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1

Modeling Human Dynamics of Face-to-Face Interaction Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of interconversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents that perform a random walk in a two-dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

Starnini, Michele; Baronchelli, Andrea; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

2013-04-01

2

Empirical temporal networks of face-to-face human interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ever increasing adoption of mobile technologies and ubiquitous services allows to sense human behavior at unprecedented level of details and scale. Wearable sensors, in particular, open up a new window on human mobility and proximity in a variety of indoor environments. Here we review stylized facts on the structural and dynamical properties of empirical networks of human face-to-face proximity, measured in three different real-world contexts: an academic conference, a hospital ward, and a museum exhibition. First, we discuss the structure of the aggregated contact networks, that project out the detailed ordering of contact events while preserving temporal heterogeneities in their weights. We show that the structural properties of aggregated networks highlight important differences and unexpected similarities across contexts, and discuss the additional complexity that arises from attributes that are typically associated with nodes in real-world interaction networks, such as role classes in hospitals. We then consider the empirical data at the finest level of detail, i.e., we consider time-dependent networks of face-to-face proximity between individuals. To gain insights on the effects that causal constraints have on spreading processes, we simulate the dynamics of a simple susceptible-infected model over the empirical time-resolved contact data. We show that the spreading pathways for the epidemic process are strongly affected by the temporal structure of the network data, and that the mere knowledge of static aggregated networks leads to erroneous conclusions about the transmission paths on the corresponding dynamical networks.

Barrat, A.; Cattuto, C.; Colizza, V.; Gesualdo, F.; Isella, L.; Pandolfi, E.; Pinton, J.-F.; Ravà, L.; Rizzo, C.; Romano, M.; Stehlé, J.; Tozzi, A. E.; Van den Broeck, W.

2013-09-01

3

Social network dynamics of face-to-face interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent availability of data describing social networks is changing our understanding of the “microscopic structure” of a social tie. A social tie indeed is an aggregated outcome of many social interactions such as face-to-face conversations or phone calls. Analysis of data on face-to-face interactions shows that such events, as many other human activities, are bursty, with very heterogeneous durations. In this paper we present a model for social interactions at short time scales, aimed at describing contexts such as conference venues in which individuals interact in small groups. We present a detailed analytical and numerical study of the model’s dynamical properties, and show that it reproduces important features of empirical data. The model allows for many generalizations toward an increasingly realistic description of social interactions. In particular, in this paper we investigate the case where the agents have intrinsic heterogeneities in their social behavior, or where dynamic variations of the local number of individuals are included. Finally we propose this model as a very flexible framework to investigate how dynamical processes unfold in social networks.

Zhao, Kun; Stehlé, Juliette; Bianconi, Ginestra; Barrat, Alain

2011-05-01

4

Temporal Networks of Face-to-Face Human Interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ever increasing adoption of mobile technologies and ubiquitous services allows to sense human behavior at unprecedented levels of details and scale. Wearable sensors are opening up a new window on human mobility and proximity at the finest resolution of face-to-face proximity. As a consequence, empirical data describing social and behavioral networks are acquiring a longitudinal dimension that brings forth new challenges for analysis and modeling. Here we review recent work on the representation and analysis of temporal networks of face-to-face human proximity, based on large-scale datasets collected in the context of the SocioPatterns collaboration. We show that the raw behavioral data can be studied at various levels of coarse-graining, which turn out to be complementary to one another, with each level exposing different features of the underlying system. We briefly review a generative model of temporal contact networks that reproduces some statistical observables. Then, we shift our focus from surface statistical features to dynamical processes on empirical temporal networks. We discuss how simple dynamical processes can be used as probes to expose important features of the interaction patterns, such as burstiness and causal constraints. We show that simulating dynamical processes on empirical temporal networks can unveil differences between datasets that would otherwise look statistically similar. Moreover, we argue that, due to the temporal heterogeneity of human dynamics, in order to investigate the temporal properties of spreading processes it may be necessary to abandon the notion of wall-clock time in favour of an intrinsic notion of time for each individual node, defined in terms of its activity level. We conclude highlighting several open research questions raised by the nature of the data at hand.

Barrat, Alain; Cattuto, Ciro

5

Modelling Interaction Dynamics during Face-to-Face Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a During face to face interactions, the emotional state of each participant is greatly affected by the behavior of other participants\\u000a and how much this behavior conforms with common protocols of interaction in the society. Research in human to human interaction\\u000a in face to face situations has uncovered many forms of synchrony in the behavior of the interacting partners. This includes

Yasser Mohammad; Toyoaki Nishida

6

A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Electronic Peer-Mentoring: Interactions with Mentor Gender  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study compared the relative impact of peer-mentoring that took place either face-to-face or through electronic chat. Proteges were 106 college freshmen randomly assigned to a senior college student mentor and to one of the two communication modes. Fifty-one mentors interacted with one of these proteges face-to-face and one solely…

Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.; Scielzo, Shannon A.; Yarbrough, Charyl S.; Rosopa, Patrick J.

2008-01-01

7

Animated Pedagogical Agents: Face-to-Face Interaction in Interactive Learning Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have witnessed the birth of a new paradigm for learning environments: animated pedagogical agents. These lifelike autonomous characters cohabit learning environments with students to create rich, face-to-face learning interactions. This opens up exciting new possibilities; for example, agents can demonstrate complex tasks, employ locomotion and gesture to focus students' attention on the most salient aspect of the task

W. Lewis Johnson; Jeff W. Rickel; James C. Lester

2000-01-01

8

Learning, Interactional, and Motivational Outcomes in One-to-One Synchronous Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Tutoring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Face-to-face (FTF) human-human tutoring has ranked among the most effective forms of instruction. However, because computer-mediated (CM) tutoring is becoming increasingly common, it is instructive to evaluate its effectiveness relative to face-to-face tutoring. Does the lack of spoken, face-to-face interaction affect learning gains and…

Siler, Stephanie Ann; VanLehn, Kurt

2009-01-01

9

Social Sensing: Obesity, Unhealthy Eating and Exercise in Face-to-Face Networks  

E-print Network

Social Sensing: Obesity, Unhealthy Eating and Exercise in Face-to-Face Networks Anmol Madan MIT-behaviors, i.e., exposure to peers that are obese, are inactive, have unhealthy dietary habits and those in the midst of a global obesity epidemic, with over a billion overweight and over 300 million clinically obese

10

Internet Communication versus Face-to-Face Interaction in Quality of Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to understand the role of the Internet in quality of life (QoL). Specifically, it examines the question of whether Internet communication serves, like face-to-face interactions, to enhance quality of life. It is hypothesized that the use of the Internet for interpersonal communication can improve quality of life among Internet…

Lee, Paul S. N.; Leung, Louis; Lo, Venhwei; Xiong, Chengyu; Wu, Tingjun

2011-01-01

11

Learning Opportunities in Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication and Face-to-Face Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated how synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) and face-to-face (F2F) oral interaction influence the way in which learners collaborate in language learning and how they solve their communicative problems. The findings suggest that output modality may affect how learners produce language, attend to linguistic forms,…

Kim, Hye Yeong

2014-01-01

12

Social sensing: Obesity, unhealthy eating and exercise in face-to-face networks  

E-print Network

What is the role of face-to-face interactions in the diffusion of health-related behaviors- diet choices, exercise habits, and long-term weight changes? We use co-location and communication sensors in mass-market mobile ...

Madan, Anmol Prem Prakash

13

Exploring Relationship between Face-to-Face Interaction and Team Performance Using Wearable Sensor Badges  

PubMed Central

Quantitative analyses of human-generated data collected in various fields have uncovered many patterns of complex human behaviors. However, thus far the quantitative evaluation of the relationship between the physical behaviors of employees and their performance has been inadequate. Here, we present findings demonstrating the significant relationship between the physical behaviors of employees and their performance via experiments we conducted in inbound call centers while the employees wore sensor badges. There were two main findings. First, we found that face-to-face interaction among telecommunicators and the frequency of their bodily movements caused by the face-to-face interaction had a significant correlation with the entire call center performance, which we measured as “Calls per Hour.” Second, our trial to activate face-to-face interaction on the basis of data collected by the wearable sensor badges the employees wore significantly increased their performance. These results demonstrate quantitatively that human-human interaction in the physical world plays an important role in team performance. PMID:25501748

Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Ishibashi, Nozomu; Yano, Kazuo

2014-01-01

14

The Collaborative Language Learning Attributes of Cyber Face-to-Face Interaction: The Perspectives of the Learner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the degrees of collaborative language learning that were supported in cyber face-to-face interaction. The concept of "cyber face-to-face" is used here to encapsulate the kind of environment in which a combination of real-time oral/aural, visual, and text-based interaction happens simultaneously via the various features in an…

Wang, Yuping; Chen, Nian-Shing

2012-01-01

15

Link Prediction and the Role of Stronger Ties in Networks of Face-to-Face Proximity  

E-print Network

Understanding the structures why links are formed is an important and prominent research topic. In this paper, we therefore consider the link prediction problem in face-to-face contact networks, and analyze the predictability of new and recurring links. Furthermore, we study additional influence factors, and the role of stronger ties in these networks. Specifically, we compare neighborhood-based and path-based network proximity measures in a threshold-based analysis for capturing temporal dynamics. The results and insights of the analysis are a first step onto predictability applications for human contact networks, for example, for improving recommendations.

Scholz, Christoph; Stumme, Gerd

2014-01-01

16

Live face-to-face interaction during fMRI: A new tool for social cognitive neuroscience  

E-print Network

Cooperative social interaction is critical for human social development and learning. Despite the importance of social interaction, previous neuroimaging studies lack two fundamental components of everyday face-to-face ...

Kleiner, Mario

17

Investigating Face-to-Face Peer Interaction Patterns in a Collaborative Web Discovery Task: The Bene?ts of a Shared Display  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mobile computers are now increasingly applied to facilitate face-to-face collaborative learning. However, the factors affecting face-to-face peer interactions are complex as they involve rich communication media. In particular, non-verbal interactions are necessary to convey critical communication messages in face-to-face communication. Through…

Chung, C-W.; Lee, C-C.; Liu, C-C.

2013-01-01

18

Engagement of amygdala in third-person view of face-to-face interaction.  

PubMed

Humans often watch interactions between other people without taking part in the interaction themselves. Strikingly little is, however, known about how gestures and expressions of two interacting humans are processed in the observer's brain, since the study of social cues has mostly focused on the perception of solitary humans. To investigate the neural underpinnings of the third-person view of social interaction, we studied brain activations of subjects who observed two humans either facing toward or away from each other. Activations within the amygdala, posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) were sensitive to the interactional position of the observed people and distinguished humans facing toward from humans facing away. The amygdala was most sensitive to face-to-face interaction and did not differentiate the humans facing away from the pixelated control figures, whereas the pSTS dissociated both human stimuli from the pixel figures. The results of the amygdala reactivity suggest that, in addition to regulating interpersonal distance towards oneself, the amygdala is involved in the assessment of the proximity between two other persons. PMID:21674692

Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Carlson, Synnöve; Hari, Riitta

2012-08-01

19

Analyzing Interactions by an IIS-Map-Based Method in Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning: An Empirical Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study proposes a new method named the IIS-map-based method for analyzing interactions in face-to-face collaborative learning settings. This analysis method is conducted in three steps: firstly, drawing an initial IIS-map according to collaborative tasks; secondly, coding and segmenting information flows into information items of IIS; thirdly,…

Zheng, Lanqin; Yang, Kaicheng; Huang, Ronghuai

2012-01-01

20

The Structure of Infant-Adult Social Reciprocity. A Cross Cultural Study of Face to Face Interaction: Gusii Infants and Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a cross cultural study of face to face interactions between American and Gusii mothers and their infants. Observations of the Gusii people of Western Kenya suggest that the direct expression of intense affect is de-emphasized through an avoidance of direct face to face interactions. The present study investigated (1) how and…

Keefer, Constance H.; And Others

21

Live face-to-face interaction during fMRI: a new tool for social cognitive neuroscience  

PubMed Central

Cooperative social interaction is critical for human social development and learning. Despite the importance of social interaction, previous neuroimaging studies lack two fundamental components of everyday face-to-face interactions: contingent responding and joint attention. In the current studies, functional MRI data were collected while participants interacted with a human experimenter face-to-face via live video feed as they engaged in simple cooperative games. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in a live interaction with the experimenter (“Live”) or watched a video of the same interaction (“Recorded”). During the “Live” interaction, as compared to the Recorded conditions, greater activation was seen in brain regions involved in social cognition and reward, including the right temporo-parietal junction (rTPJ), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), right superior temporal sulcus (rSTS), ventral striatum, and amygdala. Experiment 2 isolated joint attention, a critical component of social interaction. Participants either followed the gaze of the live experimenter to a shared target of attention (“Joint Attention”) or found the target of attention alone while the experimenter was visible but not sharing attention (“Solo Attention”). The right temporo-parietal junction and right posterior STS were differentially recruited during Joint, as compared to Solo, attention. These findings suggest the rpSTS and rTPJ are key regions for both social interaction and joint attention. This method of allowing online, contingent social interactions in the scanner could open up new avenues of research in social cognitive neuroscience, both in typical and atypical populations. PMID:20096792

Redcay, Elizabeth; Dodell-Feder, David; Pearrow, Mark J.; Mavros, Penelope L.; Kleiner, Mario; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Saxe, Rebecca

2010-01-01

22

Social evolution : opinions and behaviors in face-to-face networks  

E-print Network

Exposure to new ideas and opinions, and their diffusion within social networks, are important questions in education, business, and government. However until recently there has been no method to automatically capture ...

Madan, Anmol P. (Anmol Prem Prakash)

2010-01-01

23

Achieving Understanding in Face-to-Face and Video-Mediated Multiparty Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How do groups of 3 people establish common ground in problem-solving interactions differently from groups of 2? Do they do this differently when they are supported by videoconferencing technologies? The laboratory experiment reported here manipulated group size and video mediation for participants carrying out a laboratory map task that allowed…

Anderson, Anne H.

2006-01-01

24

Communication competence, social support, and depression among college students: a model of facebook and face-to-face support network influence.  

PubMed

This study examined the influence of the social networking site Facebook and face-to-face support networks on depression among (N = 361) college students. The authors used the Relational Health Communication Competence Model as a framework for examining the influence of communication competence on social support network satisfaction and depression. Moreover, they examined the influence of interpersonal and social integrative motives as exogenous variables. On the basis of previous work, the authors propose and test a theoretical model using structural equation modeling. The results indicated empirical support for the model, with interpersonal motives predicting increased face-to-face and computer-mediated competence, increased social support satisfaction with face-to-face and Facebook support, and lower depression scores. The implications of the findings for theory, key limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23030518

Wright, Kevin B; Rosenberg, Jenny; Egbert, Nicole; Ploeger, Nicole A; Bernard, Daniel R; King, Shawn

2013-01-01

25

Prosodic Modification and Vocal Adjustments in Mothers' Speech during Face-to-Face Interaction with Their Two- to Four-Month-Old Infants: A Double Video Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine 32 mothers' sensitivity to social contingency during face-to-face interaction with their two- to four-month-old infants in a closed circuit TV set-up. Prosodic qualities and vocal sounds in mother's infant-directed (ID) speech during sequences of live interaction were compared to sequences where expressive…

Braarud, Hanne Cecilie; Stormark, Kjell Morten

2008-01-01

26

Enhancing Discussions in the Asynchronous Online Classroom: The Lack of Face-to-Face Interaction Does Not Lessen the Lesson  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses educators' concerns about using asynchronous online discussions in lieu of face-to-face discussions. Drawing from research on asynchronous online education and Bloom's taxonomy, the authors introduce the system of "original examples" and "value-added comments" that they have developed to promote engaging and meaningful…

Comer, Debra R.; Lenaghan, Janet A.

2013-01-01

27

Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth.Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F recruited online youth (OY) to participate in MySpace and Facebook communities where digital media was disseminated and discussed. The resulting social networks were assessed with respect to size, growth, density, relative centrality of positions and homophily of ties. Seven PL, 53 F2F and 103 OY created two large networks. After the first 50 F2F youth participated, online networks entered a rapid growth phase. OY were among the most central youth in these networks. Younger aged persons and females were disproportionately connected to like youth. The program appears highly acceptable to homeless youth. Social network analysis revealed which PL were the most critical to the program and which types of participants (younger youth and females) may require additional outreach efforts in the future. PMID:22247453

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Barman Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G.

2012-01-01

28

Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention.  

PubMed

The objective of the study is to use social network analysis to examine the acceptability of a youth-led, hybrid face-to-face and online social networking HIV prevention program for homeless youth.Seven peer leaders (PLs) engaged face-to-face homeless youth (F2F) in the creation of digital media projects (e.g. You Tube videos). PL and F2F recruited online youth (OY) to participate in MySpace and Facebook communities where digital media was disseminated and discussed. The resulting social networks were assessed with respect to size, growth, density, relative centrality of positions and homophily of ties. Seven PL, 53 F2F and 103 OY created two large networks. After the first 50 F2F youth participated, online networks entered a rapid growth phase. OY were among the most central youth in these networks. Younger aged persons and females were disproportionately connected to like youth. The program appears highly acceptable to homeless youth. Social network analysis revealed which PL were the most critical to the program and which types of participants (younger youth and females) may require additional outreach efforts in the future. PMID:22247453

Rice, Eric; Tulbert, Eve; Cederbaum, Julie; Barman Adhikari, Anamika; Milburn, Norweeta G

2012-04-01

29

COLLABORATIVE FACE-TO-FACE  

E-print Network

. On one side of the debate is the view that the recent rise in availability of free Massive Open Online aspects of courses, however, that can't be learned online. These require face-to-face contact and our newINTEGRATED COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY FACE-TO-FACE ON-CAMPUS AND ONLINE TEAMWORK Keepingyou intheknow

University of Technology, Sydney

30

Mutual touch during mother-infant face-to-face still-face interactions: influences of interaction period and infant birth status.  

PubMed

Contact behaviours such as touch, have been shown to be influential channels of nonverbal communication between mothers and infants. While existing research has examined the communicative roles of maternal or infant touch in isolation, mutual touch, whereby touching behaviours occur simultaneously between mothers and their infants, has yet to be examined. The present study was designed to investigate mutual touch during face-to-face interactions between mothers and their 5½-month-old fullterm (n=40), very low birth weight/preterm (VLBW/preterm; n=40) infants, and infants at psychosocial risk (n=41). Objectives were to examine: (1) how the quantitative and qualitative aspects of touch employed by mothers and their infants varied across the normal periods of the still-face (SF) procedure, and (2) how these were associated with risk status. Mutual touch was systematically coded using the mother-infant touch scale. Interactions were found to largely consist of mutual touch and one-sided touch plus movement, highlighting that active touching is pervasive during mother-infant interactions. Consistent with the literature, while the SF period did not negatively affect the amount of mutual touch engaged in for mothers and their fullterm infants and mothers and their infants at psychosocial risk, it did for mothers and their VLBW/preterm infants. Together, results illuminate how both mothers and infants participate in shaping and co-regulating their interactions through the use of touch and underscore the contribution of examining the influence of birth status on mutual touch. PMID:24793734

Mantis, Irene; Stack, Dale M; Ng, Laura; Serbin, Lisa A; Schwartzman, Alex E

2014-08-01

31

Face-to-Face Interactions of Postpartum Depressed and Nondepressed Mother–Infant Pairs at 2 Months  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depression’s influence on mother–infant interactions at 2 months postpartum was studied in 24 depressed and 22 nondepressed mother–infant dyads. Depression was diagnosed using the SADS-L and RDC. In S’s homes, structured interactions of 3 min duration were videotaped and later coded using behavioral descriptors and a 1-s time base. Unstructured interactions were described using rating scales. During structured interactions, depressed

Jeffrey F. Cohn; Susan B. Campbell; Reinaldo Matias; Joyce Hopkins

1990-01-01

32

Face to Face with Ants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Imagine being the size of an ant. Be careful - a face-to-face encounter with an ant would be scary and potentially life-threatening! But, if you avoided being eaten, you could learn a lot about ant anatomy from a close-up view. Ants have many body parts that are normally hard to see without a magnifying glass or microscope. And each structure has its own special function.

Dr. Biology

33

Do Handheld Devices Facilitate Face-to-Face Collaboration? Handheld Devices with Large Shared Display Groupware to Facilitate Group Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One-to-one computing environments change and improve classroom dynamics as individual students can bring handheld devices fitted with wireless communication capabilities into the classrooms. However, the screens of handheld devices, being designed for individual-user mobile application, limit promotion of interaction among groups of learners. This…

Liu, Chen-Chung; Kao, L.-C.

2007-01-01

34

Developing Students' Metacognitive Awareness in Asynchronous Learning Networks in Comparison to Face-to-Face Discussion Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main goal of the present study is to investigate empirically the effects of Asynchronic Learning Network (ALN) embedded within metacognitive instruction (META) on two components of metacognitive awareness: Knowledge about Cognition (KC) and Regulation of Cognition (RC). Participants were 202 tenth grade students: 102 students who studied under…

Michalsky, Tova; Zion, Michal; Mevarech, Zemira R.

2007-01-01

35

Face to face versus Facebook: does exposure to social networking web sites augment or attenuate physiological arousal among the socially anxious?  

PubMed

The present study tested two competing hypotheses about the effect of Facebook exposure on the physiological arousal level of participants who then encountered the stimulus person in a face-to-face situation. Facebook exposure may attenuate later arousal by providing increased comfort and confidence, but it is also possible that Facebook exposure will augment arousal, particularly among the socially anxious. Participants completed a measure of social anxiety and were exposed to a stimulus person via Facebook, face to face, or both. Galvanic skin response was recorded during the exposures to the stimulus person. Results were consistent with the augmentation hypothesis: a prior exposure on Facebook will lead to increased arousal during a face-to-face encounter, particularly for those high in social anxiety. PMID:24180223

Rauch, Shannon M; Strobel, Cara; Bella, Megan; Odachowski, Zachary; Bloom, Christopher

2014-03-01

36

Topicality and the Structure of Interactive Talk in Face-to-Face Seminar Discussions: Implications for Research in Distributed Learning Media  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the structure of topic movement within face-to-face postgraduate university seminar discussion forums through a conversation analytic approach. The analysis of 12 audio recordings of seminars showed that in spite of clear differences in the management style of sessions by seminar leaders there were important consistencies in…

Gibson, Will; Hall, Andy; Callery, Peter

2006-01-01

37

Face to Face: Cultivating Planned Giving Prospects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The most effective way to secure and promote gifts is seen as face-to-face contact. Some effective planned giving programs including visitation programs, book plate program, reunions, and use of donors as effective door-openers are described. Suggestions for how to encourage people to discuss their estates are provided. (MLW)

Collier, Charles W.

1979-01-01

38

Programmed versus Face-to-Face Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comparison was made of the effectiveness of a programmed Self-Counseling Manual and a normal precollege counseling interview by experienced counselors. Findings supported the use of programmed counseling as an adjunct to or substitute for face-to-face counseling. (Author)

Gilbert, William M.; Ewing, Thomas N.

1971-01-01

39

Face to Face Communications in Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It has been reported that human face-to-face communications in space are compromised by facial edema, variations in the orientations of speakers and listeners, and background noises that are encountered in the shuttle and in space stations. To date, nearly all reports have been anecdotal or subjective, in the form of post-flight interviews or questionnaires; objective and quantitative data are generally lacking. Although it is acknowledged that efficient face-to-face communications are essential for astronauts to work safely and effectively, specific ways in which the space environment interferes with non-linguistic communication cues are poorly documented. Because we have only a partial understanding of how non-linguistic communication cues may change with mission duration, it is critically important to obtain objective data, and to evaluate these cues under well-controlled experimental conditions.

Cohen, Malcolm M.; Davon, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

1999-01-01

40

Teacher and Student Behaviors in Face-to-Face and Online Courses: Dealing with Complex Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this research was to compare the quality and quantity of teacher and student interaction in an on-line versus face-to-face learning environment. A Master's level course on nursing theories was taught by the same professor by both methods. Transcripts of the face-to-face class and on-line postings were analyzed to identify…

Cragg, C. E.; Dunning, Jean; Ellis, Jaqueline

2008-01-01

41

The sound of your lips: electrophysiological cross-modal interactions during hand-to-face and face-to-face speech perception  

PubMed Central

Recent magneto-encephalographic and electro-encephalographic studies provide evidence for cross-modal integration during audio-visual and audio-haptic speech perception, with speech gestures viewed or felt from manual tactile contact with the speaker’s face. Given the temporal precedence of the haptic and visual signals on the acoustic signal in these studies, the observed modulation of N1/P2 auditory evoked responses during bimodal compared to unimodal speech perception suggest that relevant and predictive visual and haptic cues may facilitate auditory speech processing. To further investigate this hypothesis, auditory evoked potentials were here compared during auditory-only, audio-visual and audio-haptic speech perception in live dyadic interactions between a listener and a speaker. In line with previous studies, auditory evoked potentials were attenuated and speeded up during both audio-haptic and audio-visual compared to auditory speech perception. Importantly, the observed latency and amplitude reduction did not significantly depend on the degree of visual and haptic recognition of the speech targets. Altogether, these results further demonstrate cross-modal interactions between the auditory, visual and haptic speech signals. Although they do not contradict the hypothesis that visual and haptic sensory inputs convey predictive information with respect to the incoming auditory speech input, these results suggest that, at least in live conversational interactions, systematic conclusions on sensory predictability in bimodal speech integration have to be taken with caution, with the extraction of predictive cues likely depending on the variability of the speech stimuli. PMID:24860533

Treille, Avril; Vilain, Coriandre; Sato, Marc

2014-01-01

42

Enhanced face-to-face Pi stacking in perfluoroalkylated organic semiconductor materials: Crystallographic and NMR studies of weak non-covalent interactions in condensed phases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this chapter, the synthesis of new perfluoroalkylated hydrocarbon aromatics A) 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(nonafluorobutyl)-benzene (4-C4F 9-Bz), B) 1,3,6,8-tetrakis(nonafluorobutyl)-pyrene (4-C4F 9-pyrene) and two new heteroaromatic compounds C) 3,8-bis(nonafluorobutyl)-1,10-phenanthroline(2-C4F9-1,10-phen) and D) 4,4'-bis(nonafluorobutyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (2-C4F9-bipy) were described, using copper mediated perfluoroalkylation in a mixture of DMSO(anhy) and anhydrous benzotrifluoride (BTF(anhy)). All the compounds were purified by recrystallization and characterized by 1H NMR, 19F NMR, mass spectrometry and elemental analyses. Single-crystals were obtained for these novel compounds and their packing modes are studied and compared with other literature reporting single crystal structures to study the effects of substitution of electron deficient fluoroalkyl chains on aromatics on packing modes, and weak noncovalent interactions that became the basis for the present chapter. We found that by fine-tuning the size of the aromatic core, lengthening perfluoroalkyl chain, altering the substitution position, and making use of these weak fluorous interactions, 1-D pi-pi stacking in these model compounds is achieved. This can provide us an opportunity to extend this concept to n-type solution processable air-stable organic semiconductor molecules which can be used in real world applications.

Tottempudi, Usha Kiran

43

Maternal Disrupted Communication During Face-to-Face Interaction at 4 months: Relation to Maternal and Infant Cortisol Among at-Risk Families  

PubMed Central

The study evaluated the association between maternal disrupted communication and the reactivity and regulation of the psychobiology of the stress response in infancy. Mothers and infants were recruited via the National Health Service from the 20% most economically impoverished data zones in a suburban region of Scotland. Mothers (N = 63; M age = 25.9) and their 4-month-old infants (35 boys, 28 girls) were videotaped interacting for 8 min, including a still-face procedure as a stress inducer and a 5-min coded recovery period. Saliva samples were collected from the dyads prior to, during, and after the still-face procedure and later assayed for cortisol. Level of disruption in maternal communication with the infant was coded from the 5-min videotaped interaction during the recovery period which followed the still-face procedure. Severely disrupted maternal communication was associated with lower levels of maternal cortisol and a greater divergence between mothers’ and infants’ cortisol levels. Results point to low maternal cortisol as a possible mechanism contributing to the mother’s difficulty in sensitively attuning to her infant’s cues, which in turn has implications for the infant’s reactivity to and recovery from a mild stressor in early infancy. PMID:25506272

Crockett, Erin E.; Holmes, Bjarne M.; Granger, Douglas A.; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

2014-01-01

44

Cocaine Exposure Is Associated with Subtle Compromises of Infants' and Mothers' Social-Emotional Behavior and Dyadic Features of Their Interaction in the Face-to-Face Still-Face Paradigm  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prenatal cocaine and opiate exposure are thought to subtly compromise social and emotional development. The authors observed a large sample of 236 cocaine-exposed and 459 nonexposed infants (49 were opiate exposed and 646 nonexposed) with their mothers in the face-to-face still-face paradigm. Infant and maternal behaviors were microanalytically…

Tronick, E. Z.; Messinger, D. S.; Weinberg, M. K.; Lester, B. M.; LaGasse, L.; Seifer, R.; Bauer, C. R.; Shankaran, S.; Bada, H.; Wright, L. L.; Poole, K.; Liu, J.

2005-01-01

45

Face-to-Face blog - Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery (NPG)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Online for less than a year, Face-to-Face is written by a team of National Portrait Gallery staff members with diverse responsibilities, from web design to curatorial. The blog is "dedicated to art, history, and the telling of American lives." There are four categories on Face-to-Face: Biography, Events, Exhibitions and News. "Biography" currently features an article series on presidential trivia, just in time for the election and "Exhibitions" provides coverage of current and recent exhibits, including "RECOGNIZE! Hip Hop and Contemporary Portraiture", "KATE" - celebrating Katherine Hepburn's 100th birthday, and the saga of the reinstallation of the painting Grant and His Generals by Ole Peter Hansen Balling, oil on canvas, 1865, when NPG re-opened in 2006 after 6 years of renovation. And of course, since it's a blog, interested readers can sign up for the RSS feed of Face-to-Face, so as not to miss a thing.

46

Comparing Asynchronous Online Discussions and Face-to-Face Discussions in a Classroom Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to investigate the perceived differences between asynchronous online discussions and face-to-face discussions in a classroom setting. The students' reflections were analysed by following a qualitative research approach. The results showed that atmosphere, response, efficiency, interactivity and communication were the…

Wang, Qiyun; Woo, Huay Lit

2007-01-01

47

Face to Face Collaborative AR on Mobile Phones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile phones are an ideal platform for augmented reality. In this paper we describe how they can also be used to support face to face collaborative AR gaming. We have created a custom port of the ARToolKit library to the Symbian mobile phone operating system and then developed a sample collaborative AR game based on this. We describe the game

Anders Henrysson; Mark Billinghurst; Mark Ollila

2005-01-01

48

Future Schools: Blending Face-to-Face and Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Hybrid schools" are schools that combine "face-to-face" education in a specific place with online instruction. In this article, the authors describe school models which offer a vision for what deeply integrated technology can mean for children's education, for the way schools are structured, and for the promise of greater efficiency amid a…

Schorr, Jonathan; McGriff, Deborah

2012-01-01

49

Comparisons of Internet-Based and Face-to-Face Learning Systems Based on "Equivalency of Experiences" According to Students' Academic Achievements and Satisfactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to determine whether "equivalent learning experiences" ensure equivalency, in the Internet-based and face-to-face interaction methods on learning results and student satisfaction. In the experimental process of this study, the effect of the Internet-based and face-to-face learning on the equivalency in learning…

Karatas, Sercin; Simsek, Nurettin

2009-01-01

50

A Comparison between the Occurrence of Pauses, Repetitions and Recasts under Conditions of Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Communication: A Preliminary Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compares pauses, repetitions and recasts in matched task interactions under face-to-face and computer-mediated conditions. Six first-year English undergraduates at a Turkish University took part in Skype-based voice chat with a native speaker and face-to-face with their instructor. Preliminary quantitative analysis of transcripts showed…

Cabaroglu, Nese; Basaran, Suleyman; Roberts, Jon

2010-01-01

51

Really Reaching the Public, Face-to-Face  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This past summer I was able to provide a young couple with their first view of Saturn through a telescope, and afterward they told me what a profound experience this look into space had been for them. It wasn't the first time I'd seen such an emotional response since I opened the East Point Solar Observatory, a small public observatory in Nahant, Mass., in 1995. But listening to them reminded me how lucky we scientists are to pursue a career that brings out such warm feelings in our neighbors. It also made me wonder whether the effectiveness of our national approach to public outreach might be increased by more face-to-face contact between scientists and the public.

Foukal, Peter

2014-02-01

52

78 FR 52996 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Face to Face: Flanders...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Face to Face: Flanders, Florence, and Renaissance Painting'' Exhibition SUMMARY: Notice...Face to Face: Flanders, Florence, and Renaissance Painting,'' imported from abroad for...exhibit objects at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical...

2013-08-27

53

Pause and gap length in face-to-face interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has long been noted that conversational partners tend to exhibit increasingly similar pitch, intensity, and timing behavior over the course of a conversation. However, the metrics developed to measure this similarity to date have generally failed to capture the dynamic temporal aspects of this process. In this paper, we propose new approaches to measuring interlocutor similarity in spoken dialogue.

Jens Edlund; Mattias Heldner; Julia Hirschberg

2009-01-01

54

Teacher Training in a Synchronous Cyber Face-to-Face Classroom: Characterizing and Supporting the Online Teachers' Learning Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the learning process undertaken by language teachers in a cyber face-to-face teacher training program. Eight tertiary Chinese language teachers attended a 12-week training program conducted in an online synchronous learning environment characterized by multimedia-based, oral and visual interaction. The term "cyber…

Wang, Yuping; Chen, Nian-Shing; Levy, Mike

2010-01-01

55

Stability and Transitions in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication during the First 6 Months: A Microhistorical Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study the authors attempted to unravel the relational, dynamical, and historical nature of mother-infant communication during the first 6 months. Thirteen mothers and their infants were videotaped weekly from 4 to 24 weeks during face-to-face interactions. Three distinct patterns of mother-infant communication were identified: symmetrical,…

Hsu, Hui-Chin; Fogel, Alan

2003-01-01

56

Making the Jump to Hybrid Space: Employing Face-to-Face and Online Modalities in a Special Event Planning Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Every quarter at California State University East Bay, a special event-planning course is offered in a hybrid format (face-to-face and online) and uses interactive Problem-Based Learning (PBL) activities designed to challenge and inspire intellectual growth. The PLB method is different in that students are not only receivers of knowledge but are…

Fortune, Mary F.

2012-01-01

57

The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Healthcare Professional's Beliefs and Attitudes toward Face to Face Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of electronic health records on healthcare professional's beliefs and attitudes toward face to face communication during patient and provider interactions was examined. Quantitative survey research assessed user attitudes towards an electronic health record system and revealed that healthcare professionals from a wide range of…

Nickles, Kenneth Patrick

2012-01-01

58

Highlights from a Literature Review Prepared for the Face to Face Research Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Between March 2009 and March 2011, Talk To Your Baby has been engaged in a research project, under the title of Face to Face, to identify key messages for parents and carers in relation to communicating with babies and young children, and has examined the most effective ways to promote these messages to parents and carers. The Face to Face project…

National Literacy Trust, 2010

2010-01-01

59

Teaching Philosophy: Moving from Face-to-Face to Online Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the similarities and differences between Canadian and Australian university teachers' face-to-face and online teaching approaches and philosophies. It presents perspectives on teaching face-to-face and online in two comparable Canadian and Australian universities, both of which offer instruction in these two modes. The key…

Wiesenberg, Faye P.; Stacey, Elizabeth

2008-01-01

60

Researcher and Researched: The Phenomenology of Change from Face-to-Face to Online Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online instruction, courses, and degree programs are rising in popularity in higher education and corporations. Novice and experienced instructors face increased demands from administrators and students to teach online, in a higher education environment long noted for face-to-face, residence-based instruction. Viewing the shift from face-to-face

Crawley, Frank E.; Fewell, Martha D.; Sugar, William A.

2009-01-01

61

The Impact of Face-to-Face Orientation on Online Retention: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student retention in online education is a concern for students, faculty and administration. Retention rates are 20% lower in online courses than in traditional face-to-face courses. As part of an integration and engagement strategy, a face-to-face orientation was added to an online undergraduate business information systems course to examine its…

Ali, Radwan; Leeds, Elke M.

2009-01-01

62

A Comparison of Face-to-Face and Groupware Meeting Approaches on a Collaborative Writing Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twelve groups of business students met face to face to complete a report; 10 groups used groupware (computerized decision support system). Overall report quality did not differ, although groupware users needed more time. Appearance and appropriate format were rated higher for the face-to-face group, and students found this method easier, faster,…

Perreault, Heidi R.; Moses, Duane R.

1992-01-01

63

Affect reflection technology in face-to-face service encounters  

E-print Network

This thesis examines the role of facial expressions in dyadic interactions between a banking service provider and customer. We conduct experiments in which service providers manipulate their facial expressions while ...

Kim, Kyunghee, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01

64

Synchronous Internet Therapy for Panic Disorder: How Does it Compare to Face-to-face?.  

E-print Network

??Master of Science%%%The current study aimed to test the efficacy of individual, synchronous Internet Therapy for panic disorder compared to traditional face-to-face therapy. Thirty participants… (more)

Mayoh, Lyndel Elizabeth

2006-01-01

65

Examination of program exposure across intervention delivery modes: face-to-face versus internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There has been increasing interest in the ability of the internet to produce behaviour change. The focus of this study was to describe program exposure across three intervention groups from a randomised trial (RT) comparing traditional face-to-face, internet-mediated (combined internet plus face-to-face), and internet-only program delivery. METHODS: Baseline and immediately post-intervention survey data, and exposure rates from participants that

Rebekah M Steele; W Kerry Mummery; Trudy Dwyer

2007-01-01

66

Face to Face or E-Learning in Turkish EFL Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This purpose of this study was to understand e-learners and face to face learners' views towards learning English through e-learning in vocational higher school context and to determine the role of academic achievement and gender in e-learning and face to face learning. This study was conducted at a state-run university in 2012-2013 academic…

Solak, Ekrem; Cakir, Recep

2014-01-01

67

Improving Students' Summary Writing Ability through Collaboration: A Comparison between Online Wiki Group and Conventional Face-To-Face Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Wikis, as one of the Web 2.0 social networking tools, have been increasingly integrated into second language (L2) instruction to promote collaborative writing. The current study examined and compared summary writing abilities between students learning by wiki-based collaboration and students learning by traditional face-to-face collaboration.…

Wichadee, Saovapa

2013-01-01

68

A Predictive Study of Learner Satisfaction and Outcomes in Face-to-Face, Satellite Broadcast, and Live Video-Streaming Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted to assess the predictive relationships among delivery mode (DM), self-perceived learner-to-teacher interaction, self-rated computer skill, prior distance learning experience, and learners' satisfaction and outcomes. Participants were enrolled in courses which used three different DMs: face-to-face, satellite broadcasting,…

Abdous, M'hammed; Yen, Cherng-Jyh

2010-01-01

69

An Experimental Study of Cyber Face-to-Face vs. Cyber Text-Based English Tutorial Programs for Low-Achieving University Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the effects of two types of e-tutoring interventions (text-based vs. face-to-face videoconferencing, TB vs. F2F) on the grammar performance and motivation of low-achieving students. The study investigates the patterns of interaction between tutors and students in both platforms, including the manner in which tutors and students…

Wu, Ejean; Lin, Wen-Chuan; Yang, Shu Ching

2013-01-01

70

Computer Self-Efficacy, Anxiety, and Learning in Online versus Face to Face Medium  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research is to examine the relationships between changes to computer self-efficacy (CSE) and computer anxiety and the impact on performance on computer-related tasks in both online and face-to-face mediums. While many studies have looked at these factors individually, relatively few have included multiple measures of these…

Hauser, Richard; Paul, Ravi; Bradley, John

2012-01-01

71

Insect Telepresence: Using robotic tele-embodiment to bring insects face to face with humans  

E-print Network

Insect Telepresence: Using robotic tele-embodiment to bring insects face to face with humans Stacy The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania illah@ri.cmu.edu Abstract The Insect: to promote appreciation for insect life and small-scale complexity through exploration of live insect

Nourbakhsh, Illah

72

Grade Performance of Face-to-Face versus Online Agricultural Economics Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online course offerings have been growing at a rapid pace in post-secondary education. An ordered probit model is estimated to analyze the effects of online vs. face-to-face course format in achieving specific letter grades. An upper-division agricultural economics course taught over 9 years using both formats is used for the analysis. For a…

Greenway, Gina A.; Makus, Larry D.

2014-01-01

73

An Experiment Comparing HBSE Graduate Social Work Classes: Face-to-Face and at a Distance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a quasi-experimental comparison of two master's level social work classes delivering content on human behavior in the social environment. One class, delivered face-to-face, was largely synchronous. The other class, delivered using distance technologies, was more asynchronous than the first. The authors hypothesized that…

Woehle, Ralph; Quinn, Andrew

2009-01-01

74

From the Form to the Face to Face: IRBs, Ethnographic Researchers, and Human Subjects Translate Consent  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on my fieldwork with Burmese teachers in Thailand, I describe the drawbacks of using IRB-mandated written consent procedures in my cross-cultural collaborative ethnographic research on education. Drawing on theories of intersubjectivity (Mikhail Bakhtin), ethics (Emmanuel Levinas), and translation (Naoki Sakai), I describe face-to-face

Metro, Rosalie

2014-01-01

75

Attitudes of Middle School Students: Learning Online Compared to Face to Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Education in an online setting is an increasingly popular method of instruction. Previous studies comparing college or high school student performance in online and face-to-face courses found, in most cases, similar achievement between conditions. However, research is lacking regarding middle school students' academic performance and attitudes…

Edwards, Clayton; Rule, Audrey

2013-01-01

76

Time Usage during Face-to-Face and Synchronous Distance Music Lessons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared face-to-face and videoconference private music lessons of one saxophone and two tuba students. One value of this study is the magnitude of the data analysis. More than 28,800 frames of digital video and verbatim scripts of all lessons were analyzed for time spent engaged in sequential patterns of instruction, performance, focus…

Orman, Evelyn K.; Whitaker, Jennifer A.

2010-01-01

77

Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Peer Review in EFL Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the use of face-to-face peer review (FFPR) and computer-mediated peer review (CMPR) in an Asian English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) academic writing context. The participants were 33 English majors from a university of science and technology in Taiwan, a new type of school offering 2-year associate degree programs in foreign…

Ho, Mei-ching; Savignon, Sandra J.

2007-01-01

78

Comparison of Novice Programmers' Performances: Blended versus Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of blended learning on novices' understandings of the introductory programming. A quasi-experimental design with participants of preservice computer and instructional technologies teachers, one control group (CG, N =64) and one experimental group (EG, N=61) who received the course 11 weeks. While face-to-face

Cakiroglu, Unal

2012-01-01

79

Academic Help-Seeking in Online and Face-to-Face Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article compares actual help-seeking frequencies across online and face-to-face learning environments. It also examines strategies enacted by nursing students when they faced academic difficulties, reasons for help-seeking avoidance, and the relationship between the frequency of asking questions and achievement. Participants were nursing…

Mahasneh, Randa A.; Sowan, Azizeh K.; Nassar, Yahya H.

2012-01-01

80

A model for production, perception, and acquisition of actions in face-to-face communication  

E-print Network

, co-verbal behavior, action, facial expression, hand-arm gesture, production, motor behavior behavior has been used primarily for private or non-communicative actions like walking, reaching of face-to-face communication like speech, co-verbal facial expression, and co- verbal gesturing. Three

Kopp, Stefan

81

Face-to-Face versus Online Tutoring Support in Distance Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The experiences of students taking the same course by distance learning were compared when tutorial support was provided conventionally (using limited face-to-face sessions with some contact by telephone and email) or online (using a combination of computer-mediated conferencing and email). Study 1 was a quantitative survey using an adapted…

Price, Linda; Richardson, John T. E.; Jelfs, Anne

2007-01-01

82

Online or Face-to-Face? Experimenting with Different Techniques in Teacher Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper illustrates a 5-year case study (from 2001 to 2005) regarding a course in educational technology that involved from 100 to 150 student teachers per year for a total of more than 500 trainees. Since the first version of the course, which was entirely based on a face-to-face approach, computer mediated collaborative learning techniques…

Delfino, Manuela; Persico, D.

2007-01-01

83

Group Speech Therapy in Individuals With Parkinson Disease: Face-to-Face Versus Telemedicine  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of group speech therapy for individuals with Parkinson Disease (IWPD) in general and to compare outcomes of group treatment delivered face-to-face (FtF) versus delivery via telemedicine (TM...

Wilson, Kristel Renee

2008-07-31

84

Writing as Involvement: A Case for Face-to-Face Classroom Talk in a Computer Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The abandonment of face-to-face voice conversations in favor of the use of electronic conversations in composition classes is an issue to be interrogated. In a recent push to "prepare students for the 21st century," teachers are asked to teach computer applications in the humanities--and composition teachers, who will teach writing in computer…

Berggren, Anne G.

85

Face-to-Face or Distance Training: Two Different Approaches To Motivate SMEs to Learn.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two approaches to training for small/medium-sized enterprises were compared: a British distance learning program and an Irish program offering face-to-face training for micro-enterprises. Both used constructivist, collaborative, and reflective methods. Advantages and disadvantages of each approach were identified. (SK)

Lawless, Naomi; Allan, John; O'Dwyer, Michele

2000-01-01

86

Constructivist Education and Epistemological Development in Online and Face-to-Face Higher Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study. This study examined two sections of a course in child development, one online and one face-to-face, to determine similarities and differences between the two related to constructivist education and constructivist processes. Course documents, instructor reflections, online discussion forum text, student-instructor…

Pruitt, Rebecca J.

2011-01-01

87

Increasing Students' Perceived Sociopolitical Empowerment through Online and Face-to-Face Community Psychology Seminars  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Community psychology theorists underline the importance of promoting sociopolitical empowerment, but few studies have been conducted on the evaluation of the efficacy of empowering programs among university students. The authors report two studies: the first, with 216 psychology majors, compared the efficacy of face-to-face and online community…

Francescato, Donata; Solimeno, Andrea; Mebane, Minou Ella; Tomai, Manuela

2009-01-01

88

Comparison of Power Relations within Electronic and Face-to-Face Classroom Discussions: A Case Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online discussions and transcriptions of face-to-face discussions by graduate students (14 online, 14 on campus) were analyzed. Technical support was not available 24 hours a day to online students who were predominantly women. Online discussions were more student-to-student, classroom discussions student-to-teacher. The analysis suggests how…

Jeris, Laurel

2002-01-01

89

Comparing Student Performance in Online and Face-to-Face Delivery Modalities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the research was to compare student performance in an online or face-to-face (F2F) required Psychology course on three distinct sets of variables (i.e., pre-course, course, and post-course variables). Analyses revealed mixed significant and nonsignificant results. Students did not differ in terms of such variables as hours…

Helms, Jeffrey L.

2014-01-01

90

Overcoming Student Resistance to Group Work: Online Versus Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared student group work experiences in online (OL) versus face-to-face (f2f) sections of the same graduate course, over three years, to determine what factors influence student group work experiences and how do these factors play out in f2f versus OL environments. Surveys and student journals suggest that communication issues,…

Smith, Glenn Gordon; Sorensen, Chris; Gump, Andrew; Heindel, Allen J.; Caris, Mieke; Martinez, Christopher D.

2011-01-01

91

A Comparative Study of an Online and a Face-to-Face Chemistry Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While online and face-to-face (F2F) courses have been compared in numerous studies, there has been a lack of focus on online chemistry courses. This study was conducted to compare the success of students instructed in an online or F2F general chemistry course for non-majors. One hundred forty six exam questions were categorized according to…

Gulacar, Ozcan; Damkaci, Fehmi; Bowman, Charles R.

2013-01-01

92

Comparison of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Standard Setting Using the Angoff Method  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Web-based standard setting holds promise for reducing the travel and logistical inconveniences of traditional, face-to-face standard setting meetings. However, because there are few published reports of setting standards via remote meeting technology, little is known about the practical potential of the approach, including technical feasibility of…

Katz, Irvin R.; Tannenbaum, Richard J.

2014-01-01

93

Finding Support in Moodle: A Face-to-Face Chemistry Course for Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this paper was to know the students' perceptions of using online support in a chemistry course. To achieve this objective, a qualitative research was conducted over a chemistry course that was imparted in a face-to-face modality using a LMS (learning management system) for on-line support. The supports available in the LMS were forums,…

de Vega, Carolina Armijo; McAnally-Salas, Lewis

2011-01-01

94

Comparing face-to-face meetings, nominal groups, Delphi and prediction markets on an estimation task  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted laboratory experiments for analyzing the accuracy of three structured approaches (nominal groups, Delphi, and prediction markets) relative to traditional face-to-face meetings (FTF). We recruited 227 participants (11 groups per method) who were required to solve a quantitative judgment task that did not involve distributed knowledge. This task consisted of ten factual questions, which required percentage estimates. While we

Andreas Graefe; J. Scott Armstrong

2011-01-01

95

Comparing Student Learning Outcomes in Face-to-Face and Online Course Delivery  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the advent of fully online delivery of college-level coursework, a number of issues has preoccupied administrators, educators, and researchers with regard to student learning outcomes or performance vis-a-vis face-to-face delivery. The present study does not seek to demonstrate or to discover which mode of delivery is "superior" or…

Sussman, Stephen; Dutter, Lee

2010-01-01

96

Correlates of Student Preference for Online Instruction over Face-to-Face Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to examine current online course delivery systems, the authors created and conducted a survey that examined both face-to-face (FTF) and online education (OE) classes offered at 46 universities and some community colleges in the United States, as well as at some foreign universities. Students were asked whether they preferred FTF or OE…

Kishore, Masao; Tabrizi, M. H. Nassehzadeh; Ozan, Erol; Aziz, Shahnaz; Wuensch, Karl L.

2009-01-01

97

Effects of Synchronicity and Belongingness on Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Constructive Controversy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adapting face-to-face (FTF) pedagogies to online settings raises boundary questions about the contextual conditions in which the same instructional method stimulates different outcomes. We address this issue by examining FTF and computer-mediated communication (CMC) versions of constructive controversy, a cooperative learning procedure involving…

Saltarelli, Andy J.; Roseth, Cary J.

2014-01-01

98

A Comparison of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Functional Measurement Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information Integration Theory (IIT) is concerned with how people combine information into an overall judgment. A method is hereby presented to perform Functional Measurement (FM) experiments, the methodological counterpart of IIT, on the Web. In a comparison of Web-based FM experiments, face-to-face experiments, and computer-based experiments in…

Van Acker, Frederik; Theuns, Peter

2010-01-01

99

A Comparison of Student Evaluations of Teaching between Online and Face-to-Face Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature contains indications of a bias in student evaluations of teaching (SET) against online instruction compared to face-to-face instruction. The present case study consists of content analysis of anonymous student responses to open-ended SET questions submitted by 534 students enrolled in 82 class sections taught by 41 instructors, one…

Kelly, Henry F.; Ponton, Michael K.; Rovai, Alfred P.

2007-01-01

100

Teleconference versus Face-to-Face Scientific Peer Review of Grant Application: Effects on Review Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Teleconferencing as a setting for scientific peer review is an attractive option for funding agencies, given the substantial environmental and cost savings. Despite this, there is a paucity of published data validating teleconference-based peer review compared to the face-to-face process. Our aim was to conduct a retrospective analysis of scientific peer review data to investigate whether review setting has an effect on review process and outcome measures. We analyzed reviewer scoring data from a research program that had recently modified the review setting from face-to-face to a teleconference format with minimal changes to the overall review procedures. This analysis included approximately 1600 applications over a 4-year period: two years of face-to-face panel meetings compared to two years of teleconference meetings. The average overall scientific merit scores, score distribution, standard deviations and reviewer inter-rater reliability statistics were measured, as well as reviewer demographics and length of time discussing applications. The data indicate that few differences are evident between face-to-face and teleconference settings with regard to average overall scientific merit score, scoring distribution, standard deviation, reviewer demographics or inter-rater reliability. However, some difference was found in the discussion time. These findings suggest that most review outcome measures are unaffected by review setting, which would support the trend of using teleconference reviews rather than face-to-face meetings. However, further studies are needed to assess any correlations among discussion time, application funding and the productivity of funded research projects. PMID:23951223

Gallo, Stephen A.; Carpenter, Afton S.; Glisson, Scott R.

2013-01-01

101

Teleconference versus face-to-face scientific peer review of grant application: effects on review outcomes.  

PubMed

Teleconferencing as a setting for scientific peer review is an attractive option for funding agencies, given the substantial environmental and cost savings. Despite this, there is a paucity of published data validating teleconference-based peer review compared to the face-to-face process. Our aim was to conduct a retrospective analysis of scientific peer review data to investigate whether review setting has an effect on review process and outcome measures. We analyzed reviewer scoring data from a research program that had recently modified the review setting from face-to-face to a teleconference format with minimal changes to the overall review procedures. This analysis included approximately 1600 applications over a 4-year period: two years of face-to-face panel meetings compared to two years of teleconference meetings. The average overall scientific merit scores, score distribution, standard deviations and reviewer inter-rater reliability statistics were measured, as well as reviewer demographics and length of time discussing applications. The data indicate that few differences are evident between face-to-face and teleconference settings with regard to average overall scientific merit score, scoring distribution, standard deviation, reviewer demographics or inter-rater reliability. However, some difference was found in the discussion time. These findings suggest that most review outcome measures are unaffected by review setting, which would support the trend of using teleconference reviews rather than face-to-face meetings. However, further studies are needed to assess any correlations among discussion time, application funding and the productivity of funded research projects. PMID:23951223

Gallo, Stephen A; Carpenter, Afton S; Glisson, Scott R

2013-01-01

102

Social Network Analysis to Examine Interaction Patterns in Knowledge Building Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes use of social network analysis to examine student interaction patterns in a Grade 5/6 Knowledge Building class. The analysis included face-to-face interactions and interactions in the Knowledge Forum[R] Knowledge Building environment. It is argued that sociogram data are useful to reveal group processes; in sociological terms,…

Philip, Donald N.

2010-01-01

103

A Learning Management System to Support Face-to-Face Teaching Using the Microsoft Office System  

Microsoft Academic Search

A low-cost, effective learning management system to support face-to-face teaching using standard Microsoft Office System software is described. This paper goes on to discuss the implementation, hosting, content creation and usage issues encountered during an 8-month trial that covered two full teaching semesters at Bond University. Bond University, based on the Gold Coast, is Australia’s first private university and specializes

Michael J Rees; Charles E Herring

2005-01-01

104

DIFFERENCES OF ONLINE AND FACE-TO-FACE PEER REVIEWS REGARDING TYPE AND QUALITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peer reviews are used in a wide variety of disciplines. Nevertheless research investigating the impact of technology on peer-reviewing mainly derives from the field of writing classes. This paper presents an experimental study exploring the quality and kind of feedback given in a peer-reviewing task in an IT Project Management course. The study analyzes differences between the face-to-face and the

Christine Bauer; Kathrin Figl

2006-01-01

105

The use of computer-mediated communication to enhance subsequent face-to-face discussions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study assessing the effects of synchronous and asynchronous computer-mediated communication on subsequent face-to-face discussions was conducted. Participants were asked to read a short article about internet censorship. Then they were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a synchronous (internet chat) group, an asynchronous (internet discussion board) group and a control group. Both the internet chat group and the

Beth Dietz-Uhler; Cathy Bishop-Clark

2001-01-01

106

Individual face-to-face tutorials: the value in nurse education.  

PubMed

The individual, face-to-face tutorial is one means by which academic support can be provided to students in higher education. This mode of tutorial support has been deemed effective but it can be considered labour-intensive, which is a concern in the UK with the recession currently impacting on higher education institutions. Nevertheless, with increasing student fees come higher student expectations. With all UK pre-registration nursing study programmes at degree level and with the emphasis on widening access, students may require additional academic support to ensure success. This study aimed to examine the value of individual, face-to-face tutorials for academic support in nurse education. A descriptive and exploratory design was used, mixing qualitative and quantitative methods. The survey approach employed a web-based, self-completion questionnaire, which was distributed to lecturers and pre-registration student nurses in a UK university. Following analysis of the questionnaire results, students were invited to attend a group interview. Findings highlighted the importance of individual, face-to-face tutorials with qualitative data supplying detailed accounts regarding their value. PMID:25679246

Nathan, Martina

2015-02-12

107

Teledermatology: key factors associated with reducing face-to-face dermatology visits.  

PubMed

Teledermatology makes 3 promises: better, cheaper, and faster dermatologic care. It is "better" because, although it cannot offer as much to the patient as a traditional visit, it extends the dermatologist's reach to places and in ways not previously possible as a result of time and place limitations; it is "cheaper and faster" because it has the potential to reduce costs and increase efficiency for both patients and providers. For teledermatology to fulfill these promises, it must enable dermatologists to improve access by increasing the number of patients evaluated and treated. Increased patient access depends on maximizing a scarce resource-dermatologists' time-in part by avoiding unnecessary and time-consuming face-to-face appointments. We examined the literature to date to determine which teledermatology programs have greater or lesser success in reducing face-to-face visits. Our review highlights 4 factors that are associated with a higher number of face-to-face appointments avoided by teledermatology programs: (1) effective preselection of patients for teleconsultation, (2) high-quality photographic images, (3) dermoscopy if pigmented lesions are evaluated, and (4) effective infrastructure and culture in place to implement teleconsultation recommendations. PMID:24704089

Landow, Shoshana M; Mateus, Ashley; Korgavkar, Kaveri; Nightingale, Deborah; Weinstock, Martin A

2014-09-01

108

77 FR 2611 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2012-01-18

109

77 FR 47166 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2012-08-07

110

77 FR 37101 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2012-06-20

111

77 FR 55525 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2012-09-10

112

77 FR 40411 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2012-07-09

113

77 FR 21157 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2012-04-09

114

76 FR 78342 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2011-12-16

115

77 FR 8328 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2012-02-14

116

77 FR 61053 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury...Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donna Powers at...

2012-10-05

117

76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and Clarifications Related to Home Health AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

2011-07-12

118

A randomised controlled trial of face to face versus pure online self-help cognitive behavioural treatment for perfectionism.  

PubMed

Previous research has shown cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) to be effective in reducing perfectionism. The present study investigated the efficacy of two formats of CBT for perfectionism (CBT-P), face-to-face and pure online self-help, in reducing perfectionism and associated psychological symptoms. Participants were randomly allocated to face-to-face CBT-P (n = 18), pure online self-help CBT-P (n = 16), or a waitlist control period (n = 18). There was no significant change for the waitlist group on any of the outcome measures at the end of treatment. Both the face-to-face and pure online self-help groups reported significant reductions at the end of treatment for the perfectionism variables which were maintained at the 6-month follow-up. The face-to-face group also reported significant reductions over this time in depression, anxiety, and stress, and a significant pre-post increase in self-esteem, all of which were maintained at the 6-month follow-up. In contrast, the pure online self-help group showed no significant changes on these outcomes. The face-to-face group was statistically superior to the pure online self-help group at follow-up on the perfectionism measures, concern over mistakes and personal standards. The results show promising evidence for CBT for perfectionism, especially when offered face to face, where sustained benefit across a broad range of outcomes can be expected. PMID:25461785

Egan, Sarah J; van Noort, Emily; Chee, Abby; Kane, Robert T; Hoiles, Kimberley J; Shafran, Roz; Wade, Tracey D

2014-09-30

119

An evaluation of face-to-face mentoring vs. electronic mentoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a variety of mentoring methods on students' attitudes toward science, academic performance and retention of classroom science material. Subjects for the research were seventy-one biology students at Brevard Community College located in Cocoa, Florida. Two NASA mentors provided real world applications of academic concepts being learned in an introductory biology class. The mentors worked with one class via videoconferencing and with another class in a face-to-face mode. A third class served as a control group. The study took place in the fall, 2001. Results indicated students' attitudes toward science changed over time, with the mentored classes having the higher interest scores on four of five interest subscales. The electronically mentored class had the highest mean on three of the five interest subscales. Student performance was also positively affected in the mentored classes. No significant increased retention of assigned science material was found.

Buckingham, Gregg A.

120

Adherence to Internet-Based and Face-to-Face Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Depression: A Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) is an effective and acceptable treatment for depression, especially when it includes guidance, but its treatment adherence has not yet been systematically studied. We conducted a meta-analysis, comparing the adherence to guided iCBT with the adherence to individual face-to-face CBT. Methods Studies were selected from a database of trials that investigate treatment for adult depression (see www.evidencebasedpsychotherapies.org), updated to January 2013. We identified 24 studies describing 26 treatment conditions (14 face-to-face CBT, 12 guided iCBT), by means of these inclusion criteria: targeting depressed adults, no comorbid somatic disorder or substance abuse, community recruitment, published in the year 2000 or later. The main outcome measure was the percentage of completed sessions. We also coded the percentage of treatment completers (separately coding for 100% or at least 80% of treatment completed). Results We did not find studies that compared guided iCBT and face-to-face CBT in a single trial that met our inclusion criteria. Face-to-face CBT treatments ranged from 12 to 28 sessions, guided iCBT interventions consisted of 5 to 9 sessions. Participants in face-to-face CBT completed on average 83.9% of their treatment, which did not differ significantly from participants in guided iCBT (80.8%, P ?=? .59). The percentage of completers (total intervention) was significantly higher in face-to-face CBT (84.7%) than in guided iCBT (65.1%, P < .001), as was the percentage of completers of 80% or more of the intervention (face-to-face CBT: 85.2%, guided iCBT: 67.5%, P ?=? .003). Non-completers of face-to-face CBT completed on average 24.5% of their treatment, while non-completers of guided iCBT completed on average 42.1% of their treatment. Conclusion We did not find studies that compared guided iCBT and face-to-face CBT in a single trial. Adherence to guided iCBT appears to be adequate and could be equal to adherence to face-to-face CBT. PMID:25029507

van Ballegooijen, Wouter; Cuijpers, Pim; van Straten, Annemieke; Karyotaki, Eirini; Andersson, Gerhard; Smit, Jan H.; Riper, Heleen

2014-01-01

121

Weight-related Beliefs, Behaviors, and Social Networks of Obese, Young Adult African- American Women: Implications for Healthy Weight Interventions  

E-print Network

overweight/obese females, and exhibited positive social support behaviors. Social networks included positive, negative, and non-positive relationships. Social support for weight loss is shared among network members through face-to-face interactions, phone...

Rollins, Brandy 1982-

2012-12-10

122

Statistical Mechanics of Temporal and Interacting Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last ten years important breakthroughs in the understanding of the topology of complexity have been made in the framework of network science. Indeed it has been found that many networks belong to the universality classes called small-world networks or scale-free networks. Moreover it was found that the complex architecture of real world networks strongly affects the critical phenomena defined on these structures. Nevertheless the main focus of the research has been the characterization of single and static networks. Recently, temporal networks and interacting networks have attracted large interest. Indeed many networks are interacting or formed by a multilayer structure. Example of these networks are found in social networks where an individual might be at the same time part of different social networks, in economic and financial networks, in physiology or in infrastructure systems. Moreover, many networks are temporal, i.e. the links appear and disappear on the fast time scale. Examples of these networks are social networks of contacts such as face-to-face interactions or mobile-phone communication, the time-dependent correlations in the brain activity and etc. Understanding the evolution of temporal and multilayer networks and characterizing critical phenomena in these systems is crucial if we want to describe, predict and control the dynamics of complex system. In this thesis, we investigate several statistical mechanics models of temporal and interacting networks, to shed light on the dynamics of this new generation of complex networks. First, we investigate a model of temporal social networks aimed at characterizing human social interactions such as face-to-face interactions and phone-call communication. Indeed thanks to the availability of data on these interactions, we are now in the position to compare the proposed model to the real data finding good agreement. Second, we investigate the entropy of temporal networks and growing networks , to provide a new framework to quantify the information encoded in these networks and to answer a fundamental problem in network science: how complex are temporal and growing networks. Finally, we consider two examples of critical phenomena in interacting networks. In particular, on one side we investigate the percolation of interacting networks by introducing antagonistic interactions. On the other side, we investigate a model of political election based on the percolation of antagonistic networks. The aim of this research is to show how antagonistic interactions change the physics of critical phenomena on interacting networks. We believe that the work presented in these thesis offers the possibility to appreciate the large variability of problems that can be addressed in the new framework of temporal and interacting networks.

Zhao, Kun

123

Face-to-face transfer of wafer-scale graphene films.  

PubMed

Graphene has attracted worldwide interest since its experimental discovery, but the preparation of large-area, continuous graphene film on SiO2/Si wafers, free from growth-related morphological defects or transfer-induced cracks and folds, remains a formidable challenge. Growth of graphene by chemical vapour deposition on Cu foils has emerged as a powerful technique owing to its compatibility with industrial-scale roll-to-roll technology. However, the polycrystalline nature and microscopic roughness of Cu foils means that such roll-to-roll transferred films are not devoid of cracks and folds. High-fidelity transfer or direct growth of high-quality graphene films on arbitrary substrates is needed to enable wide-ranging applications in photonics or electronics, which include devices such as optoelectronic modulators, transistors, on-chip biosensors and tunnelling barriers. The direct growth of graphene film on an insulating substrate, such as a SiO2/Si wafer, would be useful for this purpose, but current research efforts remain grounded at the proof-of-concept stage, where only discontinuous, nanometre-sized islands can be obtained. Here we develop a face-to-face transfer method for wafer-scale graphene films that is so far the only known way to accomplish both the growth and transfer steps on one wafer. This spontaneous transfer method relies on nascent gas bubbles and capillary bridges between the graphene film and the underlying substrate during etching of the metal catalyst, which is analogous to the method used by tree frogs to remain attached to submerged leaves. In contrast to the previous wet or dry transfer results, the face-to-face transfer does not have to be done by hand and is compatible with any size and shape of substrate; this approach also enjoys the benefit of a much reduced density of transfer defects compared with the conventional transfer method. Most importantly, the direct growth and spontaneous attachment of graphene on the underlying substrate is amenable to batch processing in a semiconductor production line, and thus will speed up the technological application of graphene. PMID:24336218

Gao, Libo; Ni, Guang-Xin; Liu, Yanpeng; Liu, Bo; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Loh, Kian Ping

2014-01-01

124

Face-to-face transfer of wafer-scale graphene films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene has attracted worldwide interest since its experimental discovery, but the preparation of large-area, continuous graphene film on SiO2/Si wafers, free from growth-related morphological defects or transfer-induced cracks and folds, remains a formidable challenge. Growth of graphene by chemical vapour deposition on Cu foils has emerged as a powerful technique owing to its compatibility with industrial-scale roll-to-roll technology. However, the polycrystalline nature and microscopic roughness of Cu foils means that such roll-to-roll transferred films are not devoid of cracks and folds. High-fidelity transfer or direct growth of high-quality graphene films on arbitrary substrates is needed to enable wide-ranging applications in photonics or electronics, which include devices such as optoelectronic modulators, transistors, on-chip biosensors and tunnelling barriers. The direct growth of graphene film on an insulating substrate, such as a SiO2/Si wafer, would be useful for this purpose, but current research efforts remain grounded at the proof-of-concept stage, where only discontinuous, nanometre-sized islands can be obtained. Here we develop a face-to-face transfer method for wafer-scale graphene films that is so far the only known way to accomplish both the growth and transfer steps on one wafer. This spontaneous transfer method relies on nascent gas bubbles and capillary bridges between the graphene film and the underlying substrate during etching of the metal catalyst, which is analogous to the method used by tree frogs to remain attached to submerged leaves. In contrast to the previous wet or dry transfer results, the face-to-face transfer does not have to be done by hand and is compatible with any size and shape of substrate; this approach also enjoys the benefit of a much reduced density of transfer defects compared with the conventional transfer method. Most importantly, the direct growth and spontaneous attachment of graphene on the underlying substrate is amenable to batch processing in a semiconductor production line, and thus will speed up the technological application of graphene.

Gao, Libo; Ni, Guang-Xin; Liu, Yanpeng; Liu, Bo; Castro Neto, Antonio H.; Loh, Kian Ping

2014-01-01

125

Face-to-face or face-to-screen? Undergraduates' opinions and test performance in classroom vs. online learning  

PubMed Central

As electronic communication becomes increasingly common, and as students juggle study, work, and family life, many universities are offering their students more flexible learning opportunities. Classes once delivered face-to-face are often replaced by online activities and discussions. However, there is little research comparing students' experience and learning in these two modalities. The aim of this study was to compare undergraduates' preference for, and academic performance on, class material and assessment presented online vs. in traditional classrooms. Psychology students (N = 67) at an Australian university completed written exercises, a class discussion, and a written test on two academic topics. The activities for one topic were conducted face-to-face, and the other online, with topics counterbalanced across two groups. The results showed that students preferred to complete activities face-to-face rather than online, but there was no significant difference in their test performance in the two modalities. In their written responses, students expressed a strong preference for class discussions to be conducted face-to-face, reporting that they felt more engaged, and received more immediate feedback, than in online discussion. A follow-up study with a separate group (N = 37) confirmed that although students appreciated the convenience of completing written activities online in their own time, they also strongly preferred to discuss course content with peers in the classroom rather than online. It is concluded that online and face-to-face activities can lead to similar levels of academic performance, but that students would rather do written activities online but engage in discussion in person. Course developers could aim to structure classes so that students can benefit from both the flexibility of online learning, and the greater engagement experienced in face-to-face discussion. PMID:25429276

Kemp, Nenagh; Grieve, Rachel

2014-01-01

126

Comparison of traditional face-to-face teaching with synchronous e-learning in otolaryngology emergencies teaching to medical undergraduates: a randomised controlled trial.  

PubMed

Undergraduate otolaryngology teaching in the UK is generally limited primarily due to curriculum time constraints with traditional face-to-face (FtF) teaching being restrained by the limitations of time and location. Advances in network technology have opened up new doors for the delivery of teaching in the form of online learning. This study compares a traditional instructor-led lecture with synchronous e-learning (SeL) using otolaryngological emergencies teaching as an educational intervention. A randomised controlled trial was designed involving two groups of medical students attending an otolaryngology emergencies management lecture: one present FtF and the other viewing the streamed lecture online. The primary outcome measure was improvement between pre-and post-lecture test scores. Secondary outcomes comprised the students' ratings of the lecture on a Likert-type scale. Students in both groups had improved test scores following the lecture (p < 0.001 for both groups) and there was no difference in magnitude of improvement in test scores between the two groups (p = 0.168). There was no difference in student ratings between the two groups for the usefulness of the lecture (p = 0.484), interactivity (p = 0.834) and meeting educational needs (p = 0.968). The FtF group, however, was more satisfied overall (p = 0.034). This study demonstrates that SeL may be as effective as FtF teaching in improving students' knowledge on the management of otolaryngological emergencies, and that it is generally positively perceived by medical undergraduates. This highlights the potential utility of e-learning technology in undergraduate otolaryngology training. PMID:25308244

Alnabelsi, Talal; Al-Hussaini, Ali; Owens, David

2014-10-12

127

Data on face-to-face contacts in an office building suggests a low-cost vaccination strategy based on community linkers  

E-print Network

Empirical data on contacts between individuals in social contexts play an important role in the information of models describing human behavior and how epidemics spread in populations. Here, we analyze data on face-to-face contacts collected in an office building. The statistical properties of contacts are similar to other social situations, but important differences are observed in the contact network structure. In particular, the contact network is strongly shaped by the organization of the offices in departments, which has consequences in the design of accurate agent-based models of epidemic spread. We then consider the contact network as a potential substrate for infectious disease spread and show that its sparsity tends to prevent outbreaks of fast-spreading epidemics. Moreover, we define three typical behaviors according to the fraction $f$ of links each individual shares outside its own department: residents, wanderers and linkers. Linkers ($f\\sim 50%$) act as bridges in the network and have large betw...

Génois, Mathieu; Fournet, Julie; Panisson, André; Bonmarin, Isabelle; Barrat, Alain

2014-01-01

128

Atypical brain activation patterns during a face-to-face joint attention game in adults with autism spectrum disorder.  

PubMed

Joint attention behaviors include initiating one's own and responding to another's bid for joint attention to an object, person, or topic. Joint attention abilities in autism are pervasively atypical, correlate with development of language and social abilities, and discriminate children with autism from other developmental disorders. Despite the importance of these behaviors, the neural correlates of joint attention in individuals with autism remain unclear. This paucity of data is likely due to the inherent challenge of acquiring data during a real-time social interaction. We used a novel experimental set-up in which participants engaged with an experimenter in an interactive face-to-face joint attention game during fMRI data acquisition. Both initiating and responding to joint attention behaviors were examined as well as a solo attention (SA) control condition. Participants included adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (n = 13), a mean age- and sex-matched neurotypical group (n = 14), and a separate group of neurotypical adults (n = 22). Significant differences were found between groups within social-cognitive brain regions, including dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) and right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), during the RJA as compared to SA conditions. Region-of-interest analyses revealed a lack of signal differentiation between joint attention and control conditions within left pSTS and dMPFC in individuals with ASD. Within the pSTS, this lack of differentiation was characterized by reduced activation during joint attention and relative hyper-activation during SA. These findings suggest a possible failure of developmental neural specialization within the STS and dMPFC to joint attention in ASD. PMID:22505330

Redcay, Elizabeth; Dodell-Feder, David; Mavros, Penelope L; Kleiner, Mario; Pearrow, Mark J; Triantafyllou, Christina; Gabrieli, John D; Saxe, Rebecca

2013-10-01

129

Are the Functions of Teachers in e-Learning and Face-to-Face Learning Environments Really Different?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main purpose of this study is not to compare online and traditional face-to-face instruction merely to prove which one is better, but rather it aims to highlight some of the possible risks and strengths which may help to improve the role of teachers in both methods. The scene consisted of various thematic blocks from a training programme, with…

Alonso Diaz, Laura; Blazquez Entonado, Florentino

2009-01-01

130

Connectivity: A Framework for Understanding Effective Language Teaching in Face-to-Face and Online Learning Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is an exploratory paper that uses the construct of connectivity to examine the nature of effective language teaching and learning in both face-to-face and online learning environments. Broader in scope than Siemens' notion of connectivism, the term connectivity accommodates both transmission approaches to teaching and learning and social…

Senior, Rose

2010-01-01

131

Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Presentation of Course Content in an Introductory Special Education Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Instructional content was presented differently in two introductory special education course sections. In a face-to-face (f2f) section, the instructor met with students on regularly scheduled days and times and presented content in person. In the other section, content was presented using enhanced podcasts, consisting of the instructor narrating…

Thompson, James R.; Klass, Patricia H.; Fulk, Barbara M.

2012-01-01

132

A Study of the Effectiveness of ITV as a Supplement to Face-to-Face Teaching of Functional Illiterates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Pennsylvania study investigated whether functionally illiterate adults in a face-to-face adult basic education (ABE) program using instructional television (ITV) show greater achievement gains than those in similar programs without ITV. Achievement data were drawn from raw scores on Level I, Form A (pretest), and Level I, Form B, (posttest),…

Dornish, J. Robert

133

A Comparison of a Sociocultural and Chronological Approach to Music Appreciation in Face-to-Face and Online Instructional Formats  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether differences exist with regard to music achievement, music self-concept, or student course satisfaction among students enrolled in four different sections of an undergraduate music appreciation course taught from chronological or sociocultural approaches in online or face-to-face formats.…

Eakes, Kevin

2009-01-01

134

A Retrospective Look at Replacing Face-to-Face Embryology Instruction with Online Lectures in a Human Anatomy Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Embryology is integrated into the Clinically Oriented Anatomy course at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine. Before 2008, the same instructor presented embryology in 13 face-to-face lectures distributed by organ systems throughout the course. For the 2008 and 2009 offerings of the course, a hybrid embryology…

Beale, Elmus G.; Tarwater, Patrick M.; Lee, Vaughan H.

2014-01-01

135

Ariadne's Thread: Using Social Presence Indices to Distinguish Learning Events in Face-to-Face and ICT-Rich Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on ancient Greek mythology, this article traces the learning experiences of 164 pre-service education students as they make the transition from a conventional face-to-face (f-2-f) learning environment to an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) rich setting. Influenced by Social Presence Theory (Short, Williams & Christie, 1976)…

Baskin, Colin; Henderson, Michael

2005-01-01

136

Applying the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Student Perceptions, Behaviours and Success Online and Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compares student perceptions, learning behaviours and success in online and face-to-face versions of a Principles of Microeconomics course. It follows a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) approach by using a cycle of empirical analysis, reflection and action to improve the learning experience for students. The online course…

Horspool, Agi; Lange, Carsten

2012-01-01

137

Learning through Face-to-Face and Online Discussions: Associations between Students' Conceptions, Approaches and Academic Performance in Political Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on research investigating student experiences of learning through face-to-face and online discussions in a political science course in a large Australian university. Using methodologies from relational research into university student learning, the study investigates associations between key aspects of student learning focusing…

Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Ellis, Robert; Goodyear, Peter; Piggott, Leanne

2010-01-01

138

Face-to-Face or Distance Training? Two Different Approaches To Motivate SMEs To Learn--An Update.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two projects attempted to assess and meet small and medium-sized enterprises' training needs. Britain's Learning support for Small Businesses delivery methods included paper, CD-ROM, and the Internet. The University of Limerick, Ireland, offered face-to-face learning for microenterprises. (SK)

Allan, John; O'Dwyer, Michele; Ryan, Eamon; Lawless, Naomi

2001-01-01

139

Integrating Blog and Face-to-Face Instruction into an ESP Course: English for Hospitality and Tourism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the rapid growth of international trade and globalization, English language has been emphasized in Asia countries, thus professionals with a good command of English has become essential and important. This study aimed to establish a blended model combining face-to-face (F2F) instruction for English for Specific Purposes (ESP) course: English…

Shih, Ru-Chu

2012-01-01

140

Effectiveness of Integrating Case Studies in Online and Face-to-Face Instruction of Pathophysiology: A Comparative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to growing demand from students and facilitated by innovations in educational technology, institutions of higher learning are increasingly offering online courses. Subjects in the hard sciences, such as pathophysiology, have traditionally been taught in the face-to-face format, but growing demand for preclinical science courses has compelled…

Saleh, Suha M.; Asi, Yara M.; Hamed, Kastro M.

2013-01-01

141

Underpinning Principles of Adult Learning in Face to Face (f2f) Meetings Employed by Distance-Teaching Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study presented in this article explores the application of the principles of adult learning in the face to face (f2f) meetings organised within the context of blended learning courses. The study adopts a case study approach, employing qualitative data collection through semi-structured interviews with participants in four thematic units in…

Gravani, Maria N.; Karagiorgi, Yiasemina

2014-01-01

142

A Meta-Analytic and Qualitative Review of Online versus Face-to-Face Problem-Based Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional strategy that is poised for widespread application in the current, growing, on-line digital learning environment. While enjoying a track record as a defensible strategy in face-to-face learning settings, the research evidence is not clear regarding PBL in on-line environments. A review of the…

Jurewitsch, Brian

2012-01-01

143

Accuracy of Answers Provided by Digital/Face-to-Face Reference Services in Japanese Public Libraries and Q & A Sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We asked the same 60 questions using DRS (digital reference services) in Japanese public libraries, face-to-face reference services and Q & A (question and answer) sites. It was found that: (1) The correct answer ratio of DRS is higher than that of Q & A sites; (2) DRS takes longer to provide answers as compared to Q & A sites; and (3) The correct…

Tsuji, Keita; To, Haruna; Hara, Atsuyuki

2011-01-01

144

Instructional Strategies for Face-to-Face, Internet-Based, and Hybrid Education: An Action Oriented Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of the Internet and the rapid growth of educational software, high schools are applying new instructional strategies with their students, including online and hybrid education. Hybrid education combines face-to-face encounters with online methods; students attend classroom sessions with their teachers and peers, and they engage…

Naffziger, Loren Benjamin

2012-01-01

145

Increasing Anonymity in Peer Assessment by Using Classroom Response Technology within Face-to-Face Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Peer assessment is becoming more popular in higher education, however it often goes together with undesirable social effects like peer pressure and favoritism, especially when students need to evaluate peers in a face-to-face setting. The present study was set up to investigate increased anonymity in peer assessment to counter these undesirable…

Raes, Annelies; Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy

2015-01-01

146

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: From Face to Face Interaction to a Broader Contextual Understanding of Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is increasingly used to address the emotional and interpersonal problems of people with ID. There is a limited but promising evidence base supporting this activity. However, these individuals face real and continuing challenges in their lives that have implications for their self and interpersonal perceptions.…

Jahoda, A.; Dagnan, D.; Kroese, B. Stenfert; Pert, C.; Trower, P.

2009-01-01

147

Low Proficiency Learners in Synchronous Computer-Assisted and Face-to-Face Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This experimental study offers empirical evidence of the effect of the computer-mediated environment on the linguistic output of low proficiency learners. The subjects were 32 female undergraduates with high and low proficiency in ESL. A within-subject repeated measures concurrent nested QUAN-qual (Creswell, 2003) mixed methods approach was used.…

Tam, Shu Sim; Kan, Ngat Har; Ng, Lee Luan

2010-01-01

148

THE TABLOID TALKSHOW AS A QUASI-CONVERSATIONAL TYPE OF FACE-TO- FACE INTERACTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Media discourse, and in particular programmes such as talkshows, are certainly practices that have extended, enriched, and often taken to the limits, conversation as a speech event. The number of possibilities arising from conversational practice have certainly found a new dimension in the context of the mass media, and on TV in particular (cf. Vander Berg et al. 1991 and

Carmen Gregori-Signes

2000-01-01

149

Personality, sex of participant, and face-to-face interaction affect reading of informed consent forms.  

PubMed

Students (N = 183) participated in a study designed to determine if each student read the informed consent form. Approximately 12% of students in the online condition followed the procedure compared with 38% in the laboratory phase. Participants with higher trait worry and those with lower emotion reappraisal were more likely to follow the procedure, while women were more likely to read the form than men. Across conditions, most students do not read informed consent documents, particularly in online formats. These findings of this research support the idea that women tend to be more information-seeking than men in health and research settings and those with higher trait worry tend to read the consent forms to alleviate uncertainty and trust concerns. PMID:24765727

Knepp, Michael M

2014-02-01

150

Fostering Face to Face Oral Interaction through Webquests: A Case Study in ESP for Tourism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Webquests have been used for some time to research a variety of topics. According to Lacina (2007), a webquest is an inquiry-based technology activity designed by Bernie Dodge and Tom March in which information is usually drawn from the Internet, and is a powerful instructional exercise both for teachers and students.Webquests enhance personal and…

Laborda, Jesus Garcia

2010-01-01

151

Innovative, High-Pressure, Cryogenic Control Valve: Short Face-to-Face, Reduced Cost  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A control valve that can throttle high-pressure cryogenic fluid embodies several design features that distinguish it over conventional valves designed for similar applications. Field and design engineers worked together to create a valve that would simplify installation, trim changes, and maintenance, thus reducing overall cost. The seals and plug stem packing were designed to perform optimally in cryogenic temperature ranges. Unlike conventional high-pressure cryogenic valves, the trim size can be changed independent of the body. The design feature that provides flexibility for changing the trim is a split body. The body is divided into an upper and a lower section with the seat ring sandwiched in between. In order to maintain the plug stem packing at an acceptable sealing temperature during cryogenic service, heat-exchanging fins were added to the upper body section. The body is made of stainless steel. The seat ring is made of a nickel-based alloy having a coefficient of thermal expansion less than that of the body material. Consequently, when the interior of the valve is cooled cryogenically, the body surrounding the seat ring contracts more than the seat ring. This feature prevents external leakage at the body-seat joint. The seat ring has been machined to have small, raised-face sealing surfaces on both sides of the seal groove. These sealing surfaces concentrate the body bolt load over a small area, thereby preventing external leakage. The design of the body bolt circle is different from that of conventional highpressure control valves. Half of the bolts clamp the split body together from the top, and half from the bottom side. This bolt-circle design allows a short, clean flow path, which minimizes frictional flow losses. This bolt-circle design also makes it possible to shorten the face-toface length of the valve, which is 25.5 in. (65 cm). In contrast, a conventional, high-pressure control valve face-to-face dimension may be greater than 40 in. (>1 m) long.

2002-01-01

152

The Effects of Health Education through Face To Face Teaching and Educational Movies, on Suburban Women in Childbearing Age  

PubMed Central

Background: The aim of the study was to compare the effects of ‘face-to-face education’ and ‘educational movies’ on ‘knowledge’ and ‘practice’ of women of child-bearing-age, in terms of health-care during pregnancy and during infancy in a suburban region near Tehran City, Iran. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, the sample included 873 married women. Questionnaires for knowledge and practice assessment were designed. The women were assigned to three groups: control (group I), face-to-face education (group II), and educational movie (group III). Knowledge questionnaires were completed before and immediately after intervention. Practice questionnaires were completed before and three months after intervention. Both questionnaires consisted of two types of questions: type A (concerning infant care issues) and type B (concerning prenatal health care). Results: There was a significant difference in post-test knowledge between groups I and II and between groups I and III, but not between groups II and III. In terms of post-test practice, the changes were determined for every individual question, and significantly, better results were seen in group II, especially concerning type B questions. Conclusion: Face to face education lead to better practice than educational movies. In addition, significantly better practice occurred regarding child health care issues rather than prenatal issues in both groups. Realistic and tangible issues, those easy to practice, and with little or no economical burden imposed on the family, progressed from the knowledge state to the practice state more successfully in both groups. PMID:23113010

Vameghi, R; Mohammad, K; Karimloo, M; Soleimani, F; Sajedi, F

2010-01-01

153

Concordance and Time Estimation of Store-and-forward Mobile Teledermatology Compared to Classical Face-to-face Consultation.  

PubMed

Smartphones have overcome the limitations of image quality seen in older devices and opened a new field of telemedicine called "mobile teledermatology". Technological advances and the need to reduce health service costs will strongly promote the development of telemedicine. For this reason, we evaluated the concordance between store-and-forward mobile teledermatology and the classical face-to-face dermatological visit. We also measured the time taken to submit a teleconsultation using a smartphone. Before conventional face-to-face visit, a final-year resident of the three-year course for general practitioners collected medical history, took digital images of skin diseases with a smartphone and, measuring the time required to complete this operation, transmitted them to an expert teledermatologist. In 391 patients we obtained a concordance between face-to-face and store-and-forward diagnosis of 91.05% (Cohen ? coefficient?=?0.906). On average only few minutes needs to be added to a normal visit to transmit the cases to an expert teledermatologist. PMID:24889827

Nami, Niccolò; Massone, Cesare; Rubegni, Pietro; Cevenini, Gabriele; Fimiani, Michele; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer

2015-01-15

154

Instruments to Explore Blended Learning: Modifying a Method to Analyse Online Communication for the Analysis of Face-to-Face Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the complex practice of today's blended learning, educators need to be able to evaluate both online and face-to-face communication in order to get the full picture of what is going on in blended learning scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and feasibility of a practical instrument for analysing face-to-face

de Leng, Bas A.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Donkers, H. H. L. M.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

2010-01-01

155

A Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Foreign Policy: Student Experiences of Learning through Face-to-Face and Online Discussion and Their Relationship to Academic Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents research on students' experiences of learning through a blend of face-to-face and online discussion. The participants in our study were students enrolled in a foreign policy course at a major Australian university. Students' conceptions of learning through discussion, and their approaches to both face-to-face and online…

Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Ellis, Robert A.; Goodyear, Peter; Piggott, Leanne

2011-01-01

156

The Benefits of Synchronized Genuine Smiles in Face-to-Face Service Encounters  

E-print Network

This paper examines the role of facial expressions in dyadic interactions between a banking service provider and customer. We conduct experiments in which service providers manipulate their facial expressions while interacting ...

Picard, Rosalind W.

157

Agreement between telerehabilitation involving caregivers and face-to-face clinical assessment of lymphedema in breast cancer survivors.  

PubMed

Lymphedema is a lifetime complication of breast cancer survivors that can limit their participation in recreational or strenuous daily activities. Follow-up of lymphedema using an Internet application could help patients to determine the influence on their condition of these activities and adapt them accordingly. We aimed to determine the level of agreement between lymphedema assessment by telerehabilitation and by the traditional face-to-face method. Thirty breast cancer survivors participated in a descriptive study of repeated measures using a crossover design. Patients attended a session for clinical face-to-face and real-time online telerehabilitation assessments of lymphedema. There was a 120-min interval between these two sessions. The order of sessions was randomly selected for each patient. A caregiver (relative or friend) conducted the telerehabilitation assessment using a system that includes a specific tool based on an arm diagram for measuring the participant's arm circumferences via a telehealth application. All outcome measures showed reliability estimates (?)???0.90; the lowest reliability was obtained for the total volume on the non-affected side (??=?0.90). The diagnosis of lymphedema by the two methods also showed good inter-rater reliability (Rho?=?0.89). These preliminary findings support the use of an Internet-based system to assess lymphedema in breast cancer survivors, offering carers a useful role in helping patients to follow up this lifetime health problem. PMID:24043290

Galiano-Castillo, N; Ariza-García, A; Cantarero-Villanueva, I; Fernández-Lao, C; Sánchez-Salado, C; Arroyo-Morales, M

2014-01-01

158

A comparison of the effectiveness of a game informed online learning activity and face to face teaching in increasing knowledge about managing aggression in health settings.  

PubMed

The present study compared the impact of face to face teaching with a short online game informed learning activity on health participants' knowledge about, and confidence in, managing aggressive situations. Both forms of teaching resulted in a significant increase in participants' knowledge and confidence. Face to face training led to significantly greater increases in knowledge but was equivalent in terms of confidence. Both forms of teaching were rated positively, but face to face teaching received significantly higher ratings than the online activity. The study suggests that short online game informed learning activities may offer an effective alternative for health professional training where face to face training is not possible. Further research is needed on the longer term impact of both types of training on practice. PMID:23184436

McKenzie, Karen

2013-12-01

159

Reading the Mind in the Eyes or Reading between the Lines? Theory of Mind Predicts Collective Intelligence Equally Well Online and Face-To-Face  

E-print Network

Recent research with face-to-face groups found that a measure of general group effectiveness (called “collective intelligence”) predicted a group’s performance on a wide range of different tasks. The same research also ...

Engel, David

160

Face-to-Face Implies no Interface Dennis Burford and Edwin Blake  

E-print Network

of interaction. CVEs differ from other communications technologies (such as email, chat, telephony and video have tested our system with live video input and animated three different types of faces, including a 3 tracking and synthesis. Our system uses a low cost "web-cam" and a set of markers for expression analysis

Blake, Edwin

161

The effectiveness of web-based and face-to-face continuing education methods on nurses' knowledge about AIDS: a comparative study  

PubMed Central

Background Information about web-based education outcomes in comparison with a face-to-face format can help researchers and tutors prepare and deliver future web-based or face-to-face courses more efficiently. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of web-based and face-to-face continuing education methods in improving nurses' knowledge about AIDS. Methods A quasi-experimental method was used with a pre-test and post-test design. In this study 140 nurses with BSc degrees were chosen through a random sampling method and divided into a web-based and a face-to-face group by random allocation. For the former group the intervention consisted of a web-based course on AIDS; the latter received a 3-hour lecture course on the same subject. At the beginning and end of the course in both groups, the nurses' knowledge was measured by a questionnaire. Pre- and post-test scores were compared within and between the groups. Results The results show that there was no significant difference between the groups in either the pre-test (t(138) = -1.7, p = 0.096) nor the post-test (t(138) = -1.4, p = 0.163) scores in the knowledge test. However, there was a significant difference in the pre-test and post-test scores within each group (web-based, t(69) = 26, p < .001; face-to-face, t(69) = 24.3, p < .001). Conclusion The web-based method seems to be as effective as the face-to-face method in the continuing education of nurses. Therefore, the web-based method is recommended, as complementary to the face-to-face method, for designing and delivering some topics of continuing education programs for nurses. PMID:19591678

Khatony, Alireza; Nayery, Nahid Dehghan; Ahmadi, Fazlolaah; Haghani, Hamid; Vehvilainen-Julkunen, Katri

2009-01-01

162

'Intimate mothering publics': comparing face-to-face support groups and Internet use for women seeking information and advice in the transition to first-time motherhood.  

PubMed

This paper seeks to contribute to an understanding of the changing nature of support and information-seeking practices for women in the transition to first-time motherhood. In the context of increasing digitalisation, the significance of new virtual spaces for parenting is discussed. The paper demonstrates how women seek out alternative forms of expertise (specifically, non-medical expertise) and social support. The author argues for the importance of 'intimate mothering publics' through which women gather experiential information and practical support. These publics can act as a space for women to 'test' or legitimise their new identity as a mother. Intimate mothering publics are particularly useful for thinking about the meaning-making practices and learning experiences that occur during intimate online and face-to-face interactions. A variety of types of online support may be used during pregnancy. Surreptitious support in particular involves users invisibly receiving advice, information and reassurance that might otherwise be lacking. Access to intimate mothering publics is motivated by a number of factors, including feelings of community or acceptance, the desire to be a good mother or parent, emotional support and the need for practical and experiential advice. PMID:25339096

Johnson, Sophia Alice

2015-02-01

163

Discrimination against facially stigmatized applicants in interviews: an eye-tracking and face-to-face investigation.  

PubMed

Drawing from theory and research on perceived stigma (Pryor, Reeder, Yeadon, & Hesson-McInnis, 2004), attentional processes (Rinck & Becker, 2006), working memory (Baddeley & Hitch, 1974), and regulatory resources (Muraven & Baumeister, 2000), the authors examined discrimination against facially stigmatized applicants and the processes involved. In Study 1, 171 participants viewed a computer-mediated interview of an applicant who was facially stigmatized or not and who either did or did not acknowledge the stigma. The authors recorded participants' (a) time spent looking at the stigma (using eye tracker technology), (b) ratings of the applicant, (c) memory recall about the applicant, and (d) self-regulatory depletion. Results revealed that the participants with facially stigmatized applicants attended more to the cheek (i.e., where the stigma was placed), which led participants to recall fewer interview facts, which in turn led to lower applicant ratings. In addition, the participants with the stigmatized (vs. nonstigmatized) applicant depleted more regulatory resources. In Study 2, 38 managers conducted face-to-face interviews with either a facially stigmatized or nonstigmatized applicant, and then rated the applicant. Results revealed that managers who interviewed a facially stigmatized applicant (vs. a nonstigmatized applicant) rated the applicant lower, recalled less information about the interview, and depleted more self-regulatory resources. PMID:22004221

Madera, Juan M; Hebl, Michelle R

2012-03-01

164

Assessing knowledge of human papillomavirus and collecting data on sexual behavior: computer assisted telephone versus face to face interviews  

PubMed Central

Background Education campaigns seeking to raise awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) and promoting HPV vaccination depend on accurate surveys of public awareness and knowledge of HPV and related sexual behavior. However, the most recent population-based studies have relied largely on computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI) as opposed to face to face interviews (FTFI). It is currently unknown how these survey modes differ, and in particular whether they attract similar demographics and therefore lead to similar overall findings. Methods A comprehensive survey of HPV awareness and knowledge, including sexual behavior, was conducted among 3,045 Singaporean men and women, half of whom participated via CATI, the other half via FTFI. Results Overall levels of awareness and knowledge of HPV differed between CATI and FTFI, attributable in part to demographic variations between these survey modes. Although disclosure of sexual behavior was greater when using CATI, few differences between survey modes were found in the actual information disclosed. Conclusion Although CATI is a cheaper, faster alternative to FTFI and people appear more willing to provide information about sexual behavior when surveyed using CATI, thorough assessments of HPV awareness and knowledge depend on multiple survey modes. PMID:19930668

2009-01-01

165

A comparison of face to face and video-based education on attitude related to diet and fluids: Adherence in hemodialysis patients  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Adherence to diet and fluids is the cornerstone of patients undergoing hemodialysis. By informing hemodialysis patients we can help them have a proper diet and reduce mortality and complications of toxins. Face to face education is one of the most common methods of training in health care system. But advantages of video- based education are being simple and cost-effective, although this method is virtual. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five hemodialysis patients were divided randomly into face to face and video-based education groups. A training manual was designed based on Orem’s self-care model. Content of training manual was same in both the groups. In the face to face group, 2 educational sessions were accomplished during dialysis with a 1-week time interval. In the video-based education group, a produced film, separated to 2 episodes was presented during dialysis with a 1-week time interval. An Attitude questionnaire was completed as a pretest and at the end of weeks 2 and 4. SPSS software version 11.5 was used for analysis. Results: Attitudes about fluid and diet adherence at the end of weeks 2 and 4 are not significantly different in face to face or video-based education groups. The patients’ attitude had a significant difference in face to face group between the 3 study phases (pre-, 2, and 4 weeks postintervention). The same results were obtained in 3 phases of video-based education group. Conclusion: Our findings showed that video-based education could be as effective as face to face method. It is recommended that more investment be devoted to video-based education. PMID:23853648

Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Hasanzadeh, Farzaneh; Shamsoddini, Somayyeh; Emamimoghadam, Zahra; Ebrahimzadeh, Saeed

2012-01-01

166

The Influence of Setting on Findings Produced in Qualitative Health Research: A Comparison between Face-to-Face and Online Discussion Groups about HIV\\/AIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors focus their analysis in this article on online focus groups (FGs), in an attempt to describe how the setting shapes the conversational features of the discussion and influences data construction. Starting from a review of current dominant viewpoints, they compare face-to-face discussion groups with different formats of online FGs about AIDS, from a discourse analysis perspective. They conducted

Guendalina Graffigna; A. C. Bosio

167

Patterns and Principles for Blended Synchronous Learning: Engaging Remote and Face-to-Face Learners in Rich-Media Real-Time Collaborative Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Blended synchronous learning involves using rich-media technologies to enable remote and face-to-face students to jointly participate in the same live classes. This article presents blended synchronous learning designs from seven case studies that were part of a project funded by the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching and…

Bower, Matt; Kenney, Jacqueline; Dalgarno, Barney; Lee, Mark J. W.; Kennedy, Gregor E.

2014-01-01

168

Comparison of Knowledge and Attitudes Using Computer-Based and Face-to-Face Personal Hygiene Training Methods in Food Processing Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-based training is increasingly favored by food companies for training workers due to convenience, self-pacing ability, and ease of use. The objectives of this study were to determine if personal hygiene training, offered through a computer-based method, is as effective as a face-to-face method in knowledge acquisition and improved…

Fenton, Ginger D.; LaBorde, Luke F.; Radhakrishna, Rama B.; Brown, J. Lynne; Cutter, Catherine N.

2006-01-01

169

Effects of an Online Learning Community on Active and Reflective Learners' Learning Performance and Attitudes in a Face-to-Face Undergraduate Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an Online Learning Community (OLC) on active and reflective learners' learning performance and attitude in a face-to-face undergraduate digital design course. 814 freshmen in an introductory digital design course were randomly assigned to one of two treatments: one offered students an OLC,…

Zhan, Zehui; Xu, Fuyin; Ye, Huiwen

2011-01-01

170

Testing for Near and Far Transfer Effects with a Short, Face-to-Face Adaptive Working Memory Training Intervention in Typical Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A relatively quick, face-to-face, adaptive working memory training intervention was assessed in 5-to 8-year-old typically developing children, randomly allocated to a 6-week intervention condition, or an active control condition. All children received 18 sessions of 10?minutes, three times/week for 6?weeks. Assessments of six working memory…

Henry, Lucy A.; Messer, David J.; Nash, Gilly

2014-01-01

171

Beyond the Therapeutic Hour: An Exploratory Pilot Study of Using Technology to Enhance Alliance and Engagement within Face-to-Face Psychotherapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we introduce and investigate the capacity for a novel, technologically advanced system (goACT) to enhance face-to-face psychotherapy. Specifically, we explore the capacity for goACT to enhance therapeutic alliance (TA) and engagement, and reduce distress. Using a mixed-methods, multiple-baseline design we present the first study to…

Richards, Penelope; Simpson, Susan

2015-01-01

172

A Qualitative Case Study Comparing a Computer-Mediated Delivery System to a Face-to-Face Mediated Delivery System for Teaching Creative Writing Fiction Workshops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this case study was to compare the pedagogical and affective efficiency and efficacy of creative prose fiction writing workshops taught via asynchronous computer-mediated online distance education with creative prose fiction writing workshops taught face-to-face in order to better understand their operational pedagogy and…

Daniels, Mindy A.

2012-01-01

173

Going the Distance Part 2: Five Ways of Teaching an Extension Course: Elive, Blackboard, Teleconference, Correspondence, and Face-to-Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Remote and widely dispersed clientele in Alaska create a need for effective distance-delivery programs. Extension agents often travel via small airplane, snow machine, or boat to teach face-to-face classes in off-road communities. Effective and more cost-efficient delivery methods are needed. We taught a course for beginning farmers residing…

Rader, Heidi B.; Hanna, Virgene; Spiers, Kent; Kienenberger, Donavan

2014-01-01

174

Attitudes toward Face-to-Face and Online Counseling: Roles of Self-Concealment, Openness to Experience, Loss of Face, Stigma, and Disclosure Expectations among Korean College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined attitudes toward face-to-face (f2f) and online counseling among 228 Korean college students. In addition, it tested a hypothesized model proposing that general propensities (i.e., self-concealment, openness to experience, and loss of face) would influence counseling-specific expectations (i.e., self-stigma and disclosure…

Bathje, Geoff J.; Kim, Eunha; Rau, Ellen; Bassiouny, Muhammad Adam; Kim, Taehoon

2014-01-01

175

Does the Method of Instruction Matter? An Experimental Examination of Information Literacy Instruction in the Online, Blended, and Face-to-Face Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The researchers, a librarian and a faculty member, collaborated to investigate the effectiveness of delivery methods in information literacy instruction. The authors conducted a field experiment to explore how face-to-face, online, and blended learning instructional formats influenced students' retention of information literacy skills. Results are…

Anderson, Karen; May, Frances A.

2010-01-01

176

Exercise Motivation of College Students in Online, Face-to-Face, and Blended Basic Studies Physical Activity and Wellness Course Delivery Formats  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess exercise motivation among college students self-selected into 4 online (OL) and face-to-face (F2F) basic studies' physical activity and wellness course delivery formats. Participants/Methods: Out of 1,037 enrolled students during the Spring 2009 semester, 602 responded online to demographic…

Sidman, Cara Lynn; Fiala, Kelly Ann; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

2011-01-01

177

Reading the Mind in the Eyes or Reading between the Lines? Theory of Mind Predicts Collective Intelligence Equally Well Online and Face-To-Face  

PubMed Central

Recent research with face-to-face groups found that a measure of general group effectiveness (called “collective intelligence”) predicted a group’s performance on a wide range of different tasks. The same research also found that collective intelligence was correlated with the individual group members’ ability to reason about the mental states of others (an ability called “Theory of Mind” or “ToM”). Since ToM was measured in this work by a test that requires participants to “read” the mental states of others from looking at their eyes (the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” test), it is uncertain whether the same results would emerge in online groups where these visual cues are not available. Here we find that: (1) a collective intelligence factor characterizes group performance approximately as well for online groups as for face-to-face groups; and (2) surprisingly, the ToM measure is equally predictive of collective intelligence in both face-to-face and online groups, even though the online groups communicate only via text and never see each other at all. This provides strong evidence that ToM abilities are just as important to group performance in online environments with limited nonverbal cues as they are face-to-face. It also suggests that the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test measures a deeper, domain-independent aspect of social reasoning, not merely the ability to recognize facial expressions of mental states. PMID:25514387

Engel, David; Woolley, Anita Williams; Jing, Lisa X.; Chabris, Christopher F.; Malone, Thomas W.

2014-01-01

178

Selected Topics from a Matched Study between a Face-to-Face Section and a Real-Time Online Section of a University Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two sections of an interpersonal skills building university course were observed for the purposes of this matched study. The face-to-face (F2F) section was in a classroom on the Concordia University campus in Montreal, Canada, while the non-turn-taking real-time online section used a Web application, LBD eClassroom[C] designed specifically for…

Lobel, Mia; Neubauer, Michael; Swedburg, Randy

2005-01-01

179

Designing a Self-Contained Group Area Network for Ubiquitous Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A number of studies have evidenced that handheld devices are appropriate tools to facilitate face-to-face collaborative learning effectively because of the possibility of ample social interactions. Group Area Network, or GroupNet, proposed in this paper, uses handheld devices to fill the gap between Local Area Network and Body Area Network.…

Chen, Nian-Shing; Kinshuk; Wei, Chun-Wang; Yang, Stephen J. H.

2008-01-01

180

A Social Network Analysis Comparison of an Experienced and a Novice Instructor in Online Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The most productive learning experience for students whether online or in face-to-face classes can often be the interaction among students and with an instructor. Online teaching and Social Network Analysis (SNA) offer the opportunity to examine intellectual social networking and strategies that promotes student interaction which can enhance…

Fidalgo, Patricia; Thormann, Joan

2012-01-01

181

Face-to-Face and Synchronous Interactive Videoconferencing Instruction: Learning Experiences of Educators Enrolled in an Autism Certificate Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was once considered a rare and severe disability (low incidence), but today individuals with ASD are educated in every academic environment, with 89% spending a portion of their day in the general education setting. Therefore, it is critical that all highly qualified teachers be prepared to provide appropriate…

Swanson, Terri Cooper

2013-01-01

182

Manual Actions of Nine- to Fifteen-Week-Old Human Infants during Face-to-Face Interaction with their Mothers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents evidence that the manual actions of infants as young as nine weeks of age may occur in relation to their facial expression, gaze direction, and vocalization. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for the ontogeny of nonverbal communicative gestures. (Author/RH)

Fogel, Alan; Hannan, Thomas E.

1985-01-01

183

Face-to-Face and Synchronous Interactive Videoconferencing Instruction: Learning Experiences of Educators Enrolled in an Autism Certificate Program  

E-print Network

preparation will help ensure that educators have the specific knowledge and skills needed to meet mandated requirements (e.g., IDEA, 2004; ESEA, 2001), professional practice guidelines (National Research Council, 2001), and professional standards (Council...

Swanson, Terri Cooper

2013-05-31

184

Open Sound Control: an enabling technology for musical networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since telecommunication can never equal the richness of face-to-face interaction on its own terms, the most interesting examples of networked music go beyond the paradigm of musicians playing together in a virtual room. The Open Sound Control protocol has facilitated dozens of such innovative networked music projects. First the protocol itself is described, followed by some theoretical limits on communication

MATTHEW WRIGHT

2005-01-01

185

Friending, IMing, and Hanging out Face-to-Face: Overlap in Adolescents' Online and Offline Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many new and important developmental issues are encountered during adolescence, which is also a time when Internet use becomes increasingly popular. Studies have shown that adolescents are using these online spaces to address developmental issues, especially needs for intimacy and connection to others. Online communication with its potential for…

Reich, Stephanie M.; Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2012-01-01

186

Comparison of face-to-face versus email guided self-help for binge eating: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Guided self-help is a recommended first-step treatment for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and atypical variants of these disorders. Further research is needed to compare guided self-help that is delivered face-to-face versus via email. Methods/Design This clinical trial uses a randomised, controlled design to investigate the effectiveness of providing guided self-help either face-to-face or via e-mail, also using a delayed treatment control condition. At least 17 individuals are required per group, giving a minimum N of 51. Discussion Symptom outcomes will be assessed and estimates of cost-effectiveness made. Results are proposed to be disseminated locally and internationally (through submission to conferences and peer-reviewed journals), and will hopefully inform local service provision. The trial has been approved by an ethics review board and was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01832792 on 9 April 2013. PMID:24886555

2014-01-01

187

Education Innovation: Case Studies in e-Learning and Face-to-Face Teaching in Higher Education: What is the Best?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Education innovation is here to stay. This chapter gives the results of a study of the application of information and communication technology to advanced teaching and learning activities. It is strategically important that the technology opens up new ways of teaching and learning. The purpose of this chapter is firstly to identify the typical advanced teaching and learning activities/functions that can be applied in e-Learning and face-to-face teaching and learning. Case studies were selected from a group of teachers who have already been involved in both teaching modes for some years and thus have experience in blended teaching and learning. A number of teaching activities/functions were seen as positive in their application in the e-Learning situation. Those that stand out are peer review and collaboration, promotion of reflection and stimulation of critical and creative thinking, team teaching, promotion of discovery/extension of knowledge, and problematization of the curriculum. In face-to-face teaching and learning, inviting engagement, how to come to know, involving metaphors and analogies, teaching that connects to learning, inspire change, promote understanding, and others stand out. As seen by the teachers in the case studies, both e-Learning and face-to-face teaching and learning are seen as complementary to each other. We define this view as blended teaching and learning.

Boon, J. A.

188

Effect of Face-to-Face Interview Versus Computer-Assisted Self-Interview on Disclosure of Intimate Partner Violence Among African American Women in WIC Clinics.  

PubMed

African American women in the United States report intimate partner violence (IPV) more often than the general population of women. Overall, women underreport IPV because of shame, embarrassment, fear of retribution, or low expectation of legal support. African American women may be especially unlikely to report IPV because of poverty, low social support, and past experiences of discrimination. The purpose of this article is to determine the context in which low-income African American women disclose IPV. Consenting African American women receiving Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) services in WIC clinics were randomized to complete an IPV screening (Revised Conflict Tactics Scales-Short Form) via computer-assisted self-interview (CASI) or face-to-face interview (FTFI). Women (n = 368) reported high rates of lifetime and prior-year verbal (48%, 34%), physical (12%, 7%), sexual (10%, 7%), and any (49%, 36%) IPV, as well as IPV-related injury (13%, 7%). Mode of screening, but not interviewer race, affected disclosure. Women screened via FTFI reported significantly more lifetime and prior-year negotiation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 10.54, 3.97) and more prior-year verbal (aOR = 2.10), sexual (aOR = 4.31), and any (aOR = 2.02) IPV than CASI-screened women. African American women in a WIC setting disclosed IPV more often in face-to-face than computer screening, and race-matching of client and interviewer did not affect disclosure. Findings highlight the potential value of face-to-face screening to identify women at risk of IPV. Programs should weigh the costs and benefits of training staff versus using computer-based technologies to screen for IPV in WIC settings. PMID:24923890

Fincher, Danielle; VanderEnde, Kristin; Colbert, Kia; Houry, Debra; Smith, L Shakiyla; Yount, Kathryn M

2015-03-01

189

Telephone consultations in place of face to face out-patient consultations for patients discharged from hospital following surgery: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Routine follow-up following uncomplicated surgery is being delivered by telephone in some settings. Telephone consultations may be preferable to patients and improve outpatient resource use. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of telephone consultations with face to face follow-up consultations, in patients discharged from hospital following surgery. Methods Seven electronic databases (including Medline, Embase and PsycINFO) were searched from inception to July 2011. Comparative studies of any design in which routine follow-up via telephone was compared with face to face consultation in patients discharged from hospital after surgery were included. Study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal were performed independently by two reviewers with consensus reached by discussion and involvement of a third reviewer where necessary. Results Five papers (four studies; 865 adults) met the inclusion criteria. The studies were of low methodological quality and reported dissimilar outcomes precluding any formal synthesis. Conclusions There has been very little comparative evaluation of different methods of routine follow-up care in patients discharged from hospital following surgery. Further work is needed to establish a role for telephone consultation in this patient group. PMID:23561005

2013-01-01

190

Supporting More Inclusive Learning with Social Networking: A Case Study of Blended Socialised Design Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a qualitative case study of socialised blended learning, using a social network platform to investigate the level of literacies and interactions of students in a blended learning environment of traditional face-to-face design studio and online participatory teaching. Using student and staff feedback, the paper examines the use…

Rodrigo, Russell; Nguyen, Tam

2013-01-01

191

Factors Associated With Non-participation in a Face-to-Face Second Survey Conducted 5 Years After the Baseline Survey  

PubMed Central

Background Non-participation in second surveys is reported to be associated with certain baseline characteristics; however, such data are unavailable for Japanese populations. Although disease incidence during follow-up might influence participation, few reports have addressed this possibility. This study sought to identify factors associated with non-participation in a second survey of a population-based cohort, and to evaluate the influence of self-reported disease incidence on non-participation. Methods After excluding participants who left the area (n = 423), died (n = 163), and withdrew from the study (n = 9) among 12 078 participants in a baseline survey for the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort Study in the Saga region between 2005 and 2007, 11 483 people were invited by mail to participate in a face-to-face second survey between 2010 and 2012. The 5-year clinical health history of non-participants was assessed by mail or telephone. Baseline characteristics and self-reported clinical outcomes of non-participants were compared with those of participants. Results Among 11 483 people, 8454 (73.6%) participated in the second survey, and 2608 out of 3029 non-participants answered mail or telephone health surveys. Female sex, youngest and oldest ages, lower education, lower occupational class, current smoking, lower physical activity level, shorter sleep time, obesity, and constipation were associated with non-participation. Light drinking (0.1–22.9 g ethanol/day) was associated with participation. Non-participants reported a significantly higher incidence of cancer and a significantly lower proportion of hypertension compared with participants. Conclusions Both baseline characteristics and disease incidence during the follow-up period had significant associations with non-participation in the face-to-face second survey.

Hara, Megumi; Shimanoe, Chisato; Otsuka, Yasuko; Nishida, Yuichiro; Nanri, Hinako; Horita, Mikako; Yasukata, Jun; Miyoshi, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Yosuke; Higaki, Yasuki; Tanaka, Keitaro

2015-01-01

192

Models, Entropy and Information of Temporal Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temporal social networks are characterized by heterogeneous duration of contacts, which can either follow a power-law distribution, such as in face-to-face interactions, or a Weibull distribution, such as in mobile-phone communication. Here we model the dynamics of face-to-face interaction and mobile phone communication by a reinforcement dynamics, which explains the data observed in these different types of social interactions. We quantify the information encoded in the dynamics of these networks by the entropy of temporal networks. Finally, we show evidence that human dynamics is able to modulate the information present in social network dynamics when it follows circadian rhythms and when it is interfacing with a new technology such as the mobile-phone communication technology.

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Márton; Bianconi, Ginestra

193

Obtaining sensitive information from a wary population: a comparison of telephone and face-to-face surveys of welfare recipients in the United States.  

PubMed

Recent studies reveal the benefits of technological developments such as audio computer assisted self-interviewing (A-CASI) in interview methodology, especially for surveys of sensitive behavior and information. However, we believe that the selection of mode of administration depends not only on the technology available and the behavior of interest, but also on the specific population under study. We therefore assess survey mode effects on reported rates of alcohol and drug use among welfare recipients, an especially important group for scholars and public health agencies. The sample consisted of adult recipients of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) in Oklahoma, January 2001. Adjusting for demographic characteristics, employment, and education, we employ odds ratios to compare 30-day, 1 year, and lifetime prevalence estimates from telephone and face-to-face surveys. Telephone methodology yields similar or higher estimates for lifetime prevalence of alcohol, marijuana, and hard drug use and abuse, though lower estimates of recent use. We discuss our findings in relation to underfunded public health agencies that must efficiently assess and respond to local levels of drug abuse and we conclude that mode selection may depend upon the population under study. PMID:15955399

Pridemore, William Alex; Damphousse, Kelly R; Moore, Rebecca K

2005-09-01

194

Tablet and Face-to-Face Hybrid Professional Development: Providing Earth Systems Science Educators Authentic Research Opportunities through The GLOBE Program at Purdue University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program (www.globe.gov). GLOBE's vision promotes and supports students, teachers and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based authentic science investigations of the environment and the Earth system working in close partnership with NASA, NOAA and NSF Earth System Science Projects (ESSP's) in study and research about the dynamics of Earth's environment. GLOBE Partners conduct face-to-face Professional Development in more than 110 countries, providing authentic scientific research experience in five investigation areas: atmosphere, earth as a system, hydrology, land cover, and soil. This presentation will provide a sample for a new framework of Professional Development that was implemented in July 2013 at Purdue University lead by Mr. Steven Smith who has tested GLOBE training materials for future training. The presentation will demonstrate how institutions can provide educators authentic scientific research opportunities through various components, including: - Carrying out authentic research investigations - Learning how to enter their authentic research data into the GLOBE database and visualize it on the GLOBE website - Learn how to access to NASA's Earth System Science resources via GLOBE's new online 'e-Training Program' - Exploring the connections of their soil protocol measurements and the history of the soil in their area through iPad soils app - LIDAR data exposure, Hydrology data exposure

Wegner, K.; Branch, B. D.; Smith, S. C.

2013-12-01

195

ACT Internet-based vs face-to-face? A randomized controlled trial of two ways to deliver Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depressive symptoms: an 18-month follow-up.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate two interventions based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for depressive symptoms: A face-to-face treatment (ACT group) was compared to a guided self-help treatment delivered via the Internet consisting of two assessment sessions (pre and post) and an ACT-based Internet program (iACT). Outpatients experiencing at least mild depressive symptoms were randomized to either approach. The iACT treatment group received access to an ACT-based Internet program and supportive web-based contact over a period of 6 weeks. The face-to-face group received ACT-based treatment once a week over the same period of time. In both groups, the results showed a significant effect on depression symptomatology, and general wellbeing after treatment and at the 18-month follow-up. However, the data indicated that the iACT group changed differently regarding depressive symptoms and wellbeing as compared to the face-to face ACT group. Results showed large pre-treatment to 18-month follow-up within-group effect sizes for all symptom measures in the iACT treatment group (1.59-2.08), and for most outcome measures in the face-to-face ACT group (1.12-1.37). This non-inferiority study provides evidence that guided Internet-delivered ACT intervention can be as effective as ACT-based face-to-face treatment for outpatients reporting depressive symptoms, and it may offer some advantages over a face-to-face intervention. PMID:25127179

Lappalainen, Päivi; Granlund, Anna; Siltanen, Sari; Ahonen, Suvi; Vitikainen, Minna; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

2014-10-01

196

Social Interactions Model and Adaptability of Human Behavior  

PubMed Central

Human social networks evolve on the fast timescale of face-to-face interactions and of interactions mediated by technology such as a telephone calls or video conferences. The resulting networks have a strong dynamical component that changes significantly the properties of dynamical processes. In this paper we study a general model of pairwise human social interaction intended to model both face-to-face interactions and mobile-phone communication. We study the distribution of durations of social interactions in within the model. This distribution in one limit is a power-law, for other values of the parameters of the model this distribution is given by a Weibull function. Therefore the model can be used to model both face-to-face interactions data, where the distribution of duration has been shown to be fat-tailed, and mobile-phone communication data where the distribution of duration is given by a Weibull distribution. The highly adaptable social interaction model propose in this paper has a very simple algorithmic implementation and can be used to simulate dynamical processes occurring in dynamical social interaction networks. PMID:22194724

Zhao, Kun; Bianconi, Ginestra

2011-01-01

197

Stakeholders’ perspectives on access-to-medicines policy and research priorities in Latin America and the Caribbean: face-to-face and web-based interviews  

PubMed Central

Background This study aims to rank policy concerns and policy-related research issues in order to identify policy and research gaps on access to medicines (ATM) in low- and middle-income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), as perceived by policy makers, researchers, NGO and international organization representatives, as part of a global prioritization exercise. Methods Data collection, conducted between January and May 2011, involved face-to-face interviews in El Salvador, Colombia, Dominican Republic, and Suriname, and an e-mail survey with key-stakeholders. Respondents were asked to choose the five most relevant criteria for research prioritization and to score policy/research items according to the degree to which they represented current policies, desired policies, current research topics, and/or desired research topics. Mean scores and summary rankings were obtained. Linear regressions were performed to contrast rankings concerning current and desired policies (policy gaps), and current and desired research (research gaps). Results Relevance, feasibility, and research utilization were the top ranked criteria for prioritizing research. Technical capacity, research and development for new drugs, and responsiveness, were the main policy gaps. Quality assurance, staff technical capacity, price regulation, out-of-pocket payments, and cost containment policies, were the main research gaps. There was high level of coherence between current and desired policies: coefficients of determination (R2) varied from 0.46 (Health system structure; r = 0.68, P <0.01) to 0.86 (Sustainable financing; r = 0.93, P <0.01). There was also high coherence between current and desired research on Rational selection and use of medicines (r = 0.71, P <0.05, R2 = 0.51), Pricing/affordability (r = 0.82, P <0.01, R2 = 0.67), and Sustainable financing (r = 0.76, P <0.01, R2 = 0.58). Coherence was less for Health system structure (r = 0.61, P <0.01, R2 = 0.38). Conclusions This study combines metrics approaches, contributing to priority setting methodology development, with country and regional level stakeholder participation. Stakeholders received feedback with the results, and we hope to have contributed to the discussion and implementation of ATM research and policy priorities in LAC. PMID:24965383

2014-01-01

198

Is There a Role for Social Networking Sites in Education?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace have become popular among millions of users including students of all ages. There are ongoing discussions over the potential of these sites to support teaching and learning, particularly to complement traditional or online classroom activities. This paper explores whether social networking have a place in teaching and learning by investigating how students use these sites and whether they find opportunities to discuss study related activities with their peers. Two small scale studies were carried out in a face-to-face undergraduate course in Singapore and students enrolled in a face-to-face Master’s programme in Brazil. Data were collected using surveys and interviews; findings were mixed. Many of the Brazilian students used social networking sites to both socialize and discuss their studies while the Singaporean students used such sites for social interactions only. The paper discusses these differences and offers suggestions for further research.

Santos, Ieda M.; Hammond, Michael; Durli, Zenilde; Chou, Shiao-Yuh

199

The Clinical Effectiveness of Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy With Face-to-Face Therapist Support for Depressed Primary Care Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Most patients with mild to moderate depression receive treatment in primary care, but despite guideline recommendations, structured psychological interventions are infrequently delivered. Research supports the effectiveness of Internet-based treatment for depression; however, few trials have studied the effect of the MoodGYM program plus therapist support. The use of such interventions could improve the delivery of treatment in primary care. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of a guided Web-based intervention for mild to moderate depression, which could be suitable for implementation in general practice. Methods Participants (N=106) aged between 18 and 65 years were recruited from primary care and randomly allocated to a treatment condition comprising 6 weeks of therapist-assisted Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or to a 6-week delayed treatment condition. The intervention included the Norwegian version of the MoodGYM program, brief face-to-face support from a psychologist, and reminder emails. The primary outcome measure, depression symptoms, was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Secondary outcome measures included the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and the EuroQol Group 5-Dimension Self-Report Questionnaire (EQ-5D). All outcomes were based on self-report and were assessed at baseline, postintervention, and at 6-month follow-up. Results Postintervention measures were completed by 37 (71%) and 47 (87%) of the 52 participants in the intervention and 54 participants in the delayed treatment group, respectively. Linear mixed-models analyses revealed a significant difference in time trends between the groups for the BDI-II, (P=.002), for HADS depression and anxiety subscales (P<.001 and P=.001, respectively), and for the SWLS (P<.001). No differential group effects were found for the BAI and the EQ-5D. In comparison to the control group, significantly more participants in the intervention group experienced recovery from depression as measured by the BDI-II. Of the 52 participants in the treatment program, 31 (60%) adhered to the program, and overall treatment satisfaction was high. The reduction of depression and anxiety symptoms was largely maintained at 6-month follow-up, and positive gains in life satisfaction were partly maintained. Conclusions The intervention combining MoodGYM and brief therapist support can be an effective treatment of depression in a sample of primary care patients. The intervention alleviates depressive symptoms and has a significant positive effect on anxiety symptoms and satisfaction with life. Moderate rates of nonadherence and predominately positive evaluations of the treatment also indicate the acceptability of the intervention. The intervention could potentially be used in a stepped-care approach, but remains to be tested in regular primary health care. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000257066; http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/trial.aspx?trialid=ACTRN12610000257066 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Ie3YhIZa). PMID:23916965

Lillevoll, Kjersti R; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Wilsgaard, Tom; Eisemann, Martin; Waterloo, Knut; Kolstrup, Nils

2013-01-01

200

ePro: a system for supporting collaboration that enhances interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many systems that support group activities utilize computer and network technologies so that people in different places or at different times can communicate with each other. In this paper, we propose a system called ePro for supporting face-to-face collaboration by integrating physical and virtual worlds. In order to enhance interactions among group members and raise their engagement, ePro connects a

Masanori Sugimoto; Fusako Kusunoki; Hiromichi Hashizume

2000-01-01

201

Exploring the Potential of Rehearsal via Automatized Structured Tasks versus Face-to-Face Pair Work to Facilitate Pragmatic and Oral Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research has uncovered ways to improve communicative competence, including task-based learner-learner interaction (e.g., R. Ellis, 2003) and task planning (e.g., Mochizuki and Ortega, 2008). Teacher-guided planning particularly increases the benefits of learner-learner interaction (Foster and Skehan, 1999). One component of communicative…

Sydorenko, Tetyana V.

2011-01-01

202

The effectiveness of face to face education using catharsis education action (CEA) method in improving the adherence of private general practitioners to national guideline on management of tuberculosis in Bandung, Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Background In many countries, private general practitioners are the first contact in health services for people with symptoms of tuberculosis. Targeting the private sector has been recommended in previous studies to improve tuberculosis control. A brief face-to-face intervention using Catharsis Education Action (CEA) method, repeated at periodic intervals, seems to change physicians' attitudes, beliefs and practice. The objective of the study was to determine the effectiveness of CEA method in improving the private general practitioners' (PPs) adherence to the national guideline on the management of tuberculosis patients in Bandung District, Indonesia. Method A randomized controlled trial was done. For the intervention group, a session of the CEA method was delivered to PPs while brief reminder with provision of pamphlet was used for the comparative group. Results A total of 82 PPs were included in the analysis. The intervention group showed some positive trends in adherence especially in the use of sputum as first laboratory examination (RR = 1.24) and follow up (RR = 1.37), though not reaching statistical significance. After intervention PPs in CEA group maintained the adherence, but PPs in pamphlets group showed deterioration (score before to after: -12.5). Conclusion Face to face education using CEA method seems to be as effective as brief reminder with provision of pamphlet in improving the adherence. CEA offers additional information that can be useful in designing intervention programs to improve the adherence to guideline. PMID:22449199

2012-01-01

203

Investigating Maternal Touch and Infants' Self-Regulatory Behaviours during a Modified Face-to-Face Still-Face with Touch Procedure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maternal touch and infants' self-regulatory behaviours were examined during a modified Still-Face with Touch (SF?+?T) procedure. Mothers and their 5½-month-old infants participated in one period of Normal interaction followed by three SF?+?T periods. Maternal functions of touch, and infants' self-regulatory behaviour, affect, and…

Jean, Amélie D. L.; Stack, Dale M.; Arnold, Sharon

2014-01-01

204

Differences in Learning Styles and Satisfaction between Traditional Face-to-Face and Online Web-Based Sport Management Studies Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each student has a unique learning style or individual way of perceiving, interacting, and responding to a learning environment. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the prevalence of learning styles among undergraduate Sport Management Studies (SMS) students at California University of Pennsylvania (Cal U). Learning style…

West, Ellen Jo

2010-01-01

205

Learners Need Face-to-Face Advice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In January the 157 Group launched a policy paper making the case for professional careers guidance. With the launch of the National Careers Service in April, information, advice and guidance is a hot topic within the education and skills sector and one that is regularly debated. The combination of policy changes, including the introduction of…

Sedgmore, Lynne

2012-01-01

206

Explaining Student Interaction and Satisfaction: An Empirical Investigation of Delivery Mode Influence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How interpersonal interactions within a course affect student satisfaction differently between face-to-face and online modes is an important research question to answer with confidence. Using students from a marketing course delivered face-to-face and online concurrently, our first study demonstrates that student-to-professor and…

Johnson, Zachary S.; Cascio, Robert; Massiah, Carolyn A.

2014-01-01

207

A three-group study, internet-based, face-to-face based and standard- management after acute whiplash associated disorders (WAD) – choosing the most efficient and cost-effective treatment: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background The management of Whiplash Associated Disorders is one of the most complicated challenges with high expenses for the health care system and society. There are still no general guidelines or scientific documentation to unequivocally support any single treatment for acute care following whiplash injury. The main purpose of this study is to try a new behavioural medicine intervention strategy at acute phase aimed to reduce the number of patients who have persistent problems after the whiplash injury. The goal is also to identify which of three different interventions that is most cost-effective for patients with Whiplash Associated Disorders. In this study we are controlling for two factors. First, the effect of behavioural medicine approach is compared with standard care. Second, the manner in which the behavioural medicine treatment is administered, Internet or face-to-face, is evaluated in it's effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design The study is a randomized, prospective, experimental three-group study with analyses of cost-effectiveness up to two-years follow-up. Internet – based programme and face-to-face group treatment programme are compared to standard-treatment only. Patient follow-ups take place three, six, twelve and 24 months, that is, short-term as well as long-term effects are evaluated. Patients will be enrolled via the emergency ward during the first week after the accident. Discussion This new self-help management will concentrate to those psychosocial factors that are shown to be predictive in long-term problems in Whiplash Associated Disorders, i.e. the importance of self-efficacy, fear of movement, and the significance of catastrophizing as a coping strategy for restoring and sustaining activities of daily life. Within the framework of this project, we will develop, broaden and evaluate current physical therapy treatment methods for acute Whiplash Associated Disorders. The project will contribute to the creation of a cost-effective behavioural medicine approach to management of acute Whiplash Associated Disorders. The results of this study will answer an important question; on what extent and how should these patients be treated at acute stage and how much does the best management cost. Trial registration number Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN61531337 PMID:19624833

Söderlund, Anne; Bring, Annika; Åsenlöf, Pernilla

2009-01-01

208

Demonstration: interactive Social-Emotional Toolkit (iSET)  

E-print Network

Social communication in autism is significantly hindered by difficulties processing affective cues in realtime face-to-face interaction. The interactive Social-Emotional Toolkit (iSET) allows its users to record and annotate ...

Madsen, Miriam A.

209

Topology of molecular interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Molecular interactions are often represented as network models which have become the common language of many areas of biology. Graphs serve as convenient mathematical representations of network models and have themselves become objects of study. Their topology has been intensively researched over the last decade after evidence was found that they share underlying design principles with many other types of networks. Initial studies suggested that molecular interaction network topology is related to biological function and evolution. However, further whole-network analyses did not lead to a unified view on what this relation may look like, with conclusions highly dependent on the type of molecular interactions considered and the metrics used to study them. It is unclear whether global network topology drives function, as suggested by some researchers, or whether it is simply a byproduct of evolution or even an artefact of representing complex molecular interaction networks as graphs. Nevertheless, network biology has progressed significantly over the last years. We review the literature, focusing on two major developments. First, realizing that molecular interaction networks can be naturally decomposed into subsystems (such as modules and pathways), topology is increasingly studied locally rather than globally. Second, there is a move from a descriptive approach to a predictive one: rather than correlating biological network topology to generic properties such as robustness, it is used to predict specific functions or phenotypes. Taken together, this change in focus from globally descriptive to locally predictive points to new avenues of research. In particular, multi-scale approaches are developments promising to drive the study of molecular interaction networks further. PMID:24041013

2013-01-01

210

INTERACTING WITH SOCIAL NETWORKS TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE BODY SENSOR NETWORKS  

E-print Network

INTERACTING WITH SOCIAL NETWORKS TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE BODY SENSOR NETWORKS by DAVID BAUSCHLICHER.........................................................................................3 2.1 Wireless Sensor Networks.............................................................3 2.2 Body Sensor Networks..................................................................5 2.2.1 Energy

Miles, Will

211

Comparison of Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview and Face-To-Face Interview Methods in Eliciting HIV-Related Risks among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Men Who Inject Drugs in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Introduction Face-to-face (FTF) interviews are the most frequently used means of obtaining information on sexual and drug injecting behaviours from men who have sex with men (MSM) and men who inject drugs (MWID). However, accurate information on these behaviours may be difficult to elicit because of sociocultural hostility towards these populations and the criminalization associated with these behaviours. Audio computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) is an interviewing technique that may mitigate social desirability bias in this context. Methods This study evaluated differences in the reporting of HIV-related risky behaviours by MSM and MWID using ACASI and FTF interviews. Between August and September 2010, 712 MSM and 328 MWID in Nigeria were randomized to either ACASI or FTF interview for completion of a behavioural survey that included questions on sensitive sexual and injecting risk behaviours. Data were analyzed separately for MSM and MWID. Logistic regression was run for each behaviour as a dependent variable to determine differences in reporting methods. Results MSM interviewed via ACASI reported significantly higher risky behaviours with both women (multiple female sexual partners 51% vs. 43%, p?=?0.04; had unprotected anal sex with women 72% vs. 57%, p?=?0.05) and men (multiple male sex partners 70% vs. 54%, p?0.001) than through FTF. Additionally, they were more likely to self-identify as homosexual (AOR: 3.3, 95%CI:2.4–4.6) and report drug use in the past 12 months (AOR:40.0, 95%CI: 9.6–166.0). MWID interviewed with ACASI were more likely to report needle sharing (AOR:3.3, 95%CI:1.2–8.9) and re-use (AOR:2.2, 95%CI:1.2–3.9) in the past month and prior HIV testing (AOR:1.6, 95%CI 1.02–2.5). Conclusion The feasibility of using ACASI in studies and clinics targeting key populations in Nigeria must be explored to increase the likelihood of obtaining more accurate data on high risk behaviours to inform improved risk reduction strategies that reduce HIV transmission. PMID:24416134

Adebajo, Sylvia; Obianwu, Otibho; Eluwa, George; Vu, Lung; Oginni, Ayo; Tun, Waimar; Sheehy, Meredith; Ahonsi, Babatunde; Bashorun, Adebobola; Idogho, Omokhudu; Karlyn, Andrew

2014-01-01

212

Dynamic and interacting complex networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis employs methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations to study some aspects of dynamic and interacting complex networks. The mapping of various social and physical phenomena to complex networks has been a rich field in the past few decades. Subjects as broad as petroleum engineering, scientific collaborations, and the structure of the internet have all been analyzed in a network physics context, with useful and universal results. In the first chapter we introduce basic concepts in networks, including the two types of network configurations that are studied and the statistical physics and epidemiological models that form the framework of the network research, as well as covering various previously-derived results in network theory that are used in the work in the following chapters. In the second chapter we introduce a model for dynamic networks, where the links or the strengths of the links change over time. We solve the model by mapping dynamic networks to the problem of directed percolation, where the direction corresponds to the time evolution of the network. We show that the dynamic network undergoes a percolation phase transition at a critical concentration pc, that decreases with the rate r at which the network links are changed. The behavior near criticality is universal and independent of r. We find that for dynamic random networks fundamental laws are changed: i) The size of the giant component at criticality scales with the network size N for all values of r, rather than as N2/3 in static network, ii) In the presence of a broad distribution of disorder, the optimal path length between two nodes in a dynamic network scales as N1/2, compared to N1/3 in a static network. The third chapter consists of a study of the effect of quarantine on the propagation of epidemics on an adaptive network of social contacts. For this purpose, we analyze the susceptible-infected-recovered model in the presence of quarantine, where susceptible individuals protect themselves by disconnecting their links to infected neighbors with probability w and reconnecting them to other susceptible individuals chosen at random. Starting from a single infected individual, we show by an analytical approach and simulations that there is a phase transition at a critical rewiring (quarantine) threshold wc separating a phase (w < wc) where the disease reaches a large fraction of the population from a phase (w > wc) where the disease does not spread out. We find that in our model the topology of the network strongly affects the size of the propagation and that wc increases with the mean degree and heterogeneity of the network. We also find that wc is reduced if we perform a preferential rewiring, in which the rewiring probability is proportional to the degree of infected nodes. In the fourth chapter, we study epidemic processes on interconnected network systems, and find two distinct regimes. In strongly-coupled network systems, epidemics occur simultaneously across the entire system at a critical value betac. In contrast, in weakly-coupled network systems, a mixed phase exists below betac where an epidemic occurs in one network but does not spread to the coupled network. We derive an expression for the network and disease parameters that allow this mixed phase and verify it numerically. Public health implications of communities comprising these two classes of network systems are also mentioned.

Dickison, Mark E.

213

Mesoscale properties of clay aggregates from potential of mean force representation of interactions between nanoplatelets  

E-print Network

Face-to-face and edge-to-edge free energy interactions of Wyoming Na-montmorillonite platelets were studied by calculating potential of mean force along their center to center reaction coordinate using explicit solvent ...

Ebrahimi, Davoud

214

Protein interaction networks from literature mining  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to accurately predict and understand physiological changes in the biological network system in response to disease or drug therapeutics is of crucial importance in life science. The extensive amount of gene expression data generated from even a single microarray experiment often proves difficult to fully interpret and comprehend the biological significance. An increasing knowledge of protein interactions stored in the PubMed database, as well as the advancement of natural language processing, however, makes it possible to construct protein interaction networks from the gene expression information that are essential for understanding the biological meaning. From the in house literature mining system we have developed, the protein interaction network for humans was constructed. By analysis based on the graph-theoretical characterization of the total interaction network in literature, we found that the network is scale-free and semantic long-ranged interactions (i.e. inhibit, induce) between proteins dominate in the total interaction network, reducing the degree exponent. Interaction networks generated based on scientific text in which the interaction event is ambiguously described result in disconnected networks. In contrast interaction networks based on text in which the interaction events are clearly stated result in strongly connected networks. The results of protein-protein interaction networks obtained in real applications from microarray experiments are discussed: For example, comparisons of the gene expression data indicative of either a good or a poor prognosis for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL rearrangements, using our system, showed newly discovered signaling cross-talk.

Ihara, Sigeo

2005-03-01

215

Interactive multimedia service system on ATM networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents an interactive multimedia conferencing system designed in compliance with the telecommunication information networking architecture software concepts and principles. The interactive multimedia conference service is implemented on Iona's Orbix as a distributed processing environment, windows-NT PC, UNIX Workstations, interconnected by ATM networks. The multimedia conference systems is developed to provide the network based multimedia conferencing services for large public ATM networks.

Nam, Taek Yong; Kim, Bongtae; Jeong, Taesoo

1998-02-01

216

Explorers of the Universe: Interactive Electronic Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper details how the Interactive Electronic Network is being utilized by secondary and postsecondary students, and their teachers and professors, to facilitate learning and understanding. The Interactive Electronic Network is couched within the Explorers of the Universe web site in a restricted portion entitled Gateway.

Alvarez, Marino C.; Burks, Geoffrey; Busby, Michael R.; Cannon, Tiffani; Sotoohi, Goli; Wade, Montanez

2000-01-01

217

A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families  

PubMed Central

In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model can effectively create synthetic networks whose internal and cross-network properties closely resemble those of real PPI networks. The proposed model can serve as an effective framework for generating comprehensive benchmark datasets that can be used for reliable performance assessment of comparative network analysis algorithms. Using this model, we constructed a large-scale network alignment benchmark, called NAPAbench, and evaluated the performance of several representative network alignment algorithms. Our analysis clearly shows the relative performance of the leading network algorithms, with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The algorithm and source code of the network synthesis model and the network alignment benchmark NAPAbench are publicly available at http://www.ece.tamu.edu/bjyoon/NAPAbench/. PMID:22912671

Sahraeian, Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim; Yoon, Byung-Jun

2012-01-01

218

Measuring Large-Scale Social Networks with High Resolution  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the deployment of a large-scale study designed to measure human interactions across a variety of communication channels, with high temporal resolution and spanning multiple years—the Copenhagen Networks Study. Specifically, we collect data on face-to-face interactions, telecommunication, social networks, location, and background information (personality, demographics, health, politics) for a densely connected population of 1 000 individuals, using state-of-the-art smartphones as social sensors. Here we provide an overview of the related work and describe the motivation and research agenda driving the study. Additionally, the paper details the data-types measured, and the technical infrastructure in terms of both backend and phone software, as well as an outline of the deployment procedures. We document the participant privacy procedures and their underlying principles. The paper is concluded with early results from data analysis, illustrating the importance of multi-channel high-resolution approach to data collection. PMID:24770359

Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Sekara, Vedran; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Cuttone, Andrea; Madsen, Mette My; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Lehmann, Sune

2014-01-01

219

Interaction network among functional drug groups  

PubMed Central

Background More attention has been being paid to combinatorial effects of drugs to treat complex diseases or to avoid adverse combinations of drug cocktail. Although drug interaction information has been increasingly accumulated, a novel approach like network-based method is needed to analyse that information systematically and intuitively Results Beyond focussing on drug-drug interactions, we examined interactions between functional drug groups. In this work, functional drug groups were defined based on the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System. We defined criteria whether two functional drug groups are related. Then we constructed the interaction network of drug groups. The resulting network provides intuitive interpretations. We further constructed another network based on interaction sharing ratio of the first network. Subsequent analysis of the networks showed that some features of drugs can be well described by this kind of interaction even for the case of structurally dissimilar drugs. Conclusion Our networks in this work provide intuitive insights into interactions among drug groups rather than those among single drugs. In addition, information on these interactions can be used as a useful source to describe mechanisms and features of drugs. PMID:24555875

2013-01-01

220

Inferring network interactions using recurrent neural networks and swarm intelligence.  

PubMed

We present a novel algorithm combining artificial neural networks and swarm intelligence (SI) methods to infer network interactions. The algorithm uses ant colony optimization (ACO) to identify the optimal architecture of a recurrent neural network (RNN), while the weights of the RNN are optimized using particle swarm optimization (PSO). Our goal is to construct an RNN that mimics the true structure of an unknown network and the time-series data that the network generated. We applied the proposed hybrid SI-RNN algorithm to infer a simulated genetic network. The results indicate that the algorithm has a promising potential to infer complex interactions such as gene regulatory networks from time-series gene expression data. PMID:17946231

Ressom, Habtom W; Zhang, Yuji; Xuan, Jianhua; Wang, Yue; Clarke, Robert

2006-01-01

221

Comparative analysis of protein interaction networks.  

PubMed

Recent advances in proteomics and computational biology have lead to a flood of protein interaction data and resulting interaction networks (e.g. (Gavin et al., 2002)). Here I first analyse the status and quality of parts lists (genes and proteins), then comparatively assess large-scale protein interaction data (von Mering et al., 2002) and finally try to identify biological meaningful units (e.g. pathways, cellular processes) within interaction networks that are derived from the conservation of gene neighborhood (Snel et al., 2002). Possible extensions of gene neighborhood analysis to eukaryotes (von Mering and Bork, 2002) will be discussed. PMID:12385984

Bork, Peer

2002-01-01

222

Interactivity vs. fairness in networked linux systems  

SciTech Connect

In general, the Linux 2.6 scheduler can ensure fairness and provide excellent interactive performance at the same time. However, our experiments and mathematical analysis have shown that the current Linux interactivity mechanism tends to incorrectly categorize non-interactive network applications as interactive, which can lead to serious fairness or starvation issues. In the extreme, a single process can unjustifiably obtain up to 95% of the CPU! The root cause is due to the facts that: (1) network packets arrive at the receiver independently and discretely, and the 'relatively fast' non-interactive network process might frequently sleep to wait for packet arrival. Though each sleep lasts for a very short period of time, the wait-for-packet sleeps occur so frequently that they lead to interactive status for the process. (2) The current Linux interactivity mechanism provides the possibility that a non-interactive network process could receive a high CPU share, and at the same time be incorrectly categorized as 'interactive.' In this paper, we propose and test a possible solution to address the interactivity vs. fairness problems. Experiment results have proved the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

Wu, Wenji; Crawford, Matt; /Fermilab; ,

2007-01-01

223

Searching Similar Modules in Protein Interaction Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a new method to search protein networks functionally similar to a given query signal transduction pathway within protein interaction networks. This method consists of two parts: 1) a backtracking search algorithm to find topologically identical subgraphs and 2) a measurement of similarity between proteins by using Gene Ontology (1). For validation of our method, we implemented a software

Hiroyuki Ok; Masanori Arit

224

Interactive Videodisc for Learners of French.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes development of a learning module for students studying foreign languages, which usually depicts social behavior between the foreign language nationals to teach communicative competence in face-to-face interactions between nationals and students. Marketing of the module, which was first produced on videotape and later on interactive

Hancock, Roger

1985-01-01

225

Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach.

Peter M Thule (Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center); Kathrin Dethleffsen (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität); Michael Meyer (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität)

2012-12-01

226

Fuzzy-rule-based Adaptive Resource Control for Information Sharing in P2P Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With more and more peer-to-peer (P2P) technologies available for online collaboration and information sharing, people can launch more and more collaborative work in online social networks with friends, colleagues, and even strangers. Without face-to-face interactions, the question of who can be trusted and then share information with becomes a big concern of a user in these online social networks. This paper introduces an adaptive control service using fuzzy logic in preference definition for P2P information sharing control, and designs a novel decision-making mechanism using formal fuzzy rules and reasoning mechanisms adjusting P2P information sharing status following individual users' preferences. Applications of this adaptive control service into different information sharing environments show that this service can provide a convenient and accurate P2P information sharing control for individual users in P2P networks.

Wu, Zhengping; Wu, Hao

227

Detecting Conserved Interaction Patterns in Biological Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular interaction data plays an important role in understanding biological processes at a modular level by providing a framework for understanding cellular organization, func- tional hierarchy, and evolutionary conservation. As the quality and quantity of network and interaction data increases rapidly, the problem of effectively analyzing this data becomes sig- nificant. Graph theoretic formalisms, commonly used for these analysis tasks,

Mehmet Koyutürk; Yohan Kim; Shankar Subramaniam; Wojciech Szpankowski; Ananth Grama

2006-01-01

228

Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Teaching and Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online education has emerged in the 21st century as a popular alternative to traditional education. Proponents argue that online education provides opportunities for learners that they would otherwise do without (Beard & Harper, 2002; Hay, Peltier, & Drago, 2004). Opponents (see, for example, Hay et al., 2004) have argued, however, that the loss…

Beck, Victoria Simpson

2010-01-01

229

A Program in Community Relations: Face-to-Face Confrontations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the sources of conflict in our urban centers today is the distrust that exists between the community and the police. In an effort to improve relations between community members and the police, so that both groups might work together more effectively in solving community problems, the Houston Cooperative Crime Prevention Program was…

Hanson, Philip G.; O'Connell, Walter E.

230

Face-to-Face Interference in Typical and Atypical Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Visual communication cues facilitate interpersonal communication. It is important that we look at faces to retrieve and subsequently process such cues. It is also important that we sometimes look away from faces as they increase cognitive load that may interfere with online processing. Indeed, when typically developing individuals hold face gaze…

Riby, Deborah M.; Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa

2012-01-01

231

Programmed Counseling Vs. Face-To-Face Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One session interviews were conducted with students planning to enter the University of Illinois. The interviews dealt with interpretation of aptitude and interest tests in relation to curricular plans, discussion of the students' expected level of achievement and areas of strength and weakness, a screening procedure for personality problems and…

Ewing, Thomas N.; Gilbert, William M.

232

Online or Face-to-Face? Which Class to Take  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online classes are a viable option in today's educational landscape, but are they right for your school and students? This article reviews the status of online education, 21st century skills, best practices in online education, and online classes as experienced by a middle school student and parent. (Contains 2 figures.)

Cramer, Susan; Cramer, Steven

2008-01-01

233

Colorado Springs In addition to face-to-face instruction,  

E-print Network

that focuses on practice in the context of community. This perspective recognizes that practice is informed combination of the following courses: sociology, psychology, economics, political science, anthropology

234

Face to Face: Stories from the Aftermath of Infamy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the wake of 9/11, many Muslims around the United States faced a backlash of resentment and anger. This groundswell of emotion was not without parallel, as Japanese and Japanese-Americans faced a similar reaction after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. The Independent Television Service has developed this Web site to bring a human face to the experiences of Muslims and Japanese people in the United States by collecting these powerful interviews from members of both groups. On the site, visitors can listen to stories from older Japanese-Americans talk about their experiences on the West Coast after Pearl Harbor, and the experiences of Muslims, both young and old. The interviews are divided into thematic sections, such as "Fear," "Internment," "Identity," and "Being American." At another section of the site, visitors can respond to the stories, and a glossary of terms is also provided as background material. Overall, this site serves as a fine educational tool, and for those looking for a number of perspectives on the experience of living in America.

235

Signal integrity face to face with EMC in PCB design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a review of the most important phenomena that determine the signal integrity and EMC on the signal traces for the PCB equipped with digital circuits. The aim of this paper is to highlight the effects of variation of design parameters, signal integrity and EMC field. For all of the mentioned phenomena the mathematical models are specified. These

Dan Pitica; S. Lungu; Ovidiu Pop

2003-01-01

236

Verbmobil - Translation of Face-To-Face Dialogs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Verbmobil is a long-term project on the translation of spontaneous language in negotiation dialogs. We describe the goals of the project, the chosen discourse domains and the initial project schedule. We discuss some of the distinguishing features of Verbmobil and introduce the notion of translation on demand and variable depth of processing in speech translation. Finally, the role of anytime

Wolfgang Wahlster

1993-01-01

237

Teamwork through Team Building: Face-to-Face to Online  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the ways the authors incorporated team-building activities into our online business writing courses by interrogating the ways that kinesthetic learning translates into the electronic realm. The authors review foundational theories of team building, including Cog's Ladder and Tuckman's Stages, and offer sample exercises they…

Staggers, Julie; Garcia, Susan; Nagelhout, Ed

2008-01-01

238

392 RESONANCE April 2011 FACE-TO-FACE  

E-print Network

spent a term at the California Institute of Technology, USA as Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Scholar's Novel Richard Brautigan was a 20th century American novelist, poet, and short story writer. His work

Banaji,. Murad

239

Technology as Small Group Face-to-Face Collaborative Scaffolding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a wealth of evidence that collaboration between learners can enhance the outcomes for all concerned. This supports the theorization of learning as a socio-cultural practice, framed by Vygotsky and developed by other researchers such as Rogoff, Lave and Wenger. However, there is also evidence that working collaboratively may not be a…

Nussbaum, Miguel; Alvarez, Claudio; McFarlane, Angela; Gomez, Florencia; Claro, Susana; Radovic, Darinka

2009-01-01

240

User interface requirements for face to face groupware  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the user interface of the Capture Lab, a computer-supported meeting room that has been in operation since late 1987. One goal of the Capture Lab design is to support meetings of business people (who are often novice computer users) without requiring an additional person to serve as a computer technician or facilitator. This paper discusses the user

Mary Elwart-Keys; David Halonen; Marjorie Horton; Robert Kass; Paul Scott

1990-01-01

241

BIND - The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Biomolecular Interaction Network Database (BIND; http:\\/\\/binddb.org) is a database designed to store full descriptions of interactions, molecular complexes and pathways. Development of the BIND 2.0 data model has led to the incorporation of virtually all components of molecular mechanisms including interactions between any two molecules composed of proteins, nucleic acids and small molecules. Chemical reactions, photochemical activation and conformational

Gary D. Bader; Ian Donaldson; Cheryl Wolting; B. F. Francis Ouellette; Tony Pawson; Christopher W. V. Hogue

2001-01-01

242

Unraveling spurious properties of interaction networks with tailored random networks.  

PubMed

We investigate interaction networks that we derive from multivariate time series with methods frequently employed in diverse scientific fields such as biology, quantitative finance, physics, earth and climate sciences, and the neurosciences. Mimicking experimental situations, we generate time series with finite length and varying frequency content but from independent stochastic processes. Using the correlation coefficient and the maximum cross-correlation, we estimate interdependencies between these time series. With clustering coefficient and average shortest path length, we observe unweighted interaction networks, derived via thresholding the values of interdependence, to possess non-trivial topologies as compared to Erdös-Rényi networks, which would indicate small-world characteristics. These topologies reflect the mostly unavoidable finiteness of the data, which limits the reliability of typically used estimators of signal interdependence. We propose random networks that are tailored to the way interaction networks are derived from empirical data. Through an exemplary investigation of multichannel electroencephalographic recordings of epileptic seizures--known for their complex spatial and temporal dynamics--we show that such random networks help to distinguish network properties of interdependence structures related to seizure dynamics from those spuriously induced by the applied methods of analysis. PMID:21850239

Bialonski, Stephan; Wendler, Martin; Lehnertz, Klaus

2011-01-01

243

Functional module identification in protein interaction networks by interaction patterns  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Identifying functional modules in protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks may shed light on cellular functional organization and thereafter underlying cellular mechanisms. Many existing module identification algorithms aim to detect densely connected groups of proteins as potential modules. However, based on this simple topological criterion of ‘higher than expected connectivity’, those algorithms may miss biologically meaningful modules of functional significance, in which proteins have similar interaction patterns to other proteins in networks but may not be densely connected to each other. A few blockmodel module identification algorithms have been proposed to address the problem but the lack of global optimum guarantee and the prohibitive computational complexity have been the bottleneck of their applications in real-world large-scale PPI networks. Results: In this article, we propose a novel optimization formulation LCP2 (low two-hop conductance sets) using the concept of Markov random walk on graphs, which enables simultaneous identification of both dense and sparse modules based on protein interaction patterns in given networks through searching for LCP2 by random walk. A spectral approximate algorithm SLCP2 is derived to identify non-overlapping functional modules. Based on a bottom-up greedy strategy, we further extend LCP2 to a new algorithm (greedy algorithm for LCP2) GLCP2 to identify overlapping functional modules. We compare SLCP2 and GLCP2 with a range of state-of-the-art algorithms on synthetic networks and real-world PPI networks. The performance evaluation based on several criteria with respect to protein complex prediction, high level Gene Ontology term prediction and especially sparse module detection, has demonstrated that our algorithms based on searching for LCP2 outperform all other compared algorithms. Availability and implementation: All data and code are available at http://www.cse.usf.edu/?xqian/fmi/slcp2hop/. Contact: yijie@mail.usf.edu or xqian@ece.tamu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24085567

Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

2014-01-01

244

The Effect of Online Interactive Visuals on Undergraduate Mathematics Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there is a trend towards increased use of online instruction for undergraduate instruction, online delivery lacks the student-teacher interactivity and the easy exchange of visuals that is available during face-to-face environments. Interactivity and visualization are valuable for mathematics instruction as a way of reducing cognitive…

Just, Glen A.

2010-01-01

245

Dynamical and bursty interactions in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a modeling framework for dynamical and bursty contact networks made of agents in social interaction. We consider agents’ behavior at short time scales in which the contact network is formed by disconnected cliques of different sizes. At each time a random agent can make a transition from being isolated to being part of a group or vice versa. Different distributions of contact times and intercontact times between individuals are obtained by considering transition probabilities with memory effects, i.e., the transition probabilities for each agent depend both on its state (isolated or interacting) and on the time elapsed since the last change in state. The model lends itself to analytical and numerical investigations. The modeling framework can be easily extended and paves the way for systematic investigations of dynamical processes occurring on rapidly evolving dynamical networks, such as the propagation of an information or spreading of diseases.

Stehlé, Juliette; Barrat, Alain; Bianconi, Ginestra

2010-03-01

246

From networks of protein interactions to networks of functional dependencies  

PubMed Central

Background As protein-protein interactions connect proteins that participate in either the same or different functions, networks of interacting and functionally annotated proteins can be converted into process graphs of inter-dependent function nodes (each node corresponding to interacting proteins with the same functional annotation). However, as proteins have multiple annotations, the process graph is non-redundant, if only proteins participating directly in a given function are included in the related function node. Results Reasoning that topological features (e.g., clusters of highly inter-connected proteins) might help approaching structured and non-redundant understanding of molecular function, an algorithm was developed that prioritizes inclusion of proteins into the function nodes that best overlap protein clusters. Specifically, the algorithm identifies function nodes (and their mutual relations), based on the topological analysis of a protein interaction network, which can be related to various biological domains, such as cellular components (e.g., peroxisome and cellular bud) or biological processes (e.g., cell budding) of the model organism S. cerevisiae. Conclusions The method we have described allows converting a protein interaction network into a non-redundant process graph of inter-dependent function nodes. The examples we have described show that the resulting graph allows researchers to formulate testable hypotheses about dependencies among functions and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:22607727

2012-01-01

247

Species abundance and asymmetric interaction strength in ecological networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The strength of interactions among species in a network tends to be highly asymmetric. We evaluate the hypothesis that this asymmetry results from the distribution of abundance among species, so that species interactions occur randomly among individuals. We used a database on mutualistic and antagonistic bipartite quantitative interaction networks. We show that across all types of networks asymmetry was correlated

Diego P. Vázquez; Carlos J. Melián; Neal M. Williams; Nico Blüthgen; Boris R. Krasnov; Robert Poulin

2007-01-01

248

Protein interaction networks viewed through statistical-mechanical glasses  

E-print Network

Protein interaction networks viewed through statistical-mechanical glasses ACC Coolen Dept of Mathematics and Randall Division King's College London London, Oct 21st 2009 ACC Coolen (KCL) Protein interaction networks 2009/10/21 1 / 33 #12;Outline 1 What are protein interaction networks, and why study them

Coolen, ACC "Ton"

249

Inferring microbial interaction networks based on consensus similarity network fusion.  

PubMed

With the rapid accumulation of high-throughput metagenomic sequencing data, it is possible to infer microbial species relations in a microbial community systematically. In recent years, some approaches have been proposed for identifying microbial interaction network. These methods often focus on one dataset without considering the advantage of data integration. In this study, we propose to use a similarity network fusion (SNF) method to infer microbial relations. The SNF efficiently integrates the similarities of species derived from different datasets by a cross-network diffusion process. We also introduce consensus k-nearest neighborhood (Ck-NN) method instead of k-NN in the original SNF (we call the approach CSNF). The final network represents the augmented species relationships with aggregated evidence from various datasets, taking advantage of complementarity in the data. We apply the method on genus profiles derived from three microbiome datasets and we find that CSNF can discover the modular structure of microbial interaction network which cannot be identified by analyzing a single dataset. PMID:25326827

Jiang, XingPeng; Hu, XiaoHua

2014-11-01

250

Network Archaeology: Uncovering Ancient Networks from Present-Day Interactions  

PubMed Central

What proteins interacted in a long-extinct ancestor of yeast? How have different members of a protein complex assembled together over time? Our ability to answer such questions has been limited by the unavailability of ancestral protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. To overcome this limitation, we propose several novel algorithms to reconstruct the growth history of a present-day network. Our likelihood-based method finds a probable previous state of the graph by applying an assumed growth model backwards in time. This approach retains node identities so that the history of individual nodes can be tracked. Using this methodology, we estimate protein ages in the yeast PPI network that are in good agreement with sequence-based estimates of age and with structural features of protein complexes. Further, by comparing the quality of the inferred histories for several different growth models (duplication-mutation with complementarity, forest fire, and preferential attachment), we provide additional evidence that a duplication-based model captures many features of PPI network growth better than models designed to mimic social network growth. From the reconstructed history, we model the arrival time of extant and ancestral interactions and predict that complexes have significantly re-wired over time and that new edges tend to form within existing complexes. We also hypothesize a distribution of per-protein duplication rates, track the change of the network's clustering coefficient, and predict paralogous relationships between extant proteins that are likely to be complementary to the relationships inferred using sequence alone. Finally, we infer plausible parameters for the model, thereby predicting the relative probability of various evolutionary events. The success of these algorithms indicates that parts of the history of the yeast PPI are encoded in its present-day form. PMID:21533211

Navlakha, Saket; Kingsford, Carl

2011-01-01

251

Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding  

SciTech Connect

Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A. (JHU); (Maryland)

2013-04-08

252

Growing up with Social Networks and Online Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This presentation examines child and adolescent social networking with an emphasis on how this unprecedented form of communication can be used to contribute to healthy growth and development. Most literature about child and adolescent relationships reflects yesterday's world, a time when face-to-face encounters were the only concern. Students saw…

Strom, Paris; Strom, Robert

2012-01-01

253

Teachers' Support with Ad-Hoc Collaborative Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Efforts to improve the educational process must focus on those most responsible for implementing it: the teachers. It is with them in mind that we propose a face-to-face computer-supported collaborative learning system that uses wirelessly networked hand-held computers to create an environment for helping students assimilate and transfer…

Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Lpez, X.; Rodrguez, P.; Santelices, R.; Rosas, R.; Marianov, V.

2005-01-01

254

Toolbox to analyze computer-network interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the nature of data communications requires tools to collect data from the computer, the network and their interaction. A tool is needed to get better understanding of the processes generating traffic to the network. The main components are an instrumented Linux kernel, a synthetic benchmark program, a system call tracer and a set of analysis programs for the post processing. The data collected from the network can be synchronized with the data collected from computer with an adequate accuracy without expensive hardware. Changes on the operating system (e.g. scheduling algorithm) or on the network can be easily evaluated by the synthetic benchmark where it is possible to modify CPU/IO-intensity ratio and the number of processes each type thus emulating different real-world applications. The data and the code size can be modified to evaluate the memory system performances over different working set sizes. The early measurements on the Ethernet indicate that this toolbox is useful. Measurements have revealed how network traffic is affected as number of processes changes. The toolbox development continues on ATM environment.

Peuhkuri, Markus

1997-10-01

255

A closed loop hybrid interactive satellite network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hybrid communication networks use a combination of satellite and terrestrial communication links to optimize the system. The major advantages of closed loop hybrid interactive satellite network technology are that it reduces the response time from that experienced in systems depending solely on geosynchronous orbiting satellites and avoids the requirement of having ground stations at every node in the network. This technology uses a T1 carrier to broadcast the outbound data to the user base which provides an enormous bandwidth and footprint, and telephone multiplexed high speed data lines for inbound data which have low bandwidth but can accommodate a large number of users. The major components of this technology are as follows. The network interface unit takes multiplexed outbound data, forms it into high level data link control (HDLC) packets and superimposes it onto a T1 carrier for transmission to the satellite uplink. The packetized outbound data is transmitted to the satellite. The satellite downlink receives the data and broadcasts to ground stations anywhere in the geographic boundaries of the satellite footprint. The data is then routed to the link access unit (LAU). The LAU demultiplexes the outbound data from the downlink and routes it to the user via RS232 protocol. Inbound traffic received by the LAU is multiplexed and transmitted over high speed synchronous data lines back to the network interfaces unit and on to the host computer.

Goodchild, John D.

256

Dynamics of interacting information waves in networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To better understand the inner workings of information spreading, network researchers often use simple models to capture the spreading dynamics. But most models only highlight the effect of local interactions on the global spreading of a single information wave, and ignore the effects of interactions between multiple waves. Here we take into account the effect of multiple interacting waves by using an agent-based model in which the interaction between information waves is based on their novelty. We analyzed the global effects of such interactions and found that information that actually reaches nodes reaches them faster. This effect is caused by selection between information waves: lagging waves die out and only leading waves survive. As a result, and in contrast to models with noninteracting information dynamics, the access to information decays with the distance from the source. Moreover, when we analyzed the model on various synthetic and real spatial road networks, we found that the decay rate also depends on the path redundancy and the effective dimension of the system. In general, the decay of the information wave frequency as a function of distance from the source follows a power-law distribution with an exponent between -0.2 for a two-dimensional system with high path redundancy and -0.5 for a tree-like system with no path redundancy. We found that the real spatial networks provide an infrastructure for information spreading that lies in between these two extremes. Finally, to better understand the mechanics behind the scaling results, we provide analytical calculations of the scaling for a one-dimensional system.

Mirshahvalad, A.; Esquivel, A. V.; Lizana, L.; Rosvall, M.

2014-01-01

257

Inferring species interaction networks from species abundance data: A comparative  

E-print Network

Inferring species interaction networks from species abundance data: A comparative evaluation, with hundreds or thousands of species interacting in a number of ways from competition and predation importantly, knowledge about species interactions is restricted to specific kinds of interac- tions

Kaski, Samuel

258

EDIC RESEARCH PROPOSAL 1 Improving Meetings Effectiveness using Interactive  

E-print Network

- nizations (NGOs), and virtually any other kind of organization. Having no alternative to replace the group solutions to overcome them. Index Terms--Augmented Meetings, Interactive Artifacts, the- sis proposal communication means cannot efficiently handle urgent matters. Also, face to face meetings can leverage

259

Creative Multimodal Learning Environments and Blended Interaction for Problem-Based Activity in HCI Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory case study aims to examine how students benefit from a multimodal learning environment while they engage in collaborative problem-based activity in a Human Computer Interaction (HCI) university course. For 12 weeks, 30 students, in groups of 5-7 each, participated in weekly face-to-face meetings and online interactions.…

Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Arh, Tanja; Klobucar, Tomaž; Pipan, Matija

2015-01-01

260

Effectiveness of Strategies to Enhance Interaction in Courses Employing Different Blend Categories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the value of participant interaction to enhance learning, and the growth of blended (face-to-face and online) delivery, the purpose of this study was to examine the way instructor-designers approach interactions in blended learning environments, and the effectiveness of these approaches in terms of student satisfaction and expectations.…

Pensabene, Thomas C.

2011-01-01

261

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a  

E-print Network

Biodiversity, Species Interactions and Ecological Networks in a Fragmented World Melanie Hagen*, W.3 Species trait combinations 126 5. Habitat Fragmentation and Biotic Interactions 129 5.1 Mutualistic plant is organised into complex ecological networks of interacting species in local ecosystems, but our knowledge

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

262

Reconstructing Amino Acid Interaction Networks by an Ant Colony Approach  

E-print Network

Reconstructing Amino Acid Interaction Networks by an Ant Colony Approach Omar GACI and Stefan BALEV are the proteins amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. We consider the problem of reconstructing protein's interaction network from its amino acid sequence. We rely on a probability that two

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

263

Interaction networks: From protein functions to drug discovery. A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most genes, proteins and other components carry out their functions within a complex network of interactions and a single molecule can affect a wide range of other cell components. A global, integrative, approach has been developed for several years, including protein–protein interaction networks (interactomes). In this review, we describe the high-throughput methods used to identify new interactions and to build

E. Chautard; N. Thierry-Mieg; S. Ricard-Blum

2009-01-01

264

Recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction data has made it possible to understand the basic components and organization of cell machinery from the network level. The arising challenge is how to analyze such complex interacting data to reveal the principles of cellular organization, processes and functions. Many studies have shown that clustering protein interaction network is an effective approach

Jianxin Wang; Min Li; Youping Deng; Yi Pan

2010-01-01

265

Human Cancer Protein-Protein Interaction Network: A Structural Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction

Gozde Kar; Attila Gursoy; Ozlem Keskin

2009-01-01

266

Examining Information Sharing and Relationship Building in Online Social Networks: An Emergent Analytic Framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of collaborative information use in electronic environments suggest that virtual communities share characteristics with face-to-face communities. The authors expand on an existing model to present an analytic framework for examining online social networks. The framework emphasizes the information sharing behaviors that are critical in building critical relationships in these online communities. Résumé : Les études sur l'utilisation collaborative de

267

Cambodian Parental Involvement: The Role of Parental Beliefs, Social Networks, and Trust  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of social capital (parental beliefs, social networks, and trust) as a predictor of parental involvement in Cambodian children's education was examined, controlling for human capital (family socioeconomic status). Parents of elementary students (n = 273) were interviewed face to face in Cambodia. Teacher contact scored highest,…

Eng, Sothy; Szmodis, Whitney; Mulsow, Miriam

2014-01-01

268

Nature of Teacher-Students' Interaction in Electronic Learning and Traditional Courses of Higher Education--A Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Present paper explores differential teacher-student interaction in electronic learning (el) and in face to face traditional learning (tl) courses at higher education. After thorough study literature available and getting information from university teachers teaching el and tl courses about the nature of teacher-students interaction in both modes…

Malik, Sufiana Khatoon; Khurshed, Fauzia

2011-01-01

269

Multiple Tipping Points and Optimal Repairing in Interacting Networks  

E-print Network

Systems that comprise many interacting dynamical networks, such as the human body with its biological networks or the global economic network consisting of regional clusters, often exhibit complicated collective dynamics. To understand the collective behavior of these systems, we investigate a model of interacting networks exhibiting the fundamental processes of failure, damage spread, and recovery. We find a very rich phase diagram that becomes exponentially more complex as the number of networks is increased. In the simplest example of $n=2$ interacting networks we find two critical points, 4 triple points, 10 allowed transitions, and two "forbidden" transitions, as well as a manifold of metastable regions represented by complex hysteresis. Knowing and understanding the phase diagram have an immediate practical implication; it enables us to find the optimal strategy for repairing partially or fully damaged interconnected networks. To support our model, we analyze an example of real interacting financial net...

Majdandzic, Antonio; Curme, Chester; Vodenska, Irena; Levy-Carciente, Sary; Stanley, H Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

2015-01-01

270

Integrating physical and genetic maps: from genomes to interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical and genetic mapping data have become as important to network biology as they once were to the Human Genome Project. Integrating physical and genetic networks currently faces several challenges: increasing the coverage of each type of network; establishing methods to assemble individual interaction measurements into contiguous pathway models; and annotating these pathways with detailed functional information. A particular challenge

Andreas Beyer; Sourav Bandyopadhyay; Trey Ideker

2007-01-01

271

Real time face detection and facial expression recognition: Development and application to human-computer interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: to human computer interaction and force us to think innew ways about how computers could be used in daily life.Face to face communication is a real-time process operatingat a a time scale in the order of 40 milliseconds. Thelevel of uncertainty at this time scale is considerable, makingit necessary for humans and machines to rely on sensoryrich perceptual primitives

M. Bartlett; G. Littlewort; I. Fasel; J. Movellan

2003-01-01

272

Perceptive animated interfaces: first steps toward a new paradigm for human-computer interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a vision of the near future in which computer interaction is characterized by natural face-to-face conversations with lifelike characters that speak, emote, and gesture. These animated agents will converse with people much like people converse effectively with assistants in a variety of focused applications. Despite the research advances required to realize this vision, and the lack of

RONALD COLE; SAREL VAN VUUREN; BRYAN PELLOM; KADRI HACIOGLU; Jiyong Ma; JAVIER MOVELLAN; SCOTT SCHWARTZ; DAVID WADE-STEIN; WAYNE WARD; Jie Yan

2003-01-01

273

Real Time Face Detection and Facial Expression Recognition: Development and Applications to Human Computer Interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer animated agents and robots bring a social dimension to human computer interaction and force us to think in new ways about how computers could be used in daily life. Face to face communication is a real-time process operating at a a time scale in the order of 40 milliseconds. The level of uncertainty at this time scale is considerable,

Marian Stewart Bartlett; Gwen Littlewort; Ian Fasel; Javier R. Movellan

2003-01-01

274

Pedagogic Effectiveness of Print, Interactive Multimedia, and Online Resources: A Case Study of IGNOU  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the present paper, the authors report on a comparative study on the pedagogic effectiveness of printed self-learning text with face-to-face tutorial support, interactive multimedia CD-ROM and online learning in an introductory computing module at the certificate level offered at Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), India. The study…

Dikshit, Jyotsna; Garg, Suresh; Panda, Santosh

2013-01-01

275

Oral Computer-Mediated Interaction between L2 Learners: It's about Time!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores task-based, synchronous oral computer-mediated communication (CMC) among intermediate-level learners of Spanish. In particular, this paper examines (a) how learners in video and audio CMC groups negotiate for meaning during task-based interaction, (b) possible differences between both oral CMC modes and traditional face-to-face

Yanguas, Inigo

2010-01-01

276

Infant Directed Speech in Natural Interaction--Norwegian Vowel Quantity and Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An interactive face-to-face setting is used to study natural infant directed speech (IDS) compared to adult directed speech (ADS). With distinctive vowel quantity and vowel quality, Norwegian IDS was used in a natural quasi-experimental design. Six Norwegian mothers were recorded over a period of 6 months alone with their infants and in an adult…

Englund, Kjellrun T.; Behne, Dawn M.

2005-01-01

277

Dynamic modularity in protein interaction networks predicts breast cancer outcome  

E-print Network

cells drives phenotypic transformations that directly affect disease outcome. Here we examineDynamic modularity in protein interaction networks predicts breast cancer outcome Ian W Taylor1 the dynamic structure of the human protein interaction network (interactome) to determine whether changes

Morris, Quaid

278

Proteins: From Structural Classification to Amino Acid Interaction Networks  

E-print Network

Proteins: From Structural Classification to Amino Acid Interaction Networks O. GACI LITIS are the protein's amino acids and whose edges are the inter- actions between them. Using a graph theory approach: proteins, amino acid, interaction network, structural classification 1 Introduction Proteins are biological

Boyer, Edmond

279

Protein-protein interaction networks (PPI) and complex diseases  

PubMed Central

The physical interaction of proteins which lead to compiling them into large densely connected networks is a noticeable subject to investigation. Protein interaction networks are useful because of making basic scientific abstraction and improving biological and biomedical applications. Based on principle roles of proteins in biological function, their interactions determine molecular and cellular mechanisms, which control healthy and diseased states in organisms. Therefore, such networks facilitate the understanding of pathogenic (and physiologic) mechanisms that trigger the onset and progression of diseases. Consequently, this knowledge can be translated into effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, the results of several studies have proved that the structure and dynamics of protein networks are disturbed in complex diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. Based on such relationship, a novel paradigm is suggested in order to confirm that the protein interaction networks can be the target of therapy for treatment of complex multi-genic diseases rather than individual molecules with disrespect the network. PMID:25436094

Safari-Alighiarloo, Nahid; Taghizadeh, Mohammad; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Goliaei, Bahram

2014-01-01

280

Applied Graph-Mining Algorithms to Study Biomolecular Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks carry vital information on the organization of molecular interactions in cellular systems. The identification of functionally relevant modules in PPI networks is one of the most important applications of biological network analysis. Computational analysis is becoming an indispensable tool to understand large-scale biomolecular interaction networks. Several types of computational methods have been developed and employed for the analysis of PPI networks. Of these computational methods, graph comparison and module detection are the two most commonly used strategies. This review summarizes current literature on graph kernel and graph alignment methods for graph comparison strategies, as well as module detection approaches including seed-and-extend, hierarchical clustering, optimization-based, probabilistic, and frequent subgraph methods. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the major algorithms employed under each theme, including our recently published frequent subgraph method, for detecting functional modules commonly shared across multiple cancer PPI networks. PMID:24800226

2014-01-01

281

Domain-mediated protein interaction prediction: From genome to network.  

PubMed

Protein-protein interactions (PPIs), involved in many biological processes such as cellular signaling, are ultimately encoded in the genome. Solving the problem of predicting protein interactions from the genome sequence will lead to increased understanding of complex networks, evolution and human disease. We can learn the relationship between genomes and networks by focusing on an easily approachable subset of high-resolution protein interactions that are mediated by peptide recognition modules (PRMs) such as PDZ, WW and SH3 domains. This review focuses on computational prediction and analysis of PRM-mediated networks and discusses sequence- and structure-based interaction predictors, techniques and datasets for identifying physiologically relevant PPIs, and interpreting high-resolution interaction networks in the context of evolution and human disease. PMID:22561014

Reimand, Jüri; Hui, Shirley; Jain, Shobhit; Law, Brian; Bader, Gary D

2012-08-14

282

Computer-mediated interactions through English for Elite Police Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of English for Elite Police Network program is to provide an interactive platform for trainees, instructors, police experts and other participants so as to enhance interests as well as efficiency in professional English learning and training. Computer-mediated interactions are strengthened in both police English learning and policing skills training through role-playing, discussing and interacting in scenarios which enable

Zhongwen Liu

2011-01-01

283

Using "You've Got Mail" to Teach Social Information Processing Theory and Hyperpersonal Perspective in Online Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the expansion of online interactions and exponential growth of Computer Mediated Communication (CMC), attention is brought to those theories in communication that address the implications of relationships developed within these contexts. In communication courses students learn about both face-to-face (FtF) and CMC relationships and have the…

Heinemann, Daria S.

2011-01-01

284

K-12 Teachers' Perceptions of and Their Satisfaction with Interaction Type in Blended Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Blended learning is an effective approach to instruction that combines features of face-to-face learning and computer-mediated learning. This study investigated the relationship between student perceptions of three types of interaction and blended learning course satisfaction. The participants included K-12 teachers enrolled in a graduate-level…

Kuo, Yu-Chun; Belland, Brian R.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Walker, Andrew E.

2014-01-01

285

The Importance of Interaction for Academic Success in Online Courses with Hearing, Deaf, and Hard-of-Hearing Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the findings of three studies within a program of research designed to better understand the factors contributing to the academic achievement of students in online courses and the contributions of interaction to online learning. The first study compared the academic achievement of students in the online and face-to-face (F2F)…

Long, Gary L.; Marchetti, Carol; Fasse, Richard

2011-01-01

286

Interaction site prediction by structural similarity to neighboring clusters in protein-protein interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Recently, revealing the function of proteins with protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is regarded as one of important issues in bioinformatics. With the development of experimental methods such as the yeast two-hybrid method, the data of protein interaction have been increasing extremely. Many databases dealing with these data comprehensively have been constructed and applied to analyzing PPI networks. However, few

Hiroyuki Monji; Satoshi Koizumi; Tomonobu Ozaki; Takenao Ohkawa

2011-01-01

287

VNP: Interactive Visual Network Pharmacology of Diseases, Targets, and Drugs  

PubMed Central

In drug discovery, promiscuous targets, multifactorial diseases, and “dirty” drugs construct complex network relationships. Network pharmacology description and analysis not only give a systems-level understanding of drug action and disease complexity but can also help to improve the efficiency of target selection and drug design. Visual network pharmacology (VNP) is developed to visualize network pharmacology of targets, diseases, and drugs with a graph network by using disease, target or drug names, chemical structures, or protein sequence. To our knowledge, VNP is the first free interactive VNP server that should be very helpful for systems pharmacology research. VNP is freely available at http://cadd.whu.edu.cn/ditad/vnpsearch. PMID:24622768

Hu, Q-N; Deng, Z; Tu, W; Yang, X; Meng, Z-B; Deng, Z-X; Liu, J

2014-01-01

288

The causal interaction within attention networks and emotion network: A fMRI study.  

PubMed

fMRI studies have suggested that there are two different attention networks: the dorsal attention network (DAN) and the ventral attention network (VAN). The emotion network has also been discovered by some researches. The dorsal attention network controls goal-oriented top-down deployment of attention; the ventral attention network controls stimulus-driven bottom-up deployment of attention; the emotion network will feed back the stimulus especially fearful expressions from the environment. The interaction within these networks has been noticed but few studies have been carried out. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction within these networks. The regions of interest were acquired by using the GLM analysis after which the granger causality among these ROIs was calculated. Connections among ROIs were considered as causal when their respective granger causality value is greater than the mean value of all granger causalities. According to the results, there is interaction within the three networks, which suggested that the ventral attention network may distract the dorsal attention network and that the emotion network may influence both attention networks. PMID:25570470

Sicong Liu; Xianxian Kong; Zhenlan Jin; Ling Li

2014-08-01

289

Network topological reordering revealing systemic patterns in yeast protein interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying candidate genes\\/proteins involved in human disease specific molecular pathways or networks has been a primary focus of biomedical research. Although node ranking and graph clustering methods can help identify localized topological properties in a network, it remains unclear how the results should be interpreted in biological functional context in systems-level. In complex biomolecular interaction networks, biomolecular entities may not

Xiaogang Wu; Ragini Pandey; Jake Yue Chen

2009-01-01

290

Protein Interactions and Fluctuations in a Proteomic Network using an Elastic Network Model  

E-print Network

Protein Interactions and Fluctuations in a Proteomic Network using an Elastic Network Model http://www.jbsdonline.com Abstract A set of protein conformations are analyzed by normal mode analysis. An elastic network model different species. Slow modes that are associated with the function of proteins have common features among

Demirel, Melik C.

291

Inter-Network Interactions: Impact of Connections between Oscillatory Neuronal Networks on Oscillation Frequency and Pattern  

PubMed Central

Oscillations in electrical activity are a characteristic feature of many brain networks and display a wide variety of temporal patterns. A network may express a single oscillation frequency, alternate between two or more distinct frequencies, or continually express multiple frequencies. In addition, oscillation amplitude may fluctuate over time. The origin of this complex repertoire of activity remains unclear. Different cortical layers often produce distinct oscillation frequencies. To investigate whether interactions between different networks could contribute to the variety of oscillation patterns, we created two model networks, one generating on its own a relatively slow frequency (20 Hz; slow network) and one generating a fast frequency (32 Hz; fast network). Taking either the slow or the fast network as source network projecting connections to the other, or target, network, we systematically investigated how type and strength of inter-network connections affected target network activity. For high inter-network connection strengths, we found that the slow network was more effective at completely imposing its rhythm on the fast network than the other way around. The strongest entrainment occurred when excitatory cells of the slow network projected to excitatory or inhibitory cells of the fast network. The fast network most strongly imposed its rhythm on the slow network when its excitatory cells projected to excitatory cells of the slow network. Interestingly, for lower inter-network connection strengths, multiple frequencies coexisted in the target network. Just as observed in rat prefrontal cortex, the target network could express multiple frequencies at the same time, alternate between two distinct oscillation frequencies, or express a single frequency with alternating episodes of high and low amplitude. Together, our results suggest that input from other oscillating networks may markedly alter a network's frequency spectrum and may partly be responsible for the rich repertoire of temporal oscillation patterns observed in the brain. PMID:25007325

Avella Gonzalez, Oscar J.; van Aerde, Karlijn I.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; van Pelt, Jaap; van Ooyen, Arjen

2014-01-01

292

Interaction Networks: Generating High Level Hints Based on Network Community Clustering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We introduce a novel data structure, the Interaction Network, for representing interaction-data from open problem solving environment tutors. We show how using network community detecting techniques are used to identify sub-goals in problems in a logic tutor. We then use those community structures to generate high level hints between sub-goals.…

Eagle, Michael; Johnson, Matthew; Barnes, Tiffany

2012-01-01

293

Passing Messages between Biological Networks to Refine Predicted Interactions  

E-print Network

), a message-passing model using multiple sources of information to predict regulatory relationships, and used-wide, condition-specific regulatory networks in yeast as a model. The resulting networks were not only more Interactions. PLoS ONE 8(5): e64832. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064832 Editor: Szabolcs Semsey, Niels Bohr

Yuan, Guo-Cheng "GC"

294

Linking Classrooms of the Future through Interactive Telecommunications Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes an interactive television (ITV) distance education network designed to service rural schools. Phase one of the network involved the installation of over 14 miles of fiber optic cable linking two high schools, a career center, and the University of Rio Grande; phase two will bring seven high schools in economically depressed…

Cisco, Ponney G.

295

Cross-Species Analysis of Protein-protein Interaction Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Data on protein-protein interactions are increasing exponentially. To date, large scale protein interaction networks are available\\u000a for human and most model species. The arising challenge is to organize these networks into models of cellular machinery. As\\u000a in other biological domains, a comparative approach provides a powerful basis for addressing this challenge. In this chapter\\u000a we review the on-going effort for

Nir Yosef; Eytan Ruppin; Roded Sharan

2008-01-01

296

The role of protein interaction networks in systems biomedicine  

PubMed Central

The challenging task of studying and modeling complex dynamics of biological systems in order to describe various human diseases has gathered great interest in recent years. Major biological processes are mediated through protein interactions, hence there is a need to understand the chaotic network that forms these processes in pursuance of understanding human diseases. The applications of protein interaction networks to disease datasets allow the identification of genes and proteins associated with diseases, the study of network properties, identification of subnetworks, and network-based disease gene classification. Although various protein interaction network analysis strategies have been employed, grand challenges are still existing. Global understanding of protein interaction networks via integration of high-throughput functional genomics data from different levels will allow researchers to examine the disease pathways and identify strategies to control them. As a result, it seems likely that more personalized, more accurate and more rapid disease gene diagnostic techniques will be devised in the future, as well as novel strategies that are more personalized. This mini-review summarizes the current practice of protein interaction networks in medical research as well as challenges to be overcome. PMID:25379140

Sevimoglu, Tuba; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

2014-01-01

297

Recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

The increasing availability of large-scale protein-protein interaction data has made it possible to understand the basic components and organization of cell machinery from the network level. The arising challenge is how to analyze such complex interacting data to reveal the principles of cellular organization, processes and functions. Many studies have shown that clustering protein interaction network is an effective approach for identifying protein complexes or functional modules, which has become a major research topic in systems biology. In this review, recent advances in clustering methods for protein interaction networks will be presented in detail. The predictions of protein functions and interactions based on modules will be covered. Finally, the performance of different clustering methods will be compared and the directions for future research will be discussed. PMID:21143777

2010-01-01

298

Retail bank customer preferences: personal and remote interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper uses a questionnaire and a theoretical model of bank-customer interaction preferences as the basis for examining the perceptions of retail bank customers regarding the use of remote delivery channels and the extent to which they still value traditional branch-based face-to-face interactions. The empirical evidence suggests that despite the increase in remote banking, retail bank customers still place significantly

Mark Durkin; Danielle McCartan-Quinn; Aodheen O’Donnell; Barry Howcroft

2003-01-01

299

Towards an understating of signal transduction protein interaction networks.  

PubMed

Protein network analysis has witnessed a number of advancements in the past for understanding molecular characteristics for important network topologies in biological systems. The signaling pathway regulates cell cycle progression and anti-apoptotic molecules. This pathway is also involved in maintaining cell survival by modulating the activity of apoptosis through RAS, P13K, AKT and BAD activities. The importance of protein-protein interactions to improve usability of the interactome by scoring and ranking interaction data for proteins in signal transduction networks is illustrated using available data and resources. PMID:22715315

Kaladhar, Dowluru Svgk; Sai, Potladurthi Chandra; Rao, Padmanabhuni V Nageswara; Chaitanya, Amajala Krishna; Rao, Duddukuri Govinda; Rao, Vadlapudi Varahala; Reddy, Erva Rajeswara; Kumar, Sudabattula Vijaya; Kumar, Divyakolu Vinod

2012-01-01

300

Towards an understating of signal transduction protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Protein network analysis has witnessed a number of advancements in the past for understanding molecular characteristics for important network topologies in biological systems. The signaling pathway regulates cell cycle progression and anti-apoptotic molecules. This pathway is also involved in maintaining cell survival by modulating the activity of apoptosis through RAS, P13K, AKT and BAD activities. The importance of protein-protein interactions to improve usability of the interactome by scoring and ranking interaction data for proteins in signal transduction networks is illustrated using available data and resources. PMID:22715315

Kaladhar, Dowluru SVGK; Sai, Potladurthi Chandra; Rao, Padmanabhuni V Nageswara; chaitanya, Amajala Krishna; Rao, Duddukuri Govinda; Rao, Vadlapudi Varahala; Reddy, Erva Rajeswara; kumar, Sudabattula Vijaya; Kumar, Divyakolu Vinod

2012-01-01

301

NetworkAnalyst - integrative approaches for protein–protein interaction network analysis and visual exploration  

PubMed Central

Biological network analysis is a powerful approach to gain systems-level understanding of patterns of gene expression in different cell types, disease states and other biological/experimental conditions. Three consecutive steps are required - identification of genes or proteins of interest, network construction and network analysis and visualization. To date, researchers have to learn to use a combination of several tools to accomplish this task. In addition, interactive visualization of large networks has been primarily restricted to locally installed programs. To address these challenges, we have developed NetworkAnalyst, taking advantage of state-of-the-art web technologies, to enable high performance network analysis with rich user experience. NetworkAnalyst integrates all three steps and presents the results via a powerful online network visualization framework. Users can upload gene or protein lists, single or multiple gene expression datasets to perform comprehensive gene annotation and differential expression analysis. Significant genes are mapped to our manually curated protein-protein interaction database to construct relevant networks. The results are presented through standard web browsers for network analysis and interactive exploration. NetworkAnalyst supports common functions for network topology and module analyses. Users can easily search, zoom and highlight nodes or modules, as well as perform functional enrichment analysis on these selections. The networks can be customized with different layouts, colors or node sizes, and exported as PNG, PDF or GraphML files. Comprehensive FAQs, tutorials and context-based tips and instructions are provided. NetworkAnalyst currently supports protein-protein interaction network analysis for human and mouse and is freely available at http://www.networkanalyst.ca. PMID:24861621

Xia, Jianguo; Benner, Maia J.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

2014-01-01

302

NetworkAnalyst--integrative approaches for protein-protein interaction network analysis and visual exploration.  

PubMed

Biological network analysis is a powerful approach to gain systems-level understanding of patterns of gene expression in different cell types, disease states and other biological/experimental conditions. Three consecutive steps are required--identification of genes or proteins of interest, network construction and network analysis and visualization. To date, researchers have to learn to use a combination of several tools to accomplish this task. In addition, interactive visualization of large networks has been primarily restricted to locally installed programs. To address these challenges, we have developed NetworkAnalyst, taking advantage of state-of-the-art web technologies, to enable high performance network analysis with rich user experience. NetworkAnalyst integrates all three steps and presents the results via a powerful online network visualization framework. Users can upload gene or protein lists, single or multiple gene expression datasets to perform comprehensive gene annotation and differential expression analysis. Significant genes are mapped to our manually curated protein-protein interaction database to construct relevant networks. The results are presented through standard web browsers for network analysis and interactive exploration. NetworkAnalyst supports common functions for network topology and module analyses. Users can easily search, zoom and highlight nodes or modules, as well as perform functional enrichment analysis on these selections. The networks can be customized with different layouts, colors or node sizes, and exported as PNG, PDF or GraphML files. Comprehensive FAQs, tutorials and context-based tips and instructions are provided. NetworkAnalyst currently supports protein-protein interaction network analysis for human and mouse and is freely available at http://www.networkanalyst.ca. PMID:24861621

Xia, Jianguo; Benner, Maia J; Hancock, Robert E W

2014-07-01

303

Modeling the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Epidemics seldom occur as isolated phenomena. Typically, two or more viral agents spread within the same host population and may interact dynamically with each other. We present a general model where two viral agents interact via an immunity mechanism as they propagate simultaneously on two networks connecting the same set of nodes. By exploiting a correspondence between the propagation dynamics and a dynamical process performing progressive network generation, we develop an analytical approach that accurately captures the dynamical interaction between epidemics on overlay networks. The formalism allows for overlay networks with arbitrary joint degree distribution and overlap. To illustrate the versatility of our approach, we consider a hypothetical delayed intervention scenario in which an immunizing agent is disseminated in a host population to hinder the propagation of an undesirable agent (e.g., the spread of preventive information in the context of an emerging infectious disease).

Marceau, Vincent; Noël, Pierre-André; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Allard, Antoine; Dubé, Louis J.

2011-08-01

304

Social network extraction and analysis based on multimodal dyadic interaction.  

PubMed

Social interactions are a very important component in people's lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times' Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links' weights are a measure of the "influence" a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

305

Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction  

PubMed Central

Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

306

Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

2010-01-01

307

Behavioural phenotype affects social interactions in an animal network  

PubMed Central

Animal social networks can be extremely complex and are characterized by highly non-random interactions between group members. However, very little is known about the underlying factors affecting interaction preferences, and hence network structure. One possibility is that behavioural differences between individuals, such as how bold or shy they are, can affect the frequency and distribution of their interactions within a network. We tested this using individually marked three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), and found that bold individuals had fewer overall interactions than shy fish, but tended to distribute their interactions more evenly across all group members. Shy fish, on the other hand, tended to associate preferentially with a small number of other group members, leading to a highly skewed distribution of interactions. This was mediated by the reduced tendency of shy fish to move to a new location within the tank when they were interacting with another individual; bold fish showed no such tendency and were equally likely to move irrespective of whether they were interacting or not. The results show that animal social network structure can be affected by the behavioural composition of group members and have important implications for understanding the spread of information and disease in social groups. PMID:18647713

Pike, Thomas W; Samanta, Madhumita; Lindström, Jan; Royle, Nick J

2008-01-01

308

Functional interactions between large-scale networks during memory search.  

PubMed

Neuroimaging studies have identified two major large-scale brain networks, the default mode network (DMN) and the dorsal attention network (DAN), which are engaged for internally and externally directed cognitive tasks respectively, and which show anticorrelated activity during cognitively demanding tests and at rest. We identified these brain networks using independent component analysis (ICA) of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, and examined their interactions during the free-recall task, a self-initiated memory search task in which retrieval is performed in the absence of external cues. Despite the internally directed nature of the task, the DAN showed transient engagement in the seconds leading up to successful retrieval. ICA revealed a fractionation of the DMN into 3 components. A posteromedial network increased engagement during memory search, while the two others showed suppressed activity during memory search. Cooperative interactions between this posteromedial network, a right-lateralized frontoparietal control network, and a medial prefrontal network were maintained during memory search. The DAN demonstrated heterogeneous task-dependent shifts in functional coupling with various subnetworks within the DMN. This functional reorganization suggests a broader role of the DAN in the absence of externally directed cognition, and highlights the contribution of the posteromedial network to episodic retrieval. PMID:24084128

Kragel, James E; Polyn, Sean M

2015-03-01

309

Hub Promiscuity in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Hubs are proteins with a large number of interactions in a protein-protein interaction network. They are the principal agents in the interaction network and affect its function and stability. Their specific recognition of many different protein partners is of great interest from the structural viewpoint. Over the last few years, the structural properties of hubs have been extensively studied. We review the currently known features that are particular to hubs, possibly affecting their binding ability. Specifically, we look at the levels of intrinsic disorder, surface charge and domain distribution in hubs, as compared to non-hubs, along with differences in their functional domains. PMID:20480050

Patil, Ashwini; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki

2010-01-01

310

Intimate Strangers and Estranged Intimates: An Investigation of the Impact of Instant Messaging and Short Message Service on the Size and Strength of Social Networks in Kuwait  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information and communication technologies (ICT) have revolutionized how people experience spatial proximity, reality, and connectivity. These technologies provide inexpensive access to anything and anyone in the world. They also replicate face-to-face interaction in cyber-space and allow for participation in numerous modes of social exchange. …

Al-Sanaa, Bashaiar

2009-01-01

311

Knowledge-guided inference of domain–domain interactions from incomplete protein–protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Protein-protein interactions (PPIs), though extremely valuable towards a better understanding of protein functions and cellular processes, do not provide any direct information about the regions/domains within the proteins that mediate the interaction. Most often, it is only a fraction of a protein that directly interacts with its biological partners. Thus, understanding interaction at the domain level is a critical step towards (i) thorough understanding of PPI networks; (ii) precise identification of binding sites; (iii) acquisition of insights into the causes of deleterious mutations at interaction sites; and (iv) most importantly, development of drugs to inhibit pathological protein interactions. In addition, knowledge derived from known domain–domain interactions (DDIs) can be used to understand binding interfaces, which in turn can help discover unknown PPIs. Results: Here, we describe a novel method called K-GIDDI (knowledge-guided inference of DDIs) to narrow down the PPI sites to smaller regions/domains. K-GIDDI constructs an initial DDI network from cross-species PPI networks, and then expands the DDI network by inferring additional DDIs using a divide-and-conquer biclustering algorithm guided by Gene Ontology (GO) information, which identifies partial-complete bipartite sub-networks in the DDI network and makes them complete bipartite sub-networks by adding edges. Our results indicate that K-GIDDI can reliably predict DDIs. Most importantly, K-GIDDI's novel network expansion procedure allows prediction of DDIs that are otherwise not identifiable by methods that rely only on PPI data. Contact: xwchen@ku.edu Availability: http://www.ittc.ku.edu/?xwchen/domainNetwork/ddinet.html Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19667081

Liu, Mei; Chen, Xue-wen; Jothi, Raja

2009-01-01

312

Specificity and Evolvability in Eukaryotic Protein Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Progress in uncovering the protein interaction networks of several species has led to questions of what underlying principles might govern their organization. Few studies have tried to determine the impact of protein interaction network evolution on the observed physiological differences between species. Using comparative genomics and structural information, we show here that eukaryotic species have rewired their interactomes at a fast rate of approximately 10?5 interactions changed per protein pair, per million years of divergence. For Homo sapiens this corresponds to 103 interactions changed per million years. Additionally we find that the specificity of binding strongly determines the interaction turnover and that different biological processes show significantly different link dynamics. In particular, human proteins involved in immune response, transport, and establishment of localization show signs of positive selection for change of interactions. Our analysis suggests that a small degree of molecular divergence can give rise to important changes at the network level. We propose that the power law distribution observed in protein interaction networks could be partly explained by the cell's requirement for different degrees of protein binding specificity. PMID:17305419

Beltrao, Pedro; Serrano, Luis

2007-01-01

313

Exploring Function Prediction in Protein Interaction Networks via Clustering Methods  

PubMed Central

Complex networks have recently become the focus of research in many fields. Their structure reveals crucial information for the nodes, how they connect and share information. In our work we analyze protein interaction networks as complex networks for their functional modular structure and later use that information in the functional annotation of proteins within the network. We propose several graph representations for the protein interaction network, each having different level of complexity and inclusion of the annotation information within the graph. We aim to explore what the benefits and the drawbacks of these proposed graphs are, when they are used in the function prediction process via clustering methods. For making this cluster based prediction, we adopt well established approaches for cluster detection in complex networks using most recent representative algorithms that have been proven as efficient in the task at hand. The experiments are performed using a purified and reliable Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network, which is then used to generate the different graph representations. Each of the graph representations is later analysed in combination with each of the clustering algorithms, which have been possibly modified and implemented to fit the specific graph. We evaluate results in regards of biological validity and function prediction performance. Our results indicate that the novel ways of presenting the complex graph improve the prediction process, although the computational complexity should be taken into account when deciding on a particular approach. PMID:24972109

Trivodaliev, Kire; Bogojeska, Aleksandra; Kocarev, Ljupco

2014-01-01

314

NetworkView: 3D display and analysis of protein·RNA interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Summary: NetworkView is an application for the display and analysis of protein·RNA interaction networks derived from structure and/or dynamics. These networks typically model individual protein residues and nucleic acid monomers as nodes and their pairwise contacts as edges with associated weights. NetworkView projects the network onto the underlying 3D molecular structure so that visualization and analysis of the network can be coupled to physical and biological properties. NetworkView is implemented as a plugin to the molecular visualization software VMD. Availability and implementation: NetworkView is included with VMD, which is available at http://www.ks.uiuc.edu/Research/vmd/. Documentation, tutorials and supporting programs are available at http://www.scs.illinois.edu/schulten/software/. Contact: networkview@scs.illinois.edu PMID:22982572

Eargle, John; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

2012-01-01

315

Topological and Dynamical Properties of Protein Interaction Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter reviews some of the recent research on topological and dynamical properties of Protein-protein Interaction (PPI) networks. In its first part we describe the set of numerical algorithms aimed at: 1) constructing a null-model random network with a desired set of low-level topological properties; 2) detection of over- or under-represented topological patterns such as degree-degree correlations between interacting nodes. In the second part of the chapter we describe a recently developed set of computational tools and analytical methods which allow one to go beyond purely topological studies of PPI networks and efficiently calculate the mass-action equilibrium of protein concentrations and its response to systematic perturbations. In particular, we explore how large (several-fold) changes in total abundance of a small number of proteins shift the equilibrium between free and bound concentrations of proteins throughout the PPI network. Our primary conclusion is that, on average, the effects of such perturbations exponentially decay with the network distance away from the perturbed node. This explains why, despite globally connected topology, individual functional modules in such networks are able to operate fairly independently. Under specific favorable conditions, realized in a significant number of paths in the yeast PPI network, concentration perturbations can selectively propagate over considerable network distances (up to four steps). Such "action-at-a-distance" requires high concentrations of heterodimers along the path as well as low free (unbound) concentration of intermediate proteins.

Maslov, Sergei

316

The Evolutionary Dynamics of Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Inferred from the Reconstruction of Ancient Networks  

PubMed Central

Cellular functions are based on the complex interplay of proteins, therefore the structure and dynamics of these protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are the key to the functional understanding of cells. In the last years, large-scale PPI networks of several model organisms were investigated. A number of theoretical models have been developed to explain both the network formation and the current structure. Favored are models based on duplication and divergence of genes, as they most closely represent the biological foundation of network evolution. However, studies are often based on simulated instead of empirical data or they cover only single organisms. Methodological improvements now allow the analysis of PPI networks of multiple organisms simultaneously as well as the direct modeling of ancestral networks. This provides the opportunity to challenge existing assumptions on network evolution. We utilized present-day PPI networks from integrated datasets of seven model organisms and developed a theoretical and bioinformatic framework for studying the evolutionary dynamics of PPI networks. A novel filtering approach using percolation analysis was developed to remove low confidence interactions based on topological constraints. We then reconstructed the ancient PPI networks of different ancestors, for which the ancestral proteomes, as well as the ancestral interactions, were inferred. Ancestral proteins were reconstructed using orthologous groups on different evolutionary levels. A stochastic approach, using the duplication-divergence model, was developed for estimating the probabilities of ancient interactions from today's PPI networks. The growth rates for nodes, edges, sizes and modularities of the networks indicate multiplicative growth and are consistent with the results from independent static analysis. Our results support the duplication-divergence model of evolution and indicate fractality and multiplicative growth as general properties of the PPI network structure and dynamics. PMID:23526967

Rattei, Thomas; Makse, Hernán A.

2013-01-01

317

The evolutionary dynamics of protein-protein interaction networks inferred from the reconstruction of ancient networks.  

PubMed

Cellular functions are based on the complex interplay of proteins, therefore the structure and dynamics of these protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are the key to the functional understanding of cells. In the last years, large-scale PPI networks of several model organisms were investigated. A number of theoretical models have been developed to explain both the network formation and the current structure. Favored are models based on duplication and divergence of genes, as they most closely represent the biological foundation of network evolution. However, studies are often based on simulated instead of empirical data or they cover only single organisms. Methodological improvements now allow the analysis of PPI networks of multiple organisms simultaneously as well as the direct modeling of ancestral networks. This provides the opportunity to challenge existing assumptions on network evolution. We utilized present-day PPI networks from integrated datasets of seven model organisms and developed a theoretical and bioinformatic framework for studying the evolutionary dynamics of PPI networks. A novel filtering approach using percolation analysis was developed to remove low confidence interactions based on topological constraints. We then reconstructed the ancient PPI networks of different ancestors, for which the ancestral proteomes, as well as the ancestral interactions, were inferred. Ancestral proteins were reconstructed using orthologous groups on different evolutionary levels. A stochastic approach, using the duplication-divergence model, was developed for estimating the probabilities of ancient interactions from today's PPI networks. The growth rates for nodes, edges, sizes and modularities of the networks indicate multiplicative growth and are consistent with the results from independent static analysis. Our results support the duplication-divergence model of evolution and indicate fractality and multiplicative growth as general properties of the PPI network structure and dynamics. PMID:23526967

Jin, Yuliang; Turaev, Dmitrij; Weinmaier, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Makse, Hernán A

2013-01-01

318

E-learning Instructional Platforms Based on Network and Multimedia Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

E-learning has become a widely accepted and effective teaching and learning mode at Chinese universities with the rapid development of internet, multimedia technology and computer network technology. Based on computer network and multimedia, e-learning instructional platforms provide a unique pattern different from the traditional face-to-face education in the process of knowledge acquisition for college students. The e-learning instructional platforms using

Chengcheng Zhang; Fei Wang

2010-01-01

319

HIV Infection, Sexual Behaviors, Sexual Networks, and Drug Use Among Rural Residents in Yunnan Province, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

This cross-sectional study examined HIV prevalence, sexual behaviors, sexual networks, and drug use among 591 participants\\u000a from a rural community in Yunnan Province, China. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to collect information about sexual\\u000a behavior, drug use, and sexual networks. Blood samples were collected and tested for HIV. Of the participants, 52.6% were\\u000a male and 62.6% were Jingpo minority. The HIV

Zhuohua Fu; Na He; Song Duan; Qingwu Jiang; Runhua Ye; Yongcheng Pu; Genming Zhao; Z. Jennifer Huang; Frank Y. Wong

2011-01-01

320

Strategy selection in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks.  

PubMed

Evolutionary game theory provides an appropriate tool for investigating the competition and diffusion of behavioral traits in biological or social populations. A core challenge in evolutionary game theory is the strategy selection problem: Given two strategies, which one is favored by the population? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends not only on the payoff functions of strategies but also on the interaction structure of the population. Group interactions are one of the fundamental interactive modes within populations. This work aims to investigate the strategy selection problem in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks. In detail, the strategy selection conditions are obtained for some typical networks with group interactions. Furthermore, the obtained conditions are applied to investigate selection between cooperation and defection in populations. The conditions for evolution of cooperation are derived for both the public goods game and volunteer's dilemma game. Numerical experiments validate the above analytical results. PMID:25270102

Tan, Shaolin; Feng, Shasha; Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao

2014-11-01

321

Human Cancer Protein-Protein Interaction Network: A Structural Perspective  

PubMed Central

Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction networks. Similar or overlapping binding sites should be used repeatedly in single interface hub proteins, making them promiscuous. Alternatively, multi-interface hub proteins make use of several distinct binding sites to bind to different partners. We propose a methodology to integrate protein interfaces into cancer interaction networks (ciSPIN, cancer structural protein interface network). The interactions in the human protein interaction network are replaced by interfaces, coming from either known or predicted complexes. We provide a detailed analysis of cancer related human protein-protein interfaces and the topological properties of the cancer network. The results reveal that cancer-related proteins have smaller, more planar, more charged and less hydrophobic binding sites than non-cancer proteins, which may indicate low affinity and high specificity of the cancer-related interactions. We also classified the genes in ciSPIN according to phenotypes. Within phenotypes, for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and leukemia, interface properties were found to be discriminating from non-cancer interfaces with an accuracy of 71%, 67%, 61%, respectively. In addition, cancer-related proteins tend to interact with their partners through distinct interfaces, corresponding mostly to multi-interface hubs, which comprise 56% of cancer-related proteins, and constituting the nodes with higher essentiality in the network (76%). We illustrate the interface related affinity properties of two cancer-related hub proteins: Erbb3, a multi interface, and Raf1, a single interface hub. The results reveal that affinity of interactions of the multi-interface hub tends to be higher than that of the single-interface hub. These findings might be important in obtaining new targets in cancer as well as finding the details of specific binding regions of putative cancer drug candidates. PMID:20011507

Kar, Gozde; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

2009-01-01

322

Correlation between interaction strengths drives stability in large ecological networks.  

PubMed

Food webs have markedly non-random network structure. Ecologists maintain that this non-random structure is key for stability, since large random ecological networks would invariably be unstable and thus should not be observed empirically. Here we show that a simple yet overlooked feature of natural food webs, the correlation between the effects of consumers on resources and those of resources on consumers, substantially accounts for their stability. Remarkably, random food webs built by preserving just the distribution and correlation of interaction strengths have stability properties similar to those of the corresponding empirical systems. Surprisingly, we find that the effect of topological network structure on stability, which has been the focus of countless studies, is small compared to that of correlation. Hence, any study of the effects of network structure on stability must first take into account the distribution and correlation of interaction strengths. PMID:24946877

Tang, Si; Pawar, Samraat; Allesina, Stefano

2014-09-01

323

Topology and static response of interaction networks in molecular biology  

PubMed Central

We introduce a mathematical framework describing static response of networks occurring in molecular biology. This formalism has many similarities with the Laplace–Kirchhoff equations for electrical networks. We introduce the concept of graph boundary and we show how the response of the biological networks to external perturbations can be related to the Dirichlet or Neumann problems for the corresponding equations on the interaction graph. Solutions to these two problems are given in terms of path moduli (measuring path rigidity with respect to the propagation of interaction along the graph). Path moduli are related to loop products in the interaction graph via generalized Mason–Coates formulae. We apply our results to two specific biological examples: the lactose operon and the genetic regulation of lipogenesis. Our applications show consistency with experimental results and in the case of lipogenesis check some hypothesis on the behaviour of hepatic fatty acids on fasting. PMID:16849230

Radulescu, Ovidiu; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Siegel, Anne; Veber, Philippe; Le Borgne, Michel

2005-01-01

324

Evaluating Australian football league player contributions using interactive network simulation.  

PubMed

This paper focuses on the contribution of Australian Football League (AFL) players to their team's on-field network by simulating player interactions within a chosen team list and estimating the net effect on final score margin. A Visual Basic computer program was written, firstly, to isolate the effective interactions between players from a particular team in all 2011 season matches and, secondly, to generate a symmetric interaction matrix for each match. Negative binomial distributions were fitted to each player pairing in the Geelong Football Club for the 2011 season, enabling an interactive match simulation model given the 22 chosen players. Dynamic player ratings were calculated from the simulated network using eigenvector centrality, a method that recognises and rewards interactions with more prominent players in the team network. The centrality ratings were recorded after every network simulation and then applied in final score margin predictions so that each player's match contribution-and, hence, an optimal team-could be estimated. The paper ultimately demonstrates that the presence of highly rated players, such as Geelong's Jimmy Bartel, provides the most utility within a simulated team network. It is anticipated that these findings will facilitate optimal AFL team selection and player substitutions, which are key areas of interest to coaches. Network simulations are also attractive for use within betting markets, specifically to provide information on the likelihood of a chosen AFL team list "covering the line ". Key pointsA simulated interaction matrix for Australian Rules football players is proposedThe simulations were carried out by fitting unique negative binomial distributions to each player pairing in a sideEigenvector centrality was calculated for each player in a simulated matrix, then for the teamThe team centrality measure adequately predicted the team's winning marginA player's net effect on margin could hence be estimated by replacing him in the simulated side with another player. PMID:24149734

Sargent, Jonathan; Bedford, Anthony

2013-01-01

325

Insights into Protein–DNA Interactions through Structure Network Analysis  

PubMed Central

Protein–DNA interactions are crucial for many cellular processes. Now with the increased availability of structures of protein–DNA complexes, gaining deeper insights into the nature of protein–DNA interactions has become possible. Earlier, investigations have characterized the interface properties by considering pairwise interactions. However, the information communicated along the interfaces is rarely a pairwise phenomenon, and we feel that a global picture can be obtained by considering a protein–DNA complex as a network of noncovalently interacting systems. Furthermore, most of the earlier investigations have been carried out from the protein point of view (protein-centric), and the present network approach aims to combine both the protein-centric and the DNA-centric points of view. Part of the study involves the development of methodology to investigate protein–DNA graphs/networks with the development of key parameters. A network representation provides a holistic view of the interacting surface and has been reported here for the first time. The second part of the study involves the analyses of these graphs in terms of clusters of interacting residues and the identification of highly connected residues (hubs) along the protein–DNA interface. A predominance of deoxyribose–amino acid clusters in ?-sheet proteins, distinction of the interface clusters in helix–turn–helix, and the zipper-type proteins would not have been possible by conventional pairwise interaction analysis. Additionally, we propose a potential classification scheme for a set of protein–DNA complexes on the basis of the protein–DNA interface clusters. This provides a general idea of how the proteins interact with the different components of DNA in different complexes. Thus, we believe that the present graph-based method provides a deeper insight into the analysis of the protein–DNA recognition mechanisms by throwing more light on the nature and the specificity of these interactions. PMID:18773096

Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

2008-01-01

326

Graph spectral analysis of protein interaction network evolution.  

PubMed

We present an analysis of protein interaction network data via the comparison of models of network evolution to the observed data. We take a bayesian approach and perform posterior density estimation using an approximate bayesian computation with sequential Monte Carlo method. Our approach allows us to perform model selection over a selection of potential network growth models. The methodology we apply uses a distance defined in terms of graph spectra which captures the network data more naturally than previously used summary statistics such as the degree distribution. Furthermore, we include the effects of sampling into the analysis, to properly correct for the incompleteness of existing datasets, and have analysed the performance of our method under various degrees of sampling. We consider a number of models focusing not only on the biologically relevant class of duplication models, but also including models of scale-free network growth that have previously been claimed to describe such data. We find a preference for a duplication-divergence with linear preferential attachment model in the majority of the interaction datasets considered. We also illustrate how our method can be used to perform multi-model inference of network parameters to estimate properties of the full network from sampled data. PMID:22552917

Thorne, Thomas; Stumpf, Michael P H

2012-10-01

327

Graph spectral analysis of protein interaction network evolution  

PubMed Central

We present an analysis of protein interaction network data via the comparison of models of network evolution to the observed data. We take a Bayesian approach and perform posterior density estimation using an approximate Bayesian computation with sequential Monte Carlo method. Our approach allows us to perform model selection over a selection of potential network growth models. The methodology we apply uses a distance defined in terms of graph spectra which captures the network data more naturally than previously used summary statistics such as the degree distribution. Furthermore, we include the effects of sampling into the analysis, to properly correct for the incompleteness of existing datasets, and have analysed the performance of our method under various degrees of sampling. We consider a number of models focusing not only on the biologically relevant class of duplication models, but also including models of scale-free network growth that have previously been claimed to describe such data. We find a preference for a duplication-divergence with linear preferential attachment model in the majority of the interaction datasets considered. We also illustrate how our method can be used to perform multi-model inference of network parameters to estimate properties of the full network from sampled data. PMID:22552917

Thorne, Thomas; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

2012-01-01

328

A Network-based Approach for Predicting Missing Pathway Interactions  

PubMed Central

Embedded within large-scale protein interaction networks are signaling pathways that encode response cascades in the cell. Unfortunately, even for well-studied species like S. cerevisiae, only a fraction of all true protein interactions are known, which makes it difficult to reason about the exact flow of signals and the corresponding causal relations in the network. To help address this problem, we introduce a framework for predicting new interactions that aid connectivity between upstream proteins (sources) and downstream transcription factors (targets) of a particular pathway. Our algorithms attempt to globally minimize the distance between sources and targets by finding a small set of shortcut edges to add to the network. Unlike existing algorithms for predicting general protein interactions, by focusing on proteins involved in specific responses our approach homes-in on pathway-consistent interactions. We applied our method to extend pathways in osmotic stress response in yeast and identified several missing interactions, some of which are supported by published reports. We also performed experiments that support a novel interaction not previously reported. Our framework is general and may be applicable to edge prediction problems in other domains. PMID:22916002

Navlakha, Saket; Gitter, Anthony; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

2012-01-01

329

Interactive Collaborative Scene Assembly Using AR on Mobile Phones  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this paper we present and evaluate a platform for interactive collaborative face-to-face Augmented Reality using a distributed\\u000a scene graph on mobile phones. The results of individual actions are viewed on the screen in real-time on every connected phone.\\u000a We show how multiple collaborators can use consumer mobile camera phones to furnish a room together in an Augmented Reality\\u000a environment.

Miroslav Andel; Alexander Petrovski; Anders Henrysson; Mark Ollila

2006-01-01

330

Coordinating joint activity in avatar-mediated interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs) currently represent the most widely used type of social 3D virtual worlds with millions of users worldwide. Although MMOGs take face-to-face conversation as their metaphor for user-to-user interaction, avatars currently give off much less information about what users are doing than real human bodies. Consequently, users routinely encounter slippages in coordination when engaging in joint

Robert J. Moore; E. Cabell Hankinson Gathman; Nicolas Ducheneaut; Eric Nickell

2007-01-01

331

An Interaction Library for the Fc?RI Signaling Network  

PubMed Central

Antigen receptors play a central role in adaptive immune responses. Although the molecular networks associated with these receptors have been extensively studied, we currently lack a systems-level understanding of how combinations of non-covalent interactions and post-translational modifications are regulated during signaling to impact cellular decision-making. To fill this knowledge gap, it will be necessary to formalize and piece together information about individual molecular mechanisms to form large-scale computational models of signaling networks. To this end, we have developed an interaction library for signaling by the high-affinity IgE receptor, Fc?RI. The library consists of executable rules for protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions. This library extends earlier models for Fc?RI signaling and introduces new interactions that have not previously been considered in a model. Thus, this interaction library is a toolkit with which existing models can be expanded and from which new models can be built. As an example, we present models of branching pathways from the adaptor protein Lat, which influence production of the phospholipid PIP3 at the plasma membrane and the soluble second messenger IP3. We find that inclusion of a positive feedback loop gives rise to a bistable switch, which may ensure robust responses to stimulation above a threshold level. In addition, the library is visualized to facilitate understanding of network circuitry and identification of network motifs. PMID:24782869

Chylek, Lily A.; Holowka, David A.; Baird, Barbara A.; Hlavacek, William S.

2014-01-01

332

Distinguishing Mother-Infant Interaction from Stranger-Infant Interaction at 2, 4, and 6 Months of Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Observers watched videotaped face-to-face mother-infant and stranger-infant interactions of 12 infants at 2, 4, or 6 months of age. Half of the observers saw each mother paired with her own infant and another infant of the same age (mother tapes) and half saw each infant paired with his or her mother and with a stranger (infant tapes). Observers…

Bigelow, Ann E.; Power, Michelle; Mcquaid, Nancy; Ward, Ashley; Rochat, Philippe

2008-01-01

333

GINI: From ISH Images to Gene Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Accurate inference of molecular and functional interactions among genes, especially in multicellular organisms such as Drosophila, often requires statistical analysis of correlations not only between the magnitudes of gene expressions, but also between their temporal-spatial patterns. The ISH (in-situ-hybridization)-based gene expression micro-imaging technology offers an effective approach to perform large-scale spatial-temporal profiling of whole-body mRNA abundance. However, analytical tools for discovering gene interactions from such data remain an open challenge due to various reasons, including difficulties in extracting canonical representations of gene activities from images, and in inference of statistically meaningful networks from such representations. In this paper, we present GINI, a machine learning system for inferring gene interaction networks from Drosophila embryonic ISH images. GINI builds on a computer-vision-inspired vector-space representation of the spatial pattern of gene expression in ISH images, enabled by our recently developed system; and a new multi-instance-kernel algorithm that learns a sparse Markov network model, in which, every gene (i.e., node) in the network is represented by a vector-valued spatial pattern rather than a scalar-valued gene intensity as in conventional approaches such as a Gaussian graphical model. By capturing the notion of spatial similarity of gene expression, and at the same time properly taking into account the presence of multiple images per gene via multi-instance kernels, GINI is well-positioned to infer statistically sound, and biologically meaningful gene interaction networks from image data. Using both synthetic data and a small manually curated data set, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in network building. Furthermore, we report results on a large publicly available collection of Drosophila embryonic ISH images from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project, where GINI makes novel and interesting predictions of gene interactions. Software for GINI is available at http://sailing.cs.cmu.edu/Drosophila_ISH_images/ PMID:24130465

Puniyani, Kriti; Xing, Eric P.

2013-01-01

334

Ecological interaction and phylogeny, studying functionality on composed networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a class of composed networks that are formed by two tree networks, TP and TA, whose end points touch each other through a bipartite network BPA. We explore this network using a functional approach. We are interested in how much the topology, or the structure, of TX (X=A or P) determines the links of BPA. This composed structure is a useful model in evolutionary biology, where TP and TA are the phylogenetic trees of plants and animals that interact in an ecological community. We make use of ecological networks of dispersion of fruits, which are formed by frugivorous animals and plants with fruits; the animals, usually birds, eat fruits and disperse their seeds. We analyse how the phylogeny of TX determines or is correlated with BPA using a Monte Carlo approach. We use the phylogenetic distance among elements that interact with a given species to construct an index ? that quantifies the influence of TX over BPA. The algorithm is based on the assumption that interaction matrices that follows a phylogeny of TX have a total phylogenetic distance smaller than the average distance of an ensemble of Monte Carlo realisations. We find that the effect of phylogeny of animal species is more pronounced in the ecological matrix than plant phylogeny.

Cruz, Claudia P. T.; Fonseca, Carlos Roberto; Corso, Gilberto

2012-02-01

335

A protein interaction network associated with asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying candidate genes related to complex diseases or traits and mapping their relationships require a system-level analysis at a cellular scale. The objective of the present study is to systematically analyze the complex effects of interrelated genes and provide a framework for revealing their relationships in association with a specific disease (asthma in this case). We observed that protein–protein interaction

Sohyun Hwang; Seung-Woo Son; Sang Cheol Kim; Young Joo Kim; Hawoong Jeong; Doheon Lee

2008-01-01

336

Modeling Neuronal Interactivity using Dynamic Bayesian Networks  

E-print Network

learning algorithms, different DBN structures charac- terize drug addicted subjects vs. control subjects. This finding provides an independent test for the effect of psychopathology on brain function. In general, we Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has enabled scientists to look into the active brain. However, interactivity

Gabrieli, John

337

Pattern formation by dynamically interacting network motifs  

E-print Network

signaling pathways in Dro- sophila oogenesis. The model accounts for the dynamic interaction. computational modeling Drosophila signaling systems biology During Drosophila oogenesis, the 2-dimensional stages of oogenesis, BR controls the expression of thickveins (tkv), which encodes a type I DPP receptor

Shvartsman, Stanislav "Stas"

338

Simulating market dynamics: interactions between consumer psychology and social networks.  

PubMed

Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. In a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation model. The main results indicated that the behavioral rules dominating the artificial consumer's decision making determine the resulting market dynamics, such as fashions, lock-in, and unstable renewal. Results also show the importance of psychological variables like social networks, preferences, and the need for identity to explain the dynamics of markets. In this article we extend this work in two directions. First, we will focus on a more systematic investigation of the effects of different network structures. The previous article was based on Watts and Strogatz's approach, which describes the small-world and clustering characteristics in networks. More recent research demonstrated that many large networks display a scale-free power-law distribution for node connectivity. In terms of market dynamics this may imply that a small proportion of consumers may have an exceptional influence on the consumptive behavior of others (hubs, or early adapters). We show that market dynamics is a self-organized property depending on the interaction between the agents' decision-making process (heuristics), the product characteristics (degree of satisfaction of unit of consumption, visibility), and the structure of interactions between agents (size of network and hubs in a social network). PMID:14761255

Janssen, Marco A; Jager, Wander

2003-01-01

339

Mining networks of human contact with wearable sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the development of sensors of various types and the use of digital media and computational devices, we increasingly leave digital traces of our daily activities. The scale at which such data can be gathered and analyzed makes possible a novel, data-driven approach to the investigation of various aspects of human behavior. In this talk, I will focus on the research done within the SocioPatterns project (www.sociopatterns.org), in which we have developed the SocioPatterns sensing platform to obtain longitudinal datasets on face-to-face contact events between individuals in a variety of contexts ranging from scientific conferences to museum, schools or hospitals. The gathered data sets consists in dynamic networks of human contacts, and their analysis reveal interesting similarities and differences of human interaction patterns across contexts. I will also consider the impact of the temporal resolution, which allows to take into account causality constraints, on dynamical processes occurring on networks, such as spreading processes.

Barrat, Alain

2012-02-01

340

Interactive Network Exploration to Derive Insights: Filtering, Clustering,  

E-print Network

of realistic networks generated by scientific article citations, cell phone calling patterns, banking, commercial, terrorist, or friendship interactions, where pro-social initiatives, commercial enterprises evolving struc- tures, where links act as pathways for volatile information or commodity flows. #12;2 B

Golbeck, Jennifer

341

The evolution of domain arrangements in proteins and interaction networks  

E-print Network

Review The evolution of domain arrangements in proteins and interaction networks E. Bornberg can be analysed conveniently by computational methods. In this review we summarise facts and hypotheses about the evolution of domains in multi-domain proteins and protein com- plexes, and the tools

Teichmann, Sarah

342

Cellcell interaction networks regulate blood stem and progenitor cell fate  

E-print Network

Cell­cell interaction networks regulate blood stem and progenitor cell fate Daniel C Kirouac1 a novel mathematical model of blood stem cell development incorporating cell-level kinetic parameters. Through integrated in silico and experimental analyses, we show that blood stem and progenitor cell fate

Zandstra, Peter W.

343

Visual Analysis of Network Traffic Interactive Monitoring, Detection, and  

E-print Network

Visual Analysis of Network Traffic ­ Interactive Monitoring, Detection, and Interpretation-time, attempts to manually analyze their output at a fine-granular level are often tedious, require exhaustive and intrusion detection systems with visual exploration interfaces that empower human analysts to gain deeper

Reiterer, Harald

344

Plant Protein-Protein Interaction Network and Interactome  

PubMed Central

Protein-protein interaction network represents an important aspect of systems biology. The understanding of the plant protein-protein interaction network and interactome will provide crucial insights into the regulation of plant developmental, physiological, and pathological processes. In this review, we will first define the concept of plant interactome and the protein-protein interaction network. The significance of the plant interactome study will be discussed. We will then compare the pros and cons for different strategies for interactome mapping including yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H), affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS), bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), and in silico prediction. The application of these platforms on specific plant biology questions will be further discussed. The recent advancements revealed the great potential for plant protein-protein interaction network and interactome to elucidate molecular mechanisms for signal transduction, stress responses, cell cycle control, pattern formation, and others. Mapping the plant interactome in model species will provide important guideline for the future study of plant biology. PMID:20808522

Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Yuan, Joshua S

2010-01-01

345

Modular decomposition of protein-protein interaction networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce an algorithmic method, termed modular decomposition, that defines the organization of protein-interaction networks as a hierarchy of nested modules. Modular decomposition derives the logical rules of how to combine proteins into the actual functional complexes by identifying groups of proteins acting as a single unit (sub-complexes) and those that can be alternatively exchanged in a set of similar

Julien Gagneur; Roland Krause; Tewis Bouwmeester; Georg Casari

2004-01-01

346

PROTEIN INTERACTION NETWORK INFERENCE TOOL CAPSTONE PROJECT REPORT  

E-print Network

PROTEIN INTERACTION NETWORK ­ INFERENCE TOOL CAPSTONE PROJECT REPORT BY DIVYA N. RAO ADVISOR: Dr;2 INTRODUCTION Proteins along with carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids form the building blocks of all organisms. Proteins are macromolecules composed of amino acids that are connected by peptide bonds

Menczer, Filippo

347

Cell Stem Cell An Expanded Oct4 Interaction Network: Implications  

E-print Network

Cell Stem Cell Resource An Expanded Oct4 Interaction Network: Implications for Stem Cell Biology is key in embryonic stem cell identity and reprogramming. Insight into its part- ners should illuminate set of Oct4-binding proteins in mouse embryonic stem cells. We find that Oct4 asso- ciates

Babu, M. Madan

348

Drug-domain interaction networks in myocardial infarction.  

PubMed

It has been well recognized that the pace of the development of new drugs and therapeutic interventions lags far behind biological knowledge discovery. Network-based approaches have emerged as a promising alternative to accelerate the discovery of new safe and effective drugs. Based on the integration of several biological resources including two recently published datasets i.e., Drug-target interactions in myocardial infarction (My-DTome) and drug-domain interaction network, this paper reports the association between drugs and protein domains in the context of myocardial infarction (MI). A MI drug-domain interaction network, My-DDome, was firstly constructed, followed by topological analysis and functional characterization of the network. The results show that My-DDome has a very clear modular structure, where drugs interacting with the same domain(s) within each module tend to have similar therapeutic effects. Moreover it has been found that drugs acting on blood and blood forming organs (ATC code B) and sensory organs (ATC code S) are significantly enriched in My-DDome (p < 0.000001), indicating that by incorporating protein domain information into My-DTome, more detailed insights into the interplay between drugs, their known targets, and seemingly unrelated proteins can be revealed. PMID:23974657

Wang, Haiying; Zheng, Huiru; Azuaje, Francisco; Zhao, Xing-Ming

2013-09-01

349

Protein interaction networks by proteome peptide scanning.  

PubMed

A substantial proportion of protein interactions relies on small domains binding to short peptides in the partner proteins. Many of these interactions are relatively low affinity and transient, and they impact on signal transduction. However, neither the number of potential interactions mediated by each domain nor the degree of promiscuity at a whole proteome level has been investigated. We have used a combination of phage display and SPOT synthesis to discover all the peptides in the yeast proteome that have the potential to bind to eight SH3 domains. We first identified the peptides that match a relaxed consensus, as deduced from peptides selected by phage display experiments. Next, we synthesized all the matching peptides at high density on a cellulose membrane, and we probed them directly with the SH3 domains. The domains that we have studied were grouped by this approach into five classes with partially overlapping specificity. Within the classes, however, the domains display a high promiscuity and bind to a large number of common targets with comparable affinity. We estimate that the yeast proteome contains as few as six peptides that bind to the Abp1 SH3 domain with a dissociation constant lower than 100 microM, while it contains as many as 50-80 peptides with corresponding affinity for the SH3 domain of Yfr024c. All the targets of the Abp1 SH3 domain, identified by this approach, bind to the native protein in vivo, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Finally, we demonstrate that this strategy can be extended to the analysis of the entire human proteome. We have developed an approach, named WISE (whole interactome scanning experiment), that permits rapid and reliable identification of the partners of any peptide recognition module by peptide scanning of a proteome. Since the SPOT synthesis approach is semiquantitative and provides an approximation of the dissociation constants of the several thousands of interactions that are simultaneously analyzed in an array format, the likelihood of each interaction occurring in any given physiological settings can be evaluated. WISE can be easily extended to a variety of protein interaction domains, including those binding to modified peptides, thereby offering a powerful proteomic tool to help completing a full description of the cell interactome. PMID:14737190

Landgraf, Christiane; Panni, Simona; Montecchi-Palazzi, Luisa; Castagnoli, Luisa; Schneider-Mergener, Jens; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Cesareni, Gianni

2004-01-01

350

Mining functional subgraphs from cancer protein-protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks carry vital information about proteins' functions. Analysis of PPI networks associated with specific disease systems including cancer helps us in the understanding of the complex biology of diseases. Specifically, identification of similar and frequently occurring patterns (network motifs) across PPI networks will provide useful clues to better understand the biology of the diseases. Results In this study, we developed a novel pattern-mining algorithm that detects cancer associated functional subgraphs occurring in multiple cancer PPI networks. We constructed nine cancer PPI networks using differentially expressed genes from the Oncomine dataset. From these networks we discovered frequent patterns that occur in all networks and at different size levels. Patterns are abstracted subgraphs with their nodes replaced by node cluster IDs. By using effective canonical labeling and adopting weighted adjacency matrices, we are able to perform graph isomorphism test in polynomial running time. We use a bottom-up pattern growth approach to search for patterns, which allows us to effectively reduce the search space as pattern sizes grow. Validation of the frequent common patterns using GO semantic similarity showed that the discovered subgraphs scored consistently higher than the randomly generated subgraphs at each size level. We further investigated the cancer relevance of a select set of subgraphs using literature-based evidences. Conclusion Frequent common patterns exist in cancer PPI networks, which can be found through effective pattern mining algorithms. We believe that this work would allow us to identify functionally relevant and coherent subgraphs in cancer networks, which can be advanced to experimental validation to further our understanding of the complex biology of cancer. PMID:23282132

2012-01-01

351

How People Interact in Evolving Online Affiliation Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of human interactions is of central importance for understanding the behavior of individuals, groups, and societies. Here, we observe the formation and evolution of networks by monitoring the addition of all new links, and we analyze quantitatively the tendencies used to create ties in these evolving online affiliation networks. We show that an accurate estimation of these probabilistic tendencies can be achieved only by following the time evolution of the network. Inferences about the reason for the existence of links using statistical analysis of network snapshots must therefore be made with great caution. Here, we start by characterizing every single link when the tie was established in the network. This information allows us to describe the probabilistic tendencies of tie formation and extract meaningful sociological conclusions. We also find significant differences in behavioral traits in the social tendencies among individuals according to their degree of activity, gender, age, popularity, and other attributes. For instance, in the particular data sets analyzed here, we find that women reciprocate connections 3 times as much as men and that this difference increases with age. Men tend to connect with the most popular people more often than women do, across all ages. On the other hand, triangular tie tendencies are similar, independent of gender, and show an increase with age. These results require further validation in other social settings. Our findings can be useful to build models of realistic social network structures and to discover the underlying laws that govern establishment of ties in evolving social networks.

Gallos, Lazaros K.; Rybski, Diego; Liljeros, Fredrik; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

2012-07-01

352

Rationalizing Tight Ligand Binding through Cooperative Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Small modifications of the molecular structure of a ligand sometimes cause strong gains in binding affinity to a protein target, rendering a weakly active chemical series suddenly attractive for further optimization. Our goal in this study is to better rationalize and predict the occurrence of such interaction hot-spots in receptor binding sites. To this end, we introduce two new concepts into the computational description of molecular recognition. First, we take a broader view of noncovalent interactions and describe protein–ligand binding with a comprehensive set of favorable and unfavorable contact types, including for example halogen bonding and orthogonal multipolar interactions. Second, we go beyond the commonly used pairwise additive treatment of atomic interactions and use a small world network approach to describe how interactions are modulated by their environment. This approach allows us to capture local cooperativity effects and considerably improves the performance of a newly derived empirical scoring function, ScorpionScore. More importantly, however, we demonstrate how an intuitive visualization of key intermolecular interactions, interaction networks, and binding hot-spots supports the identification and rationalization of tight ligand binding. PMID:22087588

2011-01-01

353

Information sharing and relationships on social networking sites.  

PubMed

This article investigates the relationship between sharing personal information and relationship development in the context of social networking sites (SNSs). Information disclosed on these sites could affect relationships in a different manner compared to more traditional interactions, such as instant messaging or face-to-face interaction. Respondents in the age range of 12 to 83 were surveyed about experiences of relationship development as a consequence of contact through Facebook or Hyves-the most popular Dutch SNSs. Results showed a primarily positive effect of information sharing on SNSs on our relationships. Furthermore, relationship development mainly occurs among acquaintances and friends, and public posts are most strongly related to relationship development. These findings suggest that SNSs might affect relationships in a distinct fashion as acquaintances and friends gain access to public self-disclosures that might normally only be reserved for close friends and family. Overall, this study provides an insight into some of the positive aspects of the public nature of SNSs in contrast with the general negative associations. PMID:23659723

Steijn, Wouter M P; Schouten, Alexander P

2013-08-01

354

Using a Dynamic Bayesian Network to Learn Genetic Interactions Linus Gransson  

E-print Network

of reverse engineering of genetic networks, i.e. inferring the underlying genetic network from analysis1 Using a Dynamic Bayesian Network to Learn Genetic Interactions Linus Göransson Graduate School. Obtaining a map of this genetic network would give a whole new perspective on genetic interactions, leading

Koski, Timo

355

Reconstruction of Missing Data in Social Networks Based on Temporal Patterns of Interactions  

E-print Network

in the series of interaction events between agents in a social network. We then develop a reconstruction modelReconstruction of Missing Data in Social Networks Based on Temporal Patterns of Interactions Alexey results to the Los Angeles gang network. Keywords: Social networks, temporal dependence of events, missing

Bertozzi, Andrea L.

356

Towards a Networked Community of Learners and Carers: The WebAutism Project Case Study for the Kaleidoscope JEIRP - PLE (Productive Learning in Networked Learning Environments)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project is set within the context of a networked learning course that offers post-experience professional training to non-traditional university students - parents and carers of people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The course is offered as a flexible and blended course with online module activities supported by face-to-face workshops and online tutorials. Reading material including audio-visual material is closely

Rachel Pilkington; Karen Guldberg

357

Social cognition on the Internet: testing constraints on social network size.  

PubMed

The social brain hypothesis (an explanation for the evolution of brain size in primates) predicts that humans typically cannot maintain more than 150 relationships at any one time. The constraint is partly cognitive (ultimately determined by some aspect of brain volume) and partly one of time. Friendships (but not necessarily kin relationships) are maintained by investing time in them, and failure to do so results in an inexorable deterioration in the quality of a relationship. The Internet, and in particular the rise of social networking sites (SNSs), raises the possibility that digital media might allow us to circumvent some or all of these constraints. This allows us to test the importance of these constraints in limiting human sociality. Although the recency of SNSs means that there have been relatively few studies, those that are available suggest that, in general, the ability to broadcast to many individuals at once, and the possibilities this provides in terms of continuously updating our understanding of network members' behaviour and thoughts, do not allow larger networks to be maintained. This may be because only relatively weak quality relationships can be maintained without face-to-face interaction. PMID:22734062

Dunbar, R I M

2012-08-01

358

Bootstrapping under constraint for the assessment of group behavior in human contact networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing availability of time- and space-resolved data describing human activities and interactions gives insights into both static and dynamic properties of human behavior. In practice, nevertheless, real-world data sets can often be considered as only one realization of a particular event. This highlights a key issue in social network analysis: the statistical significance of estimated properties. In this context, we focus here on the assessment of quantitative features of specific subset of nodes in empirical networks. We present a method of statistical resampling based on bootstrapping groups of nodes under constraints within the empirical network. The method enables us to define acceptance intervals for various null hypotheses concerning relevant properties of the subset of nodes under consideration in order to characterize by a statistical test its behavior as “normal” or not. We apply this method to a high-resolution data set describing the face-to-face proximity of individuals during two colocated scientific conferences. As a case study, we show how to probe whether colocating the two conferences succeeded in bringing together the two corresponding groups of scientists.

Tremblay, Nicolas; Barrat, Alain; Forest, Cary; Nornberg, Mark; Pinton, Jean-François; Borgnat, Pierre

2013-11-01

359

Social cognition on the Internet: testing constraints on social network size  

PubMed Central

The social brain hypothesis (an explanation for the evolution of brain size in primates) predicts that humans typically cannot maintain more than 150 relationships at any one time. The constraint is partly cognitive (ultimately determined by some aspect of brain volume) and partly one of time. Friendships (but not necessarily kin relationships) are maintained by investing time in them, and failure to do so results in an inexorable deterioration in the quality of a relationship. The Internet, and in particular the rise of social networking sites (SNSs), raises the possibility that digital media might allow us to circumvent some or all of these constraints. This allows us to test the importance of these constraints in limiting human sociality. Although the recency of SNSs means that there have been relatively few studies, those that are available suggest that, in general, the ability to broadcast to many individuals at once, and the possibilities this provides in terms of continuously updating our understanding of network members’ behaviour and thoughts, do not allow larger networks to be maintained. This may be because only relatively weak quality relationships can be maintained without face-to-face interaction. PMID:22734062

Dunbar, R. I. M.

2012-01-01

360

Ant Colony Approach to Predict Amino Acid Interaction Networks Le Havre University  

E-print Network

Ant Colony Approach to Predict Amino Acid Interaction Networks Omar GACI Le Havre University LITIS the notion of protein interaction network. This is a graph whose vertices are the proteins amino acids's interaction network from its amino acid sequence. An ant colony approach is used to solve this problem. 1

Boyer, Edmond

361

Characterization of amino acid interaction networks in proteins Omar Gaci and Stefan Balev  

E-print Network

Characterization of amino acid interaction networks in proteins Omar Gaci and Stefan Balev LITIS.Balev}@univ-lehavre.fr Abstract: A protein interaction network is a graph whose vertices are the protein's amino acids and whose of interactions between the protein's amino acids which form chemical bonds. We use the following network model

Boyer, Edmond

362

Multiplicative interaction in network meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Meta-analysis of a set of clinical trials is usually conducted using a linear predictor with additive effects representing treatments and trials. Additivity is a strong assumption. In this paper, we consider models for two or more treatments that involve multiplicative terms for interaction between treatment and trial. Multiplicative models provide information on the sensitivity of each treatment effect relative to the trial effect. In developing these models, we make use of a two-way analysis-of-variance approach to meta-analysis and consider fixed or random trial effects. It is shown using two examples that models with multiplicative terms may fit better than purely additive models and provide insight into the nature of the trial effect. We also show how to model inconsistency using multiplicative terms. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25410043

Piepho, Hans-Peter; Madden, Laurence V; Williams, Emlyn R

2015-02-20

363

Design and Integration of Low-Cost Technologies and Software to Create Interactive Learning and Support Environments which Augment Traditional Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the preliminary results of a project based on the premise that technologies for learning should not attempt to replace traditional education, but should provide services that facilitate teaching, learning, and education-related administrative tasks. It examines the need for an easy-to-use, open, and affordable interactive learning environment that can support both face-to-face interaction and computer meditated interaction. In

Taha A. Taha

2005-01-01

364

Dynamical network interactions in distributed control of robots.  

PubMed

In this paper the dynamical network model of the interactions within a group of mobile robots is investigated and proposed as a possible strategy for controlling the robots without central coordination. Motivated by the results of the analysis of our simple model, we show that the system performance in the presence of noise can be improved by including long-range connections between the robots. Finally, a suitable strategy based on this model to control exploration and transport is introduced. PMID:16599782

Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Rizzo, Alessandro

2006-03-01

365

Neural networks and pattern recognition in human-computer interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the activities of the workshop held on Sunday 28th April at the CHI'91 conference. Participants were there to discuss different ideas, methods and approaches to using pattern recognition in human-computer interaction.The workshop aimed to bring together researchers using novel methodologies, such as neural networks, in HCI applications, as well as practitioners using alternative or more traditional

Janet Finlay; Russell Beale

1993-01-01

366

A quantitative analysis of monochromaticity in genetic interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Background A genetic interaction refers to the deviation of phenotypes from the expected when perturbing two genes simultaneously. Studying genetic interactions help clarify relationships between genes, such as compensation and masking, and identify gene groups of functional modules. Recently, several genome-scale experiments for measuring quantitative (positive and negative) genetic interactions have been conducted. The results revealed that genes in the same module usually interact with each other in a consistent way (pure positive or negative); this phenomenon was designated as monochromaticity. Monochromaticity might be the underlying principle that can be utilized to unveil the modularity of cellular networks. However, no appropriate quantitative measurement for this phenomenon has been proposed. Results In this study, we propose the monochromatic index (MCI), which is able to quantitatively evaluate the monochromaticity of potential functional modules of genes, and the MCI was used to study genetic landscapes in different cellular subsystems. We demonstrated that MCI not only amend the deficiencies of MP-score but also properly incorporate the background effect. The results showed that not only within-complex but also between-complex connections present significant monochromatic tendency. Furthermore, we also found that significantly higher proportion of protein complexes are connected by negative genetic interactions in metabolic network, while transcription and translation system adopts relatively even number of positive and negative genetic interactions to link protein complexes. Conclusion In summary, we demonstrate that MCI improves deficiencies suffered by MP-score, and can be used to evaluate monochromaticity in a quantitative manner. In addition, it also helps to unveil features of genetic landscapes in different cellular subsystems. Moreover, MCI can be easily applied to data produced by different types of genetic interaction methodologies such as Synthetic Genetic Array (SGA), and epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP). PMID:22372977

2011-01-01

367

Neuronal oscillations and functional interactions between resting state networks.  

PubMed

Functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies showed that resting state activity in the healthy brain is organized into multiple large-scale networks encompassing distant regions. A key finding of resting state fMRI studies is the anti-correlation typically observed between the dorsal attention network (DAN) and the default mode network (DMN), which - during task performance - are activated and deactivated, respectively. Previous studies have suggested that alcohol administration modulates the balance of activation/deactivation in brain networks, as well as it induces significant changes in oscillatory activity measured by electroencephalography (EEG). However, our knowledge of alcohol-induced changes in band-limited EEG power and their potential link with the functional interactions between DAN and DMN is still very limited. Here we address this issue, examining the neuronal effects of alcohol administration during resting state by using simultaneous EEG-fMRI. Our findings show increased EEG power in the theta frequency band (4-8 Hz) after administration of alcohol compared to placebo, which was prominent over the frontal cortex. More interestingly, increased frontal tonic EEG activity in this band was associated with greater anti-correlation between the DAN and the frontal component of the DMN. Furthermore, EEG theta power and DAN-DMN anti-correlation were relatively greater in subjects who reported a feeling of euphoria after alcohol administration, which may result from a diminished inhibition exerted by the prefrontal cortex. Overall, our findings suggest that slow brain rhythms are responsible for dynamic functional interactions between brain networks. They also confirm the applicability and potential usefulness of EEG-fMRI for central nervous system drug research. PMID:25050432

Lei, Xu; Wang, Yulin; Yuan, Hong; Mantini, Dante

2014-07-01

368

Genetic interaction networks: better understand to better predict  

PubMed Central

A genetic interaction (GI) between two genes generally indicates that the phenotype of a double mutant differs from what is expected from each individual mutant. In the last decade, genome scale studies of quantitative GIs were completed using mainly synthetic genetic array technology and RNA interference in yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. These studies raised questions regarding the functional interpretation of GIs, the relationship of genetic and molecular interaction networks, the usefulness of GI networks to infer gene function and co-functionality, the evolutionary conservation of GI, etc. While GIs have been used for decades to dissect signaling pathways in genetic models, their functional interpretations are still not trivial. The existence of a GI between two genes does not necessarily imply that these two genes code for interacting proteins or that the two genes are even expressed in the same cell. In fact, a GI only implies that the two genes share a functional relationship. These two genes may be involved in the same biological process or pathway; or they may also be involved in compensatory pathways with unrelated apparent function. Considering the powerful opportunity to better understand gene function, genetic relationship, robustness and evolution, provided by a genome-wide mapping of GIs, several in silico approaches have been employed to predict GIs in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Most of these methods used weighted data integration. In this article, we will review the later knowledge acquired on GI networks in metazoans by looking more closely into their relationship with pathways, biological processes and molecular complexes but also into their modularity and organization. We will also review the different in silico methods developed to predict GIs and will discuss how the knowledge acquired on GI networks can be used to design predictive tools with higher performances. PMID:24381582

Boucher, Benjamin; Jenna, Sarah

2013-01-01

369

Damage to the Salience Network and Interactions with the Default Mode Network  

PubMed Central

Interactions between the Salience Network (SN) and the Default Mode Network (DMN) are thought to be important for cognitive control. However, evidence for a causal relationship between the networks is limited. Previously, we have reported that traumatic damage to white matter tracts within the SN predicts abnormal DMN function. Here we investigate the effect of this damage on network interactions that accompany changing motor control. We initially used fMRI of the Stop Signal Task to study response inhibition in humans. In healthy subjects, functional connectivity (FC) between the right anterior insula (rAI), a key node of the SN, and the DMN transiently increased during stopping. This change in FC was not seen in a group of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with impaired cognitive control. Furthermore, the amount of SN tract damage negatively correlated with FC between the networks. We confirmed these findings in a second group of TBI patients. Here, switching rather than inhibiting a motor response: (1) was accompanied by a similar increase in network FC in healthy controls; (2) was not seen in TBI patients; and (3) tract damage after TBI again correlated with FC breakdown. This shows that coupling between the rAI and DMN increases with cognitive control and that damage within the SN impairs this dynamic network interaction. This work provides compelling evidence for a model of cognitive control where the SN is involved in the attentional capture of salient external stimuli and signals the DMN to reduce its activity when attention is externally focused. PMID:25122883

Jilka, Sagar R.; Scott, Gregory; Ham, Timothy; Pickering, Alan; Bonnelle, Valerie; Braga, Rodrigo M.; Leech, Robert

2014-01-01

370

Adding Protein Context to the Human Protein-Protein Interaction Network to Reveal Meaningful Interactions  

PubMed Central

Interactions of proteins regulate signaling, catalysis, gene expression and many other cellular functions. Therefore, characterizing the entire human interactome is a key effort in current proteomics research. This challenge is complicated by the dynamic nature of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), which are conditional on the cellular context: both interacting proteins must be expressed in the same cell and localized in the same organelle to meet. Additionally, interactions underlie a delicate control of signaling pathways, e.g. by post-translational modifications of the protein partners - hence, many diseases are caused by the perturbation of these mechanisms. Despite the high degree of cell-state specificity of PPIs, many interactions are measured under artificial conditions (e.g. yeast cells are transfected with human genes in yeast two-hybrid assays) or even if detected in a physiological context, this information is missing from the common PPI databases. To overcome these problems, we developed a method that assigns context information to PPIs inferred from various attributes of the interacting proteins: gene expression, functional and disease annotations, and inferred pathways. We demonstrate that context consistency correlates with the experimental reliability of PPIs, which allows us to generate high-confidence tissue- and function-specific subnetworks. We illustrate how these context-filtered networks are enriched in bona fide pathways and disease proteins to prove the ability of context-filters to highlight meaningful interactions with respect to various biological questions. We use this approach to study the lung-specific pathways used by the influenza virus, pointing to IRAK1, BHLHE40 and TOLLIP as potential regulators of influenza virus pathogenicity, and to study the signalling pathways that play a role in Alzheimer's disease, identifying a pathway involving the altered phosphorylation of the Tau protein. Finally, we provide the annotated human PPI network via a web frontend that allows the construction of context-specific networks in several ways. PMID:23300433

Schaefer, Martin H.; Lopes, Tiago J. S.; Mah, Nancy; Shoemaker, Jason E.; Matsuoka, Yukiko; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Louis-Jeune, Caroline; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Neumann, Gabriele; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kitano, Hiroaki; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

2013-01-01

371

Simulation of an SEIR infectious disease model on the dynamic contact network of conference attendees  

E-print Network

The spread of infectious diseases crucially depends on the pattern of contacts among individuals. Knowledge of these patterns is thus essential to inform models and computational efforts. Few empirical studies are however available that provide estimates of the number and duration of contacts among social groups. Moreover, their space and time resolution are limited, so that data is not explicit at the person-to-person level, and the dynamical aspect of the contacts is disregarded. Here, we want to assess the role of data-driven dynamic contact patterns among individuals, and in particular of their temporal aspects, in shaping the spread of a simulated epidemic in the population. We consider high resolution data of face-to-face interactions between the attendees of a conference, obtained from the deployment of an infrastructure based on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) devices that assess mutual face-to-face proximity. The spread of epidemics along these interactions is simulated through an SEIR model, u...

Stehlé, Juliette; Barrat, Alain; Cattuto, Ciro; Colizza, Vittoria; Isella, Lorenzo; Régis, Corinne; Pinton, Jean-François; Khanafer, Nagham; Broeck, Wouter Van den; Vanhems, Philippe; 10.1186/1741-7015-9-87

2011-01-01

372

Comparison of Profile Similarity Measures for Genetic Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

Analysis of genetic interaction networks often involves identifying genes with similar profiles, which is typically indicative of a common function. While several profile similarity measures have been applied in this context, they have never been systematically benchmarked. We compared a diverse set of correlation measures, including measures commonly used by the genetic interaction community as well as several other candidate measures, by assessing their utility in extracting functional information from genetic interaction data. We find that the dot product, one of the simplest vector operations, outperforms most other measures over a large range of gene pairs. More generally, linear similarity measures such as the dot product, Pearson correlation or cosine similarity perform better than set overlap measures such as Jaccard coefficient. Similarity measures that involve L2-normalization of the profiles tend to perform better for the top-most similar pairs but perform less favorably when a larger set of gene pairs is considered or when the genetic interaction data is thresholded. Such measures are also less robust to the presence of noise and batch effects in the genetic interaction data. Overall, the dot product measure performs consistently among the best measures under a variety of different conditions and genetic interaction datasets. PMID:23874711

Deshpande, Raamesh; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Myers, Chad L.

2013-01-01

373

Exploring drug-target interaction networks of illicit drugs  

PubMed Central

Background Drug addiction is a complex and chronic mental disease, which places a large burden on the American healthcare system due to its negative effects on patients and their families. Recently, network pharmacology is emerging as a promising approach to drug discovery by integrating network biology and polypharmacology, allowing for a deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms of drug actions at the systems level. This study seeks to apply this approach for investigation of illicit drugs and their targets in order to elucidate their interaction patterns and potential secondary drugs that can aid future research and clinical care. Results In this study, we extracted 188 illicit substances and their related information from the DrugBank database. The data process revealed 86 illicit drugs targeting a total of 73 unique human genes, which forms an illicit drug-target network. Compared to the full drug-target network from DrugBank, illicit drugs and their target genes tend to cluster together and form four subnetworks, corresponding to four major medication categories: depressants, stimulants, analgesics, and steroids. External analysis of Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) second sublevel classifications confirmed that the illicit drugs have neurological functions or act via mechanisms of stimulants, opioids, and steroids. To further explore other drugs potentially having associations with illicit drugs, we constructed an illicit-extended drug-target network by adding the drugs that have the same target(s) as illicit drugs to the illicit drug-target network. After analyzing the degree and betweenness of the network, we identified hubs and bridge nodes, which might play important roles in the development and treatment of drug addiction. Among them, 49 non-illicit drugs might have potential to be used to treat addiction or have addictive effects, including some results that are supported by previous studies. Conclusions This study presents the first systematic review of the network characteristics of illicit drugs, their targets, and other drugs that share the targets of these illicit drugs. The results, though preliminary, provide some novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of drug addiction. The observation of illicit-related drugs, with partial verification from previous studies, demonstrated that the network-assisted approach is promising for the identification of drug repositioning. PMID:24268016

2013-01-01

374

Linear Motif-Mediated Interactions Have Contributed to the Evolution of Modularity in Complex Protein Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

The modular architecture of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is evident in diverse species with a wide range of complexity. However, the molecular components that lead to the evolution of modularity in PPI networks have not been clearly identified. Here, we show that weak domain-linear motif interactions (DLIs) are more likely to connect different biological modules than strong domain-domain interactions (DDIs). This molecular division of labor is essential for the evolution of modularity in the complex PPI networks of diverse eukaryotic species. In particular, DLIs may compensate for the reduction in module boundaries that originate from increased connections between different modules in complex PPI networks. In addition, we show that the identification of biological modules can be greatly improved by including molecular characteristics of protein interactions. Our findings suggest that transient interactions have played a unique role in shaping the architecture and modularity of biological networks over the course of evolution. PMID:25299147

Kim, Inhae; Lee, Heetak; Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Sanguk

2014-01-01

375

Attractive Interactions among Intermediate Filaments Determine Network Mechanics In Vitro  

PubMed Central

Mechanical and structural properties of K8/K18 and vimentin intermediate filament (IF) networks have been investigated using bulk mechanical rheometry and optical microrheology including diffusing wave spectroscopy and multiple particle tracking. A high elastic modulus G0 at low protein concentration c, a weak concentration dependency of G0 (G0?c0.5±0.1) and pronounced strain stiffening are found for these systems even without external crossbridgers. Strong attractive interactions among filaments are required to maintain these characteristic mechanical features, which have also been reported for various other IF networks. Filament assembly, the persistence length of the filaments and the network mesh size remain essentially unaffected when a nonionic surfactant is added, but strain stiffening is completely suppressed, G0 drops by orders of magnitude and exhibits a scaling G0?c1.9±0.2 in agreement with microrheological measurements and as expected for entangled networks of semi-flexible polymers. Tailless K8?/K18?T and various other tailless filament networks do not exhibit strain stiffening, but still show high G0 values. Therefore, two binding sites are proposed to exist in IF networks. A weaker one mediated by hydrophobic amino acid clusters in the central rod prevents stretched filaments between adjacent cross-links from thermal equilibration and thus provides the high G0 values. Another strong one facilitating strain stiffening is located in the tail domain with its high fraction of hydrophobic amino acid sequences. Strain stiffening is less pronounced for vimentin than for K8/K18 due to electrostatic repulsion forces partly compensating the strong attraction at filament contact points. PMID:24690778

Pawelzyk, Paul; Mücke, Norbert; Herrmann, Harald; Willenbacher, Norbert

2014-01-01

376

Functional clustering of yeast proteins from the protein-protein interaction network  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The abundant data available for protein interaction networks have not yet been fully understood. New types of analyses are needed to reveal organizational principles of these networks to investigate the details of functional and regulatory clusters of proteins. RESULTS: In the present work, individual clusters identified by an eigenmode analysis of the connectivity matrix of the protein-protein interaction network

Taner Z. Sen; Andrzej Kloczkowski; Robert L. Jernigan

2006-01-01

377

Determining modular organization of protein interaction networks by maximizing modularity density  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: With ever increasing amount of available data on biological networks, modeling and understanding the structure of these large networks is an important problem with profound biological implications. Cellular functions and biochemical events are coordinately carried out by groups of proteins interacting each other in biological modules. Identifying of such modules in protein interaction networks is very important for understanding

Shihua Zhang; Xue-Mei Ning; Chris Ding; Xiang-Sun Zhang

2010-01-01

378

Apolo: making sense of large network data by combining rich user interaction and machine learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extracting useful knowledge from large network datasets has become a fundamental challenge in many domains, from scientific literature to social networks and the web. We introduce Apolo, a system that uses a mixed-initiative approach - combining visualization, rich user interaction and machine learning - to guide the user to incrementally and interactively explore large network data and make sense of

Duen Horng Chau; Aniket Kittur; Jason I. Hong; Christos Faloutsos

2011-01-01

379

[Protein interaction network analysis of Panax notoginseng saponins].  

PubMed

Panax notoginseng (PN) is one of the commonly used clinical medicines for cardiovascular diseases and possesses a variety of pharmacological effects. P. notoginseng saponins (PNS) are the most important bioactive components in PN. The purpose of this study was to explain the mechanism of PNS on molecular network level. 18 targets of the main medicinal ingredients of PNS were gained by virtual screening based on pharmacophores and data mining. A protein interaction network of PNS was constructed with 189 nodes and 721 interactions. By a graph theoretic clustering algorithm Molecular Complex Detection (MCODE), 14 modules were detected. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of the modules demonstrated that the roles of PNS played in cardiovascular disease related to multiple biological processes, which could represent the characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a whole to regulate the disease. The results showed that the blood circulation and hemostasis efficacy of PN related with the biological processes such as positive regulation of cAMP metabolic and biosynthetic process, platelet activation and regulation of blood vessel size, regulation of T cell proliferation and differentiation and so on. Therefore, the module-based network analysis will be an effective method for better understanding TCM. PMID:25272850

Ren, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Xing; Wang, Shi-Feng; He, Yu-Su; Zhai, Chen-Xi; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

2014-06-01

380

Homeless but Connected: The Role of Heterogeneous Social Network Ties and Social Networking Technology in the Mental Health Outcomes of Street-Living Youth  

PubMed Central

Although social integration tends to have positive effects on the mental health of housed adolescents, the role of homeless adolescents’ social networks is more ambiguous. Social network data were collected from 136 homeless adolescents in Hollywood, California to examine how network ties are associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Face-to-face relationships with street-based peers were a risk factor for both anxiety and depression, while contacting home-based friends through social networking technology was found to be protective for depression. Community-based and public agencies serving homeless adolescents should consider facilitating the maintenance of these protective relationships by providing internet access. PMID:22075769

Rice, Eric; Ray, Diana; Kurzban, Seth

2013-01-01

381

The protein interaction network mediated by human SH3 domains.  

PubMed

Families of conserved protein domains, specialized in mediating interactions with short linear peptide motifs, are responsible for the formation of a variety of dynamic complexes in the cell. An important subclass of these motifs are characterized by a high proline content and play a pivotal role in biological processes requiring the coordinated assembly of multi-protein complexes. This is achieved via interaction of proteins containing modules such as Src Homology-3 (SH3) or WW domains and specific proline rich patterns. Here we make available via a publicly accessible database a synopsis of our current understanding of the interaction landscape of the human SH3 protein family. This is achieved by integrating an information extraction strategy with a new experimental approach. In a first approach we have used a text mining strategy to capture a large number of manuscripts reporting interactions between SH3 domains and target peptides. Relevant information was annotated in the MINT database. In a second experimental approach we have used a variant of the WISE (Whole Interactome Scanning Experiment) strategy to probe a large number of naturally occurring and chemically-synthesized peptides arrayed at high density on a glass surface. By this method we have tested 60 human SH3 domains for their ability to bind a collection of 9192 poly-proline containing peptides immobilized on a glass chip. To evaluate the quality of the resulting interaction dataset, we retested some of the interactions on a smaller scale and performed a series of pull down experiments on native proteins. Peptide chips, pull down assays, SPOT synthesis and phage display experiments have allowed us to further characterize the specificity and promiscuity of proline-rich binding domains and to map their interaction network. Both the information captured from the literature and the interactions inferred from the peptide chip experiments were collected and stored in the PepspotDB (http://mint.bio.uniroma2.it/PepspotDB/). PMID:21740962

Carducci, Martina; Perfetto, Livia; Briganti, Leonardo; Paoluzi, Serena; Costa, Stefano; Zerweck, Johannes; Schutkowski, Mike; Castagnoli, Luisa; Cesareni, Gianni

2012-01-01

382

Knowledge-guided inference of domain–domain interactions from incomplete protein–protein interaction networks  

E-print Network

incomplete protein–protein interaction networks Mei Liu1, Xue-wen Chen1,? and Raja Jothi2 1Bioinformatics and Computational Life-Sciences Laboratory, ITTC, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Kansas, 1520 West 15th Street... of protein functions and cellular processes, do not provide any direct information about the regions/domains, defined as structural or functional sub-units, within the proteins that mediate the interaction (Jothi et al., 2006). Most often, it is only a...

Liu, Mei; Chen, Xue-wen; Jothi, Raja

2009-08-10

383

Face-to-Face, Hybrid, or Online?: Issues Faculty Face Redesigning an Introductory Engineering Graphics Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A hybrid introductory course was developed and piloted during the Fall 2007 semester in three laptop sections (i.e., all of the students owned and brought laptops to class each day). The online portion of the course included voiced-over content presentations, software demonstrations, and sketching examples as well as online assessments. Sections…

Branoff, Theodore; Wiebe, Eric

2009-01-01

384

Face to Face with the Ghost in the Machine: Psycholinguistics and TESOL  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Psycholinguistics is the study of how the mind handles language. There is some lack of consensus as to how far the scope of the field extends, but this article focuses on its most central concerns, namely, how language is acquired, how it is stored in the mind, and how it is processed in use. It aims to build bridges to some of the more important…

Field, John

2008-01-01

385

Journal of Consulting and Clinical Therapeutic Alliance in Face-to-Face and  

E-print Network

therapeutic alliance in clients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression by telephone (T the WAI and depression outcomes did not vary by treatment group (Cohen's f2 ranged from 0 to .004, ps .07 reduces therapeutic alliance relative to FtF-CBT. Keywords: alliance, telephone therapy, CBT, depression

Chisholm, Rex L.

386

Face-to-Face Implies no Interface Dennis Burford Edwin Blake  

E-print Network

. CVEs differ from other communications technologies (such as email, chat, telephony and video-cost cameras and PCs. We have tested our system with live video input and animated three different types "web-cam" and a set of markers for expression analysis. Once the markers have been placed on the face

Blake, Edwin

387

The Fernald Envoy Program: How face-to-face public involvement is working  

SciTech Connect

In March 1994, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), initiated the Fernald Envoy Program as a tool for strengthening public involvement in the restoration of the Fernald site, a former US Department of Energy uranium processing facility which ceased operation in 1989 and became an environmental restoration site. Based on the concept that opinion leaders play a key role in the flow of information, the Envoy Program was developed to link Fernald with opinion leaders in community groups. In February and March 1995, the University of Cincinnati Center for Environmental Communication Studies, under contract with the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation, conducted an evaluation to determine how the Envoy Program was functioning in relation to the original Envoy Plan. A quasi-experimental design was applied using telephone surveys of opinion leaders in groups with envoy representation and in groups without representation. Findings validated the effectiveness of the program and also identified areas for program improvement.

Hoopes, J. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Hundertmark, C.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, J. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Center for Environmental Communication Studies

1995-12-31

388

Comparison of Face-to-Face and Online Mathematics Learning of Sixth Graders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online education is increasing in popularity at the college and high school levels with several studies showing the comparability of e-learning and more traditional methods. Middle school students' ability to function well with this mode of instruction has not been established in the literature, although the circumstances of Generation Z growing…

Edwards, Clayton M.; Rule, Audrey C.; Boody, Robert M.

2013-01-01

389

"Face-to-face with It": medical students' narratives about their end-of-life education.  

PubMed

Medical schools have been slow to include meaningful end-of-life (EOL) educational experiences in their curricula. As an area of inquiry and focused clinical experience, death is "conspicuous" by its absence, reflecting a medical culture that defines death as failure. The author asked fourth-year medical students at one institution to describe their experiences with dying patients and their families, the skills and attitudes they brought to these encounters, the support they received from attendings and residents while caring for dying patients, and suggestions for the medical curriculum that would help prepare them for care of the dying. Using a qualitative method, she analyzed ten students' written narratives, which dealt with experiences during their third-year clerkships, and compared these reflections with the literature on EOL care in medical education. The themes that emerged provided four organizers for this essay: (1) students' worry and uncertainty about EOL care, (2) guidance and role modeling in EOL care, (3) preparation for EOL care, and (4) conclusions and recommendations for the medical curriculum. In general, students did not feel well prepared or supported as they cared for their first dying patients, including, for example, delivering a terminal prognosis or obtaining a DNR. However, while they did wish for more support and role modeling from residents and attendings, they generally believed that care of the dying can be learned only through direct clinical experience. These beliefs call into question curricular issues of placement of EOL inquiry--most often in the preclinical curriculum--and the teaching of its content, currently overwhelmingly by lectures. The author concludes with recommendations for thoughtful, integrative, interdisciplinary curriculum changes in EOL education. PMID:11953289

Wear, Delese

2002-04-01

390

Folk computing : designing technology to support face-to-face community building  

E-print Network

Creating common ground in a community of people who do not all know each other is a chicken-and-egg problem: members do not share enough common ground to support the kinds of conversations that help build it. "Folk Computing" ...

Borovoy, Richard Daniel

2002-01-01

391

An Examination of Motivation Model Components in Face-to-Face and Online Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation consists of psychological components (i.e., empowerment, usefulness, success, interest, and caring) that have been derived from research and theory as ones that are critical to student engagement in academic settings. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine whether men and women rate…

Jones, Brett D.

2010-01-01

392

Professional Staff Committee MINUTES 6/10/2010 FACE-TO-FACE  

E-print Network

for improvement c) No issue too small or too big for PAC d) Communication can flow directly to any PAC member 2) Concerns forwarded by PSC Members a) Budget cuts, especially in facilities, are resulting in workplace) Communication of what the campus can expect and exactly what services are being cut would be helpful (e

Hemmers, Oliver

393

Detecting Emotional Expression in Face-to-Face and Online Breast Cancer Support Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Accurately detecting emotional expression in women with primary breast cancer participating in support groups may be important for therapists and researchers. In 2 small studies (N = 20 and N = 16), the authors examined whether video coding, human text coding, and automated text analysis provided consistent estimates of the level of emotional…

Liess, Anna; Simon, Wendy; Yutsis, Maya; Owen, Jason E.; Piemme, Karen Altree; Golant, Mitch; Giese-Davis, Janine

2008-01-01

394

How Middle School Students Come Face to Face With Down Syndrome Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article discusses how real research on Down syndrome, being done in a lab at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), was incorporated into a laboratory activity for middle school students. The activity asked students to evaluate re

Buckingham, Jane; Allen, Jared; Marrs, Kathleen; Roper, Randall

2010-01-01

395

Face to Face Legal Services and Their Alternatives: Global Lessons from the Digital Revolution  

E-print Network

in the United Kingdom (UK) as `social welfare law' and in North America as `poverty law'. Now entitlement of America (US), on the use of telephone hotlines and tracked the development, particularly in the US

Strathclyde, University of

396

The Embedded Librarian Online or Face-to-Face: American University's Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the role online communication and tools play in embedded librarianship at American University. Two embedded models of user engagement, traditional and hybrid, are discussed. The librarians operating in each mode share their experiences providing tailored support to the departments of music/performing arts and business. The…

Matos, Michael A.; Matsuoka-Motley, Nobue; Mayer, William

2010-01-01

397

Collaborative Representations: Supporting Face-to-Face and Online Knowledge-Building Discourse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present widespread interest in the use of electronic media for presents an unprecedented opportunity for leveraging the computational medium's strengths for learning. However, existing software tools provide only primitive support for online knowledge-building discourse. Further work is needed in supporting coordinated use of disciplinary representations, discourse representations, and knowledge representations. This paper introduces the concept of representational guidance for

Daniel D. Suthers

2001-01-01

398

Leadership Development Using Three Modes of Educational Delivery: Online, Blended and Face to Face  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research explores differences in the development of life long learning skills that support leadership development across three different modes of educational delivery. Performance outcomes from 550 students across three modes of educational delivery in a post graduate leadership and management course were compared. The 12 module course and…

Ladyshewsky, Richard; Taplin, Ross

2014-01-01

399

Testing Principles of Language Learning in a Cyber Face-to-Face Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the application of the established principles of instructed language learning in a cyber fact- to-face environment supported by an advanced Synchronous Learning Management System (SLMS). Following a critical review of the use of SLMS in distance language learning, the main body of the article focuses on the discussion of results from an empirical study, in reference to

Nian-shing Chen; Yuping Wang

2008-01-01

400

An Exploratory Study of Face-to-Face and Cyberbullying in Sixth Grade Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a pilot study, sixth grade students (N = 124) completed a questionnaire assessing students' experience with bullying and cyberbullying, demographic information, quality of parent-child relationship, and ways they have dealt with bullying/cyberbullying in the past. Two multiple regression analyses were conducted. The multiple regression analysis…

Accordino, Denise B.; Accordino, Michael P.

2011-01-01

401

Managerial implications of computer-based online\\/face-to-face business education: a case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online business education is becoming increasingly common in tertiary education in response to the growing needs of a changing student population. E-learning and teaching online business have unique challenges when compared to their more traditional classroom counterparts, which promotes the concepts of a nimble organisation from the managers’ perspective. A recent survey of 35 students at a major private university

Alan D. Smith; William T. Rupp

2004-01-01

402

Enhancing Student Performance in Online Learning and Traditional Face-to-Face Class Delivery  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within many educational institutions across the world, the delivery of undergraduate and post-graduate courses is facilitated by online learning technologies. The development and transformation of traditional academic courses for online learning delivery provides a number of opportunities for both the academic institution and prospective students.…

Stansfield, Mark; McLellan, Evelyn; Connolly, Thomas

2004-01-01

403

Professionals' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Online versus Face-to-face Continuing Professional Education Courses  

E-print Network

non-academic context for professions other than nursing or healthcare. Moreover, the learners? voice is often absent in the debates. This exploratory study was designed to a) obtain professionals? perceptions concerning the effectiveness of online...

Ke, Jie

2011-10-21

404

Professional Staff Committee MINUTES Nov. 13, 2008 FACE-TO-FACE  

E-print Network

of the Year Award program change/expand? iii. Support for staff in dealing with stress #12;iv. Communication from the administration back to employees ­ even if the message is "We have no new information." 1 the ideas employees forwarded to the administration through the website? What ideas were not, and why?) D

Hemmers, Oliver

405

Face to face: blocking facial mimicry can selectively impair recognition of emotional expressions.  

PubMed

People spontaneously mimic a variety of behaviors, including emotional facial expressions. Embodied cognition theories suggest that mimicry reflects internal simulation of perceived emotion in order to facilitate its understanding. If so, blocking facial mimicry should impair recognition of expressions, especially of emotions that are simulated using facial musculature. The current research tested this hypothesis using four expressions (happy, disgust, fear, and sad) and two mimicry-interfering manipulations (1) biting on a pen and (2) chewing gum, as well as two control conditions. Experiment 1 used electromyography over cheek, mouth, and nose regions. The bite manipulation consistently activated assessed muscles, whereas the chew manipulation activated muscles only intermittently. Further, expressing happiness generated most facial action. Experiment 2 found that the bite manipulation interfered most with recognition of happiness. These findings suggest that facial mimicry differentially contributes to recognition of specific facial expressions, thus allowing for more refined predictions from embodied cognition theories. PMID:18633815

Oberman, Lindsay M; Winkielman, Piotr; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

2007-01-01

406

Optimal diabetes care outcomes following face-to-face medication therapy management services.  

PubMed

Pharmacists play an integral role in influencing resolution of drug-related problems. This study examines the relationship between a pharmacist-led and delivered medication therapy management (MTM) program and achievement of Optimal Diabetes Care benchmarks. Data within Fairview Pharmacy Services were used to identify a group of patients with diabetes who received MTM services during a 2007 demonstration project (n=121) and a control group who were invited to receive MTM services but opted out (n=103). Rates of achieving optimal diabetes clinical management for both groups were compared using the D5 diabetes measure for years 2006, 2007, and 2008. The D5 components are: glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c<7%); low-density lipoprotein (<100 mg/dl); blood pressure (<130/80 mmHg); tobacco free; and daily aspirin use. Multivariate difference-in-differences (DID) estimation was used to determine the impact of 1 year of MTM services on each care component. Patients who opted in for MTM had higher Charlson scores, more complex medication regimens, and a higher percentage of diabetes with complications (P<0.05). In 2007, the percentage of diabetes patients optimally managed was significantly higher for MTM patients compared to 2006 values (21.49% vs. 45.45%, P<0.01). Nonlinear DID models showed that MTM patients were more likely to meet the HbA1c criterion in 2007 (odds ratio: 2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-5.85, P=0.038). Linear DID models for HbA1c showed a mean reduction of 0.54% (95% CI: 0.091%-0.98%, P=0.018) for MTM patients. An MTM program contributed to improved optimal diabetes management in a population of patients with complex diabetes clinical profiles. PMID:23113628

Brummel, Amanda R; Soliman, Ahmed M; Carlson, Angeline M; de Oliveira, Djenane Ramalho

2013-02-01

407

Replacing Face-to-Face Tutorials by Synchronous Online Technologies: Challenges and Pedagogical Implications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a study which investigates the implementation of a synchronous e-learning system ("Interwise") for online tutorials on an information technology related course offered by the Open University of Hong Kong (OUHK). It examines a set of interview data related to students' and tutors' views on the use of the system. Issues…

Ng, Kwok Chi

2007-01-01

408

The Creation of Virtual and Face-to-Face Learning Communities: An International Collaboration Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the use of technology in higher education to support an international collaboration between 2 graduate seminars in cognition and instruction, one in Mexico and another in Canada. The culture of both seminars is described in the context of using computer mediated collaboration systems. The online collaboration between and…

Lajoie, Susanne P.; Garcia, Benilde; Berdugo, Gloria; Marquez, Luis; Espindola, Susana; Nakamura, Carlos

2006-01-01

409

Distinguishing Online and Face-to-Face Learning: Acquisition, Learning, and Online Pedagogy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation examines the type of training currently available to potential online instructors in order to generate a graduate-level degree program design effectively offering online pedagogy. Current online teacher training is largely based on acquisition of technological skills, such as mastering the operational components of a platform…

Grant, Abigail A.

2012-01-01

410

Assessing Middle School Student Participation in Online vs. Face-to-Face Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators have observed reluctance in middle school students to vocally engage in small group learning tasks, the result of which could be a decrease in student learning. The same students have been observed collaborating with peers outside of the classroom when using technology. The purpose of this study is to determine if technology provides a…

Oravetz, Cathleen L.

2011-01-01

411

Innovative, High-Pressure, Cryogenic Control Valve: Short Face-to-Face, Reduced Cost  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A control valve that can throttle high-pressure cryogenic fluid embodies several design features that distinguish it over conventional valves designed for similar applications. Field and design engineers worked together to create a valve that would simplify installation, trim changes, and maintenance, thus reducing overall cost. The seals and plug stem packing were designed to perform optimally in cryogenic temperature ranges. Unlike conventional high-pressure cryogenic valves, the trim size can be changed independent of the body.

Wilkes, Karlin; Larsen, Ed; McCourt, Jackson

2003-01-01

412

Quantifying nonverbal communicative behavior in face-to-face human dialogues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The referred study is based on the assumption that understanding how humans use nonverbal behavior in dialogues can be very useful in the design of more natural-looking animated talking heads. The goal of the study is twofold: (1) to explore how people use specific facial expressions and head movements to serve important dialogue functions, and (2) to show evidence that it is possible to measure and quantify the entity of these movements with the Qualisys MacReflex motion tracking system. Naturally elicited dialogues between humans have been analyzed with focus on the attention on those nonverbal behaviors that serve the very relevant functions of regulating the conversational flux (i.e., turn taking) and producing information about the state of communication (i.e., feedback). The results show that eyebrow raising, head nods, and head shakes are typical signals involved during the exchange of speaking turns, as well as in the production and elicitation of feedback. These movements can be easily measured and quantified, and this measure can be implemented in animated talking heads.

Skhiri, Mustapha; Cerrato, Loredana

2002-11-01

413

Face-to-face with anti-inflammatory therapy for rosacea.  

PubMed

In the past, our understanding of rosacea has been inadequate and limited to descriptions of factors that exacerbate and improve the disease. While the pathophysiology of rosacea is complex and multifactorial, cathelicidin peptides have emerged as key players in the pathogenesis of this common dermatological disorder. This article correlates recent findings in abnormal cathelicidin production and proteolytic processing in rosacea with therapeutic actions of current treatment options and, in this way, highlights potential points of intervention for the development of efficient therapeutic alternatives. PMID:24684602

Salzer, Suzanna; Ruzicka, Thomas; Schauber, Jürgen

2014-06-01

414

Edge-on face-to-face MOSFET for synchrotron microbeam dosimetry: MC modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dosimetry of X-ray microbeams using MOSFETs results in an asymmetrical beam profile due to a lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using PENELOPE and GEANT4 codes to study this effect and a MOSFET on a micropositioner was scanned in the microbeam. Based on the simulations a new method of microbeam dosimetry is proposed.

Anatoly B. Rosenfeld; Erik A. Siegbahn; Elke Brauer-Krish; Andrew Holmes-Siedle; Michael L. F. Lerch; Alberto Bravin; Iwan M. Cornelius; George J. Takacs; Nirmal Painuly; Heidi Nettelback; Tomas Kron

2005-01-01

415

Adolescent Literacy Tutoring: Face-to-Face and Via Webcam Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research project was to examine the effectiveness of supervised literacy tutoring delivered by 25 secondary teacher candidates to middle and high school students via webcam technology and in person. The results stem from two semester-long studies of technology-delivered tutoring from a university to middle and high school…

Houge, Timothy T.; Peyton, David; Geier, Constance; Petrie, Bruce

2007-01-01

416

The Bilingual Language Interaction Network for Comprehension of Speech*  

PubMed Central

During speech comprehension, bilinguals co-activate both of their languages, resulting in cross-linguistic interaction at various levels of processing. This interaction has important consequences for both the structure of the language system and the mechanisms by which the system processes spoken language. Using computational modeling, we can examine how cross-linguistic interaction affects language processing in a controlled, simulated environment. Here we present a connectionist model of bilingual language processing, the Bilingual Language Interaction Network for Comprehension of Speech (BLINCS), wherein interconnected levels of processing are created using dynamic, self-organizing maps. BLINCS can account for a variety of psycholinguistic phenomena, including cross-linguistic interaction at and across multiple levels of processing, cognate facilitation effects, and audio-visual integration during speech comprehension. The model also provides a way to separate two languages without requiring a global language-identification system. We conclude that BLINCS serves as a promising new model of bilingual spoken language comprehension. PMID:24363602

Marian, Viorica

2013-01-01

417

Long-term observation of a pollination network: fluctuation in species and interactions, relative  

E-print Network

LETTER Long-term observation of a pollination network: fluctuation in species and interactions partners. Strikingly, few species and interactions were consistently present in all four annual plant­pollinator networks (53% of the plant species, 21% of the pollinator species and 4.9% of the interactions). The high

Petanidou, Theodora

418

Delineating Geographical Regions with Networks of Human Interactions in an Extensive Set of Countries  

E-print Network

Large-scale networks of human interaction, in particular country-wide telephone call networks, can be used to redraw geographical maps by applying algorithms of topological community detection. The geographic projections ...

Sobolevsky, Stanislav

419

Cytoscape Web: an interactive web-based network browser  

PubMed Central

Summary: Cytoscape Web is a web-based network visualization tool–modeled after Cytoscape–which is open source, interactive, customizable and easily integrated into web sites. Multiple file exchange formats can be used to load data into Cytoscape Web, including GraphML, XGMML and SIF. Availability and Implementation: Cytoscape Web is implemented in Flex/ActionScript with a JavaScript API and is freely available at http://cytoscapeweb.cytoscape.org/ Contact: gary.bader@utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20656902

Lopes, Christian T.; Franz, Max; Kazi, Farzana; Donaldson, Sylva L.; Morris, Quaid; Bader, Gary D.

2010-01-01

420

Spatially-Interactive Biomolecular Networks Organized by Nucleic Acid Nanostructures  

PubMed Central

Conspectus Living systems have evolved a variety of nanostructures to control the molecular interactions that mediate many functions including the recognition of targets by receptors, the binding of enzymes to substrates, and the regulation of enzymatic activity. Mimicking these structures outside of the cell requires methods that offer nanoscale control over the organization of individual network components. Advances in DNA nanotechnology have enabled the design and fabrication of sophisticated one-, two- and three-dimensional (1D, 2D and 3D) nanostructures that utilize spontaneous and sequence specific DNA hybridization. Compared to other self-assembling biopolymers, DNA nanostructures offer predictable and programmable interactions, and surface features to which other nanoparticles and bio-molecules can be precisely positioned. The ability to control the spatial arrangement of the components while constructing highly-organized networks will lead to various applications of these systems. For example, DNA nanoarrays with surface displays of molecular probes can sense noncovalent hybridization interactions with DNA, RNA, and proteins and covalent chemical reactions. DNA nanostructures can also align external molecules into well-defined arrays, which may improve the resolution of many structural determination methods, such as X-ray diffraction, cryo-EM, NMR, and super-resolution fluorescence. Moreover, by constraining target entities to specific conformations, self-assembled DNA nanostructures can serve as molecular rulers to evaluate conformation-dependent activities. This Account describes the most recent advances in the DNA nanostructure directed assembly of biomolecular networks and explores the possibility of applying this technology to other fields of study. Recently, several reports have demonstrated the DNA nanostructure directed assembly of spatially-interactive biomolecular networks. For example, researchers have constructed synthetic multi-enzyme cascades by organizing the position of the components using DNA nanoscaffolds in vitro, or by utilizing RNA matrices in vivo. These structures display enhanced efficiency compared to the corresponding unstructured enzyme mixtures. Such systems are designed to mimic cellular function, where substrate diffusion between enzymes is facilitated and reactions are catalyzed with high efficiency and specificity. In addition, researchers have assembled multiple choromophores into arrays using a DNA nanoscaffold that optimizes the relative distance between the dyes and their spatial organization. The resulting artificial light harvesting system exhibits efficient cascading energy transfers. Finally, DNA nanostructures have been used as assembly templates to construct nanodevices that execute rationally-designed behaviors, including cargo loading, transportation and route control. PMID:22642503

Fu, Jinglin; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

2013-01-01

421

BioNetwork Interactive E-Learning Tools  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The North Carolina Community College System BioNetwork's interactive eLearning tools (IETs) are reusable chunks of training that can be deployed in a variety of courses or training programs. IETs are designed to enhance, not replace hands-on training. Learners are able to enter a hands-on lab experience better prepared and more confident. The tools included here cover such topics as Aseptic Technique, Fermentation, pH Meter Calibration, and Sterile Gowning Procedures. The items here require that users have or download Unity Web Player.

2012-01-12

422

Percolation on interacting networks with feedback-dependency links  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When real networks are considered, coupled networks with connectivity and feedback-dependency links are not rare but more general. Here, we develop a mathematical framework and study numerically and analytically the percolation of interacting networks with feedback-dependency links. For the case that all degree distributions of intra- and inter- connectivity links are Poissonian, we find that for a low density of inter-connectivity links, the system undergoes from second order to first order through hybrid phase transition as coupling strength increases. It implies that the average degree k ¯ of inter-connectivity links has a little influence on robustness of the system with a weak coupling strength, which corresponds to the second order transition, but for a strong coupling strength corresponds to the first order transition. That is to say, the system becomes robust as k ¯ increases. However, as the average degree k of each network increases, the system becomes robust for any coupling strength. In addition, we find that one can take less cost to design robust system as coupling strength decreases by analyzing minimum average degree kmin of maintaining system stability. Moreover, for high density of inter-connectivity links, we find that the hybrid phase transition region disappears, the first order region becomes larger and second order region becomes smaller. For the case of two coupled scale-free networks, the system also undergoes from second order to first order through hybrid transition as the coupling strength increases. We find that for a weak coupling strength, which corresponds to the second order transitions, feedback dependency links have no effect on robustness of system relative to no-feedback condition, but for strong coupling strength which corresponds to first order or hybrid phase transition, the system is more vulnerable under feedback condition comparing with no-feedback condition. Thus, for designing resilient system, designers should try to avoid the feedback dependency links, because the existence of feedback- dependency links makes the system extremely vulnerable and difficult to defend.

Dong, Gaogao; Du, Ruijin; Tian, Lixin; Liu, Runran

2015-01-01

423

A Human Protein Interaction Network Shows Conservation of Aging Processes between Human and Invertebrate Species  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have mapped a protein interaction network of human homologs of proteins that modify longevity in invertebrate species. This network is derived from a proteome-scale human protein interaction Core Network generated through unbiased high-throughput yeast two-hybrid searches. The longevity network is composed of 175 human homologs of proteins known to confer increased longevity through loss of function in yeast, nematode,

Russell Bell; Alan Hubbard; Rakesh Chettier; Di Chen; John P. Miller; Pankaj Kapahi; Mark Tarnopolsky; Sudhir Sahasrabuhde; Simon Melov; Robert E. Hughes

2009-01-01

424

Interactions Affected by Arginine Methylation in the Yeast Protein–Protein Interaction Network*  

PubMed Central

Protein–protein interactions can be modulated by the methylation of arginine residues. As a means of testing this, we recently described a conditional two-hybrid system, based on the bacterial adenylate cyclase (BACTH) system. Here, we have used this conditional two-hybrid system to explore the effect of arginine methylation in modulating protein–protein interactions in a subset of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine methylproteome network. Interactions between the yeast hub protein Npl3 and yeast proteins Air2, Ded1, Gbp2, Snp1, and Yra1 were first validated in the absence of methylation. The major yeast arginine methyltransferase Hmt1 was subsequently included in the conditional two-hybrid assay, initially to determine the degree of methylation that occurs. Proteins Snp1 and Yra1 were confirmed as Hmt1 substrates, with five and two novel arginine methylation sites mapped by ETD LC-MS/MS on these proteins, respectively. Proteins Ded1 and Gbp2, previously predicted but not confirmed as substrates of Hmt1, were also found to be methylated with five and seven sites mapped respectively. Air2 was found to be a novel substrate of Hmt1 with two sites mapped. Finally, we investigated the interactions of Npl3 with the five interaction partners in the presence of active Hmt1 and in the presence of Hmt1 with a G68R inactivation mutation. We found that the interaction between Npl3 and Air2, and Npl3 and Ded1, were significantly increased in the presence of active Hmt1; the interaction of Npl3 and Snp1 showed a similar degree of increase in interaction but this was not statistically significant. The interactions of Npl3 and Gbp2, along with Npl3 and Yra1, were not significantly increased or decreased by methylation. We conclude that methylarginine may be a widespread means by which the interactions of proteins are modulated. PMID:23918811

Erce, Melissa A.; Abeygunawardena, Dhanushi; Low, Jason K. K.; Hart-Smith, Gene; Wilkins, Marc R.

2013-01-01

425

ParaLearn: a massively parallel, scalable system for learning interaction networks on FPGAs  

Microsoft Academic Search

ParaLearn is a scalable, parallel FPGA-based system for learning interaction networks using Bayesian statistics. ParaLearn includes problem specific parallel\\/scalable algorithms, system software and hardware architecture to address this complex problem. Learning interaction networks from data uncovers causal relationships and allows scientists to predict and explain a system's behavior. Interaction networks have applications in many fields, though we will discuss them

Narges Bani Asadi; Christopher W. Fletcher; Greg Gibeling; John Wawrzynek; Wing H. Wong; Garry P. Nolan; Zoey Zhou

2010-01-01

426

A genetic interaction network model of a complex neurological disease.  

PubMed

Absence epilepsy (AE) is a complex, heritable disease characterized by a brief disruption of normal behavior and accompanying spike-wave discharges (SWD) on the electroencephalogram. Only a handful of genes has been definitively associated with AE in humans and rodent models. Most studies suggest that genetic interactions play a large role in the etiology and severity of AE, but mapping and understanding their architecture remains a challenge, requiring new computational approaches. Here we use combined analysis of pleiotropy and epistasis (CAPE) to detect and interpret genetic interactions in a meta-population derived from three C3H × B6J strain crosses, each of which is fixed for a different SWD-causing mutation. Although each mutation causes SWD through a different molecular mechanism, the phenotypes caused by each mutation are exacerbated on the C3H genetic background compared with B6J, suggesting common modifiers. By combining information across two phenotypic measures - SWD duration and frequency - CAPE showed a large, directed genetic network consisting of suppressive and enhancing interactions between loci on 10 chromosomes. These results illustrate the power of CAPE in identifying novel modifier loci and interactions in a complex neurological disease, toward a more comprehensive view of its underlying genetic architecture. PMID:25251056

Tyler, A L; McGarr, T C; Beyer, B J; Frankel, W N; Carter, G W

2014-11-01

427

Collective behavior of interacting locally synchronized oscillations in neuronal networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Local circuits in the cortex and hippocampus are endowed with resonant, oscillatory firing properties which underlie oscillations in various frequency ranges (e.g. gamma range) frequently observed in the local field potentials, and in electroencephalography. Synchronized oscillations are thought to play important roles in information binding in the brain. This paper addresses the collective behavior of interacting locally synchronized oscillations in realistic neural networks. A network of five neurons is proposed in order to produce locally synchronized oscillations. The neuron models are Hindmarsh-Rose type with electrical and/or chemical couplings. We construct large-scale models using networks of such units which capture the essential features of the dynamics of cells and their connectivity patterns. The profile of the spike synchronization is then investigated considering different model parameters such as strength and ratio of excitatory/inhibitory connections. We also show that transmission time-delay might enhance the spike synchrony. The influence of spike-timing-dependence-plasticity is also studies on the spike synchronization.

Jalili, Mahdi

2012-10-01

428

Protein-Protein Interaction Network and Gene Ontology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evolution of computer technologies makes it possible to access a large amount and various kinds of biological data via internet such as DNA sequences, proteomics data and information discovered about them. It is expected that the combination of various data could help researchers find further knowledge about them. Roles of a visualization system are to invoke human abilities to integrate information and to recognize certain patterns in the data. Thus, when the various kinds of data are examined and analyzed manually, an effective visualization system is an essential part. One instance of these integrated visualizations can be combination of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data and Gene Ontology (GO) which could help enhance the analysis of PPI network. We introduce a simple but comprehensive visualization system that integrates GO and PPI data where GO and PPI graphs are visualized side-by-side and supports quick reference functions between them. Furthermore, the proposed system provides several interactive visualization methods for efficiently analyzing the PPI network and GO directedacyclic- graph such as context-based browsing and common ancestors finding.

Choi, Yunkyu; Kim, Seok; Yi, Gwan-Su; Park, Jinah

429

Sequence memory based on coherent spin-interaction neural networks.  

PubMed

Sequence information processing, for instance, the sequence memory, plays an important role on many functions of brain. In the workings of the human brain, the steady-state period is alterable. However, in the existing sequence memory models using heteroassociations, the steady-state period cannot be changed in the sequence recall. In this work, a novel neural network model for sequence memory with controllable steady-state period based on coherent spininteraction is proposed. In the proposed model, neurons fire collectively in a phase-coherent manner, which lets a neuron group respond differently to different patterns and also lets different neuron groups respond differently to one pattern. The simulation results demonstrating the performance of the sequence memory are presented. By introducing a new coherent spin-interaction sequence memory model, the steady-state period can be controlled by dimension parameters and the overlap between the input pattern and the stored patterns. The sequence storage capacity is enlarged by coherent spin interaction compared with the existing sequence memory models. Furthermore, the sequence storage capacity has an exponential relationship to the dimension of the neural network. PMID:25149698

Xia, Min; Wong, W K; Wang, Zhijie

2014-12-01

430

Community structure of non-coding RNA interaction network.  

PubMed

Rapid technological advances have shown that the ratio of non-protein coding genes rises to 98.5% in humans, suggesting that current knowledge on genetic information processing might be largely incomplete. It implies that protein-coding sequences only represent a small fraction of cellular transcriptional information. Here, we examine the community structure of the network defined by functional interactions between non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and proteins related bio-macromolecules (PRMs) using a two-fold approach: modularity in bipartite network and k-clique community detection. First, the high modularity scores as well as the distribution of community sizes showing a scaling-law revealed manifestly non-random features. Second, the k-clique sub-graphs and overlaps show that the identified communities of the ncRNA molecules of H. sapiens can potentially be associated with certain functions. These findings highlight the complex modular structure of ncRNA interactions and its possible regulatory roles in the cell. PMID:23545211

Nacher, Jose C

2013-01-01

431

Prediction of chemical-protein interactions network with weighted network-based inference method.  

PubMed

Chemical-protein interaction (CPI) is the central topic of target identification and drug discovery. However, large scale determination of CPI is a big challenge for in vitro or in vivo experiments, while in silico prediction shows great advantages due to low cost and high accuracy. On the basis of our previous drug-target interaction prediction via network-based inference (NBI) method, we further developed node- and edge-weighted NBI methods for CPI prediction here. Two comprehensive CPI bipartite networks extracted from ChEMBL database were used to evaluate the methods, one containing 17,111 CPI pairs between 4,741 compounds and 97 G protein-coupled receptors, the other including 13,648 CPI pairs between 2,827 compounds and 206 kinases. The range of the area under receiver operating characteristic curves was 0.73 to 0.83 for the external validation sets, which confirmed the reliability of the prediction. The weak-interaction hypothesis in CPI network was identified by the edge-weighted NBI method. Moreover, to validate the methods, several candidate targets were predicted for five approved drugs, namely imatinib, dasatinib, sertindole, olanzapine and ziprasidone. The molecular hypotheses and experimental evidence for these predictions were further provided. These results confirmed that our methods have potential values in understanding molecular basis of drug polypharmacology and would be helpful for drug repositioning. PMID:22815915

Cheng, Feixiong; Zhou, Yadi; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun

2012-01-01

432

Transcription factor modularity in a gene-centered C. elegans core neuronal protein-DNA interaction network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transcription regulatory networks play a pivotal role in the development, function, and pathology of metazoan organisms. Such networks are comprised of protein-DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their target genes. An important question pertains to how the architecture of such networks relates to network functionality. Here, we show that a Caenorhabditis elegans core neuronal protein-DNA interaction network is organized

Vanessa Vermeirssen; M. Inmaculada Barrasa; César A. Hidalgo; J. A. B. Babon; R. Sequerra; L. Doucette-Stamm; A.-L. Barabasi; A. J. M. Walhout

2007-01-01

433

Novel recurrent neural network for modelling biological networks: oscillatory p53 interaction dynamics.  

PubMed

Understanding the control of cellular networks consisting of gene and protein interactions and their emergent properties is a central activity of Systems Biology research. For this, continuous, discrete, hybrid, and stochastic methods have been proposed. Currently, the most common approach to modelling accurate temporal dynamics of networks is ordinary differential equations (ODE). However, critical limitations of ODE models are difficulty in kinetic parameter estimation and numerical solution of a large number of equations, making them more suited to smaller systems. In this article, we introduce a novel recurrent artificial neural network (RNN) that addresses above limitations and produces a continuous model that easily estimates parameters from data, can handle a large number of molecular interactions and quantifies temporal dynamics and emergent systems properties. This RNN is based on a system of ODEs representing molecular interactions in a signalling network. Each neuron represents concentration change of one molecule represented by an ODE. Weights of the RNN correspond to kinetic parameters in the system and can be adjusted incrementally during network training. The method is applied to the p53-Mdm2 oscillation system - a crucial component of the DNA damage response pathways activated by a damage signal. Simulation results indicate that the proposed RNN can successfully represent the behaviour of the p53-Mdm2 oscillation system and solve the parameter estimation problem with high accuracy. Furthermore, we presented a modified form of the RNN that estimates parameters and captures systems dynamics from sparse data collected over relatively large time steps. We also investigate the robustness of the p53-Mdm2 system using the trained RNN under various levels of parameter perturbation to gain a greater understanding of the control of the p53-Mdm2 system. Its outcomes on robustness are consistent with the current biological knowledge of this system. As more quantitative data become available on individual proteins, the RNN would be able to refine parameter estimation and mapping of temporal dynamics of individual signalling molecules as well as signalling networks as a system. Moreover, RNN can be used to modularise large signalling networks. PMID:24012741

Ling, Hong; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

2013-12-01

434

Modeling attacker-defender interactions in information networks.  

SciTech Connect

The simplest conceptual model of cybersecurity implicitly views attackers and defenders as acting in isolation from one another: an attacker seeks to penetrate or disrupt a system that has been protected to a given level, while a defender attempts to thwart particular attacks. Such a model also views all non-malicious parties as having the same goal of preventing all attacks. But in fact, attackers and defenders are interacting parts of the same system, and different defenders have their own individual interests: defenders may be willing to accept some risk of successful attack if the cost of defense is too high. We have used game theory to develop models of how non-cooperative but non-malicious players in a network interact when there is a substantial cost associated with effective defensive measures. Although game theory has been applied in this area before, we have introduced some novel aspects of player behavior in our work, including: (1) A model of how players attempt to avoid the costs of defense and force others to assume these costs; (2) A model of how players interact when the cost of defending one node can be shared by other nodes; and (3) A model of the incentives for a defender to choose less expensive, but less effective, defensive actions.

Collins, Michael Joseph

2010-09-01

435

Identification of Global Ferredoxin Interaction Networks in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*  

PubMed Central

Ferredoxins (FDXs) can distribute electrons originating from photosynthetic water oxidation, fermentation, and other reductant-generating pathways to specific redox enzymes in different organisms. The six FDXs identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not fully characterized in terms of their biological function. In this report, we present data from the following: (a) yeast two-hybrid screens, identifying interaction partners for each Chlamydomonas FDX; (b) pairwise yeast two-hybrid assays measuring FDX interactions with proteins from selected biochemical pathways; (c) affinity pulldown assays that, in some cases, confirm and even expand the interaction network for FDX1 and FDX2; and (d) in vitro NADP+ reduction and H2 photo-production assays mediated by each FDX that verify their role in these two pathways. Our results demonstrate new potential roles for FDX1 in redox metabolism and carbohydrate and fatty acid biosynthesis, for FDX2 in anaerobic metabolism, and possibly in state transition. Our data also suggest that FDX3 is involved in nitrogen assimilation, FDX4 in glycolysis and response to reactive oxygen species, and FDX5 in hydrogenase maturation. Finally, we provide experimental evidence that FDX1 serves as the primary electron donor to two important biological pathways, NADPH and H2 photo-production, whereas FDX2 is capable of driving these reactions at less than half the rate observed for FDX1. PMID:24100040

Peden, Erin A.; Boehm, Marko; Mulder, David W.; Davis, ReAnna; Old, William M.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Dubini, Alexandra

2013-01-01

436

Functional features and protein network of human sperm-egg interaction.  

PubMed

Elucidation of the sperm-egg interaction at the molecular level is one of the unresolved problems in sexual reproduction, and understanding the molecular mechanism is crucial in solving problems in infertility and failed in vitro fertilization (IVF). Many molecular interactions in the form of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the sperm-egg membrane interaction. Due to the complexity of the problem such as difficulties in analyzing in vivo membrane PPIs, many efforts have failed to comprehensively elucidate the fusion mechanism and the molecular interactions that mediate sperm-egg membrane fusion. The main purpose of this study was to reveal possible protein interactions and associated molecular function during sperm-egg interaction using a protein interaction network approach. Different databases have been used to construct the human sperm-egg interaction network. The constructed network revealed new interactions. These included CD151 and CD9 in human oocyte that interact with CD49 in sperm, and CD49 and ITGA4 in sperm that interact with CD63 and CD81, respectively, in the oocyte. These results showed that the different integrins in sperm may be involved in human sperm-egg interaction. It was also suggested that sperm ADAM2 plays a role as a protein candidate involved in sperm-egg membrane interaction by interacting with CD9 in the oocyte. Interleukin-4 receptor activity, receptor signaling protein tyrosine kinase activity, and manganese ion transmembrane transport activity are the major molecular functions in sperm-egg interaction protein network. The disease association analysis indicated that sperm-egg interaction defects are also reflected in other disease networks such as cardiovascular, hematological, and breast cancer diseases. By analyzing the network, we identified the major molecular functions and disease association genes in sperm-egg interaction protein. Further experimental studies will be required to confirm the significance of these new computationally resolved interactions and the genetic links between sperm-egg interaction abnormalities and the associated disease. PMID:25222562

Sabetian, Soudabeh; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Abu Naser, Mohammed

2014-12-01

437

Issues of Interaction in Pure-Online English Learning Environment through Perspectives of Cognitive Constructivism and Social Constructivism: A Case Study for Non-formal Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Most previous studies on the use of Internet technology and computers for second language learning have been conducted in\\u000a blended learning environments. Although much research has been undertaken into interactions in online learning, little work\\u000a has focused on online English learning, let alone the pure-online (ie non-blended) English learning environment with no face-to-face\\u000a element. This paper investigates the English-language learning

Yanhui Han

2010-01-01

438

The large-scale organization of the bacterial network of ecological co-occurrence interactions  

E-print Network

not live in isolation but rather form a complex system of inter-species interactions. These interactions of species sharing limited resources, interactions can be described in terms of `competitionThe large-scale organization of the bacterial network of ecological co-occurrence interactions

Shamir, Ron

439

The Social Fabric of Elementary Schools: A Network Typology of Social Interaction among Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While researchers are currently studying various forms of social network interaction among teachers for their impact on educational policy implementation and practice, knowledge on how various types of networks are interrelated is limited. The goal of this study is to understand the dimensionality that may underlie various types of social networks

Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.; Karsten, Sjoerd; Daly, Alan J.

2012-01-01

440

The Missing Part of Seed Dispersal Networks: Structure and Robustness of Bat-Fruit Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mutualistic networks are crucial to the maintenance of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, what we know about seed dispersal networks is based only on bird-fruit interactions. Therefore, we aimed at filling part of this gap by investigating bat-fruit networks. It is known from population studies that: (i) some bat species depend more on fruits than others, and (ii) that some specialized frugivorous

Marco Aurelio Ribeiro Mello; Flávia Maria Darcie Marquitti; Paulo Roberto Guimarães; Elisabeth Klara Viktoria Kalko; Pedro Jordano; Marcus Aloizio Martinez de Aguiar; Anna Traveset

2011-01-01

441

one that refers to anything that has autonomous behaviors. Agents in the network interact, adapt and  

E-print Network

agents. This approach allows the application of agent-based modeling along with social network formation, and relationships change over time. Dynamic social network technology is based on agent-based modelingone that refers to anything that has autonomous behaviors. Agents in the network interact, adapt

Kemner, Ken

442

Specialization of mutualistic interaction networks decreases toward tropical latitudes.  

PubMed

Species-rich tropical communities are expected to be more specialized than their temperate counterparts. Several studies have reported increasing biotic specialization toward the tropics, whereas others have not found latitudinal trends once accounting for sampling bias or differences in plant diversity. Thus, the direction of the latitudinal specialization gradient remains contentious. With an unprecedented global data set, we investigated how biotic specialization between plants and animal pollinators or seed dispersers is associated with latitude, past and contemporary climate, and plant diversity. We show that in contrast to expectation, biotic specialization of mutualistic networks is significantly lower at tropical than at temperate latitudes. Specialization was more closely related to contemporary climate than to past climate stability, suggesting that current conditions have a stronger effect on biotic specialization than historical community stability. Biotic specialization decreased with increasing local and regional plant diversity. This suggests that high specialization of mutualistic interactions is a response of pollinators and seed dispersers to low plant diversity. This could explain why the latitudinal specialization gradient is reversed relative to the latitudinal diversity gradient. Low mutualistic network specialization in the tropics suggests higher tolerance against extinctions in tropical than in temperate communities. PMID:22981771

Schleuning, Matthias; Fründ, Jochen; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Alarcón, Ruben; Albrecht, Matthias; Andersson, Georg K S; Bazarian, Simone; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Bommarco, Riccardo; Dalsgaard, Bo; Dehling, D Matthias; Gotlieb, Ariella; Hagen, Melanie; Hickler, Thomas; Holzschuh, Andrea; Kaiser-Bunbury, Christopher N; Kreft, Holger; Morris, Rebecca J; Sandel, Brody; Sutherland, William J; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Tscharntke, Teja; Watts, Stella; Weiner, Christiane N; Werner, Michael; Williams, Neal M; Winqvist, Camilla; Dormann, Carsten F; Blüthgen, Nico

2012-10-23

443

Ensemble transcript interaction networks: a case study on Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Systems biology techniques are a topic of recent interest within the neurological field. Computational intelligence (CI) addresses this holistic perspective by means of consensus or ensemble techniques ultimately capable of uncovering new and relevant findings. In this paper, we propose the application of a CI approach based on ensemble Bayesian network classifiers and multivariate feature subset selection to induce probabilistic dependences that could match or unveil biological relationships. The research focuses on the analysis of high-throughput Alzheimer's disease (AD) transcript profiling. The analysis is conducted from two perspectives. First, we compare the expression profiles of hippocampus subregion entorhinal cortex (EC) samples of AD patients and controls. Second, we use the ensemble approach to study four types of samples: EC and dentate gyrus (DG) samples from both patients and controls. Results disclose transcript interaction networks with remarkable structures and genes not directly related to AD by previous studies. The ensemble is able to identify a variety of transcripts that play key roles in other neurological pathologies. Classical statistical assessment by means of non-parametric tests confirms the relevance of the majority of the transcripts. The ensemble approach pinpoints key metabolic mechanisms that could lead to new findings in the pathogenesis and development of AD. PMID:22281045

Armañanzas, Rubén; Larrañaga, Pedro; Bielza, Concha

2012-10-01

444

Quantifying randomness in protein-protein interaction networks of different species: A random matrix approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyze protein-protein interaction networks for six different species under the framework of random matrix theory. Nearest neighbor spacing distribution of the eigenvalues of adjacency matrices of the largest connected part of these networks emulate universal Gaussian orthogonal statistics of random matrix theory. We demonstrate that spectral rigidity, which quantifies long range correlations in eigenvalues, for all protein-protein interaction networks follow random matrix prediction up to certain ranges indicating randomness in interactions. After this range, deviation from the universality evinces underlying structural features in network.

Agrawal, Ankit; Sarkar, Camellia; Dwivedi, Sanjiv K.; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Jalan, Sarika

2014-06-01

445

Collaborating in Social Networks: The Problem Solving Activity Leading to Interaction - 'Struggle' Analysis Framework (SAF)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the effect of problem solving activity during computer- supported collaborative problem solving in digital social networks and introduces the 'Struggle Analysis Framework (SAF)', for analyzing interactions in these networks; interactions will be called 'struggle'. A study of collaborative modeling has been contacted in the frame of an authentic educational activity among students in a secondary school and

Tzanavaris Spyros

446

Community-Based Network Study of Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions in Plant Lectins Using Glycan  

E-print Network

Community-Based Network Study of Protein- Carbohydrate Interactions in Plant Lectins Using Glycan lectins and their interacting carbohydrates by using community-based analysis of a lectin-carbohydrate functional groups. Citation: Malik A, Lee J, Lee J (2014) Community-Based Network Study of Protein-Carbohydrate

Lee, Jooyoung

447

Molecular Interactions in Poly(methacrylic acid)/Poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) Interpenetrating Polymer Networks  

E-print Network

Molecular Interactions in Poly(methacrylic acid)/Poly(N- isopropyl acrylamide) Interpenetrating interactions between the component networks in poly- (methacrylic acid)/poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PMAA networks; hydrogels; hydrogen bonding; poly- (methacrylic acid); poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) INTRODUCTION

Peppas, Nicholas A.

448

A Protein Interaction Network Links GIT1, an Enhancer of Huntingtin Aggregation, to Huntington's Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is a valuable approach for characterizing proteins of unknown function. Here, we have developed a strategy combining library and matrix yeast two-hybrid screens to generate a highly connected PPI network for Huntington's disease (HD). The network contains 186 PPIs among 35 bait and 51 prey proteins. It revealed 165 new potential interactions, 32 of which

Heike Goehler; Maciej Lalowski; Ulrich Stelzl; Stephanie Waelter; Martin Stroedicke; Uwe Worm; Anja Droege; Katrin S. Lindenberg; Maria Knoblich; Christian Haenig; Martin Herbst; Jaana Suopanki; Eberhard Scherzinger; Claudia Abraham; Bianca Bauer; Renate Hasenbank; Anja Fritzsche; Andreas H. Ludewig; Konrad Buessow; Sarah H. Coleman; Claire-Anne Gutekunst; Bernhard G. Landwehrmeyer; Hans Lehrach; Erich E. Wanker

2004-01-01

449

Domain Bridging Interactions in the Allosteric Network for IIAGlc Inhibition of the Escherichia coli Glycerol Kinase  

E-print Network

DOMAIN BRIDGING INTERACTIONS IN THE ALLOSTERIC NETWORK FOR IIAGLC INHIBITION OF THE ESCHERICHIA COLI GLYCEROL KINASE A Thesis by EDITH ABENA ACQUAYE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Biochemistry Domain Bridging Interactions in the Allosteric Network for IIAGlc Inhibition...

Acquaye, Edith Abena

2011-10-21

450

Comprehensive curation and analysis of global interaction networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The study of complex biological networks and prediction of gene function has been enabled by high-throughput (HTP) methods for detection of genetic and protein interactions. Sparse coverage in HTP datasets may, however, distort network properties and confound predictions. Although a vast number of well substantiated interactions are recorded in the scientific literature, these data have not yet been

Teresa Reguly; Ashton Breitkreutz; Lorrie Boucher; Bobby-Joe Breitkreutz; Gary C Hon; Chad L Myers; Ainslie Parsons; Helena Friesen; Rose Oughtred; Amy Tong; Chris Stark; Yuen Ho; David Botstein; Brenda Andrews; Charles Boone; Olga G Troyanskya; Trey Ideker; Kara Dolinski; Nizar N Batada; Mike Tyers

2006-01-01

451

Molecular structures and ? ? interactions of some flavonoids and biflavonoids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The molecular structures of two flavones, wogonin ( 1) and mikanin ( 2), and two biflavonoids, cupressuflavone ( 3) and neochamaejasmin A ( 4), were determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The intermolecular ?-? interactions in 1- 4 and the flavanones alpinetin ( 5) and naringenin ( 6) were investigated. Compounds 1- 4 feature offset face-to-face intermolecular ?-? interactions with centroid-centroid distances ranging from 3.70 to 3.81 Å and displacement angles ranging from 2.7 to 9.9°.

Jiang, Ren-Wang; Ye, Wen-Cai; Woo, Ka-Yan; Du, Jiang; Che, Chun-Tao; But, Paul Pui-Hay; Mak, Thomas C. W.

2002-12-01

452

The synchronization within and interaction between the default and dorsal attention networks in early infancy.  

PubMed

An anticorrelated interaction between the dorsal attention and the default-mode networks has been observed, although how these 2 networks establish such relationship remains elusive. Behavioral studies have reported the emergence of attention and default network-related functions and a preliminary competing relationship between them at early infancy. This study attempted to test the hypothesis--resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging will demonstrate not only improved network synchronization of the dorsal attention and the default networks, respectively, during the first 2 years of life but also an anticorrelated network interaction pattern between the 2 networks at 1 year which will be further enhanced at 2 years old. Our results demonstrate that both networks start from an isolated region in neonates but evolve to highly synchronized networks at 1 year old. Paralleling the individual network maturation process, the anticorrelated behaviors are absent at birth but become apparent at 1 year and are further enhanced during the second year of life. Our studies elucidate not only the individual maturation process of the dorsal attention and default networks but also offer evidence that the maturation of the individual networks may be needed prior exhibiting the adult-like interaction patterns between the 2 networks. PMID:22368080

Gao, Wei; Gilmore, John H; Shen, Dinggang; Smith, Jeffery Keith; Zhu, Hongtu; Lin, Weili

2013-03-01

453

Connecting research discovery with care delivery in dementia: the development of the Indianapolis Discovery Network for Dementia  

PubMed Central

Background The US Institute of Medicine has recommended an integrated, locally sensitive collaboration among the various members of the community, health care systems, and research organizations to improve dementia care and dementia research. Methods Using complex adaptive system theory and reflective adaptive process, we developed a professional network called the “Indianapolis Discovery Network for Dementia” (IDND). The IDND facilitates effective and sustainable interactions among a local and diverse group of dementia researchers, clinical providers, and community advocates interested in improving care for dementia patients in Indianapolis, Indiana. Results The IDND was established in February 2006 and now includes more than 250 members from more than 30 local (central Indiana) organizations representing 20 disciplines. The network uses two types of communication to connect its members. The first is a 2-hour face-to-face bimonthly meeting open to all members. The second is a web-based resource center (http://www.indydiscoverynetwork.org ). To date, the network has: (1) accomplished the development of a network website with an annual average of 12,711 hits per day; (2) produced clinical tools such as the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor and the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden Scale; (3) translated and implemented the collaborative dementia care model into two local health care systems; (4) created web-based tracking software, the Enhanced Medical Record for Aging Brain Care (eMR-ABC), to support care coordination for patients with dementia; (5) received more than USD$24 million in funding for members for dementia-related research studies; and (6) adopted a new group-based problem-solving process called the “IDND consultancy round.” Conclusion A local interdisciplinary “think-tank” network focused on dementia that promotes collaboration in research projects, educational initiatives, and quality improvement efforts that meet the local research, clinical, and community needs relevant to dementia care has been built. PMID:23204843

Boustani, Malaz A; Frame, Amie; Munger, Stephanie; Healey, Patrick; Westlund, Jessie; Farlow, Martin; Hake, Ann; Austrom, Mary Guerriero; Shepard, Polly; Bubp, Corby; Azar, Jose; Nazir, Arif; Adams, Nadia; Campbell, Noll L; Chehresa, Azita; Dexter, Paul

2012-01-01

454

2nd Workshop on Design for Social Interaction through Physical Play  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We aim to stimulate social interaction by designing and creating interactive objects for physical play for diverse user groups, such as children, elderly or people with special needs. With this workshop we aim to bring researchers and practitioners together to share and explore issues and opportunities for technology-enhanced physical play for stimulating face-to-face social interaction (as opposed to virtual interaction through a computer). The focus of this workshop is on sharing theories that are valuable for the design and research of products and applications in this field.

Bekker, Tilde; Sturm, Janienke; Barakova, Emilia

455

Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

2014-05-01

456

Modeling Dark Energy Through AN Ising Fluid with Network Interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show that the dark energy (DE) effects can be modeled by using an Ising perfect fluid with network interactions, whose low redshift equation of state (EoS), i.e. ?0, becomes ?0 = -1 as in the ?CDM model. In our picture, DE is characterized by a barotropic fluid on a lattice in the equilibrium configuration. Thus, mimicking the spin interaction by replacing the spin variable with an occupational number, the pressure naturally becomes negative. We find that the corresponding EoS mimics the effects of a variable DE term, whose limiting case reduces to the cosmological constant ?. This permits us to avoid the introduction of a vacuum energy as DE source by hand, alleviating the coincidence and fine tuning problems. We find fairly good cosmological constraints, by performing three tests with supernovae Ia (SNeIa), baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. Finally, we perform the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) selection criteria, showing that our model is statistically favored with respect to the Chevallier-Polarsky-Linder (CPL) parametrization.

Luongo, Orlando; Tommasini, Damiano

2014-12-01

457

Project LINK: ``A Live and Interactive Network of Knowledge"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Project LINK (A Live and Interactive Network of Knowledge), a collaboration among Eureka Scientific, Inc., the Exploratorium, and NASA/Ames Research Center will demonstrate video-conferencing capabilities from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) to the San Francisco Exploratorium in the context of science education outreach to K--12 teachers and students. The project is intended to pilot-test strategies for facilitating the live interface between scientists aboard the KAO and K-12 teachers and students through the resources and technical expertise available at science museums and private industry. The interface will be based on Internet/CuSeeMe videoconferencing capabilities which will allow teachers and students at the Exploratorium to collaborate in a live and interactive manner with teachers and scientists aboard the KAO. The teacher teams chosen for the on-board experiments represent rural and urban school districts in California. The teachers will interface with colleagues as part of the NASA-Funded Project FOSTER (Flight Opportunities for Science Teacher EnRichment). Our project will serve to demonstrate live interface capabilities in preparation for the ``Live from the Stratosphere" Project. Teachers from Project LINK will participate on two flights aboard the KAO during the Summer of 1995. Lesson plans, classroom activities, project description and lessons learned will be disseminated through the World Wide Web. Project LINK is made possible by a grant from NASA to Eureka Scientific, Inc.

Hawkins, I.; Welsh, B.

1995-05-01

458

Neural networks for enhanced human-computer interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of neural networks to create adaptive models of users and communications channels for use in designing system response characteristics is discussed. Two types of neural networks that will be useful for this type of task are considered. One, the Kohonen learning vector quantization (LVQ) network, is a clustering network. It can adjust the vector element values of a

Alianna J. Maren

1991-01-01

459

An Overview of the Statistical Methods Used for Inferring Gene Regulatory Networks and Protein-Protein Interaction Networks  

PubMed Central

The large influx of data from high-throughput genomic and proteomic technologies has encouraged the researchers to seek approaches for understanding the structure of gene regulatory networks and proteomic networks. This work reviews some of the most important statistical methods used for modeling of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. The paper focuses on the recent advances in the statistical graphical modeling techniques, state-space representation models, and information theoretic methods that were proposed for inferring the topology of GRNs. It appears that the problem of inferring the structure of PPI networks is quite different from that of GRNs. Clustering and probabilistic graphical modeling techniques are of prime importance in the statistical inference of PPI networks, and some of the recent approaches using these techniques are also reviewed in this paper. Performance evaluation criteria for the approaches used for modeling GRNs and PPI networks are also discussed. PMID:23509452

Noor, Amina; Serpedin, Erchin; Nounou, Mohamed; Nounou, Hazem; Mohamed, Nady; Chouchane, Lotfi

2013-01-01

460

Cross-species cluster co-conservation: a new method for generating protein interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Co-conservation (phylogenetic profiles) is a well-established method for predicting functional relationships between proteins. Several publicly available databases use this method and additional clustering strategies to develop networks of protein interactions (cluster co-conservation (CCC)). CCC has previously been limited to interactions within a single target species. We have extended CCC to develop protein interaction networks based on co-conservation between protein pairs across multiple species, cross-species cluster co-conservation. PMID:17803817

Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Detweiler, Corrella S; Erickson, Kimberly D; Hunter, Lawrence; Gill, Ryan T

2007-01-01

461

Protein Complex Discovery by Interaction Filtering from Protein Interaction Networks Using Mutual Rank Coexpression and Sequence Similarity  

PubMed Central

The evaluation of the biological networks is considered the essential key to understanding the complex biological systems. Meanwhile, the graph clustering algorithms are mostly used in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. The complexes introduced by the clustering algorithms include noise proteins. The error rate of the noise proteins in the PPI network researches is about 40–90%. However, only 30–40% of the existing interactions in the PPI databases depend on the specific biological function. It is essential to eliminate the noise proteins and the interactions from the complexes created via clustering methods. We have introduced new methods of weighting interactions in protein clusters and the splicing of noise interactions and proteins-based interactions on their weights. The coexpression and the sequence similarity of each pair of proteins are considered the edge weight of the proteins in the network. The results showed that the edge filtering based on the amount of coexpression acts similar to the node filtering via graph-based characteristics. Regarding the removal of the noise edges, the edge filtering has a significant advantage over the graph-based method. The edge filtering based on the amount of sequence similarity has the ability to remove the noise proteins and the noise interactions. PMID:25692131

Kazemi-Pour, Ali; Goliaei, Bahram; Pezeshk, Hamid

2015-01-01

462

Interspecies protein-protein interaction network construction for characterization of host-pathogen interactions: a Candida albicans-zebrafish interaction study  

PubMed Central

Background Despite clinical research and development in the last decades, infectious diseases remain a top global problem in public health today, being responsible for millions of morbidities and mortalities each year. Therefore, many studies have sought to investigate host-pathogen interactions from various viewpoints in attempts to understand pathogenic and defensive mechanisms, which could help control pathogenic infections. However, most of these efforts have focused predominately on the host or the pathogen individually rather than on a simultaneous analysis of both interaction partners. Results In this study, with the help of simultaneously quantified time-course Candida albicans-zebrafish interaction transcriptomics and other omics data, a computational framework was developed to construct the interspecies protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for C. albicans-zebrafish interactions based on the inference of ortholog-based PPIs and the dynamic modeling of regulatory responses. The identified C. albicans-zebrafish interspecies PPI network highlights the association between C. albicans pathogenesis and the zebrafish redox process, indicating that redox status is critical in the battle between the host and pathogen. Conclusions Advancing from the single-species network construction method, the interspecies network construction approach allows further characterization and elucidation of the host-pathogen interactions. With continued accumulation of interspecies transcriptomics data, the proposed method could be used to explore progressive network rewiring over time, which could benefit the development of network medicine for infectious diseases. PMID:23947337

2013-01-01

463

Interaction modification effects on ecological networks are affected by ratio dependence and network topology.  

PubMed

Interaction modification (IM), where one species modifies the strength of the density-mediated direct interaction between two other species, is an important ecological process, but little is known about the collective effect of multiple IM on overall community dynamics. We use stochastic bioenergetic modelling of ecological networks with different network topologies, functional responses and parameter values, to investigate the effects of IM connectance and IM strength on ecosystem properties including the evenness of species abundances and variability of system biomass. We found that the maximum system biomass that could potentially be attained by the model systems increased with IM connectance and strength when the models had nonrandom topology and prey-dependent functional responses as opposed to random topology and ratio-dependent responses. The maximum potential species evenness increased with IM strength but decreased with increasing IM connectance, when all modifications were negative. These findings underscore the importance of accounting for multiple IM across the community for understanding complex community dynamics. PMID:25167789

Lin, Yangchen; Sutherland, William J

2014-12-21

464

Deciphering microbial interactions and detecting keystone species with co-occurrence networks  

PubMed Central

Co-occurrence networks produced from microbial survey sequencing data are frequently used to identify interactions between community members. While this approach has potential to reveal ecological processes, it has been insufficiently validated due to the technical limitations inherent in studying complex microbial ecosystems. Here, we simulate multi-species microbial communities with known interaction patterns using generalized Lotka-Volterra dynamics. We then construct co-occurrence networks and evaluate how well networks reveal the underlying interactions and how experimental and ecological parameters can affect network inference and interpretation. We find that co-occurrence networks can recapitulate interaction networks under certain conditions, but that they lose interpretability when the effects of habitat filtering become significant. We demonstrate that networks suffer from local hot spots of spurious correlation in the neighborhood of hub species that engage in many interactions. We also identify topological features associated with keystone species in co-occurrence networks. This study provides a substantiated framework to guide environmental microbiologists in the construction and interpretation of co-occurrence networks from microbial survey datasets. PMID:24904535

Berry, David; Widder, Stefanie

2014-01-01

465

Construction of a Large Extracellular Protein Interaction Network and Its Resolution by Spatiotemporal Expression Profiling*  

PubMed Central

Extracellular interactions involving both secreted and membrane-tethered receptor proteins are essential to initiate signaling pathways that orchestrate cellular behaviors within biological systems. Because of the biochemical properties of these proteins and their interactions, identifying novel extracellular interactions remains experimentally challenging. To address this, we have recently developed an assay, AVEXIS (avidity-based extracellular interaction screen) to detect low affinity extracellular interactions on a large scale and have begun to construct interaction networks between zebrafish receptors belonging to the immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat protein families to identify novel signaling pathways important for early development. Here, we expanded our zebrafish protein library to include other domain families and many more secreted proteins and performed our largest screen to date totaling 16,544 potential unique interactions. We report 111 interactions of which 96 are novel and include the first documented extracellular ligands for 15 proteins. By including 77 interactions from previous screens, we assembled an expanded network of 188 extracellular interactions between 92 proteins and used it to show that secreted proteins have twice as many interaction partners as membrane-tethered receptors and that the connectivity of the extracellular network behaves as a power law. To try to understand the functional role of these interactions, we determined new expression patterns for 164 genes within our clone library by using whole embryo in situ hybridization at five key stages of zebrafish embryonic development. These expression data were integrated with the binding network to reveal where each interaction was likely to function within the embryo and were used to resolve the static interaction network into dynamic tissue- and stage-specific subnetworks within the developing zebrafish embryo. All these data were organized into a freely accessible on-line database called ARNIE (AVEXIS Receptor Network with Integrated Expression; www.sanger.ac.uk/arnie) and provide a valuable resource of new extracellular signaling interactions for developmental biology. PMID:20802085

Martin, Stephen; Söllner, Christian; Charoensawan, Varodom; Adryan, Boris; Thisse, Bernard; Thisse, Christine; Teichmann, Sarah; Wright, Gavin J.

2010-01-01

466

A study of protein structure using amino acid interaction networks 1 A study of protein structure using amino acid  

E-print Network

A study of protein structure using amino acid interaction networks 1 X A study of protein structure using amino acid interaction networks Omar Gaci and Stefan Balev University of Le Havre France 1 of interacting amino acids. We believe that understanding these networks can help to better understand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

467

UniHI 7: an enhanced database for retrieval and interactive analysis of human molecular interaction networks  

PubMed Central

Unified Human Interactome (UniHI) (http://www.unihi.org) is a database for retrieval, analysis and visualization of human molecular interaction networks. Its primary aim is to provide a comprehensive and easy-to-use platform for network-based investigations to a wide community of researchers in biology and medicine. Here, we describe a major update (version 7) of the database previously featured in NAR Database Issue. UniHI 7 currently includes almost 350 000 molecular interactions between genes, proteins and drugs, as well as numerous other types of data such as gene expression and functional annotation. Multiple options for interactive filtering and highlighting of proteins can be employed to obtain more reliable and specific network structures. Expression and other genomic data can be uploaded by the user to examine local network structures. Additional built-in tools enable ready identification of known drug targets, as well as of biological processes, phenotypes and pathways enriched with network proteins. A distinctive feature of UniHI 7 is its user-friendly interface designed to be utilized in an intuitive manner, enabling researchers less acquainted with network analysis to perform state-of-the-art network-based investigations. PMID:24214987

Kalathur, Ravi Kiran Reddy; Pinto, José Pedro; Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A.; Machado, Rui S.R.; Almeida, Dulce; Chaurasia, Gautam; Futschik, Matthias E.

2014-01-01

468

Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism  

PubMed Central

Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases. PMID:24722188

Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A.; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A.; Roth, Frederick P.; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E.; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.

2014-01-01

469

Limitation of degree information for analyzing the interaction evolution in online social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previously many studies on online social networks simply analyze the static topology in which the friend relationship once established, then the links and nodes will not disappear, but this kind of static topology may not accurately reflect temporal interactions on online social services. In this study, we define four types of users and interactions in the interaction (dynamic) network. We found that active, disappeared, new and super nodes (users) have obviously different strength distribution properties and this result also can be revealed by the degree characteristics of the unweighted interaction and friendship (static) networks. However, the active, disappeared, new and super links (interactions) only can be reflected by the strength distribution in the weighted interaction network. This result indicates the limitation of the static topology data on analyzing social network evolutions. In addition, our study uncovers the approximately stable statistics for the dynamic social network in which there are a large variation for users and interaction intensity. Our findings not only verify the correctness of our definitions, but also helped to study the customer churn and evaluate the commercial value of valuable customers in online social networks.

Shang, Ke-Ke; Yan, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Xiao-Ke

2014-04-01

470

Significant conservation of synthetic lethal genetic interaction networks between distantly related eukaryotes  

PubMed Central

Synthetic lethal genetic interaction networks define genes that work together to control essential functions and have been studied extensively in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis technique (ScSGA). The extent to which synthetic lethal or other genetic interaction networks are conserved between species remains uncertain. To address this question, we compared literature-curated and experimentally derived genetic interaction networks for two distantly related yeasts, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. cerevisiae. We find that 23% of interactions in a novel, high-quality S. pombe literature-curated network are conserved in the existing S. cerevisiae network. Next, we developed a method, called S. pombe SGA analysis (SpSGA), enabling rapid, high-throughput isolation of genetic interactions in this species. Direct comparison by SpSGA and ScSGA of ?220 genes involved in DNA replication, the DNA damage response, chromatin remodeling, intracellular transport, and other processes revealed that ?29% of genetic interactions are common to both species, with the remainder exhibiting unique, species-specific patterns of genetic connectivity. We define a conserved yeast network (CYN) composed of 106 genes and 144 interactions and suggest that this network may help understand the shared biology of diverse eukaryotic species. PMID:18931302

Dixon, Scott J.; Fedyshyn, Yaroslav; Koh, Judice L. Y.; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Chahwan, Charly; Chua, Gordon; Toufighi, Kiana; Baryshnikova, Anastasija; Hayles, Jacqueline; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Myers, Chad L.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Durocher, Daniel; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles

2008-01-01

471

Node Degree Distribution in Amino Acid Interaction Networks Le Havre University  

E-print Network

Node Degree Distribution in Amino Acid Interaction Networks Omar GACI Le Havre University LITIS is a graph whose vertices are the protein's amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them of interactions between the protein's amino acids which form chemical bonds. In this paper we identify some

Boyer, Edmond

472

Virtual Identification of Essential Proteins Within the Protein Interaction Network of Yeast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Topological analysis of large scale protein-protein interaction networks (PINs) is important for understanding the organisational and functional principles of individual proteins. The number of interactions that a protein has in a PIN has been observed to be correlated with its indispensability. Essential proteins generally have more interactions than the non-essential ones. We show here that the lethality associated with removal

Ernesto Estrada; Edificio CACTUS

2005-01-01

473

Energy Mobility Network : system design, interfaces, and future interactions  

E-print Network

The Energy Mobility Network is a mobile, networked energy production, consumption and sharing system that is designed to motivate users to be more aware of their energy consumption. In particular, the system provides a ...

Cheung, Natalie Wen Yua

2011-01-01

474

Network Evolution YeastProteinInteractionNetworkfromhttp://www.visualcomplexity.com  

E-print Network

of intermediary metabolism PNAS 2000 97:7704-7708 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citric_acid_cycle #12;Network Model of Indels Haussler, Borodovsky, Churchill Hidden Markov Models Labi-Campbell #12;Network

Goldschmidt, Christina

475