, Michael

2012-01-01

385

Web 2.0 Technologies: Facilitating Interaction in an Online Human Services Counseling Skills Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the face-to-face classroom, human services counseling educators rely on highly interpersonal, interactive methods to teach clinical skills. Replicating these instructional methods in the asynchronous, text-based e-learning environment has been difficult and sometimes impossible. However, web-based technologies, specifically Web 2.0 technologies, may afford educators the opportunity to simulate and enhance the strengths of highly interpersonal and interactive methods of face-to-face

Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw; Victoria L. Walker

2009-01-01

386

Work, Friendship, and Media Use for Information Exchange in a Networked Organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use a social network approach to examine how work and friendship ties in a university research group were associated with the kinds of media used for different kinds of information exchange. The use of electronic mail, unscheduled face-to-face encounters, and sched- uled face-to-face meetings predominated for the ex- change of six kinds of information: Receiving Work, Giv- ing Work,

Caroline Haythornthwaite; Barry Wellman

1998-01-01

387

Random neural networks with synchronized interactions.  

PubMed

Large-scale distributed systems, such as natural neuronal and artificial systems, have many local interconnections, but they often also have the ability to propagate information very fast over relatively large distances. Mechanisms that enable such behavior include very long physical signaling paths and possibly saccades of synchronous behavior that may propagate across a network. This letter studies the modeling of such behaviors in neuronal networks and develops a related learning algorithm. This is done in the context of the random neural network (RNN), a probabilistic model with a well-developed mathematical theory, which was inspired by the apparently stochastic spiking behavior of certain natural neuronal systems. Thus, we develop an extension of the RNN to the case when synchronous interactions can occur, leading to synchronous firing by large ensembles of cells. We also present an O(N3) gradient descent learning algorithm for an N-cell recurrent network having both conventional excitatory-inhibitory interactions and synchronous interactions. Finally, the model and its learning algorithm are applied to a resource allocation problem that is NP-hard and requires fast approximate decisions. PMID:18386985

Gelenbe, Erol; Timotheou, Stelios

2008-09-01

388

The evolutionary dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network  

E-print Network

The evolutionary dynamics of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network after) event in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The model allowed us to predict the frequency of intergene. We apply our methodology to the protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (23

Kishony, Roy

389

Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding  

SciTech Connect

Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A. (JHU); (Maryland)

2013-04-08

390

Cooperative tertiary interaction network guides RNA folding.  

PubMed

Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold. PMID:22500801

Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R M; Woodson, Sarah A

2012-04-13

391

Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An ongoing study of the structure, function, and evolution of individual activity within lab groups is introduced. This study makes extensive use of techniques from social network analysis. These techniques allow rigorous quantification and hypothesis-testing of the interactions inherent in social groups and the impact of intrinsic characteristics of individuals on their social interactions. As these techniques are novel within the physics education research community, an overview of their meaning and application is given. We then present preliminary results from videotaped laboratory groups involving mixed populations of traditional and non-traditional students in an introductory algebra-based physics course.

Warren, Aaron R.

2009-01-24

392

Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ongoing study of the structure, function, and evolution of individual activity within lab groups is introduced. This study makes extensive use of techniques from social network analysis. These techniques allow rigorous quantification and hypothesis-testing of the interactions inherent in social groups and the impact of intrinsic characteristics of individuals on their social interactions. As these techniques are novel within the physics education research community, an overview of their meaning and application is given. We then present preliminary results from videotaped laboratory groups involving mixed populations of traditional and non-traditional students in an introductory algebra-based physics course.

Warren, Aaron R.

2008-10-01

393

BIND--The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database.  

PubMed

The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND; http://binddb. org) is a database designed to store full descriptions of interactions, molecular complexes and pathways. Development of the BIND 2.0 data model has led to the incorporation of virtually all components of molecular mechanisms including interactions between any two molecules composed of proteins, nucleic acids and small molecules. Chemical reactions, photochemical activation and conformational changes can also be described. Everything from small molecule biochemistry to signal transduction is abstracted in such a way that graph theory methods may be applied for data mining. The database can be used to study networks of interactions, to map pathways across taxonomic branches and to generate information for kinetic simulations. BIND anticipates the coming large influx of interaction information from high-throughput proteomics efforts including detailed information about post-translational modifications from mass spectrometry. Version 2.0 of the BIND data model is discussed as well as implementation, content and the open nature of the BIND project. The BIND data specification is available as ASN.1 and XML DTD. PMID:11125103

Bader, G D; Donaldson, I; Wolting, C; Ouellette, B F; Pawson, T; Hogue, C W

2001-01-01

394

The Influences of Network Interpersonal Interaction among College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to explore the characteristics and the effects of interpersonal interaction based on network among college students. The development of internet facilitates the deep change of college students in all aspects, especially in the interpersonal interaction. Based on the definition of the network interpersonal interaction, the current paper summarized the characteristics of network communication

Qin Xuemei; Nan Hua

2010-01-01

395

Protein interaction networks viewed through statistical-mechanical glasses  

E-print Network

Protein interaction networks viewed through statistical-mechanical glasses ACC Coolen Dept of Mathematics and Randall Division King's College London London, Oct 21st 2009 ACC Coolen (KCL) Protein interaction networks 2009/10/21 1 / 33 #12;Outline 1 What are protein interaction networks, and why study them

Coolen, ACC "Ton"

396

Measuring Large-Scale Social Networks with High Resolution  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the deployment of a large-scale study designed to measure human interactions across a variety of communication channels, with high temporal resolution and spanning multiple years—the Copenhagen Networks Study. Specifically, we collect data on face-to-face interactions, telecommunication, social networks, location, and background information (personality, demographics, health, politics) for a densely connected population of 1 000 individuals, using state-of-the-art smartphones as social sensors. Here we provide an overview of the related work and describe the motivation and research agenda driving the study. Additionally, the paper details the data-types measured, and the technical infrastructure in terms of both backend and phone software, as well as an outline of the deployment procedures. We document the participant privacy procedures and their underlying principles. The paper is concluded with early results from data analysis, illustrating the importance of multi-channel high-resolution approach to data collection. PMID:24770359

Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sekara, Vedran; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Cuttone, Andrea; Madsen, Mette My; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Lehmann, Sune

2014-01-01

397

The origins of 12-month attachment: A microanalysis of 4-month mother–infant interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

A microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant face-to-face communication revealed a fine-grained specification of communication processes that predicted 12-month insecure attachment outcomes, particularly resistant and disorganized classifications. An urban community sample of 84 dyads were videotaped at 4 months during a face-to-face interaction, and at 12 months during the Ainsworth Strange Situation. Four-month mother and infant communication modalities of attention, affect, touch,

Beatrice Beebe; Joseph Jaffe; Sara Markese; Karen Buck; Henian Chen; Patricia Cohen; Lorraine Bahrick; Howard Andrews; Stanley Feldstein

2010-01-01

398

Modulatory interactions between the default mode network and task positive networks in resting-state.  

PubMed

The two major brain networks, i.e., the default mode network (DMN) and the task positive network, typically reveal negative and variable connectivity in resting-state. In the present study, we examined whether the connectivity between the DMN and different components of the task positive network were modulated by other brain regions by using physiophysiological interaction (PPI) on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Spatial independent component analysis was first conducted to identify components that represented networks of interest, including the anterior and posterior DMNs, salience, dorsal attention, left and right executive networks. PPI analysis was conducted between pairs of these networks to identify networks or regions that showed modulatory interactions with the two networks. Both network-wise and voxel-wise analyses revealed reciprocal positive modulatory interactions between the DMN, salience, and executive networks. Together with the anatomical properties of the salience network regions, the results suggest that the salience network may modulate the relationship between the DMN and executive networks. In addition, voxel-wise analysis demonstrated that the basal ganglia and thalamus positively interacted with the salience network and the dorsal attention network, and negatively interacted with the salience network and the DMN. The results demonstrated complex modulatory interactions among the DMNs and task positive networks in resting-state, and suggested that communications between these networks may be modulated by some critical brain structures such as the salience network, basal ganglia, and thalamus. PMID:24860698

Di, Xin; Biswal, Bharat B

2014-01-01

399

Global Mapping of the Yeast Genetic Interaction Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

A genetic interaction network containing ~1000 genes and ~4000 interactions was mapped by crossing mutations in 132 different query genes into a set of ~4700 viable gene yeast deletion mutants and scoring the double mutant progeny for fitness defects. Network connectivity was predictive of function because interactions often occurred among functionally related genes, and similar patterns of interactions tended to

Amy Hin Yan Tong; Guillaume Lesage; Gary D. Bader; Huiming Ding; Hong Xu; Xiaofeng Xin; James Young; Gabriel F. Berriz; Renee L. Brost; Michael Chang; YiQun Chen; Xin Cheng; Gordon Chua; Helena Friesen; Debra S. Goldberg; Jennifer Haynes; Christine Humphries; Grace He; Shamiza Hussein; Lizhu Ke; Nevan Krogan; Zhijian Li; Joshua N. Levinson; Hong Lu; Patrice Ménard; Christella Munyana; Ainslie B. Parsons; Owen Ryan; Raffi Tonikian; Tania Roberts; Anne-Marie Sdicu; Jesse Shapiro; Bilal Sheikh; Bernhard Suter; Sharyl L. Wong; Lan V. Zhang; Hongwei Zhu; Christopher G. Burd; Sean Munro; Chris Sander; Jasper Rine; Jack Greenblatt; Matthias Peter; Anthony Bretscher; Graham Bell; Frederick P. Roth; Grant W. Brown; Brenda Andrews; Howard Bussey; Charles Boone

2004-01-01

400

Information Diffusion in Overlaying Social-Physical Networks  

E-print Network

information spreads amongst people through conventional communication media (e.g., face-to-face communication that conjoining the physical network with online social networks can have a dramatic impact on the speed and scale. Motivation and Background Modern society relies on basic physical network infrastruc- tures, such as power

Yagan, Osman

401

Financial interaction networks inferred from traded volumes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to use the advanced inference techniques available for Ising models, we transform complex data (real vectors) into binary strings, by local averaging and thresholding. This transformation introduces parameters, which must be varied to characterize the behaviour of the system. The approach is illustrated on financial data, using three inference methods -- equilibrium, synchronous and asynchronous inference -- to construct functional connections between stocks. We show that the traded volume information is enough to obtain well known results about financial markets, which use however the presumably richer price information: collective behaviour ("market mode") and strong interactions within industry sectors. Synchronous and asynchronous Ising inference methods give results which are coherent with equilibrium ones, and more detailed since the obtained interaction networks are directed.

Zeng, Hong-Li; Lemoy, Rémi; Alava, Mikko

2014-07-01

402

The Networked Teacher: How New Teachers Build Social Networks for Professional Support. Series on School Reform  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New teachers need support from their peers and mentors to locate resources, information, new ideas, emotional support, and inspiration. This timely book explains the research and theory behind social networks (face-to-face and online), describes what effective social networking for educators looks like, reveals common obstacles that new teachers…

Baker-Doyle, Kira J.

2011-01-01

403

Cooperative tertiary interaction network guides RNA folding  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Non-coding RNAs form unique three-dimensional structures, which perform many biochemical and regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting and native PAGE. Double and triple mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on native state stability. Instead, formation of core and peripheral structural motifs are cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native topology of the ribozyme. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses non-native structures and makes the search for the native state more efficient. We suggest that cooperativity in non-coding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures that promote a unique fold despite a rugged energy landscape. PMID:22500801

Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, Robert M.; Woodson1, Sarah A.

2012-01-01

404

Dynamic interaction networks in a hierarchically organized tissue  

E-print Network

Dynamic interaction networks in a hierarchically organized tissue Daniel C Kirouac1,11 , Caryn Ito1 understood. Herein, we describe the structure and dynamics of intercellular and intracellular networks

Zandstra, Peter W.

405

Recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction data has made it possible to understand the basic components and organization of cell machinery from the network level. The arising challenge is how to analyze such complex interacting data to reveal the principles of cellular organization, processes and functions. Many studies have shown that clustering protein interaction network is an effective approach

Jianxin Wang; Min Li; Youping Deng; Yi Pan

2010-01-01

406

ET Toxic Metals Replacement Review SEA Spring Face to Face  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The information contained in the presentation covers development work carried out under SDS projects. The intent of the effort is to find chrome(VI) free alternates to our current chromated processing solutions. The information presented reports progress in work aimed to replace our alkaline cleaner (Turco 4215), conversion coat (Iridite 14-2) and chrome (VI) compounds used in LOx tank hydrostatic proof test solution. To date we have found candidates for use in the proof test solution and alkaline cleaner. These candidates are in the final stages of testing. Lab data is reported in the presentation.

Pratz, Earl

2007-01-01

407

Professional development technology-assisted versus face-to-face  

Microsoft Academic Search

Education is one of the most political topics of today and teachers need highly effective professional development training to meet the challenges required for educating all students with their diverse needs. The educational process is a very complex mission and teachers must work collaboratively to acquire new and effective methods and strategies to impact high levels of student achievement. Teachers

J. Wylie Sirk

2011-01-01

408

Colorado Springs In addition to face-to-face instruction,  

E-print Network

a regionally- accredited institution · 18 credits in social and behavioral sciences including the following by socio-behavioral and ecosystems knowledge rooted in ideologies that include democracy, humanism combination of the following courses: sociology, psychology, economics, political science, anthropology

409

Making the Transition from Face-to-Face to Cyberspace  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College and university faculty members are comfortable with their role as facilitators of learning in the traditional classroom setting. However, how do they move a current course to the online format? Is an online course merely a transfer of materials used in the course to an online format? The experiences and research results of these authors…

Simmons, Susan; Jones, Wesley, Jr.; Silver, Stephen

2004-01-01

410

Technology as small group face-to-face Collaborative Scaffolding  

Microsoft Academic Search

a b s t r a c t There is a wealth of evidence that collaboration between learners can enhance the outcomes for all con- cerned. This supports the theorization of learning as a socio-cultural practice, framed by Vygotsky and developed by other researchers such as Rogoff, Lave and Wenger. However, there is also evidence that working collaboratively may not

Miguel Nussbaum; Claudio Alvarez; Angela Mcfarlane; Florencia Gomez; Susana Claro; Darinka Radovic

2009-01-01

411

Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online education has emerged in the 21st century as a popular alternative to traditional education. Proponents argue that online education provides opportunities for learners that they would otherwise do without (Beard & Harper, 2002; Hay, Peltier, & Drago, 2004). Opponents (see, for example, Hay et al., 2004) have argued, however, that the loss…

Beck, Victoria Simpson

2010-01-01

412

Face to Face: Stories from the Aftermath of Infamy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the wake of 9/11, many Muslims around the United States faced a backlash of resentment and anger. This groundswell of emotion was not without parallel, as Japanese and Japanese-Americans faced a similar reaction after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. The Independent Television Service has developed this Web site to bring a human face to the experiences of Muslims and Japanese people in the United States by collecting these powerful interviews from members of both groups. On the site, visitors can listen to stories from older Japanese-Americans talk about their experiences on the West Coast after Pearl Harbor, and the experiences of Muslims, both young and old. The interviews are divided into thematic sections, such as "Fear," "Internment," "Identity," and "Being American." At another section of the site, visitors can respond to the stories, and a glossary of terms is also provided as background material. Overall, this site serves as a fine educational tool, and for those looking for a number of perspectives on the experience of living in America.

413

User interface requirements for face to face groupware  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the user interface of the Capture Lab, a computer-supported meeting room that has been in operation since late 1987. One goal of the Capture Lab design is to support meetings of business people (who are often novice computer users) without requiring an additional person to serve as a computer technician or facilitator. This paper discusses the user

Mary Elwart-Keys; David Halonen; Marjorie Horton; Robert Kass; Paul Scott

1990-01-01

414

Teamwork through Team Building: Face-to-Face to Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the ways the authors incorporated team-building activities into our online business writing courses by interrogating the ways that kinesthetic learning translates into the electronic realm. The authors review foundational theories of team building, including Cog's Ladder and Tuckman's Stages, and offer sample exercises they…

Staggers, Julie; Garcia, Susan; Nagelhout, Ed

2008-01-01

415

Online and Face-to-Face Training: A Cost Matrix  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online instruction gains an increasing presence due to associated benefits, including the ability to disregard geographical and time constraints, and the belief that online training is more cost efficient. This paper provides a discussion of issues to be faced by HRD professionals who intend to move the training environment online in response to…

Jeffcoat Bartley, Sharon; Golek, Jennifer H.

2004-01-01

416

Verbmobil - Translation of Face-To-Face Dialogs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Verbmobil is a long-term project on the translation of spontaneous language in negotiation dialogs. We describe the goals of the project, the chosen discourse domains and the initial project schedule. We discuss some of the distinguishing features of Verbmobil and introduce the notion of translation on demand and variable depth of processing in speech translation. Finally, the role of anytime

Wolfgang Wahlster

1993-01-01

417

Collaborative recall in face-to-face and electronic groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

When people remember shared experiences, the amount they recall as a collaborating group is less than the amount obtained by pooling their individual memories. We tested the hypothesis that reduced group productivity can be attributed, at least in part, to content filtering, where information is omitted from group products either because individuals fail to retrieve it or choose to withhold

Justina Ohaeri Ekeocha; Susan E. Brennan

2008-01-01

418

Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning Supported by Mobile Phones  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of handheld computers in educational contexts has increased considerably in recent years and their value as a teaching tool has been confirmed by many positive experiences, particular within collaborative learning systems (Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning [MCSCL]). The cost of the devices has hindered widespread use in…

Echeverria, Alejandro; Nussbaum, Miguel; Calderon, Juan Felipe; Bravo, Claudio; Infante, Cristian; Vasquez, Andrea

2011-01-01

419

Fuzzy-rule-based Adaptive Resource Control for Information Sharing in P2P Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With more and more peer-to-peer (P2P) technologies available for online collaboration and information sharing, people can launch more and more collaborative work in online social networks with friends, colleagues, and even strangers. Without face-to-face interactions, the question of who can be trusted and then share information with becomes a big concern of a user in these online social networks. This paper introduces an adaptive control service using fuzzy logic in preference definition for P2P information sharing control, and designs a novel decision-making mechanism using formal fuzzy rules and reasoning mechanisms adjusting P2P information sharing status following individual users' preferences. Applications of this adaptive control service into different information sharing environments show that this service can provide a convenient and accurate P2P information sharing control for individual users in P2P networks.

Wu, Zhengping; Wu, Hao

420

Bootstrapping under constraint for the assessment of group behavior in human contact networks  

E-print Network

The increasing availability of time --and space-- resolved data describing human activities and interactions gives insights into both static and dynamic properties of human behavior. In practice, nevertheless, real-world datasets can often be considered as only one realisation of a particular event. This highlights a key issue in social network analysis: the statistical significance of estimated properties. In this context, we focus here on the assessment of quantitative features of specific subset of nodes in empirical networks. We present a resampling method based on bootstrapping groups of nodes under constraints within the empirical network. The method enables us to define confidence intervals for various Null Hypotheses concerning relevant properties of the subset of nodes under consideration, in order to characterize its behavior as "normal" or not. We apply this method to a high resolution dataset describing the face-to-face proximity of individuals during two co-located scientific conferences. As a ca...

Tremblay, Nicolas; Forest, Cary; Nornberg, Mark; Pinton, Jean-François; Borgnat, Pierre

2012-01-01

421

The effects of metacognitive instruction embedded within an asynchronous learning network on scientific inquiry skills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study is aimed at investigating the effects of four learning methods on students’ scientific inquiry skills. The four learning methods are: (a) metacognitive-guided inquiry within asynchronous learning networked technology (MINT); (b) an asynchronous learning network (ALN) with no metacognitive guidance; (c) metacognitive-guided inquiry embedded within face-to-face (F2F) interaction; and (d) F2F interaction with no metacognitive guidance. The study examined general scientific ability and domain-specific inquiry skills in microbiology. Participants were 407 10th-grade students (15 years old). The MINT research group significantly outperformed all other research groups, and F2F (group d) acquired the lowest mean scores. No significant differences were found between research groups (b) and (c). MINT makes significant contributions to students’ achievements in designing experiments and drawing conclusions. The novel use of metacognitive training within an ALN environment demonstrates the advantage of enhancing the effects of ALN on students’ achievements in science.

Zion, Michal; Michalsky, Tova; Mevarech, Zemira R.

2005-08-01

422

Spinning Multiple Social Networks for Semantic Web  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are important for the Semantic Web. Several means can be used to obtain social networks: using social networking services, aggregating Friend- of-a-Friend (FOAF) documents, mining text informa- tion on the Web or in e-mail messages, and observing face-to-face communication using sensors. Integrating multiple social networks is a key issue for further uti- lization of social networks in the

Yutaka Matsuo; Masahiro Hamasaki; Yoshiyuki Nakamura; Takuichi Nishimura; Kôiti Hasida; Hideaki Takeda; Junichiro Mori; Danushka Bollegala; Mitsuru Ishizuka

2006-01-01

423

Enhancing the Functional Content of Eukaryotic Protein Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Protein interaction networks are a promising type of data for studying complex biological systems. However, despite the rich information embedded in these networks, these networks face important data quality challenges of noise and incompleteness that adversely affect the results obtained from their analysis. Here, we apply a robust measure of local network structure called common neighborhood similarity (CNS) to address these challenges. Although several CNS measures have been proposed in the literature, an understanding of their relative efficacies for the analysis of interaction networks has been lacking. We follow the framework of graph transformation to convert the given interaction network into a transformed network corresponding to a variety of CNS measures evaluated. The effectiveness of each measure is then estimated by comparing the quality of protein function predictions obtained from its corresponding transformed network with those from the original network. Using a large set of human and fly protein interactions, and a set of over GO terms for both, we find that several of the transformed networks produce more accurate predictions than those obtained from the original network. In particular, the measure and other continuous CNS measures perform well this task, especially for large networks. Further investigation reveals that the two major factors contributing to this improvement are the abilities of CNS measures to prune out noisy edges and enhance functional coherence in the transformed networks. PMID:25275489

Pandey, Gaurav; Arora, Sonali; Manocha, Sahil; Whalen, Sean

2014-01-01

424

Interactive graphics interface for power system network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evolution in user-machine interfaces for power system network analysis software is examined, and an interactive graphics approach is described. Batch and interactive processing are defined, and the drawbacks of text-based interactive interfaces are identified. The development of a user-machine interface for power system network analysis using interactive graphics is described. The conceptual model used to visualize the power system

S. Chan

1990-01-01

425

Discrete network models of interacting nephrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The kidney is one of the major organs involved in whole-body homeostasis, and exhibits many of the properties of a complex system. The functional unit of the kidney is the nephron, a complex, segmented tube into which blood plasma is filtered and its composition adjusted. Although the behaviour of individual nephrons can fluctuate widely and even chaotically, the behaviour of the kidney remains stable. In this paper, we investigate how the filtration rate of a multi-nephron system is affected by interactions between nephrons. We introduce a discrete-time multi-nephron network model. The tubular mechanisms that have the greatest effect on filtration rate are the transport of sodium and water, consequently our model attempts to capture these mechanisms. Multi-nephron systems also incorporate two competing coupling mechanisms-vascular and hemodynamic-that enforce in-phase and anti-phase synchronisations respectively. Using a two-nephron model, we demonstrate how changing the strength of the hemodynamic coupling mechanism and changing the arterial blood pressure have equivalent effects on the system. The same two-nephron system is then used to demonstrate the interactions that arise between the two coupling mechanisms. We conclude by arguing that our approach is scalable to large numbers of nephrons, based on the performance characteristics of the model.

Moss, Rob; Kazmierczak, Ed; Kirley, Michael; Harris, Peter

2009-11-01

426

Interactive Transmission Network Planning Using a Least-Effort Criterion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an interactive software tool for long term transmission system expansion planning. All network synthesis is based on the DC power-flow model. The ranking of new additions is based on a ''least-effort'' criterion that takes into account the pattern of flow distribution in the network. An automatic network synthesis algorithm can be used for static studies. The reinforcement

A. Monticelli; A. Santos; M. V. F. Pereira; S. H. Cunha; B. J. Parker; J. C. G. Praca

1982-01-01

427

THE ETHICS OF ECONOMIC INTERACTIONS IN THE NETWORK ECONOMY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rise of the network economy brought about the strong conviction that economic interactions in the network economy could be based on cooperative, informed and transparent communication, which would counteract the negative welfare effects of unequal bargaining power, the opacity of the intentions of the parties, opportunistic behaviors, monopolies and market failures. So the contracts of the network economy nowadays

László Fekete

2006-01-01

428

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a  

E-print Network

. O'Gorman# , Kristian Trøjelsgaard*, Jason M. Tylianakis}} , Mariana Morais Vidal} , Guy Woodward.4 Antagonistic interactions within food webs 134 5.5 Antagonistic host­parasitoid interactions 135 5.6 Summary.3 Mutualistic plant­frugivore networks 150 6.4 Mutualistic plant­ant networks 153 6.5 Antagonistic food webs 154

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

429

Network game design: hints and implications of player interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

While psychologists analyze network game-playing behavior in terms of players' social interaction and experience, un- derstanding user behavior is equally important to network researchers, because how users act determines how well net- work systems, such as online games, perform. To gain a bet- ter understanding of patterns of player interaction and their implications for game design, we analyze a 1,

Kuan-ta Chen; Chin-laung Lei

2006-01-01

430

Joint clustering of protein interaction networks through Markov random walk.  

PubMed

Biological networks obtained by high-throughput profiling or human curation are typically noisy. For functional module identification, single network clustering algorithms may not yield accurate and robust results. In order to borrow information across multiple sources to alleviate such problems due to data quality, we propose a new joint network clustering algorithm ASModel in this paper. We construct an integrated network to combine network topological information based on protein-protein interaction (PPI) datasets and homological information introduced by constituent similarity between proteins across networks. A novel random walk strategy on the integrated network is developed for joint network clustering and an optimization problem is formulated by searching for low conductance sets defined on the derived transition matrix of the random walk, which fuses both topology and homology information. The optimization problem of joint clustering is solved by a derived spectral clustering algorithm. Network clustering using several state-of-the-art algorithms has been implemented to both PPI networks within the same species (two yeast PPI networks and two human PPI networks) and those from different species (a yeast PPI network and a human PPI network). Experimental results demonstrate that ASModel outperforms the existing single network clustering algorithms as well as another recent joint clustering algorithm in terms of complex prediction and Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. PMID:24565376

Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

2014-01-01

431

Guaranteeing global synchronization in networks with stochastic interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We design the interactions between oscillators communicating via variably delayed pulse coupling to guarantee their synchronization on arbitrary network topologies. We identify a class of response functions and prove convergence to network-wide synchrony from arbitrary initial conditions. Synchrony is achieved if the pulse emission is unreliable or intentionally probabilistic. These results support the design of scalable, reliable and energy-efficient communication protocols for fully distributed synchronization as needed, e.g., in mobile phone networks, embedded systems, sensor networks and autonomously interacting swarm robots.

Klinglmayr, Johannes; Kirst, Christoph; Bettstetter, Christian; Timme, Marc

2012-07-01

432

Extended Hierarchical Task Network Planning for Interactive Comedy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We focus on interactive comedy, a relatively new genre in interactive drama, in this study. To be able to maintain the story, we adopt hierarchical task network planning (HTN) for planning of a char- acter agent. We then extend HTN such that the extended HTN allows for the direct use of character failures, higher interactions with the viewer, and more

Ruck Thawonmas; Keisuke Tanaka; Hiroki Hassaku

2003-01-01

433

VNP: Interactive Visual Network Pharmacology of Diseases, Targets, and Drugs  

PubMed Central

In drug discovery, promiscuous targets, multifactorial diseases, and “dirty” drugs construct complex network relationships. Network pharmacology description and analysis not only give a systems-level understanding of drug action and disease complexity but can also help to improve the efficiency of target selection and drug design. Visual network pharmacology (VNP) is developed to visualize network pharmacology of targets, diseases, and drugs with a graph network by using disease, target or drug names, chemical structures, or protein sequence. To our knowledge, VNP is the first free interactive VNP server that should be very helpful for systems pharmacology research. VNP is freely available at http://cadd.whu.edu.cn/ditad/vnpsearch. PMID:24622768

Hu, Q-N; Deng, Z; Tu, W; Yang, X; Meng, Z-B; Deng, Z-X; Liu, J

2014-01-01

434

Interactive Care Wall  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a video-mediated interactive care wall as a way of sup- porting a face-to-face like care between elders and their remote caregivers. This interactive care wall attempts to interconnect two physically-disjoint spaces by linking one wall on the elder's living space and one wall on the caregivers' liv- ing space. To make this interconnection appears seamless, the care wall

Chu-feng Lien; Hao-ji Wu; Hao-hua Chu

435

Protein Interactions and Fluctuations in a Proteomic Network using an Elastic Network Model  

E-print Network

Protein Interactions and Fluctuations in a Proteomic Network using an Elastic Network Model http://www.jbsdonline.com Abstract A set of protein conformations are analyzed by normal mode analysis. An elastic network model different species. Slow modes that are associated with the function of proteins have common features among

Demirel, Melik C.

436

Key Factor and Interaction for Network Performance in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present a comprehensive statistical experiment and identify the key factors and interactions that impact network performance over mobile ad hoc networks. We use the design of experiments software named Design-Ease to establish the mathematical model for analyzing the set of simulation results from ns2. A variety of important parameters for network performance including routing protocol, node

Yiming Wang; Dritan Kaleshi; Michael H Barton; Jianhua He; Li Li; A. Munro; Zhong Fan

2007-01-01

437

Socioeconomic Networks with Long-Range Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In well networked communities, information is often shared informally among an individual’s direct and indirect acquaintances. Here we study a modified version of a model previously proposed by Jackson and Wolinsky to account for communicating information and allocating goods in socioeconomic networks. The model defines a utility function of node i which is a weighted sum of contributions from all

Rui Carvalho; Giulia Iori

2007-01-01

438

Understanding Latent Interactions in Online Social Networks  

E-print Network

,wangxiao,huangpeng,swp,dyf}@net.pku.edu.cn, {bowlin,ravenben}@cs.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT Popular online social networks (OSNs) like Facebook and Twitter to date. All friendship links in Renren are public, allowing us to exhaustively crawl a connected graph Renren network, and use statistics of profile visits to study issues of user profile popularity

Zhao, Ben Y.

439

Interaction Networks: Generating High Level Hints Based on Network Community Clustering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We introduce a novel data structure, the Interaction Network, for representing interaction-data from open problem solving environment tutors. We show how using network community detecting techniques are used to identify sub-goals in problems in a logic tutor. We then use those community structures to generate high level hints between sub-goals.…

Eagle, Michael; Johnson, Matthew; Barnes, Tiffany

2012-01-01

440

Communication networks and loser effects interact to influence the outcome of aggressive interactions in  

E-print Network

Communication networks and loser effects interact to influence the outcome of aggressive. Specifically, loser effects have a greater influence on fight dynamics than elements of communication networks social history may be masking any effects that visual communication networks have on agonistic behaviour

Moore, Paul A.

441

Optimizing a global alignment of protein interaction networks  

E-print Network

Motivation: The global alignment of protein interaction networks is a widely studied problem. It is an important first step in understanding the relationship between the proteins in different species and identifying ...

Ma, C.-Y.

442

The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database and related tools 2005 update  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND) (http:\\/\\/bind.ca) archives biomolecular interac- tion, reaction, complex and pathway information. Our aim is to curate the details about molecular interac- tionsthatarisefrompublishedexperimentalresearch and to provide this information, as well as tools to

C. Alfarano; C. E. Andrade; K. Anthony; N. Bahroos; M. Bajec; K. Bantoft; Doron Betel; B. Bobechko; K. Boutilier; E. Burgess; K. Buzadzija; R. Cavero; C. D'abreo; Ian Donaldson; D. Dorairajoo; M. J. Dumontier; M. R. Dumontier; V. Earles; R. Farrall; Howard J. Feldman; E. Garderman; Y. Gong; R. Gonzaga; V. Grytsan; E. Gryz; V. Gu; E. Haldorsen; A. Halupa; R. Haw; A. Hrvojic; L. Hurrell; Ruth Isserlin; F. Jack; F. Juma; A. Khan; T. Kon; S. Konopinsky; V. Le; E. Lee; S. Ling; M. Magidin; J. Moniakis; J. Montojo; S. Moore; B. Muskat; I. Ng; J. P. Paraiso; B. Parker; Greg Pintilie; R. Pirone; John J. Salama; S. Sgro; T. Shan; Y. Shu; J. Siew; D. Skinner; Kevin A. Snyder; R. Stasiuk; D. Strumpf; Brigitte Tuekam; S. Tao; Z. Wang; M. White; R. Willis; Cheryl Wolting; S. Wong; A. Wrong; C. Xin; R. Yao; B. Yates; S. Zhang; K. Zheng; Tony Pawson; B. F. Francis Ouellette; Christopher W. V. Hogue

2005-01-01

443

Wireless network control of interacting Rydberg atoms.  

PubMed

We identify a relation between the dynamics of ultracold Rydberg gases in which atoms experience a strong dipole blockade and spontaneous emission, and a stochastic process that models certain wireless random-access networks. We then transfer insights and techniques initially developed for these wireless networks to the realm of Rydberg gases, and explain how the Rydberg gas can be driven into crystal formations using our understanding of wireless networks. Finally, we propose a method to determine Rabi frequencies (laser intensities) such that particles in the Rydberg gas are excited with specified target excitation probabilities, providing control over mixed-state populations. PMID:24815645

Sanders, Jaron; van Bijnen, Rick; Vredenbregt, Edgar; Kokkelmans, Servaas

2014-04-25

444

Wireless Network Control of Interacting Rydberg Atoms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We identify a relation between the dynamics of ultracold Rydberg gases in which atoms experience a strong dipole blockade and spontaneous emission, and a stochastic process that models certain wireless random-access networks. We then transfer insights and techniques initially developed for these wireless networks to the realm of Rydberg gases, and explain how the Rydberg gas can be driven into crystal formations using our understanding of wireless networks. Finally, we propose a method to determine Rabi frequencies (laser intensities) such that particles in the Rydberg gas are excited with specified target excitation probabilities, providing control over mixed-state populations.

Sanders, Jaron; van Bijnen, Rick; Vredenbregt, Edgar; Kokkelmans, Servaas

2014-04-01

445

Proteins: From Structural Classification to Amino Acid Interaction Networks  

E-print Network

Proteins: From Structural Classification to Amino Acid Interaction Networks O. GACI LITIS are the protein's amino acids and whose edges are the inter- actions between them. Using a graph theory approach, we identify a number of properties of these networks. Some of them are common to all proteins, while

Boyer, Edmond

446

An interactive network of time-sharing computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the design and implementation of an experimental interactive time-sharing network of computers created as a joint effort by Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU), Princeton University and the Research Division of IBM. The motivation behind the creation, the functional capabilities, and applications of the network are some of the key points addressed. Design philosophy and major implementation considerations are thoroughly

Ronald M. Rutledge; Albin L. Vareha; Lee C. Varian; Allan H. Weis; Salomon F. Seroussi; James W. Mayer; Joan F. Jaffe; Mary Anne K. Angell

1969-01-01

447

The role of protein interaction networks in systems biomedicine  

PubMed Central

The challenging task of studying and modeling complex dynamics of biological systems in order to describe various human diseases has gathered great interest in recent years. Major biological processes are mediated through protein interactions, hence there is a need to understand the chaotic network that forms these processes in pursuance of understanding human diseases. The applications of protein interaction networks to disease datasets allow the identification of genes and proteins associated with diseases, the study of network properties, identification of subnetworks, and network-based disease gene classification. Although various protein interaction network analysis strategies have been employed, grand challenges are still existing. Global understanding of protein interaction networks via integration of high-throughput functional genomics data from different levels will allow researchers to examine the disease pathways and identify strategies to control them. As a result, it seems likely that more personalized, more accurate and more rapid disease gene diagnostic techniques will be devised in the future, as well as novel strategies that are more personalized. This mini-review summarizes the current practice of protein interaction networks in medical research as well as challenges to be overcome. PMID:25379140

Sevimoglu, Tuba; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

2014-01-01

448

The Firm's Management of Social Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consumer choice is influenced in a direct and meaningful way by the actions taken by others. These “actions” range from face-to-face recommendations from a friend to the passive observation of what a stranger is wearing. We refer to the set of such contexts as “social interactions” (SI). We believe that at least some of the SI effects are partially within

David Godes; Dina Mayzlin; Yubo Chen; Sanjiv Das; Chrysanthos Dellarocas; Bruce Pfeiffer; Barak Libai; Subrata Sen; Mengze Shi; Peeter Verlegh

2005-01-01

449

Communication Cost, Belief Development, and Structural Change: A Dynamic Model of Networked Communities of Practice  

E-print Network

. The choice of communication infrastructure affects the development of communities of practice. Face-to-faceCommunication Cost, Belief Development, and Structural Change: A Dynamic Model of Networked/10/00 Communication Cost, Belief Development, and Structural Change: A Dynamic Model of Networked Communities

Sadeh, Norman M.

450

Recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

The increasing availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction data has made it possible to understand the basic components and organization of cell machinery from the network level. The arising challenge is how to analyze such complex interacting data to reveal the principles of cellular organization, processes and functions. Many studies have shown that clustering protein interaction network is an effective approach for identifying protein complexes or functional modules, which has become a major research topic in systems biology. In this review, recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks will be presented in detail. The predictions of protein functions and interactions based on modules will be covered. Finally, the performance of different clustering methods will be compared and the directions for future research will be discussed. PMID:21143777

2010-01-01

451

NetworkAnalyst--integrative approaches for protein-protein interaction network analysis and visual exploration.  

PubMed

Biological network analysis is a powerful approach to gain systems-level understanding of patterns of gene expression in different cell types, disease states and other biological/experimental conditions. Three consecutive steps are required--identification of genes or proteins of interest, network construction and network analysis and visualization. To date, researchers have to learn to use a combination of several tools to accomplish this task. In addition, interactive visualization of large networks has been primarily restricted to locally installed programs. To address these challenges, we have developed NetworkAnalyst, taking advantage of state-of-the-art web technologies, to enable high performance network analysis with rich user experience. NetworkAnalyst integrates all three steps and presents the results via a powerful online network visualization framework. Users can upload gene or protein lists, single or multiple gene expression datasets to perform comprehensive gene annotation and differential expression analysis. Significant genes are mapped to our manually curated protein-protein interaction database to construct relevant networks. The results are presented through standard web browsers for network analysis and interactive exploration. NetworkAnalyst supports common functions for network topology and module analyses. Users can easily search, zoom and highlight nodes or modules, as well as perform functional enrichment analysis on these selections. The networks can be customized with different layouts, colors or node sizes, and exported as PNG, PDF or GraphML files. Comprehensive FAQs, tutorials and context-based tips and instructions are provided. NetworkAnalyst currently supports protein-protein interaction network analysis for human and mouse and is freely available at http://www.networkanalyst.ca. PMID:24861621

Xia, Jianguo; Benner, Maia J; Hancock, Robert E W

2014-07-01

452

NetworkAnalyst - integrative approaches for protein-protein interaction network analysis and visual exploration  

PubMed Central

Biological network analysis is a powerful approach to gain systems-level understanding of patterns of gene expression in different cell types, disease states and other biological/experimental conditions. Three consecutive steps are required - identification of genes or proteins of interest, network construction and network analysis and visualization. To date, researchers have to learn to use a combination of several tools to accomplish this task. In addition, interactive visualization of large networks has been primarily restricted to locally installed programs. To address these challenges, we have developed NetworkAnalyst, taking advantage of state-of-the-art web technologies, to enable high performance network analysis with rich user experience. NetworkAnalyst integrates all three steps and presents the results via a powerful online network visualization framework. Users can upload gene or protein lists, single or multiple gene expression datasets to perform comprehensive gene annotation and differential expression analysis. Significant genes are mapped to our manually curated protein-protein interaction database to construct relevant networks. The results are presented through standard web browsers for network analysis and interactive exploration. NetworkAnalyst supports common functions for network topology and module analyses. Users can easily search, zoom and highlight nodes or modules, as well as perform functional enrichment analysis on these selections. The networks can be customized with different layouts, colors or node sizes, and exported as PNG, PDF or GraphML files. Comprehensive FAQs, tutorials and context-based tips and instructions are provided. NetworkAnalyst currently supports protein-protein interaction network analysis for human and mouse and is freely available at http://www.networkanalyst.ca. PMID:24861621

Xia, Jianguo; Benner, Maia J.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

2014-01-01

453

A web-based protein interaction network visualizer  

PubMed Central

Background Interaction between proteins is one of the most important mechanisms in the execution of cellular functions. The study of these interactions has provided insight into the functioning of an organism’s processes. As of October 2013, Homo sapiens had over 170000 Protein-Protein interactions (PPI) registered in the Interologous Interaction Database, which is only one of the many public resources where protein interactions can be accessed. These numbers exemplify the volume of data that research on the topic has generated. Visualization of large data sets is a well known strategy to make sense of information, and protein interaction data is no exception. There are several tools that allow the exploration of this data, providing different methods to visualize protein network interactions. However, there is still no native web tool that allows this data to be explored interactively online. Results Given the advances that web technologies have made recently it is time to bring these interactive views to the web to provide an easily accessible forum to visualize PPI. We have created a Web-based Protein Interaction Network Visualizer: PINV, an open source, native web application that facilitates the visualization of protein interactions (http://biosual.cbio.uct.ac.za/pinv.html). We developed PINV as a set of components that follow the protocol defined in BioJS and use the D3 library to create the graphic layouts. We demonstrate the use of PINV with multi-organism interaction networks for a predicted target from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, its interacting partners and its orthologs. Conclusions The resultant tool provides an attractive view of complex, fully interactive networks with components that allow the querying, filtering and manipulation of the visible subset. Moreover, as a web resource, PINV simplifies sharing and publishing, activities which are vital in today’s research collaborative environments. The source code is freely available for download at https://github.com/4ndr01d3/biosual. PMID:24885165

2014-01-01

454

The MIT Media Lab's Glass Infrastructure: An Interactive Information System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The MIT Media Lab's Glass Infrastructure is a place-based, social, interactive information system that encourages face-to-face conversations to enhance visitors' experience and address the information-compartmentalization problem inherent in most complex organizations. This department is part of a special issue on pervasive interaction.

Michail Bletsas

2012-01-01

455

Teachers' Support with Ad-Hoc Collaborative Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Efforts to improve the educational process must focus on those most responsible for implementing it: the teachers. It is with them in mind that we propose a face-to-face computer-supported collaborative learning system that uses wirelessly networked hand-held computers to create an environment for helping students assimilate and transfer…

Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Lpez, X.; Rodrguez, P.; Santelices, R.; Rosas, R.; Marianov, V.

2005-01-01

456

Adolescents' and Emerging Adults' Social Networking Online: Homophily or Diversity?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than half of all online American adolescents and emerging adults have created personal profiles for social networking on the Internet. Does homophily in their offline friendships extend online? Drawing mainly on research of face-to-face friendship, we collected data from the public spaces, called "walls," of 129 young Americans ages 16 to 19…

Mazur, Elizabeth; Richards, Lacey

2011-01-01

457

Cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions during anesthesia.  

PubMed

General anesthetics are used during medical and surgical procedures to reversibly induce a state of total unconsciousness in patients. Here, we investigate, from a dynamic network perspective, how the cortical and cardiovascular systems behave during anesthesia by applying nonparametric spectral techniques to cortical electroencephalography, electrocardiogram and respiratory signals recorded from anesthetized rats under two drugs, ketamine-xylazine (KX) and pentobarbital (PB). We find that the patterns of low-frequency cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions may undergo significant changes in network activity strengths and in number of network links at different depths of anesthesia dependent upon anesthetics used. PMID:23028572

Shiogai, Yuri; Dhamala, Mukesh; Oshima, Kumiko; Hasler, Martin

2012-01-01

458

Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction  

PubMed Central

Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

Escalera, Sergio; Baro, Xavier; Vitria, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

459

Behavioural phenotype affects social interactions in an animal network  

PubMed Central

Animal social networks can be extremely complex and are characterized by highly non-random interactions between group members. However, very little is known about the underlying factors affecting interaction preferences, and hence network structure. One possibility is that behavioural differences between individuals, such as how bold or shy they are, can affect the frequency and distribution of their interactions within a network. We tested this using individually marked three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and found that bold individuals had fewer overall interactions than shy fish, but tended to distribute their interactions more evenly across all group members. Shy fish, on the other hand, tended to associate preferentially with a small number of other group members, leading to a highly skewed distribution of interactions. This was mediated by the reduced tendency of shy fish to move to a new location within the tank when they were interacting with another individual; bold fish showed no such tendency and were equally likely to move irrespective of whether they were interacting or not. The results show that animal social network structure can be affected by the behavioural composition of group members and have important implications for understanding the spread of information and disease in social groups. PMID:18647713

Pike, Thomas W; Samanta, Madhumita; Lindstrom, Jan; Royle, Nick J

2008-01-01

460

Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

2010-01-01

461

Optimization of an interactive distributive computer network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The activities under a cooperative agreement for the development of a computer network are briefly summarized. Research activities covered are: computer operating systems optimization and integration; software development and implementation of the IRIS (Infrared Imaging of Shuttle) Experiment; and software design, development, and implementation of the APS (Aerosol Particle System) Experiment.

Frederick, V.

1985-01-01

462

Tracking Serendipitous Interactions: How Individual Cultures Shape the Office  

E-print Network

their nat- ural behavior [10], and surveys can suffer from partici- pants giving answers they feel are socially desirable, or misremembering [11, 12]. Recently, technological meth- ods such as wearable badges and sensors have enabled so- cial interaction... is face-to-face (“35% of the variation in a team’s performance can be accounted for simply by the number of face-to-face exchanges among team mem- bers” [5]), while the least valuable forms are e-mail and mobile text messages. The significance...

Brown, Chloe; Efstratiou, Christos; Leontiadis, Ilias; Quercia, Daniele; Mascolo, Cecilia

2014-02-15

463

NetworkView: 3D display and analysis of protein?RNA interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Summary: NetworkView is an application for the display and analysis of protein·RNA interaction networks derived from structure and/or dynamics. These networks typically model individual protein residues and nucleic acid monomers as nodes and their pairwise contacts as edges with associated weights. NetworkView projects the network onto the underlying 3D molecular structure so that visualization and analysis of the network can be coupled to physical and biological properties. NetworkView is implemented as a plugin to the molecular visualization software VMD. Availability and implementation: NetworkView is included with VMD, which is available at http://www.ks.uiuc.edu/Research/vmd/. Documentation, tutorials and supporting programs are available at http://www.scs.illinois.edu/schulten/software/. Contact: networkview@scs.illinois.edu PMID:22982572

Eargle, John; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

2012-01-01

464

The Evolutionary Dynamics of Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Inferred from the Reconstruction of Ancient Networks  

PubMed Central

Cellular functions are based on the complex interplay of proteins, therefore the structure and dynamics of these protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are the key to the functional understanding of cells. In the last years, large-scale PPI networks of several model organisms were investigated. A number of theoretical models have been developed to explain both the network formation and the current structure. Favored are models based on duplication and divergence of genes, as they most closely represent the biological foundation of network evolution. However, studies are often based on simulated instead of empirical data or they cover only single organisms. Methodological improvements now allow the analysis of PPI networks of multiple organisms simultaneously as well as the direct modeling of ancestral networks. This provides the opportunity to challenge existing assumptions on network evolution. We utilized present-day PPI networks from integrated datasets of seven model organisms and developed a theoretical and bioinformatic framework for studying the evolutionary dynamics of PPI networks. A novel filtering approach using percolation analysis was developed to remove low confidence interactions based on topological constraints. We then reconstructed the ancient PPI networks of different ancestors, for which the ancestral proteomes, as well as the ancestral interactions, were inferred. Ancestral proteins were reconstructed using orthologous groups on different evolutionary levels. A stochastic approach, using the duplication-divergence model, was developed for estimating the probabilities of ancient interactions from today's PPI networks. The growth rates for nodes, edges, sizes and modularities of the networks indicate multiplicative growth and are consistent with the results from independent static analysis. Our results support the duplication-divergence model of evolution and indicate fractality and multiplicative growth as general properties of the PPI network structure and dynamics. PMID:23526967

Rattei, Thomas; Makse, Hernan A.

2013-01-01

465

Microbial interaction networks in soil and in silico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil harbors a huge number of microbial species interacting through secretion of antibiotics and other chemicals. What patterns of species interactions allow for this astonishing biodiversity to be sustained, and how do these interactions evolve? I used a combined experimental-theoretical approach to tackle these questions. Focusing on bacteria from the genus Steptomyces, known for their diverse secondary metabolism, I isolated 64 natural strains from several individual grains of soil and systematically measured all pairwise interactions among them. Quantitative measurements on such scale were enabled by a novel experimental platform based on robotic handling, a custom scanner array and automatic image analysis. This unique platform allowed the simultaneous capturing of ˜15,000 time-lapse movies of growing colonies of each isolate on media conditioned by each of the other isolates. The data revealed a rich network of strong negative (inhibitory) and positive (stimulating) interactions. Analysis of this network and the phylogeny of the isolates, together with mathematical modeling of microbial communities, revealed that: 1) The network of interactions has three special properties: ``balance'', ``bi- modality'' and ``reciprocity''; 2) The interaction network is fast evolving; 3) Mathematical modeling explains how rapid evolution can give rise to the three special properties through an interplay between ecology and evolution. These properties are not a result of stable co-existence, but rather of continuous evolutionary turnover of strains with different production and resistance capabilities.

Vetsigian, Kalin

2012-02-01

466

Exploring Function Prediction in Protein Interaction Networks via Clustering Methods  

PubMed Central

Complex networks have recently become the focus of research in many fields. Their structure reveals crucial information for the nodes, how they connect and share information. In our work we analyze protein interaction networks as complex networks for their functional modular structure and later use that information in the functional annotation of proteins within the network. We propose several graph representations for the protein interaction network, each having different level of complexity and inclusion of the annotation information within the graph. We aim to explore what the benefits and the drawbacks of these proposed graphs are, when they are used in the function prediction process via clustering methods. For making this cluster based prediction, we adopt well established approaches for cluster detection in complex networks using most recent representative algorithms that have been proven as efficient in the task at hand. The experiments are performed using a purified and reliable Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network, which is then used to generate the different graph representations. Each of the graph representations is later analysed in combination with each of the clustering algorithms, which have been possibly modified and implemented to fit the specific graph. We evaluate results in regards of biological validity and function prediction performance. Our results indicate that the novel ways of presenting the complex graph improve the prediction process, although the computational complexity should be taken into account when deciding on a particular approach. PMID:24972109

Trivodaliev, Kire; Bogojeska, Aleksandra; Kocarev, Ljupco

2014-01-01

467

Detecting Friendship Within Dynamic Online Interaction Networks  

E-print Network

In many complex social systems, the timing and frequency of interactions between individuals are observable but friendship ties are hidden. Recovering these hidden ties, particularly for casual users who are relatively less active, would enable a wide variety of friendship-aware applications in domains where labeled data are often unavailable, including online advertising and national security. Here, we investigate the accuracy of multiple statistical features, based either purely on temporal interaction patterns or on the cooperative nature of the interactions, for automatically extracting latent social ties. Using self-reported friendship and non-friendship labels derived from an anonymous online survey, we learn highly accurate predictors for recovering hidden friendships within a massive online data set encompassing 18 billion interactions among 17 million individuals of the popular online game Halo: Reach. We find that the accuracy of many features improves as more data accumulates, and cooperative featu...

Merritt, Sears; Mason, Winter; Clauset, Aaron

2013-01-01

468

Topological and Dynamical Properties of Protein Interaction Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter reviews some of the recent research on topological and dynamical properties of Protein-protein Interaction (PPI) networks. In its first part we describe the set of numerical algorithms aimed at: 1) constructing a null-model random network with a desired set of low-level topological properties; 2) detection of over- or under-represented topological patterns such as degree-degree correlations between interacting nodes. In the second part of the chapter we describe a recently developed set of computational tools and analytical methods which allow one to go beyond purely topological studies of PPI networks and efficiently calculate the mass-action equilibrium of protein concentrations and its response to systematic perturbations. In particular, we explore how large (several-fold) changes in total abundance of a small number of proteins shift the equilibrium between free and bound concentrations of proteins throughout the PPI network. Our primary conclusion is that, on average, the effects of such perturbations exponentially decay with the network distance away from the perturbed node. This explains why, despite globally connected topology, individual functional modules in such networks are able to operate fairly independently. Under specific favorable conditions, realized in a significant number of paths in the yeast PPI network, concentration perturbations can selectively propagate over considerable network distances (up to four steps). Such "action-at-a-distance" requires high concentrations of heterodimers along the path as well as low free (unbound) concentration of intermediate proteins.

Maslov, Sergei

469

Ecology 2.0: Coexistence and Domination of Interacting Networks  

E-print Network

The overwhelming success of the web 2.0, with online social networks as key actors, has induced a paradigm shift in the nature of human interactions. The user-driven character of these services for the first time has allowed researchers to quantify large-scale social patterns. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of networks at a system level are still poorly understood. For instance, the simultaneous existence of numerous digital services naturally raises the question under which conditions these services can coexist. In analogy to population dynamics, the digital world is forming a complex ecosystem of interacting networks whose fitnesses depend on their ability to attract and maintain users' attention, which constitutes a limited resource. In this paper, we introduce an ecological theory of the digital world which exhibits a stable coexistence of several networks as well as the domination of a single one, in contrast to the principle of competitive exclusion. Interestingly, our model also predic...

Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja

2014-01-01

470

Correlation between interaction strengths drives stability in large ecological networks.  

PubMed

Food webs have markedly non-random network structure. Ecologists maintain that this non-random structure is key for stability, since large random ecological networks would invariably be unstable and thus should not be observed empirically. Here we show that a simple yet overlooked feature of natural food webs, the correlation between the effects of consumers on resources and those of resources on consumers, substantially accounts for their stability. Remarkably, random food webs built by preserving just the distribution and correlation of interaction strengths have stability properties similar to those of the corresponding empirical systems. Surprisingly, we find that the effect of topological network structure on stability, which has been the focus of countless studies, is small compared to that of correlation. Hence, any study of the effects of network structure on stability must first take into account the distribution and correlation of interaction strengths. PMID:24946877

Tang, Si; Pawar, Samraat; Allesina, Stefano

2014-09-01

471

Integrating protein-protein interaction networks with phenotypes reveals signs of interactions  

PubMed Central

A major objective of systems biology is to organize molecular interactions as networks and to characterize information-flow within networks. We describe a computational framework to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and genetic screens to predict the “signs” of interactions (i.e. activation/inhibition relationships). We constructed a Drosophila melanogaster signed PPI network, consisting of 6,125 signed PPIs connecting 3,352 proteins that can be used to identify positive and negative regulators of signaling pathways and protein complexes. We identified an unexpected role for the metabolic enzymes Enolase and Aldo-keto reductase as positive and negative regulators of proteolysis, respectively. Characterization of the activation/inhibition relationships between physically interacting proteins within signaling pathways will impact our understanding of many biological functions, including signal transduction and mechanisms of disease. PMID:24240319

Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Zirin, Jonathan; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Yilmazel, Bahar; Samsonova, Anastasia A.; Neumüller, Ralph A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Perrimon, Norbert

2013-01-01

472

Default Network Modulation and Large-Scale Network Interactivity in Healthy Young and R. Nathan Spreng and Daniel L. Schacter  

E-print Network

Default Network Modulation and Large-Scale Network Interactivity in Healthy Young and Old Adults R-related changes in default, attention, and control network activity and their interactions in young and old adults analysis and with intrinsic connectivity networks as regions of interest. In both groups, autobiographical

Schacter, Daniel

473

Modelling the Efficiencies and Interactions of Attentional Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posner and colleagues [38,40] assert that attention comprises three distinct anatomical areas of the brain responsible for\\u000a separate aspects of attention, namely alerting, orienting and executive control. Based on this view of attention, the work\\u000a presented here computationally models the attentional networks task (ANT) which can be used to assess the efficiency and interactions\\u000a of these disparate networks, collectively responsible

Fehmida Hussain; Sharon Wood

2008-01-01

474

Topology and static response of interaction networks in molecular biology  

PubMed Central

We introduce a mathematical framework describing static response of networks occurring in molecular biology. This formalism has many similarities with the Laplace–Kirchhoff equations for electrical networks. We introduce the concept of graph boundary and we show how the response of the biological networks to external perturbations can be related to the Dirichlet or Neumann problems for the corresponding equations on the interaction graph. Solutions to these two problems are given in terms of path moduli (measuring path rigidity with respect to the propagation of interaction along the graph). Path moduli are related to loop products in the interaction graph via generalized Mason–Coates formulae. We apply our results to two specific biological examples: the lactose operon and the genetic regulation of lipogenesis. Our applications show consistency with experimental results and in the case of lipogenesis check some hypothesis on the behaviour of hepatic fatty acids on fasting. PMID:16849230

Radulescu, Ovidiu; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Siegel, Anne; Veber, Philippe; Le Borgne, Michel

2005-01-01

475

Prediction and Annotation of Plant Protein Interaction Networks  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale experimental studies of interactions between components of biological systems have been performed for a variety of eukaryotic organisms. However, there is a dearth of such data for plants. Computational methods for prediction of relationships between proteins, primarily based on comparative genomics, provide a useful systems-level view of cellular functioning and can be used to extend information about other eukaryotes to plants. We have predicted networks for Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa indica and japonica and several plant pathogens using the Bioverse (http://bioverse.compbio.washington.edu) and show that they are similar to experimentally-derived interaction networks. Predicted interaction networks for plants can be used to provide novel functional annotations and predictions about plant phenotypes and aid in rational engineering of biosynthesis pathways.

McDermott, Jason E.; Wang, Jun; Yu, Jun; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Samudrala, Ram

2009-02-01

476

Interactive mobile gaming over heterogeneous networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactive, mobile online games have recently become popular thus receiving the attention of researchers. Mobile games represent a particularly interesting case because of the proliferation of smart personal devices and the increasing availability of high speed wireless access points. With this vision, we propose a holistic solution that enables a top quality online gaming experience regardless whether the player is

Claudio E. Palazzi

2007-01-01

477

Networked Interactive Video for Group Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an interactive video system, VISTRAIN (Video-Based Integrated System for Training Applications), which was developed by the National Computing Centre in the United Kingdom for the Scottish Police College to help train police supervisory officers in crowd control. Group training is discussed, and management training applications are…

Eary, John

1992-01-01

478

Evaluating Australian Football League Player Contributions Using Interactive Network Simulation  

PubMed Central

This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL) players to their team’s on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player’s match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong’s Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list “covering the line ”. Key points A simulated interaction matrix for Australian Rules football players is proposed The simulations were carried out by fitting unique negative binomial distributions to each player pairing in a side Eigenvector centrality was calculated for each player in a simulated matrix, then for the team The team centrality measure adequately predicted the team’s winning margin A player’s net effect on margin could hence be estimated by replacing him in the simulated side with another player PMID:24149734

Sargent, Jonathan; Bedford, Anthony

2013-01-01

479

Ising models of strongly coupled biological networks with multivariate interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biological networks consist of a large number of variables that can be coupled by complex multivariate interactions. However, several neuroscience and cell biology experiments have reported that observed statistics of network states can be approximated surprisingly well by maximum entropy models that constrain correlations only within pairs of variables. We would like to verify if this reduction in complexity results from intricacies of biological organization, or if it is a more general attribute of these networks. We generate random networks with p-spin (p>2) interactions, with N spins and M interaction terms. The probability distribution of the network states is then calculated and approximated with a maximum entropy model based on constraining pairwise spin correlations. Depending on the M/N ratio and the strength of the interaction terms, we observe a transition where the pairwise approximation is very good to a region where it fails. This resembles the sat-unsat transition in constraint satisfaction problems. We argue that the pairwise model works when the number of highly probable states is small. We argue that many biological systems must operate in a strongly constrained regime, and hence we expect the pairwise approximation to be accurate for a wide class of problems.

Merchan, Lina; Nemenman, Ilya

2013-03-01

480

Constructing the angiome: a global angiogenesis protein interaction network  

PubMed Central

Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing microvessels. Excessive and insufficient angiogenesis have been associated with many diseases including cancer, age-related macular degeneration, ischemic heart, brain, and skeletal muscle diseases. A comprehensive understanding of angiogenesis regulatory processes is needed to improve treatment of these diseases. To identify proteins related to angiogenesis, we developed a novel integrative framework for diverse sources of high-throughput data. The system, called GeneHits, was used to expand on known angiogenesis pathways to construct the angiome, a protein-protein interaction network for angiogenesis. The network consists of 478 proteins and 1,488 interactions. The network was validated through cross validation and analysis of five gene expression datasets from in vitro angiogenesis assays. We calculated the topological properties of the angiome. We analyzed the functional enrichment of angiogenesis-annotated and associated proteins. We also constructed an extended angiome with 1,233 proteins and 5,726 interactions to derive a more complete map of protein-protein interactions in angiogenesis. Finally, the extended angiome was used to identify growth factor signaling networks that drive angiogenesis and antiangiogenic signaling networks. The results of this analysis can be used to identify genes and proteins in different disease conditions and putative targets for therapeutic interventions as high-ranked candidates for experimental validation. PMID:22911453

Rivera, Corban G.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Bader, Joel S.

2012-01-01

481

Statistical networks emerging from link-node interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a network model, where the nodes and links are interacting statistical variables. Each node can be in one of two states (Ising variable), the like nodes tend to link, while the linked nodes tend to be in the same state. The network structure is determined by an effective potential generated by the quickly relaxing nodes, and is measurable via the statistical features of the nodes. For low temperatures the nodes get spontaneously ordered inducing the connectivity enhancement, link-link correlations and clustering. The giant component of the network does appear via a first-order percolation transition leading to bistability and hysteresis.

Allahverdyan, A. E.; Petrosyan, K. G.

2006-09-01

482

Insights into Protein-DNA Interactions through Structure Network Analysis  

PubMed Central

Protein–DNA interactions are crucial for many cellular processes. Now with the increased availability of structures of protein–DNA complexes, gaining deeper insights into the nature of protein–DNA interactions has become possible. Earlier, investigations have characterized the interface properties by considering pairwise interactions. However, the information communicated along the interfaces is rarely a pairwise phenomenon, and we feel that a global picture can be obtained by considering a protein–DNA complex as a network of noncovalently interacting systems. Furthermore, most of the earlier investigations have been carried out from the protein point of view (protein-centric), and the present network approach aims to combine both the protein-centric and the DNA-centric points of view. Part of the study involves the development of methodology to investigate protein–DNA graphs/networks with the development of key parameters. A network representation provides a holistic view of the interacting surface and has been reported here for the first time. The second part of the study involves the analyses of these graphs in terms of clusters of interacting residues and the identification of highly connected residues (hubs) along the protein–DNA interface. A predominance of deoxyribose–amino acid clusters in ?-sheet proteins, distinction of the interface clusters in helix–turn–helix, and the zipper-type proteins would not have been possible by conventional pairwise interaction analysis. Additionally, we propose a potential classification scheme for a set of protein–DNA complexes on the basis of the protein–DNA interface clusters. This provides a general idea of how the proteins interact with the different components of DNA in different complexes. Thus, we believe that the present graph-based method provides a deeper insight into the analysis of the protein–DNA recognition mechanisms by throwing more light on the nature and the specificity of these interactions. PMID:18773096

Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

2008-01-01

483

Interface-resolved network of protein-protein interactions.  

PubMed

We define an interface-interaction network (IIN) to capture the specificity and competition between protein-protein interactions (PPI). This new type of network represents interactions between individual interfaces used in functional protein binding and thereby contains the detail necessary to describe the competition and cooperation between any pair of binding partners. Here we establish a general framework for the construction of IINs that merges computational structure-based interface assignment with careful curation of available literature. To complement limited structural data, the inclusion of biochemical data is critical for achieving the accuracy and completeness necessary to analyze the specificity and competition between the protein interactions. Firstly, this procedure provides a means to clarify the information content of existing data on purported protein interactions and to remove indirect and spurious interactions. Secondly, the IIN we have constructed here for proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) exhibits distinctive topological properties. In contrast to PPI networks with their global and relatively dense connectivity, the fragmentation of the IIN into distinctive network modules suggests that different functional pressures act on the evolution of its topology. Large modules in the IIN are formed by interfaces sharing specificity for certain domain types, such as SH3 domains distributed across different proteins. The shared and distinct specificity of an interface is necessary for effective negative and positive design of highly selective binding targets. Lastly, the organization of detailed structural data in a network format allows one to identify pathways of specific binding interactions and thereby predict effects of mutations at specific surfaces on a protein and of specific binding inhibitors, as we explore in several examples. Overall, the endocytosis IIN is remarkably complex and rich in features masked in the coarser PPI, and collects relevant detail of protein association in a readily interpretable format. PMID:23696724

Johnson, Margaret E; Hummer, Gerhard

2013-01-01

484

Infant Smiling during Social Interaction: Arousal Modulation or Activation Indicator?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a study of infant smiling, 20 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in normal face-to-face interaction when the infants were 9 and 14 weeks of age. Videotapes were used to determine which of two classes of smiling behavior models, either arousal modulation or activation indicator, was most supported by empirical data. Arousal modulation models…

Ewy, Richard

485

OpenMessenger: Gradual Initiation of Interaction for Distributed Workgroups  

E-print Network

Carl Gutwin2 Gonzalo Ramos3 Mark Watson4 1 Department of Communications, Faculty of Computing@cs.usask.ca, gonzo.ramos@gmail.com, markwatson@worldhouse.ca ABSTRACT The initiation of interaction in face-to-face, and social signals. One of the main benefits of this process is that people can be more sensitive to issues

Toronto, University of