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Sample records for facet joint syndrome

  1. CT-Guided Transfacet Pedicle Screw Fixation in Facet Joint Syndrome: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Manfré, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Axial microinstability secondary to disc degeneration and consequent chronic facet joint syndrome (CFJS) is a well-known pathological entity, usually responsible for low back pain (LBP). Although posterior lumbar fixation (PIF) has been widely used for lumbar spine instability and LBP, complications related to wrong screw introduction, perineural scars and extensive muscle dissection leading to muscle dysfunction have been described. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of facet joints zygapophyseal nerves conventionally used for pain treatment fails in approximately 21% of patients. We investigated a “covert-surgery” minimal invasive technique to treat local spinal instability and LBP, using a novel fully CT-guided approach in patients with axial instability complicated by CFJS resistant to radioablation, by introducing direct fully or partially threaded transfacet screws (transfacet fixation - TFF), to acquire solid arthrodesis, reducing instability and LBP. The CT-guided procedure was well tolerated by all patients in simple analogue sedation, and mean operative time was approximately 45 minutes. All eight patients treated underwent clinical and CT study follow-up at two months, revealing LBP disappearance in six patients, and a significant reduction of lumbar pain in two. In conclusion, CT-guided TFF is a fast and safe technique when facet posterior fixation is needed. PMID:25363265

  2. Types of subtalar joint facets.

    PubMed

    Jung, Min-Ho; Choi, Byoung Young; Lee, Ji Yong; Han, Chang Sung; Lee, Jin Suk; Yang, Young Chul; Cho, Byung Pil

    2015-08-01

    Articular facets of the clinical subtalar joint (CSTJ) were analyzed using a total of 118 (right 57, left 61) dry, paired calcanei and tali from 68 Korean adult cadavers. The CSTJ facets were classified into the following three types depending on their continuity: type A, all three facets are separated; type B, the anterior and middle facets are partially connected; and type C, the anterior and middle facets are fused to form a single facet. The continuity between the anterior and middle facets was represented by the degree of separation (DS), which ranged between 2.00 (type A) and 1.00 (type C). Type A was most common (39.0 %) in calcanei and rarest (11.0 %) in tali. Matching of calcaneus-talus pairs yielded five combined types: A-A (11.0 %), A-B (28.0 %), B-B (18.6 %), B-C (13.6 %), and C-C (28.8 %). The mean DS was slightly greater in calcanei (1.53) than in tali (1.32), and decreased in the order of types A-A, A-B, B-B, B-C, and C-C. The intersecting angles between the anterior and middle facets, which are related to the mobility of the CSTJ, were inversely related to the DS. These findings indicate that the anterior and middle facets are fused more frequently in tali than in calcanei, and combinations of different CSTJ facet types (A-B, B-C) exist over 40 % of feet. Our results indicate that types with a smaller DS (such as B-C and C-C) are relatively mobile but less stable compared to those with a greater DS (such as A-A and A-B). PMID:25822134

  3. Cervical facet joint kinematics during bilateral facet dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Panjabi, Manohar M.; Simpson, Andrew K.; Pearson, Adam M.; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Yue, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Previous biomechanical models of cervical bilateral facet dislocation (BFD) are limited to quasi-static loading or manual ligament transection. The goal of the present study was to determine the facet joint kinematics during high-speed BFD. Dislocation was simulated using ten cervical functional spinal units with muscle force replication by frontal impact of the lower vertebra, tilted posteriorly by 42.5°. Average peak rotations and anterior sliding (displacement of upper articulating facet surface along the lower), separation and compression (displacement of upper facet away from and towards the lower), and lateral shear were determined at the anterior and posterior edges of the right and left facets and statistically compared (P < 0.05). First, peak facet separation occurred, and was significantly greater at the left posterior facet edge, as compared to the anterior edges. Next, peak flexion rotation and anterior facet sliding occurred, followed by peak facet compression. The highest average facet translation peaks were 22.0 mm for anterior sliding, 7.9 mm for separation, 9.9 mm for compression and 3.6 mm for lateral shear. The highest average rotation of 63° occurred in flexion, significantly greater than all other directions. These events occurred, on average, within 0.29 s following impact. During BFD, the main sagittal motions included facet separation, flexion rotation, anterior sliding, followed by compression, however, non-sagittal motions also existed. These motions indicated that unilateral dislocation may precede bilateral dislocation. PMID:17566792

  4. Facet joint laser radiation: tissue effects of a new clinical laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmann, Klaus; Thal, Dietmar R.

    1996-01-01

    Chronic unilateral and bilateral back pain with pseudoradicular symptoms, is a common clinical syndrome, which in many cases can be related to the facet joint syndrome. The pain is caused by mechanical affection of synovial and capsular nerve terminals. Therefore, current therapeutical attempts including physical therapy, intra-articular injection of local anesthetics and steroids and thermocoagulation of the facet joint with a thermocoagulator, are performed. We confirmed laser coagulation of the facet joint. Porcine cadaveric spines were treated immediately after death by intra-articular facet joint laser radiation. With the pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) altogether 600 J were applied in three different places 4 mm apart at the top of the facet joint. The results showed that facet joint laser radiation leads to a small (about 1 - 2 mm diameter) lesion restricted to the facet joint cavity and its synovia. Histologically, we found a central carbonization zone and necrosis, including almost the whole cartilage and approximately 0.2 mm of the adjacent bone. These changes are similar to Nd:Yag-laser applications in other skeletal regions. It is suggested that these changes may lead to facet joint denervation by coagulation of the synovial nerve terminals. Cicatration of the laser lesion might cause ankylosis of this joint. In sum, facet joint laser radiation could be an alternative therapeutical tool for lower back pain of the facet joint syndrome type. Therefore, future clinical application of this technique seems to be very promising.

  5. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  6. Three-dimensional evaluation of the facet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folio, Les R.

    1990-04-01

    Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging nave revolurionalized analysis of vertebral anatomy and pathology. Further advances with 3-dimensional imaging have recently become an important adjunct for diagnosis and treatment in structural abnormalities. Facets are intimately related to their surrounding musculature and malalignment may cause pain directly or indirectly. High resolution 3-dimensional reformations of CT Scans give us new insight on structure and function of facet joints, since their motion and architecture are ever complex. It is well documented in the literature that facet joint biomecnanics is a partial contributor to the myriad at causes of low back The term "facet Joint syndrome" was coined in 1933 by GhorMley.3 The osteopathic lesion complex is well defined by LeRoy and McCole and comparison of roentgenographic findings before and after manipulation has teen described by Long and Lioyd.4,5 since alterations in facet biamechanics are an important aspect of osteopathic manipulative therapy (OT), 3-dimensional hign resolution imaging will prove to be a great asset in osteopathic research. Rotating the spine allows for different viewing perspectives to provide optimal and consistent measurements of the facet joint. Rotations are performed on the X, Y and 7, axis and measurements pre and post-manipulation are performed and compared on matching axis and perspectives. Rotation about the X, Y and Z axis help appreciate the 3-dimensionality of the vertebral column to project to the viewer a feeling that the spine is floating in space before them. This does give the viewer a 3-D understanding of the object however, only at a perspective at a Lime.

  7. 12. Pain originating from the lumbar facet joints.

    PubMed

    van Kleef, Maarten; Vanelderen, Pascal; Cohen, Steven P; Lataster, Arno; Van Zundert, Jan; Mekhail, Nagy

    2010-01-01

    Although the existence of a "facet syndrome" had long been questioned, it is now generally accepted as a clinical entity. Depending on the diagnostic criteria, the zygapophysial joints account for between 5% and 15% of cases of chronic, axial low back pain. Most commonly, facetogenic pain is the result of repetitive stress and/or cumulative low-level trauma, leading to inflammation and stretching of the joint capsule. The most frequent complaint is axial low back pain with referred pain perceived in the flank, hip, and thigh. No physical examination findings are pathognomonic for diagnosis. The strongest indicator for lumbar facet pain is pain reduction after anesthetic blocks of the rami mediales (medial branches) of the rami dorsales that innervate the facet joints. Because false-positive and, possibly, false-negative results may occur, results must be interpreted carefully. In patients with injection-confirmed zygapophysial joint pain, procedural interventions can be undertaken in the context of a multidisciplinary, multimodal treatment regimen that includes pharmacotherapy, physical therapy and regular exercise, and, if indicated, psychotherapy. Currently, the "gold standard" for treating facetogenic pain is radiofrequency treatment (1 B+). The evidence supporting intra-articular corticosteroids is limited; hence, this should be reserved for those individuals who do not respond to radiofrequency treatment (2 B±). PMID:20667027

  8. Cervical zygapophysial (facet) joint pain: effectiveness of interventional management strategies.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Kaye, Alan D; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic facet joint nerve blocks have been utilized in the diagnosis of cervical facet joint pain in patients without disk herniation or radicular pain due to a lack of reliable noninvasive diagnostic measures. Therapeutic interventions include intra-articular injections, facet joint nerve blocks and radiofrequency neurotomy. The diagnostic accuracy and effectiveness of facet joint interventions have been assessed in multiple diagnostic accuracy studies, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and systematic reviews in managing chronic neck pain. This assessment shows there is Level II evidence based on a total of 11 controlled diagnostic accuracy studies for diagnosing cervical facet joint pain in patients without disk herniation or radicular pain utilizing controlled diagnostic blocks. Due to significant variability and internal inconsistency regarding prevalence in a heterogenous population; despite 11 studies, evidence is determined as Level II. Prevalence ranged from 36% to 67% with at least 80% pain relief as the criterion standard with a false-positive rate ranging from 27% to 63%. The evidence is Level II for the long-term effectiveness of radiofrequency neurotomy and facet joint nerve blocks in managing cervical facet joint pain. There is Level III evidence for cervical intra-articular injections. PMID:26653406

  9. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed. PMID:26721580

  10. Lumbar Facet Joint Motion in Patients with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qi; Wang, Shaobai; Shin, Jae-Hyuk; Li, Guoan; Wood, Kirkham B.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Objective To investigate the in vivo biomechanical effect of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) on the motion of the facet joint during various functional weight-bearing activities. Summary of Background Data Although the morphological changes of the facet joints in patients with DLS have been reported in a few studies, no data has been reported on the kinematics of these facet joints. Methods Ten patients with DLS at L4–L5 were studied. Each patient underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to obtain three-dimensional (3D) models of the lumbar vertebrae from L2–L5 as well as a dual fluoroscopic imaging scan in different postures: flexion-extension, left-right bending and left-right torsion. The positions of the vertebrae were reproduced by matching the MRI-based vertebral models to the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the facet joint and the ranges of motion (ROMs) were compared with those of healthy subjects and those of patients with degenerative disc diseases (DDD) previously published. Results In DLS patients, the range of rotation of the facet joints was significantly less at the DLS level (L4–L5) than that at the adjacent levels (L2–L3 and L3–L4), while the range of translation was similar at all levels. The range of rotation at the facet joints of the DLS level decreased compared to those of both the DDD patients and healthy subjects at the corresponding vertebral level (L4–L5), while no significant difference was found in the range of translation. The ROM of facet joints in DLS and in DDD patients was similar at the adjacent levels (L2–L3 and L3–L4). Conclusion The range of rotation decreased at the facet joints at the DLS level (L4–L5) in patients compared to those in healthy subjects and DDD patients. This decrease in range of rotation implies that the DLS disease may cause restabilization of the joint. The data may help the selection of conservative treatment or different

  11. Epiduroscopic Removal of a Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Bae, Jun Yeol; In, Chi Bum; Choi, Eun Joo; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2015-01-01

    Facet joint synovial cysts are usually associated with osteoarthritis of the adjacent facet joint and/or spondylolisthesis. In between the conservative and operative ends of the treatment spectrum lie minimally invasive techniques such as cyst rupture using epiduroscopy. In this report, we describe an 82-year-old male patient presenting with low back pain radiating to his lower left extremity and associated paresthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed a synovial cyst at left L4/5 facet joint. Using epiduroscopy, the cyst was mechanically ruptured by popping it with the tip of the scope. The patient remained symptom-free at his successive visits until 12 months after the procedure, and was opened for desired follow up. PMID:26495082

  12. Augmented reality needle guidance improves facet joint injection training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungi, Tamas; Yeo, Caitlin T.; U-Thainual, Paweena; McGraw, Robert C.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-03-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if medical trainees would benefit from augmented reality image overlay and laser guidance in learning how to set the correct orientation of a needle for percutaneous facet joint injection. METHODS: A total of 28 medical students were randomized into two groups: (1) The Overlay group received a training session of four insertions with image and laser guidance followed by two insertions with laser overlay only; (2) The Control group was trained by carrying out six freehand insertions. After the training session, needle trajectories of two facet joint injections without any guidance were recorded by an electromagnetic tracker and were analyzed. Number of successful needle placements, distance covered by needle tip inside the phantom and procedural time were measured to evaluate performance. RESULTS: Number of successful placements was significantly higher in the Overlay group compared to the Control group (85.7% vs. 57.1%, p = 0.038). Procedure time and distance covered inside phantom have both been found to be less in the Overlay group, although not significantly. CONCLUSION: Training with augmented reality image overlay and laser guidance improves the accuracy of facet joint injections in medical students learning image-guided facet joint needle placement.

  13. Lumbar facet injection for the treatment of chronic piriformis myofascial pain syndrome: 52 case studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jen-Ting; Chen, Han-Yu; Hong, Chang-Zern; Lin, Ming-Ta; Chou, Li-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Shui; Tsai, Chien-Tsung; Chang, Wen-Dien

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of lumbar facet joint injection for piriformis myofascial pain syndrome. Methods Fifty-two patients with chronic myofascial pain in the piriformis muscle each received a lumbar facet injection into the ipsilateral L5–S1 facet joint region, using the multiple insertion technique. Subjective pain intensity, trunk extension range, and lumbar facet signs were measured before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after injection. Thirty-six patients received follow-up for 6 months. Results Immediately after the injection, 27 patients (51.9%) had complete pain subsidence, 19 patients (36.5%) had pain reduction to a tolerable level, and only 6 patients (11.5%) had no pain relief to a tolerable level. Mean pain intensity was reduced from 7.4±0.9 to 1.6±2.1 after injection (P<0.01). This effectiveness lasted for 2 weeks in 49 patients (94.2%), and lasted for approximately 6 months in 35 (97.2%) of 36 patients. The mean range of motion increased from 13.4±6.8 degrees to 22.1±6.0 degrees immediately after injection, and further increased 2 weeks and 6 months later. Immediately after injection, 45 patients (86.5%) had no facet sign. In addition, 90.4% and 94.4% of patients had no facet sign after 2 weeks and after 6 months, respectively. Conclusions It is important to identify the possible cause of piriformis myofascial pain syndrome. If this pain is related to lumbar facet lesions, lumbar facet joint injection can immediately suppress piriformis myofascial pain symptoms. This effectiveness may last for at least 6 months in most patients. This study further supports the importance of eliminating the underlying etiological lesion for complete and effective relief of myofascial pain syndrome. PMID:25170256

  14. Joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fikree, Asma; Aziz, Qasim; Grahame, Rodney

    2013-05-01

    Although perceived as a rare condition, joint hypermobility syndrome is common. Its prevalence in rheumatology clinics is extremely high. Early estimates suggest that it may be the most common of all rheumatologic conditions. The problem lies in the general lack of awareness of the syndrome, its means of recognition, and the resultant failure to diagnose it correctly when present. It is a worldwide problem. This article provides an overview of hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome, stressing its multisystemic nature and the negative impact that it may have on quality of life, with particular reference to gastrointestinal involvement. PMID:23597972

  15. Joint hypermobility syndrome pain.

    PubMed

    Grahame, Rodney

    2009-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defined as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now perceived as a commonly overlooked, underdiagnosed, multifaceted, and multisystemic heritable disorder of connective tissue (HDCT), which shares many of the phenotypic features of other HDCTs such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Whereas the additional flexibility can confer benefits in terms of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences that resonate far beyond the confines of the musculoskeletal system. There is hardly a clinical specialty to be found that is not touched in one way or another by JHS. Over the past decade, it has become evident that of all the complications that may arise in JHS, chronic pain is arguably the most menacing and difficult to treat. PMID:19889283

  16. Factors affecting results of fluoroscopy-guided facet joint injection: Probable differences in the outcome of treatment between pure facet joint hypertrophy and concomitant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Akif; Ozkul, Baris; Balioglu, Mehmet Bulent; Atici, Yunus; Gultekin, Muhammet Zeki; Albayrak, Merih Dilan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective cohort study. Purpose: Facet joints are considered a common source of chronic low-back pain. To determine whether pathogens related to the facet joint arthritis have any effect on treatment failure. Materials and Methods: Facet joint injection was applied to 94 patients treated at our hospital between 2011 and 2012 (mean age 59.5 years; 80 women and 14 men). For the purpose of analysis, the patients were divided into two groups. Patients who only had facet hypertrophy were placed in group A (47 patients, 41 women and 6 men, mean age 55.3 years) and patients who had any additional major pathology to facet hypertrophy were placed in group B (47 patients, 39 women and 8 men, mean age 58.9 years). Injections were applied around the facet joint under surgical conditions utilizing fluoroscopy device guidance. A mixture of methylprednisolone and lidocaine was used as the injection ingredient. Results: In terms of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores, no significant difference was found between preinjection and immediate postinjection values in both groups, and the scores of group A patients were significantly lower (P < 0.005) compared with that of group B patients at the end of the third, sixth, and twelfth month. Conclusion: For low-back pain caused by facet hypertrophy, steroid injection around the facet joint is an effective treatment, but if there is an existing major pathology, it is not as effective. PMID:27041884

  17. Association between facet joint osteoarthritis and the Oswestry Disability Index

    PubMed Central

    Maataoui, Adel; Vogl, Thomas J; Middendorp, Marcus; Kafchitsas, Konstantinos; Khan, M Fawad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation of facet joint osteoarthritis (FJOA) at lumbar levels L4/L5 and L5/S1 and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). METHODS: The study involved lumbar MRIs of 591 patients with a mean age of 47.3 years. The MRIs of the lumbar spine were performed on a 1.5 Tesla scanner (Magnetom® Avanto, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) using a dedicated receive only spine coil. After initial blinding, each dataset was evaluated by 2 board certified radiologist with more than 5 years experience in musculoskeletal imaging. In total 2364 facet joints were graded. Degenerative changes of the facet joints were evaluated according to the 4-point scale as proposed by Weishaupt et al Functional status was assessed using the ODI. The index is scored from 0 to 100 and interpreted as follows: 0%-20%, minimal disability; 20%-40%, moderate disability; 40%-60%, severe disability; 60%-80%, crippled; 80%-100%, patients are bedbound. Spearman’s coefficient of rank correlation was used for statistical analysis, with significance set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: In total 2364 facet joints at lumbar levels L4/5 and L5/S1 were analysed in 591 individuals. FJOA was present in 97% (L4/L5) and 98% (L5/S1). At level L4/5 (left/right) 17/15 (2.9%/2.5%) were described as grade 0, 146/147 (24.7%/24.9%) as grade 1, 290/302 (49.1%/51.1%) as grade 2 and 138/127 (23.4%/21.5%) as grade 3. At level L5/S1 (left/right) 10/11 (1.7%/1.9%) were described as grade 0, 136/136 (23.0%/23.0%) as grade 1, 318/325 (53.8%/55.0%) as grade 2 and 127/119 (21.5%/20.1%) as grade 3. Regarding the ODI scores, patients’ disability had a minimum of 0% and a maximum of 91.11% with an arithmetic mean of 32.77% ± 17.02%. The majority of patients (48.39%) had moderate functional disability (21%-40%). There was no significant correlation between FJOA and ODI on both sides of lumbar level L4/5 and on the left side of lumbar level L5/S1. A weak positive correlation was evaluated between ODI and FJOA on the right

  18. Morphometric Study of Clavicular Facet of Coracoclavicular Joint in Adult Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Anita; Vasudeva, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anthropologists have used Coracoclavicular Joint (CCJ), a non-metric anatomical variant in population, as a marker for population migration from prehistoric times to present. Aim The aim of this osteological study was to determine the incidence and morphometry of articular facet of CCJ on conoid tubercle of clavicle in Indian population, as Indian studies are scanty and incomplete. Materials and Methods The study was done on 144 adult human clavicles (76 right and 68 left; 93 males and 51 females) collected from osteology museum in Department of Anatomy, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India. The presence of articular facet on the conoid tubercle was determined and Maximum Antero-Posterior (MAPD) and maximum transverse diameter (MTD) was measured by digital vernier calliper. The incidence was compared on the basis of sex, side and with other osteological studies in the world. Statistical analysis was done using the Chi-Square test for nominal categorical data and student’s t-test for normally distributed continuous variables in Microsoft Excel 2007 to assess the relationship between the examined variables. Results Articular facet on conoid tubercle was found in 8 cases (5.6%). Seven (9.2%) were present on the right side and one (1.5%) on the left side. Seven cases (7.5%) were present in males and one case (2%) was found in females. The facets were generally oval, with MAPD and MTD of 12.28 and 17.17 mm respectively. A significant side variation was present with right sided facet being more common. The left sided facet was more transversely elongated than right. In males, the facets were more elongated antero-posteriorly than in females. Conclusion The Indian population showed an incidence of 5.6%, which was comparable to other ethnic groups in world population. The morphometric and side differences could be attributed to the occupational factors and range of movements associated with the CCJ. The CCJ should be borne in mind as a differential

  19. Subdural empyema following lumbar facet joint injection: An exceeding rare complication.

    PubMed

    Fayeye, Oluwafikayo; Silva, Adikarige Haritha Dulanka; Chavda, Swarupsinh; Furtado, Navin Raoul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is extremely common with a life time prevalence estimated at greater than 70% [1]. Facet joint arthrosis is thought to be the causative aetiological substrate in approximately 25% of chronic low back pain cases [2]. Facet joint injection is a routine intervention in the armamentarium for both the diagnostic and therapeutic management of chronic low back pain. In fact, a study by Carrino et al. reported in excess of 94,000 facet joint injection procedures were carried out in the US in 1999 [3]. Although generally considered safe, the procedure is not entirely without risk. Complications including bleeding, infection, exacerbation of pain, dural puncture headache, and pneumothorax have been described. We report a rare case of a 47-year-old female patient who developed a left L4/5 facet septic arthrosis with an associated subdural empyema and meningitis following facet joint injection. This case is unique, as to the best of our knowledge no other case of subdural empyema following facet joint injection has been reported in the literature. Furthermore this case serves to highlight the potential serious adverse sequelae of a routine and apparently innocuous intervention. The need for medical practitioners to be alert to and respond rapidly to the infective complications of facet joint injection cannot be understated. PMID:27154449

  20. In Vivo Measurement of the Subchondral Bone Thickness of Lumbar Facet Joint Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Duan, C. Y.; Espinoza Orías, A. A.; Shott, S.; An, H. S.; Andersson, G.B.J.; Hu, J.Z.; Lu, H. B.; Inoue, N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To measure in vivo thicknesses of the facet joint subchondral bone across genders, age groups, with or without low back pain symptom groups and spinal levels. Methods Lumbar (L1–L2 to L5-S1) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 81 subjects (41 males and 40 females, mean age 37.6 years). Thicknesses of the subchondral bone were measured in 1,620 facet joints using the MR images with custom-written image processing algorithms together with a multi-threshold segmentation technique using each facet joint’s middle axial-slice. This method was validated with 12 cadaver facet joints, scanned with both MR and micro-computed tomography images. Results An overall average thickness value for the 1,620 analyzed joints was measured as 1.56 ± 0.01 mm. The subchondral bone thickness values showed significant increases with successive lower spinal levels in the subjects without low back pain. The facet joint subchondral bone thickness in asymptomatic females was much smaller than in asymptomatic males. Mean subchondral bone thickness in the superior facet was greater than that in the inferior facet in both female and male asymptomatic subjects. Conclusions This study is the first to quantitatively show subchondral bone thickness using a validated MR-based technique. The subchondral bone thickness was greater in asymptomatic males and increased with each successive lower spinal level. These findings may suggest that the subchondral bone thickness increases with loading. Furthermore, the superior facet subchondral bone was thicker than the inferior facet in all cases regardless of gender, age or spinal level in the subjects without low back pain. More research is needed to link subchondral bone microstructure to facet joint kinematics and spinal loads. PMID:21034837

  1. Encapsulated Ruffini-like endings in human lumbar facet joints

    PubMed Central

    VANDENABEELE, F.; CREEMERS, J.; LAMBRICHTS, I.; LIPPENS, P.; JANS, M.

    1997-01-01

    The innervation of the human lumbar facet joint capsule was studied by light and electron microscopy. Small numbers of encapsulated corpuscular endings were identified in the dense fibrous layer. Clusters of 2 types of endings were found: small cylindrical corpuscles (type 1) and large fusiform corpuscles (type 2). The corpuscles were classified structurally as Ruffini-type endings. The 1st type was predominant and characterised by a compartmentalised receptor complex, a thin perineurial capsule and a narrow subcapsular space. The 2nd type was characterised by a thicker perineurial capsule, a ‘spindle-like’ receptive complex, and an extensive subcapsular space with capillaries and concentrically oriented fibroblast-like cells. Both types of endings were innervated mainly by thinly myelinated group III (A delta) and unmyelinated group IV (C) nerve fibres that branched and terminated in the receptor complex. Their sensory endings were intimately related to the collagen fibre bundles as multiple enlarged axonal segments (‘beads’) with ultrastructural features which were characteristic of receptive sites: an accumulation of mitochondria and vesicles, and ‘bare’ areas of axolemma lacking a Schwann cell investment but covered by a thin basal lamina. Some beads in the 2nd type of ending contained granular vesicles, 30–60 mm in diameter, resembling sympathetic nerve endings. Small diameter collagen fibrils situated within multilayered basal laminae were found among the multiple receptive sites in the receptive complex in both types of ending. Their possible functional significance in mechanoreception is discussed. Particular attention has been given to their apparent variable orientation to the mechanoreceptive site. PMID:9449076

  2. Load Rate of Facet Joints at the Adjacent Segment Increased After Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Pei, Bao-Qing; Yang, Jin-Cai; Hai, Yong; Li, De-Yu; Wu, Shu-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cause of the adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after fusion remains unknown. It is reported that adjacent facet joint stresses increase after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. This increase of stress rate may lead to tissue injury. Thus far, the load rate of the adjacent segment facet joint after fusion remains unclear. Methods: Six C2–C7 cadaveric spine specimens were loaded under four motion modes: Flexion, extension, rotation, and lateral bending, with a pure moment using a 6° robot arm combined with an optical motion analysis system. The Tecscan pressure test system was used for testing facet joint pressure. Results: The contact mode of the facet joints and distributions of the force center during different motions were recorded. The adjacent segment facet joint forces increased faster after fusion, compared with intact conditions. While the magnitude of pressures increased, there was no difference in distribution modes before and after fusion. No pressures were detected during flexion. The average growth velocity during extension was the fastest and was significantly faster than lateral bending. Conclusions: One of the reasons for cartilage injury was the increasing stress rate of loading. This implies that ASD after fusion may be related to habitual movement before and after fusion. More and faster extension is disadvantageous for the facet joints and should be reduced as much as possible. PMID:25881597

  3. Material Properties of the Human Lumbar Facet Joint Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Little, Jesse S.; Khalsa, Partap S.

    2005-01-01

    The human facet joint capsule is one of the structures in the lumbar spine that constrains motions of vertebrae during global spine loading (e.g., physiological flexion). Computational models of the spine have not been able to include accurate nonlinear and viscoelastic material properties, as they have not previously been measured. Capsules were tested using a uniaxial ramp-hold protocol or a haversine displacement protocol using a commercially available materials testing device. Plane strain was measured optically. Capsules were tested both parallel and perpendicular to the dominant orientation of the collagen fibers in the capsules. Viscoelastic material properties were determined. Parallel to the dominant orientation of the collagen fibers, the complex modulus of elasticity was E* = 1.63MPa, with a storage modulus of E′ = 1.25MPa and a loss modulus of: E″ = 0.39MPa. The mean stress relaxation rates for static and dynamic loading were best fit with first-order polynomials: B (ɛ) = 0.1110 ɛ − 0.0733 and B (ɛ) = −0.1249ɛ 11794-8181 +0.0190, respectively. Perpendicular to the collagen fiber orientation, the viscous and elastic secant moduli were 1.81 and 1.00 MPa, respectively. The mean stress relaxation rate for static loading was best fit with a first-order polynomial: B (ɛ) = − 0.04ɛ − 0.06. Capsule strength parallel and perpendicular to collagen fiber orientation was 1.90 and 0.95 MPa, respectively, and extensibility was 0.65 and 0.60, respectively. Poisson’s ratio parallel and perpendicular to fiber orientation was 0.299 and 0.488, respectively. The elasticity moduli were nonlinear and anisotropic, and capsule strength was larger aligned parallel to the collagen fibers. The phase lag between stress and strain increased with haversine frequency, but the storage modulus remained large relative to the complex modulus. The stress relaxation rate was strain dependent parallel to the collagen fibers, but was strain independent perpendicularly

  4. Comparison of facet joint activity on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT with facet joint signal change on MRI with fat suppression

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Vance T.; Murphy, Robert C.; Schenck, Louis A.; Carter, Rickey E.; Johnson, Geoffrey B.; Kotsenas, Amy L.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Nathan, Mark A.; Wald, John T.; Maus, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We compared signal change on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with fat suppression and bone scan activity of lumbar facet joints to determine if these two imaging findings are correlated. METHODS We retrospectively identified all patients who underwent imaging of the lumbar spine for pain evaluation using both technetium-99m methylene disphosphonate single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT) and MRI with at least one fat-suppressed T2- or T1-weighted sequence with gadolinium enhancement within a 180-day interval, at our institution between 1 January 2008 and 19 February 2013. Facet joint activity on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and peri-facet signal change on MRI were rated as normal or increased. Agreement between the two examination types were determined with the κ and prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted κ (PABAK) statistics. RESULTS This study included 60 patients (28 male, 47%), with a mean age of 49±19.7 years (range, 12–93 years). The κ value indicated no agreement between 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and MRI (κ=−0.026; 95% confidence interval: −0.051, 0.000). The PABAK values were fair to high at each spinal level, which suggests that relatively low disease prevalence lowered the κ values. Together, the κ and PABAK values indicate that there is some degree of intermodality agreement, but that it is not consistent. CONCLUSION Overall, facet joint signal change on fat-suppressed MRI did not always correlate with increased 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT activity. MRI and 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT for facet joint evaluation should not be considered interchangeable examinations in clinical practice or research. PMID:27035592

  5. The Effects of Lumbar Facet Dowels on Joint Stiffness: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Trahan, Jayme; Morales, Eric; Richter, Erich O.; Tender, Gabriel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Facet joint arthrosis may play a significant role in low back pain generation. The placement of facet dowels is a percutaneous treatment that aims to fuse the facets and increase joint stiffness. In this cadaveric study, we evaluated spine stiffness after facet dowel insertion in combination with several surgical procedures and determined which motions promote dowel migration. Methods Six fresh frozen lumbar spines were tested in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Spine stiffness was determined for the intact specimens, after L4 laminectomy, and after bilateral L4-L5 facet dowel placement, respectively. One specimen underwent a unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) construct and another underwent extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) graft (22 mm) placement, followed by placement of facet dowels. Afterwards, the specimens were subjected to 10,000 cycles of fatigue testing in flexion-extension or axial rotation. Results The overall decrease in stiffness after laminectomy was 4.6%. Facet dowel placement increased overall stiffness by 7.2%. The greatest increase was seen with axial rotation (13%), compared to flexion, extension, and lateral bending (9.5%, 2.3%, and 5.6%, respectively). The TLIF and XLIF plus dowel construct increased specimen stiffness to 266% and 163% of baseline, respectively. After fatigue testing, dowel migration was detected by computed tomography in the 2 uninstrumented specimens undergoing axial rotation cycling. Conclusion Facet dowels increase the stiffness of the motion segment to which they are applied and can be used in conjunction with laminectomy procedures to increase the stiffness of the joint. However, dowel migration can occur after axial rotation movements. Hybrid TLIF or XLIF plus facet dowel constructs have significantly higher stiffness than noninstrumented ones and may prevent dowel migration. PMID:24688332

  6. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints.

    PubMed

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  7. A rare case of cervical facet joint and synovial cyst at C5/C6.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are uncommon, and particularly rare at cervical levels. We report a 40-year-old woman who presented with pain distribution in the typical C6 dermatome. MRI revealed a right-sided large extradural cystic lesion adjacent to the C5/C6 facet joint that was hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI and hypointense on T1-weighted MRI. The patient underwent posterior cervical surgery at the C5/C6 level which involved posterior decompressive unilateral laminotomy and excision of the C5/C6 facet joint cyst. Following complete facetectomy of the right C5/C6 facet joint and exposure of the C6 nerve throughout its foraminal course, instrumented fusion was performed. Following the procedure, the patient had an uneventful recovery with relief of her radicular symptoms at follow-up clinical review. PMID:26916905

  8. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints

    PubMed Central

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  9. Prevalence of facet joint pain in chronic spinal pain of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Boswell, Mark V; Singh, Vijay; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Damron, Kim S; Beyer, Carla D

    2004-01-01

    Background Facet joints are a clinically important source of chronic cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the prevalence of facet joint pain by spinal region in patients with chronic spine pain referred to an interventional pain management practice. Methods Five hundred consecutive patients with chronic, non-specific spine pain were evaluated. The prevalence of facet joint pain was determined using controlled comparative local anesthetic blocks (1% lidocaine or 1% lidocaine followed by 0.25% bupivacaine), in accordance with the criteria established by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The study was performed in the United States in a non-university based ambulatory interventional pain management setting. Results The prevalence of facet joint pain in patients with chronic cervical spine pain was 55% 5(95% CI, 49% – 61%), with thoracic spine pain was 42% (95% CI, 30% – 53%), and in with lumbar spine pain was 31% (95% CI, 27% – 36%). The false-positive rate with single blocks with lidocaine was 63% (95% CI, 54% – 72%) in the cervical spine, 55% (95% CI, 39% – 78%) in the thoracic spine, and 27% (95% CI, 22% – 32%) in the lumbar spine. Conclusion This study demonstrated that in an interventional pain management setting, facet joints are clinically important spinal pain generators in a significant proportion of patients with chronic spinal pain. Because these patients typically have failed conservative management, including physical therapy, chiropractic treatment and analgesics, they may benefit from specific interventions designed to manage facet joint pain. PMID:15169547

  10. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    PubMed

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. PMID:25922335

  11. Establishment of a rat model of adjuvant-induced osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Zhu, Jialiang; Song, Keran; Hou, Shuxun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chunli; Tang, Jiaguang

    2014-12-01

    To study the establishment of adjuvant-induced osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint in a rat model. Complete Freund's adjuvant (experimental group) and saline (control group) were randomly injected into the right and left side of rat, respectively. The rats were killed, and degeneration of lumbar facet joint was evaluated at macroscopic level and scored based on OARSI scores system. Moreover, Interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the synovium were measured. The macroscopic scores and OARSI scores of experimental group were higher than the control group (P < 0.05). The concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α was significantly increased only on 3- and 7-day post-surgery when compared with controls, and interleukin-1β was increased on days 3,7 and 14 post-surgery (P < 0.05). The rat model of adjuvant can induce degeneration of the lumbar facet joint. It can be useful for studies on mechanisms and treatment of lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis. PMID:24973958

  12. Chronic unilateral locked facet joint with spinal cord injury in a 26-month-old child: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Luo, Peng; Xu, Hua-Zi; Chi, Yong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the successful posterior surgical reduction and fusion on a 26-month-old child with chronic unilateral locked facet joint and spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods A 26-month-old child with chronic unilateral locked facet joint and SCI treated by posterior surgical reduction and fusion. Plaster external fixation was applied and rehabilitation exercise was trained post-operatively. Results Chronic unilateral locked facet joint was reduced successfully and bone fusion of C4/5 was achieved 3 months after surgery. The function of both lower limbs was improved 1 year after surgery, aided with physical rehabilitation. Conclusion Unilateral locked facet joint in pediatric population is rare. Few clinical experiences were found in the literature. Non-surgical treatment has advantages of not being invasive and is preferred for acute patients; however, it may not be suitable for chronic unilateral locked facet joint with SCI, in which surgical intervention is needed. PMID:24673578

  13. Characterization of subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Cordula; Urech, Karin; Hügle, Thomas; Benz, Robyn Melanie; Geurts, Jeroen; Schären, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis may be a cause of low back pain in degenerative spine diseases including lumbar spinal stenosis. Subchondral bone is regarded as a potential therapeutic target for osteoarthritis treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize subchondral bone histopathology in osteoarthritic facet joints from lumbar spinal stenosis patients. Fifteen patients with degenerative spinal stenosis scheduled for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery were recruited for this study. Osteoarthritis severity was graded on T1- and T2-weighted MRI images using Weishaupt scoring system. Dissected osteoarthritic facet joints were subjected to histological and immunohistochemistry analyses to study relative abundance of osteoblast, osteoclasts, and macrophages using van Gieson's, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and CD68-antibody staining, respectively. Presence of nerve fibers was evaluated by PGP9.5-antibody staining. Differential bone histopathology, independent from radiological osteoarthritis grade, was observed in facet joints. Extensive de novo bone formation was found in subchondral bone tissues of eight of fifteen specimens. Regions of bone formation showed high abundance of blood vessels and CD68-positive macrophages, but were devoid of multinucleated osteoclasts. Additional pathological changes in subchondral marrow spaces, including inflammatory infiltration and enhanced osteoclast activity, were characterized by macrophage-rich tissues. PGP9.5-positive nerve fibers were detected near arterioles, but not in regions displaying bone pathology. Individual histopathological parameters did not associate with clinical features or radiological osteoarthritis severity. Subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis is characterized by marrow infiltration by macrophage-rich tissues and enhanced de novo bone formation. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34

  14. Navigated Pin-Point Approach to Osteoid Osteoma Adjacent to the Facet Joint of Spine

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Masashi; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Nishizawa, Kazuya; Imai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign osteoblastic tumor. Its curative treatment is complete removal of the nidus, where intraoperative localization of the nidus governs clinical results. However, treatment can be difficult since the lesion is often invisible over the bony surface. Accordingly, establishment of an ideal less invasive surgical strategy for spinal OO remains yet unsettled. We illustrate the efficacy of a computed tomography (CT)-based navigation system in excising OO located adjacent to the facet joint of spine. In our 2 cases, complete and pin-point removal of the nidus located close to the facet joint was successfully achieved, without excessive removal of the bone potentially leading to spinal instability and possible damage of nearby neurovascular structures. We advocate a less invasive approach to spinal OO, particularly in an environment with an available CT-based navigation system. PMID:26949472

  15. Osseous associated cervical spondylomyelopathy at the C2-C3 articular facet joint in 11 dogs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C; Gutierrez-Quintana, R; Penderis, J; Gonçalves, R

    2015-11-21

    In dogs, vertebral canal stenosis at C2-C3 due to articular facet joint degeneration is only sporadically identified. The authors' aims were to review the clinical presentation, MRI characteristics, treatment and outcome of dogs presenting with this condition. Eleven cases were eligible for inclusion. Neurological examination revealed tetraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia in all 4 limbs in 3/11, proprioceptive tetra-ataxia only in 4/11, pelvic limb proprioceptive ataxia in 2/11 and no gait abnormalities in 2/11 dogs. Cervical hyperaesthesia was present in 7/11 dogs. MRI revealed bilateral articular facet joint degeneration in 10/11 cases and unilateral degeneration in one. Surgery was performed in six cases and medical management elected in five. Long-term follow-up information was available for 11 animals. Four of the surgical cases are alive and have no neurological deficits, one was euthanased for an unrelated condition and one lost to follow-up. Of the cases managed medically, three are alive showing no neurological deficits, one is alive still displaying neurological deficits and one euthanased for an unrelated condition whilst still ataxic. This study shows that both medical and surgical management can result in good outcomes in dogs with vertebral canal stenosis resulting from articular facet joint degeneration at the level of C2-C3. PMID:26510824

  16. Evaluation of the stress distribution change at the adjacent facet joints after lumbar fusion surgery: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianxiong; Jia, Haobo; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Yu, Jingtao; Feng, Rui; Wang, Jie; Xing, Dan; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Shaowen; Yang, Yang; Chen, Yang; Ma, Baoyi

    2014-07-01

    Spinal fusion surgery has been widely applied in clinical treatment, and the spinal fusion rate has improved markedly. However, its postoperative complications, especially adjacent segment degeneration, have increasingly attracted the attention of spinal surgeons. The most common pathological condition at adjacent segments is hypertrophic degenerative arthritis of the facet joint. To study the stress distribution changes at the adjacent facet joint after lumbar fusion with pedicle screw fixation, human cadaver lumbar spines were used in the present study, and electrical resistance strain gauges were attached on L1-L4 articular processes parallel or perpendicular to the articular surface of facet joints. Subsequently, electrical resistance strain gauge data were measured using anYJ-33 static resistance strain indicator with three types of models: the intact model, the laminectomy model, and the fusion model with pedicle screw fixation. The strain changes in the measurement sites indirectly reflect the stress changes. Significant differences in strain were observed between the normal and laminectomy state at all facet joints. Significant differences in strain were observed between the normal and the pedicle screw fixation fusion state at the L1/2 and L3/4 facet joints. The increased stress on the facet joints after lumbar fusion with pedicle screw fixation may be the cause of adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:24963037

  17. Prediction of the human thoracic and lumbar articular facet joint morphometry from radiographic images

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Maria E; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The articular facet joints (AFJ) play an important role in the biomechanics of the spine. Although it is well known that some AFJ dimensions (e.g. facet height/width or facet angles) play a major role in spinal deformities such as scoliosis, little is known about statistical correlations between these dimensions and the size of the vertebral bodies. Such relations could allow patient-specific prediction of AFJ morphometry from a few dimensions measurable by X-ray. This would be of clinical interest and could also provide parameters for mathematical modeling of the spine. Our purpose in this study was to generate prediction equations for 20 parameters of the human thoracic and lumbar AFJ from T1 to L4 as a function of only one given parameter, the vertebral body height posterior (VBHP). Linear and nonlinear regression analyses were performed with published anatomical data, including linear and angular dimensions of the AFJ and vertebral body heights, to find the best functions to describe the correlations between these parameters. Third-order polynomial regressions, in contrast to the linear, exponential and logarithmic regressions, provided moderate to high correlations between the AFJ parameters and vertebral body heights; e.g. facet height superior and interfacet width (R2, 0.605–0.880); facet height inferior, interfacet height and sagittal/transverse angle superior (R2, 0.875–0.973). Different correlations were found for facet width and transverse angle inferior in the thoracic (R2, 0.703–0.930) and lumbar (R2, 0.457–0.892) regions. A set of 20 prediction equations for AFJ parameters was generated (P-values < 0.005, anova). Comparison of the AFJ predictions with experimental data indicated mean percent errors < 13%, with the exception of the thoracolumbar junction (T12–L1). It was possible to establish useful predictions for human thoracic and lumbar AFJ dimensions based on the size of the vertebral bodies. The generated set of equations allows the

  18. Does therapist’s attitude affect clinical outcome of lumbar facet joint injections?

    PubMed Central

    Middendorp, Marcus; Kollias, Konstantinos; Ackermann, Hanns; Splettstößer, Annina; Vogl, Thomas J; Khan, M Fawad; Maataoui, Adel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if the clinical outcome of intra-articular lumbar facet joint injections is affected by the therapist’s attitude. METHODS: A total of 40 patients with facet joint-associated chronic low back pain were randomly divided into two groups. All patients received computed tomography-guided, monosegmental intra-articular facet joint injections. Following the therapeutic procedure, the patients of the experimental group (EG) held a conversation with the radiologist in a comfortable atmosphere. During the dialog, the patients were encouraged to ask questions and were shown four images. The patients of the control group (CG) left the clinic without any further contact with the radiologist. Outcome was assessed using a pain-based Verbal Numeric Scale at baseline, at 1 wk and at 1, 3, and 6 mo after first treatment. RESULTS: The patient demographics showed no differences between the groups. The patients of the EG received 57 interventional procedures in total, while the patients of the CG received 70 interventional procedures. In both groups, the pain scores decreased significantly over the entire observation period. Compared to the CG, the EG showed a statistically significant reduction of pain at 1 wk and 1 mo post-treatment, while at 3 and 6 mo after treatment, there were no significant differences between both groups. CONCLUSION: Our results show a significant effect on pain relief during the early post-interventional period in the EG as compared to the CG. The basic principle behind the higher efficacy might be the phenomenon of hetero-suggestion. PMID:27358691

  19. Facet joint septic arthritis due to community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) - A case report.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Rajesh; Inassi, Jojo; Marthya, Anwar

    2015-10-01

    Septic arthritis of facet joint (SAFJ) is extremely rare. Only about sixty cases have been reported so far. A single case of SAFJ in a series of 491 cases of spinal infections was first reported by David-Chaussé in 1981. A case report of SAFJ was published by Halpin in 1987. With the growing availability and use of MRI, more and more cases are being reported. The most common organism that causes SAFJ is Staphylococcus aureus. We are reporting a case of SAFJ caused by community acquired, methicillin resistant S aureus (MRSA) successfully treated by Linezolid. PMID:26719620

  20. Idiopathic septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint associated with paraspinal abscess.

    PubMed

    Kitova-John, Margarita Borislavova; Azim-Araghi, Ali; Sheikh, Faraz Tariq; Kitov, Borislav Dimitrov

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of severe lower back pain on a background of 24 h of mild fever and general tiredness with an associated right-sided foot drop. Five weeks after the onset and with no improvement in symptoms in spite of analgesia and physiotherapy, the patient had a lumbar spine MRI which demonstrated a collection extending from the facet joints of L5 and L6 to the iliacus muscle on the right. A CT-guided aspiration was performed with a lengthy hospital stay for intravenous antibiotic treatment. The culture and sensitivity study of the aspirate isolated Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26272966

  1. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.; Dorsky, S.; Caruana, V.; Kaplan, I.L. )

    1989-08-01

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements.

  2. Morphological and biomechanical analyses of the subchondral mineralized zone in human sacral facet joints: Application to improved diagnosis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Mielke, Gabriela; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2015-05-01

    The anatomy of the facet joint subchondral mineralized zone (SMZ) is the main parameter used in diagnosing osteoarthritis. Usually, a single CT scan slice is used to measure the thickness, but the measurement is highly location-dependent. Bone mineral density (BMD) and porosity could be more reliable than thickness for detecting SMZ sclerosis, and linking them to stiffness can provide insights into the mechanism of osteoarthritis progression. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1) to assess spatial heterogeneity in thickness, BMD, and porosity within the non-pathological human facet joint SMZ; (2) to correlate these measurements with the static modulus of elasticity (MOEsta ). Four non-pathological facet joints were excised and imaged using micro-computed tomography (µCT) to measure SMZ thickness, BMD, and porosity. A total of eight parallelepiped SMZ samples were similarly analyzed and then mechanically tested. The mean SMZ BMD, porosity, and thickness (± Standard Deviation) of the whole facet joints were 611 ± 35 mgHA/cc, 9.8 ± 1.3%, and 1.39 ± 0.41 mm, respectively. The mean BMD, porosity, and MOEsta of the eight SMZ samples were 479 ± 23 mgHA/cc, 12 ± 0.01%, and 387 ± 138 MPa, respectively, with a positive rank correlation between BMD and porosity. BMD and porosity were more homogeneous within the facet joint than thickness and they could be more reliable parameters than thickness for detecting SMZ sclerosis. The values for the physiological SMZ and MOEsta of human facets joints obtained here were independent of BMD. SMZ BMD and porosity were related to each other. PMID:25716678

  3. THE PROSTAGLANDIN E2 RECEPTOR, EP2, IS UPREGULATED IN THE DRG AFTER PAINFUL CERVICAL FACET JOINT INJURY IN THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Kras, Jeffrey V.; Dong, Ling; Winkelstein, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design This study implemented immunohistochemistry to assay prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor EP2 expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of rats after painful cervical facet joint injury. Objective The objective of this study was to identify if inflammatory cascades are induced in association with cervical facet joint distraction-induced pain by investigating the time course of EP2 expression in the DRG. Summary of Background Data The cervical facet joint is a common source of neck pain and non-physiological stretch of the facet capsular ligament can initiate pain from the facet joint via mechanical injury. PGE2 levels are elevated in painful inflamed and arthritic joints, and PGE2 sensitizes joint afferents to mechanical stimulation. Although in vitro studies suggest the EP2 receptor subtype contributes to painful joint disease the EP2 response has not been investigated for any association with painful mechanical joint injury. Methods Separate groups of male Holtzman rats underwent either a painful cervical facet joint distraction injury or sham procedure. Bilateral forepaw mechanical allodynia was assessed, and immunohistochemical techniques were used to quantify EP2 expression in the DRG at days 1 and 7. Results Facet joint distraction induced mechanical allodynia that was significant (p<0.024) at all time points. Painful joint injury also significantly elevated total EP2 expression in the DRG at day 1 (p=0.009), which was maintained also at day 7 (p<0.001). Neuronal expression of EP2 in the DRG was only increased over sham levels at day 1 (p=0.013). Conclusions Painful cervical facet joint distraction induces an immediate and sustained increase of EP2 expression in the DRG, implicating peripheral inflammation in the initiation and maintenance of facet joint pain. The transient increase in neuronal EP2 suggests, as in other painful joint conditions, that after joint injury non-neuronal cells may migrate to the DRG, some of which likely express EP2

  4. Injection in the cervical facet joint for shoulder pain with myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chien-Tsung; Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Kao, Mu-Jung; Hong, Chang-Zern

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this double-blinded, randomized, controlled study was to confirm the effectiveness of the cervical facet joint injection in treating shoulder pain with the myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle secondary to cervical facet lesion. Eighty-nine patients with chronic unilateral shoulder pain due to myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle received an injection to the C4-5 facet joint in the experimental group and to the corresponding unilateral multifidi muscle in the control group. Subjective pain intensity and pressure pain threshold of the myofascial trigger point were assessed, and the prevalence of endplate noise in the myofascial trigger point region was measured in 28 patients before, immediately after, and 1 month after the injection. Half of the patients in the experimental group, but none of the control patients, reported being completely pain free 1 month after the injection. Both the decrease in the pain intensity and the increase in pressure pain threshold were significantly more in the experimental group than in the control group either immediately or 1 month after the injection. There was no significant difference in the change of endplate noise prevalence between the 2 groups. This study demonstrates that intra-articular or peri-articular injection into the cervical facet joint region can effectively inactivate the upper trapezius myofascial trigger point secondary to the facet lesion. PMID:19708635

  5. Explosive growth of facet joint interventions in the medicare population in the United States: a comparative evaluation of 1997, 2002, and 2006 data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services (OIG-DHHS) issued a report which showed explosive growth and also raised questions of lack of medical necessity and/or indications for facet joint injection services in 2006. The purpose of the study was to determine trends of frequency and cost of facet joint interventions in managing spinal pain. Methods This analysis was performed to determine trends of frequency and cost of facet joint Interventions in managing spinal pain, utilizing the annual 5% national sample of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for 1997, 2002, and 2006. Outcome measures included overall characteristics of Medicare beneficiaries receiving facet joint interventions, utilization of facet joint interventions by place of service, by specialty, reimbursement characteristics, and other variables. Results From 1997 to 2006, the number of patients receiving facet joint interventions per 100,000 Medicare population increased 386%, facet joint visits increased 446%, and facet joint interventions increased 543%. The increases were higher in patients aged less than 65 years compared to those 65 or older with patients increasing 504% vs. 355%, visits increasing 587% vs. 404%, and services increasing 683% vs. 498%. Total expenditures for facet joint interventions in the Medicare population increased from over $229 million in 2002 to over $511 million in 2006, with an overall increase of 123%. In 2006, there was a 26.8-fold difference in utilization of facet joint intervention services in Florida compared to the state with the lowest utilization - Hawaii. There was an annual increase of 277.3% in the utilization of facet joint interventions by general physicians, whereas a 99.5% annual increase was seen for nurse practitioners (NPs) and certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) from 2002 to 2006. Further, in Florida, 47% of facet joint interventions were performed by general physicians

  6. [Concomitant diseases in primary joint hypermobility syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skoumal, Martin; Haberhauer, Günther; Mayr, Hans

    2004-10-15

    The primary joint hypermobility syndrome (pJH) is an overlap disorder of connective-tissue dysplasias, which incorporates features seen in the Marfan syndromes (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), and osteogenesis imperfecta. Patients with pJH usually present arthralgia, back pain, soft-tissue lesions, recurrent joint dislocation, or subluxation. Extraarticular features may include, e. g., striae cutis, keratoconus, easy bruising, mitral valve prolapse, aortic incompetence, aneurysms, pneumothorax, hernia, urinary incontinence, and pelvic floor prolapse. Due to the high frequency of critical dissection and rupture, the early recognition of rare life-threatening complications such as dilatation of the aortic root and aneurysms is important. Therefore, patients (and their family members) with pJH should also be examined for life-threatening features seen in MFS and EDS. PMID:15490074

  7. Sjögren's syndrome: another facet of the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Colafrancesco, S; Perricone, C; Priori, R; Valesini, G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2014-06-01

    Recently, a new syndrome, namely the "Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants" (ASIA) has been defined. In this syndrome different conditions characterized by common signs and symptoms and induced by the presence of an adjuvant are included. The adjuvant is a substance capable of boosting the immune response and of acting as a trigger in the development of autoimmune diseases. Post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena represent a major issue of ASIA. Indeed, despite vaccines represent a mainstay in the improvement of human health, several of these have been implicated as a potential trigger for autoimmune diseases. Sjogren's Syndrome (SjS) is a systemic chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of an inflammatory involvement of exocrine glands accompanied by systemic manifestations. Own to the straight association between infectious agents exposure (mainly viruses) and sicca syndrome development, the possible link between vaccine and SjS is not surprising. Indeed, a few cases of SjS following vaccine delivery have been reported. At the same extent, the induction of SjS following silicone exposure has been described too. Thus, the aim of this review was to focus on SjS and its possible development following vaccine or silicone exposure in order to define another possible facet of the ASIA syndrome. PMID:24774584

  8. Evaluation of Lumbar Facet Joint Nerve Blocks in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial with a 2-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Falco, Frank J.E.; Cash, Kimberly A.; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2010-01-01

    Study Design: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Objective: To determine the clinical effectiveness of therapeutic lumbar facet joint nerve blocks with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain of facet joint origin. Summary of Background Data: Lumbar facet joints have been shown as the source of chronic pain in 21% to 41% of low back patients with an average prevalence of 31% utilizing controlled comparative local anesthetic blocks. Intraarticular injections, medial branch blocks, and radiofrequency neurotomy of lumbar facet joint nerves have been described in the alleviation of chronic low back pain of facet joint origin. Methods: The study included 120 patients with 60 patients in each group with local anesthetic alone or local anesthetic and steroids. The inclusion criteria was based upon a positive response to diagnostic controlled, comparative local anesthetic lumbar facet joint blocks. Outcome measures included the numeric rating scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), opioid intake, and work status, at baseline, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Results: Significant improvement with significant pain relief of ≥ 50% and functional improvement of ≥ 40% were observed in 85% in Group 1, and 90% in Group II, at 2-year follow-up. The patients in the study experienced significant pain relief for 82 to 84 weeks of 104 weeks, requiring approximately 5 to 6 treatments with an average relief of 19 weeks per episode of treatment. Conclusions: Therapeutic lumbar facet joint nerve blocks, with or without steroids, may provide a management option for chronic function-limiting low back pain of facet joint origin. PMID:20567613

  9. (18)F-Sodium Fluoride PET-CT Hybrid Imaging of the Lumbar Facet Joints: Tracer Uptake and Degree of Correlation to CT-graded Arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Mabray, Marc C; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Behr, Spencer C; Pampaloni, Miguel H; Majumdar, Sharmila; Dillon, William P; Talbott, Jason F

    2016-01-01

    We aim to evaluate (18)F-NaF uptake by facet joints with hybrid PET-CT technique. Specifically, we evaluate NaF uptake in the facet joints of the lower lumbar spine, and correlate with the morphologic grade of facet arthropathy on CT. 30 consecutive patients who underwent standard vertex to toes NaF PET-CT for re-staging of primary neoplastic disease without measurable or documented bony metastases were identified. Maximum (SUVmax) and average (SUVavg) standardized uptake values were calculated for each L3-4, L4-5, and L5-S1 facet joint (n = 180) and normalized to average uptake in the non-diseased femur. A Pathria grade (0-3) was assigned to each facet based upon the CT morphology. Spearman's rank correlation was performed for normalized SUVmax and SUVavg with Pathria grade. ANOVA was performed with Tukey-Kramer pairwise tests to evaluate differences in uptake between Pathria groups. Facet normalized SUVmax (r = 0.31, P < 0.001) and SUVavg (r = 0.28, P < 0.001) demonstrated a mild positive correlation with CT Pathria grade. There was a wide range of uptake values within each Pathria grade subgroup with statistically significant differences in uptake only between Pathria grade 3 as compared to grades 0, 1, and 2. In conclusion, NaF uptake and morphologic changes of the facet joint on CT are weakly correlated. Physiologic information provided by NaF uptake is often discrepant with structural findings on CT suggesting NaF PET may supplement conventional structural imaging for identification of pain generating facet joints. Prospective investigation into the relationship of facet joint NaF uptake with pain and response to pain interventions is warranted. PMID:27134557

  10. 18F-Sodium Fluoride PET-CT Hybrid Imaging of the Lumbar Facet Joints: Tracer Uptake and Degree of Correlation to CT-graded Arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Behr, Spencer C.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Dillon, William P.; Talbott, Jason F.

    2016-01-01

    We aim to evaluate 18F-NaF uptake by facet joints with hybrid PET-CT technique. Specifically, we evaluate NaF uptake in the facet joints of the lower lumbar spine, and correlate with the morphologic grade of facet arthropathy on CT. 30 consecutive patients who underwent standard vertex to toes NaF PET-CT for re-staging of primary neoplastic disease without measurable or documented bony metastases were identified. Maximum (SUVmax) and average (SUVavg) standardized uptake values were calculated for each L3-4, L4-5, and L5-S1 facet joint (n = 180) and normalized to average uptake in the non-diseased femur. A Pathria grade (0-3) was assigned to each facet based upon the CT morphology. Spearman's rank correlation was performed for normalized SUVmax and SUVavg with Pathria grade. ANOVA was performed with Tukey-Kramer pairwise tests to evaluate differences in uptake between Pathria groups. Facet normalized SUVmax (r = 0.31, P < 0.001) and SUVavg (r = 0.28, P < 0.001) demonstrated a mild positive correlation with CT Pathria grade. There was a wide range of uptake values within each Pathria grade subgroup with statistically significant differences in uptake only between Pathria grade 3 as compared to grades 0, 1, and 2. In conclusion, NaF uptake and morphologic changes of the facet joint on CT are weakly correlated. Physiologic information provided by NaF uptake is often discrepant with structural findings on CT suggesting NaF PET may supplement conventional structural imaging for identification of pain generating facet joints. Prospective investigation into the relationship of facet joint NaF uptake with pain and response to pain interventions is warranted. PMID:27134557

  11. [Burning mouth syndrome - a joint biopsychosocial approach].

    PubMed

    Arpone, Francesca; Combremont, Florian; Weber, Kerstin; Scolozzi, Paolo

    2016-02-10

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a medical condition that is often refractory to conventional diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Patients suffering from BMS can benefit from a biopsychosocial approach in a joint, medical-psychological consultation model. Such a consultation exists at Geneva University Hospitals, involving the collaboration of the maxillo-facial and oral surgery division and the division of liaison psychiatry and crisis intervention, in order to take into account the multiple factors involved in BMS onset and persistence. This article will describe BMS clinical presentation, and present an integrate approach to treat these patients. PMID:27039444

  12. Establishment of a rat model of lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis using intraarticular injection of urinary plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar facet joint (LFJ) osteoarthritis (OA) is an important etiology of low back pain. Several animal models of LFJ OA have been established using intraarticular injection of various chemicals. This study aimed to establish a rat model of LFJ OA using urinary plasminogen activator (uPA). Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with intraarticular injection in the L5-L6 facet joints with uPA (OA group, n = 40) or normal saline (vehicle group, n = 40). Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hind paws were evaluated using von Frey hairs and a thermoalgesia instrument, respectively. Toluidine blue staining, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunohistochemical examination of the LFJ was performed. Treatment with uPA induced cartilage damage, synovitis, and proliferation of synovial cells in the fact joints. The OA group showed significantly higher hyperalgesia in the hind paws in comparison with the vehicle group and normal controls (P < 0.05). Expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS in the LFJ cartilage in the OA group was significantly increased (P < 0.05). A rat model of LFJ OA was successfully established using intraarticular injection of uPA. This animal model is convenient and shows good resemblance to human OA pathology. PMID:25892493

  13. TECHNIQUE, DIFFICULTY, AND ACCURACY OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY-GUIDED TRANSLAMINAR AND TRANSFORAMINAL LUMBOSACRAL EPIDURAL AND INTRAARTICULAR LUMBAR FACET JOINT INJECTIONS IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Sandersen, Charlotte; Couvreur, Thierry; Bolen, Géraldine

    2016-01-01

    In human medicine, spinal pain and radiculopathy are commonly managed by computed tomography (CT)-guided facet joint injections and by transforaminal or translaminar epidural injections. In dogs, CT-guided lumbosacral epidural or lumbar facet joint injections have not been described. The aim of this experimental, ex vivo, feasibility study was to develop techniques and to assess their difficulty and accuracy. Two canine cadavers were used to establish the techniques and eight cadavers to assess difficulty and accuracy. Contrast medium was injected and a CT scan was performed after each injection. Accuracy was assessed according to epidural or joint space contrast opacification. Difficulty was classified as easy, moderately difficult, or difficult, based on the number of CT scans needed to guide insertion of the needle. A total of six translaminar and five transforaminal epidural and 53 joint injections were performed. Translaminar injections had a high success rate (100%), were highly accurate (75%), and easy to perform (100%). Transforaminal injections had an moderately high success rate (75%), were accurate (75%), and moderately difficult to perform (100%). Success rate of facet joint injections was 62% and was higher for larger facet joints, such as L7-S1. Accuracy of facet joint injections ranged from accurate (37-62%) to highly accurate (25%) depending on the volume injected. In 77% of cases, injections were moderately difficult to perform. Possible complications of epidural and facet joint injections were subarachnoid and vertebral venous plexus puncture and periarticular spread, respectively. Further studies are suggested to evaluate in vivo feasibility and safety of these techniques. PMID:26693948

  14. Biomechanical analysis of press-extension technique on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and staggered facet joint.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong-Gen; Liao, Sheng-Hui; Jiang, Zhong; Huang, Huan-Ming; Ning, Xi-Tao; Jiang, Neng-Yi; Pei, Jian-Wei; Huang, Qin; Wei, Hui

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of a new Chinese massage technique named "press-extension" on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation, and provides a biomechanical explanation of this massage technique. Self-developed biomechanical software was used to establish a normal L1-S1 lumbar 3D FE model, which integrated the spine CT and MRI data-based anatomical structure. Then graphic technique is utilized to build a degenerative lumbar FE model with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation. According to the actual press-extension experiments, mechanic parameters are collected to set boundary condition for FE analysis. The result demonstrated that press-extension techniques bring the annuli fibrosi obvious induction effect, making the central nucleus pulposus forward close, increasing the pressure in front part. Study concludes that finite element modelling for lumbar spine is suitable for the analysis of press-extension technique impact on lumbar intervertebral disc biomechanics, to provide the basis for the disease mechanism of intervertebral disc herniation using press-extension technique. PMID:27275119

  15. Addressing the confounding role of joint hypermobility syndrome and gastrointestinal involvement in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Fikree, Asma; Aziz, Qasim

    2014-06-01

    Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in visceral function have been demonstrated in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Joint hypermobility is frequently associated with both postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and gastrointestinal symptoms. Future studies in this area should appropriately and systematically control for the presence of joint hypermobility syndrome. PMID:24682800

  16. Fluoroscopic caudal epidural injections in managing chronic axial low back pain without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain without disc herniation is common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing this condition, including epidural injections. However, there is continued debate on the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. Methods A randomized, double-blind, actively controlled trial was conducted. The objective was to evaluate the ability to assess the effectiveness of caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joints, or sacroiliac joints. A total of 120 patients were randomized to two groups; one group did not receive steroids (group 1) and the other group did (group 2). There were 60 patients in each group. The primary outcome measure was at least 50% improvement in Numeric Rating Scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures were employment status and opioid intake. These measures were assessed at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Results Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (primary outcome) defined as a 50% or more reduction in scores from baseline, were observed in 54% of patients in group 1 and 60% of patients in group 2 at 24 months. In contrast, 84% of patients in group 1 and 73% in group 2 saw significant pain relief and functional status improvement in the successful groups at 24 months. Conclusion Caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids are effective in patients with chronic axial low back pain of discogenic origin without facet joint pain, disc herniation, and/or radiculitis. PMID:23091395

  17. Lateral patellar facetectomy and medial reefing in patients with lateral facet syndrome after patellar-retaining total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pagenstert, Geert; Seelhoff, Juliane; Henninger, Heath B; Wirtz, Dieter C; Valderrabano, Victor; Barg, Alexej

    2014-11-01

    We analyzed clinical outcomes of partial lateral patellar facetectomy and medial reefing in patients with lateral patellar facet syndrome with painful patellar-retaining total knee arthroplasty. 34 patients were followed for a mean of 40 months. All 34 patients were matched with those having secondary patellar resurfacing without facetectomy. Both groups experienced significant pain relief and range of motion improvement. The facetectomy group had higher Kujala scores than those in patellar resurfacing group. Patients with facetectomy had significantly less pain postoperatively. There were significant differences in postoperative lateral patellar tilt and congruency angle in both groups. The mid-term results for LPF with medial reefing are promising to resolve pain in patients with lateral patellar facet syndrome in patellar-retaining TKA. Therapeutic level III (retrospective comparative study). PMID:25070901

  18. Generalized joint hypermobility, joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2015-03-01

    This issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics Seminar Series Part C is dedicated to generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT). gJHM is the best known clinical manifestation of inherited defects of the connective tissue. On the other side, JHS and EDS-HT are actually considered one and the same from a clinical perspective by most practitioners and researchers (i.e., JHS/EDS-HT), and their molecular basis remains unknown. For decades, "non-syndromic" gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT have been thought to be simple clinical curiosities or an asset for the "affected" individual. In recent years, the attention on these partially overlapping phenotypes has increased, as they are now recognized risk factors for a series of non-communicable diseases and long-term disabilities. This series consists of 10 papers focused on three main topics, namely (i) assessment and differential diagnosis of children and adults with gJHM, (ii) systematic presentation of selected key non-articular manifestations of JHS/EDS-HT and actual perception of physiotherapy as the best therapeutic resource for this condition, and (iii) exploration of the available knowledge relating "congenital laxity of tissues" to various dysfunctions of the nervous system during development and adulthood. The contributors hope that this collection raises attention to this fascinating field of knowledge, which seems to have ramifications in virtually all medical disciplines. PMID:25821089

  19. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression.

  20. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25992955

  1. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25992955

  2. Development of an Experimental Animal Model for Lower Back Pain by Percutaneous Injury-Induced Lumbar Facet Joint Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Ahmadinia, Kasra; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L; Andrews, Steven; Haralampus, Chris A; Xiao, Guozhi; Sohn, Hong-Moon; You, Jae-Won; Seo, Yo-Seob; Stein, Gary S; Van Wijnen, Andre J; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-11-01

    We report generation and characterization of pain-related behavior in a minimally invasive facet joint degeneration (FJD) animal model in rats. FJD was produced by a non-open percutaneous puncture-induced injury on the right lumbar FJs at three consecutive levels. Pressure hyperalgesia in the lower back was assessed by measuring the vocalization response to pressure from a force transducer. After hyperalgesia was established, pathological changes in lumbar FJs and alterations of intervertebral foramen size were assessed by histological and imaging analyses. To investigate treatment options for lumber FJ osteoarthritis-induced pain, animals with established hyperalgesia were administered with analgesic drugs, such as morphine, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (ketorolac), or pregabalin. Effects were assessed by behavioral pain responses. One week after percutaneous puncture-induced injury of the lumbar FJs, ipsilateral primary pressure hyperalgesia developed and was maintained for at least 12 weeks without foraminal stenosis. Animals showed decreased spontaneous activity, but no secondary hyperalgesia in the hind paws. Histopathological and microfocus X-ray computed tomography analyses demonstrated that the percutaneous puncture injury resulted in osteoarthritis-like structural changes in the FJs cartilage and subchondral bone. Pressure hyperalgesia was completely reversed by morphine. The administration of celecoxib produced moderate pain reduction with no statistical significance while the administration of ketorolac and pregabalin produced no analgesic effect on FJ osteoarthritis-induced back pain. Our animal model of non-open percutanous puncture-induced injury of the lumbar FJs in rats shows similar characteristics of low back pain produced by human facet arthropathy. PMID:25858171

  3. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  4. Cervical Facet Joint Infection and Associated Epidural Abscess with Streptococcus intermedius from a Dental Infection Origin A Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Ian David; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S

    2016-09-01

    Pyogenic cervical facet joint infections are rare and such infections from a dental origin are even less common. Of these few cases, none have described infection with Streptococcus intermedius as the pathogen. A 65-year-old orthopaedic surgeon complained of fevers, right-sided radiating neck pain, stiffness, swelling, erythema, and right upper extremity weakness one month after he had broken a crown over his right mandibular premolar, a continued source of pain. Imaging of the cervical spine showed a right C4-C5 facet inflammatory arthropathy and a small epidural abscess that was cultured and initially treated with intravenous antibiotics. The oral maxillofacial surgery team performed an extraction of the infected, symptomatic tooth. For continued right upper extremity weakness, the patient underwent C4-C5 laminoforaminotomy and irrigation and debridement of the right C4-C5 facet joint. After 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, the patient's infectious and inflammatory markers had normalized. By 4 months, he had regained full strength at his upper extremity and a painless and full range of motion of his cervical spine.Pyogenic cervical facet joint infection is very rare and potentially dangerous. A high clinical suspicion and appropriate imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, are important for correct diagnosis. Prompt medical and surgical treatment may avert complications, and although the patient presented made a complete recovery, patients may be left with neurological compromise. PMID:27620549

  5. Limited joint mobility syndrome in diabetes mellitus: A minireview

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, Esther G; Landman, Gijs W; Nijenhuis-Rosien, Leonie; Bilo, Henk J

    2015-01-01

    Limited joint mobility syndrome (LJMS) or diabetic cheiroarthropathy is a long term complication of diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of LJMS is based on clinical features: progression of painless stiffness of hands and fingers, fixed flexion contractures of the small hand and foot joints, impairment of fine motion and impaired grip strength in the hands. As the syndrome progresses, it can also affect other joints. It is important to properly diagnose such a complication as LJMS. Moreover, it is important to diagnose LJMS because it is known that the presence of LJMS is associated with micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Due to the lack of curative treatment options, the suggested method to prevent or decelerate the development of LJMS is improving or maintaining good glycemic control. Daily stretching excercises of joints aim to prevent or delay progression of joint stiffness, may reduce the risk of inadvertent falls and will add to maintain quality of life. PMID:26265997

  6. 3D visualization of the lumbar facet joint after degeneration using propagation phase contrast micro-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yong; Zhang, Yi; Yin, Xianzheng; Lu, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong; Duan, Chunyue

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar facet joint (LFJ) degeneration is believed to be an important cause of low back pain (LBP). Identifying the morphological changes of the LFJ in the degeneration process at a high-resolution level could be meaningful for our better understanding of the possible mechanisms underlying this process. In the present study, we determined the 3D morphology of the LFJ using propagation phase contrast micro-tomography (PPCT) in rats to assess the subtle changes that occur during the degeneration process. PPCT provides vivid 3D images of micromorphological changes in the LFJ during its degeneration process, and the changes in the subchondral bone occurred earlier than in the cartilage during the early stage of degeneration of the LFJ. The delineation of this alteration was similar to that with the histological method. Our findings demonstrated that PPCT could serve as a valuable tool for 3D visualization of the morphology of the LFJ by providing comprehensive information about the cartilage and the underlying subchondral bone and their changes during degeneration processes. It might also have great potential for providing effective diagnostic tools to track changes in the cartilage and to evaluate the effects of therapeutic interventions for LFJ degeneration in preclinical studies. PMID:26907889

  7. Evaluation of lower limb disability in joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Celletti, Claudia; Castori, Marco; Grammatico, Paola; Camerota, Filippo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate degree and possible major determinants of lower limb disability in joint hypermobility syndrome. Forty patients with joint hypermobility syndrome were studied. Lower limb function was evaluated with the lower limb functional scale (LEFS). Intensity of pain was estimated by the numeric rating scale. Rough results were compared with previously published data for osteoarthritis patients. Within the studied population, comparisons were performed by age, sex, numeric rating scale and Beighton scores. In joint hypermobility syndrome, LEFS score was similar to osteoarthritis, but in the former, comparable values were observed with a ~10 year earlier onset. LEFS scores resulted significantly related to age, pain intensity and Beighton score. No correlation with sex was observed. This study demonstrated that, in joint hypermobility syndrome, disability of lower limbs is remarkable and related to the increase in pain and age and to the decrease in residual joint hypermobility. These preliminary results may be relevant for the identification of more efficient and tailored treatment programs. PMID:21792643

  8. A New CT Method for Assessing 3D Movements in Lumbar Facet Joints and Vertebrae in Patients before and after TDR

    PubMed Central

    Svedmark, Per; Berg, Svante; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Weidenhielm, Lars; Nemeth, Gunnar; Olivecrona, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a 3D-CT method for analyzing facet joint motion and vertebral rotation in the lumbar spine after TDR. Ten patients were examined before and then three years after surgery, each time with two CT scans: provoked flexion and provoked extension. After 3D registration, the facet joint 3D translation and segmental vertebral 3D rotation were analyzed at the operated level (L5-S1) and adjacent level (L4-L5). Pain was evaluated using VAS. The median (±SD) 3D movement in the operated level for the left facet joint was 3.2 mm (±1.9 mm) before and 3.5 mm (±1.7 mm) after surgery and for the right facet joint was 3.0 mm (±1.0 mm) before and 3.6 mm (±1.4 mm) after surgery. The median vertebral rotation in the sagittal plane at the operated level was 5.4° (±2.3°) before surgery and 6.8° (±1.7°) after surgery and in the adjacent level was 7.7° (±4.0°) before and 9.2° (±2.7°) after surgery. The median VAS was reduced from 6 (range 5–8) to 3 (range 2–8) in extension and from 4 (range 2–6) to 2 (range 1–3) in flexion. PMID:26587533

  9. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. Case Report: The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. Conclusions: The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical

  10. Joint hypermobility syndrome: problems that require psychological intervention.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Velasco, C; Gély-Nargeot, M C; Bulbena Vilarrasa, A; Bravo, J F

    2011-09-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), also known as Ehlers-Danlos III, is an inherited disorder of connective tissue, characterised by an exceptional increase in the joint's mobility and the presence of musculoskeletal and other symptoms. It is a benign syndrome if compared with the other types of Ehlers-Danlos, but it can become disabling particularly because it is a significant source of pain and distress. The purpose of this work is to describe some common problems in JHS that render psychological intervention in their overall management relevant. Chronic pain, associated psychopathological factors such as anxiety, depression and somatosensory amplification, and problems arising from a lack of recognition and knowledge of the syndrome, are frequent among those affected, having a negative impact on their quality of life. We emphasise the relevance of addressing JHS from a biopsychosocial approach. PMID:21373784

  11. SAPHO syndrome of the temporomandibular joint associated with sudden deafness.

    PubMed

    Marsot-Dupuch, K; Doyen, J E; Grauer, W O; de Givry, S C

    1999-05-01

    We report a case of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) associated with sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible and temporal bone, causing deafness. The presence of a palmoplantar pustulosis established the diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. SAPHO (an acronym referring to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome is defined by the association of characteristic osteoarticular and dermatologic manifestations, with diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible being a part of this entity. We review the literature of SAPHO syndrome with mandibular manifestations and discuss the mechanisms of inflammatory spread from the TMJ to the cochlea. To our knowledge, this is the first description of skull base involvement in a patient with SAPHO syndrome leading to sudden deafness. PMID:10369364

  12. Critical Values of Facet Joint Angulation and Tropism in the Development of Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: An International, Large-Scale Multicenter Study by the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Samartzis, Dino; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Acharya, Shankar; Kawakami, Mamoru; Satoh, Shigenobu; Chen, Wen-Jer; Park, Chun-Kun; Lee, Chong-Suh; Foocharoen, Thanit; Nagashima, Hideki; Kuh, Sunguk; Zheng, Zhaomin; Condor, Richard; Ito, Manabu; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jeong, Je Hoon; Luk, Keith D. K.; Prijambodo, Bambang; Rege, Amol; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Luo, Zhuojing; Tassanawipas, Warat; Acharya, Narayana; Pokharel, Rohit; Shen, Yong; Ito, Takui; Zhang, Zhihai; Aithala P, Janardhana; Kumar, Gomatam Vijay; Jabir, Rahyussalim Ahmad; Basu, Saumyajit; Li, Baojun; Moudgil, Vishal; Goss, Ben; Sham, Phoebe; Williams, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  An international, multicenter cross-sectional image-based study performed in 33 institutions in the Asia Pacific region. Objective  The study addressed the role of facet joint angulation and tropism in relation to L4–L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Methods  The study included 349 patients (63% females; mean age: 61.8 years) with single-level DS; 82 had no L4–L5 DS (group A) and 267 had L4–L5 DS (group B). Axial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were utilized to assess facet joint angulations and tropism (i.e., asymmetry between facet joint angulations) between groups. Results  There was a statistically significant difference between group A (left mean: 46.1 degrees; right mean: 48.2 degrees) and group B (left mean: 55.4 degrees; right mean: 57.5 degrees) in relation to bilateral L4–L5 facet joint angulations (p < 0.001). The mean bilateral angulation difference was 7.4 and 9.6 degrees in groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.025). A critical value of 58 degrees or greater significantly increased the likelihood of DS if unilateral (adjusted OR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.2 to 5.5; p = 0.021) or bilateral facets (adjusted OR: 5.9; 95% CI: 2.7 to 13.2; p < 0.001) were involved. Facet joint tropism was found to be relevant between 16 and 24 degrees angulation difference (adjusted OR: 5.6; 95% CI: 1.2 to 26.1; p = 0.027). Conclusions  In one of the largest studies assessing facet joint orientation in patients with DS, greater sagittal facet joint angulation was associated with L4-L5 DS, with a critical value of 58 degrees or greater increasing the likelihood of the condition for unilateral and bilateral facet joint involvement. Specific facet joint tropism categories were noted to be associated with DS. PMID:27433424

  13. Reduction of radiation dose during facet joint injection using the new image guidance system SabreSource™: a prospective study in 60 patients

    PubMed Central

    Proschek, Dirk; Kafchitsas, K.; Rauschmann, M. A.; Kurth, A. A.; Vogl, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    Interventional procedures are associated with high radiation doses for both patients and surgeons. To reduce the risk from ionizing radiation, it is essential to minimize radiation dose. This prospective study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness in reducing radiation dose during facet joint injection in the lumbar spine and to evaluate the feasibility and possibilities of the new real time image guidance system SabreSource™. A total of 60 patients, treated with a standardized injection therapy of the facet joints L4–L5 or L5–S1, were included in this study. A total of 30 patients were treated by fluoroscopy guidance alone, the following 30 patients were treated using the new SabreSource™ system. Thus a total of 120 injections to the facet joints were performed. Pain, according to the visual analogue scale (VAS), was documented before and 6 h after the intervention. Radiation dose, time of radiation and the number of exposures needed to place the needle were recorded. No significant differences concerning age (mean age 60.5 years, range 51–69), body mass index (mean BMI 26.2, range 22.2–29.9) and preoperative pain (VAS 7.9, range 6–10) were found between the two groups. There was no difference in pain reduction between the two groups (60 vs. 61.5%; P = 0.001) but the radiation dose was significantly smaller with the new SabreSource™ system (reduction of radiation dose 32.7%, P = 0.01; reduction of mean entrance surface dose 32.3%, P = 0.01). The SabreSource™ System significantly reduced the radiation dose received during the injection therapy of the lumbar facet joints. With minimal effort for the setup at the beginning of a session, the system is easy to handle and can be helpful for other injection therapies (e.g. nerve root block therapies). PMID:19082641

  14. An International Multicenter Study Assessing the Role of Ethnicity on Variation of Lumbar Facet Joint Orientation and the Occurrence of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis in Asia Pacific: A Study from the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Goss, Ben; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Acharya, Shankar; Kawakami, Mamoru; Satoh, Shigenobu; Chen, Wen-Jer; Park, Chun-Kun; Lee, Chong-Suh; Foocharoen, Thanit; Nagashima, Hideki; Kuh, Sunguk; Zheng, Zhaomin; Condor, Richard; Ito, Manabu; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jeong, Je Hoon; Luk, Keith D K; Prijambodo, Bambang; Rege, Amol; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Luo, Zhuojing; Tassanawipas, Warat; Acharya, Narayana; Pokharel, Rohit; Shen, Yong; Ito, Takui; Zhang, Zhihai; Aithala P, Janardhana; Kumar, Gomatam Vijay; Jabir, Rahyussalim Ahmad; Basu, Saumyajit; Li, Baojun; Moudgil, Vishal; Sham, Phoebe; Samartzis, Dino

    2016-02-01

    Study Design A multinational, multiethnic, cross-sectional image-based study was performed in 33 institutions, representing 10 countries, which were part of the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium. Objective Lumbar facet joint orientation has been reported to be associated with the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). The role of ethnicity regarding facet joint orientation remains uncertain. As such, the following study was performed across a wide-ranging population base to assess the role of ethnicity in facet joint orientation in patients with DS in the Asia Pacific region. Methods Lateral standing X-rays and axial magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained for patients with lumbar DS. The DS parameters and facet joint angulations were assessed from L3-S1. Sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and ethnicity were also noted. Results The study included 371 patients with known ethnic origin (mean age: 62.0 years; 64% males, 36% females). The mean BMI was 25.6 kg/m(2). The level of DS was most prevalent at L4-L5 (74.7%). There were 28.8% Indian, 28.6% Japanese, 18.1% Chinese, 8.6% Korean, 6.5% Thai, 4.9% Caucasian, 2.7% Filipino, and 1.9% Malay patients. Variations in facet joint angulations were noted from L3 to S1 and between patients with and without DS (p < 0.05). No differences were noted with regards to sex and overall BMI to facet joint angulations (p > 0.05); however, increasing age was found to increase the degree of angulation throughout the lumbar spine (p < 0.05). Accounting for age and the presence or absence of DS at each level, no statistically significant differences between ethnicity and degree of facet joint angulations from L3-L5 were noted (p > 0.05). Ethnic variations were noted in non-DS L5-S1 facet joint angulations, predominantly between Caucasian, Chinese, and Indian ethnicities (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study is the first to suggest that ethnicity may not play a role in facet

  15. An International Multicenter Study Assessing the Role of Ethnicity on Variation of Lumbar Facet Joint Orientation and the Occurrence of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis in Asia Pacific: A Study from the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Goss, Ben; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Acharya, Shankar; Kawakami, Mamoru; Satoh, Shigenobu; Chen, Wen-Jer; Park, Chun-Kun; Lee, Chong-Suh; Foocharoen, Thanit; Nagashima, Hideki; Kuh, Sunguk; Zheng, Zhaomin; Condor, Richard; Ito, Manabu; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jeong, Je Hoon; Luk, Keith D. K.; Prijambodo, Bambang; Rege, Amol; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Luo, Zhuojing; Tassanawipas, Warat; Acharya, Narayana; Pokharel, Rohit; Shen, Yong; Ito, Takui; Zhang, Zhihai; Aithala P, Janardhana; Kumar, Gomatam Vijay; Jabir, Rahyussalim Ahmad; Basu, Saumyajit; Li, Baojun; Moudgil, Vishal; Sham, Phoebe; Samartzis, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A multinational, multiethnic, cross-sectional image-based study was performed in 33 institutions, representing 10 countries, which were part of the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium. Objective Lumbar facet joint orientation has been reported to be associated with the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). The role of ethnicity regarding facet joint orientation remains uncertain. As such, the following study was performed across a wide-ranging population base to assess the role of ethnicity in facet joint orientation in patients with DS in the Asia Pacific region. Methods Lateral standing X-rays and axial magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained for patients with lumbar DS. The DS parameters and facet joint angulations were assessed from L3–S1. Sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and ethnicity were also noted. Results The study included 371 patients with known ethnic origin (mean age: 62.0 years; 64% males, 36% females). The mean BMI was 25.6 kg/m2. The level of DS was most prevalent at L4–L5 (74.7%). There were 28.8% Indian, 28.6% Japanese, 18.1% Chinese, 8.6% Korean, 6.5% Thai, 4.9% Caucasian, 2.7% Filipino, and 1.9% Malay patients. Variations in facet joint angulations were noted from L3 to S1 and between patients with and without DS (p < 0.05). No differences were noted with regards to sex and overall BMI to facet joint angulations (p > 0.05); however, increasing age was found to increase the degree of angulation throughout the lumbar spine (p < 0.05). Accounting for age and the presence or absence of DS at each level, no statistically significant differences between ethnicity and degree of facet joint angulations from L3–L5 were noted (p > 0.05). Ethnic variations were noted in non-DS L5–S1 facet joint angulations, predominantly between Caucasian, Chinese, and Indian ethnicities (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study is the first to suggest that ethnicity may not play a role in

  16. Fluoroscopic cervical epidural injections in chronic axial or disc-related neck pain without disc herniation, facet joint pain, or radiculitis

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Malla, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Background While chronic neck pain is a common problem in the adult population, with a typical 12-month prevalence of 30%–50%, there is a lack of consensus regarding its causes and treatment. Despite limited evidence, cervical epidural injections are one of the commonly performed nonsurgical interventions in the management of chronic neck pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, active, controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for the management of chronic neck pain with or without upper extremity pain in patients without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain. Results One hundred and twenty patients without disc herniation or radiculitis and negative for facet joint pain by means of controlled diagnostic medial branch blocks were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, ie, injection of local anesthetic only (group 1) or local anesthetic mixed with nonparticulate betamethasone (group 2). The primary outcome of significant pain relief and improvement in functional status (≥50%) was demonstrated in 72% of group 1 and 68% of group 2. The overall average number of procedures per year was 3.6 in both groups with an average total relief per year of 37–39 weeks in the successful group over a period of 52 weeks. Conclusion Cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids may be effective in patients with chronic function-limiting discogenic or axial pain. PMID:22826642

  17. Relationship between Fatigue and Gait Abnormality in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celletti, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Castori, Marco; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The…

  18. Progressive hip joint subluxation in Saul-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Yasutsugu; Kaneshi, Takuya; Kamiya, Takeshi; Hata, Kenichiro; Nishimura, Gen; Kaname, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    Saul-Wilson syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital skeletal syndrome characterized by postnatal onset of short stature, relative microcephaly, frontal bossing, prominent eyes with shallow orbits, midface hypoplasia, cataract, and generalized skeletal changes, including spondylar dysplasia, overtubulation of the long bones with metaphyseal flaring and megaepiphyses, coxa valga, elbow deformity, and brachydactyly. We describe a boy with the overall clinical and radiological features fitting the characteristics of SWS, although cataract, elbow deformity, and overt brachydactyly were not seen. He presented with painful hip joint due to hip subluxation in late childhood, which exacerbated with age and ultimately, required surgical intervention. Awareness of this orthopedic complication in SWS is essential in the management of patients with SWS. PMID:26239279

  19. Primary malignant lymphoma arising in postmastectomy lymphedema. Another facet of the Stewart-Treves syndrome.

    PubMed

    d'Amore, E S; Wick, M R; Geisinger, K R; Frizzera, G

    1990-05-01

    In rare cases, primary malignant lymphomas may arise in the soft tissues. Only one previous case has arisen in the context of chronic lymphedema. Because of the clinical appearance of such lesions, which resemble violaceous nodular or plaquelike tumors, they may be confused clinically with lymphedema-associated angiosarcomas occurring after radical mastectomy (Stewart-Treves syndrome). Furthermore, the histologic appearance of some lymphomas and angiosarcomas may also be similar. We studied two women with primary postmastectomy lymphedema-related malignant lymphoma in the soft tissues of the upper arm. These tumors arose 11 and 30 years, respectively, after radical removal of ductal mammary carcinomas. Histologically, one neoplasm mimicked metastatic carcinoma or epithelioid angiosarcoma; whereas the other was initially confused with a variety of pathologic entities, including vasculitis, epithelioid hemangioma, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The lymphoid nature of both lesions was confirmed by immunoreactivity for leukocyte common antigen in addition to the B-lymphocyte marker, L26. Conversely, vascular and epithelial determinants were absent. One patient's disease pursued an indolent course; she died of unknown causes but with no evidence of lymphoma at last follow-up. The second patient is currently in remission on chemotherapy. Awareness of the existence of lymphedema-related malignant lymphoma and familiarity with methods used for its distinction from epithelioid vascular sarcomas should prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:2327551

  20. Neurodevelopmental attributes of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: Update and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ghibellini, Giulia; Brancati, Francesco; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, increasing attention has been devoted to the extra-articular and extra-cutaneous manifestations of joint hypermobility syndrome, also termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (i.e., JHS/EDS-HT). Despite the fact that the current diagnostic criteria for both disorders remain focused on joint hypermobility, musculoskeletal pain and skin changes, medical practice and research have started investigating a wide spectrum of visceral, neurological and developmental complications, which represent major burdens for affected individuals. In particular, children with generalized joint hypermobility often present with various neurodevelopmental issues and can be referred for neurological consultation. It is common that investigations in these patients yield negative or inconsistent results, eventually leading to the exclusion of any structural neurological or muscle disorder. In the context of specialized clinics for connective tissue disorders, a clear relationship between generalized joint hypermobility and a characteristic neurodevelopmental profile affecting coordination is emerging. The clinical features of these patients tend to overlap with those of developmental coordination disorder and can be associated with learning and other disabilities. Physical and psychological consequences of these additional difficulties add to the chief manifestations of the pre-existing connective tissue disorder, affecting the well-being and development of children and their families. In this review, particular attention is devoted to the nature of the link between joint hypermobility, coordination difficulties and neurodevelopmental issues in children. Presumed pathogenesis and management issues are explored in order to attract more attention on this association and nurture future clinical research. PMID:25654988

  1. Difficulty eating and significant weight loss in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Velasco, Carolina; Van den Bossche, Thomas; Grossin, Daniel; Hamonet, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, also known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a heritable disorder of connective tissue, common but poorly known by the medical community. Although generalized joint hypermobility and fragility of tissues have been described as core features, recent research highlights the multisystemic nature of JHS/EDS-HT, which presents with a wide range of articular and extra-articular symptoms. Among these, gastrointestinal problems, temporomandibular disorders, and smell and taste abnormalities are common among those affected, having significant implications for eating. The present work reviews the literature linking JHS/EDS-HT and eating problems. Two illustrative case reports, in which JHS/EDS-HT manifestations contribute to developing and maintaining disturbed eating behaviors and significant weight loss, are presented. PMID:26506923

  2. Parallel Syndromes: Two Dimensions of Narcissism and the Facets of Psychopathic Personality in Criminally-Involved Individuals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Little research has examined different dimensions of narcissism that may parallel psychopathy facets in criminally-involved individuals. The present study examined the pattern of relationships between grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, assessed using the Narcissistic Personality Inventory-16 and the Hypersensitive Narcissism Scale, respectively, and the four facets of psychopathy (interpersonal, affective, lifestyle, and antisocial) assessed via the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV). As predicted, grandiose and vulnerable narcissism showed differential relationships to psychopathy facets, with grandiose narcissism relating positively to the interpersonal facet of psychopathy and vulnerable narcissism relating positively to the lifestyle facet of psychopathy. Paralleling existing psychopathy research, vulnerable narcissism showed stronger associations than grandiose narcissism to 1) other forms of psychopathology, including internalizing and substance use disorders, and 2) self- and other-directed aggression, measured using the Life History of Aggression and the Forms of Aggression Questionnaire. Grandiose narcissism was nonetheless associated with social dysfunction marked by a manipulative and deceitful interpersonal style and unprovoked aggression. Potentially important implications for uncovering etiological pathways and developing treatment interventions for these disorders in externalizing adults are discussed. PMID:22448731

  3. Relationship between fatigue and gait abnormality in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Celletti, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Castori, Marco; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue severity and the gait pattern using 3D Gait Analysis (GA). Eleven individuals with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) were investigated using muscle strength measured with standardised questionnaire measuring fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale, FSS) and quantitative 3D GA. Our data showed that FSS value well correlated with the peak of vertical component of ground reaction force (r=-0.66, p<0.05). The negative correlation gives evidence that the higher the fatigue is the more reduced force is during gait. Our results showed that the ground reaction force has been applied as a functional evaluation score for detecting pathology in gait of JHS/EDS-HT participants and the found correlation between vertical force and fatigue demonstrated that muscle fatigue may be associated with a loss of proprioceptive acuity in lower limb muscles. PMID:22819599

  4. Joint hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type): an updated critique.

    PubMed

    Castori, M

    2013-02-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome, alternatively termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common, though the least recognized heritable connective tissue disorder. While its leading clinical features typically affect joints, recent evidence indicates a wider spectrum of satellite symptoms/dysfunctions, involving practically all major systems and organs. Accordingly, clinical research on JHS/EDS-HT is moving from rheumatology and clinical genetics to other disciplines, including neurology, clinical psychology, ophthalmology, cardiology and gynecology/obstetrics. As the skin is one of the most commonly affected and, surely, the easiest to assess body part in heritable connective tissue disorders, it is expected that also the dermatologist should be trained to recognize this condition. In this review, JHS/EDS-HT is presented and discussed in separate sections dedicated to all major aspects of diagnosis, differential diagnosis, clinical features, natural history and principles of management. Particular attention is posed on the role of epidermal, dermal and mucosal assessment in JHS/EDS-HT is order to rise the attention to a series of too neglected, though quite common manifestations of this condition. Management principles are presented with a multidisciplinary approach in mind, covering pharmacologic, physical and occupational therapy, surgical, and nutriceutical aspects, as well as general lifestyle recommendations. Connections with organs and systems other than joints and skin are also discussed. PMID:23407074

  5. The effectiveness of ridetherapy in children with benign joint hypermobility syndrome during articulatory changes in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Mosulishvili, T; Loria, M

    2013-02-01

    Taking into account the biomechanical peculiarities of ridetherapy, the specific methodology of ridetherapy developed by us is given in this paper, also the data of treatment have been studied in the dynamics. Based on the results obtained the reliable advantage of ridetherapy method is determined as compared with therapeutic exercises. It has been established that in children with benign joint hypermobility syndrome during articulatory changes in the knee the use of ridetherapy provides an increase in muscle strength, to a certain degree their hypertrophy, the development of joint-muscular perception, the increase of proprioreception, the minimizing of excessive joint movement, the antinociceptive effect and the avoidance of secondary developed complications. PMID:23482367

  6. A new syndrome of short stature, joint limitation and muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Soljak, M A; Aftimos, S; Gluckman, P D

    1983-06-01

    A further case is presented of a new growth deficiency syndrome first reported by Myre et al. in 1981. The major clinical features are mental retardation, growth deficiency, muscular hypertrophy, joint limitation and abnormal skeletal radiography. PMID:6684009

  7. Gastrointestinal and nutritional issues in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Pascolini, Giulia; Blundo, Carlo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Gastrointestinal involvement is a well known complication of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDSs), mainly in form of abdominal emergencies due to intestinal/abdominal vessels rupture in vascular EDS. In the last decade, a growing number of works investigated the relationship between a wide spectrum of chronic gastrointestinal complaints and various EDS forms, among which the hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome; JHS/EDS-HT) was the most studied. The emerging findings depict a major role for gastrointestinal involvement in the health status and, consequently, management of JHS/EDS-HT patients. Nevertheless, fragmentation of knowledge limits its impact on practice within the boundaries of highly specialized clinics. In this paper, literature review on gastrointestinal manifestations in JHS/EDS-HT was carried out and identified papers categorized as (i) case-control/cohort studies associating (apparently non-syndromic) joint hypermobility and gastrointestinal involvement, (ii) case-control/cohort studies associating JHS/EDS-HT and gastrointestinal involvement, (iii) case reports/series on various gastrointestinal complications in (presumed) JHS/EDS-HT, and (iv) studies reporting gastrointestinal features in heterogeneous EDS patients' cohorts. Gastrointestinal manifestations of JHS/EDS-HT were organized and discussed in two categories, including structural anomalies (i.e., abdominal/diaphragmatic hernias, internal organ/pelvic prolapses, intestinal intussusceptions) and functional features (i.e., dysphagia, gastro-esophageal reflux, dyspepsia, recurrent abdominal pain, constipation/diarrhea), with emphasis on practice and future implications. In the second part of this paper, a summary of possible nutritional interventions in JHS/EDS-HT was presented. Supplementation strategies were borrowed from data available for general population with minor modifications in the light of recent discoveries in the pathogenesis of selected JHS/EDS-HT features. PMID

  8. Joint Engagement and the Emergence of Language in Children with Autism and Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger; Deckner, Deborah F.; Romski, MaryAnn

    2009-01-01

    Systematic longitudinal observations were made as typically developing toddlers and young children with autism and with Down syndrome interacted with their caregivers in order to document how joint engagement developed over a year-long period and how variations in joint engagement experiences predicted language outcome. Children with autism…

  9. Comparison of human lumbar facet joint capsule strains during simulated high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation versus physiological motions

    PubMed Central

    Ianuzzi, Allyson; Khalsa, Partap S.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Spinal manipulation (SM) is a n effective treatment for low back pain (LBP), and it has been theorized that SM induces a beneficial neurophysiological effect by stimulating mechanically sensitive neurons in the lumbar facet joint capsule (FJC). PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine whether human lumbar FJC strains during simulated SM were different from those that occur during physiological motions. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING Lumbar FJC strains were measured in human cadaveric spine specimens during physiological motions and simulated SM in a laboratory setting. METHODS Specimens were tested during displacement-controlled physiological motions of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotations. SM was simulated using combinations of manipulation site (L3, L4, and L5), impulse speed (5, 20, and 50 mm/s), and pre-torque magnitude (applied at T12 to simulate patient position; 0, 5, 10 Nm). FJC strains and vertebral motions (using six degrees of freedom) were measured during both loading protocols. RESULTS During SM, the applied loads were within the range measured during SM in vivo. Vertebral translations occurred primarily in the direction of the applied load, and were similar in magnitude regardless of manipulation site. Vertebral rotations and FJC strain magnitudes during SM were within the range that occurred during physiological motions. At a given FJC, manipulations delivered distally induced capsule strains similar in magnitude to those that occurred when the manipulation was applied proximally. CONCLUSIONS FJC strain magnitudes during SM were within the physiological range, suggesting that SM is biomechanically safe. Successful treatment of patients with LBP using SM may not require precise segmental specificity, because the strain magnitudes at a given FJC during SM do not depend upon manipulation site. PMID:15863084

  10. Facets: Ersatz, Resource and Tag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frické, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Faceted classification appears to be of utmost importance. Ersatz facets, resource faceting and tag faceting: The distinctions are drawn between facets and ersatz facets, and between faceted resources and faceted tags. Single tag resource faceting and multiple tag information object faceting: The basic features are explored of single…

  11. Benign joint hypermobility syndrome in soldiers; what is the effect of military training courses on associated joint instabilities?

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Kamran; Mottaghi, Peyman; Hosseini, Alireza; Abadi, Hossein Hassan; Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypermobile joints are joints with beyond normal range of motion and may be associated with joint derangements. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) among soldiers and effect of training courses on related joint instabilities. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cohort study on 721 soldiers of Iran Army in Isfahan in 2013 the prevalence of joint hypermobility was obtained by using Beighton criteria. Soldiers divided in two groups of healthy and suffered based on their scores. The prevalence of ankle sprain, shoulder and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocations identified before beginning service by history-taking and reviewing paraclinical documents. After 3 months of military training, a recent occurrence of mentioned diseases was revaluated in two groups. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS-20 software using Independent-T and Chi-square tests. Results: The frequency of BJHS before military training was 29.4%. After passing military training period, the incidence of ankle sprain was significantly higher in suffered group achieving the minimum Beighton score (BS) of 4 (4.3%, P = 0.03), 5 (5.5%, P = 0.005) and also 6 out of 9 (6.5%, P = 0.01). The incidence of TMJ dislocation was not significantly different based on a minimum score of 4, while it was higher in suffered group when considering the score of 5 (2.1%) and 6 (2.6%) for discrimination of two groups (P = 0.03). There was no significant difference between two groups in case of shoulder dislocation anyway. Conclusion: Military training can increase the incidence of ankle sprains and TMJ dislocations in hypermobility persons with higher BS in comparison with healthy people. Therefore, screening of joint hypermobility may be useful in identifying individuals at increased risk for joint instabilities. PMID:25364364

  12. Interventional radiology in bone and joint

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, M.; Laredo, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent radiologic procedures in bone and joints, some of which eliminate the need for surgery are exposed, including: trephine biopsies of the thoracic and lumbar spine, sacro-iliac joints, peripheral bones synovial membrane and soft tissues, using either fluoroscopic echographic or CT guidance - chemonucleolysis - vascular embolization of skeletal tumors and management of vertebral hemangiomas - selective steroid injection in a broad spectrum of diseases including vertebral facet syndrome, cervicobrachial nerve root pain, rotator cuff calcium deposit, bone cysts.

  13. The Bowen-Conradi syndrome -- a highly lethal autosomal recessive syndrome of microcephaly, micrognathia, low birth weight, and joint deformities.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A G; Woerner, S J; Montalvo-Hicks, L D; Fowlow, S B; Haslam, R H; Metcalf, P J; Lowry, R B

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes six Hutterite children from five families who appear to have been affected by the same syndrome that was described in two brothers by Bowen and Conradi [1]. Our additional cases confirm that the major features of the syndrome include porportionate intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, micrognathia, a prominent nose, rocker-bottom feet, joint limitation, and failure to thrive, with death within the first year of life. Bowen-Conradi syndrome is an autosomal recessive trait and pedigree records show that all six families now known are related to each other through two couples born in the late 1700s but that there are additional earlier possible sources of the responsible gene. The differential diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed. PMID:484596

  14. Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint Stabilization in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome--Case Report.

    PubMed

    Breahna, Anca Nicoleta; Meads, Bryce Maurice

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of an 18-years-old patient with thumb carpometacarpal ligament laxity due to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who was treated with trapezial opening wedge osteotomy combined with volar ligaments reconstruction. Two years postoperatively she is pain free and the thumb carpometacarpal joint is stable. PMID:26388011

  15. Assessing Joint Attention Responding and Initiation in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Jane; Impey, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Background: Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurogenetic disorder that overlaps with autism and is associated with severe cognitive, speech and motor impairments. Communication and social deficits are found among children with AS, both of which may be linked to impairments in joint attention. Methods: The participants in this study were four…

  16. Joint Attention Behaviours and Vocabulary Development in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zampini, L.; Salvi, A.; D'Odorico, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because of their difficulties in language development, various studies have focussed on the precursors of linguistic skills in children with Down syndrome. However, data on the predictive role of joint attention on language development in this population are inconsistent. The present study aimed to analyse attention behaviours in a…

  17. Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome/ Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: The link between connective tissue and psychological distress revised.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Ursini, Gianluca; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Psychological distress is a known feature of generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), as well as of its most common syndromic presentation, namely Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome - JHS/EDS-HT), and significantly contributes to the quality of life of affected individuals. Most published articles dealt with the link between gJHM (or JHS/EDS-HT) and anxiety-related conditions, and a novel generation of studies is emerging aimed at investigating the psychopathologic background of such an association. In this paper, literature review was carried out with a semi-systematic approach spanning the entire spectrum of psychopathological findings in gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT. Interestingly, in addition to the confirmation of a tight link between anxiety and gJHM, preliminary connections with depression, attention deficit (and hyperactivity) disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder were also found. Few papers investigated the relationship with schizophrenia with contrasting results. The mind-body connections hypothesized on the basis of available data were discussed with focus on somatotype, presumed psychopathology, and involvement of the extracellular matrix in the central nervous system. The hypothesis of positive Beighton score and alteration of interoceptive/proprioceptive/body awareness as possible endophenotypes in families with symptomatic gJHM or JHS/EDS-HT is also suggested. Concluding remarks addressed the implications of the psychopathological features of gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT in clinical practice. PMID:25821094

  18. Radiographic manifestations of the temporomandibular joint in a case of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, E; Kansu, Ö; Özgen, B; Akçiçek, G; Kansu, H

    2013-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder with progressive asymmetrical and disproportionate overgrowth of various tissues of the body. The syndrome is characterized by a wide range of malformations, including craniofacial deformities. Extraoral examination revealed several of the classical craniofacial features of Proteus syndrome: pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, macrodactyly and hyperostosis. Intraoral examination revealed a high arched palate and gingival hyperplasia. Other findings were unilateral enlargement of the tongue, alveolar growth and dilaceration of the roots of the teeth. There were severe degenerative changes and deformities in the left temporomandibular joint but the oversized condyle was asymptomatic; there was no pain, limitation and deviation at mouth opening. Treatment was not necessary owing to the asymptomatic situation but periodic follow-up with clinical and radiographic examination was considered. The aim of this article is to describe the radiographic manifestations of an asymptomatic condyle malformation and other craniofacial, oral and dental findings in a 33-year-old female patient with known Proteus syndrome. PMID:22241876

  19. [Impingement syndrome following direct injuries of the shoulder joint].

    PubMed

    Volpin, G; Stahl, S; Stein, H

    1996-02-15

    Impingement is the most common cause of pain and limitation of movement in the shoulder, with painful arc syndrome its major clinical sign. It usually becomes manifest at between 70 degrees-120 degrees of abduction, but in severe cases, this may be reduced to only 50 degrees-70 degrees. We studied 22 patients who had developed shoulder impingement following direct injuries and who had been treated by anterior acromioplasty and decompression, with an average follow-up of 32 months. 5 had sustained fractures of the greater tuberosity of the humerus at the time of injury, 14 had tears of the rotator cuff of various sizes (1 in both shoulders) and 3 had developed fibrotic scars of the subacromial bursa. Excellent or good results were achieved in 86.6%. Healing time was shorter, and there was return of full range of shoulder movement in those with subacromial scars, undisplaced fractures of the greater tuberosity, or those with a small tear of the rotator cuff. Recovery took longer in those with larger tears of the rotator cuff and in those with displaced fractures of the greater tuberosity. Recovery time was proportional to the size of the rotator cuff tear. It is concluded that direct trauma to the shoulder bears a direct relationship to the development of impingement syndrome, and that at surgery a concomitant tear in the rotator cuff is seen more than 2/3. Because of the high rate of success in surgical treatment of this syndrome, operation is indicated when a few months of physical therapy and analgesics fail to provide relief. In the presence of fractures, decompression surgery should be postponed until the fracture has united. PMID:8675117

  20. Functional assessments of the knee joint biomechanics by using pendulum test in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casabona, Antonino; Valle, Maria Stella; Pisasale, Mariangela; Pantò, Maria Rosita; Cioni, Matteo

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we assessed kinematics and viscoelastic features of knee joint in adults with Down syndrome (DS) by means of the Wartenberg pendulum test. This test allows the measuring of the kinematics of the knee joint during passive pendular motion of leg under the influence of gravity. In addition, by a combination of kinematic and anthropometric data, pendulum test provides estimates of joint viscoelastic properties by computing damping and stiffness coefficients. To monitor the occurrences of muscle activation, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of muscle rectus femoris was recorded. The experimental protocol was performed in a group of 10 adults with DS compared with 10 control adults without DS. Joint motion amplitude, velocity, and acceleration of the leg during the first knee flexion significantly decreased in persons with DS with respect to those without DS. This behavior was associated with the activation of rectus femoris in subjects with DS that resulted in increasing of joint resistance shortly after the onset of the first leg flexion. The EMG bursts mostly occurred between 50 and 150 ms from the leg flexion onset. During the remaining cycles of pendular motion, persons with DS exhibited passive leg oscillations with low tonic EMG activity and reduced damping coefficient compared with control subjects. These results suggest that adults with DS might perform preprogrammed contractions to increase joint resistance and compensate for inherent joint instability occurring for quick and unpredictable perturbations. The reduction of damping coefficients observed during passive oscillations could be a predictor of muscle hypotonia. PMID:22995394

  1. Functional assessments of the knee joint biomechanics by using pendulum test in adults with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Casabona, Antonino; Valle, Maria Stella; Pisasale, Mariangela; Pantò, Maria Rosita

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we assessed kinematics and viscoelastic features of knee joint in adults with Down syndrome (DS) by means of the Wartenberg pendulum test. This test allows the measuring of the kinematics of the knee joint during passive pendular motion of leg under the influence of gravity. In addition, by a combination of kinematic and anthropometric data, pendulum test provides estimates of joint viscoelastic properties by computing damping and stiffness coefficients. To monitor the occurrences of muscle activation, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of muscle rectus femoris was recorded. The experimental protocol was performed in a group of 10 adults with DS compared with 10 control adults without DS. Joint motion amplitude, velocity, and acceleration of the leg during the first knee flexion significantly decreased in persons with DS with respect to those without DS. This behavior was associated with the activation of rectus femoris in subjects with DS that resulted in increasing of joint resistance shortly after the onset of the first leg flexion. The EMG bursts mostly occurred between 50 and 150 ms from the leg flexion onset. During the remaining cycles of pendular motion, persons with DS exhibited passive leg oscillations with low tonic EMG activity and reduced damping coefficient compared with control subjects. These results suggest that adults with DS might perform preprogrammed contractions to increase joint resistance and compensate for inherent joint instability occurring for quick and unpredictable perturbations. The reduction of damping coefficients observed during passive oscillations could be a predictor of muscle hypotonia. PMID:22995394

  2. Inter-Dependent Mechanisms Behind Cognitive Dysfunction, Vascular Biology and Alzheimer's Dementia in Down Syndrome: Multi-Faceted Roles of APP

    PubMed Central

    Nizetic, Dean; Chen, Christopher L.; Hong, Wanjin; Koo, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) virtually all develop intellectual disability (ID) of varying degree of severity, and also have a high risk of early Alzheimer's disease (AD). ID prior to the onset of dementia, and its relationship to the onset of dementia in DS is a complex phenomenon influenced by many factors, and scarcely understood. Unraveling the causative factors and modulators of these processes remains a challenge, with potential to be informative for both ID and AD, for the development of early biomarkers and/or therapeutic approaches. We review the potential relative and inter-connected roles of the chromosome 21 gene for amyloid precursor protein (APP), in both pathological conditions. Rare non-DS people with duplication of APP (dupAPP) get familial early onset AD (FEOAD) with virtually 100% penetrance and prominent cerebrovascular pathology, but don't suffer from ID before dementia onset. All of these features appear to be radically different in DS. On the other hand, rare individuals with partial trisomy 21 (T21) (with APP, but not DS-critical region in trisomy) have been described having ID. Likewise, partial T21 DS (without APP trisomy) show a range of ID, but no AD pathology. We review the multi-faceted roles of APP that might affect cognitive functioning. Given the fact that both Aβ secretion and synaptic maturation/plasticity are dependent on neuronal activity, we explore how this conflicting inter-dependency might affect cognitive pathogenesis in a dynamic way in DS, throughout the lifespan of an individual. PMID:26648852

  3. A study of migraine characteristics in joint hypermobility syndrome a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Puledda, Francesca; Viganò, Alessandro; Celletti, Claudia; Petolicchio, Barbara; Toscano, Massimiliano; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Castori, Marco; Laudani, Guido; Valente, Donatella; Camerota, Filippo; Di Piero, Vittorio

    2015-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associated with musculoskeletal pain, fatigue and headache. Migraine with or without aura is considered the most common form of headache in JHS/EDS-HT. In this population of chronically ill patients, we investigated whether migraine characteristics were different from those of a control population of migraine patients. The study was carried out on 33 selected JHS/EDS-HT patients, diagnosed according to current criteria. Sixty-six migraine subjects matching age and gender were consecutively selected as controls (MO group) among patients attending our Headache Clinic. JHS/EDS-HT and MO were screened for a series of headache characteristics, such as frequency, intensity, age of onset, level of disability, use of rescue and prophylactic medications. Differences between the two groups were tested by using independent group comparisons. Results showed that in JHS/EDS-HT: (1) migraine has an earlier onset (12.6 vs 17 years of age; p = 0.005); (2) the rate of migraine days/month is higher (15 vs 9.3 days/month; p = 0.01); (3) accompanying symptoms are usually more frequent; (4) HIT-6 and MIDAS scores are higher (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03); (5) efficacy of rescue medication is almost identical, although, total drug consumption is significantly lower (p < 0.04). Joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type patients have a more severe headache syndrome with respect to the MO group, therefore demonstrating that migraine has a very high impact on quality of life in this disease. PMID:25791889

  4. Syndromic Surveillance System for Korea-US Joint Biosurveillance Portal: Design and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chulwoo; Burkom, Howard; Yoon, Chang-Gyo; Stewart, Miles; Elbert, Yevgeniy; Katz, Aaron; Tak, Sangwoo

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the growing importance of situational awareness of bioterrorism threats, the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the United States have constructed a joint military capability, called the Biosurveillance Portal (BSP), to enhance biosecurity. As one component of the BSP, we developed the Military Active Real-time Syndromic Surveillance (MARSS) system to detect and track natural and deliberate disease outbreaks. This article describes the ROK military health data infrastructure and explains how syndromic data are derived and made available to epidemiologists. Queries corresponding to 8 syndromes, based on published clinical effects of weaponized pathogens, were used to classify military hospital patient records to form aggregated daily syndromic counts. A set of ICD-10 codes for each syndrome was defined through literature review and expert panel discussion. A study set of time series of national daily counts for each syndrome was extracted from the Defense Medical Statistical Information System between January 1, 2011, and May 31, 2014. A stratified, adjusted cumulative summation algorithm was implemented for each syndrome group to signal alerts prompting investigation. The algorithm was developed by calculating sensitivity to sets of 1,000 artificial outbreak signals randomly injected in the dataset, with each signal injected in a separate trial. Queries and visualizations were adapted from the Suite for Automated Global bioSurveillance. Findings indicated that early warning of outbreaks affecting fewer than 50 patients will require analysis at subnational levels, especially for common syndrome groups. Developing MARSS to improve sensitivity will require modification of underlying syndromic diagnosis codes, engineering to coordinate alerts among subdivisions, and enhanced algorithms. The bioterrorist threat in the Korean peninsula mandates these efforts. PMID:27314655

  5. Antley-Bixler syndrome: a disorder characterized by congenital synostosis of the elbow joint and the cranial suture.

    PubMed

    Kitoh, H; Nogami, H; Oki, T; Arao, K; Nagasaka, M; Tanaka, Y

    1996-01-01

    The Antley-Bixler syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia, radiohumeral synostosis, joint contractures, arachnodactyly, and femoral bowing and fractures. We report four cases with this disorder, all of which had craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia with characteristic facial appearance, and contractures of bilateral elbow joints. However, femoral bowing, fractures, and arachnodactyly were not seen in our patients. In addition, proximal phalanges of the thumb and the great toe showed deformity of the delta phalanx in two cases. Characteristic features in these cases were the synostotic deformity of the elbow joint; three had radioulnahumeral synostosis, and one had radioulnar synostosis. Therefore, our cases indicated that various synostotic patterns of the elbow joints may exist in this syndrome. It is reasonable to propose that characteristic craniofacial appearance associated with the synostosis of the elbow joints of various forms should be considered minimal diagnostic criteria of the Antley-Bixler syndrome. PMID:8742293

  6. A rare case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome following temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Lehman, H; Rushinek, H

    2015-08-01

    Surgical approaches to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have been designed specifically to minimize injury to the temporal branch of the facial nerve. In spite of this, facial nerve dysfunction occurs in 1-32% of patients undergoing TMJ surgery. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by peripheral facial paralysis that often involves other cranial nerves, mostly cranial nerve VIII. The pathology is attributed to the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus in the geniculate ganglion. The diagnosis is based mostly on history and physical findings. Surgical procedures have been known to reactivate varicella zoster virus, but Ramsay Hunt syndrome subsequent to TMJ surgery has not been described yet. This report describes a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with TMJ surgery. Because of the relatively high incidence of facial nerve dysfunction associated with TMJ surgery, patients with varicella zoster virus reactivation may initially be misdiagnosed with iatrogenic facial palsy, or vice versa. PMID:25864001

  7. An Autosomal Recessive Syndrome of Joint Contractures, Muscular Atrophy, Microcytic Anemia, and Panniculitis-Associated Lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Hernandez, Maria Dolores; Sousa, Ana Berta; Subramanyam, Lalitha; Martínez de Villarreal, Laura; dos Santos, Heloísa G.; Barboza, Oralia

    2010-01-01

    Context: Genetic lipodystrophies are rare disorders characterized by partial or complete loss of adipose tissue and predisposition to insulin resistance and its complications such as diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, acanthosis nigricans, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Objective: The objective of the study was to report a novel autosomal recessive lipodystrophy syndrome. Results: We report the detailed phenotype of two males and one female patient, 26–34 yr old, belonging to two pedigrees with an autosomal recessive syndrome presenting with childhood-onset lipodystrophy, muscle atrophy, severe joint contractures, erythematous skin lesions, and microcytic anemia. Other variable clinical features include hypergammaglobulinemia, hepatosplenomegaly, generalized seizures, and basal ganglia calcification. None of the patients had diabetes mellitus or acanthosis nigricans. Two had mild hypertriglyceridemia and all had low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Skin biopsy of an erythematous nodular skin lesion from one of the patients revealed evidence of panniculitis. The lipodystrophy initially affected the upper body but later became generalized involving abdomen and lower extremities as well. Conclusions: We conclude that these patients represent a novel autoinflammatory syndrome resulting in joint contractures, muscle atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy. The molecular genetic basis of this disorder remains to be elucidated. PMID:20534754

  8. Prevalence, injury rate and, symptom frequency in generalized joint laxity and joint hypermobility syndrome in a "healthy" college population.

    PubMed

    Russek, Leslie N; Errico, Deanna M

    2016-04-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) are gaining increased attention as potential sources of pain and injury. The aims of this study were to evaluate prevalence of GJH and JHS and to determine whether musculoskeletal injuries and symptoms commonly attributed to GJH and JHS were more common within a "healthy" college student population. The study involved a convenience sample of 267 college and graduate students, aged 17-26. GJH was assessed using the Beighton score with a cutoff of 5/9, while JHS was assessed using the Brighton criteria. Injury history and symptoms were assessed by recall. Prevalence of GJH was 26.2 % overall (females 36.7 %, males 13.7 %). Prevalence of JHS was 19.5 % overall (females 24.5 %, males 13.7 %). Injury rates were not significantly different for individuals who had GJH vs. those who did not have GJH. Individuals with JHS were significantly more likely to have had sprains, back pain, and stress fractures. Symptoms were no different between those with GJH and those who did not have GJH. However, individuals with JHS were significantly more likely to report clumsiness, easy bruising, and balance problems than those who did not have JHS. GJH and JHS were relatively common in this healthy college student population; GJH was not associated with increased incidence of injury or symptoms commonly attributed to JHS, but JHS was associated with increased incidence of some injuries and symptoms. PMID:25930211

  9. Effects of Neoprene Wrist/Hand Splints on Handwriting for Students with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome: A Single System Design Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Lauren; Wesley, Alison; Wallen, Margaret; Bundy, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Pain associated with hypermobility of wrist and hand joints can contribute to decreased handwriting output. This study examined the effectiveness of a neoprene wrist/hand splint in reducing pain and increasing handwriting speed and endurance for students with joint hypermobility syndrome. Methods: Multiple baseline, single system design…

  10. Lack of consensus on tests and criteria for generalized joint hypermobility, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: hypermobile type and joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Remvig, Lars; Flycht, Lise; Christensen, Karl B; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to register clinicians performance and opinion of importance of clinical tests for generalized joint hypermobility (GJH), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), and to reach a consensus among clinicians on criteria for diagnosing GJH, EDS-HT and JHS. A panel of clinicians answered questions about how to perform and interpret clinical tests and rated test importance on an 11-box scale. The questionnaire was developed on the basis of information from focus groups and the literature. Cronbach's α was used as a measure of internal consistency/consensus among the panelists. The results showed Cronbach's α on importance score of items for diagnosing GJH, EDS-HT and JHS was 0.61, 0.79, and 0.44, respectively. Panelist-group correlation for the three conditions varied substantially (-0.46 to 0.89, 0.03 to 0.68, and -0.07 to 0.68) indicating heterogeneity among the panelists. There was agreement on which tests to use, but performance of the tests (i.e., the specific maneuvers) varied considerably inclusive use of tests with unknown reliability. Furthermore, agreement on the diagnostic criteria varied. We conclude that the level of consensus for the importance of various items for diagnosing GJH, EDS-HT and JHS, was below the required limit (Cronbach's α >0.90) for clinical decision-making and diagnosing. Consensus on tests and criteria through a Delphi process could not be reached. Better descriptions of, and reliability studies on, test maneuvers and criteria sets for these conditions are needed. Subsequent intensive training and implementation of these tests and criteria, nationally as well as internationally should be established. PMID:24464988

  11. Knowledge, assessment, and management of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type among Flemish physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Deane, Janet; Simmonds, Jane; De Wandele, Inge; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska; Calders, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Physiotherapy plays a fundamental role in managing adults with the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). However, it is a challenge for both the patient and the physiotherapist as the condition is poorly understood and treatment for JHS/EDS-HT is currently undefined. Insight into current practice is, therefore, necessary in order to establish baseline knowledge in this area and in the long term to improve the standard of patient care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate current physiotherapists' knowledge of JHS/EDS-HT and to gain insight into current physiotherapy practice with emphasis on assessment, management, and treatment efficacy. Three hundred twenty-five Flemish physiotherapists participated in the study by filling out electronically a modified version of the "Hypermobility and Hypermobility Syndrome Questionnaire" (HHQ), which covered theoretical constructs such as general knowledge, assessment, management, and learning in relation to generalized joint hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT. The results show that physiotherapists report a low level of confidence with regard to assessment and management of JHS/EDS-HT. Knowledge of hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT is weak, especially regarding the features associated with JHS/EDS-HT. Many treatment approaches are used by physiotherapists with the majority showing preference for education, reassurance, muscle strengthening, proprioceptive and core stability training. Almost all approaches were perceived as being clinically effective by the physiotherapists, highlighting a lack of consensus. In conclusion, this study in Flemish physiotherapists confirms that JHS/EDS-HT is under-recognized, not well known and deemed difficult to treat. Further education is required and sought by the physiotherapists surveyed, and future research is needed. PMID:25821093

  12. Transcriptome-Wide Expression Profiling in Skin Fibroblasts of Patients with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common systemic heritable connective tissue disorder, and is mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, minor skin changes and a wide range of satellite features. JHS/EDS-HT is considered an autosomal dominant trait but is still without a defined molecular basis. The absence of (a) causative gene(s) for JHS/EDS-HT is likely attributable to marked genetic heterogeneity and/or interaction of multiple loci. In order to help in deciphering such a complex molecular background, we carried out a comprehensive immunofluorescence analysis and gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from five women affected with JHS/EDS-HT. Protein study revealed disarray of several matrix structural components such as fibrillins, tenascins, elastin, collagens, fibronectin, and their integrin receptors. Transcriptome analysis indicated perturbation of different signaling cascades that are required for homeostatic regulation either during development or in adult tissues as well as altered expression of several genes involved in maintenance of extracellular matrix architecture and homeostasis (e.g., SPON2, TGM2, MMP16, GPC4, SULF1), cell-cell adhesion (e.g., CDH2, CHD10, PCDH9, CLDN11, FLG, DSP), immune/inflammatory/pain responses (e.g., CFD, AQP9, COLEC12, KCNQ5, PRLR), and essential for redox balance (e.g., ADH1C, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, MAOB, GSTM5). Our findings provide a picture of the gene expression profile and dysregulated pathways in JHS/EDS-HT skin fibroblasts that correlate well with the systemic phenotype of the patients. PMID:27518164

  13. Transcriptome-Wide Expression Profiling in Skin Fibroblasts of Patients with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common systemic heritable connective tissue disorder, and is mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, minor skin changes and a wide range of satellite features. JHS/EDS-HT is considered an autosomal dominant trait but is still without a defined molecular basis. The absence of (a) causative gene(s) for JHS/EDS-HT is likely attributable to marked genetic heterogeneity and/or interaction of multiple loci. In order to help in deciphering such a complex molecular background, we carried out a comprehensive immunofluorescence analysis and gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from five women affected with JHS/EDS-HT. Protein study revealed disarray of several matrix structural components such as fibrillins, tenascins, elastin, collagens, fibronectin, and their integrin receptors. Transcriptome analysis indicated perturbation of different signaling cascades that are required for homeostatic regulation either during development or in adult tissues as well as altered expression of several genes involved in maintenance of extracellular matrix architecture and homeostasis (e.g., SPON2, TGM2, MMP16, GPC4, SULF1), cell-cell adhesion (e.g., CDH2, CHD10, PCDH9, CLDN11, FLG, DSP), immune/inflammatory/pain responses (e.g., CFD, AQP9, COLEC12, KCNQ5, PRLR), and essential for redox balance (e.g., ADH1C, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, MAOB, GSTM5). Our findings provide a picture of the gene expression profile and dysregulated pathways in JHS/EDS-HT skin fibroblasts that correlate well with the systemic phenotype of the patients. PMID:27518164

  14. Low tendon stiffness and abnormal ultrastructure distinguish classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome from benign joint hypermobility syndrome in patients.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rie Harboe; Couppé, Christian; Jensen, Jacob Kildevang; Olsen, Morten Raun; Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Malfait, Fransiska; Symoens, Sofie; De Paepe, Anne; Schjerling, Peter; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Remvig, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-11-01

    There is a clinical overlap between classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS) and benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS), with hypermobility as the main symptom. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of type V collagen mutations and tendon pathology in these 2 syndromes. In patients (cEDS, n=7; BJHS, n=8) and controls (Ctrl, n=8), we measured patellar tendon ultrastructure (transmission electron microscopy), dimensions (magnetic resonance imaging), and biomechanical properties (force and ultrasonographic measurements during a ramped isometric knee extension). Mutation analyses (COL5A1 and COL5A2) were performed in the patients. COL5A1 mutations were found in 3 of 4 of the patients with cEDS. Patellar tendon dimensions were similar between the groups, but large, irregular collagen fibrils were in 4 of 5 patients with cEDS. In the cEDS group, tendon stiffness and Young's modulus were reduced to ∼50% of that in BJHS and Ctrl groups (P<0.05). The nonhypermobile, healthy controls were matched with the patients in age, sex, body weight, and physical activity, to compare outcomes. COL5A1 mutations led to structural tendon pathology and low tendon stiffness in cEDS, explaining the patients' hypermobility, whereas no tendon pathology was found that explained the hypermobility in BJHS. PMID:25122555

  15. Rating Parent-Child Interactions: Joint Engagement, Communication Dynamics, and Shared Topics in Autism, Down Syndrome, and Typical Development

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger; Deckner, Deborah F.; Nelson, P. Brooke

    2012-01-01

    A battery of 17 rating items were applied to video records of typically-developing toddlers and young children with autism and Down syndrome interacting with their parents during the Communication Play Protocol. This battery provided a reliable and broad view of the joint engagement triad of child, partner, and shared topic. Ratings of the child’s joint engagement correlated very strongly with state coding of joint engagement and replicated the findings that coordinated joint engagement was less likely in children with autism and symbol-infused joint engagement was less likely in children with Down syndrome. Ratings of other child actions, of parent contributions, and of shared topics and communicative dynamics also documented pervasive variations related to diagnosis, language facility, and communicative context. PMID:22466689

  16. Intra-Articular Fibroma of Tendon Sheath in a Knee Joint Associated with Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunseob; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lih, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in the active athlete population. A nodular lesion on the inner side of the ITB as an etiology or an accompanying lesion from friction syndrome has been rarely reported. A 45-year-old male presented with recurrent pain and a movable nodule at the lateral joint area, diagnosed as ITB friction syndrome. The nodule was confirmed as a rare intra-articular fibroma of the tendon sheath (FTS) on the basis of histopathologic findings. We describe the MRI findings, arthroscopic and pathologic features, in this case of intra-articular FTS presenting with ITB friction syndrome. PMID:25598686

  17. Intra-articular fibroma of tendon sheath in a knee joint associated with iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sunseob; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lih, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in the active athlete population. A nodular lesion on the inner side of the ITB as an etiology or an accompanying lesion from friction syndrome has been rarely reported. A 45-year-old male presented with recurrent pain and a movable nodule at the lateral joint area, diagnosed as ITB friction syndrome. The nodule was confirmed as a rare intra-articular fibroma of the tendon sheath (FTS) on the basis of histopathologic findings. We describe the MRI findings, arthroscopic and pathologic features, in this case of intra-articular FTS presenting with ITB friction syndrome. PMID:25598686

  18. Controlled medial branch anesthetic block in the diagnosis of chronic lumbar facet joint pain: the value of a three-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Ivan Dias; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; de Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To verify the incidence of facetary and low back pain after a controlled medial branch anesthetic block in a three-month follow-up and to verify the correlation between the positive results and the demographic variables. METHODS: Patients with chronic lumbar pain underwent a sham blockade (with a saline injection) and then a controlled medial branch block. Their symptoms were evaluated before and after the sham injection and after the real controlled medial branch block; the symptoms were reevaluated after one day and one week, as well as after one, two and three months using the visual analog scale. We searched for an association between the positive results and the demographic characteristics of the patients. RESULTS: A total of 104 controlled medial branch blocks were performed and 54 patients (52%) demonstrated >50% improvements in pain after the blockade. After three months, lumbar pain returned in only 18 individuals, with visual analogue scale scores >4. Therefore, these patients were diagnosed with chronic facet low back pain. The three-months of follow-up after the controlled medial branch block excluded 36 patients (67%) with false positive results. The results of the controlled medial branch block were not correlated to sex, age, pain duration or work disability but were correlated with patient age (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Patient diagnosis with a controlled medial branch block proved to be effective but was not associated with any demographic variables. A three-month follow-up is required to avoid a high number of false positives. PMID:25141111

  19. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension, respectively. Treatment included a high-velocity low amplitude thrust manipulation to the talocrural joint, which helped restore normal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. The patient also received tibiofemoral joint non-thrust manual therapy to regain normal knee extension mobility prior to implementing further functional progression exercises to her home program (HEP). This case report highlights the importance of a detailed evaluation of knee and ankle joint mobility in patients presenting with anterior knee pain. Further, manual physical therapy to the lower extremity was found to be successful in restoring normal movement patterns and pain-free function in a patient with chronic anterior knee pain. PMID:24976753

  20. Unexpected association between joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Massimo; Celletti, Claudia; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Mastroeni, Simona; Castori, Marco; Biondi, Massimo; Camerota, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a largely unrecognized, heritable connective tissue disorder, mainly characterized by joint instability complications, widespread musculoskeletal pain, and minor skin features. In a case-control study, 47 consecutive JHS/EDS-HT patients were investigated for the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and compared to 45 healthy controls in a single center. The psychiatric evaluation consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). The Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) was used to assess the overall severity of psychological, social, and occupational functions. JHS/EDS-HT patients had significantly higher mean scores for all questionnaires: HAM-A (6.7 vs. 3.8), HAM-D (6.4 vs. 2.7), GAF (75.0 vs. 86.1), and BPRS (27.5 vs. 25.6). The JHS/EDS-HT group had a 4.3 higher risk of being affected by any psychiatric disorder, and in particular, a 5.8 higher risk of having a personality disorder. In particular, 5 JHS/EDS-HT suffered from obsessive-compulsive personality disorder with an observed prevalence rate of 10.6 % (3.6-23.1). Psychiatric assessment of JHS/EDS-HT patients showed an extremely high prevalence of personality disorders (21 %), and of Axis-I disorders (38 %), mostly depressive. This study did not confirm the previously reported increased rate of panic disorders in JHS/EDS-HT. PMID:24272065

  1. The role of narrative medicine in the management of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Knight, Isobel

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder affecting every bodily system. It is largely underdiagnosed by many practitioners, with the result of a considerable delay in diagnosis and, consequently, in the onset of adequate management schedule and treatment. Patients may also experience to be misbelieved, erroneously considered affected by a psychiatric or psychosomatic disorders, and rejected by the medical profession, which can lead to feelings of anger and resentment. Patient journeys are often long and complicated, but if doctors allowed the patient time to tell the full story, and were more prepared to think holistically, there may be a far more positive outcome. Here, the patients' perspective is presented with a narrative medicine approach, illustrating the tri-dimensional experience of a JHS/EDS-HT patient, who is also a Bowen Practitioner and a medical writer/educator. Narrative medicine would be invaluable in working with JHS/EDS-HT so that the patient can tell the story, and offer the practitioner a whole picture of her/his suffering and, often, the key for understanding the cause(s). Once this has been achieved, it might be possible to build upon a more positive and therapeutic dialogue which would result in better treatment and more effective management. It is also important for doctors to communicate with JHS/EDS-HT experts who will ultimately improve the patient journey and treatment outcomes of such a complex connective tissue disorder. PMID:25821096

  2. Heart rate, conduction and ultrasound abnormalities in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Celletti, Claudia; Colotto, Marco; Amato, Silvia; Colella, Alessandra; Curione, Mario; Danese, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. Though not considered a diagnostic criterion for most EDS subtypes, cardiovascular involvement is a well-known complication in EDS. A case-control study was carried out on 28 adults with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosed according to current criteria, compared to 29 healthy subjects evaluating resting electrocardiographic (ECG), 24-h ECG and resting heart ultrasound data. Results obtained in the ECG studies showed a moderate excess in duration of the PR interval and P wave, an excess of heart conduction and rate abnormalities and an increased rate of mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency often complicating with "true" mitral valve prolapse in the ecocardiographic study. These variable ECG subclinical anomalies reported in our sample may represent the resting surrogate of such a subnormal cardiovascular response to postural changes that are known to be present in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings indicate the usefulness of a full cardiologic evaluation of adults with JHS/EDS-HT for the correct management. PMID:24752348

  3. Unusual lesions mimicking impingement syndrome in the shoulder joint - Think medially.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Malhotra, Akshay; Cribb, Gillian; Cool, Paul; Hay, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Impingement syndrome is usually caused by irritation of the rotator cuff within the sub acromial space and this includes the coraco-acromial arch (Acromion and Coraco-acromial ligament), the acromio-clavicular joint and occasionally the coracoid. Iatrogenic causes such as sutures, pins, plates or wires left from previous surgery can cause similar symptoms. We present a series of four cases mimicking "classical" impingement symptoms/signs in which the causal pathology was identified outside the sub-acromial space. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed lesions that were present in the supra-spinatus fossa but were causing pressure effects on the sub-acromial space, namely - a ganglion cyst in one case, lipomata in two other cases, and a glomus tumour. A ganglion cyst and glomus tumour mimicking impingement syndrome is a rare reported case to our knowledge. These are unusual causes that should be considered when investigating classical impingement syndrome and particularly those who may have failed to respond to decompression surgery. They highlight the potential value of looking beyond the sub-acromial space for causal lesions and in these cases, at a time when limited ultrasound investigation has become increasingly popular; MRI has clearly played an important and was essential in planning surgery as these lesions would not have been identified on USS. Even though the symptoms were classical. PMID:27594993

  4. TIBIOFEMORAL JOINT MOBILIZATION IN THE SUCCESSFUL MANAGEMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J.; Mischke, John J.; Courtney, Carol A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common source of anterior knee pain. Controversy exists over the exact clinical findings which define PFPS, thus, diagnosis and management can be challenging for clinicians. There is paucity in the literature concerning joint mobilization as treatment for PFPS, particularly at the tibiofemoral joint, as standard management is currently focused on therapeutic exercise, orthotics, bracing and taping. Therefore, the purpose of this case report is to describe the effects of tibiofemoral joint mobilization in the successful treatment of an individual with chronic PFPS as it relates to pain, function and central processing of pain. Study Design Case Report Case Description The subject was a 28-year-old female with a two year history of left anterior, inferior patellar knee pain consistent with chronic PFPS. She demonstrated diminished pressure pain threshold (PPT) and allodynia at the anterior knee, suggesting a component of central sensitization to her pain. She met several common diagnostic criteria for PFPS, however, only tibiofemoral anterior-posterior joint mobilization increased her pain. Subsequent treatment sessions (Visits 1-6) consisted of solely joint mobilization supplemented by instruction in a home exercise program (therapeutic exercise and balance training). As outcomes improved, treatment sessions (Visits 7-8) consisted of solely therapeutic exercise and balance training with focus on return to independent pain free functional activity. Outcomes Improvements consistent with the minimally clinically important difference were noted on the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC). Scores on the Fear Avoidance-Belief Questionnaire (6/24 to 2/24 PA, 31/42 to 5/42 W), PPT (119 to 386 kPa) and Step Down Test (11 to 40 steps) also demonstrated improvement. At a two month follow up, the subject reported continued improvement in functional

  5. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis as part of the clinical spectrum of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome?

    PubMed

    Pasetti, Martina; Mazzoleni, Fabio; Novelli, Giorgio; Iascone, Maria; Bozzetti, Alberto; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    The Carey-Finema-Ziter syndrome (CFZS, MIM 254940) is an apparently autosomal recessively inherited disorder consisting of the combination of non-progressive congenital myopathy with Moebius and Pierre Robin sequence, facial anomalies and growth delay. Mental development has been described as normal or delayed. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is the immobility of the joint caused by ankylotic fusion of the mandible to the cranial base or zygoma. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene. Most often is a true ankylosis of the TMJ but other pathological mechanisms are described (i.e., the fusion of the coronoid process to temporal bone or with the zygoma, or a variety of soft tissues disorders like Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva). Here we report a 2-year-old girl fitting with a clinical diagnosis of CFZS associated with a limited mouth opening in which temporomandibular joint ankylosis was suspected. Because it has been postulated that many clinical features in CFZS may only be secondary effects of brainstem anomalies and muscle weakness during development, the limited opening of the mouth observed in our patient could represent a rare clinical feature of CFZS itself. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27232676

  6. Comparison of the efficacy of saline, local anesthetics, and steroids in epidural and facet joint injections for the management of spinal pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Nampiaparampil, Devi E.; Manchikanti, Kavita N.; Falco, Frank J.E.; Singh, Vijay; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Kaye, Alan D.; Sehgal, Nalini; Soin, Amol; Simopoulos, Thomas T.; Bakshi, Sanjay; Gharibo, Christopher G.; Gilligan, Christopher J.; Hirsch, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of epidural and facet joint injections has been assessed utilizing multiple solutions including saline, local anesthetic, steroids, and others. The responses to these various solutions have been variable and have not been systematically assessed with long-term follow-ups. Methods: Randomized trials utilizing a true active control design were included. The primary outcome measure was pain relief and the secondary outcome measure was functional improvement. The quality of each individual article was assessed by Cochrane review criteria, as well as the criteria developed by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) for assessing interventional techniques. An evidence analysis was conducted based on the qualitative level of evidence (Level I to IV). Results: A total of 31 trials met the inclusion criteria. There was Level I evidence that local anesthetic with steroids was effective in managing chronic spinal pain based on multiple high-quality randomized controlled trials. The evidence also showed that local anesthetic with steroids and local anesthetic alone were equally effective except in disc herniation, where the superiority of local anesthetic with steroids was demonstrated over local anesthetic alone. Conclusion: This systematic review showed equal efficacy for local anesthetic with steroids and local anesthetic alone in multiple spinal conditions except for disc herniation where the superiority of local anesthetic with steroids was seen over local anesthetic alone. PMID:26005584

  7. Gait kinematics and passive knee joint range of motion in children with hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fatoye, Francis A; Palmer, Shea; van der Linden, Marietta L; Rowe, Philip J; Macmillan, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    Hypermobility syndrome (HMS) is characterised by generalised joint laxity and musculoskeletal complaints. Gait abnormalities have been reported in children with HMS but have not been empirically investigated. The extent of passive knee joint range of motion (ROM) has also not been well reported in children with HMS. This study evaluated gait kinematics and passive knee joint ROM in children diagnosed with HMS and healthy controls. Thirty-seven healthy children (mean age±SD=11.5±2.6 years) and 29 children with HMS (mean age±SD=11.9±1.8 years) participated. Sagittal knee motion and gait speed were evaluated using a VICON 3D motion analysis system. Passive knee ROM was measured with a manual goniometer. Independent t-tests compared the values of sagittal knee motion and gait speed between the two groups. Mann-Whitney U tests compared passive knee ROM between groups. Passive ROM (extension and flexion) was significantly higher (both p<0.001) in children with HMS than the healthy controls. Peak knee flexion (during loading response and swing phase) during walking was significantly lower (both p<0.001) in children with HMS. Knee extension in mid stance during walking was significantly increased (p<0.001) in children with HMS. However, gait speed was not statistically (p=0.496) different between the two groups. Children with HMS had higher passive knee ROM than healthy children and also demonstrated abnormal knee motion during gait. Gait re-education and joint stability exercise programmes may be of value to children with HMS. PMID:21300548

  8. Spectrum of mucocutaneous manifestations in 277 patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Morlino, Silvia; Sperduti, Isabella; Ritelli, Marco; Valiante, Michele; Chiarelli, Nicola; Zanca, Arianna; Celletti, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Grammatico, Paola; Colombi, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous manifestations are a diagnostic criterion of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). These two conditions, originally considered different disorders, are now accepted as clinically indistinguishable and often segregate as a single-familial trait. EDS-HT and JHS are still exclusion diagnoses not supported by any specific laboratory test. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis is, therefore, crucial for appropriate patients' classification and management, but it is actually hampered by the low consistency of many applied criteria including the cutaneous one. We report on mucocutaneous findings in 277 patients with JHS/EDS-HT with both sexes and various ages. Sixteen objective and five anamnestic items were selected and ascertained in two specialized outpatient clinics. Feature rates were compared by sex and age by a series of statistical tools. Data were also used for a multivariate correspondence analysis with the attempt to identify non-causal associations of features depicting recognizable phenotypic clusters. Our findings identified a few differences between sexes and thus indicated an attenuated sexual dimorphism for mucocutaneous features in JHS/EDS-HT. Ten features showed significantly distinct rates at different ages and this evidence corroborated the concept of an evolving phenotype in JHS/EDS-HT also affecting the skin. Multivariate correspondence analysis identified three relatively discrete phenotypic profiles, which may represent the cutaneous counterparts of the three disease phases previously proposed for JHS/EDS-HT. These findings could be used for revising the cutaneous criterion in a future consensus for the clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT. PMID:25655071

  9. Rating Parent-Child Interactions: Joint Engagement, Communication Dynamics, and Shared Topics in Autism, Down Syndrome, and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Lauren B.; Bakeman, Roger; Deckner, Deborah F.; Nelson, P. Brooke

    2012-01-01

    A battery of 17 rating items were applied to video records of typically-developing toddlers and young children with autism and Down syndrome interacting with their parents during the Communication Play Protocol. This battery provided a reliable and broad view of the joint engagement triad of child, partner, and shared topic. Ratings of the child's…

  10. NUBEAM Sources in FACETS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Indireshkumar, K.; Morris, A.; Pankin, A.; Cary, J. R.

    2009-05-01

    The SciDAC project for the development of a Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS) aims at producing tokamak core-to-wall transport simulations on massively parallel architectures. Here, we report on the progress of integrating the new parallel, PlasmaState based, Monte-Carlo NUBEAM module into the FACETS framework to provide neutral beam and fusion source terms in the plasma core diffusion equations. NUBEAM has recently been improved to facilitate invocation from third party software (e.g. SWIM). This was achieved by consolidating 100s of input variables into separate structures according to machine specificity, shot specificity, or time-slice specificity. Thanks to a combination of auto-generated code and a newly developed methodology for exposing Fortran90 derived types to C, all derived type members of NUBEAM structures have become in-memory accessible to FACETS's C++ infrastructure. NUBEAM, which is the first volumetric-coupling component in FACETS, has been wrapped with methods complying to the FACETS standard interface definition for easy interchangeability of modules at run time. Examples of neutral beam computations instrumented with TAU/Paratools on leadership class machines will be presented, as well as first coupled core-source FACETS simulations.

  11. Proteomic analysis for the identification of serum diagnostic markers for joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Satoh, Kazumi; Maniwa, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi

    2016-02-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) (also termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type) is a heritable connective tissue disorder which is characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, chronic pain, dizziness, fatigue, and minor skin changes. However, it has yet to be determined in patients with JHS whether specific genetic factors are involved in the risk of developing the disorder. Therefore, interventions have been limited to symptomatic treatments, and biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy have not yet been identified. In the present study, to identify potential serum biomarkers for JHS, we examined proteins with differential levels in sera from patients with JHS and in sera from control individuals using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling in combination with nano LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS followed by ProteinPilot analysis. In the sera of patients with JHS, a total of 106 proteins with differential levels were identified, and they were further narrowed down to 6 proteins (p<0.05, patient vs. control). Of the 6 proteins, proteins involved in the complement system including complement C1r subcomponent (C1R), vitronectin (VTN), complement component C9 (C9), and C4b-binding protein alpha chain (C4BPA) were identified as increased proteins in sera from patients with JHS compared with those in sera from controls. We confirmed increased levels of C1R and VTN in sera from patients with JHS by western blot analyses. The results indicate the possibility of a locally occurring inflammatory process in patients with JHS. PMID:26709396

  12. IINCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN SOCCER PLAYERS WITH JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Bertolini, Fabricio Melo; Vieira, Tallys Campos; Aguiar, Rodrigo Manso; Pinheiro, Guilherme Baldez; Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Eighty-three soccer players aged between 14 and 19 years, in the basic category of a professional soccer club in the city of Belo Horizonte, were followed up during the 2009 season. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted, in which these soccer players were divided randomly into two groups. The first consisted of individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), totaling 22 players, and the second was a control group with 61 players without this syndrome, determined through a physical examinati. Results: Both groups were studied with regard to incidence of ankle sprains. At the end of this period, the data were compiled and statistical analysis was performed. A total of 43 cases of ankle injury due to sprains were recorded, of which nine episodes were in players with JHS, thus making p = 0.106. The significance level was 5%. Conclusion: We were able to conclude that in our study there was insufficient evidence to assert that there is an association with increased incidence of ankle sprains among patients with JHS. PMID:27047888

  13. Is there any link between joint hypermobility and mitral valve prolapse in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kozanoglu, Erkan; Coskun Benlidayi, Ilke; Eker Akilli, Rabia; Tasal, Abdurrahman

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine whether benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) modifies the risk of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Female patients fulfilling the 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for FM were included into the study. Joint hypermobility and BJHS were assessed using Beighton's scoring system and Brighton criteria, respectively. Echocardiograpic evaluation was performed in order to test the presence of MVP. Of the 75 female FM patients, 68.0 % (n = 51) and 20.0 % (n = 15) were diagnosed with BJHS and MVP, respectively. The frequencies of both MVP and BJHS seemed higher than the general population prevalence (p = 0.000 for both). The frequency of MVP was significantly higher in patients with BJHS than that in patients without BJHS (p = 0.028). In addition, BJHS was found to increase the risk of MVP approximately ninefold [odds ratio (OR) 8.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.1-70.7]. As a result, BJHS and MVP are both common in female patients with FM. Moreover, among the female patients with FM, those with BJHS are about nine times more prone to MVP than those without BJHS. Cardiologic assessment might be added to the routine follow-up strategies in FM patients with BJHS in order to exclude the cardiac pathologies, especially MVP. PMID:26216348

  14. Targeted Deletion of Collagen V in Tendons and Ligaments Results in a Classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Joint Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mei; Connizzo, Brianne K.; Adams, Sheila M.; Freedman, Benjamin R.; Wenstrup, Richard J.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Birk, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen V mutations underlie classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and joint hypermobility is an important clinical manifestation. We define the function of collagen V in tendons and ligaments, as well as the role of alterations in collagen V expression in the pathobiology in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A conditional Col5a1flox/flox mouse model was bred with Scleraxis-Cre mice to create a targeted tendon and ligament Col5a1-null mouse model, Col5a1Δten/Δten. Targeting was specific, resulting in collagen V–null tendons and ligaments. Col5a1Δten/Δten mice demonstrated decreased body size, grip weakness, abnormal gait, joint laxity, and early-onset osteoarthritis. These gross changes were associated with abnormal fiber organization, as well as altered collagen fibril structure with increased fibril diameters and decreased fibril number that was more severe in a major joint stabilizing ligament, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), than in the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The ACL also had a higher collagen V content than did the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The collagen V–null ACL and flexor digitorum longus tendon both had significant alterations in mechanical properties, with ACL exhibiting more severe changes. The data demonstrate critical differential regulatory roles for collagen V in tendon and ligament structure and function and suggest that collagen V regulatory dysfunction is associated with an abnormal joint phenotype, similar to the hypermobility phenotype in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. PMID:25797646

  15. Targeted deletion of collagen V in tendons and ligaments results in a classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome joint phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Freedman, Benjamin R; Wenstrup, Richard J; Soslowsky, Louis J; Birk, David E

    2015-05-01

    Collagen V mutations underlie classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and joint hypermobility is an important clinical manifestation. We define the function of collagen V in tendons and ligaments, as well as the role of alterations in collagen V expression in the pathobiology in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A conditional Col5a1(flox/flox) mouse model was bred with Scleraxis-Cre mice to create a targeted tendon and ligament Col5a1-null mouse model, Col5a1(Δten/Δten). Targeting was specific, resulting in collagen V-null tendons and ligaments. Col5a1(Δten/Δten) mice demonstrated decreased body size, grip weakness, abnormal gait, joint laxity, and early-onset osteoarthritis. These gross changes were associated with abnormal fiber organization, as well as altered collagen fibril structure with increased fibril diameters and decreased fibril number that was more severe in a major joint stabilizing ligament, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), than in the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The ACL also had a higher collagen V content than did the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The collagen V-null ACL and flexor digitorum longus tendon both had significant alterations in mechanical properties, with ACL exhibiting more severe changes. The data demonstrate critical differential regulatory roles for collagen V in tendon and ligament structure and function and suggest that collagen V regulatory dysfunction is associated with an abnormal joint phenotype, similar to the hypermobility phenotype in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. PMID:25797646

  16. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  17. [The dark side of facet joint].

    PubMed

    Barelli, Laurence Perrin; Dettori, Nadia Guzman

    2016-06-22

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major medical and economical problem, because of its high incidence. Indeed, 70-85% of adult people will suffer from this kind of pain once in their life. We will focus in this article on chronic LBP, which represent an annual prevalence of 30% and more specifically on mechanical pain, with our without radiation into the legs. In case of failure of traditional analgesia combining drugs and physical therapies, we can propose interventional pain relief. This involves a series of diagnostic blocks (medial branch blocks), followed by the treatment (radiofrequency ablation). This treatment remains purely symptomatic. A multidisciplinary approach with patient's physical reconditioning is therefore very important. PMID:27506065

  18. SLAC All Access: FACET

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Mark

    2014-09-15

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  19. SLAC All Access: FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2012-07-05

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  20. Unilateral Ankylosis of Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) with Contralateral Condylar Aplasia and Related Orthopedic Deformity - Syndromic or Nonsyndromic?

    PubMed

    Vijay, Pradkhshana; Pardhe, Nilesh; Sunil, Vsb; Bajpai, Manas; Chhibber, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Condylar aplasia which means "failure of development" is a rare condition and can be unilateral or bilateral. Mandibular condylar Aplasia without any association with syndrome is extremely rare. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis results from trauma, infection and inadequate surgical treatment of the condylar area. Congenital cases are very rare. We report case of congenital unilateral aplasia of left mandibular condyle with ankylosis of right condyle, with an associated orthopedic deformity in a nine-year-old male patient, which may be a part of some unreported syndrome that has not been mentioned so far in literature. As per our best knowledge, no other case including such clinical features has been reported. PMID:25738097

  1. Quality of life, unmet needs, and iatrogenic injuries in rehabilitation of patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome hypermobility type/Joint Hypermobility Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bovet, Claire; Carlson, Matthew; Taylor, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) are connective tissue disorders that form an overlapping clinical syndrome and are associated with frequent medical visits and substantial morbidity. EDS-HT/JHS-associated pain correlates with poor quality of life. While physical therapy is the recommended treatment for EDS-HT/JHS, little is known about therapy-related patient experiences and iatrogenic injuries. We studied 38 adult EDS-HT/JHS patients, eliciting health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from 28 patients through the RAND SF-36 questionnaire. We also explored physical therapy experiences through focus groups with 13 patients. Our patients displayed poor HRQoL, with 71% reporting worse health over the past year. SF-36 scores were significantly lower than the scores of the average American population (P < 0.001 for 8 of 10 categories assessed), but were comparable to EDS-HT/JHS populations in Belgium, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Italy. Focus groups identified factors associated with: negative past physical therapy experiences, iatrogenic joint injuries, positive treatment experiences, and unmet rehabilitation needs. This group of EDS-HT/JHS patients has significant decrements in HRQoL and many unmet treatment needs, as well as a risk for iatrogenic injuries. We identify several approaches to help meet patients' needs and improve joint rehabilitation in patients with EDS-HT/JHS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273746

  2. Hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome in Brazilian students and teachers of ballet dance.

    PubMed

    Sanches, S B; Oliveira, G M; Osório, F L; Crippa, J A S; Martín-Santos, R

    2015-04-01

    The current literature has been discussing the risks and benefits of joint hypermobility (JHM) for careers in ballet This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of JHM and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) in a group of ballet teachers and students, looking both at aspects related to the flexibility required to dance, as at the risk of injuries when hypermobility is associated with other symptoms, in the case of JHS. We evaluated ballet teachers and ballet students, with age ranging from 18 to 40 years. All participants completed identification and sociodemographic questionnaires and underwent a physical examination. JHM was assessed using the Beighton score with goniometry. Symptoms of JHS were evaluated according to the Brighton criteria. Final sample consisted of 77 participants, being 44 ballet students and 33 ballet teachers. The prevalence of JHM in the sample as a whole was 58 %. Teachers and students had no significant differences regarding the prevalence of JHM (p = 0.74) (OR 1.21; 95 % CI 0.48-3.07). However, the prevalence of JHS was significantly different (p = 0.04) between students (16 %) and teachers (36 %). Teachers were three times more likely than student to have JHS (OR 3.02; 95 % CI 1.03-8.85). Teachers and students also presented differences in the frequency of specific items of Beighton score and Brighton criteria. These data provide elements to discuss the relationship between hypermobility, ballet technique and selection for dance, suggesting that dancers with JHS could find in ballet teaching an alternative to maintain professional activity with dance, while remaining protected from the higher risk of injury that professional dancers may be exposed to. PMID:25218649

  3. Living with joint hypermobility syndrome: patient experiences of diagnosis, referral and self-care

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Rohini H; Rimes, Katharine A; Clark, Carol J; Simmonds, Jane V; Horwood, Jeremy P

    2015-01-01

    Background. Musculoskeletal problems are common reasons for seeking primary health care. It has been suggested that many people with ‘everyday’ non-inflammatory musculoskeletal problems may have undiagnosed joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), a complex multi-systemic condition. JHS is characterized by joint laxity, pain, fatigue and a wide range of other symptoms. Physiotherapy is usually the preferred treatment option for JHS, although diagnosis can be difficult. The lived experience of those with JHS requires investigation. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine patients’ lived experience of JHS, their views and experiences of JHS diagnosis and management. Methods. Focus groups in four locations in the UK were convened, involving 25 participants with a prior diagnosis of JHS. The focus groups were audio recorded, fully transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method to inductively derive a thematic account of the data. Results. Pain, fatigue, proprioception difficulties and repeated cycles of injury were among the most challenging features of living with JHS. Participants perceived a lack of awareness of JHS from health professionals and more widely in society and described how diagnosis and access to appropriate health-care services was often slow and convoluted. Education for patients and health professionals was considered to be essential. Conclusions. Timely diagnosis, raising awareness and access to health professionals who understand JHS may be particularly instrumental in helping to ameliorate symptoms and help patients to self-manage their condition. Physiotherapists and other health professionals should receive training to provide biopsychosocial support for people with this condition. PMID:25911504

  4. Facets of Subjectification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visconti, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Subjectification, as the diachronic facet of subjectivity, has raised in the last two decades a number of interesting questions in grammaticalization and semantic change theory. In this paper I shall reflect on the nature and construal of subjectification, focusing on the question, formulated by Traugott (2010a, p. 58), "whether it is possible to…

  5. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  6. Re-writing the natural history of pain and related symptoms in the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Celletti, Claudia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Bruschini, Michela; Grammatico, Paola; Blundo, Carlo; Camerota, Filippo

    2013-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two clinically overlapping connective tissue disorders characterized by chronic/recurrent pain, joint instability complications, and minor skin changes. Fatigue and headache are also common, although are not yet considered diagnostic criteria. JHS/EDS-HT is a unexpectedly common condition that remains underdiagnosed by most clinicians and pain specialists. This results in interventions limited to symptomatic and non-satisfactory treatments, lacking reasonable pathophysiologic rationale. In this manuscript the fragmented knowledge on pain, fatigue, and headache in JHS/EDS is presented with review of the available published information and a description of the clinical course by symptoms, on the basis of authors' experience. Pathogenic mechanisms are suggested through comparisons with other functional somatic syndromes (e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and functional gastrointestinal disorders). The re-writing of the natural history of JHS/EDS-HT is aimed to raise awareness among clinical geneticists and specialists treating chronic pain conditions about pain and other complications of JHS/EDS-HT. Symptoms' clustering by disease stage is proposed to investigate both the molecular causes and the symptoms management of JHS/EDS-HT in future studies. PMID:24254847

  7. Differential diagnosis and diagnostic flow chart of joint hypermobility syndrome/ehlers-danlos syndrome hypermobility type compared to other heritable connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Chiarelli, Nicola; Ritelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is an evolving and protean disorder mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility and without a defined molecular basis. JHS/EDS-HT also presents with other connective tissue features affecting a variety of structures and organs, such as skin, eye, bone, and internal organs. However, most of these signs are present in variable combinations and severity in many other heritable connective tissue disorders. Accordingly, JHS/EDS-HT is an "exclusion" diagnosis which needs the absence of any consistent feature indicative of other partially overlapping connective tissue disorders. While both Villefranche and Brighton criteria include such an exclusion as a mandatory item, a systematic approach for reaching a stringent clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT is still lacking. The absence of a consensus on the diagnostic approach to JHS/EDS-HT concerning its clinical boundaries with similar conditions contribute to limit our actual understanding of the pathologic and molecular bases of this disorder. In this review, we revise the differential diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT with those heritable connective tissue disorders which show a significant overlap with the former and mostly include EDS classic, vascular and kyphoscoliotic types, osteogenesis imperfecta, Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, arterial tortuosity syndrome, and lateral meningocele syndrome. A diagnostic flow chart is also offered with the attempt to support the less experienced clinician in stringently recognizing JHS/EDS-HT and stimulate the debate in the scientific community for both management and research purposes. PMID:25821090

  8. Is pain the only symptom in patients with benign joint hypermobility syndrome?

    PubMed

    Albayrak, İlknur; Yilmaz, Halim; Akkurt, Halil Ekrem; Salli, Ali; Karaca, Gülten

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate pain, depression level, fatigue, sleep, and quality of life (QoL) among patients with benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) and to compare their results with those of healthy controls. The study involved 115 patients and 114 healthy volunteers. Pain level was rated using visual analogue scale (VAS) for all patients. Depression level, fatigue, sleep quality, and QoL of all the participants were evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Short Form-36 (SF-36), respectively. VAS value was 6.29 ± 0.94 in the patient group. Comparison of two groups showed that there were statistically significant differences between the patient group and the control group with respect to BDI, total CIS, PSQI scores, SF-36 subscales (physical function, role physical, bodily pain, general health, role emotional, and mental health), and mental component summary (p < 0.001). While pain is the predominant symptom among BJHS patients, depression, fatigue, impaired sleep, and QoL also commonly occur. Thus, all of these components should be taken into account when assessing patients with BJHS. PMID:24744155

  9. Craniovertebral Junction Instability: A Review of Facts about Facets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction surgery involves an appropriate philosophical, biomechanical and anatomical understanding apart from high degree of technical skill and ability of controlling venous and arterial bleeding. The author presents his 30-year experience with treating complex craniovertebral junction instability related surgical issues. The facets of atlas and axis form the primary site of movements at the craniovertebral junction. All craniovertebral junction instability is essentially localized to the atlantoaxial facet joint. Direct manipulation and fixation of the facets forms the basis of treatment for instability. PMID:26240728

  10. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations. PMID:27512259

  11. Short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, and clinical parameters in patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Büyükturan, Öznur; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the short-term effects of kinesio tape on joint position sense, isokinetic measurements, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 90 patients (112 knees) with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomized into a kinesio tape group (n=45) or placebo kinesio tape group (n=45). Baseline isokinetic quadriceps muscle tests and measurements of joint position sense were performed in both groups. Pain was measured with a Visual Analog Scale, kinesiophobia with the Tampa kinesiophobia scale, and symptoms and functional limitations with the Kujala pain scale. Measurements were repeated 2 days after kinesio tape application. [Results] No differences were found between baseline isokinetic muscle measurements and those taken 2 days after application. However, significant improvements were observed in the kinesio tape group, with regard to joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and functional limitations after treatment. Examination of the differences between pre- and post-treatment values in both groups revealed that the kinesio tape group demonstrated greater improvements compared to the placebo kinesio tape group. [Conclusion] Although short-term kinesio tape application did not increase hamstring muscle strength, it may have improved joint position sense, pain, kinesiophobia, symptoms, and daily limitations. PMID:27512259

  12. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePlus

    ... too far. In children with hypermobility syndrome, those ligaments are loose or weak. This may lead to: Arthritis, which may develop over time Dislocated joints, which is a separation of two bones where they meet at a joint Sprains and strains Children with hypermobile joints also often have flat ...

  13. The feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy for adults with joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Shea; Cramp, Fiona; Clark, Emma; Lewis, Rachel; Brookes, Sara; Hollingworth, William; Welton, Nicky; Thom, Howard; Terry, Rohini; Rimes, Katharine A; Horwood, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is a heritable disorder associated with laxity and pain in multiple joints. Physiotherapy is the mainstay of treatment, but there is little research investigating its clinical effectiveness. OBJECTIVES To develop a comprehensive physiotherapy intervention for adults with JHS; to pilot the intervention; and to conduct a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the feasibility of conducting a future definitive RCT. DESIGN Patients' and health professionals' perspectives on physiotherapy for JHS were explored in focus groups (stage 1). A working group of patient research partners, clinicians and researchers used this information to develop the physiotherapy intervention. This was piloted and refined on the basis of patients' and physiotherapists' feedback (stage 2). A parallel two-arm pilot RCT compared 'advice' with 'advice and physiotherapy' (stage 3). Random allocation was via an automated randomisation service, devised specifically for the study. Owing to the nature of the interventions, it was not possible to blind clinicians or patients to treatment allocation. SETTING Stage 1 - focus groups were conducted in four UK locations. Stages 2 and 3 - piloting of the intervention and the pilot RCT were conducted in two UK secondary care NHS trusts. PARTICIPANTS Stage 1 - patient focus group participants (n = 25, three men) were aged > 18 years, had a JHS diagnosis and had received physiotherapy within the preceding 12 months. The health professional focus group participants (n = 16, three men; 14 physiotherapists, two podiatrists) had experience of managing JHS. Stage 2 - patient participants (n = 8) were aged > 18 years, had a JHS diagnosis and no other musculoskeletal conditions causing pain. Stage 3 - patient participants for the pilot RCT (n = 29) were as for stage 2 but the lower age limit was 16 years. INTERVENTION For the pilot RCT (stage 3) the advice intervention was a one

  14. FACET Emittance Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, J; Hogan, M.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Litos, M.D.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to {approx}20 {micro}m long and {approx}10 {micro}m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  15. LOFAR Facet Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Shimwell, T. W.; Rafferty, D. A.; Sabater, J.; Heald, G.; Sridhar, S. S.; Dijkema, T. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rudnick, L.; Sarazin, C. L.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Ensslin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-03-01

    LOFAR, the Low-Frequency Array, is a powerful new radio telescope operating between 10 and 240 MHz. LOFAR allows detailed sensitive high-resolution studies of the low-frequency radio sky. At the same time LOFAR also provides excellent short baseline coverage to map diffuse extended emission. However, producing high-quality deep images is challenging due to the presence of direction-dependent calibration errors, caused by imperfect knowledge of the station beam shapes and the ionosphere. Furthermore, the large data volume and presence of station clock errors present additional difficulties. In this paper we present a new calibration scheme, which we name facet calibration, to obtain deep high-resolution LOFAR High Band Antenna images using the Dutch part of the array. This scheme solves and corrects the direction-dependent errors in a number of facets that cover the observed field of view. Facet calibration provides close to thermal noise limited images for a typical 8 hr observing run at ∼ 5\\prime\\prime resolution, meeting the specifications of the LOFAR Tier-1 northern survey.

  16. Comparison of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of facet tropism and facet arthrosis in degenerative cervical spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Ding, Z H; Xu, Y K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the assessment of facet tropism and facet arthrosis of spondylolisthesis levels in degenerative cervical spondylolisthesis as compared to computed tomography (CT). The discrepancies in the interpretation of CT and MRI data in the evaluation of facet tropism and arthrosis have given rise to questions regarding the reliability of comparisons of the two techniques. Using a 4-point scale, 3 blinded readers independently graded the severity of facet tropism and facet arthrosis of 79 cervical facet joints on axial T2-weighted and sagittal T1 and T2-weighted turbo spin echo images as well as the corresponding axial CT scans. All results were subjected to the kappa coefficient statistic for strength of agreement. In the assessment of the severity of facet arthrosis, intermethod agreement (weighted κ) between CT scanning with a moderate inter-rater reliability (range κ = 0.43-0.57) and MRI with fair inter-rater reliability (range κ = 0.23-0.38) was 0.76 and 0.43 for the severity of facet tropism and facet arthrosis, respectively. Intra-rater reliability for the severity of facet arthrosis was moderate to substantial for CT and was moderate for MRI scans. Intra-rater reliability for the severity of facet tropism was substantial to very good for CT and substantial for MRI scans. MRI can reliably determine the presence or degree of facet tropism but not facet arthrosis. Therefore, for a comprehensive assessment of cervical facet joint degeneration, both a CT and an MRI scan should be performed. PMID:24938702

  17. How do people with chronically painful joint hypermobility syndrome make decisions about activity?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anne; Corcoran, Kelley; Grahame, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Background: The model of activity avoidance prompted by fear of increased pain and/or harm dominates understanding and research into activity limitation in chronic pain. Yet, the accounts of people with chronic pain on decisions about activity limitation are rarely heard beyond the confines of fear and avoidance questionnaires. Methods: We used semi-structured interviews to explore the decisions of 11 women attending a pain management clinic with chronically painful Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS). Results: Six themes emerged from Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis: the overall aim of keeping pain to a manageable level, considering whether the planned activity was worth it and, running through all judgements, the influence of pain intensity. The decision was tipped towards avoidance by unpredictability of pain and by high emotional cost and towards going ahead with the activity by the wish to exert control and by low emotional cost. Many accounts described a specifiable cost–benefit analysis of individual decisions, weighing the importance of each activity against its potential aversive consequences, which only in a minority of cases was dominated by fear of pain or injury. Conclusion: Assumptions of fear as the basis of activity avoidance should not be used uncritically in clinical settings. Decisions about activity should explore beyond pain expectancy, incorporating goals, values, and decision processes. Summary points The model of fear of pain or re/injury and associated avoidance, an important insight that has generated effective therapeutic interventions, risks being over-applied and assumed rather than demonstrated. Patients’ own accounts, using qualitative analysis of interview in 11 women with long term chronic pain associated with joint hypermobility, give a more nuanced description of complex decision-making around activity. While a few activities were unquestionably avoided because of such fears, others were undertaken when benefits

  18. An analysis of acromioclavicular joint morphology as a factor for shoulder impingement syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkolizadeh, Adel; Sinha, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine whether acromioclavicular (AC) joint morphology was a factor in the development of symptomatic impingement necessitating AC joint excision. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study on all patients undergoing AC joint excision for symptomatic joint pain unresponsive to conservative treatment between 2009 and 2011. This involved 106 consecutive patients (57 women, 49 men, average age 54 years, age range 33 to 76 years). Prior to surgery, radiographic classification of the AC joint was performed producing three main groups: oblique, flat or curved. Pre- and postoperative assessment was performed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire. Results A significantly (p < 0.05) higher frequency of oblique AC joint morphology was seen in the AC joint excision study population compared to the normal population. Postoperative outcome demonstrated no significant difference (P > 0.05) between any of the three AC joint morphologies. Conclusions The present study demonstrates a significant association between the oblique AC joint morphology and those patients who develop AC joint pain requiring surgery. Outcomes of surgery were independent of joint morphology, gender or age, with all patient subgroups demonstrating significant improvement by the end of the study.

  19. Unilateral Ankylosis of Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) with Contralateral Condylar Aplasia and Related Orthopedic Deformity – Syndromic or Nonsyndromic?

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Pradkhshana; Sunil, VSB; Bajpai, Manas; Chhibber, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Condylar aplasia which means “failure of development” is a rare condition and can be unilateral or bilateral. Mandibular condylar Aplasia without any association with syndrome is extremely rare. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis results from trauma, infection and inadequate surgical treatment of the condylar area. Congenital cases are very rare. We report case of congenital unilateral aplasia of left mandibular condyle with ankylosis of right condyle, with an associated orthopedic deformity in a nine-year-old male patient, which may be a part of some unreported syndrome that has not been mentioned so far in literature. As per our best knowledge, no other case including such clinical features has been reported. PMID:25738097

  20. Keratectasia following laser in situ keratomileusis in a low-risk patient with benign joint hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Gustavo; Berra, Martin; Berra, Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    Here we present the case of a 27-year-old woman with benign joint hypermobility (BJHS) syndrome who developed keratectasia after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in both eyes. Both eyes had identical low Randleman risk factor scores. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a complication in a patient with BJHS. It highlights our incomplete knowledge of the risk factors for keratectasia following LASIK and suggests that BJHS should be considered as a risk factor for keratectasia. PMID:25076479

  1. The effects of neuromuscular taping on gait walking strategy in a patient with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type

    PubMed Central

    Camerota, Filippo; Galli, Manuela; Celletti, Claudia; Ancillao, Andrea; Blow, David; Albertini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this case study, biomechanical alterations induced by neuromuscular taping (NMT) were quantified, during walking, in a patient with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). Methods: A female JHS/EDS-HT patient underwent NMT applications over the low back spine and bilaterally to the knee. Quantitative gait analyses were collected before the NMT application and at the end of the treatment (2 weeks after the first application of NMT). Results: At the end of treatment following the NMT application, left step length showed improvements in cadence and velocity, the left knee showed a reduction in its flexed position at initial contact, and the right ankle joint improved its position at initial contact and in the swing phase. Improvements were also found in kinetics, in terms of the ankle moment and power. Conclusions: Results show that NMT seems to be a promising low-cost intervention for improving gait strategy in patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Further investigations are needed to assess the effects of this treatment intervention on pathological symptoms. PMID:25649985

  2. Management of pain and fatigue in the joint hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type): principles and proposal for a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Celletti, Claudia; Celli, Mauro; Morrone, Aldo; Colombi, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2012-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility type (EDS-HT), is a underdiagnosed heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by generalized joint hypermobility and a wide range of visceral, pelvic, neurologic, and cognitive dysfunctions. Deterioration of quality of life is mainly associated with pain and fatigue. Except for the recognized effectiveness of physiotherapy for some musculoskeletal features, there are no standardized guidelines for the assessment and treatment of pain and fatigue. In this work, a practical classification of pain presentations and factors contributing in generating painful sensations in JHS/EDS-HT is proposed. Pain can be topographically classified in articular limb (acute/subacute and chronic), muscular limb (myofascial and fibromyalgia), neuropathic limb, back/neck, abdominal and pelvic pain, and headache. For selected forms of pain, specific predisposing characteristics are outlined. Fatigue appears as the result of multiple factors, including muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, unrefreshing sleep, dysautonomia, intestinal malabsorption, reactive depression/anxiety, and excessive use of analgesics. A set of lifestyle recommendations to instruct patients as well as specific investigations aimed at characterizing pain and fatigue are identified. Available treatment options are discussed in the set of a structured multidisciplinary approach based on reliable outcome tools. PMID:22786715

  3. Rare Thoracolumbar Facet Synovial Cyst Presenting as Paraparesis

    PubMed Central

    Dahuja, Gitanshu; Kaur, Rashmeet

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord compressing syndrome due to synovial cyst (SC) of the thoracolumbar spine is a rare clinical condition. In this report we aim to heighten awareness of the thoracolumbar facet synovial cyst as a possible cause of thoracic myelopathy. The SC was removed thoroughly by laminectomy. The patient had an excellent recovery. The etiological and therapeutic aspects are discussed. PMID:26512282

  4. Pre- and post-operative comorbidities in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis of the thumb, and trigger digit.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Gong, H S; Lee, H J; Lee, Y H; Rhee, S H; Baek, G H

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 633 hands in 362 patients who had idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome and underwent carpal tunnel release between 1999 and 2009. Electrophysiological studies and simple radiographs of the wrist, cervical spine, and basal joint of the thumb were routinely checked, and patients were also assessed for the presence of trigger digit or de Quervain's disease before and after surgery. Among 362 patients, cervical arthritis was found in 253 patients (70%), and C5-C6 arthritis was the most common site. Basal joint arthritis of the thumb was observed in 216 (34%) of the 633 hands. Trigger digit or de Quervain's disease was observed in 85 of the 633 hands (13%) before surgery, and developed in 67 hands (11%) after surgery. Cervical arthritis, basal joint arthritis, and trigger digit commonly coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Patient education about these disorders is very important when they coexist with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:22553311

  5. The Many Facets of PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Trying to understand PISA is analogous to the parable of the blind men and the elephant. There are many facets of the PISA program, and thus many ways to both applaud and critique this ambitious international program of assessment that has gained enormous importance in the crafting of contemporary educational policy. One of the facets discussed in…

  6. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene; Maeland, Silje; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey, 110 patients diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT and 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from Statistics Norway participated. Shoulder function, pain and HRQol were registered by Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), pain drawings, 36-item Short Form (SF-36). Results Eighty-one individuals responded, with response rate 34% (JHS/EDS-HT: 53%, controls: 21%). JHS/EDS-HT had lower shoulder function (WOSI total: 49.9 versus 83.3; p < 0.001), lower HRQol on SF-36 Physical Component Scale (PCS: 28.1 versus 49.9; p < 0.001), and higher pain intensity (NRS: 6.4 versus 2.7; p < 0.001) than controls. Neck and shoulder joints were rated as primary painful areas in both groups, with significantly higher frequency in JHS/EDS-HT (neck: 90% versus 27%; shoulder: 80% versus 37%). Further, JHS/EDS-HT most often reported generalized pain (96%). Conclusions Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, increased pain intensity, as well as reduced physical HRQoL compared with controls. Although neck and shoulder were most frequently rated as painful, significantly more JHS/EDS-HT also reported generalized pain compared to controls. Implications for Rehabilitation Adults with JHS/EDS-HT have impaired shoulder function, and most often painful areas in the neck and shoulder joints, which need to be targeted in the treatment strategy. Compared with the general population adults with JHS/EDS-HT have reduced physical HRQoL, supporting a physical approach for this group. Adults with JHS/EDS-HT may present with both specific painful joints and generalized pain. PMID:26824670

  7. Facet control of gold nanorods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; Blom, Douglas A.; Lin, Ye; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-21

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure–property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair ofmore » surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Furthermore, taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities.« less

  8. Facet Control of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; Blom, Douglas A; Lin, Ye; Xin, Huolin L; Wang, Hui

    2016-02-23

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure-property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair of surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities. PMID:26795706

  9. Maxillary sinusitis as a differential diagnosis in temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rihani, A

    1985-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis may be diagnosed incorrectly as TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome because of a similarity of signs and symptoms. Both conditions can manifest with headache, facial pain radiating to the ear and the maxillary teeth, preauricular pain, and pain in the buccal vestibule posterior and superior to the maxillary tuberosity. It can be concluded that (1) more consideration should be given to sinus disturbances as a differential diagnosis in TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome, (2) it may be preferable to refer some patients with TMJ pain to a medical center where specialists in dentistry, otolaryngology, neurology, rheumatology, and psychiatry can evaluate the patient, and (3) TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome should be evaluated and treated by a dentist experienced in management of this disorder. PMID:3856028

  10. Long QT, Syndactyly, Joint Contractures, Stroke and Novel CACNA1C Mutation: Expanding the Spectrum of Timothy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Jane; Burashnikov, Elena; Antzelevitch, Charles; Blaser, Susan; Gross, Gil; Turner, Lesley; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Chitayat, David

    2011-01-01

    Timothy syndrome (TS) is described as an autosomal dominant condition with the constellation of features including prolonged QT interval, hand and foot abnormalities and mental retardation or autism. Splawski et al. [2004] previously described two phenotypes associated with TS distinguished by two unique and different mutations within the CACNA1C gene. We report on a newborn who presented with prolonged QT interval and associated polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, dysmorphic facial features, syndactyly of the hands and feet and joint contractures, suggestive of TS. He developed a stroke, subsequent intractable seizures and was found to have cortical blindness and later profound developmental delay. Initial targeted mutation analysis did not identify either of the previously described TS associated mutations; however, full gene sequencing detected a novel CACNA1C gene mutation (p.Ala1473Gly). The clinical and genetic findings in our case expand both the clinical and molecular knowledge of TS. PMID:22106044

  11. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Bentson, L.; Kharakh, D.; Owens, A.; Schuh, P.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.; Wittmer, W.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  12. Multiorgan dysfunction syndrome secondary to joint supplement overdosage in a dog.

    PubMed

    Nobles, Irma J; Khan, Safdar

    2015-04-01

    A 5-year-old spayed female Bernese mountain dog, with a chief complaint of vomiting and melena ingested approximately 200 nutritional joint supplement tablets. Despite aggressive therapy, the patient developed a coagulopathy, pancreatitis, peritonitis, acute kidney injury, and was euthanized. Postmortem examination revealed myocardial necrosis, pneumonia, centrilobular hemorrhage and necrosis of the liver, vasculitis, and acute tubular necrosis. PMID:25829554

  13. Multiorgan dysfunction syndrome secondary to joint supplement overdosage in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Irma J.; Khan, Safdar

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year-old spayed female Bernese mountain dog, with a chief complaint of vomiting and melena ingested approximately 200 nutritional joint supplement tablets. Despite aggressive therapy, the patient developed a coagulopathy, pancreatitis, peritonitis, acute kidney injury, and was euthanized. Postmortem examination revealed myocardial necrosis, pneumonia, centrilobular hemorrhage and necrosis of the liver, vasculitis, and acute tubular necrosis. PMID:25829554

  14. Compartment Syndrome Following Arthroscopic Removal of a Bullet in the Knee Joint after a Low-Velocity Gunshot Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yalçin, Sercan; Oltulu, İsmail; Erdil, Mehmet Emin; Örmeci, Tuğrul

    2016-01-01

    Gunshot injuries are getting more frequently reported while the civilian (nongovernmental) armament increases in the world. A 42-year-old male patient presented to emergency room of Istanbul Medipol University Hospital due to a low-velocity gunshot injury. We detected one entry point on the posterior aspect of the thigh, just superior to the popliteal groove. No exit wound was detected on his physical examination. There was swelling around the knee and range of motion was limited due to pain and swelling. Neurological and vascular examinations were intact. Following the initial assessment, the vascular examination was confirmed by doppler ultrasonography of the related extremity. There were no signs of compartment syndrome in the preoperative physical examination. A bullet was detected in the knee joint on the initial X-rays. Immediately after releasing the tourniquet, swelling of the anterolateral compartment of the leg and pulse deficiency was detected on foot in the dorsalis pedis artery. Although the arthroscopic removal of intra-articular bullets following gunshot injuries seems to have low morbidity rates, it should always be considered that the articular capsule may have been ruptured and the fluids used during the operation may leak into surrounding tissues and result in compartment syndrome. PMID:26929809

  15. Bilateral coracoclavicular joints as a rare cause of bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome and shoulder pain treated successfully by conservative means.

    PubMed

    Singh, V K; Singh, P K; Balakrishnan, S K

    2009-06-01

    The coracoclavicular joint (CCJ) is a rare anomalous joint. Symptomatic CCJ, being an exceptional rarity, makes it difficult to formulate a standard set of practice or guidelines. We report a 50-year-old Indian man, a machine operator by profession, who experienced bilateral shoulder pain and arm paraesthesia for two years, and was diagnosed with bilateral CCJ. The symptoms gradually increased, affecting his daily activities. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging revealed the compression of the brachial plexus in extreme shoulder abduction. After a thorough search of the literature, we retrieved four similar cases, all of them treated with individualised protocols. None of the cases was bilateral. The lack of clear evidence in any particular direction and the patient's medical condition prompted us to give a conservative trial, before embarking on more invasive methods. He showed rapid response to the conservative treatment with remission of all symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral symptomatic CCJ with bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome, that was managed conservatively. PMID:19551300

  16. A novel FGD1 mutation in a family with Aarskog–Scott syndrome and predominant features of congenital joint contractures

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Laurie Beth; Farley, Frances A.; Antonellis, Anthony; Keegan, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in FGD1 cause Aarskog–Scott syndrome (AAS), an X-linked condition characterized by abnormal facial, skeletal, and genital development due to abnormal embryonic morphogenesis and skeletal formation. Here we report a novel FGD1 mutation in a family with atypical features of AAS, specifically bilateral upper and lower limb congenital joint contractures and cardiac abnormalities. The male proband and his affected maternal uncle are hemizygous for the novel FGD1 mutation p.Arg921X. This variant is the most carboxy-terminal FGD1 mutation identified in a family with AAS and is predicted to truncate the FGD1 protein at the second to last amino acid of the carboxy-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Our study emphasizes the importance of the 3′ peptide sequence in the structure and/or function of the FGD1 protein and further demonstrates the need to screen patients with X-linked congenital joint contractures for FGD1 mutations. PMID:27551683

  17. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in individuals with Down syndrome than their peers without Down syndrome. An awareness of these more ... of the eyes, ears, and joints - just like peers without Down syndrome. What About Down Syndrome Is ...

  18. Use of the gait profile score for the evaluation of patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type.

    PubMed

    Celletti, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Castori, Marco; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2013-11-01

    Gait analysis (GA) is widely used for clinical evaluations in various pathological states, both in children and in adults, such as in patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). Otherwise, GA produces a large volume of data and there is the clinical need to provide also a quantitative measure of the patient's overall gait. Starting from this aim some global indexes were proposed by literature as a summary measure of the patient's gait, such as the Gait Profile Score (GPS). While validity of the GPS was demonstrated for the evaluation of the functional limitation of children with Cerebral Palsy, no studies have been conducted in patients JHS/EDS-HT. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the effectiveness of the GPS in the quantification of functional limitation of patients with JHS/EDS-HT. Twenty-one adult (age: 36.1 ± 12.7 years) individuals with JHS/EDS-HT were evaluated using GA and from GA data the GPS was computed. The results evidenced that the GPS value of patients was 8.9 ± 2.6, statistically different from 4.6 ± 0.9 displayed by the control group. In particular, all values of Gait Variable Scores (GVS) which compose the GPS were higher if compared to controls, with the exception of Pelvic Tilt and Foot Progression. The correlations between GPS/GVS and Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) showed significant relationship between GPS and the item 11 ("Walking 2 blocks") (ρ=-0.56; p<0.05) and 12 ("Walking a mile") of LEFS (ρ=-0.76; p<0.05). Our results showed that GPS and GVS seem to be appropriate outcome measures for the evaluation of the functional limitation during gait of patients with JHS/EDS-HT. PMID:24095856

  19. Gynecologic and obstetric implications of the joint hypermobility syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type) in 82 Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Dordoni, Chiara; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Ritelli, Marco; Morrone, Aldo; Venturini, Marina; Grammatico, Paola; Colombi, Marina

    2012-09-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) emerges as likely the most common clinical form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Given the striking predominance of affected women, practitioners often face gynecologic and obstetric issues. However, their decisions are still based on personal experience rather than literature due to the lack of a consistent body of evidence. We collected a set of gynecologic and obstetric features in 82 post-puberal women with JHS attending two Italian centers. Common gynecologic findings were dysmenorrhea (82.9%), meno/metrorrhagias (53.7%), irregular menses (46.3%), and dispareunia/vulvodinia (31.7%). Forty women were nulliparous and 42 had one or more pregnancy for a total of 93 diagnosed conceptions. Of them, 16.1% were spontaneous abortions, 6.5% voluntary interruptions, 10.7% preterm deliveries, and 66.7% deliveries at term. Overall outcome of proceeding pregnancies was good with no stillbirth and fetal/neonatal hypoxic/ischemic event. Non-operative vaginal delivery was registered in 72.2%, forceps/vacuum use in 5.5% and cesarean in 22.3%. Local/total anesthesia was successfully performed in 17 pregnancies without any problem. Major post-partum complications included abnormal scar formation after cesarean or episiotomy (46.1%), hemorrhage (19.4%), pelvic prolapses (15.3%), deep venous thrombosis (4.2%), and coccyx dislocation (1.4%). Prolapses were the most clinically relevant complication and associated with episiotomy. Gathered data were discussed for practically oriented considerations. PMID:22847925

  20. Nosology and inheritance pattern(s) of joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: a study of intrafamilial and interfamilial variability in 23 Italian pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Valiante, Michele; Sperduti, Isabella; Ritelli, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Chiarelli, Nicola; Celletti, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Grammatico, Paola; Colombi, Marina

    2014-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two markedly overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders. The cumulative frequency of JHS and EDS-HT seems high, but their recognition remains an exclusion diagnosis based on different sets of diagnostic criteria. Although proposed by a panel of experts, clinical identity between JHS and EDS-HT is still a matter of debate due to unknown molecular basis. We present 23 families with three or more individuals with a diagnosis of JHS and/or EDS-HT. Rough data from the 82 individuals were used to assess the frequency of major and minor criteria, as well as selected additional features. A series of statistical tools were applied to assess intrafamilial and interfamilial variability, emphasizing intergenerational, and intersex differences. This study demonstrates marked heterogeneity within and between families in terms of agreement of available diagnostic criteria. In 21 pedigrees affected individuals belong to two or three phenotypic sub-categories among JHS, EDS-HT, and JHS + EDS-HT overlap. Intergenerational analysis depicts a progressive shifting, also within the same pedigree, from EDS-HT in childhood, to JHS + EDS-HT in early adulthood and JHS later in life. Female-male ratio is 2.1:1, which results lower than previously observed in unselected patients' cohorts. In these pedigrees, JHS, EDS-HT, and JHS + EDS-HT segregate as a single dominant trait with complete penetrance, variable expressivity, and a markedly evolving phenotype. This study represents a formal demonstration that EDS-HT and JHS contitute the same clinical entity, and likely share the same genetic background, at least, in familial cases. PMID:25338840

  1. Faceting diagram for sticky steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akutsu, Noriko

    2016-03-01

    Faceting diagrams for the step-faceting zone, the step droplet zone, and the Gruber-Mullins-Pokrovsky-Talapov (GMPT) zone for a crystal surface are obtained by using the density matrix renormalization group method to calculate the surface tension. The model based on these calculations is the restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS) model with a point-contact-type step-step attraction (p-RSOS model) on a square lattice. The point-contact-type step-step attraction represents the energy gain obtained by forming a bonding state with orbital overlap at the meeting point of the neighboring steps. In the step-faceting zone, disconnectedness in the surface tension leads to the formation of a faceted macrostep on a vicinal surface at equilibrium. The disconnectedness in the surface tension also causes the first-order shape transition for the equilibrium shape of a crystal droplet. The lower zone boundary line (ZBL), which separates the step-faceting zone and the step droplet zone, is obtained by the condition γ 1 = lim n → ∞ γ n / n , where γn is the step tension of the n-th merged step. The upper ZBL, which separates the GMPT zone and the step droplet zone, is obtained by the condition Aq,eff = 0 and Bq,eff = 0, where Aq,eff and Bq,eff represent the coefficients for the | q → | 2 term and the | q → | 3 term, respectively, in the | q → | -expanded form of the surface free energy f eff ( q → ) . Here, q → is the surface gradient relative to the (111) surface. The reason why the vicinal surface inclined in the <101> direction does not exhibit step-faceting is explained in terms of the one-dimensional spinless quasi-impenetrable attractive bosons at absolute zero.

  2. Faceting and roughening in quasicrystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Anupam; Levine, Dov

    1987-01-01

    The question whether quasi-crystal shapes should be faceted is studied in a simple model of quasi-crystalline order. At T = 0, the model is proved to yield a completely faceted equilibrium shape in both two and three dimensions. At T greater than 0, an interface model is derived for a two-dimensional Penrose tiling. By mapping it onto a one-dimensional quasi-periodic Schroedinger equation, it is shown that the roughness exponent varies continuously with T at low T.

  3. Graphene-induced Ge (001) surface faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElhinny, Kyle M.; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Zaug, Alexander J.; Arnold, Michael S.; Evans, Paul G.

    2016-05-01

    Faceted Ge surfaces result from the growth of a graphene overlayer on Ge (001) by chemical vapor deposition. The surface exhibits four-fold symmetry after faceting, with the surface normal of the facets tilted towards [100] from the average surface normal. X-ray reflectivity measurements allow the facet angles, directions, and symmetry to be measured precisely as a function of deposition conditions. Graphene grown from a CH4 precursor in a H2/Ar carrier atmosphere at temperatures from 870 to 920 °C yields facets on the Ge surface with an average facet angle of 7.70° ± 0.07°. Additionally, a distribution of facet angles is observed with an angular spread of approximately ± 1°. The facet pattern has four-fold symmetry over a large area with no indication of the formation of competing facets from reflectivity measurements. The facet angle tends toward the {107} facet of Ge with slight variation as a function of temperature indicating that the facet angles are dominated by surface energetics. The slight dependence on temperature is accompanied by a reconstruction of the surface into {001} facets under slow-cooling conditions, suggesting that the surface diffusion kinetics and temperature dependence have an important role in the formation of the faceted surface structure at lower temperatures.

  4. Neck-Tongue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nancy; Dougherty, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is a headache disorder often initiated by rapid axial rotation of the neck resulting in unilateral neck and/or occipital pain and transient ipsilateral tongue sensory disturbance. In this review, we examine reported cases of NTS since its initial description in 1980 to highlight the significance of this condition in the differential diagnosis of headache in patients presenting with neck pain and altered tongue sensation. The anatomical basis of NTS centers on the C1-C2 facet joint, C2 ventral ramus, and inferior oblique muscle in the atlanto-axial space. NTS may be categorized as complicated (secondary to another disease process) or uncomplicated (hereditary, related to trauma, or idiopathic). Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion after a thorough history and physical without a pathognomonic radiologic finding. It is typically treated conservatively with medications, local injections, immobilization with cervical collars, or physical therapy; rarely is surgical intervention pursued. PMID:26984539

  5. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  6. Heterotopic Ossification Circumferentia Articularis (HOCA) of Both Knee Joints After Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Vaish, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the abnormal development of bone within soft tissue. It is a frequent complication after traumatic as well as atraumatic central nervous system (CNS) insult. It has rarely been found to be associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Only a few cases of HO associated with GBS have been reported so far in medical literature. We present a 30-year-old female patient with severe bilateral knee stiffness following axonal polyneuropathy type of GBS that developed 10 months ago in her immediate post-partum period. She was put on mechanical ventilation for two weeks. She was diagnosed as HO based on clinical and radiological studies. This is an extremely unusual presentation of HO encircling both the knees following GBS without any other well-known risk factors. We have coined a new nomenclature—Heterotopic Ossification Circumferentia Articularis (HOCA)—for this type of presentation. In our patient, various factors such as prolonged ICU stay, mechanical ventilation, hypoxia, and long-standing hypomobility could be attributed to the development of this severe form of HO. PMID:27004157

  7. Design of a lattice-based faceted classification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.; Atkins, John

    1992-01-01

    We describe a software reuse architecture supporting component retrieval by facet classes. The facets are organized into a lattice of facet sets and facet n-tuples. The query mechanism supports precise retrieval and flexible browsing.

  8. Quantification of Subtalar Posterior Facet Involvement During Intramedullary Guidance of Total Ankle Arthroplasty:A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    DeMill, Shyler L; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty is an evolving treatment of ankle arthritis. One implant uses intramedullary guidance to enhance accuracy by accessing the tibial canal through the inferior aspect of the foot, potentially placing the subtalar joint articulation at risk. The purpose of the present cadaveric anatomic evaluation was to identify posterior subtalar articular facet joint involvement during intramedullary guidance to the tibial canal. Ten below-the-knee cadaveric specimens were used. After drilling into the tibial medullary canal with a 6-mm drill bit and using the standard targeting jig, the specimens were dissected, and the posterior facet was evaluated. We graded posterior facet involvement according to the location of the drill hole and, if within the facet, the percentage of the facet violated by the drill bit, with 100% representing the full circumference of the 6-mm drill bit. Of the 8 specimens in which the drill bit passed through the subtalar posterior articular facet, the encroachment was peripheral in all cases, with no specimen showing circumferential 6-mm drill bit articular penetration (no cases with 100%). Sinus tarsi penetration occurred in 20% of the cases. The dissections with articular involvement included 3 specimens with >50% of the drill bit penetrating and 5 with <50%. The portion of the posterior facet involved among the specimens that were violated was anterocentral in the joint. A risk of damage to the posterior facet of the subtalar joint exists with intramedullary total ankle systems. Our study has demonstrated that the drill bit will involve the anterocentral and anterolateral portions of the posterior facet of the subtalar joint, with <6 mm articular disruption in all cases. PMID:26015304

  9. Late diagnosis of lateral meningocele syndrome in a 55-year-old woman with symptoms of joint instability and chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ritelli, Marco; Brancati, Francesco; De Bernardo, Carmelilia; Colombi, Marina; Grammatico, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Lateral meningocele syndrome (LMS) is a rare hereditary connective tissue disorder characterized by pan-spinal meningoceles, specific facial dysmorphism, skeletal and soft tissue abnormalities, and hypotonia and/or muscle weakness. LMS has been observed in eleven patients with two instances of vertical transmission, and seven sporadic cases with an age at diagnosis ranging from 25 months to 33 years. We report on a further observation of LMS in a 55-year-old woman presenting with a long history of joint instability, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and iatrogenic bladder and anorectal dysfunction due to irreversible nerve damage after surgical excision of a meningeal cyst. Her clinical characteristics are compared with those of previously reported patients, as well as two further cases originally diagnosed with Hajdu-Cheney and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, but displaying typical features of LMS. PMID:24311540

  10. A distinct X-linked syndrome involving joint contractures, keloids, large optic cup-to-disc ratio, and renal stones results from a filamin A (FLNA) mutation.

    PubMed

    Lah, Melissa; Niranjan, Tejasvi; Srikanth, Sujata; Holloway, Lynda; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao; Weaver, David D

    2016-04-01

    We further evaluated a previously reported family with an apparently undescribed X-linked syndrome involving joint contractures, keloids, an increased optic cup-to-disc ratio, and renal stones to elucidate the genetic cause. To do this, we obtained medical histories and performed physical examination on 14 individuals in the family, five of whom are affected males and three are obligate carrier females. Linkage analysis was performed on all but one individual and chromosome X-exome sequencing was done on two affected males. The analysis localized the putative gene to Xq27-qter and chromosome X-exome sequencing revealed a mutation in exon 28 (c.4726G>A) of the filamin A (FLNA) gene, predicting that a conserved glycine had been replaced by arginine at amino acid 1576 (p.G1576R). Segregation analysis demonstrated that all known carrier females tested were heterozygous (G/A), all affected males were hemizygous for the mutation (A allele) and all normal males were hemizygous for the normal G allele. The data and the bioinformatic analysis indicate that the G1576R mutation in the FLNA gene is very likely pathogenic in this family. The syndrome affecting the family shares phenotypic overlap with other syndromes caused by FLNA mutations, but appears to be a distinct phenotype, likely representing a unique genetic syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26804200

  11. Crystallographic Facet-Induced Toxicological Responses by Faceted Titanium Dioxide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Li, Kai; Li, Xi; Chang, Yun; Feng, Yanlin; Sun, Xiujuan; Cheng, Yan; Wu, Zhijian; Zhang, Haiyuan

    2016-06-28

    Toxicological responses of nanomaterials have been closely correlated to their physicochemical properties, and establishment of a property-activity relationship of nanomaterials is favorable for a deep understanding of the nanomaterials' toxicity mechanism, prospectively predicting nanomaterials' potential hazards and rationally designing safer nanomaterials. Faceted nanomaterials usually exhibit more versatile and effective performance than spherical nanomaterials due to their selectively exposed crystallographic facets with high densities of unsaturated atoms. These facets have high surface reactivity, capable of eliciting strong interactions with biological systems. Few studies paid attention to the toxic behaviors of faceted nanomaterials in terms of their distinctive facets. In the present study, the toxicological role of the crystallographic facets of TiO2 nanomaterials was investigated, and the precise property-activity relationship was exploited to clearly understand the toxicity of faceted nanomaterials. A series of faceted TiO2 nanocrystals with the morphology of truncated octahedral bipyramids were prepared to expose different percentages of {101} and {001} facets on the surface. Density functional theory calculation revealed that {101} facets could only molecularly absorb water molecules while {001} facets due to their surface-unsaturated Ti atoms could dissociate the absorbed water molecules to generate hydroxyl radicals. Biophysical assessments corroborated the increased production of hydroxyl radicals on the {001} facets compared to {101} facets, which endowed {001} facets with strong hemolytic activity and elicited severe toxicities. A series of increased oxidative stress toxicological responses, including cellular ROS production, heme oxygenase-1 expression, cellular GSH depletion, and mitochondrial dysfunctions, were triggered by faceted TiO2 nanocrystals with progressively increased {001} percentages, demonstrating the toxicological roles of {001

  12. Faceting of Re (1121) induced by oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Wenhua; Madey, Theodore E.

    2006-03-01

    The oxygen-induced nanoscale faceting of Re (1121) has been studied by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES); the results are compared with recent STM and LEED studies of O-induced faceting of Re(1231). The evolution of surface morphology depends on oxygen exposures and deposition temperatures. Re(1121) remains planar after oxygen deposition at 300K. Annealing O-covered Re(1121) between 800K-1200K leads to the formation of (0110) and (1010) facets that coexist with the (1121) surface. Under oxidation conditions, i.e. dosing a large amount of oxygen at high temperatures (900-1000K), the (1121) surface is completely covered by 4-sided nanoscale pyramidal structures whose facets are identified as (0110), (1010), (0111) and (1011). The fact that the (1121) surface becomes completely faceted only after oxidation is consistent with our previous data for O-induced faceting of Re(1231), where one facet has the (1121) orientation and is unstable against oxidation. The faceted O/Re surfaces may be potential templates to grow nano-structures with narrow size distribution, and may also be substrates to study structural sensitivity in catalytic reactions.

  13. Eight Key Facets of Small Business Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, James Calvert

    1980-01-01

    Identifies eight key facets of small business management and suggests activities that may be used to assist in their development. The key facets are (1) product or service, (2) competition, (3) marketing strategies, (4) personnel needs, (5) equipment and facility needs, (6) finances, (7) planning, and (8) entrepreneurship. (JOW)

  14. Facets of the balanced minimal evolution polytope.

    PubMed

    Forcey, Stefan; Keefe, Logan; Sands, William

    2016-08-01

    The balanced minimal evolution (BME) method of creating phylogenetic trees can be formulated as a linear programming problem, minimizing an inner product over the vertices of the BME polytope. In this paper we undertake the project of describing the facets of this polytope. We classify and identify the combinatorial structure and geometry (facet inequalities) of all the facets in dimensions up to five, and classify even more facets in all dimensions. A full set of facet inequalities would allow a full implementation of the simplex method for finding the BME tree-although there are reasons to think this an unreachable goal. However, our results provide the crucial first steps for a more likely-to-be-successful program: finding efficient relaxations of the BME polytope. PMID:26714816

  15. Faceting of Re (1121) induced by ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Wenhua; Madey, Theodore E.; Jacob, Timo

    2007-03-01

    The ammonia-induced nanoscale faceting of Re (1121) has been studied by LEED and STM; the results are compared with recent studies of O-induced faceting of Re(1121). After exposure to ammonia at 700K, the Re(1121) surface only shows a (1x2) reconstruction and remains planar (ammonia dissociates on Re, and only N remains on the surface at T>700K). By exposure to ammonia at 900K, Re(1121) becomes completely faceted, forming 2-sided ridge-like structures with (1342) and (3142) facets. However, this morphology is different from that in O-induced faceting of Re(1121). The two ridge sides, (1342) and (3142), are vicinal surfaces of closed-packed (0110) and (1010) respectively; these latter two surfaces appear as facets in O-induced faceting of Re(1121). DFT calculations are implemented to understand the origin of the different morphologies. Our work demonstrates that it is possible to tailor the surface morphology by choosing appropriate adsorbate and annealing conditions, which in turn provides model systems to study structural sensitivity in catalytic reactions as well as potential templates to grow nanostructures.

  16. 'Costen's syndrome'--correlation or coincidence: a review of 45 patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, otalgia and other aural symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brookes, G B; Maw, A R; Coleman, M J

    1980-02-01

    Forty-five patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, and otalgia together with other aural symptoms (deafness, tinnitus, pressure/blockage and vertigo) were evaluated clinically and audiometrically. The theoretical mechanisms by which aural symptoms may be produced as a result of temporomandibular joint dysfunction are outlined and discussed in the light of the patients under review. The wide diversity in the incidence of additional aural symptoms apart from otalgia reported in the literature is noted, together with the general lack of full objective audiometric assessment. In 37 patients the aural symptoms were directly attributable to other coincidental otolaryngological pathology. Details of the remaining 8 cases are presented. The other aural symptoms of 4 of these patients were also probably accounted for by other coincidental otalaryngological pathology. It may be significant that 2 of the other patients were suffering from concurrent psychiatric disorders. Thus in this series at least 9% of the patients were considered to have other aural symptoms coincidental to temporomandibular joint dysfunction. This is compatible with the relatively common occurrence of both temporomandibular joint dysfunction and aural symptoms in the general population. This study leads us to believe that there is no direct aetiological basis to link temporomandibular joint dysfunction and other aural symptoms apart from otalgia. PMID:7363490

  17. Method for partially coating laser diode facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Anil R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Bars of integral laser diode devices cleaved from a wafer are placed with their p regions abutting and n regions abutting. A thin BeCu mask having alternate openings and strips of the same width as the end facets is used to mask the n region interfaces so that multiple bars can be partially coated over their exposed p regions with a reflective or partial reflective coating. The partial coating permits identification of the emitting facet from the fully coated back facet during a later device mounting procedure.

  18. A novel multiple joint dislocation syndrome associated with a homozygous nonsense variant in the EXOC6B gene.

    PubMed

    Girisha, Katta Mohan; Kortüm, Fanny; Shah, Hitesh; Alawi, Malik; Dalal, Ashwin; Bhavani, Gandham SriLakshmi; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2016-08-01

    We report two brothers from a consanguineous couple with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD), multiple joint dislocations at birth, severe joint laxity, scoliosis, gracile metacarpals and metatarsals, delayed bone age and poorly ossified carpal and tarsal bones, probably representing a yet uncharacterized SEMD with laxity and dislocations. This condition has clinical overlap with autosomal dominantly inherited SEMD with joint laxity, leptodactylic type caused by recurrent missense variants in the kinesin family member 22 gene (KIF22). Single-nucleotide polymorphism array analysis and whole-exome sequencing in the two affected siblings revealed a shared homozygous nonsense variant [c.906T>A/p.(Tyr302*)] in EXOC6B as the most likely cause. EXOC6B encodes a component of the exocyst complex required for tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. As transport of vesicles from the golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane occurs through kinesin motor proteins along microtubule tracks, the function of EXOC6B is linked to KIF22 suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism in skeletal dysplasias with joint laxity and dislocations. PMID:26669664

  19. FACET: SLAC___s New User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.-J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.A.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first User Run started in spring 2012 with 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams. The facility is designed to provide short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. The creation of drive and witness bunches and shaped bunch profiles is possible with 'Notch' Collimation. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. Positrons will be available at FACET in future user runs. We present the User Facility and the available tools and opportunities for future experiments.

  20. Stability of crystal facets in gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Katz-Boon, Hadas; Walsh, Michael; Dwyer, Christian; Mulvaney, Paul; Funston, Alison M; Etheridge, Joanne

    2015-03-11

    Metal nanocrystals can be grown in a variety of shapes through the modification of surface facet energies via surfactants. However, the surface facets are only a few atoms wide, making it extremely challenging to measure their geometries and energies. Here, we locate and count atoms in Au nanorods at successive time intervals using quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy. This enables us to determine the atomic-level geometry and the relative stability of the facets and to expound their relationship to the overall three-dimensional nanocrystal shape and size. We reveal coexisting high- and low-index facets with comparable stability and dimensions and find the geometry of the nanorods is remarkably stable, despite significant atom movements. This information provides unique insights into the mechanisms that govern growth kinetics and nanocrystal morphology. PMID:25658226

  1. FACET: Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmoria, Karl D.; Banavar, Sridhar; Chatterji, Gano B.; Sheth, Kapil S.; Grabbe, Shon

    2000-01-01

    FACET (Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool) is an Air Traffic Management research tool being developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. This paper describes the design, architecture and functionalities of FACET. The purpose of FACET is to provide E simulation environment for exploration, development and evaluation of advanced ATM concepts. Examples of these concepts include new ATM paradigms such as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management, airspace redesign and new Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for controllers working within the operational procedures of the existing air traffic control system. FACET is currently capable of modeling system-wide en route airspace operations over the contiguous United States. Airspace models (e.g., Center/sector boundaries, airways, locations of navigation aids and airports) are available from databases. A core capability of FACET is the modeling of aircraft trajectories. Using round-earth kinematic equations, aircraft can be flown along flight plan routes or great circle routes as they climb, cruise and descend according to their individual aircraft-type performance models. Performance parameters (e.g., climb/descent rates and speeds, cruise speeds) are obtained from data table lookups. Heading, airspeed and altitude-rate dynamics are also modeled. Additional functionalities will be added as necessary for specific applications. FACET software is written in Java and C programming languages. It is platform-independent, and can be run on a variety of computers. FACET has been designed with a modular software architecture to enable rapid integration of research prototype implementations of new ATM concepts. There are several advanced ATM concepts that are currently being implemented in FACET airborne separation assurance, dynamic density predictions, airspace redesign (re-sectorization), benefits of a controller DST for direct-routing, and the integration of commercial space transportation system operations into the U.S. National

  2. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thin, and loose jointed. Most people with Marfan syndrome have heart and blood vessel problems, such as a weakness in the aorta or heart valves that leak. They may also have problems with ... diagnose Marfan syndrome. Your doctor may use your medical history, family ...

  3. MultiFacet: A Faceted Interface for Browsing Large Multimedia Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Michael J.; Hampton, Shawn D.; Endert, Alexander; Roberts, Ian E.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2013-10-31

    Faceted browsing is a common technique for exploring collections where the data can be grouped into a number of pre-defined categories, most often generated from textual metadata. Historically, faceted browsing has been applied to a single data type such as text or image data. However, typical collections contain multiple data types, such as information from web pages that contain text, images, and video. Additionally, when browsing a collection of images and video, facets are often created based on the metadata which may be incomplete, inaccurate, or missing altogether instead of the actual visual content contained within those images and video. In this work we address these limitations by presenting MultiFacet, a faceted browsing interface that supports multiple data types. MultiFacet constructs facets for images and video in a collection from the visual content using computer vision techniques. These visual facets can then be browsed in conjunction with text facets within a single interface to reveal relationships and phenomena within multimedia collections. Additionally, we present a use case based on real-world data, demonstrating the utility of this approach towards browsing a large multimedia data collection.

  4. An Initial Facet Analysis of the FYCSP Word Attack Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besel, Ronald

    The concepts "facet analysis,""facet design," and "facet structure" are defined. The FYCSP (First Year Communication Skills Program) Word Attack Test is analyzed in terms of two related facet structures. Stepwise linear regression is used to predict distractor attractiveness. Hypotheses suggested by Guttman relating distractor attractiveness to…

  5. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  6. Facet development for a faceted stretched-membrane dish by Solar Kinetics, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Schertz, P.T.; Brown, D.C.; Konnerth, A. III )

    1991-07-01

    A 3.6-meter diameter stretched-membrane optical facet for a parabolic dish has been successfully designed and demonstrated under contract with Sandia National Laboratories. Twelve facets identical to them will be used to make the lightweight reflector of the dish. The project goal of 2.5-mrad surface accuracy was met with each of the two full-sized prototypes, and accuracies of as low as 1.1 mrad were achieved. The facet weight is 11.7 kg/m{sup 2} (2.4lbs/ft{sup 2}). The facet is similar in construction to the successful stretched-membrane heliostat; it has two thin metal membranes attached to a ring. However, the front membrane for this facet is plastically formed at the factor in order to achieve a shorter facet f/D (approximately 3.0). A passive tether restrains the from membrane when not in operation, that is, when the stabilizing vacuum is off. The optical surface is achieved with a silvered-acrylic film laminated to the metal membrane. The facet is expected to cost $55.40/m{sup 2} at a production rate of 10,000 facets per year and $115, 000/m{sup 2}-at a production rate of 500 facets a year. Several key issues have been resolved. Stress concentrations due to seams in the reflective laminate did not cause membrane rupture during forming as they have for dishes with lower focal length-to-diameter ratios. The laminate survived the forming process and simulated operation without deterioration. The optical effect of the tether on the membrane was tested and found to be very small. Most important, highly accurate shapes were obtained using a simple forming procedure. Additional tests are needed to demonstrate process repeatablility and facet performance in typical operating conditions. 18 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. The facets of relativistic quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosch, H. G.; Müller, V. F.

    2010-04-01

    Relativistic quantum field theory is generally recognized to form the adequate theoretical frame for subatomic physics, with the Standard Model of Particle Physics as a major achievement. We point out that quantum field theory in its present form is not a monolithic theory, but rather consists of distinct facets, which aim at a common ideal goal. We give a short overview of the strengths and limitations of these facets. We emphasize the theory-dependent relation between the quantum fields, and the basic objects in the empirical domain, the particles. Given the marked conceptual differences between the facets, we argue to view these, and therefore also the Standard Model, as symbolic constructions. We finally note that this view of physical theories originated in the 19th century and is related to the emergence of the classical field as an autonomous concept.

  8. The facets of relativistic quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosch, H. G.; Müller, V. F.

    2011-04-01

    Relativistic quantum field theory is generally recognized to form the adequate theoretical frame for subatomic physics, with the Standard Model of Particle Physics as a major achievement. We point out that quantum field theory in its present form is not a monolithic theory, but rather consists of distinct facets, which aim at a common ideal goal. We give a short overview of the strengths and limitations of these facets. We emphasize the theory-dependent relation between the quantum fields, and the basic objects in the empirical domain, the particles. Given the marked conceptual differences between the facets, we argue to view these, and therefore also the Standard Model, as symbolic constructions. We finally note that this view of physical theories originated in the 19th century and is related to the emergence of the classical field as an autonomous concept.

  9. Legg-Perthes disease-like joint involvement and diagnosis delay in Scheie syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melikoglu, Meltem Alkan; Kocabas, Hilal; Sezer, Ilhan; Cay, Hasan Fatih; Cassidy, Aysegul Guller; Balci, Nilufer

    2007-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I is an inherited disease caused by the absence or malfunctioning of lysosomal enzymes. Three subtypes, based on severity of symptoms, were described, and Scheie syndrome (also called MPS I S) is the mildest form. Although there may be some typical extra-articular manifestations, musculoskeletal involvement may be the only presenting sign in the absence of other symptoms in the patients with less severe forms. The patients with MPS I S, especially in attenuated phenotypes, may be sometimes difficult to recognize for physicians not familiar with the disease. With this case presentation, it is aimed to draw attention to this disease, which could be delayed for the correct diagnosis. An increased awareness of the disease may contribute to more accurate diagnosis, and patients may benefit from early intervention. PMID:17264973

  10. [Subacromial pain syndromes as a possible results of errors in the initial diagnosis and therapy of the shoulder joint].

    PubMed

    Hadziahmetović, Z

    1999-01-01

    The author in this paper shows possible diagnostic mistakes in the development of subacromial painful arc syndrome (cases with inadequate diagnostics). A hundred cases with acute shoulder's injury (without fractures and luxationes) who were admitted at the Clinic for bone surgery and Emergency Department of Clinical Centre, CUC Sarajevo in period between 1 January 1998-30 June 1998. Only clinical and X-ray examination in part were performed. A very interesting case with subacromial impingement as a consequence of such kind of treatment is presented in this paper. It can be concluded that it is necessary to use as a routine a comparative advantages of Echosonography, CT, MRI, as non invasive diagnostic methods at clinically suspected intra or extra articular lesions. PMID:10386045

  11. Surgical technique: hemi-extensor carpi radialis brevis tenodesis for stabilizing the midcarpal joint in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krijgh, David D; Harley, Oliver J; Hovius, Steven E; Coert, J Henk; Walbeehm, Erik T

    2014-10-01

    Patients with the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos (EDS-HT) often complain of wrist pain, usually originating from subluxations. As a result of the laxity, wrist function in these patients can be highly limited. This paper presents a surgical technique that stabilizes the lunocapitate joint with the use of an extensor carpi radialis brevis strip. Five patients with confirmed EDS-HT were treated with an extensor carpi radialis brevis tenodesis for their midcarpal instability. Two patients presented with complications following surgery, one major and one minor. This paper presents a potentially satisfactory surgical solution to recurrent midcarpal instability in EDS-HT patients and demonstrates that the use of an autologous tendon might be feasible in spite of a background of abnormal collagen metabolism. PMID:25194773

  12. The potential impact of various diagnostic strategies in cases of chronic pain syndromes associated with lumbar spine degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bokov, Andrey; Perlmutter, Olga; Aleynik, Alexander; Rasteryaeva, Marina; Mlyavykh, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the possible effects of various diagnostic strategies and the relative contribution of various structures in order to determine the optimal diagnostic strategy in treating patients with noncompressive pain syndromes. Study design Prospective, nonrandomized cohort study of 83 consecutive patients with noncompressive pain syndromes resistant to repeated courses of conservative treatment. The follow-up period was 18 months. Results Nucleoplasty was effective in cases of discogenic pain; the consequences related to false positive results of the discography were significant. The most specific criterion was 80% pain relief after facet joint blocks, whereas 50% pain relief and any subjective pain relief were not associated with a significant increase in the success rate. A considerable rate of false negative results was associated with 80% pain relief, whereas 50% pain relief after facet joint blocks showed the optimal ratio of sensitivity and specificity. Facet joint pain was detected in 50.6% of cases (95% confidence interval 44.1%–66.3%), discogenic pain in 16.9% cases (95% confidence interval 9.5%–26.7%), and sacroiliac joint pain in 7.2% cases (95% confidence interval 2.7%–15%). It was impossible to differentiate the main source of pain in 25.3% of cases. Conclusion It is rational to adjust the diagnostic algorithm to the probability of detecting a particular pain source and, in doing so, reduce the number of invasive diagnostic measures to evaluate a pain source. False positive results of diagnostic measures can negatively affect the overall efficacy of a particular technology; therefore, all reasons for the failure should be studied in order to reach an unbiased conclusion. In choosing diagnostic criteria, not only should the success rate of a particular technology be taken into consideration but also the rate of false negative results. Acceptable diagnostic criteria should be based on a rational balance of sensitivity and specificity. PMID

  13. Alignment and focus of mirrored facets of a heliosat

    SciTech Connect

    Yellowhair, Julius E; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Diver, Richard B; Moss, Timothy A

    2013-11-12

    Various technologies pertaining to aligning and focusing mirrored facets of a heliostat are described herein. Updating alignment and/or focus of mirrored facets is undertaken through generation of a theoretical image, wherein the theoretical image is indicative of a reflection of the target via the mirrored facets when the mirrored facets are properly aligned. This theoretical image includes reference points that are overlaid on an image of the target as reflected by the mirrored facets of the heliostat. A technician adjusts alignment/focus of a mirrored facet by causing reflected reference markings to become aligned with the reference points in the theoretical image.

  14. Perovskite solar cells: Different facets of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eperon, Giles E.; Ginger, David S.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of halide perovskites vary significantly between crystalline grains, but the impact of this heterogeneity on solar cell performance is unclear. Now, this variability is shown to limit the photovoltaic properties of solar cells, and its origins are linked to differing properties between crystal facets.

  15. A Model of Job Facet Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Patricia G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Elements of the job that lead to overall job satisfaction were surveyed among public employees. The 17-facet model included promotion, training, supervisor, upper management, organization of work tasks, work stress, work challenge and autonomy, physical work space and equipment, work group, organizational structure, pay, etc. (Author/MH)

  16. Problem of time: facets and Machian strategy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Edward

    2014-10-01

    The problem of time is that "time" in each of ordinary quantum theory and general relativity are mutually incompatible notions. This causes difficulties in trying to put these two theories together to form a theory of quantum gravity. The problem of time has eight facets in canonical approaches. I clarify that all but one of these facets already occur at the classical level, and reconceptualize and re-name some of these facets as follows. The frozen formalism problem becomes temporal relationalism, the thin sandwich problem becomes configurational relationalism, via the notion of best matching. The problem of observables becomes the problem of beables, and the functional evolution problem becomes the constraint closure problem. I also outline how each of the global and multiple-choice problems of time have their own plurality of facets. This article additionally contains a local resolution to the problem of time at the conceptual level and which is actually realizable for the relational triangle and minisuperspace models. This resolution is, moreover, Machian, and has three levels: classical, semiclassical, and a combined semiclassical-histories-timeless records scheme. I end by delineating the current frontiers of this program toward resolution of the problem of time in the cases of full general relativity and of slightly inhomogeneous cosmology. PMID:25266113

  17. [Neuromuscular signal transmission in adulthood. Current facets of acquired and hereditary disorders].

    PubMed

    Abicht, A; Kröger, S; Schoser, B

    2011-06-01

    The availability of early diagnosis and modern effective therapies has reduced mortality and disability linked to late-onset acquired or hereditary neuromuscular transmission disorders. Nevertheless, identification of the pathogenesis of these diseases remains a challenge. In addition to non-specific and fluctuating presenting symptoms current diagnostic work-up strategies include electrophysiology, antibody measurements and less frequently molecular genetics. For differential diagnostic purposes there is an increasing demand for improving awareness concerning late-onset congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) which are rare but nevertheless symptomatically treatable diseases. Especially in seronegative myasthenic syndromes, molecular genetic analyses of CMS genes should be integrated into the differential diagnostic work-up. Therefore, some facets of neuromuscular synaptogenesis in the context of seronegative acquired myasthenic syndromes and recently uncovered congenital myasthenic syndromes are reviewed. PMID:21584790

  18. Facet-Selective Epitaxy of Compound Semiconductors on Faceted Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Gao, Ruixuan; No, You-Shin; Kim, Sun-Kyung; McClelland, Arthur A; Bell, David C; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Integration of compound semiconductors with silicon (Si) has been a long-standing goal for the semiconductor industry, as direct band gap compound semiconductors offer, for example, attractive photonic properties not possible with Si devices. However, mismatches in lattice constant, thermal expansion coefficient, and polarity between Si and compound semiconductors render growth of epitaxial heterostructures challenging. Nanowires (NWs) are a promising platform for the integration of Si and compound semiconductors since their limited surface area can alleviate such material mismatch issues. Here, we demonstrate facet-selective growth of cadmium sulfide (CdS) on Si NWs. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that crystalline CdS is grown epitaxially on the {111} and {110} surface facets of the Si NWs but that the Si{113} facets remain bare. Further analysis of CdS on Si NWs grown at higher deposition rates to yield a conformal shell reveals a thin oxide layer on the Si{113} facet. This observation and control experiments suggest that facet-selective growth is enabled by the formation of an oxide, which prevents subsequent shell growth on the Si{113} NW facets. Further studies of facet-selective epitaxial growth of CdS shells on micro-to-mesoscale wires, which allows tuning of the lateral width of the compound semiconductor layer without lithographic patterning, and InP shell growth on Si NWs demonstrate the generality of our growth technique. In addition, photoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy show that the epitaxial shells display strong and clean band edge emission, confirming their high photonic quality, and thus suggesting that facet-selective epitaxy on NW substrates represents a promising route to integration of compound semiconductors on Si. PMID:26057208

  19. Bone Scans Are Reliable for the Identification of Lumbar Disk and Facet Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Malham, Gregory M.; Parker, Rhiannon M.; Ballok, Zita E.; Goss, Ben; Diwan, Ashish D.; Uribe, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Surgeon survey. Objective To evaluate the reliability of bone single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) versus bone SPECT images co-registered with computed tomography (bone SPECT-CT) by analyzing interobserver agreement for identification of the anatomical location of technetium99m-labeled oxidronate uptake in the lumbar disk and/or facet joint. Methods Seven spine surgeons interpreted 20 bone scans: 10 conventional black-and-white tomograms (bone SPECT) and 10 color-graded bone SPECT-CT scans. Each surgeon was asked to identify the location of any diagnostically relevant uptake in the disk and/or facet joint between L1 and S1. Reliability was evaluated using the free-marginal kappa statistic, and the level of agreement was assessed using the Landis and Koch interpretation. Results Conventional bone SPECT scans and bone SPECT-CT scans were reliable for the identification of diagnostically relevant uptake, with bone SPECT-CT having higher reliability (kappa = 0.72) than bone SPECT alone (0.59). Bone SPECT and bone SPECT-CT were also reliable in identifying disk pathology, with kappa values of 0.72 and 0.81, respectively. However, bone SPECT-CT was more reliable (0.81) than bone SPECT (0.60) when identifying facet disease. Conclusions For the identification of disk pathology, it is reasonable to use either conventional bone SPECT or bone SPECT-CT; however, bone SPECT-CT is more reliable for facet joint pathology. PMID:25648168

  20. Effect of Retrograde Reaming for Tibiotalocalcaneal Arthrodesis on Subtalar Joint Destruction: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Jason A; Routh, Lucas K; Leary, Jeffrey T; Buzhardt, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    Recent published data have suggested successful union of subtalar and tibiotalar joints without formal debridement during tibiotalocalcaneal (TTC) fusion procedures. Although previous studies have reported on the importance of the proper guidewire starting point and trajectory to obtain appropriate hindfoot alignment for successful fusion, to our knowledge, no studies have quantified the amount of articular damage to the subtalar joint with retrograde reaming. We hypothesized that reaming would destroy >50% of the posterior facet of the subtalar joint. The bilateral lower extremities of 5 cadavers were obtained and the subtalar joints exposed. Retrograde TTC nail guidewires were inserted, and a 12-mm reamer was passed through the subtalar and ankle joints. Pre- and postreaming images of the subtalar joint were obtained to compare the amount of joint destruction after reaming. We found an average of 5.89% articular destruction of the talar posterior facet and an average of 4.01% articular destruction of the posterior facet of the calcaneus. No damage to the middle facets of the subtalar joint was observed. TTC nailing is a successful procedure for ankle and subtalar joint fusion. Published studies have reported successful subtalar union using TTC nailing without formal open debridement of the subtalar joint, preserving the soft tissue envelope. TTC nail insertion using a 12-mm reamer will destroy 5.89% and 4.01% of the respective talar and calcaneal posterior facets of the subtalar joint. PMID:26372551

  1. Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

    2011-12-13

    We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches

  2. Formulation and Application of the Generalized Multilevel Facets Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Liu, Chih-Yu

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors develop a generalized multilevel facets model, which is not only a multilevel and two-parameter generalization of the facets model, but also a multilevel and facet generalization of the generalized partial credit model. Because the new model is formulated within a framework of nonlinear mixed models, no efforts are…

  3. Perceptions of Overall Job Satisfaction and Facet Satisfaction of Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdaway, Edward A.; Johnson, Neil A.

    Learned opinion supports the relevance of satisfaction with job facets in studies of job satisfaction, but an analysis of the perceived importance of these facets concerning overall job satisfaction in education has largely been ignored. The relationships among Alberta (Canada) elementary and junior high school principals' job facet perceptions…

  4. Identifying Facets of Problem Solving in Mathematics Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klieme, Eckhard; Clausen, Marten

    Facets of problem solving instruction (PSI) were studied in German mathematics classrooms. Nine different facets of PSI were identified from the research literature, and a video rating form was developed to assess these facets and teacher effectiveness. Videotaped mathematics lessons (n=147) for German eighth graders from the sample for the Third…

  5. Does lumbar facet arthrosis precede disc degeneration? A postmortem study.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Lee, Michael J; Cassinelli, Ezequiel; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2007-11-01

    It is believed lumbar degeneration begins in the disc, where desiccation and collapse lead to instability and compensatory facet arthrosis. We explored the contrary contention that facet degeneration precedes disc degeneration by examining 647 skeletal lumbar spines. Using facet osteophytosis as a measure of facet degeneration and vertebral rim osteophytosis as a measure of disc degeneration, we assumed bone degeneration in both locations equally reflected the progression of those in the soft tissues. We graded arthrosis Grade 0 to 4 on a continuum from no arthritis to ankylosis. The data were analyzed for different age groups to examine patterns of degeneration with age. Specimens younger than 30 years of age had a higher prevalence of facet osteophytosis compared with vertebral rim osteophotosis at L1-L2 and L2-L3. Specimens aged 30 to 39 years showed more facet osteophytosis than vertebral rim osteophytosis at L4-L5. Specimens older than 40 years, however, showed more vertebral rim osteophytosis compared with facet osteophytosis at all levels except L4-L5 and L5-S1. This skeletal study suggests facet osteophytosis appears early in the degenerative process, preceding vertebral rim osteophytosis of degenerating intervertebral discs. However, once facets begin deteriorating with age, vertebral rim osteophytosis overtakes continued facet osteophytosis. These data challenge the belief that facet osteophytosis follows vertebral rim osteophytosis; rather, it appears vertebral rim osteophytosis progresses more rapidly in later years, but facet osteophotosis occurs early, predominating in younger individuals. PMID:17767079

  6. Facet Modelling: An Approach to Flexible and Integrated Conceptual Modelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opdahl, Andreas L.; Sindre, Guttorm

    1997-01-01

    Identifies weaknesses of conceptual modelling languages for the problem domain of information systems (IS) development. Outlines an approach called facet modelling of real-world problem domains to deal with the complexity of contemporary analysis problems. Shows how facet models can be defined and visualized; discusses facet modelling in relation…

  7. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures

    PubMed Central

    Siegling, Alex B.; Petrides, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS), and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS). Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet), while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ’s four-factor model (as a distinct factor). The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness. PMID:27055017

  8. Exercise in children with joint hypermobility syndrome and knee pain: a randomised controlled trial comparing exercise into hypermobile versus neutral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain in children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) is traditionally managed with exercise, however the supporting evidence for this is scarce. No trial has previously examined whether exercising to neutral or into the hypermobile range affects outcomes. This study aimed to (i) determine if a physiotherapist-prescribed exercise programme focused on knee joint strength and control is effective in reducing knee pain in children with JHS compared to no treatment, and (ii) whether the range in which these exercises are performed affects outcomes. Methods A prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial conducted in a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia compared an 8 week exercise programme performed into either the full hypermobile range or only to neutral knee extension, following a minimum 2 week baseline period without treatment. Randomisation was computer-generated, with allocation concealed by sequentially numbered opaque sealed envelopes. Knee pain was the primary outcome. Quality of life, thigh muscle strength, and function were also measured at (i) initial assessment, (ii) following the baseline period and (iii) post treatment. Assessors were blinded to the participants’ treatment allocation and participants blinded to the difference in the treatments. Results Children with JHS and knee pain (n=26) aged 7-16 years were randomly assigned to the hypermobile (n=12) or neutral (n=14) treatment group. Significant improvements in child-reported maximal knee pain were found following treatment, regardless of group allocation with a mean 14.5 mm reduction on the visual analogue scale (95% CI 5.2 – 23.8 mm, p=0.003). Significant differences between treatment groups were noted for parent-reported overall psychosocial health (p=0.009), specifically self-esteem (p=0.034), mental health (p=0.001) and behaviour (p=0.019), in favour of exercising into the hypermobile range (n=11) compared to neutral only (n=14). Conversely, parent

  9. Rough surface scattering based on facet model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khamsi, H. R.; Fung, A. K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    A model for the radar return from bare ground was developed to calculate the radar cross section of bare ground and the effect of the frequency averaging on the reduction of the variance of the return. It is shown that, by assuming that the distribution of the slope to be Gaussian and that the distribution of the length of the facet to be in the form of the positive side of a Gaussian distribution, the results are in good agreement with experimental data collected by an 8- to 18-GHz radar spectrometer system. It is also shown that information on the exact correlation length of the small structure on the ground is not necessary; an effective correlation length may be calculated based on the facet model and the wavelength of the incident wave.

  10. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Shani; Sapir, Zvi; Schultz, Moty; Butenko, Alexander V; Ocko, Benjamin M; Deutsch, Moshe; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-19

    Liquid droplets, widely encountered in everyday life, have no flat facets. Here we show that water-dispersed oil droplets can be reversibly temperature-tuned to icosahedral and other faceted shapes, hitherto unreported for liquid droplets. These shape changes are shown to originate in the interplay between interfacial tension and the elasticity of the droplet's 2-nm-thick interfacial monolayer, which crystallizes at some T = Ts above the oil's melting point, with the droplet's bulk remaining liquid. Strikingly, at still-lower temperatures, this interfacial freezing (IF) effect also causes droplets to deform, split, and grow tails. Our findings provide deep insights into molecular-scale elasticity and allow formation of emulsions of tunable stability for directed self-assembly of complex-shaped particles and other future technologies. PMID:26733673

  11. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Shani; Sapir, Zvi; Schultz, Moty; Butenko, Alexander V.; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Deutsch, Moshe; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Liquid droplets, widely encountered in everyday life, have no flat facets. Here we show that water-dispersed oil droplets can be reversibly temperature-tuned to icosahedral and other faceted shapes, hitherto unreported for liquid droplets. These shape changes are shown to originate in the interplay between interfacial tension and the elasticity of the droplet’s 2-nm-thick interfacial monolayer, which crystallizes at some T = Ts above the oil’s melting point, with the droplet’s bulk remaining liquid. Strikingly, at still-lower temperatures, this interfacial freezing (IF) effect also causes droplets to deform, split, and grow tails. Our findings provide deep insights into molecular-scale elasticity and allow formation of emulsions of tunable stability for directed self-assembly of complex-shaped particles and other future technologies. PMID:26733673

  12. FACET: The New User Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.J.; Erikson, R.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Li, S.Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; Seryi, A.; Wittmer, W.; /Michigan State U.

    2011-12-13

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Its high power electron and positron beams make it a unique facility, ideal for beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration studies. The first 2 km of the SLAC linac produce 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron and positron beams with short bunch lengths of 20 {mu}m. A final focusing system can produce beam spots 10 {mu}m wide. User-aided Commissioning took place in summer 2011 and FACET will formally come online in early 2012. We present the User Facility, the current features, planned upgrades and the opportunities for further experiments. Accelerators are our primary tool for discovering the fundamental laws to the universe. Each new frontier we probe requires a new, more powerful method. Accelerators are therefore increasing in size and cost. The future of this field requires new accelerating techniques that can reach the high energies required over shorter distances. New concepts for high gradient acceleration include utilizing the wakes in plasma and dielectric and metallic structures. FACET was built to provide a test bed for novel accelerating concepts with its high charge and highly compressed beams. As a test facility unlike any other, it has also attracted groups interested in beam diagnostic techniques and terahertz studies. The first phase of the construction was completed in May 2011. Beam commissioning began in June and was interleaved with the installation of five experiments. Users were invited to aid with the commissioning for the month of August during which time experimental hardware and software were checked out and some first measurements were taken. FACET is currently in the process of becoming a Department of Energy User Facility for High Energy Physics.

  13. Shell structure in faceted metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavloff, Nicolas; Creagh, Stephen C.

    1993-12-01

    We study the quantized electronic energy levels in a three-dimensional icosahedral billiard modeling a faceted metal cluster. The first 2000 levels are determined numerically. The magic numbers are compared with experimental data and with the results for a spherical model. We discuss the supershell structure and propose its study as a test of cluster sphericity. We compare our results with the predictions of the semiclassical trace formula and point out the relevance of diffractive orbits.

  14. Thrombospondin-4 and excitatory synaptogenesis promote spinal sensitization after painful mechanical joint injury.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Nathan D; Zaucke, Frank; Kras, Jeffrey V; Dong, Ling; Luo, Z David; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-02-01

    Facet joint injury induces persistent pain that may be maintained by structural plasticity in the spinal cord. Astrocyte-derived thrombospondins, especially thrombospondin-4 (TSP4), have been implicated in synaptogenesis and spinal sensitization in neuropathic pain, but the TSP4 response and its relationship to synaptic changes in the spinal cord have not been investigated for painful joint injury. This study investigates the role of TSP4 in the development and maintenance of persistent pain following injurious facet joint distraction in rats and tests the hypothesis that excitatory synaptogenesis contributes to such pain. Painful facet joint loading induces dorsal horn excitatory synaptogenesis along with decreased TSP4 in the DRG and increased astrocytic release of TSP4 in the spinal cord, all of which parallel the time course of sustained tactile allodynia. Blocking injury-induced spinal TSP4 expression with antisense oligonucleotides or reducing TSP4 activity at its neuronal receptor in the spinal cord with gabapentin treatment both attenuate the allodynia and dorsal horn synaptogenesis that develop after painful facet joint loading. Increased spinal TSP4 also facilitates the development of allodynia and spinal hyperexcitability, even after non-painful physiological loading of the facet joint. These results suggest that spinal TSP4 plays an important role in the development and maintenance of persistent joint-mediated pain by inducing excitatory synaptogenesis and facilitating the transduction of mechanical loading of the facet joint that leads to spinal hyperexcitability. PMID:25483397

  15. Stiff skin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geng, S; Lei, X; Toyohara, J P; Zhan, P; Wang, J; Tan, S

    2006-07-01

    Stiff skin syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by pronounced skin induration, mild hypertrichosis and limited joint mobility, predominantly on the buttocks and thighs. Many heterogeneous cases have been reported under the name of stiff skin syndrome. We present a case of stiff skin syndrome from China, the diagnosis based on the patient's typical clinical and histopathological features. PMID:16836505

  16. Facet coatings for nonhermetically packaged lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.; He, C.; Djavani-Tabrizi, S.; Yin, T.; Mallard, R.; Das, S. R.

    2004-05-01

    Nonhermetic packaging is one avenue of reducing the module cost of optical devices; however, this requires the coatings applied to the facets of lasers and modulators to be highly stable and impervious to the effects of high humidity under high temperature/high power operating conditions. We have developed two types of facet coatings for nonhermetic applications. One involves electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ECR-PECVD) of a SiNx cap layer and the other utilizes ion beam deposition (IBD) of a Ta2O5 cap layer, both on top of a two-layer SiO2/a-Si high-reflectance (HR) coating deposited on the facets of Fabry-Perot (F-P) ridge waveguide (RWG) lasers operating at 1310 nm. The lasers were aged under 85 °C/85% relative humidity (RH) conditions and ex situ tested using drive currents of 10-20 mA (subthreshold) and 80-120 mA operating currents (Iop). The output power-current-voltage (L-I-V) tests were conducted at room temperature and at various time intervals up to 5000 h. For comparison, tests were also done on devices aged in a dry oven. .

  17. JPL tests of a LaJet concentrator facet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; Argoud, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    A LaJet Energy Company (LEC) concentrator facet, 60 in. in diameter, was tested for imaging quality. The following two methods were used: (1) autofocus tests with a point source of light at the facet's radius of curvature; and (2) tests with the Sun close to the horizon as a distant source. The tests of the LaJet facet indicate that all of the solar image reflected by an LEC 460 solar concentrator made of like facets should fall within a 9-in. aperture if the outer facets are carefully adjusted. Such a concentrator would have acceptable performance, but complete evaluation must be made with an assembled concentrator.

  18. Nanoparticle growth. Facet development during platinum nanocube growth.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Xin, Huolin; Czarnik, Cory; Ercius, Peter; Elmlund, Hans; Pan, Ming; Wang, Lin-Wang; Zheng, Haimei

    2014-08-22

    An understanding of how facets of a nanocrystal develop is critical for controlling nanocrystal shape and designing novel functional materials. However, the atomic pathways of nanocrystal facet development are mostly unknown because of the lack of direct observation. We report the imaging of platinum nanocube growth in a liquid cell using transmission electron microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution. The growth rates of all low index facets are similar until the {100} facets stop growth. The continuous growth of the rest facets leads to a nanocube. Our calculation shows that the much lower ligand mobility on the {100} facets is responsible for the arresting of {100} growing facets. These findings shed light on nanocrystal shape-control mechanisms and future design of nanomaterials. PMID:25146287

  19. High Stability of Faceted Nanotubes and Fullerenes of Multiphase Layered Phosphorus: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jie; Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David

    2014-11-01

    We present a paradigm in constructing very stable, faceted nanotube and fullerene structures by laterally joining nanoribbons or patches of different planar phosphorene phases. Our ab initio density functional calculations indicate that these phases may form very stable, nonplanar joints. Unlike fullerenes and nanotubes obtained by deforming a single-phase planar monolayer at substantial energy penalty, we find faceted fullerenes and nanotubes to be nearly as stable as the planar single-phase monolayers. The resulting rich variety of polymorphs allows us to tune the electronic properties of phosphorene nanotubes and fullerenes not only by the chiral index but also by the combination of different phosphorene phases. In selected phosphorene nanotubes, a metal-insulator transition may be induced by strain or by changing the number of walls.

  20. High stability of faceted nanotubes and fullerenes of multi-phase layered phosphorus: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jie; Zhu, Zhen; Tomanek, David

    2015-03-01

    We present a paradigm in constructing very stable, faceted nanotube and fullerene structures by laterally joining nanoribbons or patches of different planar phosphorene phases. Our ab initio density functional calculations indicate that these phases may form very stable, non-planar joints. Unlike fullerenes and nanotubes obtained by deforming a single-phase planar monolayer at substantial energy penalty, we find faceted fullerenes and nanotubes to be nearly as stable as the planar single-phase monolayers. The resulting rich variety of polymorphs allows to tune the electronic properties of phosphorene nanotubes (PNTs) and fullerenes not only by the chiral index, but also by the combination of different phosphorene phases. In selected PNTs, a metal-insulator transition may be induced by strain or changing the number of walls. Supported by the National Science Foundation Cooperative Agreement #EEC-0832785, titled ``NSEC: Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing.''

  1. [Facets of diagnostics of mentalization in children].

    PubMed

    Juen, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Clinical relevance of variations within the ability to mentalize is usually reported in the field of psychopathology in adults. This might be due to difficulties in methods for empirical assessment of this capacity in children. In this short report the author discusses facets and abilities of how to engage the inner world of young children with story stem techniques and especially how to register variations in the ability to mentalize. Ideas for assessment in early childhood are presented and illustrated along two clinical vignettes. This paper gives a short impression of clinical diagnostics of mentalization in childhood. PMID:25478751

  2. SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cotten, A; Flipo, R M; Mentre, A; Delaporte, E; Duquesnoy, B; Chastanet, P

    1995-09-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne are sometimes associated with peculiar aseptic skeletal conditions, but such skeletal lesions can be found without skin lesions. The term SAPHO syndrome has been coined for this cluster of manifestations. (The acronym SAPHO refers to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis.) The most common site of the disease is the upper anterior chest wall, characterized by predominantly osteosclerotic lesions, hyperostosis, and arthritis of the adjacent joints. Osteosclerosis of the vertebral bodies, hyperostosis, and erosions of the vertebral plates can be encountered. Unilateral sacroiliitis is frequently observed. Long bone involvement consists of osteosclerosis or osteolysis with periosteal new bone formation. Peripheral arthritis can be present but is rarely associated with joint destruction. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains unknown, but a link with seronegative spondyloarthropathies is probable. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual syndrome to avoid misdiagnosis (eg, tumor, infection), unnecessary surgery, and antibiotic therapy. PMID:7501856

  3. Spontaneous septic arthritis of the lumbar facet caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an otherwise healthy adolescent.

    PubMed

    Papaliodis, Dean N; Roberts, Timothy T; Richardson, Nicholas G; Lawrence, James B

    2014-07-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy with isolated septic arthritis of a lumbar facet. This rare presentation of an infection in a lumbar facet joint occurred after minor trauma sustained in a football game. Septic arthritis of the spinal facet joint is an uncommon phenomenon. Only 5 cases have been reported in immunocompromised pediatric patients. To our knowledge, no case of septic arthritis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient has been reported. An otherwise healthy 16-year-old boy presented with 4 weeks of escalating back pain after a minor athletics-related trauma. Evaluation showed incapacitating pain, lumbar musculature spasms, and the absence of fever, hemodynamic, or neurologic changes. Laboratory values were within normal limits. Magnetic resonance images showed a fluid collection within the L3-L4 facet and a localized abscess. Computed tomographic-guided aspiration showed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, for which the patient received 6 weeks of vancomycin with complete resolution of symptoms. Refractory lumbago in an adolescent requires careful evaluation. PMID:25046186

  4. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2013-07-09

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  5. Faceted ceramic fibers, tapes or ribbons and epitaxial devices therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-07-24

    A crystalline article includes a single-crystal ceramic fiber, tape or ribbon. The fiber, tape or ribbon has at least one crystallographic facet along its length, which is generally at least one meter long. In the case of sapphire, the facets are R-plane, M-plane, C-plane or A-plane facets. Epitaxial articles, including superconducting articles, can be formed on the fiber, tape or ribbon.

  6. Preliminary design of large reflectors with flat facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Anderson, M. S.; Card, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    A concept for approximating curved antenna surfaces using flat facets is discussed. A preliminary design technique for determining the size of the reflector surface facets necessary to meet antenna surface accuracy requirements is presented. A proposed large Microwave Radiometer Satellite is selected as an application, and the far field electromagnetic response of a faceted reflector surface is compared with that from a spherical reflector surface.

  7. Preliminary design of large reflectors with flat facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Anderson, M. S.; Card, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for approximating curved antenna surfaces using flat facets is discussed. A preliminary design technique for determining the size of the reflector surface facets necessary to meet antenna surface accuracy requirements is presented. A proposed large microwave radiometer satellite (MRS) is selected as an application, and the far-field electromagnetic response of a faceted reflector surface is compared with that from a spherical reflector surface.

  8. Transverse effects in plasma wakefield acceleration at FACET - Simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Adli, E.; Hogan, M.; Frederico, J.; Litos, M. D.; An, W.; Mori, W.

    2012-12-21

    We investigate transverse effects in the plasma-wakefield acceleration experiments planned and ongoing at FACET. We use PIC simulation tools, mainly QuickPIC, to simulate the interaction of the drive electron beam and the plasma. In FACET a number of beam dynamics knobs, including dispersion and bunch length knobs, can be used to vary the beam transverse characteristics in the plasma. We present simulation results and the status of the FACET experimental searches.

  9. [Performance assessment using the Many-Facet Rasch Measurement].

    PubMed

    Prieto Adánez, Gerardo

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes how the Many-Facet Rasch Measurement (MFRM) can be applied to constructed-response items and rater analysis. The article provides an introduction to MFRM, a description of facet analysis procedures, and an illustrative example to examine the effects of various sources of variability on students' performance on a DELE (Diplomas in Spanish as a Foreign Language) test by means of the FACETS program. Results highlight the usefulness of the MFRM to detect raters that have extreme values on the continuum of severity. MFRM facilitates comprehension of the assessment process as well as providing objective measurement of facet elements. PMID:21504675

  10. Faceted Gold Nanorods: Nanocuboids, Convex Nanocuboids, and Concave Nanocuboids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Zhou, Yadong; Villarreal, Esteban; Lin, Ye; Zou, Shengli; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-10

    Au nanorods are optically tunable anisotropic nanoparticles with built-in catalytic activities. The state-of-the-art seed-mediated nanorod synthesis offers excellent control over the aspect ratios of cylindrical Au nanorods, which enables fine-tuning of plasmon resonances over a broad spectral range. However, facet control of Au nanorods with atomic-level precision remains significantly more challenging. The coexistence of various types of low-index and high-index facets on the highly curved nanorod surfaces makes it extremely challenging to quantitatively elucidate the atomic-level structure-property relationships that underpin the catalytic competence of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that cylindrical Au nanorods undergo controlled facet evolution during their overgrowth in the presence of Cu(2+) and cationic surfactants, resulting in the formation of anisotropic nanostructures enclosed by well-defined facets, such as low-index faceting nanocuboids and high-index faceting convex nanocuboids and concave nanocuboids. These faceted Au nanorods exhibit enriched optical extinction spectral features, broader plasmonic tuning range, and enhanced catalytic tunability in comparison to the conventional cylindrical Au nanorods. The capabilities to both fine-tailor the facets and fine-tune the plasmon resonances of anisotropic Au nanoparticles open up unique opportunities for us to study, in great detail, the facet-dependent interfacial molecular transformations on Au nanocatalysts using surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a time-resolved spectroscopic tool. PMID:25927399