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Sample records for facial bone lengthening

  1. [Lengthening temporalis myoplasty: A new approach to facial rehabilitation with the "mirror-effect" method].

    PubMed

    Blanchin, T; Martin, F; Labbe, D

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis often reveals two conditions that are hard to control: labial occlusion and palpebral closure. Today, there are efforts to go beyond the sole use of muscle stimulation techniques, and attention is being given to cerebral plasticity stimulation? This implies using the facial nerves' efferent pathway as the afferent pathway in rehabilitation. This technique could further help limit the two recalcitrant problems, above. We matched two groups of patients who underwent surgery for peripheral facial paralysis by lengthening the temporalis myoplasty (LTM). LTM is one of the best ways to examine cerebral plasticity. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed nerve and is both motor and sensory. After a LTM, patients have to use the trigeminal nerve differently, as it now has a direct role in generating the smile. The LTM approach, using the efferent pathway, therefore, creates a challenge for the brain. The two groups followed separate therapies called "classical" and "mirror-effect". The "mirror-effect" method gave a more precise orientation of the patient's cerebral plasticity than did the classical rehabilitation. The method develops two axes: voluntary movements patients need to control their temporal smile; and spontaneous movements needed for facial expressions. Work on voluntary movements is done before a "digital mirror", using an identical doubled hemiface, providing the patient with a fake copy of his face and, thus, a 7 "mirror-effect". The spontaneous movements work is based on what we call the "Therapy of Motor Emotions". The method presented here is used to treat facial paralysis (Bell's Palsies type), whether requiring surgery or not. Importantly, the facial nerve, like the trigeminal nerve above, is also a mixed nerve and is stimulated through the efferent pathway in the same manner. PMID:23598073

  2. Leg lengthening - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as Legg-Perthes disease previous injuries or bone fractures that may stimulate excessive bone growth abnormal spinal ... lengthened; usually the lower leg bone (tibia) or upper leg bone (femur). Metal pins or screws are ...

  3. Facial Asymmetry in Young Adults with Condylar Hyperplasia-Unusual Changes in the Facial Bones

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha Lakhanpal; JK, Dayashankar Rao; Goel, Sumit; Srivastava, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Facial asymmetry can be caused by various pathological conditions, condylar hyperplasia (CH) is one of such condition, characterized by unilateral or bilateral mandibular condylar overgrowth, causing facial asymmetry, mandibular deviation, malocclusion and functional impairment. Advanced imaging and scintigraphic methods, helps the clinicians in diagnosing and monitoring its macroscopic aspects. Here we report three interesting and illustrative cases of facial asymmetry with unilateral CH discussing the unusual changes in the facial bones. PMID:25738093

  4. The effect of latency on bone lengthening force and bone mineralization: an investigation using strain gauge mounted on internal distractor device

    PubMed Central

    Singare, Sekou; Li, Dichen; Liu, Yaxiong; Wu, Zhongying; Wang, Jue

    2006-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of latency on the development of bone lengthening force and bone mineralization during mandible distraction osteogenesis. Methods Distraction tensions were investigated at different latency period in 36 rabbits using internal unilateral distractor. Strain gauges were prepared and attached to the distractor to directly assess the level of distraction tension during mandible lengthening. The tensile force environment of the mandible of rabbit during distraction was evaluated through in vivo experiments using two gauges. The animals were divided into 3 groups each containing 12 rabbits. Latency periods of 0, 4 and 7 days respectively were observed prior to beginning distraction. The distraction protocol consisted of a lengthening rate of 1 mm once daily for 8 days, followed by a consolidation phase of 2 weeks after which the animals were killed. Biopsies specimens were taken from the distracted area at the end of the distraction period. A non-distracted area of the mandible bone served as control. The specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to assess the ultrastructural pattern, and the bone mineralization. Results The resting tension acting on the distraction gap increases through distraction. The 7-day latency groups exhibit higher tension then those of 0-day and 4-days latency groups. Quantitative energy dispersive spectral analysis confirmed that immediate distractions were associated with lower calcium and phosphate atomic weight ratio. Conclusion the latency periods could affect the bone lengthening tension and the bone mineralization process. PMID:16524487

  5. Bone lengthening with extra-articular arthrodesis of the hip using external fixation

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This is a case series of 11 children and adolescents who underwent femoral lengthening and percutaneous hip arthrodesis using a method of extra-articular joint compression in combination with callotasis. Clinical review indicated a significant improvement in physical function and psychological well-being. The average lengthening was 5.3 cm or 16% of the initial length. Complications were more frequent in patients older than 14 years (P = 0.034) as was a higher maturation index (P = 0.021). No additional operations were required to achieve the surgical objective. PMID:18810590

  6. Standardization of surgical techniques used in facial bone contouring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Sung

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of facial bone contouring surgery for cosmetic purposes, various surgical methods have been used to improve the aesthetics of facial contours. In general, by standardizing the surgical techniques, it is possible to decrease complication rates and achieve more predictable surgical outcomes, thereby increasing patient satisfaction. The technical strategies used by the author to standardize facial bone contouring procedures are introduced here. The author uses various pre-manufactured surgical tools and hardware for facial bone contouring. During a reduction malarplasty or genioplasty procedure, double-bladed reciprocating saws and pre-bent titanium plates customized for the zygomatic body, arch and chin are used. Various guarded oscillating saws are used for mandibular angloplasty. The use of double-bladed saws and pre-bent plates to perform reduction malarplasty reduces the chances of post-operative asymmetry or under- or overcorrection of the zygoma contours due to technical faults. Inferior alveolar nerve injury and post-operative jawline asymmetry or irregularity can be reduced by using a guarded saw during mandibular angloplasty. For genioplasty, final placement of the chin in accordance with preoperative quantitative analysis can be easily performed with pre-bent plates, and a double-bladed saw allows more procedural accuracy during osteotomies. Efforts by the surgeon to avoid unintentional faults are key to achieving satisfactory results and reducing the incidence of complications. The surgical techniques described in this study in conjunction with various in-house surgical tools and modified hardware can be used to standardize techniques to achieve aesthetically gratifying outcomes. PMID:26346781

  7. Transgenic mouse model for neurocristopathy: Schwannomas and facial bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Jensen, N A; Rodriguez, M L; Garvey, J S; Miller, C A; Hood, L

    1993-04-15

    We have characterized a strain of double transgenic mice with simian virus 40 large tumor antigen and prokaryotic lacZ under the control of the myelin basic protein promoter that develops spindle-cell sarcomas and osteogenic sarcomas at 5-7 months of age. Although poorly differentiated, the spindle-cell sarcomas were characterized as malignant Schwannomas based on their neural association, the presence of basal lamina, and expression of Schwann cell-specific genes. The osteogenic sarcomas were often multiple and appeared predominantly in the facial bones, less frequently in the ribs and vertebral column, and only rarely in the appendicular skeleton. Benign osteoblastic lesions were often observed adjacent to these sarcomas. Both the osteoblastic cells in the facial skeleton and Schwann cells are regarded as neural crest derivatives. The biological properties and anatomical location of these tumors suggest that they may share a common origin from the neural crest or its derivatives. R.P. Bolande [Hum. Pathol. (1974) 5, 409-429] introduced the term neurocristopathy as a unifying concept to describe such lesions arising from the neural crest or its derivatives. Cell lines established from both bone and Schwann cell tumors arising in these transgenic mice express simian virus 40 large tumor antigen mRNA as well as functional large tumor antigen. Such cell lines are potentially valuable in the search for markers that identify mammalian neural crest derivatives. PMID:8386366

  8. Bilateral Facial Paralysis Caused by Bilateral Temporal Bone Fracture: A Case Report and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Eliçora, Sultan ?evik; Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Bi?kin, Sultan; Damar, Murat; Bilgin, Ergin

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral facial paralysis caused by bilateral temporal bone fracture is a rare clinical entity, with seven cases reported in the literature to date. In this paper, we describe a 40-year-old male patient with bilateral facial paralysis and hearing loss that developed after an occupational accident. On physical examination, House-Brackmann (HB) facial paralysis of grade 6 was observed on the right side and HB grade 5 paralysis on the left. Upon temporal bone computed tomography (CT) examination, a fracture line exhibiting transverse progression was observed in both petrous temporal bones. Our patient underwent transmastoid facial decompression surgery of the right ear. The patient refused a left-side operation. Such patients require extensive monitoring in intensive care units because the presence of multiple injuries means that facial functions are often very difficult to evaluate. Therefore, delays may ensue in both diagnosis and treatment of bilateral facial paralysis. PMID:26175920

  9. Intra-temporal facial nerve centerline segmentation for navigated temporal bone surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voormolen, Eduard H. J.; van Stralen, Marijn; Woerdeman, Peter A.; Pluim, Josien P. W.; Noordmans, Herke J.; Regli, Luca; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, Jan W.; Viergever, Max A.

    2011-03-01

    Approaches through the temporal bone require surgeons to drill away bone to expose a target skull base lesion while evading vital structures contained within it, such as the sigmoid sinus, jugular bulb, and facial nerve. We hypothesize that an augmented neuronavigation system that continuously calculates the distance to these structures and warns if the surgeon drills too close, will aid in making safe surgical approaches. Contemporary image guidance systems are lacking an automated method to segment the inhomogeneous and complexly curved facial nerve. Therefore, we developed a segmentation method to delineate the intra-temporal facial nerve centerline from clinically available temporal bone CT images semi-automatically. Our method requires the user to provide the start- and end-point of the facial nerve in a patient's CT scan, after which it iteratively matches an active appearance model based on the shape and texture of forty facial nerves. Its performance was evaluated on 20 patients by comparison to our gold standard: manually segmented facial nerve centerlines. Our segmentation method delineates facial nerve centerlines with a maximum error along its whole trajectory of 0.40+/-0.20 mm (mean+/-standard deviation). These results demonstrate that our model-based segmentation method can robustly segment facial nerve centerlines. Next, we can investigate whether integration of this automated facial nerve delineation with a distance calculating neuronavigation interface results in a system that can adequately warn surgeons during temporal bone drilling, and effectively diminishes risks of iatrogenic facial nerve palsy.

  10. Tendon lengthening and transfer.

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, F; Bachy, M

    2015-02-01

    Tendon lengthening and transfer are usually indicated for certain neuromuscular disorders, peripheral or central nerve injury, congenital disorder or direct traumatic or degenerative musculotendinous lesion. In musculotendinous lengthening, technique depends on muscle anatomy, degree of correction required, and the need to avoid excessive loss of force. Lengthening within the muscle or aponeurosis is stable. In the tendon, however, it may provide greater gain but is not stable and requires postoperative immobilization to avoid excessive lengthening. Tendon transfer consists in displacing a muscle's tendon insertion in order to restore function. The muscle to be transferred is chosen according to strength, architecture and course, contraction timing, intended direction, synergy and the joint moment arm to be restored. Functions to be restored have to be prioritized, and alternatives to transfer should be identified. The principles of tendon transfer require preoperative assessment of the quality of the tissue through which the transfer is to pass and of the suppleness of the joints concerned. During the procedure, transfer tension should be optimized and the neurovascular bundle should be protected. The method of fixation, whether tendon-to-bone or tendon-to-tendon suture, should be planned according to local conditions and the surgeon's experience. PMID:25572471

  11. Sensorineural Deafness, Distinctive Facial Features and Abnormal Cranial Bones

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Alona; Laurino, Mercy; Maravilla, Kenneth R.; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2008-01-01

    The Waardenburg syndromes (WS) account for approximately 2% of congenital sensorineural deafness. This heterogeneous group of diseases currently can be categorized into four major subtypes (WS types 1-4) on the basis of characteristic clinical features. Multiple genes have been implicated in WS, and mutations in some genes can cause more than one WS subtype. In addition to eye, hair and skin pigmentary abnormalities, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal bridge are seen in WS type 1. Mutations in the PAX3 gene are responsible for the condition in the majority of these patients. In addition, mutations in PAX3 have been found in WS type 3 that is distinguished by musculoskeletal abnormalities, and in a family with a rare subtype of WS, craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome (CDHS), characterized by dysmorphic facial features, hand abnormalities, and absent or hypoplastic nasal and wrist bones. Here we describe a woman who shares some, but not all features of WS type 3 and CDHS, and who also has abnormal cranial bones. All sinuses were hypoplastic, and the cochlea were small. No sequence alteration in PAX3 was found. These observations broaden the clinical range of WS and suggest there may be genetic heterogeneity even within the CDHS subtype. PMID:18553554

  12. [Bone distraction osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Malevez, Ch; Dujardin, Th; Glorieux, V; Swennen, G; Schutyser, F; Van Cleynenbreugel, J

    2002-01-01

    Bone osteogenesis has been used by many surgeons to compensate dissymmetry due to congenital malformations, diseases or traumas. Bone distraction is the process of generating new bone in a gap between two bone segments in response to the application of graduated tensile stress across the bone gap. Different types of distraction are actually proposed to be an alternative to facial osteotomies or bone grafting techniques. Distraction can be unilateral, bilateral and correct the deficiencies in one, two or three dimensions. The advantages of the distraction osteogenesis are the possibilities to obtain bone lengthening together with simultaneous expansion of the functional soft tissue matrix including skin, muscles, nerves, cartilage, blood vessels and periosteum. Distractors are internal or external devices made of pins or miniplates fixed on the bone and connected by lengthening--screw--systems allowing elongation. PMID:12649984

  13. Dose and diagnostic image quality in digital tomosynthesis imaging of facial bones in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Hickling, S.; Elbakri, I. A.; Reed, M.; Wrogemann, J.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of digital tomosynthesis (DT) for pediatric facial bone imaging. We compared the eye lens dose and diagnostic image quality of DT facial bone exams relative to digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT), and investigated whether we could modify our current DT imaging protocol to reduce patient dose while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. We measured the dose to the eye lens for all three modalities using high-sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an anthropomorphic skull phantom. To assess the diagnostic image quality of DT compared to the corresponding DR and CT images, we performed an observer study where the visibility of anatomical structures in the DT phantom images were rated on a four-point scale. We then acquired DT images at lower doses and had radiologists indicate whether the visibility of each structure was adequate for diagnostic purposes. For typical facial bone exams, we measured eye lens doses of 0.1-0.4 mGy for DR, 0.3-3.7 mGy for DT, and 26 mGy for CT. In general, facial bone structures were visualized better with DT then DR, and the majority of structures were visualized well enough to avoid the need for CT. DT imaging provides high quality diagnostic images of the facial bones while delivering significantly lower doses to the lens of the eye compared to CT. In addition, we found that by adjusting the imaging parameters, the DT effective dose can be reduced by up to 50% while maintaining sufficient image quality.

  14. Response of patients and families to lengthening of the facial bones by extraoral distraction osteogenesis: a review of 14 patients.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, A F; Duncan, C M; McLean, G R; Moos, K F; Chibbaro, P D

    2002-10-01

    Fourteen patients or their immediate family were interviewed about their experiences of having either unilateral or bilateral external distraction osteogenesis of the mandible. The patients showed a high level of co-operation with treatment. Six of the 14 patients required repeat distractions, and had been informed and accepted that this was a possibility before the initial distraction. However, patients or their parents expressed some reservations about the extraoral distractors, which prevented them from practising their favourite sport and made them vulnerable to bullying by their friends and colleagues. Patients had moderate pain when the appliances were removed. They all expressed their satisfaction with the results and would recommend this treatment to others. Problems, including speech, eating, pain, and sleeping difficulties, were encountered by patients at all stages of treatment. Of considerable concern was the disruption of education when the child was treated during the school term. PMID:12379186

  15. Facial nerve paralysis in temporal bone fractures: outcomes after late decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, A; Campobasso, G; Piazza, F; Quaranta, N; Salonna, I

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this paper was to address some of the unanswered questions regarding management of facial nerve paralysis in temporal bone fractures (TBF), such as the outcomes after late facial nerve decompression surgery. The study design was a retrospective review of a consecutive clinical series. Thirteen patients who underwent late decompression surgery for facial nerve paralysis due to TBF involving the perigeniculate ganglion region were analyzed. Patients were operated on 27-90 days after trauma. A transmastoid extralabyrinthine approach was used in all cases. Facial nerve-sheath slitting was performed routinely. Normal or subnormal facial nerve function (HB 1 or HB 2) was achieved in 7/9 cases (78%) evaluated at > or = 1 year after surgery. Good functional results were also obtained in two patients operated on 3 months after trauma. Bases on the outcomes observed in the present series, in patients unable to be operated on early, presenting 1 to 3 months with >95% denervation on EnoG, facial nerve decompression may have a beneficial effect. PMID:11583403

  16. Bad to the bone: facial structure predicts unethical behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Haselhuhn, Michael P.; Wong, Elaine M.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers spanning many scientific domains, including primatology, evolutionary biology and psychology, have sought to establish an evolutionary basis for morality. While researchers have identified social and cognitive adaptations that support ethical behaviour, a consensus has emerged that genetically determined physical traits are not reliable signals of unethical intentions or actions. Challenging this view, we show that genetically determined physical traits can serve as reliable predictors of unethical behaviour if they are also associated with positive signals in intersex and intrasex selection. Specifically, we identify a key physical attribute, the facial width-to-height ratio, which predicts unethical behaviour in men. Across two studies, we demonstrate that men with wider faces (relative to facial height) are more likely to explicitly deceive their counterparts in a negotiation, and are more willing to cheat in order to increase their financial gain. Importantly, we provide evidence that the link between facial metrics and unethical behaviour is mediated by a psychological sense of power. Our results demonstrate that static physical attributes can indeed serve as reliable cues of immoral action, and provide additional support for the view that evolutionary forces shape ethical judgement and behaviour. PMID:21733897

  17. Rib Bone Graft Adjusted to Fit the Facial Asymmetry: A Frame Structure Graft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Ho; Choi, Jong Hwan; Hwang, Kun; Choi, Jun Ho

    2015-10-01

    The authors introduce the concept of a "frame structure graft" in which a harvested rib bone was adjusted to fit facial asymmetry.On the costochondral junction of the sixth or seventh rib, a 5?cm incision was made. Through a subperiosteal dissection, the rib bone was harvested. Using a reciprocating saw, the harvested rib was scored on its anterior surface as well as its posterior surface with a partial depth at different intervals. The harvested rib bone was placed on the skin surface of the unaffected side of the face and a curvature was created exactly matching that of the unaffected side by bending the bone using a greenstick fracture. Thereafter, the graft was adjusted to conceal the asymmetry of the deficient side. The adjusted "frame structure" was transferred to the defect through the incisions on the affected side, and the "frame structure" graft was placed on the mandible or zygoma. The graft fixation was done externally with at least 2 Kirschner wires (K-wires).From January 2005 to August 2013, a total of 30 patients (13 men, 17 women, mean age 25.6 years) received a frame structure graft. All 30 patients achieved good healing at the operation site without complications. Donor-site morbidity as pneumothorax from the rib bone harvest was not found.Merits of this frame structure graft, the authors think, are that this method could allow a similar curvature to the normal side. In addition, the procedure itself is easy. PMID:26468802

  18. [Lengthening temporalis myoplasty: Technical refinements].

    PubMed

    Guerreschi, P; Labbé, D

    2015-10-01

    First described by Labbé in 1997, the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM) ensures the transfer of the entire temporal muscle from the coronoid process to the upper half of the lip without interposition of aponeurotic tissue. Thanks to brain plasticity, the temporal muscle is able to change its function because it is entirely mobilized towards another effector: the labial commissure. After 6 months of speech rehabilitation, the muscle loses its chewing function and it acquires its new smiling function. We describe as far as possible all the technical points to guide surgeons who would like to perform this powerful surgical procedure. We show the coronoid process approaches both through an upper temporal fossa approach and a lower nasolabial fold approach. Rehabilitation starts 3 weeks after the surgery following a standardized protocol to move from a mandibular smile to a voluntary smile, and then a spontaneous smile in 3 steps. The LTM is the main part of a one-stage global treatment of the paralyzed face. It constitutes a dynamic palliative treatment usually started at the sequelae stage, 18 months after the outcome of a peripheral facial paralysis. This one-stage procedure is a reproducible and relevant surgical technique in the difficult treatment of peripheral facial paralysis. An active muscle is transferred to reanimate the labial commissure and to recreate a mobile nasolabial fold. PMID:26422063

  19. Crown lengthening procedure in the management of amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Kalaivani, S.; Manohar, Jenish; Shakunthala, P.; Sujatha, S.; Rajasekaran, S. A.; Karthikeyan, B.; Kalaiselvan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full mouth rehabilitation includes a promising treatment planning and execution thus fulfilling esthetic, occlusal, and functional parameters maintaining the harmony of the stomatognathic system. Crown lengthening procedures have become an integral component of the esthetic armamentarium and are utilized with increasing frequency to enhance the appearance of restorations placed in the esthetic zone. Crown lengthening plays a role to create healthy relationship of the gingiva and bone levels so as to gain access to more of the tooth which can be restored, if it is badly worn, decayed or fractured, below the gum line. This paper highlights the full mouth crown lengthening procedure performed on a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta. PMID:26538965

  20. Onlay bone grafting simultaneous with facial soft tissue augmentation in a hemifacial microsomia patient using de-epithelialized orthograde submental flap: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2014-01-01

    Soft tissue augmentation in hemifacial microsomia patients is a challenging procedure. Free microvascular flap transfer is considered usually as the most accepted choice. On the other hand, bone grafting, simultaneous with facial soft tissue augmentation using de-epithelialized orthograde submental flap, is a suggested procedure. Moreover, preoperative evaluation of facial artery and anterior belly of the digastric muscle are essential steps for success in such flaps. Furthermore, bone suture technique helps achieve more predictable results and reduces the need for postoperative bulky dressing. PMID:24753799

  1. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Pablo Santos; Chiarelli, Fabio; Rodrigues, José A.; Shibli, Jamil A.; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey), crown lengthening is the most habitual surgical periodontal treatment. PMID:26609452

  2. Automatic Placement/Arrangement of Underneath Bone Structures for 3D Facial

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Fuhua "Frank"

    . Introduction Recent years have seen an explosion in 3D computer generated animation. The entertainment industry and Animations Alice J. Lin Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755 Fuhua (Frank) Cheng University of Kentucky means for generating facial expressions and animations. The time saved with the method is significant

  3. Limb Lengthening in Patients with Achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwang-Won; Garcia, Rey-an Niño; Rejuso, Chastity Amor; Choi, Jung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although bilateral lower-limb lengthening has been performed on patients with achondroplasia, the outcomes for the tibia and femur in terms of radiographic parameters, clinical results, and complications have not been compared with each other. We proposed 1) to compare the radiological outcomes of femoral and tibial lengthening and 2) to investigate the differences of complications related to lengthening. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 28 patients (average age, 14 years 4 months) with achondroplasia who underwent bilateral limb lengthening between 2004 and 2012. All patients first underwent bilateral tibial lengthening, and at 9-48 months (average, 17.8 months) after this procedure, bilateral femoral lengthening was performed. We analyzed the pixel value ratio (PVR) and characteristics of the callus of the lengthened area on serial radiographs. The external fixation index (EFI) and healing index (HI) were computed to compare tibial and femoral lengthening. The complications related to lengthening were assessed. Results The average gain in length was 8.4 cm for the femur and 9.8 cm for the tibia. The PVR, EFI, and HI of the tibia were significantly better than those of the femur. Fewer complications were found during the lengthening of the tibia than during the lengthening of the femur. Conclusion Tibial lengthening had a significantly lower complication rate and a higher callus formation rate than femoral lengthening. Our findings suggest that bilateral limb lengthening (tibia, followed by femur) remains a reasonable option; however, we should be more cautious when performing femoral lengthening in selected patients. PMID:26446651

  4. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    PubMed

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle. PMID:26143045

  5. Free bone graft reconstruction of irradiated facial tissue: Experimental effects of basic fibroblast growth factor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, B.L.; Connolly, D.T.; Winkelmann, T.; Sadove, A.M.; Heuvelman, D.; Feder, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the potential utility of basic fibroblast growth factor in the induction of angiogenesis and osseous healing in bone previously exposed to high doses of irradiation. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were evaluated by introducing basic fibroblast growth factor into irradiated mandibular resection sites either prior to or simultaneous with reconstruction by corticocancellous autografts harvested from the ilium. The fate of the free bone grafts was then evaluated at 90 days postoperatively by microangiographic, histologic, and fluorochrome bone-labeling techniques. Sequestration, necrosis, and failure to heal to recipient osseous margins was observed both clinically and histologically in all nontreated irradiated graft sites as well as those receiving simultaneous angiogenic stimulation at the time of graft placement. No fluorescent activity was seen in these graft groups. In the recipient sites pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor prior to placement of the graft, healing and reestablishment of mandibular contour occurred in nearly 50 percent of the animals. Active bone formation was evident at cortical margins adjacent to the recipient sites but was absent in the more central cancellous regions of the grafts.

  6. Nail lengthening and fingertip amputations.

    PubMed

    Adani, Roberto; Marcoccio, Ignazio; Tarallo, Luigi

    2003-10-01

    Fingertip injuries can be treated in different ways, including shortening with primary closure, skin grafts, and local or distant flaps. Nail bed involvement complicates fingertip reconstruction and may influence the choice of treatment. Local flaps can usually replace the pulp and provide a satisfactory functional and aesthetic result, whereas reconstruction of the fingernail apparatus is more difficult. In the period between 1998 and 2001, 12 fingertip injuries with nail bed involvement were treated with a combination of local flaps (Tranquilli-Leali and Venkataswami flaps) and the eponychial flap. The eponychial flap described by Bakhach is a backward cutaneous translation flap that lengthens the nail plate and restores a good appearance of the nail apparatus. This technique is simple to use and can be used with different flaps for pulp reconstruction. PMID:14504512

  7. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery. PMID:26195012

  8. Facial paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... otherwise healthy, facial paralysis is often due to Bell palsy . This is a condition in which the facial ... speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts for more than 6 to 12 months, ...

  9. [Differential diagnosis in fibro-osseous lesions of facial bones: report of a case of ossifying fibroma and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Lerda, W; Magnano, M; Ferraris, R; Gerri, F; Motta, M; Bongioannini, G

    2002-10-01

    Ossifying fibroma is a relatively rare, benign neoplasm of non-odontogenic origin, affecting the facial bones, and prevalently localized in the mandible, but which can also appear in the maxilla, paranasal sinuses and peripheral bones. Its growth is generally very slow and it is usually asymptomatic, for which it often manages to reach a considerable size. An incidental diagnosis during orthopantography, on the other hand, is not infrequent. The diagnosis, which is fundamentally made by utilizing conventional x-rays and CT and NMR scans, may present several controversial aspects and is not to be disjointed from the clinical and anatomopathological aspects, for which close interdisciplinary collaboration is required in many cases. In effecting a differential diagnosis, the possibility of inflammatory lesions, other fibrous-osseous lesions (in particular, fibrous dysplasia) and benign or malignant neoplasms must be taken into consideration. The present work presents a case of ossifying fibroma of the maxilla that is emblematic in its clinical, radiological and histopathological aspects. It also discusses problems connected with classification and differential diagnosis, in particular with respect to fibrous dysplasia, which are important in determining the proper therapeutic approach. PMID:12510342

  10. Utterance final lengthening and focus induced lengthening in standard Chinese bi-syllabic words 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Hongjuan

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the patterns of durational adjustment of bi-syllabic words in Standard Chinese when different constituents of the word are focused for correction. Results show that both focus-induced lengthening and ...

  11. Facial bradykinesia.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Matteo; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Marsili, Luca; Defazio, Giovanni; Thompson, Philip D; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to summarise the main clinical and pathophysiological features of facial bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease (PD) and in atypical parkinsonism. Clinical observation suggests that reduced spontaneous and emotional facial expressions are features of facial bradykinesia in PD and atypical parkinsonism. In atypical parkinsonism, facial bradykinesia is complicated by additional dystonic features. Experimental studies evaluating spontaneous and emotional facial movements demonstrate that PD is characterised by a reduction in spontaneous blinking and emotional facial expression. In PD, neurophysiological studies show that voluntary orofacial movements are smaller in amplitude and slower in velocity. In contrast, movements of the upper face (eg, voluntary blinking) are normal in terms of velocity and amplitude but impaired in terms of switching between the closing and opening phases. In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), voluntary blinking is not only characterised by a severely impaired switching between the closing and opening phases of voluntary blinking, but is also slow in comparison with PD. In conclusion, in PD, facial bradykinesia reflects abnormalities of spontaneous, emotional and voluntary facial movements. In PSP, spontaneous and voluntary facial movements are abnormal but experimental studies on emotional facial movements are lacking. Data on facial bradykinesia in other atypical parkinsonism diseases, including multiple system atrophy and corticobasal degeneration, are limited. In PD, facial bradykinesia is primarily mediated by basal ganglia dysfunction whereas in PSP, facial bradykinesia is a consequence of a widespread degeneration involving the basal ganglia, cortical and brainstem structures. PMID:23236012

  12. Plasticity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Mouse Bone Marrow in the Presence of Conditioned Medium of the Facial Nerve and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná; Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo Lopes de Paiva; Marinho, Maria Jocileide de Medeiros; Pereira, Wogelsanger Oliveira; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Costa, Miriam Stela Mariz de Oliveira; Júnior, Expedito Silva do Nascimento; Cavalcante, Jeferson Sousa

    2014-01-01

    A number of evidences show the influence of the growth of injured nerve fibers in peripheral nervous system as well as potential implant stem cells (SCs). The SCs implementation in the clinical field is promising and the understanding of proliferation and differentiation is essential. This study aimed to evaluate the plasticity of mesenchymal SCs from bone marrow of mice in the presence of culture medium conditioned with facial nerve explants and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). The growth and morphology were assessed for over 72 hours. Quantitative phenotypic analysis was taken from the immunocytochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), protein OX-42 (OX-42), protein associated with microtubule MAP-2 (MAP-2), protein ?-tubulin III (?-tubulin III), neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), and neurofilament 200 (NF-200). Cells cultured with conditioned medium alone or combined with FGF-2 showed morphological features apparently similar at certain times to neurons and glia and a significant proliferative activity in groups 2 and 4. Cells cultivated only with conditioned medium acquired a glial phenotype. Cells cultured with FGF-2 and conditioned medium expressed GFAP, OX-42, MAP-2, ?-tubulin III, NeuN, and NF-200. This study improves our understanding of the plasticity of mesenchymal cells and allows the search for better techniques with SCs. PMID:25614888

  13. Plasticity of mesenchymal stem cells from mouse bone marrow in the presence of conditioned medium of the facial nerve and fibroblast growth factor-2.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná; Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo Lopes de Paiva; Marinho, Maria Jocileide de Medeiros; Pereira, Wogelsanger Oliveira; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Costa, Miriam Stela Mariz de Oliveira; do Nascimento Júnior, Expedito Silva; Cavalcante, Jeferson Sousa

    2014-01-01

    A number of evidences show the influence of the growth of injured nerve fibers in peripheral nervous system as well as potential implant stem cells (SCs). The SCs implementation in the clinical field is promising and the understanding of proliferation and differentiation is essential. This study aimed to evaluate the plasticity of mesenchymal SCs from bone marrow of mice in the presence of culture medium conditioned with facial nerve explants and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). The growth and morphology were assessed for over 72 hours. Quantitative phenotypic analysis was taken from the immunocytochemistry for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), protein OX-42 (OX-42), protein associated with microtubule MAP-2 (MAP-2), protein ?-tubulin III (?-tubulin III), neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), and neurofilament 200 (NF-200). Cells cultured with conditioned medium alone or combined with FGF-2 showed morphological features apparently similar at certain times to neurons and glia and a significant proliferative activity in groups 2 and 4. Cells cultivated only with conditioned medium acquired a glial phenotype. Cells cultured with FGF-2 and conditioned medium expressed GFAP, OX-42, MAP-2, ?-tubulin III, NeuN, and NF-200. This study improves our understanding of the plasticity of mesenchymal cells and allows the search for better techniques with SCs. PMID:25614888

  14. Facial nerve neuromas: radiologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Latack, J T; Gabrielsen, T O; Knake, J E; Kemink, J L; Graham, M D; Gebarski, S S; Yang, P J

    1983-12-01

    Eight patients who had facial nerve neuromas were examined, and the radiographic findings are reported. Thin section tomography, high resolution computed tomography, posterior fossa computed tomography, and cerebellopontine angle cisternography using Pantopaque (iophendylate) demonstrated bone erosions and soft tissue masses conforming to the course of the facial nerve. The lesions generally exhibited either a proximal or a distal pattern of nerve involvement. Radiologic imaging frequently permits a correct preoperative diagnosis and accurate definition of the extent of facial nerve neuromas, assessments that are important for proper patient management. PMID:6606188

  15. Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    White, Lawrence M.; Marotta, Thomas R.; McLennan, Michael K.; Kassel, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate clinical radiographic investigation, together with an understanding of the normal radiographic anatomy of the facial skeleton, allows for precise delineation of facial fracutres and associated soft tissue injuries encountered in clinical practice. A combination of multiple plain radiographic views and coronal and axial computed tomographic images allow for optimal delineation of fracture patterns. This information is beneficial in the clinical and surgical management patients with facial injuries

  16. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  17. The Science and Theory behind Facial Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pessa, Joel E.; Hubbard, Bradley; Rohrich, Rod J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The etiology of age-related facial changes has many layers. Multiple theories have been presented over the past 50–100 years with an evolution of understanding regarding facial changes related to skin, soft tissue, muscle, and bone. This special topic will provide an overview of the current literature and evidence and theories of facial changes of the skeleton, soft tissues, and skin over time. PMID:25289202

  18. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  19. Telomere recombination and alternative telomere lengthening mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Draskovic, Irena; Londono Vallejo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes that protect them from being recognized as DNA double stranded breaks. Telomeres shorten with every cell division and in the absence of the checkpoint mechanisms critical telomere shortening leads to chromosome end fusions and genomic instability. Cancer cells achieve immortality by engaging in one of the two known mechanisms for telomere maintenance: elongation by telomerase or through recombination. Recombination based elongation of telomeres, also known as alternative lengthening of telomeres or ALT, is prevalent among cancers of mesenchymal origin. However, the conditions favoring ALT emergence are not known. Here we will discuss possible players in ALT mechanisms, including recruitment of telomeres to recombination centers, alterations of telomere associated proteins and modifications at the level of chromatin that could generate recombination permissive conditions at telomeres. PMID:23276906

  20. Facial swelling

    MedlinePLUS

    Puffy face; Swelling of the face; Moon face; Facial edema ... or jaw surgery Injury or trauma to the face (such as a burn) Malnutrition (when severe) Obesity Salivary gland disorders Sinusitis Stye with swelling around the infected eye Tooth abscess

  1. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... find out more. asc"} Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  2. Facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C

    2014-11-01

    Facial attractiveness has important social consequences. Despite a widespread belief that beauty cannot be defined, in fact, there is considerable agreement across individuals and cultures on what is found attractive. By considering that attraction and mate choice are critical components of evolutionary selection, we can better understand the importance of beauty. There are many traits that are linked to facial attractiveness in humans and each may in some way impart benefits to individuals who act on their preferences. If a trait is reliably associated with some benefit to the perceiver, then we would expect individuals in a population to find that trait attractive. Such an approach has highlighted face traits such as age, health, symmetry, and averageness, which are proposed to be associated with benefits and so associated with facial attractiveness. This view may postulate that some traits will be universally attractive; however, this does not preclude variation. Indeed, it would be surprising if there existed a template of a perfect face that was not affected by experience, environment, context, or the specific needs of an individual. Research on facial attractiveness has documented how various face traits are associated with attractiveness and various factors that impact on an individual's judgments of facial attractiveness. Overall, facial attractiveness is complex, both in the number of traits that determine attraction and in the large number of factors that can alter attraction to particular faces. A fuller understanding of facial beauty will come with an understanding of how these various factors interact with each other. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:621-634. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1316 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The author has declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26308869

  3. ATRX represses alternative lengthening of telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Christine E.; Huschtscha, Lily I.; Harvey, Adam; Bower, Kylie; Noble, Jane R.; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Reddel, Roger R.

    2015-01-01

    The unlimited proliferation of cancer cells requires a mechanism to prevent telomere shortening. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) is an homologous recombination-mediated mechanism of telomere elongation used in tumors, including osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcoma subtypes, and glial brain tumors. Mutations in the ATRX/DAXX chromatin remodeling complex have been reported in tumors and cell lines that use the ALT mechanism, suggesting that ATRX may be an ALT repressor. We show here that knockout or knockdown of ATRX in mortal cells or immortal telomerase-positive cells is insufficient to activate ALT. Notably, however, in SV40-transformed mortal fibroblasts ATRX loss results in either a significant increase in the proportion of cell lines activating ALT (instead of telomerase) or in a significant decrease in the time prior to ALT activation. These data indicate that loss of ATRX function cooperates with one or more as-yet unidentified genetic or epigenetic alterations to activate ALT. Moreover, transient ATRX expression in ALT-positive/ATRX-negative cells represses ALT activity. These data provide the first direct, functional evidence that ATRX represses ALT. PMID:26001292

  4. ATRX represses alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    PubMed

    Napier, Christine E; Huschtscha, Lily I; Harvey, Adam; Bower, Kylie; Noble, Jane R; Hendrickson, Eric A; Reddel, Roger R

    2015-06-30

    The unlimited proliferation of cancer cells requires a mechanism to prevent telomere shortening. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) is an homologous recombination-mediated mechanism of telomere elongation used in tumors, including osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcoma subtypes, and glial brain tumors. Mutations in the ATRX/DAXX chromatin remodeling complex have been reported in tumors and cell lines that use the ALT mechanism, suggesting that ATRX may be an ALT repressor. We show here that knockout or knockdown of ATRX in mortal cells or immortal telomerase-positive cells is insufficient to activate ALT. Notably, however, in SV40-transformed mortal fibroblasts ATRX loss results in either a significant increase in the proportion of cell lines activating ALT (instead of telomerase) or in a significant decrease in the time prior to ALT activation. These data indicate that loss of ATRX function cooperates with one or more as-yet unidentified genetic or epigenetic alterations to activate ALT. Moreover, transient ATRX expression in ALT-positive/ATRX-negative cells represses ALT activity. These data provide the first direct, functional evidence that ATRX represses ALT. PMID:26001292

  5. Facial blindsight

    PubMed Central

    Solcà, Marco; Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Schnider, Armin; Leemann, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people’s categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex. PMID:26483655

  6. Facial blindsight.

    PubMed

    Solcà, Marco; Guggisberg, Adrian G; Schnider, Armin; Leemann, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people's categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex. PMID:26483655

  7. Facial morphogenesis of the earliest europeans.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Martinón-Torres, María; O'Higgins, Paul; Paine, Michael L; Carbonell, Eudald; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Bromage, Timothy G

    2013-01-01

    The modern human face differs from that of our early ancestors in that the facial profile is relatively retracted (orthognathic). This change in facial profile is associated with a characteristic spatial distribution of bone deposition and resorption: growth remodeling. For humans, surface resorption commonly dominates on anteriorly-facing areas of the subnasal region of the maxilla and mandible during development. We mapped the distribution of facial growth remodeling activities on the 900-800 ky maxilla ATD6-69 assigned to H. antecessor, and on the 1.5 My cranium KNM-WT 15000, part of an associated skeleton assigned to African H. erectus. We show that, as in H. sapiens, H. antecessor shows bone resorption over most of the subnasal region. This pattern contrasts with that seen in KNM-WT 15000 where evidence of bone deposition, not resorption, was identified. KNM-WT 15000 is similar to Australopithecus and the extant African apes in this localized area of bone deposition. These new data point to diversity of patterns of facial growth in fossil Homo. The similarities in facial growth in H. antecessor and H. sapiens suggest that one key developmental change responsible for the characteristic facial morphology of modern humans can be traced back at least to H. antecessor. PMID:23762314

  8. Imaging of facial nerve schwannomas: diagnostic pearls and potential pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Mundada, Pravin; Purohit, Bela Satish; Kumar, Tahira Sultana; Tan, Tiong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are uncommon in the facial nerve and account for less than 1% of tumors of temporal bone. They can involve one or more than one segment of the facial nerve. The clinical presentations and the imaging appearances of facial nerve schwannomas are influenced by the topographical anatomy of the facial nerve and vary according to the segment(s) they involve. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging features of facial nerve schwannomas according to their various anatomical locations and also reviews the pertinent differential diagnoses and potential diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26712680

  9. Facial Composite System Using Real Facial Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchovi?ová, So?a; Zahradníková, Barbora; Schreiber, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Facial feature points identification plays an important role in many facial image applications, like face detection, face recognition, facial expression classification, etc. This paper describes the early stages of the research in the field of evolving a facial composite, primarily the main steps of face detection and facial features extraction. Technological issues are identified and possible strategies to solve some of the problems are proposed.

  10. Lengthening temporalis myoplasty: a surgical tool for dynamic labial commissure reanimation.

    PubMed

    Guerreschi, Pierre; Labbe, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM), first described by Labbé in 1997, ensures the transfers of the entire temporal muscle from the coronoid process to the upper half of the lip without interposition of aponeurotic tissue. The temporal muscle changes function because it is entirely mobilized toward another effector: the labial commissure. Thanks to brain plasticity, the muscle loses its chewing function, and after 6 months of speech rehabilitation it acquires its new smiling function. We describe technical points especially the coronoid process approaches both through an upper temporal fossa approach and a lower nasolabial fold approach. Rehabilitation starts 3 weeks after the surgery following a standardized protocol to move from a mandibular smile to a voluntary, then spontaneous, smile in three steps. The LTM is the main part of a one-stage global treatment of the paralyzed face. It constitutes a dynamic palliative treatment usually started at the sequelae stage, 18?month after the outcome of a peripheral facial paralysis. This one-stage procedure is a reproducible and relevant surgical technique in the difficult treatment of peripheral facial paralysis. It allows implementing an active muscle transfer to reanimate the labial commissure and re-create a mobile nasolabial fold. PMID:25958897

  11. [The history of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. PMID:26088742

  12. Long-term results of remodelling the facial bones with a soft moulding helmet in beagles: the "reciprocally stimulated growth" hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyoseob; Chung, Jaiho; Park, Dong Ha; Yoon, Soo Han

    2016-01-01

    Facial deformity is often seen in infants with deformational plagiocephaly and it usually improves with conservative management. However, we know of few studies of the effect of helmet treatment on the facial skeleton. Our aim therefore was to find out its long-term effects on skull remodelling, and on the shape of the face. Seven beagles wore helmets for seven weeks after birth. Seven study beagles and 3 controls were killed and we measured the length, width, and height of the skulls, maxillas, and mandibles. Statistical analysis showed that the total craniofacial length and skull length did not differ significantly, and skull volumes were similar. Maximal craniofacial, skull, maxillary, and mandibular width were all significantly less in the study group. The maximal craniofacial, maxillary, and mandibular widths were strongly correlated with changes in the skull width, and the width:length ratios of the skulls, maxillas, and mandibles did differ significantly. The skull widths in the study group were significantly smaller, which suggests that a soft moulding helmet may change the growth pattern permanently. The effect of a soft moulding helmet on the lateral aspect of the skull affected the width of the face semipermanently. This modulation in the shape of the skull vault and base may change the shape of the maxilla and mandible, which may serve as a background for the use of helmet treatment to change the facial configuration. PMID:26621214

  13. Delayed Facial Nerve Palsy after Seat Belt Induced Injury.

    PubMed

    Osuagwu, Ferdnand C; Bradley, Ronald; Pasupuleti, Devakinanda; Bobeda, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Blunt trauma causing facial nerve palsy and facial nerve trauma due to seat belt injury is rarely reported. We describe a 63 year old female who was involved in a road traffic accident without any imaging evidence of temporal bone fracture developing left facial nerve palsy on the second day. We discuss the pathophysiology of this condition and the need to be aware of this unusual complication when evaluating patient with blunt trauma to the face. PMID:26662661

  14. Evaluation of surgical outcome of penile augmentation and lengthening procedures.

    PubMed

    Nabil, Nashaat; Hosny, Hossam; Kadah, Amr; Shamloul, Rany

    2013-01-01

    Our study included 280 patients complaining of small-sized penis. They were seen in the outpatient clinic of the Andrology Department, Kasr El Aini, Cairo University. Patients were collected from 2002 till 2008 and classified into 4 categories from an etiological point of view. Eleven patients (3.9%) were operated upon according to fine selection criteria; six patients were selected for lengthening procedures, while two patients were selected for increasing girth procedures and three patients for combined operation of lengthening and increasing girth techniques. Seven patients showed subjective satisfaction after lengthening procedures and four patients showed subjective satisfaction after increasing girth techniques. In conclusion, detailed analysis of short penis complaint with a proper diagnosis and patient education are required for accurate management of patients complaining of a short penis. PMID:23548799

  15. The Accordion Maneuver: A Noninvasive Strategy for Absent or Delayed Callus Formation in Cases of Limb Lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Makhdom, Asim M.; Cartaleanu, Adrian Sever; Rendon, Juan Sebastian; Villemure, Isabelle; Hamdy, Reggie C.

    2015-01-01

    The distraction osteogenesis (DO) technique has been used worldwide to treat many orthopaedic conditions. Although successful, absent or delayed callus formation in the distraction gap can lead to significant morbidities. An alternate cycle of distraction-compression (accordion maneuver) is one approach to accelerate bone regeneration. The primary aim of our study is to report our experience with the accordion maneuver during DO and to provide a detailed description of this technique, as performed in our center. The secondary aim is to present a review of the literature regarding the use of accordion maneuver. We reviewed the database of all patients undergoing limb lengthening from the year of 1997 to 2012. Four patients (6.15%) out of 65 showed poor bone regenerate in their tibiae and therefore accordion maneuver was applied for a mean of 6.75 weeks. Of these, three patients have had successful outcome with this technique. The literature showed that this technique is successful approach to trigger bone healing. However, details of how and when to apply this combination of distraction-compression forces were lacking. In conclusion, the accordion technique is safe noninvasive approach to promote bone formation, thus avoiding more invasive surgical procedures in cases of poor callus formation in limb lengthening. PMID:26557996

  16. The Accordion Maneuver: A Noninvasive Strategy for Absent or Delayed Callus Formation in Cases of Limb Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Makhdom, Asim M; Cartaleanu, Adrian Sever; Rendon, Juan Sebastian; Villemure, Isabelle; Hamdy, Reggie C

    2015-01-01

    The distraction osteogenesis (DO) technique has been used worldwide to treat many orthopaedic conditions. Although successful, absent or delayed callus formation in the distraction gap can lead to significant morbidities. An alternate cycle of distraction-compression (accordion maneuver) is one approach to accelerate bone regeneration. The primary aim of our study is to report our experience with the accordion maneuver during DO and to provide a detailed description of this technique, as performed in our center. The secondary aim is to present a review of the literature regarding the use of accordion maneuver. We reviewed the database of all patients undergoing limb lengthening from the year of 1997 to 2012. Four patients (6.15%) out of 65 showed poor bone regenerate in their tibiae and therefore accordion maneuver was applied for a mean of 6.75 weeks. Of these, three patients have had successful outcome with this technique. The literature showed that this technique is successful approach to trigger bone healing. However, details of how and when to apply this combination of distraction-compression forces were lacking. In conclusion, the accordion technique is safe noninvasive approach to promote bone formation, thus avoiding more invasive surgical procedures in cases of poor callus formation in limb lengthening. PMID:26557996

  17. Facial restoration.

    PubMed

    Diner, J

    1975-07-01

    Medical science has demonstrated that fiction can be turned into fact. It is prophesied that man will be able to liver longer due to the development of synthetic organs. Sophisticated facial prostheses will be included in this progressive field. Perhaps the next century will make synthetic substitutes past history with the transplantation of organs as established practice. Or, perhaps some of the latest developments of growing skin or the use of carbonated teflon inserts will replace currently used plastics. In the meantime, we must continue to work within the limitations of our present technology. PMID:1228185

  18. Genetics Home Reference: SOST-related sclerosing bone dysplasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... areas. Abnormal bone growth can pinch (compress) the cranial nerves, which emerge from the brain and extend to ... of the head and neck. Compression of the cranial nerves can lead to paralyzed facial muscles (facial nerve ...

  19. Bunch lengthening in the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1990-02-01

    A high level of current dependent bunch lengthening has been observed on the North damping ring of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). At currents of 3 {times} 10{sup 10} this behavior does not appear to degrade the machine's performance significantly. However, at the higher currents that are envisioned for the future one fears that its performance could be greatly degraded due to the phenomenon of bunch lengthening. This was the motivation for the work described in this paper. In this paper we calculate the longitudinal impedance of the damping ring vacuum chamber. More specifically, in this paper we find the response function of the ring to a short Gaussian bunch, which we call the Green function wake. In addition, we try to estimate the relative importance of the different vacuum chamber objects, in order to see how we might reduce the ring impedance. This paper also describes bunch length measurements performed on the North damping ring. We use the Green function wake, discussed above, to compute the bunch lengthening. Then we compare these results with those obtained from the measurements. In addition, we calculate the current dependence of the tune distribution.

  20. Alternative lengthening of telomeres in cancer stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, B; Booth, R E; Jin, Y; Zhou, X; Crowe, D L

    2015-01-29

    Chromosome ends are protected by telomeres that prevent DNA damage response and degradation. Telomerase expression extends telomeres and inhibits DNA damage response. Telomeres are also maintained by the recombination-based alternative lengthening pathway. Telomerase is believed to be the sole mechanism for telomere maintenance in the epidermis. We show that basal cells in the epidermis maintain telomeres both by telomerase and alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT) mechanisms in vivo. ALT was detected in epidermal stem cells in Terc(-/-) mice, and normal human epidermal keratinocytes are also ALT-positive. The ALT pathway is suppressed in primary, but not metastatic, epidermal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in Terc(+/+) mice. The ALT pathway is expressed in stem cells and basal cells in epidermal SCC in Terc(-/-) mice, and in some telomerase-positive human SCC lines. Telomeres shorten markedly in stem cells and basal cells in epidermal SCC in vivo. Telomere shortening is associated with telomeric DNA damage response and apoptosis in stem cells and basal cells. Stem cells were transformed in both primary and metastatic epidermal SCC. Genetic ablation of this small cell population resulted in significant tumor regression in vivo. We concluded that alternative lengthening of telomeres is important in epidermal homeostasis and tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:24531712

  1. Producing computer facial animation 

    E-print Network

    Koehlert, Erik Wulf

    1998-01-01

    This thesis provides a starting point for computer raphics. character developers wishing to produce facial animation using Maya software. A background on past developments is given to highlight major events in the history of computer facial...

  2. [Facial nerve paralysis and mandibular fracture].

    PubMed

    Salonna, I; Fanizzi, P; Quaranta, A

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe three cases of peripheral facial nerve paralysis in patients with a mandibular fracture. In two cases, in which the onset of palsy was uncertain, the facial nerve injury was contralateral to the fractured side. Topodiagnostic tests showed neural damage at the third intrapetrosal portion and at the genicular ganglion. In one of the two patients tomography revealed a fracture line through the anterio-superior wall of the external auditory canal homolateral to the facial palsy. In the third subject palsy set in immediately after the trauma and was ipsilateral to the mandibular fracture; the facial lesion was localized at the genicular ganglion. In the first two cases, functional recovery was spontaneous (40 and 0 days after the trauma respectively). In the third subject, the nerve was decompressed surgically with a complete functional recovery two months later. The functional and clinical findings of these three cases show that a contralateral facial palsy secondary to a mandibular fracture resolves spontaneously while the traumatic displacement of the mandibular condyle may determine a temporal bone fracture sometimes followed by a lesion in the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve. An event such as the latter may delay functional recovery and thus warrant surgery such as in cases of Bell's palsy. PMID:1298156

  3. Vestibular Schwannoma Atypically Invading Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Jeong; Yang, Na-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) usually present the widening of internal auditory canal (IAC), and these bony changes are typically limited to IAC, not extend to temporal bone. Temporal bone invasion by VS is extremely rare. We report 51-year-old man who revealed temporal bone destruction beyond IAC by unilateral VS. The bony destruction extended anteriorly to the carotid canal and inferiorly to the jugular foramen. On histopathologic examination, the tumor showed typical benign schwannoma and did not show any unusual vascularity or malignant feature. Facial nerve was severely compressed and distorted by tumor, which unevenly eroded temporal bone in surgical field. Vestibular schwannoma with atypical invasion of temporal bone can be successfully treated with combined translabyrinthine and lateral suboccipiral approach without facial nerve dysfunction. Early detection and careful dissection of facial nerve with intraoperative monitoring should be considered during operation due to severe adhesion and distortion of facial nerve by tumor and eroded temporal bone. PMID:25932298

  4. Safety and efficacy of botox injection in alleviating post-operative pain and improving quality of life in lower extremity limb lengthening and deformity correction

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Reggie C; Montpetit, Kathleen; Ruck-Gibis, Joanne; Thorstad, Kelly; Raney, Ellen; Aiona, Michael; Platt, Robert; Finley, Allen; Mackenzie, William; McCarthy, James; Narayanan, Unni

    2007-01-01

    Background Distraction osteogenesis is the standard treatment for the management of lower limb length discrepancy of more than 3 cm and bone loss secondary to congenital anomalies, trauma or infection. This technique consists of an osteotomy of the bone to be lengthened, application of an external fixator, followed by gradual and controlled distraction of the bone ends. Although limb lengthening using the Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis principle yields excellent results in most cases, the technique has numerous problems and is not well tolerated by many children. The objective of the current study is to determine if Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A), which is known to possess both analgesic and paralytic actions, can be used to alleviate post-operative pain and improve the functional outcome of children undergoing distraction osteogenesis. Methods/Design The study design consists of a multi centre, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Patients between ages 5–21 years requiring limb lengthening or deformity correction using distraction will be recruited from 6 different sites (Shriners Hospital for Children in Montreal, Honolulu, Philadelphia and Portland as well as DuPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware and Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ont). Approximately 150 subjects will be recruited over 2 years and will be randomized to either receive 10 units per Kg of BTX-A or normal saline (control group) intraoperatively following the surgery. Functional outcome effects will be assessed using pain scores, medication dosages, range of motion, flexibility, strength, mobility function and quality of life of the patient. IRB approval was obtained from all sites and adverse reactions will be monitored vigorously and reported to IRB, FDA and Health Canada. Discussion BTX-A injection has been widely used world wide with no major side effects reported. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time BTX-A is being used under the context of limb lengthening and deformity correction. Trial Registration NCT00412035 PMID:17903262

  5. Alternative lengthening of telomeres and loss of ATRX are frequent events in pleomorphic and dedifferentiated liposarcomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen-Chieh; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Liau, Jau-Yu; Tsai, Jia-Huei; Hsu, Hung-Han; Yang, Ching-Yao

    2015-08-01

    Telomerase activation and alternative lengthening of telomeres are two major mechanisms of telomere length maintenance. Soft tissue sarcomas appear to use the alternative lengthening of telomeres more frequently. Loss of ?-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) or death domain-associated protein 6 (DAXX) expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alternative telomere lengthening in pancreatic endocrine neoplasm and glioma. The mechanism leading to the alternative lengthening of telomeres in liposarcoma remains unknown. Whereas alternative telomere lengthening was determined to be an indicator of poor prognosis in liposarcomas as a whole, its prognostic power has not been verified in any subtype of liposarcoma. In this study, we characterized the status of alternative telomere lengthening and expression of ATRX and DAXX in 111 liposarcomas (28 well-differentiated, 52 dedifferentiated, 20 myxoid or round cell, and 11 pleomorphic liposarcomas) by telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Alternative lengthening of telomere was observed in 0% (0/16) of well-differentiated, 30% (14/46) of dedifferentiated, 5% (1/19) of myxoid or round cell, and 80% (8/10) of pleomorphic liposarcomas. Eighteen (16%) and one (1%) tumors were negative for ATRX and DAXX immunostaining, respectively. Remarkably, all cases with loss of either ATRX or DAXX expression had alternative lengthening of telomeres, and 83% (19/23) of tumors that had alternative lengthening of telomeres showed loss of either protein. The correlation between loss of either ATRX or DAXX and alternative telomere lengthening was 100% in dedifferentiated liposarcoma. The presence of alternative telomere lengthening in dedifferentiated liposarcoma suggested poor overall survival (hazard ratio=1.954, P=0.077) and was the most significant indicator of short progression-free survival (hazard ratio=3.119, P=0.003). In conclusion, we found that ATRX loss was the most likely mechanism of alternative telomere lengthening in liposarcoma and alternative telomere lengthening was a prognostic factor of poor outcome in dedifferentiated liposarcoma. PMID:26022452

  6. Recurrence of Diabetic Pedal Ulcerations Following Tendo-Achilles Lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Richard D.; Hlad, Lee M.; McKenna, Danielle R.

    2011-01-01

    Foot and ankle surgeons are frequently challenged by the devastating systemic consequences of diabetes mellitus manifested through neuropathy, integumentary and joint breakdown, delayed healing, decreased ability to fight infection, and fragile tendon/ligaments. Diabetic neuropathic pedal ulcerations lead to amputations at an alarming rate and also carry a high mortality rate. This article will discuss causes of diabetic pedal ulcerations that persist or recur after tendo-Achilles lengthening and will highlight areas that need to be addressed by the practitioner such as infection, vascular and nutritional status, glucose control, off-loading, biomechanics, and patient compliance. PMID:22396818

  7. Unpacking a time interval lengthens its perceived temporal distance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Li, Shu; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In quantity estimation, people often perceive that the whole is less than the sum of its parts. The current study investigated such an unpacking effect in temporal distance judgment. Our results showed that participants in the unpacked condition judged a given time interval longer than those in the packed condition, even the time interval was kept constant between the two conditions. Furthermore, this unpacking effect persists regardless of the unpacking ways we employed. Results suggest that unpacking a time interval may be a good strategy for lengthening its perceived temporal distance. PMID:25477854

  8. Symmetry, sexual dimorphism in facial proportions and male facial attractiveness

    E-print Network

    Little, Tony

    Symmetry, sexual dimorphism in facial proportions and male facial attractiveness I. S. Penton, but that these characteristics remain at present unde¢ned. Keywords: £uctuating asymmetry; facial attractiveness; facial sexual relationships between facial symmetry and attractiveness. It was recently proposed that symmetry

  9. Propylthiouracil, but not other antithyroid treatments, lengthens hamster circadian period

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, L.P. )

    1988-07-01

    Two experiments were performed to evaluate the role of the thyroid gland as a mediator of circadian rhythms in the hamster. In experiment 1, the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil (PTU) lengthened the circadian period ({tau}), increased thyroid weight, and eliminated detectable thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) from blood. A low-iodine diet greatly reduced T{sub 4} levels but had no effect on T{sub 3} or {tau}. Treatment with 500 {mu}Ci of {sup 131}I failed to alter any parameter of physiology or thythmicity measured. In this experiment, some animals in the low-iodine and PTU groups had greatly reduced testes sizes, and testses size was inversely correlated with change in {tau}. In experiment 2, T{sub 4} and T{sub 3} levels detected 11 wk after surgical thyroidectomy were significantly less than those found in sham-operated ammals, but concentrations of the two hormones varied widely across the thyroidectomized group. Thyroidectomy did not increase {tau} either 4 or 11 wk after surgery, nor was there evidence from individuals that level of thyroid function was associated with change in {tau}. The results from these experiments suggest that diminished thyroid function is not causal of lengthened circadian period.

  10. The epidemiology of facial fractures in automotive collisions.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Joseph; Duma, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    This study examines the pattern of facial fractures in automotive collisions using the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System. The database was examined for trends within collision and occupant descriptors among occupants sustaining facial fractures. Drivers and right front passengers were included in an analysis of frontal collisions. Side impacts were assessed separately by identifying occupants exposed to near and far side collisions. The distribution of facial bone fractures and injury sources were demonstrated for each impact configuration. Risk ratios were used to demonstrate the effects of restraint use and airbag deployment. Seatbelts were found to reduce the risk of sustaining a facial fracture by 74% in frontal impacts. Facial fractures are associated with severe impacts with a risk of 5% at a Delta-V of 40 km/h and 65 km/h for unbelted and belted occupants respectively. PMID:20184842

  11. Longitudinal growth of mammalian bones: a possible role for membrane transporters in mediating chondrocyte hypertrophy 

    E-print Network

    Mohamad Yusof, Loqman; Yusof, Loqman Mohamad

    2012-06-22

    Long bone lengthening occurs at the growth plate (GP) by well-regulated chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophy and terminal matrix deposition. GP chondrocyte (GPC) hypertrophy has been implicated to be the main determinant ...

  12. Comprehensive screening of alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype and loss of ATRX expression in sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Liau, Jau-Yu; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Tsai, Jia-Huei; Yang, Ching-Yao; Liu, Tsung-Lin; Ke, Zhi-Long; Hsu, Hung-Han; Jeng, Yung-Ming

    2015-12-01

    According to cytogenetic aberrations, sarcomas can be categorized as complex or simple karyotype tumors. Alternative lengthening of telomeres is a telomere-maintenance mechanism common in sarcomas. Recently, this mechanism was found to be associated with loss of either ?-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) or death domain-associated (DAXX) protein. We previously reported that alternative lengthening of telomeres and loss of ATRX expression were common in leiomyosarcoma, angiosarcoma, pleomorphic liposarcoma, and dedifferentiated liposarcoma. In the present study, we screened an additional 245 sarcomas of other types to determine the prevalence of alternative lengthening of telomeres, loss of ATRX/DAXX expression, and their relationship. Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas were frequently alternative lengthening of telomeres positive (65%) and loss of ATRX was seen in approximately half of the alternative lengthening of telomeres-positive tumors. Nineteen of 25 myxofibrosarcomas were alternative lengthening of telomeres-positive, but only one was ATRX deficient. Three of 15 radiation-associated sarcomas were alternative lengthening of telomeres positive, but none of them was ATRX deficient. Alternative lengthening of telomeres and/or loss of ATRX were uncommon in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas. By contrast, none of the 71 gene fusion-associated sarcomas was ATRX deficient or alternative lengthening of telomeres positive. All tumors exhibited preserved DAXX expression. Combining our previous studies and this study, a total of 384 sarcomas with complex karyotypes were examined, 83 of which were ATRX deficient (22%). By telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization, 45% (138/308) were alternative lengthening of telomeres positive, 55% (76/138) of which were ATRX deficient. Loss of ATRX was highly associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres (P<0.001). We conclude that alternative lengthening of telomeres is a frequent telomere-maintenance mechanism in cytogenetically complex sarcomas. Loss of ATRX is highly associated with this feature. PMID:26428317

  13. Detection of alternative lengthening of telomeres by telomere quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Lau, Loretta M S; Dagg, Rebecca A; Henson, Jeremy D; Au, Amy Y M; Royds, Janice A; Reddel, Roger R

    2013-01-01

    Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is one of the two known telomere length maintenance mechanisms that are essential for the unlimited proliferation potential of cancer cells. Existing methods for detecting ALT in tumors require substantial amounts of tumor material and are labor intensive, making it difficult to study prevalence and prognostic significance of ALT in large tumor cohorts. Here, we present a novel strategy utilizing telomere quantitative PCR to diagnose ALT. The protocol is more rapid than conventional methods and scrutinizes two distinct characteristics of ALT cells concurrently: long telomeres and the presence of C-circles (partially double-stranded circles of telomeric C-strand DNA). Requiring only 30 ng of genomic DNA, this protocol will facilitate large-scale studies of ALT in tumors and can be readily adopted by clinical laboratories. PMID:22923525

  14. Physiological role of stalk lengthening in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eric A; Schlimpert, Susan; Hughes, Velocity; Brun, Yves V; Thanbichler, Martin; Gitai, Zemer

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus forms a thin polar stalk, which mediates its attachment to solid surfaces. Whereas stalks remain short (1 µm) in nutrient-rich conditions, they lengthen dramatically (up to 30 µm) upon phosphate starvation. A long-standing hypothesis is that the Caulobacter stalk functions as a nutrient scavenging “antenna” that facilitates phosphate uptake and transport to the cell body. The mechanistic details of this model must be revisited, given our recent identification of a protein-mediated diffusion barrier, which prevents the exchange of both membrane and soluble proteins between the stalk extension and the cell body. In this report, we discuss the potential of stalks to facilitate nutrient uptake and propose additional physiological roles for stalk elongation in Caulobacter cells. PMID:23986806

  15. Radial Forcing and Edgar Allan Poe's Lengthening Pendulum

    E-print Network

    McMillan, Matthew; Whitney, Heather M

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's The Pit and the Pendulum, we investigate a radially driven, lengthening pendulum. We first show that increasing the length of an undriven pendulum at a uniform rate does not amplify the oscillations in a manner consistent with the behavior of the scythe in Poe's story. We discuss parametric amplification and the transfer of energy (through the parameter of the pendulum's length) to the oscillating part of the system. In this manner radial driving may easily and intuitively be understood, and the fundamental concept applied in many other areas. We propose and show by a numerical model that appropriately timed radial forcing can increase the oscillation amplitude in a manner consistent with Poe's story. Our analysis contributes a computational exploration of the complex harmonic motion that can result from radially driving a pendulum, and sheds light on a mechanism by which oscillations can be amplified parametrically. These insights should prove especially valuable in the undergra...

  16. Domain-final Lengthening and Foot-level Shortening in Spoken English*

    E-print Network

    Domain-final Lengthening and Foot- level Shortening in Spoken English* Brad Rakerd,t William Sennet") and a shortening of stressed syllables followed by unstressed syllables ("foot-Ievel shortening"). In the present that syntactic boundaries at which lengthening occurs delimit the domains over which foot-level shortening

  17. Holistic facial expression classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, John; McDonald, J.

    2005-06-01

    This paper details a procedure for classifying facial expressions. This is a growing and relatively new type of problem within computer vision. One of the fundamental problems when classifying facial expressions in previous approaches is the lack of a consistent method of measuring expression. This paper solves this problem by the computation of the Facial Expression Shape Model (FESM). This statistical model of facial expression is based on an anatomical analysis of facial expression called the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). We use the term Action Unit (AU) to describe a movement of one or more muscles of the face and all expressions can be described using the AU's described by FACS. The shape model is calculated by marking the face with 122 landmark points. We use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to analyse how the landmark points move with respect to each other and to lower the dimensionality of the problem. Using the FESM in conjunction with Support Vector Machines (SVM) we classify facial expressions. SVMs are a powerful machine learning technique based on optimisation theory. This project is largely concerned with statistical models, machine learning techniques and psychological tools used in the classification of facial expression. This holistic approach to expression classification provides a means for a level of interaction with a computer that is a significant step forward in human-computer interaction.

  18. Cranio-facial distraction osteogenesis: a review of the literature. Part II: Experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Swennen, G; Dempf, R; Schliephake, H

    2002-04-01

    In this study the literature dealing with experimental cranio-facial distraction osteogenesis (DO) was reviewed. A PUBMED search (National Library of Medicine [NCBI] revised 1 April 2001) from 1966 through December 2000 was conducted. Key words used in the search were: distraction, lengthening, mandible, mandibular, maxilla, maxillary, midface, midfacial, monobloc, cranial, cranio-facial, maxillofacial. This search revealed a total of 120 experiment-orientated articles that were all analyzed in detail in this study. The purpose of the experimental study, animal model, animal growth status, type of distraction, type of surgery, distraction rate and rhythm, latency and contention period, amount of lengthening, relapse, complications and nature of the distraction device were analyzed. This review revealed that a total of 1207 animals were used in seven different animal models for research on cranio-facial DO: 54 using dogs (45.0%), 25 using rabbits (20.8%), 18 using sheep (15.0%), 11 using minipig (9.2%), seven using monkeys (5.8%), four using rats (3.3%) and one using a cat model (0.8%). Based on the results of this study, an attempt was made to provide biological DO parameters and guidelines for future research on experimental cranio-facial DO related to the appropriate animal model. PMID:12102408

  19. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  20. How precise is the PRECICE compared to the ISKD in intramedullary limb lengthening?

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Björn; Tretow, Henning L; Schuhknecht, Britta; Gosheger, Georg; Horter, Melanie J; Rödl, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose The PRECICE intramedullary limb lengthening system uses a new technique with a magnetic rod and a motorized external remote controller (ERC) with rotational magnetic field. We evaluated the reliability and safety of the PRECICE system. Methods We compared our preliminary results with PRECICE in 24 patients (26 nails) with the known difficulties in the use of mechanical lengthening devices such as the ISKD. We used the Paley classification for evaluation of problems, obstacles, and complications. Results 2 nails were primarily without function, and 24/26 nails lengthened over the desired distance. Lengthening desired was 38 mm and lengthening obtained was 37 mm. There were 2 nail breakages, 1 in the welding seam and 1 because of a fall that occurred during consolidation. ERC usage was problematic mostly in patients with femoral lengthening. Adjustment of the ERC was necessary in 10 of 24 cases. 15 cases had implant-associated problems, obstacles were seen in 5 cases, and complications were seen in each of 4 cases. Interpretaion The reliability of the PRECICE system is comparable to that of other intramedullary lengthening devices such as the ISKD. The motorized external remote controller and its application by the patients is a weak point of the system and needs strict supervision. PMID:24758320

  1. Reactive oxygen species generation is not different during isometric and lengthening contractions of mouse muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sloboda, Darcée D.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscles can be injured by lengthening contractions, when the muscles are stretched while activated. Lengthening contractions produce structural damage that leads to the degeneration and regeneration of damaged muscle fibers by mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated at the time of injury may initiate degenerative or regenerative processes. In the present study we hypothesized that lengthening contractions that damage the muscle would generate more ROS than isometric contractions that do not cause damage. To test our hypothesis, we subjected muscles of mice to lengthening contractions or isometric contractions and simultaneously monitored intracellular ROS generation with the fluorescent indicator 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2?,7?-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-DCFH), which is oxidized by ROS to form the fluorescent product CM-DCF. We found that CM-DCF fluorescence was not different during or shortly after lengthening contractions compared with isometric controls, regardless of the amount of stretch and damage that occurred during the lengthening contractions. The only exception was that after severe stretches, the increase in CM-DCF fluorescence was impaired. We conclude that lengthening contractions that damage the muscle do not generate more ROS than isometric contractions that do not cause damage. The implication is that ROS generated at the time of injury are not the initiating signals for subsequent degenerative or regenerative processes. PMID:23948772

  2. Implant-retained craniofacial prostheses for facial defects

    PubMed Central

    Federspil, Philipp A.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial prostheses, also known as epistheses, are artificial substitutes for facial defects. The breakthrough for rehabilitation of facial defects with implant-retained prostheses came with the development of the modern silicones and bone anchorage. Following the discovery of the osseointegration of titanium in the 1950s, dental implants have been made of titanium in the 1960s. In 1977, the first extraoral titanium implant was inserted in a patient. Later, various solitary extraoral implant systems were developed. Grouped implant systems have also been developed which may be placed more reliably in areas with low bone presentation, as in the nasal and orbital region, or the ideally pneumatised mastoid process. Today, even large facial prostheses may be securely retained. The classical atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation of any system. This review outlines the basic principles of osseointegration as well as the main features of extraoral implantology. PMID:22073096

  3. Complex reconstruction of facial deformity and function after severe gunshot injury: one case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijian; Duan, Jianmin; Wang, Qiao; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we described clinical outcomes of a multi-stage surgery integrating multiple techniques in restoration of facial morphology and function of a 17-year-old boy with severe gunshot injuries. This multi-stage surgery was applied in treatment of one rare case of gunshot-caused complicated facial deformities involving most parts of the face (labrum, left nose wing, nasal columella, nasal septum, maxillary alveolar process, hard palate, soft palate, bilateral maxillary bones, left zygoma, suborbital bone defects) and clinical efficacy upon restoring facial form and function were retrospectively evaluated. The patient was diagnosed with massive facial defects and deformities caused by gunshot, which led to feeding difficulty, severe articulation disorders and serious facial disfigurement. To reconstruct facial form and restore functions of mastication and articulation, multiple examinations and surgical procedures including mirror imaging, rapid prototyping technique, porous titanium implants, microscopic surgical technique, dental implants, osteomyocutaneous flap, muscular flap, shifting and repairing of adjacent tissue flaps and free bone graft reconstruction were undertaken. Postoperatively, reconstruction of severe facial disfigurement and restoring basic functions including articulation and feeding for the first time and relatively sound clinical outcomes have been obtained, which may add clinical evidence to the treatment of similar cases of severe facial deformities. PMID:25785151

  4. Biomechanical effects of surgical cut direction in unilateral mandibular lengthening by distraction osteogenesis using a finite element model.

    PubMed

    Tehranchi, A; Behnia, H; Heidarpour, M; Toutiaee, B; Khosropour, M J

    2012-05-01

    Although the precise prediction of the results before distraction is important, performing three-dimensional (3D) simulations for all distraction osteogenesis patients is not practical. Formulating general guidelines based on the factors affecting the 3D results of distraction treatment is recommended. This study was performed on a 3D mandible based on a finite element method. Three surgical cuts (oblique, vertical and horizontal) were made in the right side of the mandible. The amount and direction of movement of proximal and distal segments were evaluated after simulation of 15 mm of distraction. In the distal segment, the maximum displacement in the pogonion occurred in the vertical cut. In the proximal segment, the maximum displacement occurred in the coronoid process in horizontal and oblique cuts in a superior direction. The condylar process rotated in the clockwise direction when the vertical cut was used and the coronoid process moved inferiorly. To make the gonial angle more prominent the vertical cut should be used. A horizontal cut is used to lengthen the ramus. Vertical and oblique cuts can be used in patients with long anterior facial height, but all other conditions being equal horizontal cuts are better used in short faced patients. PMID:22172284

  5. Simultaneous facial feature tracking and facial expression recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Wang, Shangfei; Zhao, Yongping; Ji, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    The tracking and recognition of facial activities from images or videos have attracted great attention in computer vision field. Facial activities are characterized by three levels. First, in the bottom level, facial feature points around each facial component, i.e., eyebrow, mouth, etc., capture the detailed face shape information. Second, in the middle level, facial action units, defined in the facial action coding system, represent the contraction of a specific set of facial muscles, i.e., lid tightener, eyebrow raiser, etc. Finally, in the top level, six prototypical facial expressions represent the global facial muscle movement and are commonly used to describe the human emotion states. In contrast to the mainstream approaches, which usually only focus on one or two levels of facial activities, and track (or recognize) them separately, this paper introduces a unified probabilistic framework based on the dynamic Bayesian network to simultaneously and coherently represent the facial evolvement in different levels, their interactions and their observations. Advanced machine learning methods are introduced to learn the model based on both training data and subjective prior knowledge. Given the model and the measurements of facial motions, all three levels of facial activities are simultaneously recognized through a probabilistic inference. Extensive experiments are performed to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model on all three level facial activities. PMID:23529088

  6. Facial Muscle Activations from Motion Capture Eftychios Sifakis

    E-print Network

    Fedkiw, Ron

    Facial Muscle Activations from Motion Capture Eftychios Sifakis Stanford University Email: sifakis meaningful parameterization of expressions in terms of the muscle activations and bone motion that give rise to them. We employ such a finite element simulation model to deter- mine the muscle activations

  7. Restoration of facial form and function after severe disfigurement from burn injury by a composite facial allograft.

    PubMed

    Pomahac, B; Pribaz, J; Eriksson, E; Annino, D; Caterson, S; Sampson, C; Chun, Y; Orgill, D; Nowinski, D; Tullius, S G

    2011-02-01

    Composite facial allotransplantation is emerging as a treatment option for severe facial disfigurements. The technical feasibility of facial transplantation has been demonstrated, and the initial clinical outcomes have been encouraging. We report an excellent functional and anatomical restoration 1 year after face transplantation. A 59-year-old male with severe disfigurement from electrical burn injury was treated with a facial allograft composed of bone and soft tissues to restore midfacial form and function. An initial potent antirejection treatment was tapered to minimal dose of immunosuppression. There were no surgical complications. The patient demonstrated facial redness during the initial postoperative months. One acute rejection episode was reversed with a brief methylprednisolone bolus treatment. Pathological analysis and the donor's medical history suggested that rosacea transferred from the donor caused the erythema, successfully treated with topical metronidazol. Significant restoration of nasal breathing, speech, feeding, sensation and animation was achieved. The patient was highly satisfied with the esthetic result, and regained much of his capacity for normal social life. Composite facial allotransplantation, along with minimal and well-tolerated immunosuppression, was successfully utilized to restore facial form and function in a patient with severe disfigurement of the midface. PMID:21214855

  8. Cosmetic Facial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians have committed themselves to a healthier lifestyle, and many are seeking to look as well as they feel. For patients with realistic expectations, modern techniques of cosmetic facial surgery can enhance appearance and be of psychological benefit. Today most procedures can be done under local anesthesia on an out-patient basis. Facial contour defects can be improved by means of procedures such as rhinoplasty, mentoplasty, otoplasty and malarplasty. Facial rejuvenation surgery to decrease the signs of aging includes the forehead lift, eyebrow and eyelid lift, rhytidectomy, liposuction and chemical peeling. Newer controversial trends in cosmetic facial surgery include collagen implantation and fat transfer for contour defects, and eyelid tattooing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263984

  9. Facial bacterial infections: folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Ana Cristina; Schwartz, Robert A; Cohen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Facial bacterial infections are most commonly caused by infections of the hair follicles. Wherever pilosebaceous units are found folliculitis can occur, with the most frequent bacterial culprit being Staphylococcus aureus. We review different origins of facial folliculitis, distinguishing bacterial forms from other infectious and non-infectious mimickers. We distinguish folliculitis from pseudofolliculitis and perifolliculitis. Clinical features, etiology, pathology, and management options are also discussed. PMID:25441463

  10. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  11. [Telomere lengthening by trichostatin A treatment in cloned pigs].

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing-Teng; Ji, Guang-Zhen; Kong, Qing-Ran; Mao, Jian; Shi, Yong-Qian; Liu, Shi-Chao; Wu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Juan; Liu, Lin; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2012-12-01

    Telomeres are repeated GC rich sequences at the end of chromosomes, and shorten with each cell division due to DNA end replication problem. Previously, reprogrammed somatic cells of cloned animals display variable telomere elongation. However, it was reported that the cloned animals including Dolly do not reset telomeres and show premature aging. In this study, we investigated telomere function in cloned or transgenic cloned pigs, including the cloned Northeast Min pigs, eGFP, Mx, and PGC1? transgenic cloned pigs, and found that the telomere lengths of cloned pigs were significantly shorter than the nuclear donor adult fibroblasts and age-matched noncloned pigs (P<0.05), indicating that nuclear reprogramming did not restore cellular age of donor cells after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has proven to enhance the efficiency of nuclear reprogramming in several species. In order to test whether TSA also can effectively enhance reprogramming of telomeres, TSA (40 nmol/L) was used to treat porcine cloned embryos at 1-cell stage for 24 h. Consistent with previous reports, the developmental rate of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage was significantly increased compared with those of the control group (16.35% vs. 27.09%, 21.60% vs. 34.90%, P<0.05). Notably, the telomere length of cloned porcine blastocysts was also significantly elongated (P<0.05). Although TSA did not improve the cloning efficiency (1.3% vs. 1.7%, TSA vs. control), the telomere lengths of cloned pig-lets were significantly longer compared with those of the control group and the donor fibroblasts (P<0.05). In conclusion, telomeres have not been effectively restored by SCNT in pigs but TSA can effectively lengthen the telomere lengths of cloned pigs. PMID:23262106

  12. New sterilization regs lengthen waiting time to 30 days.

    PubMed

    1978-11-15

    New sterilization regulations lengthen waiting time to 30 days, from the previous 72 hours required by regulations issued in 1974. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) Secretary Califano said the regulations "strictly" limit the se of federal funds "to sterilizations for individuals who knowingly and freely consent to them and prohibit HEW funding of coerced and uninformed sterilizations or of sterilizations based on hasty decisions." Califano said th compliance with the regulations will be rigidly monitored and that HEW is instituting a bilingual education program to make certain they are understood. The new regulations include a detailed HEW-approved consent form requiring certification by medical personnel that the patient has received, both in writing and orally, an explanation of the operation, advice about alternate forms of birth control, and assurances that no federal benefits will be lost if sterilization is refused. The 30-day waiting period between the time consent is given and the operation is performed can be waived in cases of premature delivery and emergency abdominal surgery. To reduce chances of the operation being chosen under duress, consent cannot be obtained from anyone in labor, under the influence of alcohol or other drugs, or seeking or obtaining an abortion. Interpreters must be provided where language barriers exist and special arrangements are required for handicapped persons. Funds cannot be provided for hysterectomies performed for sterilization purposes. Patients undergoing hysterectomies for medical reasons must be advised orally and in writing that sterilization will result. The new regulations, to take effect in 90 days, also eliminate the distinction between therapeutic and nontherapeutic sterilization and provide that safeguards be applied uniformly to all federally funded sterilizations. Sterilization funding will not be available for prisoners or those confined to mental hospitals or other rehabilitative facilities. The prohibition against using federal funds for sterilization of mentally incompetent persons and those under 21 years of age continues. PMID:12335456

  13. Bunch lengthening calculations for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Ruth, R.D.

    1989-03-01

    The problem of bunch lengthening in electron storage rings has been treated by many people, and there have been many experiments. In the typical experiment, the theory is used to determine the impedance of the ring. What has been lacking thus far, however, is a calculation of bunch lengthening that uses a carefully calculated ring impedance (or wakefield). In this paper we begin by finding the potential well distortion due to some very simple impedance models, in order to illustrate different types of bunch lengthening behavior. We then give a prescription for extending potential well calculations into the turbulent regime once the threshold is known. Then finally, using the wakefield calculated for the SLC damping rings, combined with the measured value of the threshold, we calculate bunch lengthening for the damping rings, and compare the results with the measurements. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  14. The facial nerve canal in patients with Bell's palsy: an investigation by high-resolution computed tomography with multiplanar reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Murai, Aya; Kariya, Shin; Tamura, Kouzou; Doi, Akira; Kozakura, Kenichi; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2013-07-01

    Facial nerve edema is an important finding in Bell's palsy patients. Inflammation may cause facial nerve edema, and mechanical compression and ischemic change of the facial nerve may occur in the facial nerve canal. A few studies have reported the dimensions of the facial nerve canal using conventional computed tomography or human temporal bone sections. However, the cross-sectional area of the facial nerve canal has not been fully understood. Therefore, the cross-sectional area of the facial nerve canal was measured in patients with unilateral Bell's palsy by computer tomography with multiplanar reconstruction. Sixteen patients with unilateral Bell's palsy were enrolled. Computed tomography of the temporal bone was performed, and perpendicular images to the facial nerve canal were reconstructed by the multiplanar reconstruction technique. The cross-sectional area of the facial nerve canal on the affected and unaffected sides was measured at the labyrinthine segment, the horizontal segment, and the mastoid segment. Both in the labyrinthine and horizontal segments, the mean cross-sectional area of the facial nerve canal was significantly smaller on the affected side than on the unaffected side. There was no significant difference between the affected and unaffected sides in the cross-sectional area of the facial nerve canal in the mastoid segment. The labyrinthine segment was the narrowest segment in the facial nerve canal. These findings suggest that the facial nerve is vulnerable, especially in the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve canal, and a narrow facial nerve canal may be one of the risk factors for Bell's palsy. PMID:23143560

  15. Managing the Pediatric Facial Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Hollier, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Facial fracture management is often complex and demanding, particularly within the pediatric population. Although facial fractures in this group are uncommon relative to their incidence in adult counterparts, a thorough understanding of issues relevant to pediatric facial fracture management is critical to optimal long-term success. Here, we discuss several issues germane to pediatric facial fractures and review significant factors in their evaluation, diagnosis, and management. PMID:22110800

  16. Middle Pleistocene human facial morphology in an evolutionary and developmental context.

    PubMed

    Freidline, Sarah E; Gunz, Philipp; Harvati, Katerina; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-11-01

    Neanderthals and modern humans exhibit distinct facial architectures. The patterning of facial morphology of their predecessors, the Middle Pleistocene humans, is more mosaic showing a mix of archaic and modern morphologies. Significant changes in facial size and robusticity occurred throughout Pleistocene human evolution, resulting in temporal trends in both facial reduction and enlargement. However, the allometric patterning in facial morphology in archaic humans is not well understood. This study explores temporal trends in facial morphology in order to gain a clearer understanding of the polarity of features, and describes the allometric patterning of facial shape. The modern human sample comprises cross-sectional growth series of four morphologically distinct human populations. The fossil sample covers specimens from the Middle Pleistocene to the Upper Paleolithic. We digitized landmarks and semilandmarks on surface and computed tomography scans and analyzed the Procrustes shape coordinates. Principal component analyses were performed, and Procrustes distances were used to identify phenetic similarities between fossil hominins. In order to explore the influence of size on facial features, allometric trajectories were calculated for fossil and modern human groups, and developmental simulations were performed. We show that facial features can be used to separate Pleistocene humans into temporal clusters. The distinctly modern human pattern of facial morphology is already present around 170 ka. Species- and population-specific facial features develop before two years of age, and several of the large-scale facial differences between Neanderthals and Middle Pleistocene humans are due to scaling along a shared allometric trajectory. These features include aspects of the frontal bone, browridge morphology, nasal aperture size and facial prognathism. Infraorbital surface topography and orientation of the midface in the European Middle Pleistocene hominins is intermediate between the African Middle Pleistocene and Neanderthal condition. This could suggest that the European Middle Pleistocene hominins display incipient Neanderthal features. PMID:22981042

  17. [Facial growth: men and women differ].

    PubMed

    Carels, C E

    1998-11-01

    In the craniofacial complex there appears to be a sexual dimorphism: men and women not only differ during the 'active growth' period for the timing, amount and localization of growth, but also in the non-active phase thereafter gender differences in facial morphology remain present. In the active growth phase, girls reach their final facial dimensions earlier than boys and boys have larger final facial dimensions than girls. The specific differences in the lateral view of the face are situated in the eminent supraorbital sinus and nose, a larger occipital condyle and mastoid process. In the frontal view, boys show a larger prominence of the zygomatic bones and the gonial region than girls. As far as the 'non-active growth' changes in adulthood are concerned, the differences between men and women are smaller, but consistent and significant. Women have smaller faces (5-9% difference) but there are now configurational differences that appear in the pattern of growth. While men maintain their vertical growth pattern from puberty, women change from a horizontal to a vertical growth pattern during adulthood. PMID:11928465

  18. Sarcomere lengthening and tension drop in the latent period of isolated frog skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    A laser diffraction technique has been developed for registering small changes in sarcomere length. The technique is capable of resolving changes as small as 0.2 A in isolated frog skeletal muscle fibers. The small sarcomere lengthening that accompanies the drop in tension in the latent period of contraction was investigated. We suggest this lengthening be named latency elongation (LE). The LE is present in a completely slack fiber and must, therefore, be caused by a forcible lengthening process. Furthermore, the LE is dependent on the existence of an overlap between thin and tick filaments. The rate of elongation and the time interval between stimulation and maximum elongation may vary along the fiber. The maximum elongation was 3-5 A per sarcomere. At any instant the drop in tension is a product of the sum of sarcomere lengthenings along the fiber and the slope stiffness of the series elasticity. The latency relaxation (LR) could be registered in the sarcomere length range from 2.2 mum to 3.6-3.7 mum. The amplitude went through a sharp maximum at 3.0-3.1 mum. In the sarcomere length range from 2.2 to 2.8 mum the delay from onset to maximum LR was nearly proportional to the distance from the Z-line to the overlap zone. A working hypothesis is presented. It is suggested that the LE is caused by a lengthening of the thin filaments. PMID:956088

  19. Infant-directed speech: Final syllable lengthening and rate of speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Robyn; Bernhardt, Barbara; Shi, Rushen; Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen

    2005-04-01

    Speech rate has been reported to be slower in infant-directed speech (IDS) than in adult-directed speech (ADS). Studies have also found phrase-final lengthening to be more exaggerated in IDS compared with ADS. In our study we asked whether the observed overall slower rate of IDS is due to exaggerated utterance-final syllable lengthening. Two mothers of preverbal English-learning infants each participated in two recording sessions, one with her child, and another with an adult friend. The results showed an overall slower rate in IDS compared to ADS. However, when utterance-final syllables were excluded from the calculation, the speech rate in IDS and ADS did not differ significantly. The duration of utterance-final syllables differed significantly for IDS versus ADS. Thus, the overall slower rate of IDS was due to the extra-long final syllable occurring in relatively short utterances. The comparable pre-final speech rate for IDS and ADS further accentuates the final syllable lengthening in IDS. As utterances in IDS are typically phrases or clauses, the particularly strong final-lengthening cue could potentially facilitate infants' segmentation of these syntactic units. These findings are consistent with the existing evidence that pre-boundary lengthening is important in the processing of major syntactic units in English-learning infants.

  20. Female facial attractiveness increases

    E-print Network

    Flegr, Jaroslav

    Female facial attractiveness increases during the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle S. Craig judge photographs of women's faces that were taken in the fertile window of the menstrual cycle as more value in the mating market at the time in the cycle when the probability of conception is at its highest

  1. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bone disease can make bones easy to break Bones can also develop cancer and infections Other bone diseases are caused by poor nutrition, genetic factors or ...

  2. Sequelae of radiation facial epilation (North American Hiroshima maiden syndrome)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, I.B.; Walfish, P.G. )

    1989-12-01

    Radiation for benign problems of the head and neck area has been uniformly recognized as unacceptable practice. This includes epilation for facial hirsutism. Twelve such patients, recently encountered, have characteristic radiodermatitis facies and have demonstrated multisite neoplastic involvement--including skin, thyroid, parathyroid, salivary gland, oral cavity, facial skeleton, and breast--and have also undergone extensive dermatologic treatment of complications of radiodermatitis. There was one cancer death, and three patients are alive with cancer. Such patients have a superficial resemblance to the Hiroshima maiden group of young women who survived atomic bombing and experienced severe facial burns, necessitating extensive plastic surgery. As atomic survivors they are at increased risk for cancer of thyroid, salivary gland, lung, breast, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal tract. The North American Hiroshima maiden should warrant easy clinical recognition and require lifetime scrutiny for multisite neoplastic disease.

  3. Secondary stem lengthening in palms: response to commentary by Tomlinson and Quinn.

    PubMed

    Renninger, Heidi J; Phillips, Nathan

    2013-03-01

    In this response, we address the criticisms put forth by Tomlinson and Quinn (American Journal of Botany 100: 461-464) about our original publication on secondary stem lengthening in Iriartea deltoidea palms (American Journal of Botany 99: 607-613) and find areas on which we may agree. We address our figure of a typical palm vascular bundle; the location, timing, and species where secondary lengthening would likely occur; and our measurement of internodes in various palms as well as our choice of individuals. Our original observations were a novel finding in the field of palm biology, and we invite more research and investigation on this subject. PMID:23455482

  4. Effect of Restraining Devices on Facial Fractures in Motor Vehicle Collisions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to summarize and critically evaluate the evidence for or against the effectiveness of restraining devices on facial fractures in motor vehicle collisions (MVCs).In a PubMed search, the search terms "facial bone fracture and seat belt," "facial bone fracture and air bag," and "facial bone fracture and restraining" were used. The authors abstracted the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from each study. Weighted mean differences and 95% CIs were also calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with Review Manager (The Nordic Cochrane Centre).The authors found 30 potentially relevant articles, of which 6 articles met our inclusion criteria. Five studies were subgrouped, and a meta-analysis of these data suggested beneficial effects of seat belts on decreasing facial fractures in MVCs (n?=?15,768,960, OR, 0.46, 95% CI?=?0.35-0.60). Three studies were subgrouped, and a meta-analysis of these data suggested that there were beneficial effects of seat belts and air bags on decreasing facial fractures in MVCs (n?=?15,768,021, OR, 0.59, 95% CI?=?0.47-0.74). Four studies were subgrouped, and a meta-analysis of these data suggested there were no significant effects of an air bag on decreasing facial fracture in MVCs (n?=?15,932,259, OR, 1.00, 95% CI?=?0.72-1.39).A seat belt alone (OR, 0.46) or a seat belt and an air bag (OR, 0.59) were effective to decrease facial fractures in MVCs. However, air bags alone had no significant effect (OR, 1.00). In using air bags, seat belt should be applied together to prevent facial fractures in motor vehicle injuries. PMID:26267585

  5. An Interactive Facial Animation System Ugur Gudukbay

    E-print Network

    Güdükbay, Ugur

    is an interpolation technique for facial animation. 2 PREVIOUS WORK Previous studies for facial modeling and animaAn Interactive Facial Animation System Fatih Erol Ugur Gudukbay Department of Computer Engineering In this paper, an interactive facial animation system is described. The system is built on top of the facial

  6. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18–25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects’ evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. In conclusion: 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population. PMID:26562655

  7. Compensatory Vowel Lengthening for Omitted Coda Consonants: A Phonetic Investigation of Children's Early Representations of Prosodic Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Jae Yung; Demuth, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Children's early word productions often differ from the target form, sometimes exhibiting vowel lengthening when word-final coda consonants are omitted (e.g., "dog" /d[open o]g/ [arrow right] [d[open o]:]). It has typically been assumed that such lengthening compensates for a missing prosodic unit (a mora). However, this study raises the…

  8. Pediatric facial transplantation: Ethical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jennifer; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Hanson, Mark D; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Facial transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as a method of reconstructing otherwise unreconstructable adult faces. As this modality is made more available, we must turn our attention to pediatric patients who may benefit from facial transplantation. In the current article, the authors present and briefly examine the most pressing ethical challenges posed by the possibility of performing facial transplantation on pediatric patients. Furthermore, they issue a call for a policy statement on pediatric facial transplantation. The present article may serve as a first step in that direction, highlighting ethical issues that would need to be considered in the creation of such a statement. PMID:25114614

  9. Fat grafting in facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Marten, Timothy J; Elyassnia, Dino

    2015-04-01

    Patients with significant facial atrophy and age-related loss of facial fat generally achieve suboptimal improvement from both surface treatments of facial skin and surgical lifts. Restoring lost facial volume by fat grafting is a powerful technique that is now acknowledged by most plastic surgeons and other physicians engaged in treating the aging face as one of the most important advances in aesthetic surgery. Properly performed, the addition of fat to areas of the face that have atrophied because of age or disease can produce a significant and sustained improvement in appearance that is unobtainable by other means. PMID:25827566

  10. Oral Crest Lengthening for Increasing Removable Denture Retention by Means of CO2 Laser

    PubMed Central

    Nammour, Samir; Gerges, Elie; Bou Tayeh, Rima; Zeinoun, Toni

    2014-01-01

    The loss of teeth and their replacement by artificial denture is associated with many problems. The denture needs a certain amount of ridge height to give it retention and a long-term function. Crest lengthening procedures are performed to provide a better anatomic environment and to create proper supporting structures for more stability and retention of the denture. The purpose of our study is to describe and evaluate the effectiveness of CO2 laser-assisted surgery in patients treated for crest lengthening (vestibular deepening). There have been various surgical techniques described in order to restore alveolar ridge height by pushing muscles attaching of the jaws. Most of these techniques cause postoperative complications such as edemas, hemorrhage, pain, infection, slow healing, and rebound to initial position. Our clinical study describes the treatment planning and clinical steps for the crest lengthening with the use of CO2 laser beam (6–15 Watts in noncontact, energy density range: 84.92–212.31?J/cm2, focus, and continuous mode with a focal point diameter of 0.3?mm). At the end of each surgery, dentures were temporarily relined with a soft material. Patients were asked to mandatorily wear their relined denture for a minimum of 4–6 weeks and to remove it for hygienic purposes. At the end of each surgery, the deepest length of the vestibule was measured by the operator. No sutures were made and bloodless wounds healed in second intention without grafts. Results pointed out the efficiency of the procedure using CO2 laser. At 8 weeks of post-op, the mean of crest lengthening was stable without rebound. Only a loss of 15% was noticed. To conclude, the use of CO2 laser is an effective option for crest lengthening. PMID:25383385

  11. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyosub E; Corcos, Daniel M; Hornby, T George

    2015-07-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-? motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P < 0.001). H-reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-? motoneuron transmission. PMID:25972590

  12. Human Maxilla Bone Response to 30° Oriented Impacts and Comparison With Frontal Bone Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Karine, BRUYERE; François, BERMOND; Robert, BOUQUET; Yves, CAIRE; Michelle, RAMET; Eric, VOÏGLIO

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the responses of human maxilla and frontal bones under 30°-oriented impacts. Maxilla and frontal bones of the same subject were impacted by a guided horizontal steel cylinder. Linear acceleration time histories and force time histories were plotted and corridors were proposed for maxilla bone response. Sensitivity of head dynamics in regard to impact energy level and localization showed the protection of the intracranial contents by the facial bones crushing. Injury risk curves were established for impact on frontal bone, showing a 50% risk injury for impact energy of 265 J or impact force of 7500 N. PMID:11558085

  13. Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Brick, Timothy R.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Nonverbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this article we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and nonverbal facial

  14. The Facial Interpersonal Perception Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luciani, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    Develops an interpersonal perception inventory which demonstrates that various ratings of facial caricature drawings when made by a husband and wife can be used as a predictor of marital adjustment. Analysis of data establishes validity for the Facial Interpersonal Perception Inventory as well as reliability and consistency. Implications are…

  15. Management of Chronic Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher G.; Dellon, A. Lee; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2009-01-01

    Pain persisting for at least 6 months is defined as chronic. Chronic facial pain conditions often take on lives of their own deleteriously changing the lives of the sufferer. Although much is known about facial pain, it is clear that those physicians who treat these conditions should continue elucidating the mechanisms and defining successful treatment strategies for these life-changing conditions. This article will review many of the classic causes of chronic facial pain due to the trigeminal nerve and its branches that are amenable to surgical therapies. Testing of facial sensibility is described and its utility introduced. We will also introduce some of the current hypotheses of atypical facial pain and headaches secondary to chronic nerve compressions and will suggest possible treatment strategies. PMID:22110799

  16. Complications in Pediatric Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mimi T.; Losee, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pediatric facial fractures, little has been published on the complications of these fractures. The existing literature is highly variable regarding both the definition and the reporting of adverse events. Although the incidence of pediatric facial fractures is relative low, they are strongly associated with other serious injuries. Both the fractures and their treatment may have long-term consequence on growth and development of the immature face. This article is a selective review of the literature on facial fracture complications with special emphasis on the complications unique to pediatric patients. We also present our classification system to evaluate adverse outcomes associated with pediatric facial fractures. Prospective, long-term studies are needed to fully understand and appreciate the complexity of treating children with facial fractures and determining the true incidence, subsequent growth, and nature of their complications. PMID:22110803

  17. Management of Midline Facial Clefts.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sobhan; Sabhlok, Samrat; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Khatri, Isha

    2015-12-01

    Median or midline facial clefts are rare anomalies of developmental origin, etiology of whose occurrence is still unknown precisely. The most basic presentation of midline facial clefts is in the form of a Median cleft lip which is defined as any congenital vertical cleft through the centre of the upper lip. First described by Bechard in 1823, it is the most common amongst all atypical clefts reported. The incidence is about 1:10,00,000 births. This may occur as a sporadic event or as a part of an inherited sequence of anomalies. It arises embryologically from incomplete fusion of the medial nasal prominences. The authors present a series of eight cases with varying degrees of midline facial clefts. This review article aims to give a broad idea on the various classifications used for further understanding of midline facial clefts and a brief idea about the various surgical management techniques used in the repair of these facial clefts. PMID:26604459

  18. Differential segmental strain during active lengthening in a large biarticular thigh muscle during running

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Jennifer A.; Ellerby, David J.; Marsh, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The iliotibialis lateralis pars postacetabularis (ILPO) is the largest muscle in the hindlimb of the guinea fowl and is thought to play an important role during the stance phase of running, both absorbing and producing work. Using sonomicrometry and electromyography, we examined whether the ILPO experiences differential strain between proximal, central and distal portions of the posterior fascicles. When the ILPO is being lengthened while active, the distal portion was found to lengthen significantly more than either the proximal or central portions of the muscle. Our data support the hypothesis that the distal segment lengthened farther and faster because it began activity at shorter sarcomere lengths on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve. Probably because of the self-stabilizing effects of operating on the ascending limb of the length–tension curve, all segments reached the end of lengthening and started shortening at the same sarcomere length. During shortening, this similarity in sarcomere length among the segments was maintained, as predicted from force–velocity effects, and shortening strain was similar in all segments. The differential active strain during active lengthening is thus ultimately determined by differences in strain during the passive portion of the cycle. The sarcomere lengths of all segments of the fascicles were similar at the end of active shortening, but after the passive portion of the cycle the distal segment was shorter. Differential strain in the segments during the passive portion of the cycle may be caused by differential joint excursions at the knee and hip acting on the ends of the muscle and being transmitted differentially by the passive visco-elastic properties of the muscle. Alternatively, the differential passive strain could be due to the action of active or passive muscles in the thigh that transmit force to the IPLO in shear. Based on basic sarcomere dynamics we predict that differential strain is more likely to occur in muscles undergoing active lengthening at the beginning of contraction than those undergoing only shortening. PMID:21957102

  19. The molecular origins of species-specific facial pattern.

    PubMed

    Brugmann, Samantha A; Tapadia, Minal D; Helms, Jill A

    2006-01-01

    The prevailing approach within the field of craniofacial development is focused on finding a balance between tissues (e.g., facial epithelia, neuroectoderm, and neural crest) and molecules (e.g., bone morphogenetic proteins, fibroblast growth factors, Wnts) that play a role in sculpting the face. We are rapidly learning that neither these tissues nor molecular signals are able to act in isolation; in fact, molecular cues are constantly reciprocating signals between the epithelia and the neural crest in order to pattern and mold facial structures. More recently, it has been proposed that this crosstalk is often mediated and organized by discrete organizing centers within the tissues that are able to act as a self-contained unit of developmental potential (e.g., the rhombomere and perhaps the ectomere). Whatever the molecules are and however they are interpreted by these tissues, it appears that there is a remarkably conserved mechanism for setting up the initial organization of the facial prominences between species. Regardless of species, all vertebrates appear to have the same basic bauplan. However, sometime during mid-gestation, the vertebrate face begins to exhibit species-specific variations, in large part due to differences in the rates of growth and differentiation of cells comprising the facial prominences. How do these differences arise? Are they due to late changes in molecular signaling within the facial prominences themselves? Or are these late changes a reflection of earlier, more subtle alterations in boundaries and fields that are established at the earliest stages of head formation? We do not have clear answers to these questions yet, but in this chapter we present new studies that shed light on this age-old question. This chapter aims to present the known signals, both on a molecular and cellular level, responsible for craniofacial development while bringing to light the events that may serve to create difference in facial morphology seen from species to species. PMID:16782454

  20. Visual facial grasp.

    PubMed

    Riestra, Alonso R; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2004-10-01

    Some patients with degenerative neurological diseases have a release of the vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR), as detected by passive head movement during visual fixation on a moving target ("doll's eyes"maneuver). However, a positive doll's eyes sign might be induced by other defects and the purpose of this article is to describe a new ocular sign of cortical dysfunction, the visual facial grasp. We observed three patients, one with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), another with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a third with cortico-basal degeneration (CBD) all of whom appeared to demonstrate a release of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) with passive head movements. Whereas the patient with PSP, who was unable to inhibit the VOR regardless of the visual target used probably had a true release of the VOR, the patients with AD and CBD were able to inhibit this reflex when the visual target was the examiner's moving face. These two patients also exhibited spontaneous preference for visual fixation on the examiner's face and improvement in smooth pursuit when the examiner's face was the visual target. This clinical observation suggests that the deficits in these two patients with AD and CBD were related to the emergence of a primitive stimulus-bound behavior, the visual facial grasp. PMID:15788274

  1. Facial neuropathy with imaging enhancement of the facial nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sehreen; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    A young women developed unilateral facial neuropathy 2 weeks after a motor vehicle collision involving fractures of the skull and mandible. MRI showed contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. We review the literature describing facial neuropathy after trauma and facial nerve enhancement patterns with different causes of facial neuropathy. PMID:25574155

  2. Stresses in ultrasonically assisted bone cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, K.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Bäker, M.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    Bone cutting is a frequently used procedure in the orthopaedic surgery. Modern cutting techniques, such as ultrasonic assisted drilling, enable surgeons to perform precision operations in facial and spinal surgeries. Advanced understanding of the mechanics of bone cutting assisted by ultrasonic vibration is required to minimise bone fractures and to optimise the technique performance. The paper presents results of finite element simulations on ultrasonic and conventional bone cutting analysing the effects of ultrasonic vibration on cutting forces and stress distribution. The developed model is used to study the effects of cutting and vibration parameters (e.g. amplitude and frequency) on the stress distributions in the cutting region.

  3. Abnormal motor reflexes and dormant facial motor neurons in rats with facial-facial anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Song, J; Luo, L H; Zhong, G; Xiao, H J; Gong, S S

    2009-01-01

    After facial nerve injury, some post-paralysis sequelae, such as synkinesis, hemispasm and 'crocodile tears' syndrome appear. The psychosocial impact of these sequelae is unavoidable. Despite recent advances and the growing popularity of this field, the pathophysiological mechanisms of facial nerve injury and regeneration are still not well understood. In this report, an abnormal motor reflex coincident with synkinetic facial movement was examined in a rat model using the blink reflex technique. Some dormant facial motor neurons were found which could not innervate through the suture site but remained alive. These results suggest that such dormant neurons might exert roles distinct from those of re-innervated neurons during facial nerve injury and regeneration. Further study is required to elucidate the biomolecular structure and electrophysiological features of such neurons. PMID:19589254

  4. The Facial Profile in the Context of Facial Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Heppt, Werner J; Vent, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Beauty has been an intriguing issue since the evolving of a culture in mankind. Even the Neanderthals are believed to have applied makeover to enhance facial structures and thus underline beauty. The determinants of beauty and aesthetics have been defined by artists and scientists alike. This article will give an overview of the evolvement of a beauty concept and the significance of the facial profile. It aims at sharpening the senses of the facial plastic surgeon for analyzing the patient's face, consulting the patient on feasible options, planning, and conducting surgery in the most individualized way. PMID:26579858

  5. Simultaneous femoral and tibial lengthening in combined congenital complete fibular hemimelia and congenital short femur using Ilizarov ring external fixator

    PubMed Central

    Bishay, Sherif N.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The combination of fibular hemimelia with congenital short femur worsens the limb length discrepancy which requires extensive femoral and tibial lengthening. Patients and methods Eight patients having unilateral lower extremity shortening presented to the National Institute of Neuromotor System, Egypt, between September 2008 and September 2010 and underwent single session femoral and tibial lengthening using Ilizarov ring external fixator technique. Consolidation of the femoral and tibial required length gain was evident in the radiographic follow-up. Conclusion Extensive limb length discrepancy can be managed by simultaneous femoral and tibial lengthening. Level of evidence The study is type IV clinical evidence. PMID:25561754

  6. Alternative lengthening of telomeres frequently occurs in mismatch repair system-deficient gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Fumihito; Li, Dong; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Semba, Shuho; Ito, Akihiko; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Maintenance of telomeric ends by the telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex or the telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres is necessary for the immortalization of human cells. The significance of alternative lengthening of telomeres has been suggested in DNA mismatch repair system-deficient cells; however, much remains unknown in human malignancies. In this study, we investigated the telomere maintenance mechanism in gastric carcinoma. In formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections of the high frequency of microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and non-MSI-H gastric carcinomas, there was no difference in telomere length monitored by telomere intensity ratio using telomere-fluorescent in situ hybridization. Immunoreactivity of hTERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase, was detected in 48% of MSI-H gastric carcinomas. The frequency was significantly lower than that in non-MSI-H gastric carcinomas (86%, P = 0.02). Conversely, the number of the alternative lengthening of telomeres-associated promyelocytic leukemia bodies (APBs) detected by combined promyelocytic leukemia immunofluorescence and telomere-fluorescent in situ hybridization was statistically higher (57%) in the MSI-H gastric carcinomas compared to that in non-MSI-H gastric carcinomas (19%, P = 0.026). The cases with hTERT(+)APBs(-) were more frequent in non-MSI-H gastric carcinomas (76%) than in MSI-H gastric carcinomas (24%), and the cases with hTERT(-)APBs(+) were more frequent in MSI-H gastric carcinomas (33%) than in non-MSI-H gastric carcinomas (10%). These results suggest that alternative lengthening of telomeres-mediated telomere maintenance plays an important role for microsatellite instability-mediated stomach carcinogenesis, as well as the telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex, although the incidence of MSI-H is low. Defects of the mismatch repair system may lead to homeologous recombination of telomeric ends for the telomerase-independent telomere maintenance in gastric carcinomas. PMID:19154407

  7. Does Facial Resemblance Enhance Cooperation?

    PubMed Central

    Giang, Trang; Bell, Raoul; Buchner, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces). A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system. PMID:23094095

  8. Posterior Cruciate Ligament (pcl) Reconstruction by Transtibial Tunnel:. Suggestions of Lengthening and Slippage Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jay-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Woong

    This paper examined the biomechanical fatigue behavior of Achilles tendon autograft after posterior cruciate ligament (PLC) reconstructions. It experimented with various fixation devices and locations on the degree of initial lengthening and slippage to investigate the relationship between lengthening and slippage ratios among calcaneal and soft tissue fixation methods. Eight specimens of proximal tibia and Achilles tendon grafts were harvested from cadavers and classified into four groups according to the type of transtibial fixation technique. A cyclic load ranging from 50N to 250N was applied to each graft when fixed to the proximal tibia at 55 degrees. The soft tissue fixation method, which uses an interference screw, demonstrated a 56.4% ratio of slippage to total elongation. The use of a double cross-pin with the same method demonstrated a 45.4% slippage ratio. The former was associated with approximately 2 mm less total elongation and 13% more slippage than lengthening compared to the latter. This result was predominantly due to the poor standard of fixation compared to the same method using a double cross-pin.

  9. Use of Allograft in Skeletally Immature Patients for Calcaneal Neck Lengthening Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yoon Hae; Park, Kun Bo; Park, Hui Wan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To date, there have been no studies evaluating the usefulness of allograft as a substitute for autograft in calcaneal neck lengthening osteotomy. This retrospective study examined the results of calcaneal neck lengthening osteotomy using allograft for pathologic flatfoot deformity in children and adolescents with various neuromuscular diseases. Materials and Methods 118 feet in 79 children treated surgically between Mar 2000 and July 2005 were reviewed. The mean age at the time of the operation was 9 + 3 years (range, 3 - 17 years) and follow-up averaged 15.4 months (range, 13 - 21 months) postoperatively. Talo-1st metatarsal angle, talo-calcaneal angle, calcaneal pitch were measured before and after operation and bony union was estimated. Results Bony union was noted at the latest follow-up and there were no postoperative complications such as reduction loss, infection, nonunion, delayed union or graft loss during the follow-up period in all but one foot. All radiographic indices were improved postoperatively in all cases. Conclusion Our results indicate that use of allograft in calcaneal neck lengthening osteotomy is a useful option for correction of the planovalgus deformity in skeletally immature patients whose enough autobone can not be obtained. PMID:18306473

  10. Harmine lengthens circadian period of the mammalian molecular clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Saori; Tomita, Tatsunosuke; Miyazaki, Koyomi; Itoh, Nanako; Yasumoto, Yuki; Oike, Hideaki; Doi, Ryosuke; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock is a cell-autonomous endogenous system that generates circadian rhythms in the behavior and physiology of most organisms. We previously reported that the harmala alkaloid, harmine, lengthens the circadian period of Bmal1 transcription in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Clock protein dynamics were examined using real-time reporter assays of PER2::LUC to determine the effects of harmine on the central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Harmine significantly lengthened the period of PER2::LUC expression in embryonic fibroblasts, in neuronal cells differentiated from neuronal progenitor cells and in SCN slices obtained from PER2::LUC mice. Although harmine did not induce the transient mRNA expression of clock genes such as Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 in embryonic fibroblasts, it significantly extended the half-life of PER2::LUC protein in neuronal cells and SCN slices. Harmine might lengthen the circadian period of the molecular clock by increasing PER2 protein stability in the SCN. PMID:25087965

  11. The effectiveness of articaine in mandibular facial infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Dennis F

    2016-01-01

    Four percent articaine local anesthetic has been successfully used to attain local anesthesia for dental procedures. Mandibular block anesthesia may consume longer time to attain and have a higher failure of local anesthesia compared to infiltration. Mandibular facial infiltration has been reported to successfully attain effective local anesthesia for dental procedures. This study involved only several tooth sites and found that 1.8 cc of 4% articaine facial infiltration in the mandible may be effective when the facial mandibular cortex is <2.0–3.0 mm. A waiting time of 5–10 minutes may be required for effective anesthesia. An additional 1.8 cc of dose may be required to attain anesthesia if an initial 1.8 cc of dose fails. The need for additional anesthetic may be predicted by a measurement of the facial cortex using cone beam computerized tomography. A study of mandibular sites is needed to delineate the anatomical dimensions, density of cortical bone, and apical neural location for ensuring successful local anesthetic infiltration.

  12. Management of Late Post-traumatic Facial Artery Pseudoaneurysmal Cyst: Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Nisha K; Shandilya, Ramanojam; Pawar, Sudhir; Gadre, Pushkar K; Gadre, Kiran; Singh, Divya

    2015-06-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the branches of the external carotid artery as a result of trauma are rare in oral and maxillofacial surgery practice. The most affected branches are the superficial temporal artery, internal maxillary artery and distal part of facial artery, usually where they pass over the bone. Very few cases of facial artery pseudoaneurysms of proximal parts (from external carotid artery up to the lower border of the mandible) are reported in the literature. We present a review of literature for management of late post-traumatic pseudoaneurysmal cyst and a case report involving proximal part of facial artery in the submandibular region following open reduction and rigid fixation of the condylar fracture in a 25-year-old male. To our knowledge this is the fourth reported case of proximal facial artery pseudoaneurysm. PMID:26028835

  13. Prehospital tracheal intubation in severe facial trauma: a short window of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Bredmose, P P; Rock, S; Lockey, D J

    2012-09-01

    A case of severe facial injury is described. The pre-hospital management including pre-hospital anaesthesia and intubation and the importance of advanced anaesthetic skills in rare trauma cases is discussed. In addition the rare situation where large bone fragments are retrieved from the scene and potentially used in reconstruction is mentioned. PMID:22903423

  14. Automated interactive facial caricature generation 

    E-print Network

    Logan, Ryan C

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to develop a concept to automatically generate facial caricatures based on anthropometric measurements. Based on this concept, a system was created to automate caricature generation with minimal user input...

  15. Facial asymmetry: a current review

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The term "asymmetry" is used to make reference to dissimilarity between homologous elements, altering the balance between structures. Facial asymmetry is common in the overall population and is often presented subclinically. Nevertheless, on occasion, significant facial asymmetry results not only in functional, but also esthetic issues. Under these conditions, its etiology should be carefully investigated in order to achieve an adequate treatment plan. Facial asymmetry assessment comprises patient's first interview, extra- as well as intraoral clinical examination, and supplementary imaging examination. Subsequent asymmetry treatment depends on patient's age, the etiology of the condition and on the degree of disharmony, and might include from asymmetrical orthodontic mechanics to orthognathic surgery. Thus, the present study aims at addressing important aspects to be considered by the orthodontist reaching an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan of facial asymmetry, in addition to reporting treatment of some patients carriers of such challenging disharmony. PMID:26691977

  16. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  17. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  18. [Facial analysis without cephalometric radiography].

    PubMed

    Remmelink, H J; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    2000-04-01

    A careful clinical examination of the face is an essential part of the orthodontic diagnosis. By visual examination of the face important diagnostic determinations can be made regarding the patients profile, dental and skeletal relationships and 'facial animation'. This article presents some clinical and photographic diagnostic methods to analyse the face. The possibilities and limitations of facial analysis without cephalometric radiography are discussed. PMID:11382969

  19. Skeletal facial deformity in patients with ? thalassemia major: Report of one Tunisian case and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bouguila, Jed; Besbes, Ghazi; Khochtali, Habib

    2015-11-01

    ? Thalassemia is an inherited genetic disorder of hemoglobin synthesis characterized by a reduction of ? chains of globin. Typical features of patients with ? thalassemia are skeletal modifications, particularly in the skull and in the facial bones. In thalassemia major, involvement of the facial skeleton can result in severe disfigurement, often referred to as "rodent facies". Various surgical approaches to correct the facial deformity have been advocated; however, treatment remains controversial. The worse the patient's systemic condition, the more unstable and more complicated the surgical procedure. Patient with multisystemic disorder and severe deformity, such as in our case, with a complete lack of cortical bone for bone fixation, might not be amenable to such procedures. Thorough knowledge of the multiple systemic manifestations, therapy, and prognosis of this syndrome is necessary to formulate a safe, comprehensive surgical plan for these patients. PMID:26363895

  20. The effects of the Ilizarov distraction technique on bone and muscle in a canine model: a preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, R. D.; Thompson, J. G.; Rizk, W. S.; Seaber, A. V.; Garrett, W. E.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the functional and morphological changes experienced by bone and muscle during Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis. Although extensive research has been conducted in the area of regenerate bone formation, the effect of limb lengthening on the biomechanical properties of bone and muscle has not been thoroughly addressed. In this study, an Ilizarov external fixator was applied to one tibia of nine skeletally mature dogs, and distracted 3 cm over thirty days. The contralateral tibia served as control. Histology and weekly radiographs assessed muscle morphology and bone growth. The contractile capabilities of the gastrocnemius muscles from the experimental and control limbs were measured prior to sacrifice, and the bending stiffness of the tibias of five dogs was determined. All dogs experienced loss of knee extension secondary to muscle contracture and/or stiffness about the joint. These dogs did not bear weight on the experimental limb. In one dog, spontaneous resolution of the muscle contracture allowed partial weight bearing during the last three weeks of consolidation. Despite 3 cm distraction, tibial lengthening ranged from 1.7 to 3 cm. Biomechanical testing revealed a significant reduction in the bending stiffness of the lengthened bones when compared with control values (p < 0.003). The weight of the lengthened muscles was 35% less than control values, a finding consistent with the histology which showed mild muscle fiber degeneration in all dogs. The contractile capabilities of the lengthened muscles were reduced to 29-80% of control values (p < 0.005). In contrast, the lengthened muscle from the weight bearing dog retained 85% of the weight and 104% of the maximum contractile force of the control muscle. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9129270

  1. Frontal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Marinheiro, Bruno Henrique; de Medeiros, Eduardo Henrique Pantosso; Sverzut, Cássio Edvard; Trivellato, Alexandre Elias

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the epidemiology, treatment, and complications of frontal bone fractures associated, or not, with other facial fractures. This evaluation also sought to minimize the influence of the surgeon's skills and the preference for any rigid internal fixation system. The files from 3758 patients who attended the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, from March 2004 to November 2011 and presented with facial trauma were scanned, and 52 files were chosen for the review. Eleven (21.15%) of these patients had pure fractures of the frontal bone, and trauma incidence was more prevalent in men (92.3%), whites (61.53%), and adults (50%). Despite the use of helmets at the moment of the trauma, motorcycle crashes were the most common etiological factor (32.69%). Fracture of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus with displacement was the main injury observed (54.9%), and the most common treatment was internal fixation with a plate and screws (45.09%). Postoperative complications were observed in 35.29% of the cases. The therapy applied was effective in handling this type of fracture, and the success rate was comparable to that reported in other published studies. PMID:25377971

  2. Volume conservation principle involved in cell lengthening and nucleus movement during tissue morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, Michael A; He, Bing; Martin, Adam C; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Wieschaus, Eric F; Kaschube, Matthias

    2012-11-20

    Tissue morphogenesis is the process in which coordinated movements and shape changes of large numbers of cells form tissues, organs, and the internal body structure. Understanding morphogenetic movements requires precise measurements of whole-cell shape changes over time. Tissue folding and invagination are thought to be facilitated by apical constriction, but the mechanism by which changes near the apical cell surface affect changes along the entire apical-basal axis of the cell remains elusive. Here, we developed Embryo Development Geometry Explorer, an approach for quantifying rapid whole-cell shape changes over time, and we combined it with deep-tissue time-lapse imaging based on fast two-photon microscopy to study Drosophila ventral furrow formation. We found that both the cell lengthening along the apical-basal axis and the movement of the nucleus to the basal side proceeded stepwise and were correlated with apical constriction. Moreover, cell volume lost apically due to constriction largely balanced the volume gained basally by cell lengthening. The volume above the nucleus was conserved during its basal movement. Both apical volume loss and cell lengthening were absent in mutants showing deficits in the contractile cytoskeleton underlying apical constriction. We conclude that a single mechanical mechanism involving volume conservation and apical constriction-induced basal movement of cytoplasm accounts quantitatively for the cell shape changes and the nucleus movement in Drosophila ventral furrow formation. Our study provides a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the fast dynamics of whole-cell shape changes during tissue folding and points to a simplified model for Drosophila gastrulation. PMID:23134725

  3. Mechanical Characteristics of a Polymer Spring Device used to Lengthen Small Intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberger, Douglas J.

    Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is a condition that occurs due to an insufficient amount of small intestine needed for nutrient absorption and water regulation of the body. A compression spring device is being developed in order to provide a mechanical stimulus to the tissue, as this type of force has been shown to promote lengthening of the tissue. The research completed in this thesis investigated the mechanical characteristics of the spring device and attempted to relate it to the functionality in rat and porcine intestinal tissue. Results from the evaluation of the springs show that Poly(epsilon-caprolactone), or PCL, is a sufficient polymer to use for creating a biodegradable device as the spring dimensions can be adjusted through variations in the diameter, thickness, and band size in order to provide an adequate spring constant for multiple animal types. Design of the springs, however, need to take into account the size of the gelatin capsule used, the amount of plastic deformation and creep behavior of the spring under compression for an extended time period, and the variation in the mechanical properties of the animal soft tissue that requires lengthening. Integration of the spring in-continuity requires a feature that will provide a mechanical resistance to force that is greater than the force of the spring in the compressed state. The spring still requires further development and any design should also take into account the possibility of intestinal perforations or obstructions. The polymer spring device provides a good means towards developing a treatment option for SBS, and other potential soft tissue lengthening needs of the body.

  4. The MAGEC system for spinal lengthening in children with scoliosis: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    PubMed

    Jenks, Michelle; Craig, Joyce; Higgins, Joanne; Willits, Iain; Barata, Teresa; Wood, Hannah; Kimpton, Christine; Sims, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Scoliosis-structural lateral curvature of the spine-affects around four children per 1,000. The MAGEC system comprises a magnetically distractible spinal rod implant and an external remote controller, which lengthens the rod; this system avoids repeated surgical lengthening. Rod implants brace the spine internally and are lengthened as the child grows, preventing worsening of scoliosis and delaying the need for spinal fusion. The Medical Technologies Advisory Committee at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected the MAGEC system for evaluation in a NICE medical technologies guidance. Six studies were identified by the sponsor (Ellipse Technologies Inc.) as being relevant to the decision problem. Meta-analysis was used to compare the clinical evidence results with those of one conventional growth rod study, and equal efficacy of the two devices was concluded. The key weakness was selection of a single comparator study. The External Assessment Centre (EAC) identified 16 conventional growth rod studies and undertook meta-analyses of relevant outcomes. Its critique highlighted limitations around study heterogeneity and variations in baseline characteristics and follow-up duration, precluding the ability to draw firm conclusions. The sponsor constructed a de novo costing model showing that MAGEC rods generated cost savings of £9,946 per patient after 6 years, compared with conventional rods. The EAC critiqued and updated the model structure and inputs, calculating robust cost savings of £12,077 per patient with MAGEC rods compared with conventional rods over 6 years. The year of valuation was 2012. NICE issued a positive recommendation as supported by the evidence (Medical Technologies Guidance 18). PMID:25172432

  5. Attenuated sarcomere lengthening of the aged murine left ventricle observed using two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nance, Michael E; Whitfield, Justin T; Zhu, Yi; Gibson, Anne K; Hanft, Laurin M; Campbell, Kenneth S; Meininger, Gerald A; McDonald, Kerry S; Segal, Steven S; Domeier, Timothy L

    2015-09-01

    The Frank-Starling mechanism, whereby increased diastolic filling leads to increased cardiac output, depends on increasing the sarcomere length (Ls) of cardiomyocytes. Ventricular stiffness increases with advancing age, yet it remains unclear how such changes in compliance impact sarcomere dynamics in the intact heart. We developed an isolated murine heart preparation to monitor Ls as a function of left ventricular pressure and tested the hypothesis that sarcomere lengthening in response to ventricular filling is impaired with advanced age. Mouse hearts isolated from young (3-6 mo) and aged (24-28 mo) C57BL/6 mice were perfused via the aorta under Ca(2+)-free conditions with the left ventricle cannulated to control filling pressure. Two-photon imaging of 4-{2-[6-(dioctylamino)-2-naphthalenyl]ethenyl}1-(3-sulfopropyl)-pyridinium fluorescence was used to monitor t-tubule striations and obtain passive Ls between pressures of 0 and 40 mmHg. Ls values (in ?m, aged vs. young, respectively) were 2.02 ± 0.04 versus 2.01 ± 0.02 at 0 mmHg, 2.13 ± 0.04 versus 2.23 ± 0.02 at 5 mmHg, 2.21 ± 0.03 versus 2.27 ± 0.03 at 10 mmHg, and 2.28 ± 0.02 versus 2.36 ± 0.01 at 40 mmHg, indicative of impaired sarcomere lengthening in aged hearts. Atomic force microscopy nanoindentation revealed that intact cardiomyocytes enzymatically isolated from aged hearts had increased stiffness compared with those of young hearts (elastic modulus: aged, 41.9 ± 5.8 kPa vs. young, 18.6 ± 3.3 kPa; P = 0.006). Impaired sarcomere lengthening during left ventricular filling may contribute to cardiac dysfunction with advancing age by attenuating the Frank-Starling mechanism and reducing stroke volume. PMID:26209054

  6. Bizarre paediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Ho, W S; Ying, S Y; Wong, T W

    2000-08-01

    Child abuse and neglect account for a significant number of paediatric burn injuries. It is of great importance because of the high mortality, high frequency of repeated abuse, as well as the physical, psychological and social sequelae that it causes. Burn abuse is often under-recognized and under-reported because it is difficult to define non-accidental injury. On the other hand, false accusation of burn abuse is extremely damaging to the family. Bizarre and unusual burn injuries can be caused by accident and should not automatically be assumed to be deliberate injury. Three boys of age 1-7 years with bizarre facial burns were admitted to the Burns Unit at the Prince of Wales Hospital between February 1995 and July 1999. One was burned by his baby-sitter with hot water steam and the other two were burned by their mothers with hot boiled eggs. The unusual causes of their burns raised the suspicion of child abuse and formal investigations were carried out by the Social Services Department. Detail assessment including a developmental history of the child and the psychosocial assessment of the family revealed that these three boys were burned because of poor medical advice and innocent cultural belief. PMID:10812279

  7. Specific modulation of spinal and cortical excitabilities during lengthening and shortening submaximal and maximal contractions in plantar flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Duclay, Julien; Pasquet, Benjamin; Martin, Alain; Duchateau, Jacques

    2014-12-15

    This study investigated the influence of the torque produced by plantar flexor muscles on cortical and spinal excitability during lengthening and shortening voluntary contractions. To that purpose, modulations of motor-evoked potential (MEP) and Hoffmann (H) reflex were compared in the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) during anisometric submaximal and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the plantar flexor muscles. For the submaximal shortening and lengthening contractions, the target torque was set at 50% of their respective MVC force. The results indicate that the amplitudes of both MEP and H-reflex responses, normalized to the maximal M wave, were significantly (P < 0.05) lower during lengthening compared with shortening submaximal contraction. For these two parameters, the reduction reached, respectively, 22.1 and 31.9% for the SOL and 34.5 and 29.3% for the MG. During MVC, normalized MEP and H reflex of the SOL were both reduced significantly by 19.9% (P < 0.05) and 29.9% (P < 0.001) during lengthening and shortening contraction, respectively, whereas no significant change (P > 0.05) was observed for MG. In addition, the silent period in the ongoing electromyogram (EMG) activity following the MEP was significantly (P < 0.01) briefer during lengthening than shortening contractions but did not differ (P > 0.05) between contraction intensities and muscles. Together, these results indicate that cortical and spinal mechanisms involved in the modulation of muscle activation during shortening and lengthening contractions differ between synergistic muscles according to the torque produced. Data further document previous studies reporting that the specific modulation of muscle activation during lengthening contraction is not torque dependent. PMID:25324516

  8. Compound facial expressions of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

  9. Compound facial expressions of emotion.

    PubMed

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories--happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

  10. Facial coloration tracks changes in women's estradiol.

    PubMed

    Jones, Benedict C; Hahn, Amanda C; Fisher, Claire I; Wincenciak, Joanna; Kandrik, Michal; Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; DeBruine, Lisa M

    2015-06-01

    Red facial coloration is an important social cue in many primate species, including humans. In such species, the vasodilatory effects of estradiol may cause red facial coloration to change systematically during females' ovarian cycle. Although increased red facial coloration during estrus has been observed in female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), evidence linking primate facial color changes directly to changes in measured estradiol is lacking. Addressing this issue, we used a longitudinal design to demonstrate that red facial coloration tracks within-subject changes in women's estradiol, but not within-subject changes in women's progesterone or estradiol-to-progesterone ratio. Moreover, the relationship between estradiol and facial redness was observed in two independent samples of women (N = 50 and N = 65). Our results suggest that changes in facial coloration may provide cues of women's fertility and present the first evidence for a direct link between estradiol and female facial redness in a primate species. PMID:25796069

  11. Observations of bunch lengthening effects in the APS 7-GeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Yang, B.X.; Chae, Y.C.

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of the bunch length and horizontal beam size at a dispersive point in the lattice versus single-bunch current have been done on the Advanced Photo Source (APS) 7-GeV storage ring. These data are relevant to issues (limits) of obtaining high peak currents for storage-ring-based FELs. Bunch lengths from {sigma}{sub {tau}} {approx} 25 to 70 ps were measured using a Hamamatsu C5680 dual-sweep streak camera. Additional complementary data on energy spread deduced from horizontal beam size at a dispersive point in the lattice were also tracked versus single-bunch current. Both optical synchrotron radiation (OSR) and x-ray synchrotron radiation (XSR) techniques were used. For the set of data taken at a synchrotron frequency of 1.2 kHz (indicating rf gap voltage {<=} 6 MV), the significant bunch lengthening without a comparable horizontal size change ({Delta}E growth) is consistent with the potential well distortion model rather than the predictions of a microwave instability calculation. With higher rf gap voltage, peak currents up to 400 A were observed. A bunch-lengthening effect in multibunch mode was also observed as the stored-beam current approached the available rf power limit.

  12. A Humanlike Predictor of Facial Attractiveness

    E-print Network

    Shamir, Ron

    that describe facial geometry, color and texture, combined with an average human attractiveness score for each of facial attractiveness in general. 1 Introduction Philosophers, artists and scientists have been trying across cultures [2]. Such findings give rise to the quest for common factors which determine human facial

  13. Decoding Emotions from Facial Animations Shazia Afzal

    E-print Network

    Sezgin, Metin

    of the animations. Here we discuss results from our experiment that we consider are of relevance and interestDecoding Emotions from Facial Animations Shazia Afzal Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge of Cambridge Keywords: Facial expression analysis, animation 1 Introduction Facial feature point tracking

  14. Facial hair policy in a respirator program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, P.R. )

    1989-10-01

    In this paper the prohibition against facial hair for respirator users is explored. Reasons for the prohibition are given, along with suggestions for establishing or reviewing a policy. Recommendations are given for properly wording a facial hair policy, and the issue of facial hair on female workers is also addressed.

  15. Facial Specialty. Teacher Edition. Cosmetology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is one of a series of curriculum guides designed to direct and support instruction in vocational cosmetology programs in the State of Oklahoma. It contains seven units for the facial specialty: identifying enemies of the skin, using aromatherapy on the skin, giving facials without the aid of machines, giving facials with the aid…

  16. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  17. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. Results: In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. Conclusions: The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh. PMID:26550216

  18. Temporal bone Manifestations of Eosinophilic Granuloma.

    PubMed

    Acharya, B K; McShane, D P

    2001-10-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma is one of the triad of conditions collectively known as Histiocytosis-X. It is an uncommon granulomatous diseas which can affect the temporal bone(1) Allthough initially quiescent the disease may erode the mastoid cortex, destroy tegmen and extend into the cranial as well as erode the semicircular canals, cochlea or facial canal, giving rise to facial palsy. These lesions almost always become infected and can confused with chronic otomastoiditis. When diagnosed, theraphy consists of conservative surgery, radiation theraphy, steroids and chemotherapy(2). PMID:23119833

  19. Blocking facial mimicry reduces perceptual sensitivity for facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Ipser, Alberta; Cook, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Built on models of 'action understanding', motor theories of expression perception propose that facial simulation, a process similar to covert imitation, aids perception and interpretation of others' facial expressions. As predicted by these accounts, some reports suggest that blocking facial mimicry impairs expression recognition. However, these reports have been criticized and motor theories remain controversial. Crucially, it remains to be determined whether the labeling errors observed reflect a loss of perceptual sensitivity - a genuine perceptual phenomenon - or whether they are a product of response bias. The current study addressed this question using a novel psychophysical paradigm, where observers judged whether smiles drawn from a morph continuum were sincere or insincere. In Experiment 1, we confirmed that cues from both the eye and mouth regions contribute to sincerity judgments. Experiment 2 measured discrimination of smile sincerity across free-viewing and blocked-mimicry conditions. In the blocked-mimicry condition, participants pronounced vowel sounds during stimulus presentation, thereby loading the motor system and preventing mimicry. Each participant's responses were modeled by fitting psychometric functions. Sensitivity to changes in smile sincerity and bias were inferred from the slope and the point of subjective equality (PSE), respectively. Motor interference significantly decreased sensitivity relative to baseline, but did systematically affect bias. Experiment 3 examined whether the motor manipulation has similar effects on judgments of facial gender, a task equated for difficulty but which is not thought to recruit motor processes. Neither slope nor PSE estimates for gender judgments were affected, indicating that the loss of sensitivity seen in Experiment 2 is relatively specific to judgments of expression and does not reflect generic distraction. These findings accord with the view that judgments of facial expression benefit from motor contributions to perception. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26327064

  20. Delayed facial palsy in Miller Fisher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng-Yin; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Shahrizaila, Nortina

    2015-11-15

    Miller Fisher syndrome is characterised by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. However, facial palsy can occur during the course of the illness although development of facial palsy when other cardinal signs of Miller Fisher syndrome have reached nadir or improving, is unusual. This delayed appearance of facial palsy can be easily overlooked by the treating clinician. Here, we report four patients with Miller Fisher syndrome and delayed-onset facial palsy. We discuss the possible underlying reasons behind the delay in facial palsy. PMID:26277343

  1. Enhancing images of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Benson, P J; Campbell, R; Harris, T; Frank, M G; Tovée, M J

    1999-02-01

    Facial images can be enhanced by application of an algorithm--the caricature algorithm--that systematically manipulates their distinctiveness (Benson & Perrett, 1991c; Brennan, 1985). In this study, we first produced a composite facial image from natural images of the six facial expressions of fear, sadness, surprise, happiness, disgust, and anger shown on a number of different individual faces (Ekman & Friesen, 1975). We then caricatured the composite images with respect to a neutral (resting) expression. Experiment 1 showed that rated strength of the target expression was directly related to the degree of enhancement for all the expressions. Experiment 2, which used a free rating procedure, found that, although caricature enhanced the strength of the target expression (more extreme ratings), it did not necessarily enhance its purity, inasmuch as the attributes of nontarget expressions were also enhanced. Naming of prototypes, of original exemplar images, and of caricatures was explored in Experiment 3 and followed the pattern suggested by the free rating conditions of Experiment 2, with no overall naming advantage to caricatures under these conditions. Overall, the experiments suggested that computational methods of compositing and caricature can be usefully applied to facial images of expression. Their utility in enhancing the distinctiveness of the expression depends on the purity of expression in the source image. PMID:10089760

  2. Chapter III Facial Expression Analysis,

    E-print Network

    Lyons, Michael J.

    have lagged others, such as eye-gaze tracking, facial recognition, and conversational characters. Our on the human face (e.g. (Zhai, Morimoto, & Ihde, 1999)). Eye gaze tracking technology is to a relatively narrow selection of these areas. Eye gaze has occupied the greatest share of HCI re- search

  3. Facial dysplasia in wild chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Krief, Sabrina; Krief, Jean-Michel; Seguya, Andrew; Couly, Gérard; Levi, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    At least 10% of the Sebitoli chimpanzee community of the Kibale National Park (Uganda) present a characteristic facial phenotype with flattened nose, reduced nostrils, and concave mid-face. Affected individuals do not present skin lesions, and also young infants are affected. We suggest, therefore, a congenital origin of this defect. PMID:24849542

  4. Recognizing Facial Expressions Automatically from Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Caifeng; Braspenning, Ralph

    Facial expressions, resulting from movements of the facial muscles, are the face changes in response to a person's internal emotional states, intentions, or social communications. There is a considerable history associated with the study on facial expressions. Darwin [22] was the first to describe in details the specific facial expressions associated with emotions in animals and humans, who argued that all mammals show emotions reliably in their faces. Since that, facial expression analysis has been a area of great research interest for behavioral scientists [27]. Psychological studies [48, 3] suggest that facial expressions, as the main mode for nonverbal communication, play a vital role in human face-to-face communication. For illustration, we show some examples of facial expressions in Fig. 1.

  5. Genetic Factors That Increase Male Facial Masculinity Decrease Facial Attractiveness of Female Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  6. Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Mitchem, Dorian G; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2014-02-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  7. External auditory canal cholesteatoma and keratosis obturans: the role of imaging in preventing facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    McCoul, Edward D; Hanson, Matthew B

    2011-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to compare the clinical characteristics of external auditory canal cholesteatoma (EACC) with those of a similar entity, keratosis obturans (KO). We also sought to identify those aspects of each disease that may lead to complications. We identified 6 patients in each group. Imaging studies were reviewed for evidence of bony erosion and the proximity of disease to vital structures. All 6 patients in the EACC group had their diagnosis confirmed by computed tomography (CT), which demonstrated widening of the bony external auditory canal; 4 of these patients had critical erosion of bone adjacent to the facial nerve. Of the 6 patients with KO, only 2 had undergone CT, and neither exhibited any significant bony erosion or expansion; 1 of them developed osteomyelitis of the temporal bone and adjacent temporomandibular joint. Another patient manifested KO as part of a dermatophytid reaction. The essential component of treatment in all cases of EACC was microscopic debridement of the ear canal. We conclude that EACC may produce significant erosion of bone with exposure of vital structures, including the facial nerve. Because of the clinical similarity of EACC to KO, misdiagnosis is possible. Temporal bone imaging should be obtained prior to attempts at debridement of suspected EACC. Increased awareness of these uncommon conditions is warranted to prompt appropriate investigation and prevent iatrogenic complications such as facial nerve injury. PMID:22180115

  8. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system. PMID:22764352

  9. Suppression of the alternative lengthening of telomere pathway by the chromatin remodelling factor ATRX.

    PubMed

    Clynes, David; Jelinska, Clare; Xella, Barbara; Ayyub, Helena; Scott, Caroline; Mitson, Matthew; Taylor, Stephen; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen per cent of cancers maintain telomere length independently of telomerase by the homologous recombination (HR)-associated alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway. A unifying feature of these tumours are mutations in ATRX. Here we show that expression of ectopic ATRX triggers a suppression of the pathway and telomere shortening. Importantly ATRX-mediated ALT suppression is dependent on the histone chaperone DAXX. Re-expression of ATRX is associated with a reduction in replication fork stalling, a known trigger for HR and loss of MRN from telomeres. A G-quadruplex stabilizer partially reverses the effect of ATRX, inferring ATRX may normally facilitate replication through these sequences that, if they persist, promote ALT. We propose that defective telomere chromatinization through loss of ATRX promotes the persistence of aberrant DNA secondary structures, which in turn present a barrier to DNA replication, leading to replication fork stalling, collapse, HR and subsequent recombination-mediated telomere synthesis in ALT cancers. PMID:26143912

  10. A contradictory phenomenon of deshelving pulses in a dilute medium used for lengthened photon storage time.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byoung S

    2010-08-16

    Lengthening of photon storage time has been an important issue in quantum memories for long distance quantum communications utilizing quantum repeaters. Atom population transfer into an auxiliary spin state has been adapted to increase photon storage time of photon echoes. In this population transfer process phase shift to the collective atoms is inevitable, where the phase recovery condition must be multiple of 2pi to satisfy rephasing mechanism. Recent adaptation of the population transfer method to atomic frequency comb (AFC) echoes [Afzelius et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 040503 (2010)], where the population transfer method is originated in a controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening technique [Moiseev and Kroll, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 173601 (2001)], however, shows contradictory phenomenon violating the phase recovery condition. This contradiction in AFC is reviewed as a general case of optical locking applied to a dilute medium for an optical depth-dependent coherence leakage resulting in partial retrieval efficiency. PMID:20721162

  11. Group velocity and pulse lengthening of mismatched laser pulses in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-07

    Analytic solutions are presented to the non-paraxial wave equation describing an ultra-short, low-power, laser pulse propagating in aplasma channel. Expressions for the laser pulse centroid motion and laser group velocity are derived, valid for matched and mismatchedpropagation in a parabolic plasma channel, as well as in vacuum, for an arbitrary Laguerre-Gaussian laser mode. The group velocity of amismatched laser pulse, for which the laser spot size is strongly oscillating, is found to be independent of propagation distance andsignificantly less than that of a matched pulse. Laser pulse lengthening of a mismatched pulse owing to laser mode slippage isexamined and found to dominate over that due to dispersive pulse spreading for sufficiently long pulses. Analytic results are shown tobe in excellent agreement with numerical solutions of the full Maxwell equations coupled to the plasma response. Implications for plasmachannel diagnostics are discussed.

  12. Suppression of the alternative lengthening of telomere pathway by the chromatin remodelling factor ATRX

    PubMed Central

    Clynes, David; Jelinska, Clare; Xella, Barbara; Ayyub, Helena; Scott, Caroline; Mitson, Matthew; Taylor, Stephen; Higgs, Douglas R.; Gibbons, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen per cent of cancers maintain telomere length independently of telomerase by the homologous recombination (HR)-associated alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway. A unifying feature of these tumours are mutations in ATRX. Here we show that expression of ectopic ATRX triggers a suppression of the pathway and telomere shortening. Importantly ATRX-mediated ALT suppression is dependent on the histone chaperone DAXX. Re-expression of ATRX is associated with a reduction in replication fork stalling, a known trigger for HR and loss of MRN from telomeres. A G-quadruplex stabilizer partially reverses the effect of ATRX, inferring ATRX may normally facilitate replication through these sequences that, if they persist, promote ALT. We propose that defective telomere chromatinization through loss of ATRX promotes the persistence of aberrant DNA secondary structures, which in turn present a barrier to DNA replication, leading to replication fork stalling, collapse, HR and subsequent recombination-mediated telomere synthesis in ALT cancers. PMID:26143912

  13. Distraction lengthening following growth cessation due to thumb replantation in a child.

    PubMed

    Hallock, G G

    1996-12-01

    Growth disturbance due to premature physeal closure as a sequela of digit replantation, on occasion, can cause shortening, resulting in suboptimal function. A simple method for correction using only local tissues is possible via gradual bony distraction. This was attempted in a toddler, whose dominant thumb was amputated by a riding lawn mower when he was an infant, because replantation caused significant growth cessation. The first metacarpal distraction over 64 days netted 22 mm of lengthening. Because a further immobilization period to allow spontaneous consolidation by neo-osteogenesis was aborted at the family's insistence, a fibular autograft of that dimension was inserted into the created bony gap. Ultimately, after 24 months of follow-up, the distracted thumb had been increased 26% in length and was 88% of the length of the contralateral thumb at that time, compared to only 74% prior to initiating the distraction. PMID:8988775

  14. Retrospective case series of the imaging findings of facial nerve hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yunlong; Jin, Yanfang; Yang, Bentao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Jiandong; Wang, Zhenchang

    2015-09-01

    The aim was to compare high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and thin-section magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of facial nerve hemangioma. The HRCT and MRI characteristics of 17 facial nerve hemangiomas diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients included in the study suffered from a space-occupying lesion of soft tissues at the geniculate ganglion fossa. Affected nerve was compared for size and shape with the contralateral unaffected nerve. HRCT showed irregular expansion and broadening of the facial nerve canal, damage of the bone wall and destruction of adjacent bone, with "point"-like or "needle"-like calcifications in 14 cases. The average CT value was 320.9 ± 141.8 Hu. Fourteen patients had a widened labyrinthine segment; 6/17 had a tympanic segment widening; 2/17 had a greater superficial petrosal nerve canal involvement, and 2/17 had an affected internal auditory canal (IAC) segment. On MRI, all lesions were significantly enhanced due to high blood supply. Using 2D FSE T2WI, the lesion detection rate was 82.4 % (14/17). 3D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D FIESTA) revealed the lesions in all patients. HRCT showed that the average number of involved segments in the facial nerve canal was 2.41, while MRI revealed an average of 2.70 segments (P < 0.05). HRCT and MR findings of facial nerve hemangioma were typical, revealing irregular masses growing along the facial nerve canal, with calcifications and rich blood supply. Thin-section enhanced MRI was more accurate in lesion detection and assessment compared with HRCT. PMID:25108340

  15. Facial morphology and obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Capistrano, Anderson; Cordeiro, Aldir; Capelozza, Leopoldino; Almeida, Veridiana Correia; Silva, Priscila Izabela de Castro e; Martinez, Sandra; de Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at assessing the relationship between facial morphological patterns (I, II, III, Long Face and Short Face) as well as facial types (brachyfacial, mesofacial and dolichofacial) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients attending a center specialized in sleep disorders. Methods: Frontal, lateral and smile photographs of 252 patients (157 men and 95 women), randomly selected from a polysomnography clinic, with mean age of 40.62 years, were evaluated. In order to obtain diagnosis of facial morphology, the sample was sent to three professors of Orthodontics trained to classify patients' face according to five patterns, as follows: 1) Pattern I; 2) Pattern II; 3) Pattern III; 4) Long facial pattern; 5) Short facial pattern. Intraexaminer agreement was assessed by means of Kappa index. The professors ranked patients' facial type based on a facial index that considers the proportion between facial width and height. Results: The multiple linear regression model evinced that, when compared to Pattern I, Pattern II had the apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) worsened in 6.98 episodes. However, when Pattern II was compared to Pattern III patients, the index for the latter was 11.45 episodes lower. As for the facial type, brachyfacial patients had a mean AHI of 22.34, while dolichofacial patients had a significantly statistical lower index of 10.52. Conclusion: Patients' facial morphology influences OSA. Pattern II and brachyfacial patients had greater AHI, while Pattern III patients showed a lower index. PMID:26691971

  16. Facial expression at retrieval affects recognition of facial identity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenfeng; Liu, Chang Hong; Li, Huiyun; Tong, Ke; Ren, Naixin; Fu, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that memory can be modulated by emotional stimuli at the time of encoding and consolidation. For example, happy faces create better identity recognition than faces with certain other expressions. However, the influence of facial expression at the time of retrieval remains unknown in the literature. To separate the potential influence of expression at retrieval from its effects at earlier stages, we had participants learn neutral faces but manipulated facial expression at the time of memory retrieval in a standard old/new recognition task. The results showed a clear effect of facial expression, where happy test faces were identified more successfully than angry test faces. This effect is unlikely due to greater image similarity between the neural training face and the happy test face, because image analysis showed that the happy test faces are in fact less similar to the neutral training faces relative to the angry test faces. In the second experiment, we investigated whether this emotional effect is affected by the expression at the time of learning. We employed angry or happy faces as learning stimuli, and angry, happy, and neutral faces as test stimuli. The results showed that the emotional effect at retrieval is robust across different encoding conditions with happy or angry expressions. These findings indicate that emotional expressions do not only affect the stages of encoding and consolidation, but also the retrieval process in identity recognition. PMID:26106355

  17. Evaluation of craniofacial surgery in the treatment of facial deformities.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J E; Swanson, L T; Strand, R D; Hricko, G M

    1975-01-01

    Surgical access to the cranial, orbital, and facial areas, as developed by Tessier, has produced not only definitive repair of previously uncorrectable congenital deformities such as orbital hypertelorism and facial stenosis (e.g., Crouzon's, Apert's syndromes) but also has improved markedly the treatment of traumatic and neoplastic defects. The surgical approach allows complete dissection of facial soft tisses including the orbits from the underlying bones followed by corrective osteotomies and fixation. Mobilization of the frontal lobes through a frontal bone flap exposure may be required. The ramifications of this latest intrusion by surgeons into a previously inviolate anatomic area have involved neurosurgeons, ophthalmologists, anesthesiologists, and dental and psycho-social disciplines. The disciplines of genetics and embryology are being influenced by this new field of surgery, much as the study of immunology was influenced by transplantation surgery two decades ago. This report analyzes a 10 year experience with over 100 patients with emphasis on patient selection by disease, age, intellectual status, morbidity, complications, and the psycho-social reactions of patient and family. Procedures initially planned to correct dental and aesthetic defects are proving beneficial for other functions including hearing, taste and smell, articulation and tongue movement, respiratory function, vision, and possibly bone growth. The development of self image, a normal process always in operation, is also strikingly altered. These operations may last as long as 14 to 16 hours. We have had no deaths or postoperative blindness. One postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak was successfully repaired. Three partial losses of bone grafts and four instances of late cellulitis have occurred. Prevention of infection seems related to avoidance of dead spaces and primary closure of all mucosal, dural, conjunctival and skin surfaces. Images Figs. 1 a and b. Fig. 1c., Fig. 1d. Fig. 1f. Fig. 1g. Fig. 1h. Fig. 1i. Fig. 1m. Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b., Fig. 2c., Fig. 2d. Fig. 2e. Figs. 3 a and b. Fig. 3d., Fig. 3e. Fig. 3f. Fig. 4a., Fig. 4b. Fig. 5a. Fig. 5b., Fig. 5c. Figs. 5d and e. Fig. 5f. Figs. 5g. and 5h. Fig. 6a., Fig. 6b. Fig. 6c. Fig. 7a. Fig. 7b. Figs. 7e and f. Fig. 8a. Fig. 8b. Fig. 8c. Fig. 8d., Fig. 8e. Fig. 9a. Fig. 9b. Figs. 9c. and d. Fig. 9e. Fig. 9f. Figs. 9g. and h. Figs. 11a, b, and c. Figs. 11d, e, f. PMID:169753

  18. Repeatability of Corticospinal and Spinal Measures during Lengthening and Shortening Contractions in the Human Tibialis Anterior Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tallent, Jamie; Goodall, Stuart; Hortobágyi, Tibor; St Clair Gibson, Alan; French, Duncan N.; Howatson, Glyn

    2012-01-01

    Elements of the human central nervous system (CNS) constantly oscillate. In addition, there are also methodological factors and changes in muscle mechanics during dynamic muscle contractions that threaten the stability and consistency of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and perpherial nerve stimulation (PNS) measures. Purpose To determine the repeatability of TMS and PNS measures during lengthening and shortening muscle actions in the intact human tibialis anterior. Methods On three consecutive days, 20 males performed lengthening and shortening muscle actions at 15, 25, 50 and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The amplitude of the Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs) produced by TMS was measured at rest and during muscle contraction at 90° of ankle joint position. MEPs were normalised to Mmax determined with PNS. The corticospinal silent period was recorded at 80% MVC. Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) at 10% isometric and 25% shortening and lengthening MVCs, and V-waves during MVCs were also evoked on each of the three days. Results With the exception of MEPs evoked at 80% shortening MVC, all TMS-derived measures showed good reliability (ICC?=?0.81–0.94) from days 2 to 3. Confidence intervals (CI, 95%) were lower between days 2 and 3 when compared to days 1 and 2. MEPs significantly increased at rest from days 1 to 2 (P?=?0.016) and days 1 to 3 (P?=?0.046). The H-reflex during dynamic muscle contraction was reliable across the three days (ICC?=?0.76–0.84). V-waves (shortening, ICC?=?0.77, lengthening ICC?=?0.54) and the H-reflex at 10% isometric MVC (ICC?=?0.66) was generally less reliable over the three days. Conclusion Although it is well known that measures of the intact human CNS exhibit moment-to-moment fluctuations, careful experimental arrangements make it possible to obtain consistent and repeatable measurements of corticospinal and spinal excitability in the actively lengthening and shortening human TA muscle. PMID:22563418

  19. Visual processing of facial affect.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephen; Thoma, Robert J; Lanoue, Marianna D; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy; Edgar, Christopher; Huang, Minxiong; Weisend, Michael P; Irwin, Jessica; Paulson, Kim; Cañive, José M

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the role of the fusiform gyrus in identifying and processing facial emotional expression in humans, MEG data were collected while six healthy subjects judged whether photographs of faces displayed emotion (happiness or disgust) compared to neutral faces and equiluminant scrambled faces. For all six subjects, a magnetic source localizing to right fusiform gyrus was evident approximately 150 ms following presentation of face stimuli, but not following non-face stimuli. MEG source strength for this component was greatest for happy, intermediate for disgust, and lowest for neutral facial expressions, suggesting that activity in fusiform gyrus is sensitive to both face-specific stimuli and to the affective content of the face. These findings are considered in the context of a specialized neural face-dependent information system. PMID:14534432

  20. Treatments for unwanted facial hair.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, J; Lui, H

    Twenty-two percent of women in North America have unwanted facial hair, which can cause embarrassment and result in a significant emotional burden. Treatment options include plucking, waxing (including the sugar forms), depilatories, bleaching, shaving, electrolysis, laser, intense pulsed light (IPL), and eflornithine 13.9% cream (Vaniqa, Barrier Therapeutics in Canada and Shire Pharmaceuticals elsewhere). Eflornithine 13.9% cream is a topical treatment that does not remove the hairs, but acts to reduce the rate of growth and appears to be effective for unwanted facial hair on the mustache and chin area. Eflornithine 13.9% cream can be used in combination with other treatments such as lasers and IPL to give the patient the best chance for successful hair removal. PMID:16408139

  1. [Facial paralysis surgery. Current concepts].

    PubMed

    Robla-Costales, David; Robla-Costales, Javier; Socolovsky, Mariano; di Masi, Gilda; Fernández, Javier; Campero, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Facial palsy is a relatively common condition, from which most cases recover spontaneously. However, each year, there are 127,000 new cases of irreversible facial paralysis. This condition causes aesthetic, functional and psychologically devastating effects in the patients who suffer it. Various reconstructive techniques have been described, but there is no consensus regarding their indication. While these techniques provide results that are not perfect, many of them give a very good aesthetic and functional result, promoting the psychological, social and labour reintegration of these patients. The aim of this article is to describe the indications for which each technique is used, their results and the ideal time when each one should be applied. PMID:25498528

  2. Molecular control of facial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B.; Rooker, S.M.; Helms, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a developmental perspective on the concept of phylotypic and phenotypic stages of craniofacial development. Within Orders of avians and mammals, a phylotypic period exists when the morphology of the facial prominences is minimally divergent. We postulate that species-specific facial variations arise as a result of subtle shifts in the timing and the duration of molecular pathway activity (e.g., heterochrony), and present evidence demonstrating a critical role for Wnt and FGF signaling in this process. The same molecular pathways that shape the vertebrate face are also implicated in craniofacial deformities, indicating that comparisons between and among animal species may represent a novel method for the identification of human craniofacial disease genes. PMID:19747977

  3. Reconstruction of bony facial contour deficiencies with polymethylmethacrylate implants: case report

    PubMed Central

    ABDO FILHO, Ruy C. C.; OLIVEIRA, Thais M.; LOURENÇO, Natalino; GURGEL, Carla; ABDO, Ruy C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Facial trauma can be considered one of the most serious aggressions found in the medical centers due to the emotional consequences and the possibility of deformity. In craniofacial surgery, the use of autologous bone is still the first choice for reconstructing bony defects or irregularities. When there is a shortage of donor bone or a patient refuses an intracranial operation, alloplastic materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) can be used. The PMMA prosthesis can be pre-fabricated, bringing advantages such as reduction of surgical time, easy technical handling and good esthetic results. This paper describes the procedures for rehabilitating a patient with PMMA implants in the region of the face, recovering the facial contours and esthetics of the patient. PMID:21952926

  4. Early development of the neural plate, neural crest and facial region of marsupials

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, KATHLEEN K.

    2001-01-01

    Marsupial mammals have a distinctive reproductive strategy. The young are born after an exceptionally short period of organogenesis and are consequently extremely altricial. Yet because they must be functionally independent in an essentially embryonic condition, the marsupial neonate exhibits a unique suite of adaptations. In particular, certain bones of the facial region, most cranial musculature and a few additional structures are accelerated in their development. In contrast, central nervous system structures, especially the forebrain, are markedly premature at birth, resembling an embryonic d 11 or 12 mouse. This review examines the developmental processes that are modified to produce these evolutionary changes. The focus is on the early development of the neural plate, neural crest and facial region in the marsupial, Monodelphis domestica, compared with patterns reported for rodents. Neural crest begins differentiation and migration at the neural plate stage, which results in large accumulations of neural crest in the facial region at an early stage of development. The early accumulation of neural crest provides the material for the accelerated development of oral and facial structures. The first arch region is massive in the early embryo, and the development of the olfactory placode and frontonasal region is advanced relative to the forebrain region. The development of the forebrain is delayed in marsupials relative to the hindbrain or facial region. These observations illustrate how development may be modified to produce evolutionary changes that distinguish taxa. Further, they suggest that development is not necessarily highly conserved, but instead may be quite plastic. PMID:11523813

  5. Finite-Element Analysis of Biting Behavior and Bone Stress in the

    E-print Network

    Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    Finite-Element Analysis of Biting Behavior and Bone Stress in the Facial Skeletons of Bats biting behavior and bite force data gathered in the field with finite-element (FE) analysis. Our FE from meat and bone to plankton. This di- versity is clearly reflected in the morphology of the cranio

  6. Amniotic membrane covering for facial nerve repair?

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Murat; Tuncel, Arzu; Sheidaei, Shahrouz; ?enol, Mehmet Güney; Karabulut, Murat Hakan; Deveci, Ildem; Karaman, Nihan

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic membranes have been widely used in ophthalmology and skin injury repair because of their anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we measured therapeutic efficacy and determined if amniotic membranes could be used for facial nerve repair. The facial nerves of eight rats were dissected and end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Amniotic membranes were covered on the anastomosis sites in four rats. Electromyography results showed that, at the end of the 3rd and 8th weeks after amniotic membrane covering, the latency values of the facial nerves covered by amniotic membranes were significantly shortened and the amplitude values were significantly increased. Compared with simple facial nerve anastomosis, after histopathological examination, facial nerve anastomosed with amniotic membrane showed better continuity, milder inflammatory reactions, and more satisfactory nerve conduction. These findings suggest that amniotic membrane covering has great potential in facial nerve repair. PMID:25206390

  7. Removal of unwanted facial hair.

    PubMed

    Shenenberger, Donald W; Utecht, Lynn M

    2002-11-15

    Unwanted facial hair is a common problem that is seldom discussed in the primary care setting. Although men occasionally request removal of unwanted facial hair, women most often seek help with this condition. Physicians generally neglect to address the problem if the patient does not first request help. The condition may be caused by androgen overproduction, increased sensitivity to circulating androgens, or other metabolic and endocrine disorders, and should be properly evaluated. Options for hair removal vary in efficacy, degree of discomfort, and cost. Clinical studies on the efficacy of many therapies are lacking. Short of surgical removal of the hair follicle, the only permanent treatment is electrolysis. However, the practice of electrolysis lacks standardization, and regulation of the procedure varies from state to state. Shaving, epilation, and depilation are the most commonly attempted initial options for facial hair removal. Although these methods are less expensive, they are only temporary. Laser hair removal, although better studied than most methods and more strictly regulated, has yet to be proved permanent in all patients. Eflornithine, a topical treatment, is simple to apply and has minimal side effects. By the time most patients consult a physician, they have tried several methods of hair removal. Family physicians can properly educate patients and recommend treatment for this common condition if they are armed with basic knowledge about the treatment options. PMID:12469966

  8. Analysis of Facial Expression by Taste Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobitani, Kensuke; Kato, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    In this study, we focused on the basic taste stimulation for the analysis of real facial expressions. We considered that the expressions caused by taste stimulation were unaffected by individuality or emotion, that is, such expressions were involuntary. We analyzed the movement of facial muscles by taste stimulation and compared real expressions with artificial expressions. From the result, we identified an obvious difference between real and artificial expressions. Thus, our method would be a new approach for facial expression recognition.

  9. Neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements

    PubMed Central

    Krippl, Martin; Karim, Ahmed A.; Brechmann, André

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the somatotopy of finger movements has been extensively studied with neuroimaging, the neural foundations of facial movements remain elusive. Therefore, we systematically studied the neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al., 2002). The facial movements performed in the MRI scanner were defined as Action Units (AUs) and were controlled by a certified FACS coder. The main goal of the study was to investigate the detailed somatotopy of the facial primary motor area (facial M1). Eighteen participants were asked to produce the following four facial movements in the fMRI scanner: AU1+2 (brow raiser), AU4 (brow lowerer), AU12 (lip corner puller) and AU24 (lip presser), each in alternation with a resting phase. Our facial movement task induced generally high activation in brain motor areas (e.g., M1, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, putamen), as well as in the thalamus, insula, and visual cortex. BOLD activations revealed overlapping representations for the four facial movements. However, within the activated facial M1 areas, we could find distinct peak activities in the left and right hemisphere supporting a rough somatotopic upper to lower face organization within the right facial M1 area, and a somatotopic organization within the right M1 upper face part. In both hemispheres, the order was an inverse somatotopy within the lower face representations. In contrast to the right hemisphere, in the left hemisphere the representation of AU4 was more lateral and anterior compared to the rest of the facial movements. Our findings support the notion of a partial somatotopic order within the M1 face area confirming the “like attracts like” principle (Donoghue et al., 1992). AUs which are often used together or are similar are located close to each other in the motor cortex. PMID:26578940

  10. Evolution and development of facial bone morphology in threespine sticklebacks

    E-print Network

    Phillips, Patrick

    University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 Edited by David B. Wake, University of California, Berkeley, CA in the ray-finned fish. Attributes for developmental analysis motivated us to examine how OP shape and size. We find that when Alaskan anadromous fish take up permanent residence in lakes, they evolve smaller

  11. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. 874...NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis. (a) Identification. A mandibular implant facial prosthesis is a...

  12. 3D Facial Performance Capture From A Single RGBD Camera 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yen-Lin

    2013-05-28

    Realistic facial animation remains one of the most challenging problems in computer graphics, where facial performance capture of real people has been a key component. The current state-of-the-art technologies used to capture facial performances...

  13. The Relationships between Processing Facial Identity, Emotional Expression, Facial Speech, and Gaze Direction during Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Sibylle M.; Schwarzer, Gudrun; Korell, Monika; Maier-Karius, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with 5- to 11-year-olds and adults to investigate whether facial identity, facial speech, emotional expression, and gaze direction are processed independently of or in interaction with one another. In a computer-based, speeded sorting task, participants sorted faces according to facial identity while disregarding…

  14. Fat harvesting techniques for facial fat transfer.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel M; Glasgold, Robert A; Glasgold, Mark J

    2010-10-01

    Fat grafting has become popular as a stand-alone technique or as part of a combined procedure for facial rejuvenation, as volume restoration has increasingly become recognized as an important component in overall facial aging. Many facial plastic surgeons who are experienced in operating only in the head and neck region are unaccustomed to working elsewhere in the body. Accordingly, this article sets out to detail the specific technique for safe and effective lipoharvesting for facial fat transfer. In addition, site-specific considerations for the lower abdomen, inner/anterior/outer thighs, triceps, inner knee, buttock, and lower back are also discussed. PMID:20853226

  15. [Facial palsy rehabilitation: Assessment before surgery].

    PubMed

    Lamas, G; Barbut, J; Mamelle, E; Tankéré, F; Gatignol, P

    2015-10-01

    A patient who needs a surgery for facial rehabilitation must have a complete assessment. The etiology of the facial palsy must be clear. It is necessary to have a MRI of the facial nerve for the statement of the initial pathology or to search a lesion on the nerve. The facial palsy must be definite which is depending of the delay of the palsy and the etiology. An electromyography must be done. The choice of the procedure depends on the delay of the palsy, the site on the nerve, the associated diseases and the opinion of the patient after a good explanation. PMID:26254849

  16. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals with ASD remained emotionally unaffected. Thus, individuals with ASD do not experience feedback from activated facial expressions as controls do. This facial feedback-impairment enhances our understanding of the social and emotional lives of individuals with ASD. PMID:18293075

  17. [Indications for nuclear magnetic resonance tomography in tumors of the facial skeleton and neck area].

    PubMed

    Mödder, U; Steinbrich, W; Heindel, W; Lindemann, J; Brusis, T

    1985-06-01

    The diagnostic value of magnetic resonance tomography is examined in relation to computed tomography on the basis of 32 patients subjected to magnetic resonance tomography who had pathological processes in the craniofacial, parapharyngeal and neck regions. The high power of contrast resolution, multiplanar imaging, and good circumscription of cervical vessels, offer advantages over computed tomography in respect of space-occupying growths in the median and lower parts of the craniofacial skull. A disadvantage is the poorer detectability of tumour-conditioned bone destruction at the base of the skull and at the facial bones; in such cases, computed tomography remains the method of choice. PMID:4017436

  18. Bone Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  19. Bone tumor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bone metastases. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, et al., eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology . 5th ed. ... aggressive tumors of bone. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  20. Bone Markers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  1. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  2. Gunshot injuries to the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Moore, P L; Selby, G; Irving, R M

    2003-01-01

    The current incidence of missile injury to the temporal bone (MITB) is very low in the United Kingdom. However, the increasing frequency of firearm violence in Britain suggests a greater risk of occurrence. This, along with the devastating potential sequelae of MITB (facial palsy, dead ear, intracranial damage, major vascular injury and cosmetic disfigurement), requires otolaryngologists to be conversant with all aspects of their management. The risk of major complications is much higher with MITB than with temporal bone injury following blunt trauma, and surgical management is, therefore, much more common. We present one such case, and review the literature outlining the pathogenesis, clinical features, and recommended management. PMID:12590862

  3. Stem Cells in Teeth and Craniofacial Bones.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Chai, Y

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells are remarkable, and stem cell-based tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical science aiming to restore damaged tissue or organs. In dentistry and reconstructive facial surgery, it is of great interest to restore lost teeth or craniofacial bone defects using stem cell-mediated therapy. In the craniofacial region, various stem cell populations have been identified with regeneration potential. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge concerning the various types of tooth- and craniofacial bone-related stem cells and discuss their in vivo identities and regulating mechanisms. PMID:26350960

  4. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres: Recurrent Cytogenetic Aberrations and Chromosome Stability under Extreme Telomere Dysfunction12

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Despoina; Chiourea, Maria; Raftopoulou, Christina; Gagos, Sarantis

    2013-01-01

    Human tumors using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) exert high rates of telomere dysfunction. Numerical chromosomal aberrations are very frequent, and structural rearrangements are widely scattered among the genome. This challenging context allows the study of telomere dysfunction-driven chromosomal instability in neoplasia (CIN) in a massive scale. We used molecular cytogenetics to achieve detailed karyotyping in 10 human ALT neoplastic cell lines. We identified 518 clonal recombinant chromosomes affected by 649 structural rearrangements. While all human chromosomes were involved in random or clonal, terminal, or pericentromeric rearrangements and were capable to undergo telomere healing at broken ends, a differential recombinatorial propensity of specific genomic regions was noted. We show that ALT cells undergo epigenetic modifications rendering polycentric chromosomes functionally monocentric, and because of increased terminal recombinogenicity, they generate clonal recombinant chromosomes with interstitial telomeric repeats. Losses of chromosomes 13, X, and 22, gains of 2, 3, 5, and 20, and translocation/deletion events involving several common chromosomal fragile sites (CFSs) were recurrent. Long-term reconstitution of telomerase activity in ALT cells reduced significantly the rates of random ongoing telomeric and pericentromeric CIN. However, the contribution of CFS in overall CIN remained unaffected, suggesting that in ALT cells whole-genome replication stress is not suppressed by telomerase activation. Our results provide novel insights into ALT-driven CIN, unveiling in parallel specific genomic sites that may harbor genes critical for ALT cancerous cell growth. PMID:24339742

  5. Duration of xylogenesis in black spruce lengthened between 1950 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Boulouf Lugo, Jacqueline; Deslauriers, Annie; Rossi, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Reconstructions have identified the 20th century as being uniquely warm in the last 1000 years. Changes in the phenology of primary meristems converged toward increases in length of the growing season. Has the phenology of secondary meristem changed during the last century, and to what extent? Methods Timings of wood formation in black spruce, Picea mariana, were monitored for 9 years on a weekly timescale at four sites in the boreal forest of Quebec, Canada. Models for assessing xylem phenology were defined and applied to reconstruct onset, ending and duration of xylogenesis between 1950 and 2010 using thermal thresholds on chronologies of maximum and minimum temperatures. Key Results All sites exhibited increasing trends of both annual and May–September temperatures, with the greatest changes observed at the higher latitudes. Phenological events in spring were more affected than those occurring in autumn, with cambial resumptions occurring 0·5–0·8 d decade?1 earlier. The duration of xylogenesis has lengthened significantly since 1950, although the models supplied wide ranges of variations, between 0·07 and 1·5 d decade?1, respectively. Conclusions The estimated changes in past cambial phenology demonstrated the marked effects of the recent increase in temperature on the phenological traits of secondary meristems. In the long run, the advancement of cambial activity could modify the short time window for growth of boreal species and dramatically affect the dynamics and productivity of trees in these temperature-limited ecosystems. PMID:23041380

  6. Selective percutaneous myofascial lengthening of the lower extremities in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Skouteli, Helen; Vrettos, Stamatios G; Tzanos, George; Kanellopoulos, Anastasios D; Korres, Demetrios S; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2010-04-01

    Children with spastic cerebral palsy commonly acquire lower extremity musculoskeletal deformities that at some point may need surgical correction. The authors present 58 children with spastic cerebral palsy who underwent selective percutaneous myofascial lengthening of the hip adductor group and the medial or the lateral hamstrings. All the patients were spastic diplegic, hemiplegic, or quadriplegic. The indications for surgery were a primary contracture that interfered with the patients' walking or sitting ability or joint subluxation. Gross motor ability and gross motor function of the children were evaluated using the gross motor function classification system (GMFCS) and the gross motor function measure (GMFM), respectively. The mean time of the surgical procedure was 14 minutes (range, 1 to 27 minutes). All patients were discharged from the hospital setting the same day after the operation. There were no infections, overlengthening, nerve palsies, or vascular complications. Three patients required repeat procedures for relapsed hamstring and adductor contractures at 8, 14, and 16 months postoperatively. At 2 years after the initial operation, all the children improved on their previous functional level; 34 children improved by one GMFCS level, and 5 children improved by two GMFCS levels. The overall improvement in mean GMFM scores was from 71.19 to 83.19. PMID:20470962

  7. The alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway may operate in non-neoplastic human cells.

    PubMed

    Slatter, Tania L; Tan, Xin; Yuen, Yi Ching; Gunningham, Sarah; Ma, Sally Siyan; Daly, Erin; Packer, Stephen; Devenish, Celia; Royds, Janice A; Hung, Noelyn A

    2012-02-01

    The alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism represents an alternative to the enzyme telomerase in the maintenance of mammalian telomeres in 25-60% of sarcomas and a minority of carcinomas (about 5-15%). ALT-positive cells are distinguished by long and heterogeneous telomere length distributions by terminal restriction fragment (TRF) Southern blotting. Another diagnostic marker of ALT is discrete nuclear co-localized signals of telomeric DNA and the promyelocytic leukaemia protein (PML), referred to as ALT-associated PML bodies (APBs). Recently, we detected smaller sized co-localized PML and telomere DNA (APB-like) bodies in endothelial cells adjacent to astrocytoma tumour cells in situ. In this study, we examined a wide variety of non-neoplastic tissues, and report that co-localized signals of PML and telomere DNA are present in endothelial, stromal, and some epithelial cells. Co-localized signals of PML and telomere DNA showed an increased frequency in non-neoplastic cells with DNA damage. These results suggest that a mechanism similar to that in ALT-positive tumours also operates in non-neoplastic cells, which may be activated by DNA damage. PMID:22250043

  8. Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron unwind negatively supercoiled DNA and lengthen linear DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Verebová, Valéria; Adamcik, Jozef; Danko, Patrik; Podhradský, Dušan; Miškovský, Pavol; Stani?ová, Jana

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron unwind negatively supercoiled DNA. • Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron lengthen linear DNA. • Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron possess middle binding affinity to DNA. • Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron interact with DNA by intercalating mode. - Abstract: The intercalating drugs possess a planar aromatic chromophore unit by which they insert between DNA bases causing the distortion of classical B-DNA form. The planar tricyclic structure of anthraquinones belongs to the group of chromophore units and enables anthraquinones to bind to DNA by intercalating mode. The interactions of simple derivatives of anthraquinone, quinizarin (1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone) and danthron (1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone), with negatively supercoiled and linear DNA were investigated using a combination of the electrophoretic methods, fluorescence spectrophotometry and single molecule technique an atomic force microscopy. The detection of the topological change of negatively supercoiled plasmid DNA, unwinding of negatively supercoiled DNA, corresponding to appearance of DNA topoisomers with the low superhelicity and an increase of the contour length of linear DNA in the presence of quinizarin and danthron indicate the binding of both anthraquinones to DNA by intercalating mode.

  9. Most of the G1 period in hamster cells is eliminated by lengthening the S period.

    PubMed Central

    Stancel, G M; Prescott, D M; Liskay, R M

    1981-01-01

    Two Chinese hamster cell lines, G1+-1 and CHO, have been grown in the presence of low concentrations of hydroxyurea to determine how a slowing DNA synthesis (i.e., a lengthening of the S period) affects the length of the G1 period. Hydroxyurea concentrations of approximately 10 microM do not alter the generation times of these cell lines but do cause increases in S with corresponding decreases in G1. In both cell lines, 10 microM hydroxyurea reduces G1 to an absolute value of 1 hr, which represents decreases of 70% (G1+-1) and 60% (CHO) from control values. Higher concentrations of hydroxyurea increase the generation times and lengths of S for both cell lines but do not reduce G1 below the minimum value of 1 hr. These observations indicate that the majority of G1 is expendable and most of G1 therefore cannot contain specific events required for the initiation of DNA synthesis. This result supports the hypothesis that G1 is a portion of the cell growth cycle but not of the chromosome cycle. PMID:6947230

  10. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres is characterized by reduced compaction of telomeric chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Episkopou, Harikleia; Draskovic, Irena; Van Beneden, Amandine; Tilman, Gaëlle; Mattiussi, Marina; Gobin, Matthieu; Arnoult, Nausica; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Decottignies, Anabelle

    2014-01-01

    Proper telomeric chromatin configuration is thought to be essential for telomere homeostasis and stability. Previous studies in mouse suggested that loss of heterochromatin marks at telomeres might favor onset of Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway, by promoting homologous recombination. However, analysis of chromatin status at human ALT telomeres has never been reported. Here, using isogenic human cell lines and cellular hybrids, which rely either on telomerase or ALT to maintain telomeres, we show that chromatin compaction is reduced at ALT telomeres and this is associated with a global decrease in telomeric H3K9me3. This, subsequently, leads to upregulation of telomere transcription. Accordingly, restoration of a more condensed telomeric chromatin through telomerase-dependent elongation of short ALT telomeres reduces telomere transcription. We further show that loss of ATRX chromatin remodeler function, a frequent characteristic of ALT cells, is not sufficient to decrease chromatin condensation at telomeres nor to increase the expression of telomeric RNA species. These results offer new insight on telomeric chromatin properties in ALT cells and support the hypothesis that telomeric chromatin decondensation is important for ALT pathway. PMID:24500201

  11. Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations:Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Research

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, KAREN L.; COHN, JEFFREY F.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of the face in social interaction and social intelligence is widely recognized in anthropology. Yet the adaptive functions of human facial expression remain largely unknown. An evolutionary model of human facial expression as behavioral adaptation can be constructed, given the current knowledge of the phenotypic variation, ecological contexts, and fitness consequences of facial behavior. Studies of facial expression are available, but results are not typically framed in an evolutionary perspective. This review identifies the relevant physical phenomena of facial expression and integrates the study of this behavior with the anthropological study of communication and sociality in general. Anthropological issues with relevance to the evolutionary study of facial expression include: facial expressions as coordinated, stereotyped behavioral phenotypes, the unique contexts and functions of different facial expressions, the relationship of facial expression to speech, the value of facial expressions as signals, and the relationship of facial expression to social intelligence in humans and in nonhuman primates. Human smiling is used as an example of adaptation, and testable hypotheses concerning the human smile, as well as other expressions, are proposed. PMID:11786989

  12. Brain Systems for Assessing Facial Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Joel S.; O'Doherty, John; Kilner, James M.; Perrett, David I.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    Attractiveness is a facial attribute that shapes human affiliative behaviours. In a previous study we reported a linear response to facial attractiveness in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a region involved in reward processing. There are strong theoretical grounds for the hypothesis that coding stimulus reward value also involves the amygdala. The…

  13. Facial mimicry in its social setting

    PubMed Central

    Seibt, Beate; Mühlberger, Andreas; Likowski, Katja U.; Weyers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In interpersonal encounters, individuals often exhibit changes in their own facial expressions in response to emotional expressions of another person. Such changes are often called facial mimicry. While this tendency first appeared to be an automatic tendency of the perceiver to show the same emotional expression as the sender, evidence is now accumulating that situation, person, and relationship jointly determine whether and for which emotions such congruent facial behavior is shown. We review the evidence regarding the moderating influence of such factors on facial mimicry with a focus on understanding the meaning of facial responses to emotional expressions in a particular constellation. From this, we derive recommendations for a research agenda with a stronger focus on the most common forms of encounters, actual interactions with known others, and on assessing potential mediators of facial mimicry. We conclude that facial mimicry is modulated by many factors: attention deployment and sensitivity, detection of valence, emotional feelings, and social motivations. We posit that these are the more proximal causes of changes in facial mimicry due to changes in its social setting. PMID:26321970

  14. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stel, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals…

  15. The Ku subunit of telomerase binds Sir4 to recruit telomerase to lengthen telomeres in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hass, Evan P; Zappulla, David C

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in humans, the telomerase RNA subunit is bound by Ku, a ring-shaped protein heterodimer best known for its function in DNA repair. Ku binding to yeast telomerase RNA promotes telomere lengthening and telomerase recruitment to telomeres, but how this is achieved remains unknown. Using telomere-length analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show that Sir4 - a previously identified Ku-binding protein that is a component of telomeric silent chromatin - is required for Ku-mediated telomere lengthening and telomerase recruitment. We also find that specifically tethering Sir4 directly to Ku-binding-defective telomerase RNA restores otherwise-shortened telomeres to wild-type length. These findings suggest that Sir4 is the telomere-bound target of Ku-mediated telomerase recruitment and provide one mechanism for how the Sir4-competing Rif1 and Rif2 proteins negatively regulate telomere length in yeast. PMID:26218225

  16. How Does Facial Feedback Modulate Emotional Experience?

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joshua Ian; Senghas, Ann; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2009-01-01

    Contracting muscles involved in facial expressions (e.g. smiling or frowning) can make emotions more intense, even when unaware one is modifying expression (e.g. Strack, Martin, & Stepper, 1988). However, it is unresolved whether and how inhibiting facial expressions might weaken emotional experience. In the present study, 142 participants watched positive and negative video clips while either inhibiting their facial expressions or not. When hypothesis awareness and effects of distraction were experimentally controlled, inhibiting facial expressions weakened some emotional experiences. These findings provide new insight into ways that inhibition of facial expression can affect emotional experience: the link is not dependent on experimental demand, lay theories about connections between expression and experience, or the distraction involved in inhibiting one’s expressions. PMID:20160935

  17. Hepatitis Diagnosis Using Facial Color Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingjia; Guo, Zhenhua

    Facial color diagnosis is an important diagnostic method in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). However, due to its qualitative, subjective and experi-ence-based nature, traditional facial color diagnosis has a very limited application in clinical medicine. To circumvent the subjective and qualitative problems of facial color diagnosis of Traditional Chinese Medicine, in this paper, we present a novel computer aided facial color diagnosis method (CAFCDM). The method has three parts: face Image Database, Image Preprocessing Module and Diagnosis Engine. Face Image Database is carried out on a group of 116 patients affected by 2 kinds of liver diseases and 29 healthy volunteers. The quantitative color feature is extracted from facial images by using popular digital image processing techni-ques. Then, KNN classifier is employed to model the relationship between the quantitative color feature and diseases. The results show that the method can properly identify three groups: healthy, severe hepatitis with jaundice and severe hepatitis without jaundice with accuracy higher than 73%.

  18. Facial Animations: Future Research Directions & Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Rehman, Amjad; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, computer facial animation is used in a significant multitude fields that brought human and social to study the computer games, films and interactive multimedia reality growth. Authoring the computer facial animation, complex and subtle expressions are challenging and fraught with problems. As a result, the current most authored using universal computer animation techniques often limit the production quality and quantity of facial animation. With the supplement of computer power, facial appreciative, software sophistication and new face-centric methods emerging are immature in nature. Therefore, this paper concentrates to define and managerially categorize current and emerged surveyed facial animation experts to define the recent state of the field, observed bottlenecks and developing techniques. This paper further presents a real-time simulation model of human worry and howling with detail discussion about their astonish, sorrow, annoyance and panic perception.

  19. Lengthening the time intervals between doses of biological agents in psoriatic arthritis patients: A single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; de Hooge, Manouk; Frallonardo, Paola; Piccoli, Antonio; Cozzi, Franco; Oliviero, Francesca; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2015-12-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha therapy has changed the course of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but clinical experience about lengthening of time intervals between drug administrations is still limited. The aims of the study were to evaluate: (1) the long-term efficacy (over a 4-year period) of etanercept/adalimumab in a subset of PsA patients who did not require switches; and (2) the progressive lengthening of time intervals between treatments in patients who achieved minimal disease activity (MDA). PsA outpatients attending the Rheumatology Clinic-University of Padova who took a single anti-TNF agent (etanercept/adalimumab) for a 4-year period were studied. Therapy efficacy was assessed using clinical, biochemical, and disease activity (DA) indexes. The intervals between treatments were empirically and progressively lengthened after MDA was reached and maintained. One hundred and forty-one patients (mean age, 51.22 ± 12.34 years; mean disease duration, 12.1 ± 8.42 years) treated with etanercept/adalimumab (47.5% and 52.5%, respectively) were studied. DA indexes showed a marked, persistent improvement in all the patients throughout 4 years. The interval between injections could be extended in 46.1% of the patients (35% for adalimumab, 58% for etanercept) without provoking relapses. The mean therapy interval at the end of the study period was 3.12 weeks for adalimumab 40 mg (with respect to 2 weeks) and 2.75 weeks for etanercept 25 mg (with respect to 0.5 weeks). The new therapy timetable also led to cost savings. In conclusion, lengthening the time intervals between injections of anti-TNF agents in PsA patients who reach MDA is safe, effective, cost-effective, and facilitates patient compliance. PMID:26384393

  20. A Study Of Facial Asymmetries By The Stereometric Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crete, N.; Deloison, Y.; Mollard, R.

    1980-07-01

    In order to determine the part played in facial dissymmetry observed on a living person by the various constitutive elements of the cephalic tip (the soft parts - skin, muscles and the underlying bone structure) we undertook, using a biostereometric method, to evaluate asymmetries between homologous right and left dimensions on a living person's face and on a skeleton. While in an individual, a marked degree of facial dissymmetry can sometimes be observed; average differences between the right and left sides of the face may nethertheless balance out, and remain slight. Conventional anthropometrics techniques do not show up such slight values. With a view to securing a higher degree of accuracy, study of the stereometric technique of measurements. Using this technique, quasi imperceptible differences between the right and the left sides of the face on a living person as well as on a skeleton, together with variations in the orientation or angulation of anatomical segments in a three-dimensional space can be measured. We were thus able to detect, in a number of dry skulls, average differences of approxi-mately a millimetre between the two sides of the face which cannot be attributed to back of accuracy in measurements. Although statistically the difference are not always significant, the para-metric values of facial dimensions are invariably greater for the left side. On the other hand, for the sample of living subjects as a whole, the differences between homologous distances are not statistically significant. But it may be that, on a living subject, the experimenter is inclined to take measurements that are susceptible of symmetrization (for instance, the nasion in the median sagittal plane) whereas on a dry skull anatomical reference marks can be determined with the utmost accuracy. It may be inferred from there results that the softer parts tend, as a rule, to correct the dissymmetry of the underlying skeleton.

  1. Columella Lengthening with a Full-Thickness Skin Graft for Secondary Bilateral Cleft Lip and Nose Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon Seok; Shin, Dong Hyeok; Choi, Hyun Gon; Kim, Jee Nam; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Soon Heum; Kim, Cheol Keun; Jo, Dong In

    2015-01-01

    Background Various techniques for lengthening short columellae have been used for bilateral cleft nose repair. However, previous methods have not yielded satisfactory results. We performed a full-thickness skin graft to lengthen short columellae during secondary cleft nose repair in adult patients. Methods Ten bilateral cleft lip and nose patients underwent secondary cheiloplasty with open rhinoplasty between July 2008 and August 2014. The patients underwent a full-thickness skin graft on the medial crura to elongate the columella. The average age of the patients at the time of surgery was 22.2 years. Nasal profiles were evaluated before and after the operation using the photogrammetric method. Results The nasal profiles were improved in all patients, and all skin grafts were well taken, with the exception of one patient. Columellar height, nostril height, and columella-lip angle increased, and nasal width decreased significantly. The ratios of columellar height to nasal height, columellar height to nasal width, and nasal height to nasal width increased to a statistically significant extent. Conclusions Columella lengthening with a full-thickness skin graft is a simple and effective method for the repair of severely short columellae in bilateral cleft nose patients. We had satisfactory outcomes, with good color matching and aesthetically pleasing contours. PMID:26618116

  2. Averaging facial expression over time

    PubMed Central

    Haberman, Jason; Harp, Tom; Whitney, David

    2010-01-01

    The visual system groups similar features, objects, and motion (e.g., Gestalt grouping). Recent work suggests that the computation underlying perceptual grouping may be one of summary statistical representation. Summary representation occurs for low-level features, such as size, motion, and position, and even for high level stimuli, including faces; for example, observers accurately perceive the average expression in a group of faces (J. Haberman & D. Whitney, 2007, 2009). The purpose of the present experiments was to characterize the time-course of this facial integration mechanism. In a series of three experiments, we measured observers’ abilities to recognize the average expression of a temporal sequence of distinct faces. Faces were presented in sets of 4, 12, or 20, at temporal frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 21.3 Hz. The results revealed that observers perceived the average expression in a temporal sequence of different faces as precisely as they perceived a single face presented repeatedly. The facial averaging was independent of temporal frequency or set size, but depended on the total duration of exposed faces, with a time constant of ~800 ms. These experiments provide evidence that the visual system is sensitive to the ensemble characteristics of complex objects presented over time. PMID:20053064

  3. Lengthened G1 phase indicates differentiation status in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Calder, Ashley; Roth-Albin, Ivana; Bhatia, Sonam; Pilquil, Carlos; Lee, Jong Hee; Bhatia, Mick; Levadoux-Martin, Marilyne; McNicol, Jamie; Russell, Jennifer; Collins, Tony; Draper, Jonathan S

    2013-01-15

    The cell cycle in pluripotent stem cells is notable for the brevity of the G1 phase, permitting rapid proliferation and reducing the duration of differentiation signal sensitivity associated with the G1 phase. Changes in the length of G1 phase are understood to accompany the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but the timing and extent of such changes are poorly defined. Understanding the early steps governing the differentiation of hESCs will facilitate better control over differentiation for regenerative medicine and drug discovery applications. Here we report the first use of real-time cell cycle reporters in hESCs. We coexpressed the chromatin-decorating H2B-GFP fusion protein and the fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI)-G1 fusion protein, a G1 phase-specific reporter, in hESCs to measure the cell cycle status in live cells. We found that FUCCI-G1 expression is weakly detected in undifferentiated hESCs, but rapidly increases upon differentiation. hESCs in the G1 phase display a reduction in undifferentiated colony-initiating cell function, underscoring the relationship between G1 phase residence and differentiation. Importantly, we demonstrate inter- and intracolony variation in response to chemicals that induce differentiation, implying extensive cell-cell variation in the threshold necessary to alter the G1 phase length. Finally, gain of differentiation markers appears to be coincident with G1 phase lengthening, with distinct G1 phase profiles associated with different markers of early hESC differentiation. Our data demonstrate the tight coupling of cell cycle changes to hESC differentiation, and highlight the cell cycle reporter system and assays we have implemented as a novel avenue for investigating pluripotency and differentiation. PMID:22827698

  4. Making Time for Nature: Visual Exposure to Natural Environments Lengthens Subjective Time Perception and Reduces Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Meredith S.; Repke, Meredith A.; Nickerson, Norma P.; Conway, Lucian G.; Odum, Amy L.; Jordan, Kerry E.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity in delay discounting is associated with maladaptive behaviors such as overeating and drug and alcohol abuse. Researchers have recently noted that delay discounting, even when measured by a brief laboratory task, may be the best predictor of human health related behaviors (e.g., exercise) currently available. Identifying techniques to decrease impulsivity in delay discounting, therefore, could help improve decision-making on a global scale. Visual exposure to natural environments is one recent approach shown to decrease impulsive decision-making in a delay discounting task, although the mechanism driving this result is currently unknown. The present experiment was thus designed to evaluate not only whether visual exposure to natural (mountains, lakes) relative to built (buildings, cities) environments resulted in less impulsivity, but also whether this exposure influenced time perception. Participants were randomly assigned to either a natural environment condition or a built environment condition. Participants viewed photographs of either natural scenes or built scenes before and during a delay discounting task in which they made choices about receiving immediate or delayed hypothetical monetary outcomes. Participants also completed an interval bisection task in which natural or built stimuli were judged as relatively longer or shorter presentation durations. Following the delay discounting and interval bisection tasks, additional measures of time perception were administered, including how many minutes participants thought had passed during the session and a scale measurement of whether time "flew" or "dragged" during the session. Participants exposed to natural as opposed to built scenes were less impulsive and also reported longer subjective session times, although no differences across groups were revealed with the interval bisection task. These results are the first to suggest that decreased impulsivity from exposure to natural as opposed to built environments may be related to lengthened time perception. PMID:26558610

  5. Alternative lengthening of telomeres is induced by telomerase inhibitors in Barrett's esophageal cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiuguang; Qi, Bo; Zhao, Baosheng

    2013-04-01

    A crucial step in the path to the malignant transformation of cells and tumor formation is immortalization, which essentially depends on telomere maintenance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of telomerase in the progression of Barrett's esophagus. Telomerase activity was measured in Barrett's cells using terminal restriction fragment (TRF) analysis. Telomere length was measured using Q-FISH analysis. Furthermore, the telomere recombination events were detected between sister chromatids using chromosome orientation FISH (CO-FISH). There was a reduction in telomerase activity in the CP-A cells transduced with MT-hTER/47A+siRNA, which led to an almost complete disappearance of telomerase activity. The telomere length of the CP-A cells transduced with MT-hTER/47A+siRNA was slightly shorter compared to that of the untransduced cells. The telomerase-inhibited cells were morphologically indistinguishable from those untransduced and WT-hter-transduced cells. In the control cells, the growth rate was between 0.9 to 1.1 with the population doubling per day. Although the transduction of the telomerase inhibitors in the CP-A cells did not cause a significant reduction in cell growth, these transduced cells grew generally slower compared with the control cells. The heterogeneous telomere length was also be detected in the telomerase-inhibited CP-A cells. However, the telomere length remained homogeneous in the control cells. The metaphase of the CP-A cells transduced with MT-hTER/47A+siRNA demonstrated 70% heterogeneous telomeres. In addition, no increased recombination was observed between sister chromatids in the transduced CP-A cells compared with the control cells. Our findings suggest that an alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) may be induced by telomerase inhibitors in CP-A cells. Therefore, telomerase inhibitors may exhibit high potency in the treatment of esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett's esophagus. PMID:23338150

  6. Making Time for Nature: Visual Exposure to Natural Environments Lengthens Subjective Time Perception and Reduces Impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Meredith S; Repke, Meredith A; Nickerson, Norma P; Conway, Lucian G; Odum, Amy L; Jordan, Kerry E

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity in delay discounting is associated with maladaptive behaviors such as overeating and drug and alcohol abuse. Researchers have recently noted that delay discounting, even when measured by a brief laboratory task, may be the best predictor of human health related behaviors (e.g., exercise) currently available. Identifying techniques to decrease impulsivity in delay discounting, therefore, could help improve decision-making on a global scale. Visual exposure to natural environments is one recent approach shown to decrease impulsive decision-making in a delay discounting task, although the mechanism driving this result is currently unknown. The present experiment was thus designed to evaluate not only whether visual exposure to natural (mountains, lakes) relative to built (buildings, cities) environments resulted in less impulsivity, but also whether this exposure influenced time perception. Participants were randomly assigned to either a natural environment condition or a built environment condition. Participants viewed photographs of either natural scenes or built scenes before and during a delay discounting task in which they made choices about receiving immediate or delayed hypothetical monetary outcomes. Participants also completed an interval bisection task in which natural or built stimuli were judged as relatively longer or shorter presentation durations. Following the delay discounting and interval bisection tasks, additional measures of time perception were administered, including how many minutes participants thought had passed during the session and a scale measurement of whether time "flew" or "dragged" during the session. Participants exposed to natural as opposed to built scenes were less impulsive and also reported longer subjective session times, although no differences across groups were revealed with the interval bisection task. These results are the first to suggest that decreased impulsivity from exposure to natural as opposed to built environments may be related to lengthened time perception. PMID:26558610

  7. Facial soft tissue thickness among various vertical facial patterns in adult Pakistani subjects.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, Waqar; Fida, Mubassar; Shaikh, Attiya

    2015-12-01

    Facial reconstruction techniques are used to obtain an approximation of an individual's appearance thus helping identification of unidentified decedents from their dried skeletal remains. Many of these techniques rely on the sets of average facial soft tissue thickness (FST) values at different anatomical landmarks provided by the previous studies. FST is influenced by the age, sex, ethnicity and the body mass index of the individual. Recent literature has shown that the anthropological variations of the skull may also affect FST at certain points. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of such variations in vertical skull morphology on FST as around one third of different population groups have either a long or short facial pattern as compared to the average facial pattern. Moreover, this study also provides a FST database for the adult Pakistani subjects that may have potential implications in the facial reconstruction of the local subjects. A retrospective analysis of 276 lateral cephalograms of adult subjects having normal sagittal facial pattern was performed. Subjects were categorized into three vertical facial patterns (long face=95, average face=102, short face=79) according to the vertical dimensions of the skull and the FST was measured at 11 midline points. To compare the FST between males and females Mann-Whitney U test was used. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to compare FST among three vertical facial patterns. The results of our study revealed significant differences in FST at nine landmarks between males and females. These sex-based differences were more pronounced in the long and short facial patterns as compared to the average facial pattern. FST at stomion, pogonion, gnathion and menton was significantly greater in the short facial pattern as compared to the long facial pattern in both the sexes. The results of the present study highlight the importance of anthropological analysis of the skull and taking the vertical skeletal dimension into consideration while performing facial reconstruction. PMID:26476716

  8. Epineurial repair of an iatrogenic facial nerve neurotmesis after total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy in a dog with concurrent cranio-mandibular osteopathy.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Ignacio; Espadas, Irene; Hammond, Gawain; Pratschke, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    A 7-year-old male entire West Highland white terrier was referred to the Small Animal Hospital at the University of Glasgow for bilateral, chronic, medically unresponsive otitis media and externa. A history of cranio-mandibular osteopathy was also reported. Bilateral total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy was performed with the aid of a pneumatic burr. Extensive bone proliferation was present bilaterally originating from the caudal mandibular ramus and tympanic bulla which incorporated the horizontal canal on each side. The right facial nerve was identified leaving the stylomastoid foramen and running in a cranial direction through a 1.5 cm diameter cuff of bone surrounding the horizontal canal and external acoustic meatus. Despite careful dissection, a facial nerve neurotmesis ensued which required microsurgical epineurial repair. Neurologic examination performed 12 h post-operatively revealed abnormalities consistent with right facial nerve paralysis. At 3 months, the facial nerve function was found to have improved significantly and was assessed to be normal four months after surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this clinical communication described the first reported clinical case where unilateral facial nerve paralysis resulting from iatrogenic facial nerve neurotmesis was successfully treated by microsurgical epineurial repair. PMID:25686402

  9. Facial Soft Tissue Measurement in Microgravity-induces Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Pavela, James; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot

    2014-01-01

    Fluid shifts are a well-known phenomenon in microgravity, and one result is facial edema. Objective measurement of tissue thickness in a standardized location could provide a correlate with the severity of the fluid shift. Previous studies of forehead tissue thickness (TTf) suggest that when exposed to environments that cause fluid shifts, including hypergravity, head-down tilt, and high-altitude/lowpressure, TTf changes in a consistent and measurable fashion. However, the technique in past studies is not well described or standardized. The International Space Station (ISS) houses an ultrasound (US) system capable of accurate sub-millimeter measurements of TTf. We undertook to measure TTf during long-duration space flight using a new accurate, repeatable and transferable technique. Methods: In-flight and post-flight B-mode ultrasound images of a single astronaut's facial soft tissues were obtained using a Vivid-q US system with a 12L-RS high-frequency linear array probe (General Electric, USA). Strictly mid-sagittal images were obtained involving the lower frontal bone, the nasofrontal angle, and the osseo-cartilaginous junction below. Single images were chosen for comparison that contained identical views of the bony landmarks and identical acoustical interface between the probe and skin. Using Gingko CADx DICOM viewing software, soft tissue thickness was measured at a right angle to the most prominent point of the inferior frontal bone to the epidermis. Four independent thickness measurements were made. Conclusions: Forehead tissue thickness measurement by ultrasound in microgravity is feasible, and our data suggest a decrease in tissue thickness upon return from microgravity environment, which is likely related to the cessation of fluid shifts. Further study is warranted to standardize the technique with regard to the individual variability of the local anatomy in this area.

  10. The identification of unfolding facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Schmidt, Susanna; Viviani, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We asked whether the identification of emotional facial expressions (FEs) involves the simultaneous perception of the facial configuration or the detection of emotion-specific diagnostic cues. We recorded at high speed (500 frames s-1) the unfolding of the FE in five actors, each expressing six emotions (anger, surprise, happiness, disgust, fear, sadness). Recordings were coded every 10 frames (20 ms of real time) with the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al 2002, Salt Lake City, UT: Research Nexus eBook) to identify the facial actions contributing to each expression, and their intensity changes over time. Recordings were shown in slow motion (1/20 of recording speed) to one hundred observers in a forced-choice identification task. Participants were asked to identify the emotion during the presentation as soon as they felt confident to do so. Responses were recorded along with the associated response times (RTs). The RT probability density functions for both correct and incorrect responses were correlated with the facial activity during the presentation. There were systematic correlations between facial activities, response probabilities, and RT peaks, and significant differences in RT distributions for correct and incorrect answers. The results show that a reliable response is possible long before the full FE configuration is reached. This suggests that identification is reached by integrating in time individual diagnostic facial actions, and does not require perceiving the full apex configuration. PMID:23025158

  11. Facial Dysmorphism Across the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Suttie, Michael; Foroud, Tatiana; Wetherill, Leah; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Molteno, Christopher D.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.; Hoyme, H. Eugene; Khaole, Nathaniel; Robinson, Luther K.; Riley, Edward P.; Jacobson, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Classic facial characteristics of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) are shortened palpebral fissures, smooth philtrum, and thin upper vermillion. We aim to help pediatricians detect facial dysmorphism across the fetal alcohol spectrum, especially among nonsyndromal heavily exposed (HE) individuals without classic facial characteristics. METHODS: Of 192 Cape Coloured children recruited, 69 were born to women who reported abstaining from alcohol during pregnancy. According to multifaceted criteria, the remainder were allocated clinically to the FAS (n = 22), partial FAS (n = 26) or nonsyndromal HE (n = 75) categories. We used dense surface modeling and signature analyses of 3-dimensional facial photographs to determine agreement between clinical categorization and classifications induced from face shape alone, to visualize facial differences, and to consider predictive links between face shape and neurobehavior. RESULTS: Face classification achieved significant agreement with clinical categories for discrimination of nonexposed from FAS alone (face: 0.97–1.00; profile: 0.92) or with the addition of partial FAS (face: 0.90; profile: 0.92). Visualizations of face signatures delineated dysmorphism across the fetal alcohol spectrum and in half of the nonsyndromal HE category face signature graphs detected facial characteristics consistent with prenatal alcohol exposure. This subgroup performed less well on IQ and learning tests than did nonsyndromal subjects without classic facial characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Heat maps and morphing visualizations of face signatures may help clinicians detect facial dysmorphism across the fetal alcohol spectrum. Face signature graphs show potential for identifying nonsyndromal heavily exposed children who lack the classic facial phenotype but have cognitive impairment. PMID:23439907

  12. Impaired Overt Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Sayaka; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Previous electromyographic studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibited atypical patterns of facial muscle activity in response to facial expression stimuli. However, whether such activity is expressed in visible facial mimicry remains unknown. To investigate this issue, we videotaped facial responses in…

  13. [Computed tomography following facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Vogel, H; Eggert, C

    1985-03-01

    During the first four to six weeks after surgery, a reaction in the paranasal sinuses can be demonstrated by CT. Similar opacifications appearing later were due to tumor recurrency. Tumor recurrency leads to an increase of soft tissue structures, disappearance of vascular structures, and an increase of bone destruction. The bone destruction can show characteristic fragmentation, with the fragments at a certain distance from each other. If the recurrence is known, CT shows the extension, similar to normal preoperative CT. Follow-up examinations improve safety of interpretation. PMID:3987191

  14. Facial Motor Neuron Migration Advances

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Sarah J.; Saeger, Ivan; Guthrie, Sarah; Prince, Victoria E.

    2013-01-01

    During development, the migration of specific neuronal subtypes is required for the correct establishment of neural circuits. In mice and zebrafish, facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons undergo a tangential migration from rhombomere 4 caudally through the hindbrain. Recent advances in the field have capitalized on genetic studies in zebrafish and mouse, and high-resolution time-lapse imaging in zebrafish. Planar cell polarity signaling has emerged as a critical conserved factor in FBM neuron migration, functioning both within the neurons and their environment. In zebrafish, migration depends on specialized ‘pioneer’ neurons to lead follower FBM neurons through the hindbrain, and on interactions with structural components including pre-laid axon tracts and the basement membrane. Despite fundamental conservation, species-specific differences in migration mechanisms are being uncovered. PMID:24090878

  15. Facial attractiveness: evolutionary based research

    PubMed Central

    Little, Anthony C.; Jones, Benedict C.; DeBruine, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Face preferences affect a diverse range of critical social outcomes, from mate choices and decisions about platonic relationships to hiring decisions and decisions about social exchange. Firstly, we review the facial characteristics that influence attractiveness judgements of faces (e.g. symmetry, sexually dimorphic shape cues, averageness, skin colour/texture and cues to personality) and then review several important sources of individual differences in face preferences (e.g. hormone levels and fertility, own attractiveness and personality, visual experience, familiarity and imprinting, social learning). The research relating to these issues highlights flexible, sophisticated systems that support and promote adaptive responses to faces that appear to function to maximize the benefits of both our mate choices and more general decisions about other types of social partners. PMID:21536551

  16. [Blepharoplasty in aesthetic facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Jansma, J; Schepers, R H; Schouten, H J; Vissink, A

    2014-01-01

    Blepharoplasty is the most commonly performed procedure in aesthetic facial surgery. The upper eyelid is part of the same aesthetic subunit as the eyebrow and the lower eyelid is part of the same aesthetic subunit as the cheek. In upper eyelid blepharoplasty the excess skin and possibly also a portion of the sphincter is removed. A low-hanging eyebrow is preferably corrected by lifting the brow instead of over excising the redundant eyelid skin. Blepharoplasty of the lower eyelid is generally carried out by a very limited excision of the skin and the orbicularis oculi muscle in order to prevent lower lid retraction (ectropion). Rejuvenation in the lower lid region is also achieved by fat resection or redistribution, by means of which the double convex contour deformity is reduced. Blepharoplasty is generally performed under local anaesthesia and complications are rare. Patient satisfaction is generally high. PMID:25174189

  17. Acute unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Siew Swan; Tassone, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Mrs PS, 78 years of age, presented with acute left-sided otalgia, ear swelling and subsequent unilateral facial paralysis (Figure 1). She denied any otorrhoea or hearing loss. Past medical history relevant to the presenting complaint included: * Bell palsy diagnosed 20 years ago with no residual effect * biopsy confirmed benign parotid lump (diagnosed 3 years previously). Histopathology revealed a pleomorphic adenoma. Mrs PS declined surgical intervention at the time * chicken pox as a child * normal fasting blood glucose 1 month previously and no known immune compromise. Examination revealed yellow crusts and small vesicles on the external acoustic meatus (Figure 2). A 10 mm well defined firm and nontender nodule was palpable at the ramus of the mandible. PMID:21597548

  18. Evaluation of the facial dimensions of young adult women with a preferred facial appearance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Yong; Bayome, Mohamed; Park, Jae Hyun; Kang, Ju Hee; Kim, Kang Hyuk; Moon, Hong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the facial dimensions of young adult women with a preferred facial appearance and compare the results with those from the general population. Methods Twenty-five linear, nine angular, and three area measurements were made and four ratios were calculated using a sample of standardized frontal and lateral photographs of 46 young adult women with a preferred facial appearance (Miss Korea group) and 44 young adult women from the general population (control group). Differences between the two groups were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Results Compared with the control group, the Miss Korea group exhibited a significantly greater facial height, total facial height (TFH; trichion-menton), facial width (tragus right-tragus left), facial depth (tragus-true vertical line), and trichion-nasion/TFH ratio and smaller subnasale-menton/TFH and facial width/TFH ratios. Furthermore, the control group had smaller intercanthal and interpupillary widths. Conclusions The Miss Korea group exhibited longer, wider, and deeper faces compared with those from the general population. Furthermore, the Miss Korea group had larger eyes, longer but less protruded noses, longer and more retruded lower lips and chins, larger lip vermilion areas, and smaller labiomental angles. These results suggest that the latest trends in facial esthetics should be considered during diagnosis and treatment planning for young women with dentofacial abnormalities. PMID:26445720

  19. Talking Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  20. Eco-region dependent lengthening of vegetation period over the past 30 years in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garonna, I.; De Jong, R.; De Wit, A.; Mücher, C. A.; Schmid, B.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Phenology (LSP) is the most direct representation of intra-annual dynamics of vegetated land surfaces as observed from satellite observations. As such, LSP plays a key role in understanding the terrestrial carbon budget, as well as the response of terrestrial ecosystems to environmental change. Various studies have highlighted significant increases in vegetation activity over time (i.e. greening) over Europe in recent decades (e.g. Stöckli and Vidale, 2004), associated both with climatic changes and with large-scale human interventions including land-use change (de Jong et al., 2013). In this study, we characterize LSP changes in Europe's eco-regions for the last 30 years. We used the latest version of the 8-km Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index dataset (third generation, or NDVI-3g) to retrieve LSP metrics for Europe for the last three decades (1982-2011). Each year of NDVI data was processed using the Harmonic Analysis of Time Series (HANTS) algorithm, producing smooth NDVI annual profiles on a pixel-by-pixel basis. In order to derive LSP metrics for each year, namely Start, End and Length of Growing Season, we selected the Midpoint-pixel local threshold method, based on the White et al. (2009) inter-comparison. A landscape-based stratification, using the European Landscape Classification (LANMAP) (Mücher et al., 2010) allowed us to examine LSP characteristics and trends for the different European eco-regions. We demonstrate significant shifts in LSP metrics over the study period, with a general lengthening of the growing season in Europe of approximately 0.4 days year-1. LSP trends varied significantly between eco-regions, and we discuss potential reasons for these spatially diverse trends. de Jong, R., et al. (2013), Spatial relationship between climatologies and changes in global vegetation activity, Global Change Biology, 19(6), 1953-1964. Mücher, C. A., J. A. Klijn, D. M. Wascher, and J. H. J. Schaminée (2010), A new European Landscape Classification (LANMAP): A transparent, flexible and user-oriented methodology to distinguish landscapes, Ecological Indicators, 10(1), 87-103. Stöckli, R., and P. L. Vidale (2004), European plant phenology and climate as seen in a 20-year AVHRR land-surface parameter dataset, International Journal of Remote Sensing, 25(17), 3303-3330. White, M. A., et al. (2009), Intercomparison, interpretation, and assessment of spring phenology in North America estimated from remote sensing for 1982-2006, Global Change Biology, 15(10), 2335-2359.

  1. Facial Action Transfer with Personalized Bilinear Regression

    E-print Network

    attracted much attention in computer vision due to its diverse applications in the movie industry, computer], and virtual avatars [4]. A major challenge of FAT is to transfer subtle facial actions from the source

  2. Visual Prosody: Facial Movements Accompanying Speech 

    E-print Network

    Graf, Hans Peter; Cosatto, Eric; Strom, Volker; Huang, Fu Jie

    As we articulate speech, we usually move the head and exhibit various facial expressions. This visual aspect of speech aids understanding and helps communicating additional information, such as the speaker's mood. We analyze ...

  3. Chronic Facial Pain: A Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Joseph T.

    1983-01-01

    Facial pain is a common presenting complaint requiring patience and diagnostic acumen. The proliferation of eponyms attached to various syndromes complicates the subject. The most frequent cause of pain is likely to be muscle spasm in masticatory or temporalis muscles. This article presents a rank order for the common causes of facial pain that present diagnostic difficulty, such as temporomandibular joint pain, trigeminal neuralgia, giant cell arteritis, and post-herpetic neuralgia. PMID:21286580

  4. Locating facial features for age classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young Ho; da Vitoria Lobo, Niels

    1993-08-01

    In this paper, we outline computations for visual age classification from facial images. For now, input images can only be classified into one of three age-groups: babies, adults, and senior adults. The computations are based on cranio-facial development theory, and wrinkle analysis. In the implementation, first primary features of the face are found, followed by secondary feature analyses. Preliminary results with real data are presented.

  5. Facial nerve palsy after mandibular fracture.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, M J; Merx, P; Antonyshyn, O; Farb, R

    1995-05-01

    A 19-year-old man sustained a right parasymphyseal fracture and bilateral condylar neck fractures in a motor vehicle accident. The parasymphyseal fracture was treated by open reduction and internal fixation, and the subcondylar fractures were treated with closed reduction and maxillomandibular fixation. Three days postoperatively, a near-complete left facial nerve palsy developed. Facial nerve recovery was not full. The literature is reviewed, and possible mechanisms of this rare and devastating complication are discussed. PMID:7639495

  6. Classifying Chimpanzee Facial Expressions Using Muscle Action

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Lisa A.; Waller, Bridget M.; Vick, Sarah J.; Bard, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    The Chimpanzee Facial Action Coding System (ChimpFACS) is an objective, standardized observational tool for measuring facial movement in chimpanzees based on the well-known human Facial Action Coding System (FACS; P. Ekman & W. V. Friesen, 1978). This tool enables direct structural comparisons of facial expressions between humans and chimpanzees in terms of their common underlying musculature. Here the authors provide data on the first application of the ChimpFACS to validate existing categories of chimpanzee facial expressions using discriminant functions analyses. The ChimpFACS validated most existing expression categories (6 of 9) and, where the predicted group memberships were poor, the authors discuss potential problems with ChimpFACS and/or existing categorizations. The authors also report the prototypical movement configurations associated with these 6 expression categories. For all expressions, unique combinations of muscle movements were identified, and these are illustrated as peak intensity prototypical expression configurations. Finally, the authors suggest a potential homology between these prototypical chimpanzee expressions and human expressions based on structural similarities. These results contribute to our understanding of the evolution of emotional communication by suggesting several structural homologies between the facial expressions of chimpanzees and humans and facilitating future research. PMID:17352572

  7. Pediatric facial fractures: evolving patterns of treatment.

    PubMed

    Posnick, J C; Wells, M; Pron, G E

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the treatment of facial trauma between October 1986 and December 1990 at a major pediatric referral center. The mechanism of injury, location and pattern of facial fractures, pattern of facial injury, soft tissue injuries, and any associated injuries to other organ systems were recorded, and fracture management and perioperative complications reviewed. The study population consisted of 137 patients who sustained 318 facial fractures. Eighty-one patients (171 fractures) were seen in the acute stage, and 56 patients (147 fractures) were seen for reconstruction of a secondary deformity. Injuries in boys were more prevalent than in girls (63% versus 37%), and the 6- to 12-year cohort made up the largest group (42%). Most fractures resulted from traffic-related accidents (50%), falls (23%), or sports-related injuries (15%). Mandibular (34%) and orbital fractures (23%) predominated; fewer midfacial fractures (7%) were sustained than would be expected in a similar adult population. Three quarters of the patients with acute fractures required operative intervention. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation were frequently chosen for mandibular condyle fractures and open reduction techniques (35%) for other regions of the facial skeleton. When open reduction was indicated, plate-and-screw fixation was the preferred method of stabilization (65%). The long-term effects of the injuries and the treatment given on facial growth remain undetermined. Perioperative complication rates directly related to the surgery were low. PMID:8336220

  8. Forensic Facial Reconstruction: The Final Frontier

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vineeta; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Tyagi, Nutan

    2015-01-01

    Forensic facial reconstruction can be used to identify unknown human remains when other techniques fail. Through this article, we attempt to review the different methods of facial reconstruction reported in literature. There are several techniques of doing facial reconstruction, which vary from two dimensional drawings to three dimensional clay models. With the advancement in 3D technology, a rapid, efficient and cost effective computerized 3D forensic facial reconstruction method has been developed which has brought down the degree of error previously encountered. There are several methods of manual facial reconstruction but the combination Manchester method has been reported to be the best and most accurate method for the positive recognition of an individual. Recognition allows the involved government agencies to make a list of suspected victims’. This list can then be narrowed down and a positive identification may be given by the more conventional method of forensic medicine. Facial reconstruction allows visual identification by the individual’s family and associates to become easy and more definite. PMID:26501035

  9. Trisomy 21 and Facial Developmental Instability

    PubMed Central

    Starbuck, John M.; Cole, Theodore M.; Reeves, Roger H.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2013-01-01

    The most common live-born human aneuploidy is trisomy 21, which causes Down syndrome (DS). Dosage imbalance of genes on chromosome 21 (Hsa21) affects complex gene-regulatory interactions and alters development to produce a wide range of phenotypes, including characteristic facial dysmorphology. Little is known about how trisomy 21 alters craniofacial morphogenesis to create this characteristic appearance. Proponents of the “amplified developmental instability” hypothesis argue that trisomy 21 causes a generalized genetic imbalance that disrupts evolutionarily conserved developmental pathways by decreasing developmental homeostasis and precision throughout development. Based on this model, we test the hypothesis that DS faces exhibit increased developmental instability relative to euploid individuals. Developmental instability was assessed by a statistical analysis of fluctuating asymmetry. We compared the magnitude and patterns of fluctuating asymmetry among siblings using three-dimensional coordinate locations of 20 anatomic landmarks collected from facial surface reconstructions in four age-matched samples ranging from 4 to 12 years: 1) DS individuals (n=55); 2) biological siblings of DS individuals (n=55); 3) and 4) two samples of typically developing individuals (n=55 for each sample), who are euploid siblings and age-matched to the DS individuals and their euploid siblings (samples 1 and 2). Identification in the DS sample of facial prominences exhibiting increased fluctuating asymmetry during facial morphogenesis provides evidence for increased developmental instability in DS faces. We found the highest developmental instability in facial structures derived from the mandibular prominence and lowest in facial regions derived from the frontal prominence. PMID:23505010

  10. Facial Dog Bite Injuries of a 19-Month-Old Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Oueis, Hassan; Tann, Richard; Stenger, James

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 4.5 million Americans are bitten by dogs each year, and half of those are children. One in five dog bites results in injuries that require some form of medical attention. Children between 5 and 9 years of age are the most affected age group for this type of injury. A 19-month-old boy was admitted to the emergency department of Children's Hospital of Michigan for treatment of injuries due to a dog attack. Injuries were limited to the face of the child. Dental injuries included avulsion of upper lateral incisors, severe luxation of upper central incisors, and fracture of the facial alveolus bone. Surgical management of facial wounds was accomplished through irrigation, debridement and suturing. Dental treatment included extraction of central incisors and suturing soft tissues. PMID:26285503

  11. Measurements of drill-induced temperature change in the facial nerve during mastoid surgery: a cadaveric model using diamond burs.

    PubMed

    Abbas, G M; Jones, R O

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in temperature in the facial nerve that occur during mastoid drilling by the facial recess approach and to confirm the beneficial effects of constant irrigation while drilling. Mastoid drilling was performed on human cadaveric temporal bones by means of 4-mm diamond burs with and without irrigation. There were 6 subjects in each group. Changes in facial nerve temperature were recorded on a continuous-output monitor. Significant changes were found in temperature for both the irrigation and non-irrigation groups (p < .0001). Constant irrigation minimized the rise in temperature. Facial recess drilling poses a potential threat to cranial nerve VII via thermal injury. The temperature elevation in the non-irrigation group was significantly greater than that in the irrigation group and was greater than the tolerable limits of peripheral nervous tissue. This finding supports the need for constant irrigation during the approach to the facial recess in mastoid surgery. PMID:11558764

  12. Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations: Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Karen L. Schmidt

    E-print Network

    Cohn, Jeffrey F.

    have not fully explored that most visibly social part of the human body, the face. The face1 Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations: Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Research-624-8796 412-624-5407 (fax) Key words: nonverbal communication, social intelligence, signaling systems #12

  13. Soccer-related facial fractures: postoperative management with facial protective shields.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Pasquale; Ferrari, Francesca; Bettini, Giordana; Bissolotti, Guido; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Facial fractures are one of the most common orofacial injury sustained during participation in sporting events.The frequency of maxillofacial lesions varies according to the popularity that each sport has in a particular country. Soccer is the most popular sport in Italy, and it is responsible for a large number of facial traumas.Traumas and fractures in soccer mainly involve the zygomatic and nasal regions and are especially caused by direct contact that takes place mainly when the ball is played with the forehead. In particular, elbow-head and head-head impacts are the most frequent dangerous contacts.Soccer is not a violent sport, and the use of protective helmets is not allowed because it could be dangerous especially when players play the ball with the head. The use of protective facial shields are exclusively permitted to preserve players who underwent surgery for facial fractures.The use of a facial protection mask after a facial fracture treatment has already been reported. This article describes a clinical experience of management of 4 soccer-related facial fractures by means of fabrication of individual facial protective shields. PMID:19164981

  14. THE MASKLE: AUTOMATIC WEIGHTING FOR FACIAL An automated approach the problem of facial weighting for animation

    E-print Network

    Evans, Alun

    to create a simple animation on a 3D face model, even using a powerful tool such as Autodesk's Maya or 3DS Abstract: Facial animation of 3D characters is frequently a time-consuming and repetitive process accurate. 1 INTRODUCTION The goal of facial animation for 3D models is to enable the representation

  15. Combining appearance and geometric features for facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Liu, Honghai

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a method for facial expression recognition combining appearance and geometric facial features. The proposed framework consistently combines multiple facial representations at both global and local levels. First, covariance descriptors are computed to represent regional features combining various feature information with a low dimensionality. Then geometric features are detected to provide a general facial movement description of the facial expression. These appearance and geometric features are combined to form a vector representation of the facial expression. The proposed method is tested on the CK+ database and shows encouraging performance.

  16. Broken bone

    MedlinePLUS

    Bone - broken; Fracture; Stress fracture ... as those caused by running, can cause stress fractures of the foot, ankle, tibia, or hip ... circulation. Press firmly over the skin beyond the fracture site. (For example, if the fracture is in ...

  17. Mesh Achilles tendon lengthening--a new method to treat equinus deformity in patients with spastic cerebral palsy: surgical technique and early results.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Huang, Ming-Tung; Su, Wei-Ren; Wu, Tung-Tai

    2013-01-01

    Equinus of the ankle is a common deformity in spastic cerebral palsy. Many methods have been developed to lengthen the Achilles tendon to correct the deformity. A new mesh Achilles tendon lengthening (ATL) procedure that might decrease immobilization and promote recovery was performed in 36 tendons with equinus deformity (22 patients, average age=6.2). The results were compared with those of two other methods: the Vulpius group and the Z-lengthening group. The corrected dorsiflexion angle of the ankle at a subsequent 2-year follow-up of the mesh ATL and Vulpius groups matched (25.5±3.0 and 27.1±3.5°, respectively), whereas that of the Z-lengthening group was higher (33.9±3.8°). Nevertheless, statistics of the timing of each patient's readiness to begin rehabilitation and walking as well as gaining better stability for running and one-legged hopping indicated that the mesh ATL group recovered significantly quicker than the Vulpius and Z-lengthening groups. The mesh ATL procedure achieves a successful correction of the equinus deformity in spastic cerebral palsy comparable with that of the Vulpius procedure, with the advantage of preserving the gastrocnemius without a complete section. This confers greater antigravity stability and quicker recovery in patients. PMID:23192252

  18. The MPI Facial Expression Database — A Validated Database of Emotional and Conversational Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Kaulard, Kathrin; Cunningham, Douglas W.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Wallraven, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The ability to communicate is one of the core aspects of human life. For this, we use not only verbal but also nonverbal signals of remarkable complexity. Among the latter, facial expressions belong to the most important information channels. Despite the large variety of facial expressions we use in daily life, research on facial expressions has so far mostly focused on the emotional aspect. Consequently, most databases of facial expressions available to the research community also include only emotional expressions, neglecting the largely unexplored aspect of conversational expressions. To fill this gap, we present the MPI facial expression database, which contains a large variety of natural emotional and conversational expressions. The database contains 55 different facial expressions performed by 19 German participants. Expressions were elicited with the help of a method-acting protocol, which guarantees both well-defined and natural facial expressions. The method-acting protocol was based on every-day scenarios, which are used to define the necessary context information for each expression. All facial expressions are available in three repetitions, in two intensities, as well as from three different camera angles. A detailed frame annotation is provided, from which a dynamic and a static version of the database have been created. In addition to describing the database in detail, we also present the results of an experiment with two conditions that serve to validate the context scenarios as well as the naturalness and recognizability of the video sequences. Our results provide clear evidence that conversational expressions can be recognized surprisingly well from visual information alone. The MPI facial expression database will enable researchers from different research fields (including the perceptual and cognitive sciences, but also affective computing, as well as computer vision) to investigate the processing of a wider range of natural facial expressions. PMID:22438875

  19. The MPI facial expression database--a validated database of emotional and conversational facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Kaulard, Kathrin; Cunningham, Douglas W; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Wallraven, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The ability to communicate is one of the core aspects of human life. For this, we use not only verbal but also nonverbal signals of remarkable complexity. Among the latter, facial expressions belong to the most important information channels. Despite the large variety of facial expressions we use in daily life, research on facial expressions has so far mostly focused on the emotional aspect. Consequently, most databases of facial expressions available to the research community also include only emotional expressions, neglecting the largely unexplored aspect of conversational expressions. To fill this gap, we present the MPI facial expression database, which contains a large variety of natural emotional and conversational expressions. The database contains 55 different facial expressions performed by 19 German participants. Expressions were elicited with the help of a method-acting protocol, which guarantees both well-defined and natural facial expressions. The method-acting protocol was based on every-day scenarios, which are used to define the necessary context information for each expression. All facial expressions are available in three repetitions, in two intensities, as well as from three different camera angles. A detailed frame annotation is provided, from which a dynamic and a static version of the database have been created. In addition to describing the database in detail, we also present the results of an experiment with two conditions that serve to validate the context scenarios as well as the naturalness and recognizability of the video sequences. Our results provide clear evidence that conversational expressions can be recognized surprisingly well from visual information alone. The MPI facial expression database will enable researchers from different research fields (including the perceptual and cognitive sciences, but also affective computing, as well as computer vision) to investigate the processing of a wider range of natural facial expressions. PMID:22438875

  20. Quality of life assessment in facial palsy: validation of the Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale.

    PubMed

    Kleiss, Ingrid J; Beurskens, Carien H G; Stalmeier, Peep F M; Ingels, Koen J A O; Marres, Henri A M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed at validating an existing health-related quality of life questionnaire for patients with facial palsy for implementation in the Dutch language and culture. The Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale was translated into the Dutch language using a forward-backward translation method. A pilot test with the translated questionnaire was performed in 10 patients with facial palsy and 10 normal subjects. Finally, cross-cultural adaption was accomplished at our outpatient clinic for facial palsy. Analyses for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity and responsiveness were performed. Ninety-three patients completed the Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale, the Dutch Facial Disability Index, and the Dutch Short Form (36) Health Survey. Cronbach's ?, representing internal consistency, was 0.800. Test-retest reliability was shown by an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.737. Correlations with the House-Brackmann score, Sunnybrook score, Facial Disability Index physical function, and social/well-being function were -0.292, 0.570, 0.713, and 0.575, respectively. The SF-36 domains correlate best with the FaCE social function domain, with the strongest correlation between the both social function domains (r = 0.576). The FaCE score did statistically significantly increase in 35 patients receiving botulinum toxin type A (P = 0.042, Student t test). The domains 'facial comfort' and 'social function' improved statistically significantly as well (P = 0.022 and P = 0.046, respectively, Student t-test). The Dutch Facial Clinimetric Evaluation Scale shows good psychometric values and can be implemented in the management of Dutch-speaking patients with facial palsy in the Netherlands. Translation of the instrument into other languages may lead to widespread use, making evaluation and comparison possible among different providers. PMID:25628237

  1. Break-Induced Replication Requires DNA Damage-Induced Phosphorylation of Pif1 and Leads to Telomere Lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Vasianovich, Yulia; Harrington, Lea A.; Makovets, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Broken replication forks result in DNA breaks that are normally repaired via homologous recombination or break induced replication (BIR). Mild insufficiency in the replicative ligase Cdc9 in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in a population of cells with persistent DNA damage, most likely due to broken replication forks, constitutive activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and longer telomeres. This telomere lengthening required functional telomerase, the core DNA damage signaling cascade Mec1-Rad9-Rad53, and the components of the BIR repair pathway – Rad51, Rad52, Pol32, and Pif1. The Mec1-Rad53 induced phosphorylation of Pif1, previously found necessary for inhibition of telomerase at double strand breaks, was also important for the role of Pif1 in BIR and telomere elongation in cdc9-1 cells. Two other mutants with impaired DNA replication, cdc44-5 and rrm3?, were similar to cdc9-1: their long telomere phenotype was dependent on the Pif1 phosphorylation locus. We propose a model whereby the passage of BIR forks through telomeres promotes telomerase activity and leads to telomere lengthening. PMID:25329304

  2. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePLUS

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity, nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow ...

  3. Unique and reliable rat model for the assessment of cell therapy: bone union in the rat mandibular symphysis using bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yagyuu, Takahiro; Kirita, Tadaaki; Hattori, Koji; Tadokoro, Mika; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2015-03-01

    Many kinds of bone graft materials have been developed and reported to repair various bone defects. The defects are usually created by surgical resection of pre-existing bone tissue. However, spontaneous healing of bone defects without implantation of materials could be seen, because bone tissue possesses inherent repairing property. The central portion of the lower jaw bone in many animals consists of fibrous tissue and is called the mandibular symphysis. It persists even in old animals and thus can be interpreted as a physiological bone gap or a non-healing bone defect. We implanted calcium phosphate porous ceramics alone or composites of the ceramics and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into the bone defect (mandibular symphysis) to examine whether it could be filled with new bone tissue, resulting in bone union. Eight weeks after implantation, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological and biomechanical analyses demonstrated that bone union of the mandibles occurred in all rats with composites but in none of those with ceramics alone. These results showed that the rat mandibular symphysis is a unique bone defect site for the evaluation of bone graft materials. These analyses demonstrated that ceramics alone could not contribute to bone healing in the defect; however, supplementation with BMSCs drastically changed the properties of the ceramics (turning them into osteogenic ceramics), which completely healed the defect. As BMSCs can be culture-expanded using small amounts of bone marrow, the use of the composites might have clinical significance for the reconstruction of various bone tissues, including facial bone. PMID:23255518

  4. Facemasks and facial deposition of aerosols.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Sanjay; Gurses, Burak K; Smaldone, Gerald C

    2004-05-01

    Passage of aerosol around or through a facemask can result in deposition on the face and in the eyes. The present study quantified facial and eye deposition in a model simulating drug delivery to a young child. Aerosol delivery and facial deposition of radiolabeled saline test aerosols were studied in vitro with filters and a gamma camera. A child's face facsimile, attached to a piston pump, was used to simulate the patient receiving aerosol therapy. A filter placed in the oropharynx of the face facsimile measured aerosol delivery (inhaled mass). Seven commercially available facemasks in combination with three jet nebulizers were studied for aerosol delivery to the "patient" as well as for deposition on the face and in the eyes. Inhaled mass varied from 2.24-5.96% of nebulizer charge (drug placed in the nebulizer). Facial deposition varied from 0.44-2.34% of nebulizer charge, with eye deposition at 0.09-1.78%. All facemasks leaked aerosol, with significant facial and eye deposition approaching in magnitude delivery to the lung. Factors affecting facial and eye deposition include the interactive design characteristics of the facemask and nebulizer, as well as the aerodynamic properties of the aerosol. PMID:15095329

  5. Facial wound closure with butyl 2-cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Döner, Fehmi; Sari, Ibrahim

    2003-01-01

    Butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (B2-CA), one of the least histotoxic cyanoacrylate derivatives used as a tissue adhesive extensively for facial and plastic, otolaryngological and dental surgery, produces a mild inflammatory response and is biodegradable. In this study, we histopathologically compared B 2-CA to suture on facial wounds of 21 rabbits. Two facial incisions were made on the chins. Left incisions were sutured (control group) and right ones were treated with B 2-CA (experimental group). The animals were divided into 7 groups and were sacrificed on days 1, 2, and 5 and weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4 after surgery. The wound areas were examined histopathologically for the epithelization, inflammation, granulation response, and for foreign body giant cells. Gradation of the histopathological findings yielded no significant difference between the experimental and control groups. Hence, we conclude that B2-CA used on facial wounds shows no more histotoxicity than sutures. Thus, B2-CA could provide an alternative and a possible superior method for closing incisions of facial and plastic surgery. In addition, B2-CA has the advantages of ease of application, immediate homeostasis, and excellent cosmetic results. PMID:15198307

  6. Facial expressions of emotion are not culturally universal

    E-print Network

    Caldara, Roberto

    evolutionary psychology and social neuroscience to social networking via digital avatars. modeling | reverse-dimensional facial move- ments (see Movie S1 for an example). Observers only catego- rized these random facial

  7. Bilinear Kernel Reduced Rank Regression for Facial Expression Synthesis

    E-print Network

    such as character animation for movies and advertising, computer games, interac- tive education [1], video teleconferencing [2], avatars [3,4], and facial surgery planning [5]. Generating photo-realistic facial expressions

  8. About face, computergraphic synthesis and manipulation of facial imagery

    E-print Network

    Weil, Peggy

    1982-01-01

    A technique of pictorially synthesizing facial imagery using optical videodiscs under computer control is described. Search, selection and averaging processes are performed on a catalogue of whole faces and facial features ...

  9. Personalized low polygon count facial models for real time applications 

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, Ryan Troy

    2002-01-01

    Low polycount facial models are useful in interactive applications such as games or interactive virtual reality environments. In this thesis, I present an approach to create a wide range of low polygon count facial models. Using this approach, I...

  10. Facial Emotion Recognition and Facial Affect Display in Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Chandlee C.; Panych, Lawrence P.; Voglmaier, Martina M.; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A.; Terry, Douglas P.; Murphy, Cara; Zacks, Rayna; Shenton, Martha E.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with schizophrenia have deficits in facial affect expression and detection that hinder social interactions. The goal of this study was to examine whether or not epidemiologically-related antipsychotic-naïve schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) subjects would have similar deficits as patients with schizophrenia. Methods Matched SPD and healthy comparison (HC) subjects were asked to identify the eight classic emotions (SPD N=55, HC N=67) and to discriminate gender. Subjects (SPD N=22, HC N=17) were also photographed while displaying the same emotional expressions. Raters scored the subjects’ facial expressions along several dimensions. Results SPD subjects compared with HC were slower and less accurate in identifying facial expressions. This may have been driven by deficits in identifying gender. Although raters were able to identify correctly SPD and HC subjects’ expressions equally well, raters found SPD subjects’ facial expressions to be more odd, more ambiguous, and the subjects less attractive in general compared with HC subjects. Raters were less confident in their ability to correctly interpret SPD subjects’ facial expressions and raters were less comfortable with the idea of spending time with the SPD subjects compared with HC subjects. Conclusions SPD subjects face two hurdles in terms of daily social interactions. They have problems both in correctly interpreting others’ facial expressions and in generating socially attractive and unambiguous facial expressions. PMID:21640557

  11. Using infrared facial imagery for positive identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David C.

    1995-05-01

    Positive identification or verification of identity of an individual is a major part of the security, legal, banking, and police task of granting or denying authority to take an action. Work is being done using IR facial imaging and computer technology to perform the human recognition task rapidly, accurately, and nonintrusively. Three basic principles have been demonstrated: every human IR facial image (or thermogram) is unique to that individual; an IR camera can be used to capture human thermograms; and captured thermograms can be digitized, stored, and matched using a computer and certain mathematical algorithms. A three- part development effort has been undertaken using IR facial recognition in an access control application. The first, an opertor assisted proof-of-concept effort, has been successfully completed. The second, an automated access control unit, has been completed and is undergoing independent testing in a simulated controlled access environment. Work on the third developmental effort is planned for this summer.

  12. Facial Dysostoses: Etiology, Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, Paul A.; Andrews, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 1% of all live births exhibit a minor or major congenital anomaly. Of these approximately one-third display craniofacial abnormalities which are a significant cause of infant mortality and dramatically affect national health care budgets. To date, more than 700 distinct craniofacial syndromes have been described and in this review, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis and management of facial dysostoses with a particular emphasis on Treacher Collins, Nager and Miller syndromes. As we continue to develop and improve medical and surgical care for the management of individual conditions, it is essential at the same time to better characterize their etiology and pathogenesis. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of the development of facial dysostosis with a view towards early in-utero identification and intervention which could minimize the manifestation of anomalies prior to birth. The ultimate management for any craniofacial anomaly however, would be prevention and we discuss this possibility in relation to facial dysostosis. PMID:24123981

  13. LBP and SIFT based facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumer, Omer; Gunes, Ece O.

    2015-02-01

    This study compares the performance of local binary patterns (LBP) and scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) with support vector machines (SVM) in automatic classification of discrete facial expressions. Facial expression recognition is a multiclass classification problem and seven classes; happiness, anger, sadness, disgust, surprise, fear and comtempt are classified. Using SIFT feature vectors and linear SVM, 93.1% mean accuracy is acquired on CK+ database. On the other hand, the performance of LBP-based classifier with linear SVM is reported on SFEW using strictly person independent (SPI) protocol. Seven-class mean accuracy on SFEW is 59.76%. Experiments on both databases showed that LBP features can be used in a fairly descriptive way if a good localization of facial points and partitioning strategy are followed.

  14. Bone metabolism in very preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: do intravenous fat emulsions have an impact?

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kayla M; Pereira-da-Silva, Luis; Tou, Janet C; Ziegler, Jane; Brunetti, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Very preterm infants (<32 weeks' gestation) are at high risk for impaired skeletal development because of factors that limit the provision of extrauterine nutrients. Cumulative net deficiencies of calcium, phosphorus, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (ARA) are evident in these infants after prolonged administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This is significant because minerals as well as metabolites of DHA and ARA are important modulators of bone cell differentiation, lengthening of bone, and bone matrix deposition. Furthermore, diets containing only precursors of DHA and ARA result in suboptimal skeletal growth. With the emergence of new intravenous lipid emulsions, it is important to understand the impact of fatty acids on bone metabolism in the third trimester in order to optimize the provision of TPN in very preterm infants. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current evidence regarding intravenous lipid emulsions and bone metabolism in very preterm infants receiving prolonged TPN and to identify areas of research needed. PMID:26518033

  15. Reactivation of varicella-zoster virus in delayed facial palsy after dental treatment and oro-facial surgery.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Y; Ohtani, F; Fukuda, S; Inuyama, Y; Nagashima, K

    2000-09-01

    In rare cases, acute peripheral facial palsy occurs several days after dental treatment and oro-facial surgery. Surgical procedures have been known to trigger reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The present study examined eight patients who exhibited delayed facial palsy after dental treatment or oro-facial surgery. Ramsay Hunt syndrome was diagnosed in three patients and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) reactivation without zoster lesions (zoster sine herpete) was diagnosed in three patients either by PCR or serological assay. Therefore, VZV reactivation was detected in 75% (6 of 8) of patients who exhibited delayed facial palsy after dental or oro-facial treatment. The results suggest that VZV reactivation is a major cause of delayed facial palsy after dental treatment or oro-facial surgery. PMID:10935987

  16. Objectifying Facial Expressivity Assessment of Parkinson's Patients: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Patsis, Georgios; Jiang, Dongmei; Sahli, Hichem; Kerckhofs, Eric; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can exhibit a reduction of spontaneous facial expression, designated as “facial masking,” a symptom in which facial muscles become rigid. To improve clinical assessment of facial expressivity of PD, this work attempts to quantify the dynamic facial expressivity (facial activity) of PD by automatically recognizing facial action units (AUs) and estimating their intensity. Spontaneous facial expressivity was assessed by comparing 7 PD patients with 8 control participants. To voluntarily produce spontaneous facial expressions that resemble those typically triggered by emotions, six emotions (amusement, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, and fear) were elicited using movie clips. During the movie clips, physiological signals (facial electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiogram (ECG)) and frontal face video of the participants were recorded. The participants were asked to report on their emotional states throughout the experiment. We first examined the effectiveness of the emotion manipulation by evaluating the participant's self-reports. Disgust-induced emotions were significantly higher than the other emotions. Thus we focused on the analysis of the recorded data during watching disgust movie clips. The proposed facial expressivity assessment approach captured differences in facial expressivity between PD patients and controls. Also differences between PD patients with different progression of Parkinson's disease have been observed. PMID:25478003

  17. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... External facial fracture fixation appliance. (a) Identification. An external facial fracture...

  18. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... External facial fracture fixation appliance. (a) Identification. An external facial fracture...

  19. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... External facial fracture fixation appliance. (a) Identification. An external facial fracture...

  20. Facial animation on an anatomy-based hierarchical face model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Prakash, Edmond C.; Sung, Eric

    2003-04-01

    In this paper we propose a new hierarchical 3D facial model based on anatomical knowledge that provides high fidelity for realistic facial expression animation. Like real human face, the facial model has a hierarchical biomechanical structure, incorporating a physically-based approximation to facial skin tissue, a set of anatomically-motivated facial muscle actuators and underlying skull structure. The deformable skin model has multi-layer structure to approximate different types of soft tissue. It takes into account the nonlinear stress-strain relationship of the skin and the fact that soft tissue is almost incompressible. Different types of muscle models have been developed to simulate distribution of the muscle force on the skin due to muscle contraction. By the presence of the skull model, our facial model takes advantage of both more accurate facial deformation and the consideration of facial anatomy during the interactive definition of facial muscles. Under the muscular force, the deformation of the facial skin is evaluated using numerical integration of the governing dynamic equations. The dynamic facial animation algorithm runs at interactive rate with flexible and realistic facial expressions to be generated.

  1. Objectifying facial expressivity assessment of Parkinson's patients: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Gonzalez, Isabel; Patsis, Georgios; Jiang, Dongmei; Sahli, Hichem; Kerckhofs, Eric; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can exhibit a reduction of spontaneous facial expression, designated as "facial masking," a symptom in which facial muscles become rigid. To improve clinical assessment of facial expressivity of PD, this work attempts to quantify the dynamic facial expressivity (facial activity) of PD by automatically recognizing facial action units (AUs) and estimating their intensity. Spontaneous facial expressivity was assessed by comparing 7 PD patients with 8 control participants. To voluntarily produce spontaneous facial expressions that resemble those typically triggered by emotions, six emotions (amusement, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, and fear) were elicited using movie clips. During the movie clips, physiological signals (facial electromyography (EMG) and electrocardiogram (ECG)) and frontal face video of the participants were recorded. The participants were asked to report on their emotional states throughout the experiment. We first examined the effectiveness of the emotion manipulation by evaluating the participant's self-reports. Disgust-induced emotions were significantly higher than the other emotions. Thus we focused on the analysis of the recorded data during watching disgust movie clips. The proposed facial expressivity assessment approach captured differences in facial expressivity between PD patients and controls. Also differences between PD patients with different progression of Parkinson's disease have been observed. PMID:25478003

  2. Facial Feature Extraction Using a Probabilistic Mustafa Berkay Yilmaza

    E-print Network

    Erdogan, Hakan

    feature extraction methods in the literature Facial feature extraction from a face image has beenFacial Feature Extraction Using a Probabilistic Approach Mustafa Berkay Yilmaza , Hakan Erdogana in a human face. Robust extraction of such facial feature locations is an important problem which is used

  3. Categorical Perception of Affective and Linguistic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Stephen; Emmorey, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated categorical perception (CP) effects for affective facial expressions and linguistic facial expressions from American Sign Language (ASL) for Deaf native signers and hearing non-signers. Facial expressions were presented in isolation (Experiment 1) or in an ASL verb context (Experiment 2). Participants performed ABX…

  4. Facial Action Detection using Block-based Pyramid Appearance Descriptors

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    here enables detection a much larger range of facial behaviour by detecting 22 facial muscle actions muscle actions called Action Units (AUs). With FACS, every possible facial expression (emotional of data a psychologist could analyse. As a tool for building an advanced user-interface, real

  5. manuscript number 3033 Facial Attractiveness: Beauty and the Machine

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    manuscript number 3033 Facial Attractiveness: Beauty and the Machine Yael Eisenthal School of "facial attractiveness" in a machine-learning context. To this end, we collected human beauty ratings for datasets of facial images and used various techniques for learning the attractiveness of a face

  6. Darwin Revisited: An Infant's First Emotional Facial Expressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camras, Linda A.

    Facial expressions produced by an infant during the first 8 weeks of life were observed and recorded by the infant's mother, who was trained in several anatomically based systems for coding facial expressions. Data records included diary entries and videotape recordings. Instances of facial expression patterns currently considered to be…

  7. Violent Media Consumption and the Recognition of Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsh, Steven J.; Mounts, Jeffrey R. W.; Olczak, Paul V.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the speed of recognition of facial emotional expressions (happy and angry) as a function of violent media consumption. Color photos of calm facial expressions morphed to either an angry or a happy facial expression. Participants were asked to make a speeded identification of the emotion (happiness or anger) during the morph.…

  8. Virtual Characters with Affective Facial Behavior Ana Paula Cludio1

    E-print Network

    Carmo, Maria Beatriz

    : Virtual Humans, Social Anxiety Disorder, Facial Expressions, Body Postures, Exposure Therapy, NonverbalVirtual Characters with Affective Facial Behavior Ana Paula Cláudio1 , Augusta Gaspar2 , Eder Lopes with one to three virtual humans capable of exhibiting facial and body expressions controllable in real

  9. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the hollow part of most bones. Bone marrow aspiration is the removal of a small amount of ... tissue in liquid form for examination. Bone marrow aspiration is not the same as bone marrow biopsy . ...

  10. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePLUS

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  11. Management of the Eye in Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chi, John J

    2016-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of the eye in facial paralysis is a critical component of surgical management. The degree of facial nerve paralysis, lacrimal secretion, corneal sensation, and lower eyelid position must be assessed accurately. Upper eyelid loading procedures are standard management of lagophthalmos. Lower eyelid tightening repositions the lower eyelid and helps maintain the aqueous tear film. Eyelid reanimation allows an aesthetic symmetry with blinking and restores protective functions vital to ocular preservation. Patients often have multiple nervous deficits, including corneal anesthesia. Other procedures include tarsorrhaphy, spring implantation, and temporalis muscle transposition; associated complications have rendered them nearly obsolete. PMID:26611698

  12. Considerations in non-Caucasian facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jonathan M; Nolen, David

    2014-08-01

    Aging of the face is inevitable and undeniable. This process includes a loss of skeletal support, soft tissue volume depletion, and a decrease in skin elasticity. The contribution of these 3 factors varies between individuals with noticeable hereditary influence. Characteristic ethnic features have been described in the literature, but as societies have changed, many of these ethnic variations have blended together. Facial cosmetic procedures must to be tailored to address these variations in anatomy, and consideration must be given to enhancing the facial skeleton, adequately lifting the soft tissues, and planning careful incisions to be closed under no tension. PMID:25049130

  13. Penetrating facial injury by a wooden log.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Sadanandan; Varghese, George; Kumar, Sanjay; Subramanian, Dinesh Pambungal

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating facial injuries are potentially dangerous and require emergency management because of the presence of vital structures in the face and it may be life threatening especially when the injury involves airway, major blood vessels, spinal cord and cervical spines. Penetrating injuries of facial region can occur due to missile injuries, blast injuries, accidental fall on sharp objects such as sticks or glass and motor vehicle accidents etc., Indications for immediate surgical management of penetrating neck injuries include airway management and hemodynamic instability according to advanced trauma life support protocol. PMID:25937743

  14. [Bone transplant].

    PubMed

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands. PMID:16998521

  15. Bone-Derived Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Capanna, R.; Campanacci, D.A.; De Biase, P.; Cuomo, P.; Lorenzoni, A.

    2010-01-01

    Bone regeneration is based on the synergy between osteconduction, osteoinduction and osteogenesis. In recent years, we have witnessed the birth and development of numerous osteoconductive substrates, created with the intention of replacing bone grafts, both autologous and homologous. Recently, attention has shifted to osteogenesis, in other words, to the study of mesenchymal cells and their differentiation into osteoblastic cell lines that can be cultured in vitro (as already seen with chondroblasts). Osteoinduction, too, has been shown to be equally important, ever since Urist’s 1967 study which drew attention to the demineralised bone matrix and its properties. The following twenty years led to the definition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and finally to the marketing of the first ostegenic protein (OP-1) obtained by means of the gene recombination technique. The BMPs produced using this technique that, so far, have been shown to be most active are BMP-2 (Infuse) and BMP-7 (Osigraft). The BMPs are not the only molecules with osteoinductive capacity. Other molecules capable of influencing bone regeneration are: platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs), the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-?) family, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and the acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). All these growth factors act in synergy with the BMPs, modulating their action and exerting an inductive and proliferative action on the cell lines responsible for regenerating the bone matrix. The literature has been literally invaded by studies, both experimental and preclinical, on these proteins (Termaat, 2005), and they have provided ample demonstration that the BMPs are effective in improving healing of fractures, pseudoarthrosis and spinal fusions. Important advantages of BMPs are the complete absence of risk of transmissible disease, given that they are produced using recombination technology; their purity, and thus absence of an immune response (although such a response could be linked to the carrier used to administer them); their efficacy, which derives from the use of a pre-established dose and not from the individual variability that is a specific feature of demineralized bone matrix homologous bone grafts. In addition to their use in fractures, pseudoarthrosis and spinal fusions, very recent studies are opening up new possibilities which may represent the future field of application of these proteins: Cook et al. (Cook, 2001, Barrack, 2003) have presented the first results obtained using OP-1 in prosthetic revisions carried out in the presence of bone defects; other authors have published a case report on osteonecrosis of the femoral head treated with grafts in association with OP-1; an Italian group is currently experimenting the use of OP-1 in distraction osteogenesis with the aim of speeding up the results that can be obtained using this already well-established technique. However, the most interesting results on the use of recombinant morphogenetic proteins are those obtained by Warnke et al. (2004), maxillo-facial surgeons who, by mixing synthetic spongious bone grafts, bone marrow concentrate and morphogenetic proteins, prepared a new, replacement mandible for implantation in a patient who had lost his own due to cancer, thereby creating new vacularised bone, tailored to that specific patient. The experimental applications of these new drugs are countless and, with regard to their therapeutic potential, the general feeling is that what we are seeing is only the tip of the iceberg. However, it is necessary to ensure that experiments in this field are always geared towards sustainable clinical applications and, to this end, they should be concentrated in a smaller number of centres and conducted in accordance with approved and recognised guidelines.

  16. Face Processing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Independent or Interactive Processing of Facial Identity and Facial Expression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Julia F.; Biswas, Ajanta; Pascalis, Olivier; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmuth; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated if deficits in processing emotional expression affect facial identity processing and vice versa in children with autism spectrum disorder. Children with autism and IQ and age matched typically developing children classified faces either by emotional expression, thereby ignoring facial identity or by facial identity…

  17. Lengthening of the normal tibia in a patient with hemihypertrophy caused by Klippel- Trenaunay-Weber syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takata, Munetomo; Watanabe, Koji; Matsubara, Hidenori; Takato, Kei; Nomura, Issei; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    We report a case of Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome in a 31-year-old woman who presented with hypertrophy of the left leg. She had severe osteoarthritic changes in the left hip joint secondary to the lack of acetabular coverage of the femoral head as the result of lateral inclination of the pelvis owing to leg-length discrepancy of 4 cm. The centre-edge angle (coverage ratio of the acetabulum to the femoral head) was improved from 15º to 33º after a foot lift. She underwent osteotomy and lengthening of the normal contralateral tibia using a Taylor spatial frame. Hip arthroplasty could be avoided as osteoarthritic changes of the hip joint had improved. PMID:22184171

  18. Removing the bone brake.

    PubMed

    Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2014-09-01

    Osteoporosis results from an imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation. While bone resorption inhibitors are widely used to treat osteoporosis, stimulating bone formation is more challenging. Recently, McClung et al. (2014) found that neutralization of sclerostin, a potent inhibitor of bone formation, effectively increased bone mass in postmenopausal women. PMID:25185946

  19. A systematic review of filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV facial lipoatrophy (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jagdeo, Jared; Ho, Derek; Lo, Alex; Carruthers, Alastair

    2015-12-01

    HIV facial lipoatrophy (FLA) is characterized by facial volume loss. HIV FLA affects the facial contours of the cheeks, temples, and orbits, and is associated with social stigma. Although new highly active antiretroviral therapy medications are associated with less severe FLA, the prevalence of HIV FLA among treated individuals exceeds 50%. The goal of our systematic review is to examine published clinical studies involving the use of filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV FLA and to provide evidence-based recommendations based on published efficacy and safety data. A systematic review of the published literature was performed on July 1, 2015, on filler agents for aesthetic treatment of HIV FLA. Based on published studies, poly-L-lactic acid is the only filler agent with grade of recommendation: B. Other reviewed filler agents received grade of recommendation: C or D. Poly-L-lactic acid may be best for treatment over temples and cheeks, whereas calcium hydroxylapatite, with a Food and Drug Administration indication of subdermal implantation, may be best used deeply over bone for focal enhancement. Additional long-term randomized controlled trials are necessary to elucidate the advantages and disadvantages of fillers that have different biophysical properties, in conjunction with cost-effectiveness analysis, for treatment of HIV FLA. PMID:26481056

  20. Topological optimization for designing patient-specific large craniofacial segmental bone replacements

    E-print Network

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    of Plastic Surgery, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210; and b Department of Civil design of bone replacements by the operating surgeon at the time of surgery. This problem might and appearance after massive facial injuries is an important unsolved problem in surgery. Inade- quate

  1. Subconscious facial expression mimicry is preserved in older adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Phoebe E; Henry, Julie D

    2009-12-01

    It has been suggested that despite explicit recognition difficulties, implicit processing of facial expressions may be preserved in older adulthood. To directly test this possibility, the authors used facial electromyography to assess older (N=40) and young (N=46) adults' mimicry responses to angry and happy facial expressions, which were presented subliminally via a backward masking technique. The results indicated that despite not consciously perceiving the facial emotion stimuli, both groups mimicked the angry and happy facial expressions. Implications for emotion recognition difficulties in late adulthood are discussed. PMID:20025413

  2. Teaching 3D sculpting to facial plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Cingi, C; Oghan, F

    2011-11-01

    This article describes the authors' course, which takes facial plastic surgeons through specific exercises to demonstrate the esthetic impact of 3D manipulations of the nose and face. The course components are described, which include 3D assessment, exercises in manual dexterity, and improving imagination in sculpting facial and nasal features for the optimal esthetic result and match to a given facial shape. The overlap and relationship between a course in 3D sculpting in facial plastic surgery and current 3D tools for design and image analysis being used for facial plastic surgery are discussed. PMID:22004855

  3. Differentiation and characterization of human facial subcutaneous adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Pappas, Apostolos

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with the loss of facial subcutaneous fat and with increased abdominal subcutaneous fat. Site specific differences in adipocyte phenotype and/or gene expression may play a role in these age-related changes. In this study, we isolated and characterized human facial preadipocytes and investigated distinct metabolic properties such as a differentiation pattern in relation to abdominal preadipocytes. Subcutaneous preadipocytes were isolated from human facial and abdominal skin and cultured in the presence of differentiation factors including rosiglitazone, a known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-?) agonist, isobutyl-methyl xanthine (IBMX) and insulin. Differentiation was characterized microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR. Unexpected superior adipogenic capacity of facial preadipocytes was observed; more facial preadipocytes differentiated in response to rosiglitazone than abdominal preadipocytes and facial preadipocytes retained their ability to differentiate through passage 11 compared with passage 5 for abdominal preadipocytes. Experiments confirmed a reduced lipolysis response in facial versus abdominal adipocytes after exposure to isoproterenol, which was consistent with the reduced ?2-adrenergic receptor expression by 60% in the facial cells. The expression of other lipid metabolic gene markers was similar in both facial and abdominal adipocytes with the exception of ?3-adrenergic receptor which was only found in abdominal adipose tissue. Gene profiling, by microarray analysis, identified that several HOX genes are robustly reduced in facial adipocytes compared to abdominal adipocytes, suggesting different characteristics between the 2 fat depots. These differences may have implications for development of treatments for facial fat loss during aging. PMID:26167398

  4. Suitable models for face geometry normalization in facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Hamid; Raie, Abolghasem A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, facial expression recognition has attracted much attention in machine vision research because of its various applications. Accordingly, many facial expression recognition systems have been proposed. However, the majority of existing systems suffer from a critical problem: geometric variability. It directly affects the performance of geometric feature-based facial expression recognition approaches. Furthermore, it is a crucial challenge in appearance feature-based techniques. This variability appears in both neutral faces and facial expressions. Appropriate face geometry normalization can improve the accuracy of each facial expression recognition system. Therefore, this paper proposes different geometric models or shapes for normalization. Face geometry normalization removes geometric variability of facial images and consequently, appearance feature extraction methods can be accurately utilized to represent facial images. Thus, some expression-based geometric models are proposed for facial image normalization. Next, local binary patterns and local phase quantization are used for appearance feature extraction. A combination of an effective geometric normalization with accurate appearance representations results in more than a 4% accuracy improvement compared to several state-of-the-arts in facial expression recognition. Moreover, utilizing the model of facial expressions which have larger mouth and eye region sizes gives higher accuracy due to the importance of these regions in facial expression.

  5. Acquired facial lipoatrophy: pathogenesis and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Olszewska, Barbara; Lema?ska, Ma?gorzata; Purzycka-Bohdan, Dorota; Nowicki, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Facial lipoatrophy refers to the loss of subcutaneous fat tissue presenting by flattening or indentation of convex contour of the face. Facial lipoatrophy is a feature of the normal ageing process. It may be also a manifestation of chronic diseases, most frequently it affects HIV-infected individuals treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and may constitute a complication of connective tissue diseases, like lupus erythematosus profundus or morphea. Early recognition and treatment of the active stage of connective tissue diseases is of essential significance in prevention of subsequent scarring and atrophy lesions. In HIV-positive patients undergoing HAART therapy, the attempt to modify thetreatment scheme so it has a less lipemic effect seems to be justified. Esthetic correction of facial lipoatrophy in chronic diseases is a great challenge. Improvement of appearance is very important for affected individuals, because it diminishes their stigmatization and psychosocial dysfunction. Facial volumetric correction includes surgical and dermatological procedures such as adipose transfer and injectable dermal fillers. PMID:26015783

  6. Geometry-driven photorealistic facial expression synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingshan; Liu, Zicheng; Guo, Baining; Terzopoulos, Demetri; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2006-01-01

    Expression mapping (also called performance driven animation) has been a popular method for generating facial animations. A shortcoming of this method is that it does not generate expression details such as the wrinkles due to skin deformations. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem. We have developed a geometry-driven facial expression synthesis system. Given feature point positions (the geometry) of a facial expression, our system automatically synthesizes a corresponding expression image that includes photorealistic and natural looking expression details. Due to the difficulty of point tracking, the number of feature points required by the synthesis system is, in general, more than what is directly available from a performance sequence. We have developed a technique to infer the missing feature point motions from the tracked subset by using an example-based approach. Another application of our system is expression editing where the user drags feature points while the system interactively generates facial expressions with skin deformation details. PMID:16382607

  7. The Sternohyoid Flap for Facial Reanimation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Daniel S

    2016-02-01

    This article discusses the use of the sternohyoid muscle for facial reanimation. The report outlines the rationale for use, the technical aspects of flap harvest, and early clinical outcomes. The utility of the flap and its comparative attributes relative to the gracilis flap are discussed. PMID:26611702

  8. Autologous Fat Grafting in Facial Volumetric Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Piombino; Gaetano, Marenzi; Giovanni, Dell’Aversana Orabona; Luigi, Califano; Gilberto, Sammartino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The authors reported their surgical experience about structural fat grafting in the management of facial volumetric deficit. The purpose of this study was to assess the real indications, cosmetic results, complications, and global patient satisfaction of the Coleman technique in redefining facial contours in congenital and postoperative deformities. A retrospective analysis of 32 patients grafted according to Coleman's technique was performed, and the long-term outcomes and patient satisfaction were evaluated. The mean postoperative clinical follow-up was 14 months. The morphological changes were analyzed by comparing the photographic presurgical facial contour and the postoperative correction of soft tissue defects. All consecutive cases reported showed a progressive fat resorption for 3 months after surgery and its stable integration only after this period. Best results were performed in the treatment of genetically determined syndromes, such as the Franceschetti and Romberg syndromes. The authors suggest this surgical technique also for the treatment of unaesthetic cutaneous abscess cavity after incision and drainage. Unsatisfactory outcomes were obtained in the treatment of the posttraumatic facial scar, which needed more surgical procedures. PMID:25974786

  9. Continuous Pain Intensity Estimation from Facial Expressions

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    Continuous Pain Intensity Estimation from Facial Expressions Sebastian Kaltwang, Ognjen Rudovic.rudovic,m.pantic}@imperial.ac.uk Abstract. Automatic pain recognition is an evolving research area with promis- ing applications in health care. In this paper, we propose the first fully automatic approach to continuous pain intensity

  10. Facial Animation Driven by XRay Microbeam Data

    E-print Network

    Regina, University of

    areas. For the film industry, researchers have been focusing on producing realistically animated facesFacial Animation Driven by X­Ray Microbeam Data November Scheidt and Howard J. Hamilton Technical Animation Driven by X­Ray Microbeam Data November Scheidt and Howard J. Hamilton Department of Computer

  11. Annotation: Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), the most frequent known interstitial deletion identified in man, is associated with chromosomal microdeletions in the q11 band of chromosome 22. Individuals with VCFS are reported to have a characteristic behavioural phenotype with high rates of behavioural, psychiatric, neuropsychological and…

  12. Facial identity and facial expression are initially integrated at visual perceptual stages of face processing.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Katie; Towler, John; Eimer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that facial identity and facial expression are analysed in functionally and anatomically distinct streams within the core visual face processing system. To investigate whether expression and identity interact during the visual processing of faces, we employed a sequential matching procedure where participants compared either the identity or the expression of two successively presented faces, and ignored the other irrelevant dimension. Repetitions versus changes of facial identity and expression were varied independently across trials, and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during task performance. Irrelevant facial identity and irrelevant expression both interfered with performance in the expression and identity matching tasks. These symmetrical interference effects show that neither identity nor expression can be selectively ignored during face matching, and suggest that they are not processed independently. N250r components to identity repetitions that reflect identity matching mechanisms in face-selective visual cortex were delayed and attenuated when there was an expression change, demonstrating that facial expression interferes with visual identity matching. These findings provide new evidence for interactions between facial identity and expression within the core visual processing system, and question the hypothesis that these two attributes are processed independently. PMID:26581627

  13. Facial Attractiveness Assessment using Illustrated Questionnairers

    PubMed Central

    MESAROS, ANCA; CORNEA, DANIELA; CIOARA, LIVIU; DUDEA, DIANA; MESAROS, MICHAELA; BADEA, MINDRA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An attractive facial appearance is considered nowadays to be a decisive factor in establishing successful interactions between humans. In relation to this topic, scientific literature states that some of the facial features have more impact then others, and important authors revealed that certain proportions between different anthropometrical landmarks are mandatory for an attractive facial appearance. Aim. Our study aims to assess if certain facial features count differently in people’s opinion while assessing facial attractiveness in correlation with factors such as age, gender, specific training and culture. Material and methods. A 5-item multiple choice illustrated questionnaire was presented to 236 dental students. The Photoshop CS3 software was used in order to obtain the sets of images for the illustrated questions. The original image was handpicked from the internet by a panel of young dentists from a series of 15 pictures of people considered to have attractive faces. For each of the questions, the images presented were simulating deviations from the ideally symmetric and proportionate face. The sets of images consisted in multiple variations of deviations mixed with the original photo. Junior and sophomore year students from our dental medical school, having different nationalities were required to participate in our questionnaire. Simple descriptive statistics were used to interpret the data. Results. Assessing the results obtained from the questionnaire it was observed that a majority of students considered as unattractive the overdevelopment of the lower third, while the initial image with perfect symmetry and proportion was considered as the most attractive by only 38.9% of the subjects. Likewise, regarding the symmetry 36.86% considered unattractive the canting of the inter-commissural line. The interviewed subjects considered that for a face to be attractive it needs to have harmonious proportions between the different facial elements. Conclusions. Considering an evaluation of facial attractiveness it is important to keep in mind that such assessment is subjective and influenced by multiple factors, among which the most important are cultural background and specific training. PMID:26528052

  14. [Frontier in bone biology].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Bone is an active organ in which bone mass is maintained by the balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption, i.e., coupling of bone formation and bone resorption. Recent advances in molecular bone biology uncovered the molecular mechanism of the coupling. A fundamental role of osteocyte in the maintenance of bone mass and whole body metabolism has also been revealed recently. Moreover, neurons and neuropeptides have been shown to be intimately involved in bone homeostasis though inter-organ network, in addition to "traditional" regulators of bone metabolism such as soluble factors and cytokines PMID:26529922

  15. Performance-driven facial animation: basic research on human judgments of emotional state in facial avatars.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, A A; Neumann, U; Enciso, R; Fidaleo, D; Noh, J Y

    2001-08-01

    Virtual reality is rapidly evolving into a pragmatically usable technology for mental health (MH) applications. As the underlying enabling technologies continue to evolve and allow us to design more useful and usable structural virtual environments (VEs), the next important challenge will involve populating these environments with virtual representations of humans (avatars). This will be vital to create mental health VEs that leverage the use of avatars for applications that require human-human interaction and communication. As Alessi et al.1 pointed out at the 8th Annual Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference (MMVR8), virtual humans have mainly appeared in MH applications to "serve the role of props, rather than humans." More believable avatars inhabiting VEs would open up possibilities for MH applications that address social interaction, communication, instruction, assessment, and rehabilitation issues. They could also serve to enhance realism that might in turn promote the experience of presence in VR. Additionally, it will soon be possible to use computer-generated avatars that serve to provide believable dynamic facial and bodily representations of individuals communicating from a distance in real time. This could support the delivery, in shared virtual environments, of more natural human interaction styles, similar to what is used in real life between people. These techniques could enhance communication and interaction by leveraging our natural sensing and perceiving capabilities and offer the potential to model human-computer-human interaction after human-human interaction. To enhance the authenticity of virtual human representations, advances in the rendering of facial and gestural behaviors that support implicit communication will be needed. In this regard, the current paper presents data from a study that compared human raters' judgments of emotional expression between actual video clips of facial expressions and identical expressions rendered on a three-dimensional avatar using a performance-driven facial animation (PDFA) system developed at the University of Southern California Integrated Media Systems Center. PDFA offers a means for creating high-fidelity visual representations of human faces and bodies. This effort explores the feasibility of sensing and reproducing a range of facial expressions with a PDFA system. In order to test concordance of human ratings of emotional expression between video and avatar facial delivery, we first had facial model subjects observe stimuli that were designed to elicit naturalistic facial expressions. The emotional stimulus induction involved presenting text-based, still image, and video clips to subjects that were previously rated to induce facial expressions for the six universals2 of facial expression (happy, sad, fear, anger, disgust, and surprise), in addition to attentiveness, puzzlement and frustration. Videotapes of these induced facial expressions that best represented prototypic examples of the above emotional states and three-dimensional avatar animations of the same facial expressions were randomly presented to 38 human raters. The raters used open-end, forced choice and seven-point Likert-type scales to rate expression in terms of identification. The forced choice and seven-point ratings provided the most usable data to determine video/animation concordance and these data are presented. To support a clear understanding of this data, a website has been set up that will allow readers to view the video and facial animation clips to illustrate the assets and limitations of these types of facial expression-rendering methods (www. USCAvatars.com/MMVR). This methodological first step in our research program has served to provide valuable human user-centered feedback to support the iterative design and development of facial avatar characteristics for expression of emotional communication. PMID:11708727

  16. RUNX2 tandem repeats and the evolution of facial length in placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When simple sequence repeats are integrated into functional genes, they can potentially act as evolutionary ‘tuning knobs’, supplying abundant genetic variation with minimal risk of pleiotropic deleterious effects. The genetic basis of variation in facial shape and length represents a possible example of this phenomenon. Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), which is involved in osteoblast differentiation, contains a functionally-important tandem repeat of glutamine and alanine amino acids. The ratio of glutamines to alanines (the QA ratio) in this protein seemingly influences the regulation of bone development. Notably, in domestic breeds of dog, and in carnivorans in general, the ratio of glutamines to alanines is strongly correlated with facial length. Results In this study we examine whether this correlation holds true across placental mammals, particularly those mammals for which facial length is highly variable and related to adaptive behavior and lifestyle (e.g., primates, afrotherians, xenarthrans). We obtained relative facial length measurements and RUNX2 sequences for 41 mammalian species representing 12 orders. Using both a phylogenetic generalized least squares model and a recently-developed Bayesian comparative method, we tested for a correlation between genetic and morphometric data while controlling for phylogeny, evolutionary rates, and divergence times. Non-carnivoran taxa generally had substantially lower glutamine-alanine ratios than carnivorans (primates and xenarthrans with means of 1.34 and 1.25, respectively, compared to a mean of 3.1 for carnivorans), and we found no correlation between RUNX2 sequence and face length across placental mammals. Conclusions Results of our diverse comparative phylogenetic analyses indicate that QA ratio does not consistently correlate with face length across the 41 mammalian taxa considered. Thus, although RUNX2 might function as a ‘tuning knob’ modifying face length in carnivorans, this relationship is not conserved across mammals in general. PMID:22741925

  17. Soccer-related Facial Trauma: Multicenter Experience in 2 Brazilian University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Dini, Gal M.; Pereira, Max D.; Gurgel, Augusto; Bastos, Endrigo O.; Nagarkar, Purushottam; Gemperli, Rolf; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Soccer is the most popular sport in Brazil and a high incidence of related trauma is reported. Maxillofacial trauma can be quite common, sometimes requiring prolonged hospitalization and invasive procedures. To characterize soccer-related facial fractures needing surgery in 2 major Brazilian Centers. Methods: A retrospective review of trauma medical records from the Plastic Surgery Divisions at the Universidade Federal de São Paulo–Escola Paulista de Medicina and the Hospital das Clinicas–Universidade de São Paulo was carried out to identify patients who underwent invasive surgical procedures due to acute soccer-related facial fractures. Data points reviewed included gender, date of injury, type of fracture, date of surgery, and procedure performed. Results: A total of 45 patients (31 from Escola Paulista de Medicina and 14 from Universidade de São Paulo) underwent surgical procedures to address facial fractures between March 2000 and September 2013. Forty-four patients were men, and mean age was 28 years. The fracture patterns seen were nasal bones (16 patients, 35%), orbitozygomatic (16 patients, 35%), mandibular (7 patients, 16%), orbital (6 patients, 13%), frontal (1 patient, 2%), and naso-orbito-ethmoid (1 patient, 2%). Mechanisms of injury included collisions with another player (n = 39) and being struck by the ball (n = 6). Conclusions: Although it is less common than orthopedic injuries, soccer players do sustain maxillofacial trauma. Knowledge of its frequency is important to first responders, nurses, and physicians who have initial contact with patients. Missed diagnosis or delayed treatment can lead to facial deformities and functional problems in the physiological actions of breathing, vision, and chewing. PMID:25289361

  18. Facial emphysema after sinus lift

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Akiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Atsuya; Hasegawa, Takumi; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man with a history of en bloc resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate (T4aN0M0) was performed a lateral-window sinus lift of the edentulous area of the left maxillary molar region to facilitate future placement of dental implants. Two hours after the surgery, the patient complained of sudden malar swelling. Marked swelling was present from the left infraorbital region to the buccal region. The swelling was associated with air pockets at the alar base and in the angulus oculi medialis region and subcutaneous malar tissue. Emphysema appeared after the patient blew his nose. Therefore, the mucous membrane of the maxillary sinus might have had a small hole, and air might have entered the subcutaneous tissue via the bone window when the air pressure in the maxillary sinus increased with nose blowing. It is important to advise patients to avoid increasing the intraoral pressure after sinus-lift procedure. PMID:26088054

  19. CHILDREN'S AND ADULTS' JUDGMENTS OF FACIAL TRUSTWORTHINESS: THE RELATIONSHIP TO FACIAL ATTRACTIVENESS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengling; Xu, Fen; Luo, Xianming

    2015-08-01

    Existing research suggests that adults make effective trustworthiness judgments based on facial attractiveness during initial interactions. However, little is known about how children judge trustworthiness from faces. The present study examined the facial features that contributed to judgments of trustworthiness and attractiveness by three groups of Chinese children aged 8 years old (n=34; 17 boys), 10 years old (n=34; 17 boys), and 12 years old (n = 34; 17 boys) and a comparison group of 37 undergraduates (M age=20.2 yr.; 16 men). Using FaceGen Modeler 3.1, a total of 400 East Asian adult faces (200 male, 200 female) portraying neutral emotions with direct gazes were generated. The faces were represented by 61 shape features and were presented for a maximum of 3,000 msec. in the center of the computer screen in randomized order. The participants were asked to judge whether each person was trustworthy and to rate the level of trustworthiness; 1 month later, the attractiveness of the same faces was judged using a similar procedure. The children and the adults used similar facial features to judge trustworthiness (e.g., the brow ridge, nose, and chin). Some of the facial features used by the different age groups as the basis for the trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments were similar. Facial attractiveness accounted for roughly 30 to 60% of the variance in the groups' trustworthiness judgments. Thus, facial attractiveness may serve as a heuristic property that signals trustworthiness and guides adaptive social decisions. More importantly, even children as young as 8 years old use a strategy similar to that of adults to make trustworthiness judgments, although some differences in the use of specific facial features were observed among the age groups. PMID:26108060

  20. Neuromodulation of Emotion Using Functional Electrical Stimulation Applied to Facial Muscles

    E-print Network

    Popovic, Milos R.

    are needed. Research on facial expressions has shown that facial movements can induce the corresponding to the study of facial movements as they relate to particular emotions. Facial expressions for basic emotionsNeuromodulation of Emotion Using Functional Electrical Stimulation Applied to Facial Muscles José

  1. A 43-year-old woman presenting with subacute, bilateral, sequential facial nerve palsies, then developing pseudotumour cerebri.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Laura; Croxson, Glen; McCluskey, Peter; Halmagyi, Gabor Michael

    2015-01-01

    A patient presented elsewhere with what appeared to be a simple, unilateral, chronic suppurative otitis media and then developed an ipsilateral facial palsy. She soon developed the same problem on the other side. At the time, a brain MRI had been ordered but the clinician did not review it with a radiologist. The surgical specimens were not sent for histopathology. When transferred to our institution 3?months later, the patient had severe bilateral papilloedema due to intracranial hypertension due to missed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Further surgery revealed that the pathology in the temporal bone was B-cell lymphoma, which, fortunately, responded to chemoradiotherapy. There was good resolution of the facial palsies, but the patient has severe permanent visual loss due to optic atrophy. PMID:26604227

  2. Looking with different eyes: The psychological meaning of categorisation goals moderates facial reactivity to facial expressions.

    PubMed

    van Dillen, Lotte F; Harris, Lasana T; van Dijk, Wilco W; Rotteveel, Mark

    2015-12-01

    In the present research we examined whether the psychological meaning of people's categorisation goals affects facial muscle activity in response to facial expressions of emotion. We had participants associate eye colour (blue, brown) with either a personality trait (extraversion) or a physical trait (light frequency) and asked them to use these associations in a speeded categorisation task of angry, disgusted, happy and neutral faces while assessing participants' response times and facial muscle activity. We predicted that participants would respond differentially to the emotional faces when the categorisation criteria allowed for inferences about a target's thoughts, feelings or behaviour (i.e., when categorising extraversion), but not when these lacked any social meaning (i.e., when categorising light frequency). Indeed, emotional faces triggered facial reactions to facial expressions when participants categorised extraversion, but not when they categorised light frequency. In line with this, only when categorising extraversion did participants' response times indicate a negativity bias replicating previous results. Together, these findings provide further evidence for the contextual nature of people's selective responses to the emotions expressed by others. PMID:25435404

  3. [Gao Yuchun's experience of facial paralysis treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjun; Cui, Linhua; Yuan, Jun; He, Li; Xie, Zhanqing; Xue, Weihua; Li, Mei; Zhang, Zhenwei; Gao, Yuchun; Kang, Suobin

    2015-05-01

    To introduce professor Gao Yuchun's clinical experience and treating characteristics of facial paralysis treated with acupuncture and moxibustion. Professor Gao pays attention to yangming when he selects acupoints for clinical syndrome, and directs acupoints selection based on syndrome differentiation in different levels of jingjin, meridians and zangfu; he praises opposing needling technique and reinforcing the deficiency and reducing the excess highly; the acupuncture manipulation is gentle,shallow and slow for reducing the healthy side and reinforcing the affected side, and through losing its excess to complement its deficiency; besides, he stresses needle retaining time and distinguishes reinforcing and reducing. Facial paralysis is treated with key factors such as acupoints selecting based on yangming, acupuncture manipulation, needle retaining time, etc. And the spleen and stomach is fine and good at transportation and transformation; the meridians is harmonious; the qi and blood is smooth. The clinical efficacy is enhanced finally. PMID:26255524

  4. Automatic recognition of emotions from facial expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Henry; Gertner, Izidor

    2014-06-01

    In the human-computer interaction (HCI) process it is desirable to have an artificial intelligent (AI) system that can identify and categorize human emotions from facial expressions. Such systems can be used in security, in entertainment industries, and also to study visual perception, social interactions and disorders (e.g. schizophrenia and autism). In this work we survey and compare the performance of different feature extraction algorithms and classification schemes. We introduce a faster feature extraction method that resizes and applies a set of filters to the data images without sacrificing the accuracy. In addition, we have enhanced SVM to multiple dimensions while retaining the high accuracy rate of SVM. The algorithms were tested using the Japanese Female Facial Expression (JAFFE) Database and the Database of Faces (AT&T Faces).

  5. Facial reconstruction – anatomical art or artistic anatomy?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Facial reconstruction is employed in the context of forensic investigation and for creating three-dimensional portraits of people from the past, from ancient Egyptian mummies and bog bodies to digital animations of J. S. Bach. This paper considers a facial reconstruction method (commonly known as the Manchester method) associated with the depiction and identification of the deceased from skeletal remains. Issues of artistic licence and scientific rigour, in relation to soft tissue reconstruction, anatomical variation and skeletal assessment, are discussed. The need for artistic interpretation is greatest where only skeletal material is available, particularly for the morphology of the ears and mouth, and with the skin for an ageing adult. The greatest accuracy is possible when information is available from preserved soft tissue, from a portrait, or from a pathological condition or healed injury. PMID:20447245

  6. High-rhythm automatic driver for bone traction: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L W; Cheung, L K; Ma, L; Wong, M C M

    2008-08-01

    The distractors currently used in clinics are activated manually by intermittent advancement. An automatic driver has been developed to attach to custom-made or commercially available distractors and activate advancement at a high rhythm of 8 steps per second. One 1.5-V lithium button battery is used as the power source to drive a step motor and the driving torque is transmitted to the distractor through a flexible shaft at a rate of 2 revolutions per day. This automatic driver was tested in 5 rabbits for mandibular lengthening. Osteotomy was performed on one side of the mandible and the custom-made distractor was adapted. After a latency period of 3 days, the automatic driver was attached to the distractor's arm and mandibular lengthening was activated. After 11 days of continuous distraction the automatic driver was detached from the distractor's arm. All the rabbits were euthanized after 4 weeks of consolidation. The distraction regenerates were analysed by plain radiography, micro-computerized tomography and histological examination. All 5 rabbits completed the experimental process and healed uneventfully. The mandibles were confirmed to have lengthened successfully and the distraction gap was filled with newly formed bone. PMID:18468865

  7. Facial Skin Lesions Dentists Should Know.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Louna; Kudsi, Zaki

    2015-01-01

    Facial skin lesions are common; patients may present with a.nodule, crack, ulcer or abnormal discoloration of the skin that is not normally present. Ideally, dentists should include face examination in their routine clinical examination. Any suspicious lesion should be referred to a dermatologist as an early diagnosis and treatment could be life-saving. This article will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of common lesions of the face. PMID:26506807

  8. Facial expression decoding in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pell, Marc D; Leonard, Carol L

    2005-05-01

    The ability to derive emotional and non-emotional information from unfamiliar, static faces was evaluated in 21 adults with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 21 healthy control subjects. Participants' sensitivity to emotional expressions was comprehensively assessed in tasks of discrimination, identification, and rating of five basic emotions: happiness, (pleasant) surprise, anger, disgust, and sadness. Subjects also discriminated and identified faces according to underlying phonemic ("facial speech") cues and completed a neuropsychological test battery. Results uncovered limited evidence that the processing of emotional faces differed between the two groups in our various conditions, adding to recent arguments that these skills are frequently intact in non-demented adults with PD [R. Adolphs, R. Schul, D. Tranel, Intact recognition of facial emotion in Parkinson's disease, Neuropsychology 12 (1998) 253-258]. Patients could also accurately interpret facial speech cues and discriminate the identity of unfamiliar faces in a normal manner. There were some indications that basal ganglia pathology in PD contributed to selective difficulties recognizing facial expressions of disgust, consistent with a growing literature on this topic. Collectively, findings argue that abnormalities for face processing are not a consistent or generalized feature of medicated adults with mild-moderate PD, prompting discussion of issues that may be contributing to heterogeneity within this literature. Our results imply a more limited role for the basal ganglia in the processing of emotion from static faces relative to speech prosody, for which the same PD patients exhibited pronounced deficits in a parallel set of tasks [M.D. Pell, C. Leonard, Processing emotional tone from speech in Parkinson's disease: a role for the basal ganglia, Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci. 3 (2003) 275-288]. These diverging patterns allow for the possibility that basal ganglia mechanisms are more engaged by temporally-encoded social information derived from cue sequences over time. PMID:15820640

  9. Facial Fracture Management in Northwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Abdurrazaq Olanrewaju; Soyele, Olujide Oladele; Godwin, Ndubuizi Ugochukwu; Ibikunle, Adebayo Aremu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Facial fracture is gradually become a public health problem in our community due to the attendant morbidity and mortality. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the pattern of facial fracture in Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital. This cross-sectional study was undertaken to provide information regarding gender, age, etiology, and diagnosis of patients with maxillofacial fractures. Materials and Methods: A 1-year review of patients diagnosed and treated for facial fractures in Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital between January 2011 and December 2011. The diagnosis was based on radiographic data and clinical examination. The main analysis outcome measures were etiology, age, gender, site, and treatment. Data were organized and presented by means of descriptive statistics and Pearson's Chi-square test. The level of significance adopted was 5%. Results: A total of 40 patients were treated in this period. Over 95% were male, 81% were caused by road traffic crash (RTC) and 86.4% were in the 21-30 years group. Most patients (52%) had mandibular fractures, and the most common site was the body. Most patients with midfacial fractures had fractures of the zygomaticomaxillary region (36%), while fractures of the parasymphyseal region were more common in the mandible 156 (31%). The most common treatment for jaw fractures was mandibulomaxillary fixation (MMF). Stable zygomatic complex fractures were reduced (elevated) intraorally, and unstable ones were supported by antral packs. Conclusions: This study highlights facial fractures secondary to RTC as a serious public health problem in our environment. Preventive strategies remain the cheapest way to reduce direct and indirect costs of the sequelae of RTC. It also bring to the fore the necessity to shift to open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of fractures. PMID:24741422

  10. Impact on facial rejuvenation with dermatological preparations

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    The treatment options for facial rejuvenation using dermatological, nonsurgical techniques have dramatically increased in the past 10 years. This follows the introduction of botulinum toxin and a variety of dermal fillers. The public interest in noninvasive treatments has changed the market beyond recognition with more physicians involved in providing services to satiate the demand. The impact on the public and medical profession is discussed. PMID:19503770

  11. Facial Expression Generation from Speaker's Emotional States in Daily Conversation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hiroki; Ohshima, Koh

    A framework for generating facial expressions from emotional states in daily conversation is described. It provides a mapping between emotional states and facial expressions, where the former is represented by vectors with psychologically-defined abstract dimensions, and the latter is coded by the Facial Action Coding System. In order to obtain the mapping, parallel data with rated emotional states and facial expressions were collected for utterances of a female speaker, and a neural network was trained with the data. The effectiveness of proposed method is verified by a subjective evaluation test. As the result, the Mean Opinion Score with respect to the suitability of generated facial expression was 3.86 for the speaker, which was close to that of hand-made facial expressions.

  12. Time Perception and Dynamics of Facial Expressions of Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Fayolle, Sophie L.; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were run to examine the effects of dynamic displays of facial expressions of emotions on time judgments. The participants were given a temporal bisection task with emotional facial expressions presented in a dynamic or a static display. Two emotional facial expressions and a neutral expression were tested and compared. Each of the emotional expressions had the same affective valence (unpleasant), but one was high-arousing (expressing anger) and the other low-arousing (expressing sadness). Our results showed that time judgments are highly sensitive to movements in facial expressions and the emotions expressed. Indeed, longer perceived durations were found in response to the dynamic faces and the high-arousing emotional expressions compared to the static faces and low-arousing expressions. In addition, the facial movements amplified the effect of emotions on time perception. Dynamic facial expressions are thus interesting tools for examining variations in temporal judgments in different social contexts. PMID:24835285

  13. Normal facial age and gender perception in developmental prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Garga; Nakayama, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Developmental prosopagnosia is characterized by a severe deficit in face-identity recognition. Most developmental prosopagnosics do not report deficits of facial age or gender perception. We developed tasks for evaluating facial age and gender processing and used them in the largest group of developmental prosopagnosics (N?=?18) tested on facial age and gender perception. Care was taken to ensure that the tests were sufficiently sensitive to subtle deficits and required holistic processing as assessed by strong inversion effects in control subjects. Despite severe facial identity deficits, developmental prosopagnosics largely performed these discriminations comparably to controls. The common descriptor "faceblind" implied by the term prosopagnosia is inaccurate as certain kinds of nonidentity facial information, which we call physiognomic features, are processed well by both prosopagnosics and age-matched controls alike. Normal facial age and gender perception in developmental prosopagnosics is consistent with parallel processing models in the cognitive architecture of face processing. PMID:23428082

  14. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Nathan; O’Donohue, Peter; French, Heath; Griffin, Aaron; Gochee, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed effectively. PMID:26090278

  15. Sex differences in perception of invisible facial expressions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sang Wook; Yoon, K. Lira; Peaco, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that women are better at recognizing facial expressions than men. In the current study, we examined whether this female advantage in the processing of facial expressions also occurs at the unconscious level. In two studies, participants performed a simple detection task and a 4-AFC task while faces were rendered invisible by continuous flash suppression. When faces with full intensity expressions were suppressed, there was no significant sex difference in the time of breakup of suppression (Study 1). However, when suppressed faces depicted low intensity expressions, suppression broke up earlier in men than women, indicating that men may be more sensitive to facial features related to mild facial expressions (Study 2). The current findings suggest that the female advantage in processing of facial expressions is absent in unconscious processing of emotional information. The female advantage in facial expression processing may require conscious perception of faces. PMID:25883583

  16. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Facial Features

    PubMed Central

    Papoian, Vardan; Mardirossian, Vartan; Hess, Donald Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgeries performed in the USA has increased twelve-fold in the past two decades. The effects of rapid weight loss on facial features has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery will mimic the effects of aging thus giving the patient an older and less attractive appearance. Methods Consecutive patients were enrolled from the bariatric surgical clinic at our institution. Pre and post weight loss photographs were taken and used to generate two surveys. The surveys were distributed through social media to assess the difference between the preoperative and postoperative facial photos, in terms of patients' perceived age and overall attractiveness. 102 respondents completed the first survey and 95 respondents completed the second survey. Results Of the 14 patients, five showed statistically significant change in perceived age (three more likely to be perceived older and two less likely to be perceived older). The patients were assessed to be more attractive postoperatively, which showed statistical significance. Conclusions Weight loss does affect facial aesthetics. Mild weight loss is perceived by survey respondents to give the appearance of a younger but less attractive patient, while substantial weight loss is perceived to give the appearance of an older but more attractive patient. PMID:26430627

  17. Geometric facial gender scoring: objectivity of perception.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Syed Zulqarnain; Rooney, Kathleen; Shafait, Faisal; Walters, Mark; Mian, Ajmal

    2014-01-01

    Gender score is the cognitive judgement of the degree of masculinity or femininity of a face which is considered to be a continuum. Gender scores have long been used in psychological studies to understand the complex psychosocial relationships between people. Perceptual scores for gender and attractiveness have been employed for quality assessment and planning of cosmetic facial surgery. Various neurological disorders have been linked to the facial structure in general and the facial gender perception in particular. While, subjective gender scoring by human raters has been a tool of choice for psychological studies for many years, the process is both time and resource consuming. In this study, we investigate the geometric features used by the human cognitive system in perceiving the degree of masculinity/femininity of a 3D face. We then propose a mathematical model that can mimic the human gender perception. For our experiments, we obtained 3D face scans of 64 subjects using the 3dMDface scanner. The textureless 3D face scans of the subjects were then observed in different poses and assigned a gender score by 75 raters of a similar background. Our results suggest that the human cognitive system employs a combination of Euclidean and geodesic distances between biologically significant landmarks of the face for gender scoring. We propose a mathematical model that is able to automatically assign an objective gender score to a 3D face with a correlation of up to 0.895 with the human subjective scores. PMID:24923319

  18. The Effect of Altering the Mechanical Loading Environment on the Expression of Bone Regenerating Molecules in Cases of Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Mohammad M.; Anam, Emad A.; Makhdom, Asim M.; Villemure, Isabelle; Hamdy, Reggie Charles

    2014-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a surgical technique where gradual and controlled separation of two bony fragments following an osteotomy leads to the induction of new bone formation in the distracted gap. DO is used for limb lengthening, correction of bony deformities, and the replacement of bone loss secondary to infection, trauma, and tumors. Although DO gives satisfactory results in most cases, one major drawback of this technique is the prolonged period of time the external fixator has to be kept on until the newly formed bone consolidates thus leading to numerous complications. Numerous attempts at accelerating bone formation during DO have been reported. One specific approach is manipulation of the mechanical environment during DO by applying changes in the standard protocol of distraction. Attempts at changing this mechanical environment led to mixed results. Increasing the rate or applying acute distraction, led to poor bone formation in the distracted zone. On the other hand, the addition of compressive forces (such as weight bearing, alternating distraction with compression or by over-lengthening, and then shortening) has been reported to increase bone formation. It still remains unclear why these alterations may lead to changes in bone formation. While the cellular and molecular changes occurring during the standard DO protocol, specifically increased expression of transforming growth factor-?1, platelet-derived growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and bone morphogenic proteins have been extensively investigated, the literature is sparse on the changes occurring when this protocol is altered. It is the purpose of this article to review the pertinent literature on the changes in the expression of various proteins and molecules as a result of changes in the mechanical loading technique in DO and try to define potential future research directions. PMID:25540639

  19. Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief

    MedlinePLUS

    ... raquo Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief Heath and Aging Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief Who Has Osteoporosis? What Is ... of this makes your bones weaker. Who Has Osteoporosis? Ten million Americans have osteoporosis. They are mostly ...

  20. Menopause and Bone Loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or no exercise • Smoking cigarettes • Drinking too much alcohol Healthy Bone Osteoporosis Over time, this bone loss ... osteoporosis? • How often should I have a bone density test? • Should I take calcium and vitamin D ...

  1. Bone Lesions and Damage

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the risk of fractures. Bone loss frequently accompanies multiple myeloma, and 85% of patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma have ... result in pain, bone fractures, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia. Multiple myeloma bone lesions may be treated with bisphosphonates or ...

  2. Telomere dysfunction and activation of alternative lengthening of telomeres in B-lymphocytes infected by Epstein–Barr virus

    PubMed Central

    Kamranvar, S A; Chen, X; Masucci, M G

    2013-01-01

    Malignant cells achieve replicative immortality by two alternative mechanisms, a common one dependent on de novo synthesis of telomeric DNA by telomerase, and a rare one based on telomere recombination known as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) transforms human B-lymphocytes into lymphoblastoid cell lines with unlimited growth potential in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that newly EBV-infected cells exhibit multiple signs of telomere dysfunction, including the occurrence of extra-chromosomal telomeres, telomere fusion and telomere length heterogeneity, and undergo progressive increase in telomere length without a parallel increase in telomerase activity. This phenotype is accompanied by the accumulation of telomere-associated promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies and telomeric-sister chromatid exchange, suggesting that EBV infection promotes the activation of ALT. Newly infected cells also display a significant reduction of telomere-associated TRF2 and express low levels of TRF1, TRF2, POT1 and ATRX, pointing to telomere de-protection as an important correlate of ALT activation. Collectively, these findings highlight the involvement of recombination-dependent mechanisms for maintenance of telomere homeostasis in EBV-induced B-cell immortalization. PMID:23708666

  3. [Aspects of diagnosis and treatment of the facial nerve neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mironenko, T V; Korotnev, V N

    2002-01-01

    As many as 86 patients with neuropathy of the facial nerve complicated by development of postneuritic muscular contractures were examined. Based on the clinical-and-neurophysiological investigation, findings from rheoencephalography, electroencephalography, echoencephaloscopy, electrodiagnosis of the facial nerve, clinical variants of the facial nerve function return to normal were defined together with causes of development of muscular contractures. Efficiency is shown of use of acupuncture and magnetotherapy combined in treatment of the above trouble. PMID:12442521

  4. Facial-paralysis diagnostic system based on 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairunnisaa, Aida; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yazid, Haniza; Basri, Hassrizal Hassan; Yaacob, Sazali; Chin, Lim Chee

    2015-05-01

    The diagnostic process of facial paralysis requires qualitative assessment for the classification and treatment planning. This result is inconsistent assessment that potential affect treatment planning. We developed a facial-paralysis diagnostic system based on 3D reconstruction of RGB and depth data using a standard structured-light camera - Kinect 360 - and implementation of Active Appearance Models (AAM). We also proposed a quantitative assessment for facial paralysis based on triangular model. In this paper, we report on the design and development process, including preliminary experimental results. Our preliminary experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our quantitative assessment system to diagnose facial paralysis.

  5. Intraoperative Facial Nerve Monitoring During Cochlear Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Hui-Shan; Wu, Che-Ming; Zhuo, Ming-Ying; Yang, Chao-Hui; Hwang, Chung-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Iatrogenic facial nerve injury is one of the most severe complications of cochlear implantation (CI) surgery. Intraoperative facial nerve monitoring (IFNM) is used as an adjunctive modality in a variety of neurotologic surgeries. The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess whether the use of IFNM is associated with postoperative facial nerve injury during CI surgery. The medical charts of 645 patients who underwent CI from 1999 to 2014 were reviewed to identify postoperative facial nerve palsy between those who did and did not receive IFNM. Four patients (3 children and 1 adult) were found to have delayed onset facial nerve weakness. IFNM was used in 273 patients, of whom 2 had postoperative facial nerve weakness (incidence of 0.73%). The incidence of facial nerve weakness was 0.54% (2/372) in the patients who did not receive IFNM. IFNM had no significant effect on postoperative delayed facial palsy (P?=?1.000). All patients completely recovered within 3 months after surgery. Interestingly, all 4 cases of facial palsy received right CI, which may be because all of the surgeons in this study used their right hand to hold the drill. When right CI surgery is performed by a right-handed surgeon, the shaft of the drill is closer to the inferior angle of the facial recess, and it is easier to place the drilling shaft against the medial boundary (facial nerve) when the facial recess is small. The facial nerve sheaths of another 3 patients were unexpectedly dissected by a diamond burr during the surgery, and the monitor sounded an alarm. None of these 3 patients developed facial palsy postoperatively. This suggests that IFNM could be used as an alarm system for mechanical compression even without current stimulation. Although there appeared to be no relationship between the use of monitoring and delayed facial nerve palsy, IFNM is of great value in the early identification of a dehiscent facial nerve and assisting in the maintenance of its integrity. IFNM can still be used as an additional technique to optimize surgical success. PMID:25793243

  6. Cranio-facial clefts in pre-hispanic America.

    PubMed

    Marius-Nunez, A L; Wasiak, D T

    2015-10-01

    Among the representations of congenital malformations in Moche ceramic art, cranio-facial clefts have been portrayed in pottery found in Moche burials. These pottery vessels were used as domestic items during lifetime and funerary offerings upon death. The aim of this study was to examine archeological evidence for representations of cranio-facial cleft malformations in Moche vessels. Pottery depicting malformations of the midface in Moche collections in Lima-Peru were studied. The malformations portrayed on pottery were analyzed using the Tessier classification. Photographs were authorized by the Larco Museo.Three vessels were observed to have median cranio-facial dysraphia in association with midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible. ML001489 portrays a median cranio-facial dysraphia with an orbital cleft and a midline cleft of the lower lip extending to the mandible. ML001514 represents a median facial dysraphia in association with an orbital facial cleft and a vertical orbital dystopia. ML001491 illustrates a median facial cleft with a soft tissue cleft. Three cases of midline, orbital and lateral facial clefts have been portrayed in Moche full-figure portrait vessels. They represent the earliest registries of congenital cranio-facial malformations in ancient Peru. PMID:26010214

  7. A follow-up study of cleft children treated with vomer flap as part of a three-stage soft tissue surgical procedure. Facial morphology and dental occlusion.

    PubMed

    Friede, H; Johanson, B

    1977-01-01

    The development of the face and jaws in cleft patients, treated with a three-stage surgical procedure including a single layer vomer flap, was studied by analysing cephalometric radiographs and dental casts. The material consisted of 13 patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate and 50 cases with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, operated on 1964--1970. At the follow-up the average patient in both cleft categories demonstrated a maxillary retrognathia and in the unilateral cleft sample also a facial skeletal profile straighter than normal, though not as pronounced as we had found in cases where the vomer flap procedure was accompanied by bone grafting. However, the mean profile for the bilateral as well as the unilateral cleft group was straighter than reported for patients subjected to neither vomer flap nor bone grafting. The occlusal findings confirmed the maxillary growth retardation and similarly placed the present patients at a level between the results of the other two types of surgical regimes. As a side-effect cleft-bridging bone was formed in some part of the hard palate in every second case, though without importance for facial development. In an effort to reduce the restricted mid-facial growth found in the present patients, we have changed our surgical technique and since 1975 excluded the use of vomer flaps. PMID:333561

  8. Bone and bone marrow involvement in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Yachoui, Ralph; Parker, Brian J; Nguyen, Thanhcuong T

    2015-11-01

    Bone and bone marrow involvement in sarcoidosis have been infrequently reported. We aimed to describe the clinical features, radiological descriptions, pathological examinations, and outcomes of three patients with osseous sarcoidosis and one patient with bone marrow sarcoidosis seen at our institution. Our case series included fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography descriptions in assessing the whole-body extent of sarcoidosis. In the era of advanced imaging, large bone and axial skeleton sarcoidosis lesions are more common than previously reported. PMID:26248533

  9. INVEST IN YOUR BONES Bone Basics

    E-print Network

    in your bones? Osteoporosis, a major health problem in America, affects over 10 million persons, with 34 million at a high risk of developing the disease (National Osteoporosis Foundation, 2010). Dubbed as the "silent thief", osteoporosis is a debilitating disease which causes normal bones (above bone figure

  10. EquiFACS: The Equine Facial Action Coding System

    PubMed Central

    Wathan, Jen; Burrows, Anne M.; Waller, Bridget M.; McComb, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies of horses have investigated their facial expressions in specific contexts, e.g. pain, until now there has been no methodology available that documents all the possible facial movements of the horse and provides a way to record all potential facial configurations. This is essential for an objective description of horse facial expressions across a range of contexts that reflect different emotional states. Facial Action Coding Systems (FACS) provide a systematic methodology of identifying and coding facial expressions on the basis of underlying facial musculature and muscle movement. FACS are anatomically based and document all possible facial movements rather than a configuration of movements associated with a particular situation. Consequently, FACS can be applied as a tool for a wide range of research questions. We developed FACS for the domestic horse (Equus caballus) through anatomical investigation of the underlying musculature and subsequent analysis of naturally occurring behaviour captured on high quality video. Discrete facial movements were identified and described in terms of the underlying muscle contractions, in correspondence with previous FACS systems. The reliability of others to be able to learn this system (EquiFACS) and consistently code behavioural sequences was high—and this included people with no previous experience of horses. A wide range of facial movements were identified, including many that are also seen in primates and other domestic animals (dogs and cats). EquiFACS provides a method that can now be used to document the facial movements associated with different social contexts and thus to address questions relevant to understanding social cognition and comparative psychology, as well as informing current veterinary and animal welfare practices. PMID:26244573

  11. 3D Facial Landmark Localization3D Facial Landmark Localization using Combinatorial Search and

    E-print Network

    Whelan, Paul F.

    as an index of early brain dysmorphogenesis in neuropsychiatric disorders Down syndrome Autism Schizophrenia Bipolar disorder Fetal alcohol syndrome Velocardiofacial syndrome Velocardiofacial syndrome Cornelia de Large syndrome Joubert syndrome ... Patterns tend to be subtle #12;07/10/2012 2 Facial

  12. Effects of reconstitution of telomerase activity on telomere maintenance by the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway.

    PubMed

    Grobelny, J V; Kulp-McEliece, M; Broccoli, D

    2001-09-01

    Telomere length maintenance is essential for cellular immortalization, and thus tumorigenesis. Most human tumors and immortal cell lines maintain their telomeric DNA via the activity of a specialized reverse transcriptase, telomerase. Stabilization of telomeric repeat tracts may also be achieved through a telomerase-independent mechanism, referred to as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). ALT cells are telomerase negative and are characterized by extremely long and heterogeneously sized telomeres and novel multiprotein structures called ALT-associated PML nuclear bodies which are unique to ALT cells. To determine if reconstitution of telomerase activity suppressed ALT and restored wild-type telomere lengths, we introduced the catalytic subunit of telomerase into two ALT cell lines. Initially, two clonal lines exhibited enrichment of shorter telomeres while maintaining a population of ultra-long telomeres similar to that observed in the parental line, suggesting that telomerase is stabilizing the shorter telomeres in the population. Telomere length in the third clonal line was not detectably different from that in the parental cell line. One clonal line with a phenotype of shorter telomeres maintained this pattern over time in culture while the second gradually reverted to the parental ALT telomere length pattern, concurrent with reduction of telomerase activity. All clones continued to maintain ALT-associated PML nuclear bodies regardless of whether telomerase was present. The data suggest that introduction of telomerase activity alone is not sufficient to completely repress ALT, that telomerase acts preferentially on the shortest telomeres in the culture and that the ALT and telomerase pathways may be present concurrently in mammalian cells. PMID:11555632

  13. Alternative lengthening of telomeres is enriched in, and impacts survival of TP53 mutant pediatric malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Mangerel, Joshua; Price, Aryeh; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Brzezinski, Jack; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Merino, Diana; Baskin, Berivan; Wasserman, Jonathan; Mistry, Matthew; Barszczyk, Mark; Picard, Daniel; Mack, Stephen; Remke, Marc; Starkman, Hava; Elizabeth, Cynthia; Zhang, Cindy; Alon, Noa; Lees, Jodi; Andrulis, Irene L; Wunder, Jay S; Jabado, Nada; Johnston, Donna L; Rutka, James T; Dirks, Peter B; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D; Huang, Annie; Malkin, David; Hawkins, Cynthia; Tabori, Uri

    2014-12-01

    Although telomeres are maintained in most cancers by telomerase activation, a subset of tumors utilize alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to sustain self-renewal capacity. In order to study the prevalence and significance of ALT in childhood brain tumors we screened 517 pediatric brain tumors using the novel C-circle assay. We examined the association of ALT with alterations in genes found to segregate with specific histological phenotypes and with clinical outcome. ALT was detected almost exclusively in malignant tumors (p = 0.001). ALT was highly enriched in primitive neuroectodermal tumors (12 %), choroid plexus carcinomas (23 %) and high-grade gliomas (22 %). Furthermore, in contrast to adult gliomas, pediatric low grade gliomas which progressed to high-grade tumors did not exhibit the ALT phenotype. Somatic but not germline TP53 mutations were highly associated with ALT (p = 1.01 × 10(-8)). Of the other alterations examined, only ATRX point mutations and reduced expression were associated with the ALT phenotype (p = 0.0005). Interestingly, ALT attenuated the poor outcome conferred by TP53 mutations in specific pediatric brain tumors. Due to very poor prognosis, one year overall survival was quantified in malignant gliomas, while in children with choroid plexus carcinoma, five year overall survival was investigated. For children with TP53 mutant malignant gliomas, one year overall survival was 63 ± 12 and 23 ± 10 % for ALT positive and negative tumors, respectively (p = 0.03), while for children with TP53 mutant choroid plexus carcinomas, 5 years overall survival was 67 ± 19 and 27 ± 13 % for ALT positive and negative tumors, respectively (p = 0.07). These observations suggest that the presence of ALT is limited to a specific group of childhood brain cancers which harbor somatic TP53 mutations and may influence the outcome of these patients. Analysis of ALT may contribute to risk stratification and targeted therapies to improve outcome for these children. PMID:25315281

  14. Interest and attention in facial recognition.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Melinda C R; Weaver, George E

    2003-04-01

    When applied to facial recognition, the levels of processing paradigm has yielded consistent results: faces processed in deep conditions are recognized better than faces processed under shallow conditions. However, there are multiple explanations for this occurrence. The own-race advantage in facial recognition, the tendency to recognize faces from one's own race better than faces from another race, is also consistently shown but not clearly explained. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the levels of processing findings in facial recognition are a result of interest and attention, not differences in processing. This hypothesis was tested for both own and other faces with 105 Caucasian general psychology students. Levels of processing was manipulated as a between-subjects variable; students were asked to answer one of four types of study questions, e.g., "deep" or "shallow" processing questions, while viewing the study faces. Students' recognition of a subset of previously presented Caucasian and African-American faces from a test-set with an equal number of distractor faces was tested. They indicated their interest in and attention to the task. The typical levels of processing effect was observed with better recognition performance in the deep conditions than in the shallow conditions for both own- and other-race faces. The typical own-race advantage was also observed regardless of level of processing condition. For both own- and other-race faces, level of processing explained a significant portion of the recognition variance above and beyond what was explained by interest in and attention to the task. PMID:12776830

  15. Mapping the development of facial expression recognition.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Helen; Vizioli, Luca; Ouyang, Xinyi; Caldara, Roberto

    2015-11-01

    Reading the non-verbal cues from faces to infer the emotional states of others is central to our daily social interactions from very early in life. Despite the relatively well-documented ontogeny of facial expression recognition in infancy, our understanding of the development of this critical social skill throughout childhood into adulthood remains limited. To this end, using a psychophysical approach we implemented the QUEST threshold-seeking algorithm to parametrically manipulate the quantity of signals available in faces normalized for contrast and luminance displaying the six emotional expressions, plus neutral. We thus determined observers' perceptual thresholds for effective discrimination of each emotional expression from 5 years of age up to adulthood. Consistent with previous studies, happiness was most easily recognized with minimum signals (35% on average), whereas fear required the maximum signals (97% on average) across groups. Overall, recognition improved with age for all expressions except happiness and fear, for which all age groups including the youngest remained within the adult range. Uniquely, our findings characterize the recognition trajectories of the six basic emotions into three distinct groupings: expressions that show a steep improvement with age - disgust, neutral, and anger; expressions that show a more gradual improvement with age - sadness, surprise; and those that remain stable from early childhood - happiness and fear, indicating that the coding for these expressions is already mature by 5 years of age. Altogether, our data provide for the first time a fine-grained mapping of the development of facial expression recognition. This approach significantly increases our understanding of the decoding of emotions across development and offers a novel tool to measure impairments for specific facial expressions in developmental clinical populations. PMID:25704672

  16. Investigation into the use of photoanthropometry in facial image comparison.

    PubMed

    Moreton, Reuben; Morley, Johanna

    2011-10-10

    Photoanthropometry is a metric based facial image comparison technique. Measurements of the face are taken from an image using predetermined facial landmarks. Measurements are then converted to proportionality indices (PIs) and compared to PIs from another facial image. Photoanthropometry has been presented as a facial image comparison technique in UK courts for over 15 years. It is generally accepted that extrinsic factors (e.g. orientation of the head, camera angle and distance from the camera) can cause discrepancies in anthropometric measurements of the face from photographs. However there has been limited empirical research into quantifying the influence of such variables. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of photoanthropometric measurements between different images of the same individual taken with different angulations of the camera. The study examined the facial measurements of 25 individuals from high resolution photographs, taken at different horizontal and vertical camera angles in a controlled environment. Results show that the degree of variability in facial measurements of the same individual due to variations in camera angle can be as great as the variability of facial measurements between different individuals. Results suggest that photoanthropometric facial comparison, as it is currently practiced, is unsuitable for elimination purposes. Preliminary investigations into the effects of distance from camera and image resolution in poor quality images suggest that such images are not an accurate representation of an individuals face, however further work is required. PMID:21802228

  17. The influence of snoring, mouth breathing and apnoea on facial

    E-print Network

    Rosin, Paul

    The influence of snoring, mouth breathing and apnoea on facial morphology in late childhood, Richmond S, Popat H, et al. The influence of snoring, mouth breathing and apnoea on facial morphology: Parents in the ALSPAC reported sleep disordered symptoms (snoring, mouth breathing and apnoea

  18. Automatic construction of 3D animatable facial avatars

    E-print Network

    Sezgin, Metin

    Automatic construction of 3D animatable facial avatars By Yujian Gao*, Qinping Zhao, Aimin Hao, T a good animatable avatar automatically, given only a 3D static triangle mesh of the head. An automatic mechanism is devised for constructing multi- layer animatable facial avatars for unseen faces. We evaluate

  19. On the Trail of Facial Processing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    E-print Network

    Deussen, Oliver

    On the Trail of Facial Processing in Autism Spectrum Disorders Diana Arellano1(B) , Ulrich Max perception deficits in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we propose the project SARA. Its. Keywords: Autism spectrum disorders · Real-time NPR · Abstraction · 3D characters · Dynamic facial

  20. Cross-cultural perceptions of facial resemblance between kin.

    PubMed

    Alvergne, Alexandra; Oda, Ryo; Faurie, Charlotte; Matsumoto-Oda, Akiko; Durand, Valérie; Raymond, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Humans use facial comparisons to identify their relatives and adjust their behavior accordingly. However, the mechanisms underlying the assessment of facial similarities are poorly known. Here, we investigate the role of exposure to particular faces for the detection of facial similarities by asking judges to detect parent-child pairs using faces from different origins. In a first phase, French and Senegalese judges assessed facial resemblance in French and Senegalese families. In a second phase, Senegalese judges who had immigrated to France, as well as French and Senegalese stationary judges, were asked to rate a second set of Senegalese and French families. The judges showed no differences in their ability to detect parent-child pairs in French and Senegalese families in both the first and second phases. For judges who changed their country of residence, the answer time and duration of stay in the new country were not associated with correct assignment rates. Our results suggest that exposure has a limited role in the ability to process facial resemblance in others, which contrasts with facial recognition processing. We also discuss whether processing facial similarities is a by-product of the facial recognition system or an evolved ability to assess kinship relationships. PMID:19761314

  1. Facial Expression Analysis using Nonlinear Decomposable Generative Models

    E-print Network

    Lee, Chan-Su

    generative model. In this paper, we consider facial expressions which lie on a one dimensional closed different dynamic facial appearances for different people and for different expressions. Given a single to recognize expressions performed by different people never seen during training. We show experiment results

  2. Beyond Facial Expressions: Learning Human Emotion from Body Gestures

    E-print Network

    Gong, Shaogang

    Beyond Facial Expressions: Learning Human Emotion from Body Gestures Caifeng Shan, Shaogang Gong 4NS, UK {cfshan, sgg, pmco}@dcs.qmul.ac.uk Abstract Vision-based human affect analysis facial expressions, we investigate affective body gesture analysis in video sequences, a relatively

  3. Probabilistic Subpixel Temporal Registration for Facial Expression Analysis

    E-print Network

    Gunes, Hatice

    by the human vision system, we develop a motion rep- resentation that measures registration errors amongProbabilistic Subpixel Temporal Registration for Facial Expression Analysis Evangels Sariyanidi- rately before any analysis, otherwise registration errors may be inter- preted as facial activity

  4. Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome: 30 Years of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome is one of the names that has been attached to one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes in humans. The labels DiGeorge sequence, 22q11 deletion syndrome, conotruncal anomalies face syndrome, CATCH 22, and Sedlackova syndrome have all been attached to the same disorder. Velo-cardio-facial syndrome has an…

  5. Developmental prosopagnosia and the Benton Facial Recognition Test

    E-print Network

    Nakayama, Ken

    Developmental prosopagnosia and the Benton Facial Recognition Test Bradley C. Duchaine, PhD; and Ken Nakayama, PhD Abstract--The Benton Facial Recognition Test is used for clinical and research purposes, but evidence suggests that it is possible to pass the test with impaired face discrimination

  6. Automatic decoding of facial movements reveals deceptive pain expressions.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Littlewort, Gwen C; Frank, Mark G; Lee, Kang

    2014-03-31

    In highly social species such as humans, faces have evolved to convey rich information for social interaction, including expressions of emotions and pain [1-3]. Two motor pathways control facial movement [4-7]: a subcortical extrapyramidal motor system drives spontaneous facial expressions of felt emotions, and a cortical pyramidal motor system controls voluntary facial expressions. The pyramidal system enables humans to simulate facial expressions of emotions not actually experienced. Their simulation is so successful that they can deceive most observers [8-11]. However, machine vision may be able to distinguish deceptive facial signals from genuine facial signals by identifying the subtle differences between pyramidally and extrapyramidally driven movements. Here, we show that human observers could not discriminate real expressions of pain from faked expressions of pain better than chance, and after training human observers, we improved accuracy to a modest 55%. However, a computer vision system that automatically measures facial movements and performs pattern recognition on those movements attained 85% accuracy. The machine system's superiority is attributable to its ability to differentiate the dynamics of genuine expressions from faked expressions. Thus, by revealing the dynamics of facial action through machine vision systems, our approach has the potential to elucidate behavioral fingerprints of neural control systems involved in emotional signaling. PMID:24656830

  7. Botulinum Toxin in the Treatment of Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Omid B; Diels, Jacqueline; White, William Matthew

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews the current literature supporting the use of botulinum toxin in producing symmetric facial features and reducing unwanted, involuntary movements. Methods, protocols, and adverse events are discussed. Additionally, the authors suggest that using botulinum toxin A therapy in postparalytic facial synkinesis can provide long-term results when used in conjunction with other treatment modalities. PMID:26611697

  8. Automatic Prediction of Facial Trait Judgments: Appearance vs. Structural Models

    E-print Network

    Todorov, Alex

    Automatic Prediction of Facial Trait Judgments: Appearance vs. Structural Models Mario Rojas Q.1 characteristics plays a crucial role in human relations and it is the focus of attention for research in diverse Prediction of Facial Trait Judgments: Appearance vs. Structural Models. PLoS ONE 6(8): e23323. doi:10

  9. Crafting Personalized Facial Avatars Using Editable Portrait and Photograph Example

    E-print Network

    Deng, Zhigang

    Crafting Personalized Facial Avatars Using Editable Portrait and Photograph Example Tanasai portrait editing and image example-based painting techniques. Starting from a default 3D face portrait personalized 3D facial avatars by fusing a model-based 3D portrait editing with example-based face texture

  10. Virtual Planning of Facial Reconstructions , C. Lamberti1

    E-print Network

    Frey, Pascal

    , Casalecchio di Reno, Bologna, Italy 3 Unit of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, S. Orsola: Virtual surgery, facial reconstruction, maxillo-facial surgery, computer simulation, CT, MRI. Summary In craniofacial surgery it is not easy to predict the shape of the postoperative face, as muscular changes

  11. Automatic Recognition of Facial Actions in Spontaneous Expressions

    E-print Network

    Bartlett, Marian Stewart

    posed expressions in both which muscles are moved, and in the dy- namics of the movement. Advances movements, which roughly correspond to the individual facial muscles. An example is shown in Figure 1. FACS, or comprehension? Without an ob- jective facial measurement system, we have a chicken- and-egg problem. How do we

  12. Do Facial Expressions Develop before Birth? Nadja Reissland1

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Mark

    Kingdom Abstract Background: Fetal facial development is essential not only for postnatal bonding between that there is considerable potential of this method for assessing fetal development: Subsequent discrimination of normal and abnormal fetal facial development might identify health problems in utero. Citation: Reissland N, Francis B

  13. Oro-facial-digital syndrome type II with otolaryngological manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Havle, A; Shedge, S; Malashetti, S; Jain, V

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of oro-facial-digital syndrome type II (Mohr's syndrome) which is characterized by malformations of the oral cavity, face and digits. The facial and oral features include tongue nodules, cleft or high-arched palate, missing teeth, broad nose; cleft lip. The digital features include clinodactyly, polydactyly, syndactyly, brachydactyly and duplication of the hallux. PMID:26604509

  14. Psychometric Testing of the Gordon Facial Muscle Weakness Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Shirley C.; Blum, Cynthia Ann; Parcells, Dax Andrew

    2010-01-01

    School nurses may be the first health professionals to assess the onset of facial paralysis/muscle weakness in school-age children. The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Gordon Facial Muscle Weakness Assessment Tool (GFMWT) developed by Gordon. Data were collected in two phases. In Phase 1, 4 content experts…

  15. Development of Emotional Facial Recognition in Late Childhood and Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Laura A.; De Bellis, Michael D.; Graham, Reiko; Labar, Kevin S.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to interpret emotions in facial expressions is crucial for social functioning across the lifespan. Facial expression recognition develops rapidly during infancy and improves with age during the preschool years. However, the developmental trajectory from late childhood to adulthood is less clear. We tested older children, adolescents…

  16. Facial Affect Recognition and Social Anxiety in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ale, Chelsea M.; Chorney, Daniel B.; Brice, Chad S.; Morris, Tracy L.

    2010-01-01

    Research relating anxiety and facial affect recognition has focused mostly on school-aged children and adults and has yielded mixed results. The current study sought to demonstrate an association among behavioural inhibition and parent-reported social anxiety, shyness, social withdrawal and facial affect recognition performance in 30 children,…

  17. Automated Facial Expressions Analysis in Schizophrenia: a Continuous Dynamic Approach

    E-print Network

    Weinshall, Daphne

    for Brain Science, Jerusalem 91904, Israel 2 Sha'ar Menashe Mental Health Center, Sha'ar Menashe 38706.Tron@mail.huji.ac.il Abstract. Facial expressions play a major role in psychiatric diagnosis, monitoring and treatment correlation with negative symp- toms severity. Our results emphasize the clinical importance of facial

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER The Influences of Face Inversion and Facial Expression

    E-print Network

    Maurer, Daphne M.

    ORIGINAL PAPER The Influences of Face Inversion and Facial Expression on Sensitivity to Eye Contact and facial expression on sensitivity to eye contact in high- functioning adults with and without an autism10803-013-1802-2 #12;Sensitivity to Eye Contact in Typical Adults Typical adults can detect differences

  19. On Constructing Facial Similarity Maps California Institute of Technology

    E-print Network

    Perona, Pietro

    of the same individ- ual under different lighting conditions. We demonstrate that using our methods we can effectively create Face Spaces which correspond to human notions of facial similarity. 1. Introduction Humans naturally perceive the similarity between dif- ferent objects. Humans are especially sensitive to facial

  20. Relation between facial morphology, personality and the functions of facial make-up in women.

    PubMed

    Korichi, R; Pelle-de-Queral, D; Gazano, G; Aubert, A

    2011-08-01

    Our external appearance plays a key role in everyday life's social interactions. Hence, taking care of our appearance allows us to adjust and protect ourselves, as well as communicate emotional disposition (i.e. sympathy or aversion) and social information (i.e. values, status). However, some discrete body parts or characteristics appear to be more salient than others in contributing to global body image. For example, authors showed that facial attractiveness is one of the best predictors of overall physical attractiveness and represent one of the primary factors influencing global self-esteem. Make-up is therefore ought to play a major influence in these parameters. Moreover, in a previous study whose subject was to explain the reasons that motivate women to make-up, we showed a high implication of specific psychological traits in correlation with two make-up functions (i.e. psycho-behavioural profiles 'Seduction' and 'Camouflage'; group S and group C, respectively). The purpose of this study was to assess the possible relation between our two psycho-behavioural profiles and some morphological parameters know to be involved in facial attraction (i.e. facial asymmetry and skin visual quality). First of all, our study revealed for women from the group C a greater asymmetry of the lower face (i.e. mouth area) that could be related to a possible larger amount of negative emotional experiences. Concerning make-up behaviour, women from the group S more extensively manipulated their relative facial attractiveness, by using a large range of colours, but also through a significantly longer make-up process used to adjust their visual asymmetry and therefore increase their potential of attractiveness. On the overall, our results suggest that make-up is used differentially, according to stable psychological profiles of women, to manipulate specific visual/morphological facial features involved in attractiveness. PMID:21284661

  1. Major facial trauma after helicopter landing.

    PubMed

    Becelli, Roberto; Morello, Roberto; Renzi, Giancarlo; Matarazzo, Giorgio; Dominici, Chiara

    2011-07-01

    Injuries in civil aviation can occur as a consequence of work-related accidents happening in airport. The ground crew can sustain slips, trips, falls, and machinery accidents. Most such accidents are observed when aircraft is departing. This clinical report describes a case of an airport ground assistant severely injured by a helicopter after the strike with a main rotor blade that was slowing after that the craft was landed and the engine was stopped, and reports surgical emergency treatment of life-threatening facial lesions. PMID:21778853

  2. Intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Nath, Devajit; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Thakkar, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannoma occurring within the parotid gland is a rare tumour. We report a case of schwannoma within the parotid gland in a young female patient, who underwent ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and subsequent surgical excision of the lesion. The lesion showed hyperintensity on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI. There was no adjacent lymphadenopathy. Although hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted MRI could suggest malignant tumours, the characteristic “string sign” provided the clue for the diagnosis of schwannoma. PMID:25789306

  3. [Interpersonal violence and major facial trauma].

    PubMed

    Arza, Alejandro; Jaques, Bertrand

    2002-06-01

    70% of body lesions due to interpersonal violence are situated at the level of the face. Different factors such as the consumption of alcohol or drugs, unemployment, social maladjustment and poverty are responsible of its worrisome increase in incidence over the last years. This article describes the type and incidence of major facial lesions due to interpersonal violence treated at the Division of Maxillofacial surgery of the CHUV in Lausanne during 1992, and compares it with the series of cases treated ten years later, during 2001. PMID:12174687

  4. Languages and interfaces for facial animation

    SciTech Connect

    Magnenat-Thalmann, N.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes high-level tools for specifying, controlling, and synchronizing temporal and spatial characteristics for 3D animation of facial expressions. The proposed approach consists of hierarchical levels of controls. Specification of expressions, phonemes, emotions, sentences, and head movements by means of a high-level language is shown. The various aspects of synchronization are also emphasized. Then, association of the control different interactive devices and media which allows the animator greater flexibility and freedom, is discussed. Experiments with input accessories such as the keyboard of a music synthesizer and gestures from the DataGlove are illustrated.

  5. Therapies for the bone in mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Montaño, Adriana M; Yabe, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Akemi; Dung, Vu Chi; Giugliani, Roberto; Kubaski, Francyne; Mason, Robert W; Yasuda, Eriko; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Kenji E; Barrera, Luis A; Sly, William S; Orii, Tadao

    2015-02-01

    Patients with mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) have accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in multiple tissues which may cause coarse facial features, mental retardation, recurrent ear and nose infections, inguinal and umbilical hernias, hepatosplenomegaly, and skeletal deformities. Clinical features related to bone lesions may include marked short stature, cervical stenosis, pectus carinatum, small lungs, joint rigidity (but laxity for MPS IV), kyphoscoliosis, lumbar gibbus, and genu valgum. Patients with MPS are often wheelchair-bound and physical handicaps increase with age as a result of progressive skeletal dysplasia, abnormal joint mobility, and osteoarthritis, leading to 1) stenosis of the upper cervical region, 2) restrictive small lung, 3) hip dysplasia, 4) restriction of joint movement, and 5) surgical complications. Patients often need multiple orthopedic procedures including cervical decompression and fusion, carpal tunnel release, hip reconstruction and replacement, and femoral or tibial osteotomy through their lifetime. Current measures to intervene in bone disease progression are not perfect and palliative, and improved therapies are urgently required. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and gene therapy are available or in development for some types of MPS. Delivery of sufficient enzyme to bone, especially avascular cartilage, to prevent or ameliorate the devastating skeletal dysplasias remains an unmet challenge. The use of an anti-inflammatory drug is also under clinical study. Therapies should start at a very early stage prior to irreversible bone lesion, and damage since the severity of skeletal dysplasia is associated with level of activity during daily life. This review illustrates a current overview of therapies and their impact for bone lesions in MPS including ERT, HSCT, gene therapy, and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:25537451

  6. Isolated facial hemihyperplasia: manifestation of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sathienkijkanchai, Achara; Prucka, Sandra K; Grant, John H; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2008-01-01

    Facial asymmetry is a common finding in infants and can be the result of a number of distinctive conditions such as hemifacial microsomia, overgrowth syndromes, a soft tissue tumor, and a vascular malformation. However, overgrowth syndromes such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) typically manifest more extensive involvement; it rarely presents as isolated facial overgrowth.Here, we present a 7-year-old boy who presented with facial asymmetry. He was found to have isolated facial hemihyperplasia, involving his right cheek and teeth. No abnormalities were seen in the rest of his examination. The diagnosis of BWS was considered and was confirmed by detection of a methylation abnormality in H19 (DMR1). This case demonstrates that BWS should be considered, even with isolated facial involvement. This is important, as affected patients are predisposed to certain malignancies, especially in the first 5 to 8 years of life. Therefore, specialized surveillance is recommended as the part of management. PMID:18216702

  7. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Wataru; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1) and 30 (Experiment 2) ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing. PMID:25250001

  8. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Wataru; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1) and 30 (Experiment 2) ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing. PMID:25250001

  9. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  10. Does running strengthen bone?

    PubMed

    Boudenot, Arnaud; Achiou, Zahra; Portier, Hugues

    2015-12-01

    Bone is a living tissue needing mechanical stress to maintain strength. Traditional endurance exercises offer only modest effects on bone. Walking and running produce low impact but lead to bone fatigue. This article is specifically addressed to therapists and explains the mechanisms involved for the effects of exercise on bone. Intermittent exercise limits bone fatigue, and downhill exercises increase ground impact forces and involve eccentric muscle contractions, which are particularly osteogenic. PMID:26562001

  11. Pattern Alteration: Lengthening & Shortening 

    E-print Network

    2006-08-04

    is not marked in the area, draw one in at a right angle to the grainline. Redraw the cutting and seam lines (Fig. 9). Pant crotch depth Refer to Extension publication E-390, Special Altera- tions for Pants, for instructions. Bust cart and fullness location... of Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of Congress of May 8, 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. Edward G. Smith, Director, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A...

  12. Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... their toes. The tight Achilles tendon prevents the foot from sitting flat on the floor, and ankle motion can be limited. When this tightness cannot be treated with nonsurgical stretching or ... correct a mal-positioned foot. Patients that develop ulcers in the front part ...

  13. MET and AKT Genetic Influence on Facial Emotion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chieh-Liang; Huang, Yu-Jhen; Tsai, Guochuan E.; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Background Facial emotion perception is a major social skill, but its molecular signal pathway remains unclear. The MET/AKT cascade affects neurodevelopment in general populations and face recognition in patients with autism. This study explores the possible role of MET/AKT cascade in facial emotion perception. Methods One hundred and eighty two unrelated healthy volunteers (82 men and 100 women) were recruited. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of MET (rs2237717, rs41735, rs42336, and rs1858830) and AKT rs1130233 were genotyped and tested for their effects on facial emotion perception. Facial emotion perception was assessed by the face task of Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Thorough neurocognitive functions were also assessed. Results Regarding MET rs2237717, individuals with the CT genotype performed better in facial emotion perception than those with TT (p?=?0.016 by ANOVA, 0.018 by general linear regression model [GLM] to control for age, gender, and education duration), and showed no difference with those with CC. Carriers with the most common MET CGA haplotype (frequency?=?50.5%) performed better than non-carriers of CGA in facial emotion perception (p?=?0.018, df?=?1, F?=?5.69, p?=?0.009 by GLM). In MET rs2237717/AKT rs1130233 interaction, the C carrier/G carrier group showed better facial emotion perception than those with the TT/AA genotype (p?=?0.035 by ANOVA, 0.015 by GLM), even when neurocognitive functions were controlled (p?=?0.046 by GLM). Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to suggest that genetic factors can affect performance of facial emotion perception. The findings indicate that MET variances and MET/AKT interaction may affect facial emotion perception, implicating that the MET/AKT cascade plays a significant role in facial emotion perception. Further replication studies are needed. PMID:22558359

  14. Discrimination of gender using facial image with expression change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniyada, Jun; Fukuda, Takahiro; Terada, Kenji

    2005-12-01

    By carrying out marketing research, the managers of large-sized department stores or small convenience stores obtain the information such as ratio of men and women of visitors and an age group, and improve their management plan. However, these works are carried out in the manual operations, and it becomes a big burden to small stores. In this paper, the authors propose a method of men and women discrimination by extracting difference of the facial expression change from color facial images. Now, there are a lot of methods of the automatic recognition of the individual using a motion facial image or a still facial image in the field of image processing. However, it is very difficult to discriminate gender under the influence of the hairstyle and clothes, etc. Therefore, we propose the method which is not affected by personality such as size and position of facial parts by paying attention to a change of an expression. In this method, it is necessary to obtain two facial images with an expression and an expressionless. First, a region of facial surface and the regions of facial parts such as eyes, nose, and mouth are extracted in the facial image with color information of hue and saturation in HSV color system and emphasized edge information. Next, the features are extracted by calculating the rate of the change of each facial part generated by an expression change. In the last step, the values of those features are compared between the input data and the database, and the gender is discriminated. In this paper, it experimented for the laughing expression and smile expression, and good results were provided for discriminating gender.

  15. Facial mimicry and the mirror neuron system: simultaneous acquisition of facial electromyography and functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Likowski, Katja U.; Mühlberger, Andreas; Gerdes, Antje B. M.; Wieser, Matthias J.; Pauli, Paul; Weyers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that humans automatically react with congruent facial reactions, i.e., facial mimicry, when seeing a vis-á-vis' facial expressions. The current experiment is the first investigating the neuronal structures responsible for differences in the occurrence of such facial mimicry reactions by simultaneously measuring BOLD and facial EMG in an MRI scanner. Therefore, 20 female students viewed emotional facial expressions (happy, sad, and angry) of male and female avatar characters. During picture presentation, the BOLD signal as well as M. zygomaticus major and M. corrugator supercilii activity were recorded simultaneously. Results show prototypical patterns of facial mimicry after correction for MR-related artifacts: enhanced M. zygomaticus major activity in response to happy and enhanced M. corrugator supercilii activity in response to sad and angry expressions. Regression analyses show that these congruent facial reactions correlate significantly with activations in the IFG, SMA, and cerebellum. Stronger zygomaticus reactions to happy faces were further associated to increased activities in the caudate, MTG, and PCC. Corrugator reactions to angry expressions were further correlated with the hippocampus, insula, and STS. Results are discussed in relation to core and extended models of the mirror neuron system (MNS). PMID:22855675

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 22, NO. 7, JULY 2013 2559 Simultaneous Facial Feature Tracking and Facial

    E-print Network

    the human emotion states. In contrast to the mainstream approaches, which usually only focus on one or two Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 USA (e-mail: jiq@rip.edu). Color versions of one or more of the figures analysis attempts to recognize facial expressions that represent the human emotional states. The facial

  17. Estrogen and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Väänänen, H K; Härkönen, P L

    1996-05-01

    Estrogen plays an important role in the growth and maturation of bone as well as in the regulation of bone turnover in adult bone. During bone growth estrogen is needed for proper closure of epiphyseal growth plates both in females and in males. Also in young skeleton estrogen deficiency leads to increased osteoclast formation and enhanced bone resorption. In menopause estrogen deficiency induces cancellous as well as cortical bone loss. Highly increased bone resorption in cancellous bone leads to general bone loss and destruction of local architecture because of penetrative resorption and microfractures. In cortical bone the first response of estrogen withdrawal is enhanced endocortical resorption. Later, also intracortical porosity increases. These lead to decreased bone mass, disturbed architecture and reduced bone strength. At cellular level in bone estrogen inhibits differentiation of osteoclasts thus decreasing their number and reducing the amount of active remodeling units. This effect is probably mediated through some cytokines, IL-1 and IL-6 being strongest candidates. Estrogen regulates the expression of IL-6 in bone marrow cells by a so far unknown mechanism. It is still uncertain if the effects of estrogen on osteoblasts is direct or is due to coupling phenomenon between bone formation to resorption. PMID:8865143

  18. Oxytocin and bone

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone; Zallone, Alberta

    2014-01-01

    One of the most meaningful results recently achieved in bone research has been to reveal that the pituitary hormones have profound effect on bone, so that the pituitary-bone axis has become one of the major topics in skeletal physiology. Here, we discuss the relevant evidence about the posterior pituitary hormone oxytocin (OT), previously thought to exclusively regulate parturition and breastfeeding, which has recently been established to directly regulate bone mass. Both osteoblasts and osteoclasts express OT receptors (OTR), whose stimulation enhances bone mass. Consistent with this, mice deficient in OT or OTR display profoundly impaired bone formation. In contrast, bone resorption remains unaffected in OT deficiency because, even while OT stimulates the genesis of osteoclasts, it inhibits their resorptive function. Furthermore, in addition to its origin from the pituitary, OT is also produced by bone marrow osteoblasts acting as paracrine-autocrine regulator of bone formation modulated by estrogens. In turn, the power of estrogen to increase bone mass is OTR-dependent. Therefore, OTR?/? mice injected with 17?-estradiol do not show any effects on bone formation parameters, while the same treatment increases bone mass in wild-type mice. These findings together provide evidence for an anabolic action of OT in regulating bone mass and suggest that bone marrow OT may enhance the bone-forming action of estrogen through an autocrine circuit. This established new physiological role for OT in the maintenance of skeletal integrity further suggests the potential use of this hormone for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25209411

  19. Anthropological facial approximation in three dimensions (AFA3D): computer-assisted estimation of the facial morphology using geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Guyomarc'h, Pierre; Dutailly, Bruno; Charton, Jérôme; Santos, Frédéric; Desbarats, Pascal; Coqueugniot, Hélène

    2014-11-01

    This study presents Anthropological Facial Approximation in Three Dimensions (AFA3D), a new computerized method for estimating face shape based on computed tomography (CT) scans of 500 French individuals. Facial soft tissue depths are estimated based on age, sex, corpulence, and craniometrics, and projected using reference planes to obtain the global facial appearance. Position and shape of the eyes, nose, mouth, and ears are inferred from cranial landmarks through geometric morphometrics. The 100 estimated cutaneous landmarks are then used to warp a generic face to the target facial approximation. A validation by re-sampling on a subsample demonstrated an average accuracy of c. 4 mm for the overall face. The resulting approximation is an objective probable facial shape, but is also synthetic (i.e., without texture), and therefore needs to be enhanced artistically prior to its use in forensic cases. AFA3D, integrated in the TIVMI software, is available freely for further testing. PMID:25088006

  20. Facial Transplants in Xenopus laevis Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sive, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial birth defects occur in 1 out of every 700 live births, but etiology is rarely known due to limited understanding of craniofacial development. To identify where signaling pathways and tissues act during patterning of the developing face, a 'face transplant' technique has been developed in embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. A region of presumptive facial tissue (the "Extreme Anterior Domain" (EAD)) is removed from a donor embryo at tailbud stage, and transplanted to a host embryo of the same stage, from which the equivalent region has been removed. This can be used to generate a chimeric face where the host or donor tissue has a loss or gain of function in a gene, and/or includes a lineage label. After healing, the outcome of development is monitored, and indicates roles of the signaling pathway within the donor or surrounding host tissues. Xenopus is a valuable model for face development, as the facial region is large and readily accessible for micromanipulation. Many embryos can be assayed, over a short time period since development occurs rapidly. Findings in the frog are relevant to human development, since craniofacial processes appear conserved between Xenopus and mammals. PMID:24748020

  1. Facial Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter; Osczevski, Randall J.

    2003-07-01

    A dynamic model of facial cooling was developed in conjunction with the release of the new wind chill temperature (WCT) index, whereby the WCT provides wind chill estimates based on steady-state considerations and the dynamic model can be used to predict the rate of facial cooling and particularly the onset of freezing. In the present study, the dynamic model is applied to various combinations of air temperature and wind speed, and predictions of the resultant steady-state cheek skin temperatures are tabulated. Superimposed on these tables are times to a cheek skin temperature of 10°C, which has been reported as painful, and times to freezing. For combinations of air temperature and wind speed that result in the same final steady-state cheek temperature or the same WCT, the initial rate of change of skin temperature is higher for those combinations having higher wind speeds. This suggests that during short exposures, high winds combined with low temperatures might be perceived as more stressful than light winds with lower temperatures that result in the same "wind chill." This paper also discloses the paradox that individuals having a low cheek thermal resistance are predicted to experience a more severe WCT, but be at less risk of cooling injury than individuals with higher thermal resistances. The advantages of cooling-time predictions using the dynamic model are discussed with the recommendation/conclusion that safe exposure limits are more meaningful and less ambiguous than the reporting of the WCT.

  2. 3D analysis of facial morphology.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Peter; Hutton, Tim J; Allanson, Judith E; Campbell, Linda E; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Holden, Sean; Patton, Michael A; Shaw, Adam; Temple, I Karen; Trotter, Matthew; Murphy, Kieran C; Winter, Robin M

    2004-05-01

    Dense surface models can be used to analyze 3D facial morphology by establishing a correspondence of thousands of points across each 3D face image. The models provide dramatic visualizations of 3D face-shape variation with potential for training physicians to recognize the key components of particular syndromes. We demonstrate their use to visualize and recognize shape differences in a collection of 3D face images that includes 280 controls (2 weeks to 56 years of age), 90 individuals with Noonan syndrome (NS) (7 months to 56 years), and 60 individuals with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS; 3 to 17 years of age). Ten-fold cross-validation testing of discrimination between the three groups was carried out on unseen test examples using five pattern recognition algorithms (nearest mean, C5.0 decision trees, neural networks, logistic regression, and support vector machines). For discriminating between individuals with NS and controls, the best average sensitivity and specificity levels were 92 and 93% for children, 83 and 94% for adults, and 88 and 94% for the children and adults combined. For individuals with VCFS and controls, the best results were 83 and 92%. In a comparison of individuals with NS and individuals with VCFS, a correct identification rate of 95% was achieved for both syndromes. This article contains supplementary material, which may be viewed at the American Journal of Medical Genetics website at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0148-7299/suppmat/index.html. PMID:15098232

  3. Facial Firework Injury: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Tadisina, Kashyap Komarraju; Abcarian, Ariane; Omi, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Fireworks are used to celebrate a variety of religious, patriotic, and cultural holidays and events around the world. Fireworks are common in the United States, with the most popular holiday for their use being national Independence Day, also known as July Fourth. The use of fireworks within the context of celebrations and holidays presents the ideal environment for accidents that lead to severe and dangerous injuries. Injuries to the face from explosions present a challenging problem in terms of restoring ideal ocular, oral, and facial function. Despite the well documented prevalence of firework use and injury, there is a relatively large deficit in the literature in terms of firework injury that involves the face. We present a unique case series that includes 4 adult male patients all with severe firework injuries to the face that presented at an urban level 1 trauma center. These four patients had an average age of 26.7 years old and presented within 5 hours of each other starting on July Fourth. Two patients died from their injuries and two patients underwent reconstructive surgical management, one of which had two follow up surgeries. We explore in detail their presentation, management, and subsequent outcomes as an attempt to add to the very limited data in the field of facial firework blast injury. In addition, the coincidence of their presentation within the same 5 hours brings into question the availability of the fireworks involved, and the possibility of similar injuries related to this type of firework in the future. PMID:25035740

  4. Facial firework injury: a case series.

    PubMed

    Tadisina, Kashyap K; Abcarian, Ariane; Omi, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    Fireworks are used to celebrate a variety of religious, patriotic, and cultural holidays and events around the world. Fireworks are common in the United States, with the most popular holiday for their use being national Independence Day, also known as July Fourth. The use of fireworks within the context of celebrations and holidays presents the ideal environment for accidents that lead to severe and dangerous injuries. Injuries to the face from explosions present a challenging problem in terms of restoring ideal ocular, oral, and facial function. Despite the well documented prevalence of firework use and injury, there is a relatively large deficit in the literature in terms of firework injury that involves the face. We present a unique case series that includes 4 adult male patients all with severe firework injuries to the face that presented at an urban level 1 trauma center. These four patients had an average age of 26.7 years old and presented within 5 hours of each other starting on July Fourth. Two patients died from their injuries and two patients underwent reconstructive surgical management, one of which had two follow up surgeries. We explore in detail their presentation, management, and subsequent outcomes as an attempt to add to the very limited data in the field of facial firework blast injury. In addition, the coincidence of their presentation within the same 5 hours brings into question the availability of the fireworks involved, and the possibility of similar injuries related to this type of firework in the future. PMID:25035740

  5. Fabrication of a screw-retained restoration avoiding the facial access hole: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gazaui, Sabrina; Razzoog, Michael; Sierraalta, Marianella; Saglik, Berna

    2015-11-01

    Dental implant restorations may be either screw-retained or cemented onto an abutment. While each method has its advantages and disadvantages, cemented restorations are commonly used in the maxillary arch, usually because of esthetic concerns. Available bone in the anterior maxilla dictates the placement of the implant, which may result in a facially positioned screw-access opening. Still, a growing volume of literature states that periimplant soft tissues respond more favorably to screw-retained crowns than cement-retained crowns. This clinical report outlines a treatment with a new method of fabricating a custom abutment-crown combination for a screw-retained restoration. The technique allows the channel for the screw to be placed at an angle other than parallel to the implant body. In this case, the practitioner may choose either a screw-retained or cement-retained implant restoration, where previously only a cemented restoration was possible. PMID:26344192

  6. Estimation of stature by cephalometric facial dimensions in skeletonized bodies: study from a sample modern Colombians skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    González-Colmenares, Gretel; Medina, César Sanabria; Báez, Liliana Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of stature is an important factor in the identification of the deceased from unknown fragmentary and dismembered remains. The skull sometimes is the only remain available for identification. The aim of the present study was to estimate the stature of an individual from cephalo-facial dimensions. The study was carried out on 54 males and 16 females from the bone collection of the contemporary Colombian population that belongs to the National Institute of Legal Medicine. Ten cephalo-facial measurements were also made on each subject. The stature of each individual in centimeters was taken from the registration and/or from the autopsy document. The results indicate that the measurements N-M (p<0.001) and G-Op, Ba-N, Ma-SN (p<0.05) are correlated with stature for males. The correlation between these measures with stature for females was not significant. However, the formulae obtained from univariate linear regression analysis using cephalo-facial measurements showed a greater degree of reliability for estimation of stature in males and females. PMID:26631845

  7. A 3D Finite Element model of the face for simulation in plastic and maxillo-facial surgery

    E-print Network

    Chabanas, M; Chabanas, Matthieu; Payan, Yohan

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces a new Finite Element biomechanical model of the human face, which has been developed to be integrated into a simulator for plastic and maxillo-facial surgery. The idea is to be able to predict, from an aesthetic and functional point of view, the deformations of a patient face, resulting from repositioning of the maxillary and mandibular bone structures. This work will complete the simulator for bone-repositioning diagnosis that has been developed by the laboratory. After a description of our research project context, each step of the modeling is precisely described: the continuous and elastic structure of the skin tissues, the orthotropic muscular fibers and their insertions points, and the functional model of force generation. First results of face deformations due to muscles activations are presented. They are qualitatively compared to the functional studies provided by the literature on face muscles roles and actions.

  8. Plastic surgery and the biometric e-passport: implications for facial recognition.

    PubMed

    Ologunde, Rele

    2015-04-01

    This correspondence comments on the challenges of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery on the facial recognition algorithms employed by biometric passports. The limitations of facial recognition technology in patients who have undergone facial plastic surgery are also discussed. Finally, the advice of the UK HM passport office to people who undergo facial surgery is reported. PMID:25162924

  9. Electromyographic Responses to Emotional Facial Expressions in 6-7 Year Olds with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschamps, P. K. H.; Coppes, L.; Kenemans, J. L.; Schutter, D. J. L. G.; Matthys, W.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine facial mimicry in 6-7 year old children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and to explore whether facial mimicry was related to the severity of impairment in social responsiveness. Facial electromyographic activity in response to angry, fearful, sad and happy facial expressions was recorded in twenty 6-7 year old…

  10. Phased processing of facial emotion: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Utama, Nugraha P; Takemoto, Atsushi; Koike, Yasuharu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2009-05-01

    We examined the temporal characteristics of facial-emotion processing. The stimuli were several morphed images containing seven facial emotions (neutral, anger, happiness, disgust, sadness, surprise, and fear) and ten-graded intensity levels to parametrically control these aspects of facial emotions. Brain activity was recorded with electroencephalography as the subjects detected the facial emotion and assessed its intensity. We found that the temporal profile of detection was quite different from the assessment of intensity. A positive component 100 ms after stimulus onset (P100) was significantly correlated with the correct detection of facial emotion, whereas a negative component 170 ms after stimulus onset (N170) was significantly correlated with the assessment of intensity level. The source of both the P100 and N170 signals was consistently localized to the right occipito-parietal region. We propose phased processing of facial emotion, in which rapid detection of any facial emotion occurs within 100 ms and detailed processing, including the assessment of the intensity, occurs shortly afterwards. PMID:19428681

  11. Emotional mimicry signals pain empathy as evidenced by facial electromyography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya-Bin; Wang, Yu-Zheng; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Facial mimicry has been suggested to be a behavioral index for emotional empathy. The present study is the first to investigate the link between facial muscle activity and empathy for pain by facial electromyographic (EMG) recording while observers watched videos depicting real-life painful events. Three types of visual stimulus were used: an intact painful scene and arm-only (needle injection) and face only (painful expression) scenes. Enhanced EMG activity of the corrugator supercilii (CS) and zygomaticus major (ZM) muscles was found when observers viewed others in pain, supporting a unique pain expression that is distinct from the expression of basic emotions. In the intact video stimulus condition, CS activity was correlated positively with the empathic concern score and ZM activity, suggesting facial mimicry mediated empathy for pain. Cluster analysis of facial EMG responses revealed markedly different patterns among stimulus types, including response category, ratio, and temporal dynamics, indicating greater ecological validity of the intact scene in eliciting pain empathy as compared with partial scenes. This study is the first to quantitatively describe pain empathy in terms of facial EMG data. It may provide important evidence for facial mimicry as a behavioral indicator of pain empathy. PMID:26647740

  12. Cognitive penetrability and emotion recognition in human facial expressions

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Do our background beliefs, desires, and mental images influence our perceptual experience of the emotions of others? In this paper, we will address the possibility of cognitive penetration (CP) of perceptual experience in the domain of social cognition. In particular, we focus on emotion recognition based on the visual experience of facial expressions. After introducing the current debate on CP, we review examples of perceptual adaptation for facial expressions of emotion. This evidence supports the idea that facial expressions are perceptually processed as wholes. That is, the perceptual system integrates lower-level facial features, such as eyebrow orientation, mouth angle etc., into facial compounds. We then present additional experimental evidence showing that in some cases, emotion recognition on the basis of facial expression is sensitive to and modified by the background knowledge of the subject. We argue that such sensitivity is best explained as a difference in the visual experience of the facial expression, not just as a modification of the judgment based on this experience. The difference in experience is characterized as the result of the interference of background knowledge with the perceptual integration process for faces. Thus, according to the best explanation, we have to accept CP in some cases of emotion recognition. Finally, we discuss a recently proposed mechanism for CP in the face-based recognition of emotion. PMID:26150796

  13. Automatic Facial Expression Recognition and Operator Functional State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanson, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of human error in safety-critical occupations remains a major challenge to mission success despite increasing automation in control processes. Although various methods have been proposed to prevent incidences of human error, none of these have been developed to employ the detection and regulation of Operator Functional State (OFS), or the optimal condition of the operator while performing a task, in work environments due to drawbacks such as obtrusiveness and impracticality. A video-based system with the ability to infer an individual's emotional state from facial feature patterning mitigates some of the problems associated with other methods of detecting OFS, like obtrusiveness and impracticality in integration with the mission environment. This paper explores the utility of facial expression recognition as a technology for inferring OFS by first expounding on the intricacies of OFS and the scientific background behind emotion and its relationship with an individual's state. Then, descriptions of the feedback loop and the emotion protocols proposed for the facial recognition program are explained. A basic version of the facial expression recognition program uses Haar classifiers and OpenCV libraries to automatically locate key facial landmarks during a live video stream. Various methods of creating facial expression recognition software are reviewed to guide future extensions of the program. The paper concludes with an examination of the steps necessary in the research of emotion and recommendations for the creation of an automatic facial expression recognition program for use in real-time, safety-critical missions.

  14. Emotional mimicry signals pain empathy as evidenced by facial electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ya-Bin; Wang, Yu-Zheng; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Facial mimicry has been suggested to be a behavioral index for emotional empathy. The present study is the first to investigate the link between facial muscle activity and empathy for pain by facial electromyographic (EMG) recording while observers watched videos depicting real-life painful events. Three types of visual stimulus were used: an intact painful scene and arm-only (needle injection) and face only (painful expression) scenes. Enhanced EMG activity of the corrugator supercilii (CS) and zygomaticus major (ZM) muscles was found when observers viewed others in pain, supporting a unique pain expression that is distinct from the expression of basic emotions. In the intact video stimulus condition, CS activity was correlated positively with the empathic concern score and ZM activity, suggesting facial mimicry mediated empathy for pain. Cluster analysis of facial EMG responses revealed markedly different patterns among stimulus types, including response category, ratio, and temporal dynamics, indicating greater ecological validity of the intact scene in eliciting pain empathy as compared with partial scenes. This study is the first to quantitatively describe pain empathy in terms of facial EMG data. It may provide important evidence for facial mimicry as a behavioral indicator of pain empathy. PMID:26647740

  15. Facial expression of emotions in borderline personality disorder and depression.

    PubMed

    Renneberg, Babette; Heyn, Katrin; Gebhard, Rita; Bachmann, Silke

    2005-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by marked problems in interpersonal relationships and emotion regulation. The assumption of emotional hyper-reactivity in BPD is tested regarding the facial expression of emotions, an aspect highly relevant for communication processes and a central feature of emotion regulation. Facial expressions of emotions are examined in a group of 30 female inpatients with BPD, 27 women with major depression and 30 non-patient female controls. Participants were videotaped while watching two short movie sequences, inducing either positive or negative emotions. Frequency of emotional facial expressions and intensity of happiness expressions were examined, using the Emotional Facial Action Coding System (EMFACS-7, Friesen & Ekman, EMFACS-7: Emotional Facial Action Coding System, Version 7. Unpublished manual, 1984). Group differences were analyzed for the negative and the positive mood-induction procedure separately. Results indicate that BPD patients reacted similar to depressed patients with reduced facial expressiveness to both films. The highest emotional facial activity to both films and most intense happiness expressions were displayed by the non-clinical control group. Current findings contradict the assumption of a general hyper-reactivity to emotional stimuli in patients with BPD. PMID:15950175

  16. Bone-Immune Cell Crosstalk: Bone Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma. PMID:26000310

  17. Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Platelet-Rich Plasma Accelerate Distraction Osteogenesis in A Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Motallebizadeh, Nader; Ashrafi Halan, Javad; Tagiyar, Leila; Soroori, Sarang; Nikmahzar, Agbibi; Pedram, Mirsepehr; Shahverdi, Abdolhossein; Kazemi Mehrjerdi, Hossein; Izadi, Sadra

    2015-01-01

    Objective Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a surgical procedure used to generate large volumes of new bone for limb lengthening. Materials and Methods In this animal experimental study, a 30% lengthening of the left tibia (mean distraction distance: 60.8 mm) was performed in ten adult male dogs by callus distraction after osteotomy and application of an Ilizarov fixator. Distraction was started on postoperative day seven with a distraction rate of 0.5 mm twice per day and carried out at a rate of 1.5 mm per day until the end of the study. Autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as the treatment group (n=5) or PRP alone (control group, n=5) were injected into the distracted callus at the middle and end of the distraction period. At the end of the consolidation period, the dogs were sacrificed after which computerized tomography (CT) and histomorphometric evaluations were performed. Results Radiographic evaluationsrevealed that the amount and quality of callus formations were significantly higher in the treatment group (P<0.05). As measured by CT scan, the healing parametersin dogs of the treatment group were significantly greater (P<0.05). New bone formation in the treatment group was significantly higher (P<0.05). Conclusion The present study showed that the transplantation of BM-MSCs positively affects early bony consolidation in DO. The use of MSCs might allow a shortened period of consolidation and therefore permit earlier device removal. PMID:26199903

  18. Perception of temporal asymmetries in dynamic facial expressions

    PubMed Central

    Reinl, Maren; Bartels, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In the current study we examined whether timeline-reversals and emotional direction of dynamic facial expressions affect subjective experience of human observers. We recorded natural movies of faces that increased or decreased their expressions of fear, and played them either in the natural frame order or reversed from last to first frame (reversed timeline). This led to four conditions of increasing or decreasing fear, either following the natural or reversed temporal trajectory of facial dynamics. This 2-by-2 factorial design controlled for visual low-level properties, static visual content, and motion energy across the different factors. It allowed us to examine perceptual consequences that would occur if the timeline trajectory of facial muscle movements during the increase of an emotion are not the exact mirror of the timeline during the decrease. It additionally allowed us to study perceptual differences between increasing and decreasing emotional expressions. Perception of these time-dependent asymmetries have not yet been quantified. We found that three emotional measures, emotional intensity, artificialness of facial movement, and convincingness or plausibility of emotion portrayal, were affected by timeline-reversals as well as by the emotional direction of the facial expressions. Our results imply that natural dynamic facial expressions contain temporal asymmetries, and show that deviations from the natural timeline lead to a reduction of perceived emotional intensity and convincingness, and to an increase of perceived artificialness of the dynamic facial expression. In addition, they show that decreasing facial expressions are judged as less plausible than increasing facial expressions. Our findings are of relevance for both, behavioral as well as neuroimaging studies, as processing and perception are influenced by temporal asymmetries. PMID:26300807

  19. Facial expression recognition impairment following acute social stress.

    PubMed

    Deschênes, Andréa; Forget, Hélène; Daudelin-Peltier, Camille; Fiset, Daniel; Blais, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Recently, von Dawans et al. (2012) showed that stress exposure increases facial trustworthiness judgements. Given the relation between trustworthiness and the presence/absence of subtle visual features related to happiness and anger (Oosterhof & Todorov, 2008), we verified if social stress modulates the visual perception of facial expressions. Twenty-nine men were submitted to a social stress (i.e. Trier Social Stress Test for Groups) or a control condition (i.e. identical setting save for the socio-evaluative threat component) in a counterbalanced order. Facial expression recognition was then measured using a homemade version of the 'facial expression megamix' (Young et al.,1997) in which each of the six basic facial expressions plus neutrality were morphed with each other at seven different percentages (from 14/86 in intervals of 12%). The task was to decide which expression the image most resembled. Recognition accuracy for each facial expression when it was dominant in the morph (i.e. over 50%) was first computed. We found that social stress modulates accuracy scores only for disgust (Mstress= 81%; Mcontrol=89%; t(28)=-3.20, p=0.028; bonferroni corrected). We also verified if the emotion signal necessary to detect each facial expression when they were part of the morph was modulated by stress. For each facial expression, we calculated, separately for each percentage level, the proportion of times that it was correctly identified as being part of the morph. This produced a curve on which we fitted a cumulated gaussian to find at what percentage level an expression was detected 50% of the time. Our results show that stress decreased the sensitivity to disgust (t(28)=3.55, p=0.007; bonferroni corrected). These results indicate that an acute social stress alters the perception of facial expressions, more specifically it decreases the sensitivity to the disgust expression. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26327071

  20. "Hidden" bone metastasis from thyroid carcinoma: a clinical note.

    PubMed

    Sioka, C; Skarulis, M C; Tulloch-Reid, M K; Heiss, J D; Reynolds, J C

    2014-01-01

    The (131)I-iodide ((131)I) whole-body scan, for thyroid carcinoma is at times difficult to interpret. In a diagnostic whole body (131)I scan of a patient with follicular carcinoma, a posterior skull lesion was partially hidden by overlapping facial structures. On lateral head view, the abnormality was clearly evident. SPECT/CT and MRI showed the lesion originated in the occipital bone and had enlarged into the posterior fossa. The mass was surgically removed and the patient received (131)I therapy for residual tissue. The study demonstrates a pitfall in the reading of two dimensional radioiodine images which can be overcome by SPECT or lateral imaging. PMID:23845451

  1. Temporal bone metastasis as a sign of relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aljafar, Hadeel M.; Alsuhibani, Sari S.; Alahmari, Mohammad S.; Alzahrani, Musaed A.

    2015-01-01

    Otologic manifestations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are common presentations. However, temporal bone metastasis is rarely described as a sign of relapsing CLL. A 65-year-old male diabetic patient known to have CLL on remission presented to the outpatient otolaryngology clinic with a one month history of progressive bilateral otalgia and right otorrhea, despite multiple courses of antibiotics. He was admitted with suspicion of malignant otitis externa. Left ear showed large hemorrhagic bullae on the posterior segment of tympanic membrane. Left sided facial paralysis developed on the third day of admission. Full recovery of facial paralysis is achieved by 10 days course of corticotherapy. Histological examination of middle ear tissue biopsy showed infiltration by monotonous small lymphoid cells, showing round nuclei, condensed chromatin suggestive of CLL. Although rare, unusual otologic manifestations should raise the suspicion of a temporal bone metastasis as a sign of relapsing CLL. PMID:26446337

  2. Identification and functional analysis of novel facial patterning genes in the duplicated beak chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Nimmagadda, Suresh; Buchtová, Marcela; Fu, Katherine; Geetha-Loganathan, Poongodi; Hosseini-Farahabadi, Sara; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Patrick Kuo, Winston; Vesela, Iva; Richman, Joy M

    2015-11-15

    Cranial neural crest cells form the majority of the facial skeleton. However exactly when the pattering information and hence jaw identity is established is not clear. We know that premigratory neural crest cells contain a limited amount of information about the lower jaw but the upper jaw and facial midline are specified later by local tissue interactions. The environmental signals leading to frontonasal identity have been explored by our group in the past. Altering the levels of two signaling pathways (Bone Morphogenetic Protein) and retinoic acid (RA) in the chicken embryo creates a duplicated midline on the side of the upper beak complete with egg tooth in place of maxillary derivatives (Lee et al., 2001). Here we analyze the transcriptome 16h after bead placement in order to identify potential mediators of the identity change in the maxillary prominence. The gene list included RA, BMP and WNT signaling pathway genes as well as transcription factors expressed in craniofacial development. There was also cross talk between Noggin and RA such that Noggin activated the RA pathway. We also observed expression changes in several poorly characterized genes including the upregulation of Peptidase Inhibitor-15 (PI15). We tested the functional effects of PI15 overexpression with a retroviral misexpression strategy. PI15 virus induced a cleft beak analogous to human cleft lip. We next asked whether PI15 effects were mediated by changes in expression of major clefting genes and genes in the retinoid signaling pathway. Expression of TP63, TBX22, BMP4 and FOXE1, all human clefting genes, were upregulated. In addition, ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3 and RA target, RAR? were increased while the degradation enzyme CYP26A1 was decreased. Together these changes were consistent with activation of the RA pathway. Furthermore, PI15 retrovirus injected into the face was able to replace RA and synergize with Noggin to induce beak transformations. We conclude that the microarrays have generated a rich dataset containing genes with important roles in facial morphogenesis. Moreover, one of these facial genes, PI15 is a putative clefting gene and is in a positive feedback loop with RA. PMID:26385749

  3. Three-dimensional assessment of facial asymmetry: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Akhil, Gopi; Senthil Kumar, Kullampalayam Palanisamy; Raja, Subramani; Janardhanan, Kumaresan

    2015-01-01

    For patients with facial asymmetry, complete and precise diagnosis, and surgical treatments to correct the underlying cause of the asymmetry are significant. Conventional diagnostic radiographs (submento-vertex projections, posteroanterior radiography) have limitations in asymmetry diagnosis due to two-dimensional assessments of three-dimensional (3D) images. The advent of 3D images has greatly reduced the magnification and projection errors that are common in conventional radiographs making it as a precise diagnostic aid for assessment of facial asymmetry. Thus, this article attempts to review the newly introduced 3D tools in the diagnosis of more complex facial asymmetries. PMID:26538893

  4. Violent video game play impacts facial emotion recognition.

    PubMed

    Kirsh, Steven J; Mounts, Jeffrey R W

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the speed of recognition of facial emotional expressions (happy and angry) as a function of violent video game play. Color photos of calm facial expressions morphed to either an angry or a happy facial expression. Participants were asked to make a speeded identification of the emotion (happiness or anger) during the morph. Typically, happy faces are identified faster than angry faces (the happy-face advantage). Results indicated that playing a violent video game led to a reduction in the happy face advantage. Implications of these findings are discussed with respect to the current models of aggressive behavior. PMID:17593563

  5. Facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Samia, Younes; Yosra, Cherif; Foued, Bellazreg; Mouna, Aissi; Olfa, Berriche; Jihed, Souissi; Hammadi, Braham; Mahbouba, Frih-Ayed; Amel, Letaief; Habib, Sfar Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We report a 62 year-old-man with facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis (ChAc). He showed chorea that started 20 years ago. The orofacial dyskinisia with tongue and cheek biting resulted in facial cellulitis. The peripheral blood smear revealed acanthocytosis of 25%. The overall of chorea, orofacial dyskinetic disorder, peripheral neuropathy, disturbed behavior, acanthocytosis and the atrophy of caudate nuclei was suggestive of a diagnosis of ChAc. To our knowledge no similar cases of facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis (ChAc) were found in a review of the literature. PMID:25332750

  6. [Results of hypoglossal-facial and hypoglossal-hypoglossal anastomoses].

    PubMed

    Hernández Pascual, L; Rodriguez Arribas, M A

    1996-01-01

    From September 1976 to November 1991 a series of 34 patients with peripheral iatrogenal facial paralysis after removal of cerebellopontine angle tumors or parotid-gland surgery were treated by hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (hypoglossal-facial/hypoglossal-hypoglossal in 38.24% of cases). Patients were divided into two groups: Group A with early anastomosis and Group B with delayed anastomosis. In the first group, 57.14% of the cases presented "excessive reinnervation"; and in the second group, 95.0% of cases presented "good" or "excellent" results. In this paper we analyze and discuss our results and review the literature. PMID:9084748

  7. Toward DNA-based facial composites: preliminary results and validation.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Hill, Harold; Shriver, Mark D

    2014-11-01

    The potential of constructing useful DNA-based facial composites is forensically of great interest. Given the significant identity information coded in the human face these predictions could help investigations out of an impasse. Although, there is substantial evidence that much of the total variation in facial features is genetically mediated, the discovery of which genes and gene variants underlie normal facial variation has been hampered primarily by the multipartite nature of facial variation. Traditionally, such physical complexity is simplified by simple scalar measurements defined a priori, such as nose or mouth width or alternatively using dimensionality reduction techniques such as principal component analysis where each principal coordinate is then treated as a scalar trait. However, as shown in previous and related work, a more impartial and systematic approach to modeling facial morphology is available and can facilitate both the gene discovery steps, as we recently showed, and DNA-based facial composite construction, as we show here. We first use genomic ancestry and sex to create a base-face, which is simply an average sex and ancestry matched face. Subsequently, the effects of 24 individual SNPs that have been shown to have significant effects on facial variation are overlaid on the base-face forming the predicted-face in a process akin to a photomontage or image blending. We next evaluate the accuracy of predicted faces using cross-validation. Physical accuracy of the facial predictions either locally in particular parts of the face or in terms of overall similarity is mainly determined by sex and genomic ancestry. The SNP-effects maintain the physical accuracy while significantly increasing the distinctiveness of the facial predictions, which would be expected to reduce false positives in perceptual identification tasks. To the best of our knowledge this is the first effort at generating facial composites from DNA and the results are preliminary but certainly promising, especially considering the limited amount of genetic information about the face contained in these 24 SNPs. This approach can incorporate additional SNPs as these are discovered and their effects documented. In this context we discuss three main avenues of research: expanding our knowledge of the genetic architecture of facial morphology, improving the predictive modeling of facial morphology by exploring and incorporating alternative prediction models, and increasing the value of the results through the weighted encoding of physical measurements in terms of human perception of faces. PMID:25194685

  8. Moving to continuous facial expression space using the MPEG-4 facial definition parameter (FDP) set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpouzis, Kostas; Tsapatsoulis, Nicolas; Kollias, Stefanos D.

    2000-06-01

    Research in facial expression has concluded that at least six emotions, conveyed by human faces, are universally associated with distinct expressions. Sadness, anger, joy, fear, disgust and surprise are categories of expressions that are recognizable across cultures. In this work we form a relation between the description of the universal expressions and the MPEG-4 Facial Definition Parameter Set (FDP). We also investigate the relation between the movement of basic FDPs and the parameters that describe emotion-related words according to some classical psychological studies. In particular Whissel suggested that emotions are points in a space, which seem to occupy two dimensions: activation and evaluation. We show that some of the MPEG-4 Facial Animation Parameters (FAPs), approximated by the motion of the corresponding FDPs, can be combined by means of a fuzzy rule system to estimate the activation parameter. In this way variations of the six archetypal emotions can be achieved. Moreover, Plutchik concluded that emotion terms are unevenly distributed through the space defined by dimensions like Whissel's; instead they tend to form an approximately circular pattern, called 'emotion wheel,' modeled using an angular measure. The 'emotion wheel' can be defined as a reference for creating intermediate expressions from the universal ones, by interpolating the movement of dominant FDP points between neighboring basic expressions. By exploiting the relation between the movement of the basic FDP point and the activation and angular parameters we can model more emotions than the primary ones and achieve efficient recognition in video sequences.

  9. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement. PMID:22998924

  10. Facial Action and Emotional Language: ERP Evidence that Blocking Facial Feedback Selectively Impairs Sentence Comprehension.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joshua D; Winkielman, Piotr; Coulson, Seana

    2015-11-01

    There is a lively and theoretically important debate about whether, how, and when embodiment contributes to language comprehension. This study addressed these questions by testing how interference with facial action impacts the brain's real-time response to emotional language. Participants read sentences about positive and negative events (e.g., "She reached inside the pocket of her coat from last winter and found some (cash/bugs) inside it.") while ERPs were recorded. Facial action was manipulated within participants by asking participants to hold chopsticks in their mouths using a position that allowed or blocked smiling, as confirmed by EMG. Blocking smiling did not influence ERPs to the valenced words (e.g., cash, bugs) but did influence ERPs to final words of sentences describing positive events. Results show that affectively positive sentences can evoke smiles and that such facial action can facilitate the semantic processing indexed by the N400 component. Overall, this study offers causal evidence that embodiment impacts some aspects of high-level comprehension, presumably involving the construction of the situation model. PMID:26244721

  11. Warsaw set of emotional facial expression pictures: a validation study of facial display photographs

    PubMed Central

    Olszanowski, Michal; Pochwatko, Grzegorz; Kuklinski, Krzysztof; Scibor-Rylski, Michal; Lewinski, Peter; Ohme, Rafal K.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional facial expressions play a critical role in theories of emotion and figure prominently in research on almost every aspect of emotion. This article provides a background for a new database of basic emotional expressions. The goal in creating this set was to provide high quality photographs of genuine facial expressions. Thus, after proper training, participants were inclined to express “felt” emotions. The novel approach taken in this study was also used to establish whether a given expression was perceived as intended by untrained judges. The judgment task for perceivers was designed to be sensitive to subtle changes in meaning caused by the way an emotional display was evoked and expressed. Consequently, this allowed us to measure the purity and intensity of emotional displays, which are parameters that validation methods used by other researchers do not capture. The final set is comprised of those pictures that received the highest recognition marks (e.g., accuracy with intended display) from independent judges, totaling 210 high quality photographs of 30 individuals. Descriptions of the accuracy, intensity, and purity of displayed emotion as well as FACS AU's codes are provided for each picture. Given the unique methodology applied to gathering and validating this set of pictures, it may be a useful tool for research using face stimuli. The Warsaw Set of Emotional Facial Expression Pictures (WSEFEP) is freely accessible to the scientific community for non-commercial use by request at http://www.emotional-face.org. PMID:25601846

  12. Nasal Anthropometry on Facial Computed Tomography Scans for Rhinoplasty in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyung Min; Cho, Geon; Sung, Ha Min; Jung, Min Su; Tak, Kyoung Seok; Jung, Sung-Won; Lee, Hoon-Bum

    2013-01-01

    Background Cephalometric analysis is essential for planning treatment in maxillofacial and aesthetic facial surgery. Although photometric analysis of the Korean nose has been attempted in the past, anthropometry of the deeper nasal structures in the same population based on computerized tomography (CT) has not been published. We therefore measured three anthropometric parameters of the nose on CT scans in our clinical series of patients. Methods We conducted the current retrospective study of a total of 100 patients (n=100) who underwent a CT-guided radiological measurement at our institution during a period ranging from January of 2008 to August of 2010. In these patients, we took three anthropometric measurements: the nasofrontal angle, the pyramidal angle, and the linear distance between the nasion and the tip of the nasal bone. Results The mean nasofrontal angle was 131.14° in the male patients and 140.70° in the female patients. The mean linear distance between the nasion and the tip of the nasal bone was 21.28 mm and 18.02 mm, respectively. The mean nasal pyramidal angle was 112.89° and 103.25° at the level of the nasal root, 117.49° and 115.60° at the middle level of the nasal bone, and 127.99° and 125.04° at the level of the tip of the nasal bone, respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, our data will be helpful in the preparation of silicone implants for augmentation and/or corrective rhinoplasty in ethnic Korean people. PMID:24086818

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? ... Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  14. Ultrastructure of elastosis in facial rhytidectomy skin

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.; Woodward, M.

    1981-03-01

    Skin from 19 facial rhytidectomies performed in patients with chronic solar damage was compared with postauricular skin from patients of similar age. Light microscopy demonstrated large areas of amorphous material that stained PAS positive in all 19 face-lift specimens, while none of the controls had such material. Electron microscopy of the ''elastotic'' material revealed large amorphous masses of granular material, with loss of the microfilament component of normal elastin. Current theories suggest that the elastotic material in solar-damaged skin is a product of radiation-damaged fibroblasts, rather than being either collagen or degenerated elastin. Such knowledge may help the plastic surgeons encourage rhytidectomy patients to protect themselves from solar radiation.

  15. Diagnosis and management of facial pigmented macules.

    PubMed

    Lallas, Aimilios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Moscarella, Elvira; Longo, Caterina; Simonetti, Vito; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pigmented macules on the mottled chronic sun-damaged skin of the face is challenging and includes lentigo maligna (LM), pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, solar lentigo, and lichen-planus-like keratosis. Although dermatoscopy improves the diagnostic accuracy of the unaided eye, the accurate diagnosis and management of pigmented facial macules remains one of the most challenging scenarios in daily practice. This is related to the fact that pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, lichen-planus-like keratosis, and LM may reveal overlapping criteria, making their differential diagnosis clinically difficult. For this reason, practical rules have been introduced, which should help to minimize the risk for inappropriate diagnosis and management of LM. PMID:24314382

  16. Reconstruction of Facial Defect Using Deltopectoral Flap.

    PubMed

    Aldelaimi, Tahrir N; Khalil, Afrah A

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the head and neck is a challenge for otolarygology surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons as well as plastic surgeons. Defects caused by the resection and/or trauma should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Deltopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the facial defects. This study report a patient presenting with tragic Road Traffic Accident (RTA) admitted to maxillofacial surgery department at Ramadi Teaching Hospital, Anbar province, Iraq. An incision, medially based, was done and deltopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure and closure of defects after RTA. There was no major complication. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Deltopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation. PMID:26595007

  17. A rare cause of lateral facial swelling

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sujata; Gulati, Ujjwal; Vandana; Singh, Sapna

    2014-01-01

    A case of chronic, recurrent and asymptomatic facial swelling in a young male is presented. Swelling extended from lower midface to upper lateral neck and right commissure to anterior massetric border. History, clinical signs and symptoms and examination pointed towards the benign nature of the swelling. Fine-needle aspiration cytology tapered the diagnostic possibilities to a salivary cyst or pseudocyst. Ultrasonography identified the lesion to contain echogenic fluid with irregular borders. “Tail sign” was absent on contrast magnetic resonance imaging, excluding the involvement of the sublingual gland. Surgical excision of the lesion was done along with submandibular gland as both were in continuity via a bottle-neck tract. Final histopathological diagnosis was that of the submandibular gland extravasation phenomenon. As per the best of our knowledge, it is the first case report of a submandibular gland extravasation causing swelling in a retrograde direction onto the face. PMID:25593883

  18. Analysis of Pediatric Facial Dog Bites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Henry H.; Neumeier, Anna T.; Davies, Brett W.; Durairaj, Vikram D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and report the epidemiological data regarding pediatric facial dog bites. For this study, a retrospective chart review was used. This study was performed at a large tertiary pediatric hospital. All children younger than 18 years who sought medical attention after a facial dog bite between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2008, were included. Demographic and epidemiologic data were collected and analyzed. A total of 537 children were identified. The average age was 4.59?±?3.36 years, with a slight male preponderance (52.0%). The majority of dog bites occurred in children 5 years of age or younger (68.0%). Almost all (89.8%) of the dogs were known to the children. When circumstances surrounding the bite were documented, over half (53.2%) of the cases were provoked. The most common breeds were mixed breed (23.0%), Labrador retriever (13.7%), Rottweiler (4.9%), and German shepherd (4.4%). Inpatient treatment was required in 121 (22.5%) patients with an average length of stay of 2.96?±?2.77 days. Children 5 years or younger were more likely to be hospitalized than older children. Children 5 years old and younger are at high risk for being bitten in the face by a familiar dog and are more likely to require hospitalization than older children. Certain dog breeds are more likely to bite, and there is often a history of provocation. There is a tremendous financial and psychosocial burden associated with dog bites, and prevention strategies should focus on education with the aid of public policies and better documentation and reporting systems. PMID:24436765

  19. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood clotting. If you have a bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow doesn't make red blood cells. Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  20. Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the calcaneus grow together and form one bone. Fusion also means that no more motion can occur ... some or all of the deformity along with fusion of the bones. These surgeries usually require several ...

  1. Smoking and Bone Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Smoking and Bone Health Publication available in: PDF (61 ... Overtraining Risks for Women Oral Health Partner Resources Smoking: It’s Never Too Late to Stop (NIA)

  2. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  3. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3250 External facial fracture fixation appliance. (a) Identification. An external...

  4. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3250 External facial fracture fixation appliance. (a) Identification. An external...

  5. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3250 External facial fracture fixation appliance. (a) Identification. An external...

  6. Journal Machine Learning Gossip Facial Attraction: Symmetry Considered Harmful

    E-print Network

    Schraudolph, Nicol N.

    perceived sexually attractive potential mates (Thornhill Gangestad, 1993). independently test that claim, IJournal Machine Learning Gossip 1 (2004) Facial Attraction: Symmetry Considered Harmful Nicol superficially attractive result (Fig. left), evidenced square, masculine, aerodynamic face, bright alertly

  7. MODELING AND ANIMATING THREE DIMENSIONAL DETAILED FACIAL EXPRESSIONS

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Fuhua "Frank"

    be indistinguishable from a real face. Generating compelling animated facial expressions is an extremely important as bittersweet. As far as scientists can tell, no other creature cries emotional tears the way humans do

  8. Inhibitory Processing of Sad Facial Expressions and Depression Vulnerability

    E-print Network

    Bistricky, Steven L.

    2010-05-17

    be examined through behavioral and psychophysiological indicators, including the N200, P300a, and P300b ERP components. The present study examined whether groups traditionally at risk of depression would show inhibitory deficits for depressive facial...

  9. Oro-facial swelling: ultrasonographic aid in the diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Bansal, Satish; Khivasara, Jayesh

    2015-01-01

    Oro-facial swellings are frequently encountered in clinical practice. The aim of this report is to unveil the uncommon manifestation of a common clinical problem and the help of ultrasonographic imaging in the diagnosis.

  10. Expressing suspense using facial animations Erik de Vries

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    was able to determine that a combination of a facial expression for surprise and fear is the most to improve an embodied agent. 3. SUSPENSE Suspense contributes significantly to the enjoyment of a narrative

  11. Facial Diversity and Infant Preferences for Attractive Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langlois, Judith H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Three studies examined infant preferences for attractive faces of White males, White females, Black females, and infants. Infants viewed pairs of faces rated for attractiveness by adults. Preferences for attractive faces were found for all facial types. (BC)

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Personality at Face Value: Facial Appearance Predicts

    E-print Network

    Todorov, Alex

    to be determined. To address this question, we had 51 elderly long-term married couples complete self and informant body of literature is attesting to the importance of physical, mainly facial, appearance in driving

  13. Age effects on the implicit recognition of facial expressions. 

    E-print Network

    Maclean, Katharine

    Backgrounds: A large amount of research has been put into the investigation of the discernable decline in older adults’ abilities to explicitly label the six basic emotion facial expressions. However, very little ...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

  15. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

  16. 21 CFR 874.3695 - Mandibular implant facial prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3695 Mandibular implant facial prosthesis...device is made of materials such as stainless steel, tantalum, titanium, cobalt-chromium based alloy,...

  17. Privacy Preserving Facial and Fingerprint Multi-biometric Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzaku, Esla Timothy; Sohn, Hosik; Ro, Yong Man

    The cases of identity theft can be mitigated by the adoption of secure authentication methods. Biohashing and its variants, which utilizes secret keys and biometrics, are promising methods for secure authentication; however, their shortcoming is the degraded performance under the assumption that secret keys are compromised. In this paper, we extend the concept of Biohashing to multi-biometrics - facial and fingerprint traits. We chose these traits because they are widely used, howbeit, little research attention has been given to designing privacy preserving multi-biometric systems using them. Instead of just using a single modality (facial or fingerprint), we presented a framework for using both modalities. The improved performance of the proposed method, using face and fingerprint, as against either facial or fingerprint trait used in isolation is evaluated using two chimerical bimodal databases formed from publicly available facial and fingerprint databases.

  18. Psychophysical Measures of Sensitivity to Facial Expression of Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Marneweck, Michelle; Loftus, Andrea; Hammond, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of two simple, objective, psychophysical measures of the ability to discriminate facial expressions of emotion that vary in intensity from a neutral facial expression and to discriminate between varying intensities of emotional facial expression. The stimuli were created by morphing photographs of models expressing four basic emotions, anger, disgust, happiness, and sadness with neutral expressions. Psychometric functions were obtained for 15 healthy young adults using the Method of Constant Stimuli with a two-interval forced-choice procedure. Individual data points were fitted by Quick functions for each task and each emotion, allowing estimates of absolute thresholds and slopes. The tasks give objective and sensitive measures of the basic perceptual abilities required for perceiving and interpreting emotional facial expressions. PMID:23431121

  19. Effects of parental socio-economic conditions on facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Huber, Susanne; Fieder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Socio-economic conditions during early life are known to affect later life outcomes such as health or social success. We investigated whether family socio-economic background may also affect facial attractiveness. We used the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (n = 8434) to analyze the association between an individual's parental socio-economic background (in terms of father's highest education and parental income) and that individual's facial attractiveness (estimated by rating of high school yearbook photographs when subjects were between 17 and 20 years old), controlling for subjects' sex, year of birth, and father's age at subjects' birth. Subjects' facial attractiveness increased with increasing father's highest educational attainment as well as increasing parental income, with the latter effect being stronger for female subjects as well. We conclude that early socio-economic conditions predict, to some extent, facial attractiveness in young adulthood. PMID:25548886

  20. Muscle-based facial animation using blendshapes in superposition 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Andrew Patrick

    2007-04-25

    The blendshape is an effective tool in computer facial animation, enabling represention of muscle actions. Limitations exist, however, in the level of realism attainable under conventional use of blendshapes as non-intersecting ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Oral-facial-digital syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search Search A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine® Home Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Oral-facial-digital syndrome Related Gene(s) Related Condition(s) References Quick links ...

  2. Marginal accuracy of metal ceramic restorations with porcelain facial margins.

    PubMed

    Boyle, J J; Naylor, W P; Blackman, R B

    1993-01-01

    This study compared porcelain facial margins made with the direct-lift technique using high-fusing shoulder porcelains and the platinum foil technique with conventional body porcelain. Marginal accuracy was measured directly and the marginal sharpness computed by the software program MacDraft. Both Vita high-fusing shoulder porcelain and Vita SM 90 porcelain produced restorations that had significantly smaller mean facial marginal openings than crowns created with platinum foil. However, the SM 90 porcelain recorded significantly greater cross sectional or internal marginal discrepancies than the other two techniques (p < 0.05). Externally, the shoulder porcelains followed the facial rounding of the stone die; thus porcelain marginal roundings can be manifested as either negative roundings or underextensions and positive roundings or overextensions. The lack of marginal sharpness of porcelain facial margins may be influenced more by the die material rather than by the marginal porcelain or the technique. PMID:8455163

  3. Estimation of human emotions using thermal facial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Kotani, Kazunori; Chen, Fan; Le, Bac

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, research on human emotion estimation using thermal infrared (IR) imagery has appealed to many researchers due to its invariance to visible illumination changes. Although infrared imagery is superior to visible imagery in its invariance to illumination changes and appearance differences, it has difficulties in handling transparent glasses in the thermal infrared spectrum. As a result, when using infrared imagery for the analysis of human facial information, the regions of eyeglasses are dark and eyes' thermal information is not given. We propose a temperature space method to correct eyeglasses' effect using the thermal facial information in the neighboring facial regions, and then use Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Eigen-space Method based on class-features (EMC), and PCA-EMC method to classify human emotions from the corrected thermal images. We collected the Kotani Thermal Facial Emotion (KTFE) database and performed the experiments, which show the improved accuracy rate in estimating human emotions.

  4. Videorealistic facial animation for speech-based interfaces

    E-print Network

    Pueblo, Stephen J. (Stephen Jerell)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores the use of computer-generated, videorealistic facial animation (avatars) in speech-based interfaces to understand whether the use of such animations enhances the end user's experience. Research in ...

  5. In vivo cranial bone strain and bite force in the agamid lizard Uromastyx geyri

    PubMed Central

    Porro, Laura B.; Ross, Callum F.; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; O'Reilly, James C.; Evans, Susan E.; Fagan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo bone strain data are the most direct evidence of deformation and strain regimes in the vertebrate cranium during feeding and can provide important insights into skull morphology. Strain data have been collected during feeding across a wide range of mammals; in contrast, in vivo cranial bone strain data have been collected from few sauropsid taxa. Here we present bone strain data recorded from the jugal of the herbivorous agamid lizard Uromastyx geyri along with simultaneously recorded bite force. Principal and shear strain magnitudes in Uromastyx geyri were lower than cranial bone strains recorded in Alligator mississippiensis, but higher than those reported from herbivorous mammals. Our results suggest that variations in principal strain orientations in the facial skeleton are largely due to differences in feeding behavior and bite location, whereas food type has little impact on strain orientations. Furthermore, mean principal strain orientations differ between male and female Uromastyx during feeding, potentially because of sexual dimorphism in skull morphology. PMID:24577443

  6. Static Facial Slings: Approaches to Rehabilitation of the Paralyzed Face.

    PubMed

    Langille, Morgan; Singh, Prabhjyot

    2016-02-01

    Facial paralysis results from a variety of different causes. Patients with facial paralysis have cosmetic and functional defects that significantly affect quality of life. Surgical intervention has the potential to help improve cosmetic and functional outcomes. The 2 main categories of surgical rehabilitation are static and dynamic surgical procedures. Static rehabilitation of the midface is typically performed using autologous tissue grafts, allografts, synthetic grafts, permanent suspension sutures, and a novel technique using percutaneous suture-based slings. PMID:26611699

  7. Facial myokymia: a clue to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, K. L.; Pearce, John

    1972-01-01

    Three patients with multiple sclerosis in whom facial myokymia occurred are described. The clinical and electromyographic features of this phenomenon are reviewed. The phenomenon is most frequently associated with multiple sclerosis, and when it is transient and unassociated with progressive facial paresis and other signs of a pontine tumour, is a strong indication of this condition. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4650779

  8. Evaluating developmental shape changes in Homo antecessor subadult facial morphology.

    PubMed

    Freidline, Sarah E; Gunz, Philipp; Harvati, Katerina; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2013-10-01

    The fossil ATD6-69 from Atapuerca, Spain, dated to ca. 900 ka (thousands of years ago) has been suggested to mark the earliest appearance of modern human facial features. However, this specimen is a subadult and the interpretation of its morphology remains controversial, because it is unclear how developmental shape changes would affect the features that link ATD6-69 to modern humans. Here we analyze ATD6-69 in an evolutionary and developmental context. Our modern human sample comprises cross-sectional growth series from four populations. The fossil sample covers human specimens from the Pleistocene to the Upper Paleolithic, and includes several subadult Early Pleistocene humans and Neanderthals. We digitized landmarks and semilandmarks on surface and CT scans and analyzed the Procrustes shape coordinates using multivariate statistics. Ontogenetic allometric trajectories and developmental simulations were employed in order to identify growth patterns and to visualize potential adult shapes of ATD6-69. We show that facial differences between modern and archaic humans are not exclusively allometric. We find that while postnatal growth further accentuates the differences in facial features between Neanderthals and modern humans, those features that have been suggested to link ATD6-69's morphology to modern humans would not have been significantly altered in the course of subsequent development. In particular, the infraorbital depression on this specimen would have persisted into adulthood. However, many of the facial features that ATD6-69 shares with modern humans can be considered to be part of a generalized pattern of facial architecture. Our results present a complex picture regarding the polarity of facial features and demonstrate that some modern human-like facial morphology is intermittently present in Middle Pleistocene humans. We suggest that some of the facial features that characterize recent modern humans may have developed multiple times in human evolution. PMID:23998458

  9. Voluntary control of facial musculature in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marneweck, Michelle; Hammond, Geoff

    2014-12-15

    Aside from being measured in the context of producing facial expressions of emotion, the ability to voluntarily control a range of facial muscles in Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been systematically measured. We used in three enrollment phases an adaptation of the Upper and Lower Face Apraxia test, a measure of the ability to make voluntary movements of the upper and lower face in PD patients and healthy controls. Errors were scored due to (1) pauses prior to movement initiation, (2) loss of individuation, (3) impoverished movement, (4) no movement at all, or (5) content errors (likened to ideational apraxia errors). The results show impaired voluntary control of facial musculature in most but not all with PD (with large effect sizes) which correlated positively and highly with disease severity. Errors by PD patients were predominantly due to impoverished movement and individuation loss whereas those made by controls were predominantly due to individuation loss. Patients committed more errors than controls due to impoverishment and no movement, with negligible differences between groups in other errors. In summary, similarly to spontaneous and voluntary emotional expressions, voluntary non-emotional facial movements are impoverished in PD; impoverishment of all movement types will likely contribute to the mask-like facial appearance that is seen with disease progression. These findings also illustrate the utility of an adapted Face Apraxia test as a practical and sensitive measure of voluntary facial musculature control in PD. The test can be used to supplement clinical observations and as a research tool. PMID:25467144

  10. Facial emotion recognition in adolescents with nonsuicidal self-injury.

    PubMed

    In-Albon, Tina; Ruf, Claudia; Schmid, Marc

    2015-08-30

    Adolescents with nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) have been described as having considerable impairment in social interactions, and social difficulties are often a trigger for NSSI. However, little is known about how adolescents with NSSI disorder process facial expressions of emotion. We investigated the recognition of facial expressions of emotion in 47 adolescents with NSSI disorder, 28 clinical controls without NSSI, and 51 nonclinical controls. Following a neutral or a sad mood induction, participants were presented with a dynamic facial expression that slowly changed from neutral to full-intensity happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, fear or neutral (closed/open mouth). Recognition of facial expressions was measured by the intensity of the expression at which participants could accurately identify the facial expression. No group differences in the recognition of facial expressions were found. All groups required comparable stages of emotional expressivity to correctly recognize emotions, and there were no significant differences in accuracy. Results indicate no mood effect on recognition or accuracy. Valence and arousal ratings of stimuli indicated that compared to the nonclinical control group but not to clinical controls, the adolescents with NSSI disorder rated the stimuli as significantly more unpleasant and arousing. PMID:26163730

  11. Fully automatic recognition of the temporal phases of facial actions.

    PubMed

    Valstar, Michel F; Pantic, Maja

    2012-02-01

    Past work on automatic analysis of facial expressions has focused mostly on detecting prototypic expressions of basic emotions like happiness and anger. The method proposed here enables the detection of a much larger range of facial behavior by recognizing facial muscle actions [action units (AUs)] that compound expressions. AUs are agnostic, leaving the inference about conveyed intent to higher order decision making (e.g., emotion recognition). The proposed fully automatic method not only allows the recognition of 22 AUs but also explicitly models their temporal characteristics (i.e., sequences of temporal segments: neutral, onset, apex, and offset). To do so, it uses a facial point detector based on Gabor-feature-based boosted classifiers to automatically localize 20 facial fiducial points. These points are tracked through a sequence of images using a method called particle filtering with factorized likelihoods. To encode AUs and their temporal activation models based on the tracking data, it applies a combination of GentleBoost, support vector machines, and hidden Markov models. We attain an average AU recognition rate of 95.3% when tested on a benchmark set of deliberately displayed facial expressions and 72% when tested on spontaneous expressions. PMID:21926026

  12. Psychopathy and Identification of Facial Expressions of Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mark E.; Tangney, June P.; Stuewig, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the association between psychopathy and identification of facial expressions of emotion. Previous research in this area is scant and has produced contradictory findings (Blair et. al., 2001, 2004; Glass & Newman, 2006; Kosson et al., 2002). One hundred and forty-five male jail inmates, rated using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version participated in a facial affect recognition task. Participants were shown faces containing one of five emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, anger, or shame) displayed at one of two different levels of intensity of expression (100% or 60%). The authors predicted that psychopathy would be associated with decreased affect recognition, particularly for sad and fearful emotional expressions, and decreased recognition of less intense displays of facial affect. Results were largely consistent with expectations in that psychopathy was negatively correlated with overall facial recognition of affect, sad facial affect, and recognition of less intense displays of affect. An unexpected negative correlation with recognition of happy facial affect was also found. These results suggest that psychopathy may be associated with a general deficit in affect recognition. PMID:21547246

  13. The effect of emotional expression on perceived facial age.

    PubMed

    Ganel, Tzvi

    2015-09-01

    People smile and express other emotional expressions in social interactions to convey different types of nonverbal communications. In the current project, I have studied the effects of different emotional expressions, in particular that of facial smile, on the perceived facial age. Smiling, as well as other facial expressions such as anger or fear, could potentially change the way that a person is perceived along different facial dimensions. Notably, these dimensions include perceived age. For smiling faces, it is commonly assumed that they are perceived as younger compared with faces carrying a neutral expression. In a series of experiments, I report a counter-intuitive effect in the opposite direction. Across different experimental conditions and stimulus sets, smiling faces were consistently perceived as older compared with neutral faces of the same persons. A similar effect was found for other facial expressions beyond smile. I suggest that this effect is due to the observer's failure to ignore emotion-associated wrinkles along the region of the eyes. These findings point to a misconception regarding the relationship between facial smile and perceived age and shed new light on the processes underlying human age perception. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326395

  14. Facial expressions of singers influence perceived pitch relations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William Forde; Russo, Frank A; Livingstone, Steven R

    2010-06-01

    In four experiments, we examined whether facial expressions used while singing carry musical information that can be "read" by viewers. In Experiment 1, participants saw silent video recordings of sung melodic intervals and judged the size of the interval they imagined the performers to be singing. Participants discriminated interval sizes on the basis of facial expression and discriminated large from small intervals when only head movements were visible. Experiments 2 and 3 confirmed that facial expressions influenced judgments even when the auditory signal was available. When matched with the facial expressions used to perform a large interval, audio recordings of sung intervals were judged as being larger than when matched with the facial expressions used to perform a small interval. The effect was not diminished when a secondary task was introduced, suggesting that audio-visual integration is not dependent on attention. Experiment 4 confirmed that the secondary task reduced participants' ability to make judgments that require conscious attention. The results provide the first evidence that facial expressions influence perceived pitch relations. PMID:20551352

  15. [The hyoid bone and vertical dimension].

    PubMed

    Doual, A; Léger, J L; Doual, J M; Hadjiat, F

    2003-09-01

    Located at the center of the neck and the pharyngeal column and, thanks to its attachments, tied to the base of the skull, to the mandible, to the tongue, to the larynx, and to the scapular belt, the hyoid bone is intimately related to an extensive tendino-muscular complex. From this strategic position, the hyoid bone participates in all functional and nutritional activities of the oro-facial complex. Heavily involved in the physiology of the pharyngeal column, it appears to enjoy a remarkable stability in relation to its surrounding structures as it participates in the critical process of vertical ontogenetic development. Deceptively simple in its shape and location it is anything but. While it would be easy to scorn it as a vestigial organ of little importance, the hyoid bone is actually an ancient witness of the evolution of the first human vertebrae and a vestige of the 2nd and 3rd brachial arches. Like a toy buffeted by powerful groups of muscles and tendons, the hyoid bone occupies a crossroads position where it is solicited by many vital functions, the most critical of which is respiration. Its functional behavior seems to have evolved considerably over the course of phylogeny. By piecing together the conceptions of many authors, we can conclude that the similarities--and, later, the differences--existing between the human fetus and those of other primates, and, then between young children and young primates, are related to an essentially different status quo, which modifies the delicate equilibrium of the pharyngeal region. In metamorphosing from a sagittal equilibrium to one that is vertical, this very status quo maintains an open respiratory airway during each time frame, continuously permitting the articulation and modulation of sounds, particularly during the vertical period. The hyoid bone is unpaired, in a mid-line position, symmetrical, and located just below the mandible with which it shares, to an astonishing extent, certain morphological characteristics. Its maturation and its ossification occur slowly and late even though it migrates much more rapidly to a vertical position than does the bulk of the cervical complex. True articulations between the body and the horns of the hyoid bone persist for a very long time; and so the junction between the small horns doesn't fully calcify until about the age of 50; and, in spite of its appearance, the hyoid bone is extremely supple, a quality that allows it to make substantial contributions to functional activity. If the hyoid bone itself scarcely moves during normal respiration, modern research attributes an increasing role to it in the maintenance of the equilibrium of the pharyngeal column. It seems to be called upon to respond to a number of demands that it manages to satisfy as it helps to maintain the permeability of the pharyngeal column and thus make respiration possible. In so doing, the hyoid bone adjusts its positioning, and, perhaps most important, its orientation to the physiological requirements imposed by pharyngeal obstruction and mouth breathing. Intimately connected to the larynx, the hyoid bone plays a part in phonation that has long been recognized. Recent studies now also show that the contribution the hyoid bone makes to respiratory equilibrium is far more important than its small size would suggest. PMID:15301368

  16. [Bone metabolism: molecular mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Neumann, E; Schett, G

    2007-07-01

    In order to accommodate individual load, the skeletal system is in a continual state of change. Bone metabolism guarantees optimal bone structure. The osteoblasts are responsible for the synthesis and the osteoclasts for resorption of the bone. A finely adjusted interplay between molecular mechanisms leads, via cytokines, hormones and growth factors, to an homeostasis in bone metabolism. Disturbances of this process lead via increased bone resorption to osteoporosis, and via increased synthesis to osteopetrosis. This contribution describes the known molecular mechanisms in this remodelling process. PMID:17562055

  17. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, Judith R. (Los Alamos, NM); Anderson, Gerhard D. (Velarde, NM); Bigio, Irving J. (Los Alamos, NM); Johnson, Tamara M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Method for fusing bone. The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  18. A sex difference in facial contrast and its exaggeration by cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Russell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates the existence of a sex difference in facial contrast. By measuring carefully controlled photographic images, female faces were shown to have greater luminance contrast between the eyes, lips, and the surrounding skin than did male faces. This sex difference in facial contrast was found to influence the perception of facial gender. An androgynous face can be made to appear female by increasing the facial contrast, or to appear male by decreasing the facial contrast. Application of cosmetics was found to consistently increase facial contrast. Female faces wearing cosmetics had greater facial contrast than the same faces not wearing cosmetics. Female facial beauty is known to be closely linked to sex differences, with femininity considered attractive. These results suggest that cosmetics may function in part by exaggerating a sexually dimorphic attribute-facial contrast-to make the face appear more feminine and hence attractive. PMID:19817153

  19. Mandibular Branch of the Facial Nerve in Wistar Rats: New Experimental Model to Assess Facial Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Salomone, Raquel; Nascimento, Silvia Bona do; Ferreira, Ricardo Jose Rodriguez; Silva, Ciro Ferreira da; Costa, Heloisa Juliana Zabeu Rossi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction?The ideal animal model for nerve regeneration studies is the object of controversy, because all models described by the literature have advantages and disadvantages. Objective?To describe the histologic and functional patterns of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of Wistar rats to create a new experimental model of facial nerve regeneration. Methods?Forty-two male rats were submitted to a nerve conduction test of the mandibular branch to obtain the compound muscle action potential. Twelve of these rats had the mandibular branch surgically removed and submitted to histologic analysis (number, partial density, and axonal diameter) of the proximal and distal segments. Results?There was no statistically significant difference in the functional and histologic variables studied. Conclusion?These new histologic and functional standards of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of rats establish an objective, easy, and greatly reproducible model for future facial nerve regeneration studies. PMID:25992106

  20. Affectiva-MIT Facial Expression Dataset (AM-FED): Naturalistic and Spontaneous Facial Expressions Collected In-the-Wild

    E-print Network

    McDuff, Daniel Jonathan

    Computer classification of facial expressions requires large amounts of data and this data needs to reflect the diversity of conditions seen in real applications. Public datasets help accelerate the progress of research ...

  1. Mandibular branch of the facial nerve in wistar rats: new experimental model to assess facial nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Salomone, Raquel; Nascimento, Silvia Bona do; Ferreira, Ricardo Jose Rodriguez; Silva, Ciro Ferreira da; Costa, Heloisa Juliana Zabeu Rossi

    2014-07-01

    Introduction?The ideal animal model for nerve regeneration studies is the object of controversy, because all models described by the literature have advantages and disadvantages. Objective?To describe the histologic and functional patterns of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of Wistar rats to create a new experimental model of facial nerve regeneration. Methods?Forty-two male rats were submitted to a nerve conduction test of the mandibular branch to obtain the compound muscle action potential. Twelve of these rats had the mandibular branch surgically removed and submitted to histologic analysis (number, partial density, and axonal diameter) of the proximal and distal segments. Results?There was no statistically significant difference in the functional and histologic variables studied. Conclusion?These new histologic and functional standards of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of rats establish an objective, easy, and greatly reproducible model for future facial nerve regeneration studies. PMID:25992106

  2. Soft tissue facial angles in Down's syndrome subjects: a three-dimensional non-invasive study.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Dellavia, Claudia; Serrao, Graziano; Sforza, Chiarella

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to obtain quantitative information concerning the three-dimensional (3D) arrangement of the facial soft tissues of subjects with Down's syndrome. The 3D co-ordinates of 50 soft tissue facial landmarks were recorded by an electromechanical digitizer in 17 male and 11 female subjects with Down's syndrome aged 12-45 years, and in 429 healthy individuals of the same age, ethnicity and gender. From the landmark co-ordinates, geometric calculations were obtained of several 3D facial angles: facial convexity in the horizontal plane (upper facial convexity, mid facial convexity including the nose, and lower facial convexity), mandibular corpus convexity in the horizontal plane, facial convexity including the nose, facial convexity excluding the nose, interlabial angle, nasolabial angle, angle of nasal convexity, left and right soft tissue gonial angles. Data were compared with that collected for the normal subjects by computing the z-scores. Facial convexity in the horizontal plane (both in the upper and mid facial third), facial convexity in the sagittal plane and the angle of nasal convexity were significantly (P < 0.05) increased (flatter) in subjects with Down's syndrome than in the normal controls. Both left and right soft tissue gonial angles were significantly reduced (more acute) in the Down's syndrome subjects. Subjects with Down's syndrome had a more hypoplastic facial middle third with reduced nasal protrusion, and a reduced lower facial third (mandible) than reference, normal subjects. PMID:16043473

  3. [Bone turnover marker].

    PubMed

    Miura, Masakazu; Satoh, Yuki

    2015-10-01

    Recently the clinical application of bone turnover markers (BTMs) have been achieved significant progress and the measurements of these indices give us better understanding of pathogenesis of osteoporosis. BTMs are known the bone formation marker, the bone resorption marker and the bone matrix-related marker, respectively. In the Guidelines for the Use of Bone Metabolic Markers in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteoporosis (2012 Edition) from publishing Japan Osteoporosis Society Committee, the newly and commonly BTMs were considered to give the normal reference value in Japanese people, the influence of renal function on BTMs. The flow chart of the measurement of bone resorption markers and bone formation markers when selecting drug treatment for osteoporosis, the evaluation of therapeutic effects of bone antiresorption drugs and/or bone formation promoting drug using bone resorption markers and/or bone formation marker were corrected newly in the guideline 2012 edition. Moreover, BTMs were suggested to contribute to adhere with osteoporosis treatment. BTMs are adapted to selection of the drug for osteoporosis and to evaluate the drug efficacy. Therefore, it is very important to guide the proper application and assessment of BTMs in clinical practice. PMID:26529926

  4. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  5. Facial movement before and after masseteric-facial nerves anastomosis: a three-dimensional optoelectronic pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Frigerio, Alice; Mapelli, Andrea; Mandelli, Filippo; Sidequersky, Fernanda V; Colombo, Valeria; Ferrario, Virgilio F; Biglioli, Federico

    2012-07-01

    To quantify the effects of facial palsy reanimation, 14 patients aged 17-66 years were analysed. All patients had unilateral facial paralysis, and were candidates for surgical masseteric to facial nerve anastomosis. Two patient groups were measured: seven patients were waiting for surgery, the other seven patients had already been submitted to surgery, and had regained facial mimicry. Each patient performed three facial animations: brow raise; free smile; lip purse. These were recorded using an optoelectronic motion analyser. The three-dimensional coordinates of facial landmarks were obtained, their movements were computed, and asymmetry indices calculated (differential movements between the two hemi-faces: healthy and paretic/rehabilitated). Before surgery, mobility was larger in the healthy than in the paretic side; after surgery, the differences were reduced (brow raise and lip purse), or even reversed (smile). Before surgery, lip purse was performed with significant labial asymmetry (p=0.042; larger healthy side movement). After surgery, asymmetry indices reduced. Total labial asymmetry during smiling was significantly different from 0 before surgery (p=0.018, larger healthy side movement). After surgery, all asymmetry indices became non-significant. Before surgery the lateral displacements of all labial landmarks were towards the healthy side, while they normalized after surgery. PMID:21872484

  6. Forensic investigations frequently utilize facial reconstructions/approximations to stimulate recognition and identification. Over the past 25 years, many computer-

    E-print Network

    Frey, Pascal

    REVIEW Abstract Forensic investigations frequently utilize facial reconstructions by the wider forensic science field. In addi- tion, constant re-evaluation and assessment will promote further improvement and increase reliability. Key Words: Forensic; human identification; facial reconstruction; facial

  7. [Bone and Nutrition. Sclerostin and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Sawako; Nagamoto, Kenta; Ogata, Mao; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-07-01

    Osteocytes orchestrate bone resorption and bone formation by controlling osteoclast and osteoblast activity. On the other hand, osteocytes secret FGF23 (fibroblast growth factor 23), FGF23 acts on the kidney to control phosphate homeostasis. Sclerostin is also released from osteocytes and it regulated osteoblast activity through Wnt/?-catenin pathway. Therefore, an antibody that targets sclerostin is currently in phase- III clinical trials for the treatment of osteoporosis and it is expected as new therapeutics. PMID:26119318

  8. Facial patterning and infant emotional expression: happiness, surprise, and fear.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, S W; Campos, J J; Emde, R N

    1979-12-01

    Although recent studies have convincingly demonstrated that emotional expressions can be judged reliably from actor-posed facial displays, there exists little evidence that facial expressions in lifelike settings are similar to actor-posed displays, are reliable across situations designed to elicit the same emotion, or provide sufficient information to mediate consistent emotion judgments by raters. The present study therefore investigated these issues as they related to the emotions of happiness, surprise, and fear. 27 infants between 10 and 12 months of age (when emotion masking is not likely to confound results) were tested in 2 situations designed to elicit hapiness (peek-a-boo game and a collapsing toy), 2 to elicit surprise (a toy-switch and a vanishing-object task), and 2 to elicit fear (the visual cliff and the approach of a stranger. Dependent variables included changes in 28 facial response components taken from previous work using actor poses, as well as judgments of the presence of 6 discrete emotions. In addition, instrumental behaviors were used to verify with other than facial expression responses whether the predicted emotion was elicited. In contrast to previous conclusions on the subject, we found that judges were able to make all facial expression judgments reliably, even in the absence of contextual information. Support was also obtained for at least some degree of specificity of facial component response patterns, especially for happiness and surprise. Emotion judgments by raters were found to be a function of the presence of discrete facial components predicted to be linked to those emotions. Finally, almost all situations elicited blends, rather than discrete emotions. PMID:535426

  9. [Accuracy of the prognostic diagnosis in acute peripheral facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Masaru

    2005-01-01

    The important factors in the prognostic diagnosis of acute peripheral facial palsy are (1) the causal disease, (2) the site of injury and (3) the degree of injury, although the age of the patient, complication, treatment method and initial day of treatment are also important. Among these 3 factors, the degree of injury is most strongly related to the prognosis. However, the diagnosis of etiology is the most important for the selection of the treatment method. Above all, the differential diagnosis between Bell's palsy and zoster sine herpete (Ramsay Hunt syndrome), is the most significant. However, it is impossible to diagnose all patients with complete accuracy within 3 days after the onset of palsy, even using molecular biological examination including polymerase chain reaction analysis. The diagnosis of the site of injury does not contribute to the prediction of prognosis or the selection of treatment method, except for the determination of the approaching route of the facial nerve decompression for traumatic facial palsy. The scoring system of facial movement (40-point method), nerve excitability test (NET), electroneurography (ENoG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and stapedial reflex (SR) are commonly used to estimate the degree of injury. To estimate the accuracy of these examinations, sensitivity and specificity of the tests were calculated according to the findings within 3 days after the onset of palsy and the outcome of 116 patients with Bell's palsy and 31 with Ramsay Hunt syndrome. According to the results, none of these tests seem to be a perfect diagnostic examination for the completely precise prediction of prognosis. However, a patient is predicted to have a good prognosis, if the following 3 findings are observed: (1) more than 10 points in the 40-point scoring system of facial movement, (2) a positive response to TMS and (3) a positive response to SR. An antidromic facial nerve response probably contributes to a precise prediction of prognosis within 3 days after the onset of facial palsy. PMID:15712490

  10. Trigeminal neuralgia: unilateral episodic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2015-06-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare cause of episodic unilateral facial pain and often in the initial presentation dental causes need to be eliminated, as it frequently presents in the lower trigeminal divisions. The pain description is characteristic of electric shock-like pain that is light-touch provoked, paroxysmal, and occurring daily; the condition can go into remission for weeks or months, however. The first-line drug is either carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine and has to be started in low doses. Over 70% of patients will initially obtain immediate relief. If efficacy or tolerability becomes a problem, then referral to a secondary care specialist should be made. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can determine if there is a symptomatic cause and whether surgery is indicated. Surgical options provide longest pain relief periods. Patients need to be given information about all treatment options so they can make a decision about treatment. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 4, © Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be viewed via the Web site: www.paineurope.com , at which health professionals can find links to the original articles and request copies of the quarterly publication and access additional pain education and pain management resources. PMID:26095494

  11. On facial asymmetry and self-perception.

    PubMed

    Lu, Stephen M; Bartlett, Scott P

    2014-06-01

    Self-perception has been an enduring human concern since ancient times and remains a significant component of the preoperative and postoperative consultation. Despite modern technological attempts to reproduce the first-hand experience, there is no perfect substitute for human, stereoscopic, three-dimensional vision in evaluating appearance. Nowadays, however, the primary tools available to a patient for examining his or her own appearance, particularly the face, are photographs and mirrors. Patients are often unaware of how cameras and photographs can distort and degrade image quality, leading to an inaccurate representation of true appearance. Everyone knows that mirrors reverse an image, left and right, and most people recognize their own natural facial asymmetry at some level. However, few realize that emotions are not only expressed unequally by the left and right sides of the face but also perceived unequally by others. The impact and effect of this "facedness" is completely reversed by mirrors, potentially creating a significant discrepancy between what a patient perceives of himself or herself and what the surgeon or other third party sees. This article ties together the diverse threads leading to this problem and suggests several ways of mitigating the issue through technology and patient counseling. PMID:24867747

  12. [Lifting procedures in cosmetic facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Jansma, J; Schepers, R H; Vissink, A

    2014-10-01

    A prominent characteristic of the aging face is the descent of skin and subcutaneous tissues. In order to reduce this and create a more youthful appearance, several lifting procedures can be employed. In the forehead and eyebrow region the transblepharoplastic brow lift, the direct brow lift, the temporal brow lift, the coronal brow lift and the endoscopic brow lift can be distinguished. For the mid-face, the facelift is known to be an effective treatment for aging characteristics. Classic facelifts can be divided into the one layer-, two layer- and the deep plane facelift. Nowadays the minimal access cranial suspension lift is popular. The lifting capacity of this lift may be less, but the risk of complications is lower and the result is often more natural. A neck lift improves the chin-neck angle and a submental liposuction/lipectomy can contribute to this. Complications in lifting procedures are rare. Hematoma is the most frequent complication. Skin necrosis of the wound edges and laceration of the end branches of the facial nerve can also occur. There is a tendency towards minimally invasive procedures with smaller risk of complications and shorter recovery periods. PMID:26185994

  13. Perceptual expertise in forensic facial image comparison.

    PubMed

    White, David; Phillips, P Jonathon; Hahn, Carina A; Hill, Matthew; O'Toole, Alice J

    2015-09-01

    Forensic facial identification examiners are required to match the identity of faces in images that vary substantially, owing to changes in viewing conditions and in a person's appearance. These identifications affect the course and outcome of criminal investigations and convictions. Despite calls for research on sources of human error in forensic examination, existing scientific knowledge of face matching accuracy is based, almost exclusively, on people without formal training. Here, we administered three challenging face matching tests to a group of forensic examiners with many years' experience of comparing face images for law enforcement and government agencies. Examiners outperformed untrained participants and computer algorithms, thereby providing the first evidence that these examiners are experts at this task. Notably, computationally fusing responses of multiple experts produced near-perfect performance. Results also revealed qualitative differences between expert and non-expert performance. First, examiners' superiority was greatest at longer exposure durations, suggestive of more entailed comparison in forensic examiners. Second, experts were less impaired by image inversion than non-expert students, contrasting with face memory studies that show larger face inversion effects in high performers. We conclude that expertise in matching identity across unfamiliar face images is supported by processes that differ qualitatively from those supporting memory for individual faces. PMID:26336174

  14. Predictive Value of Postoperative Electrophysiologic Testing of the Facial Nerve After Cerebellopontine Angle Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Selesnick, Samuel H.; Digoy, G. Paul; Ptachewich, Yael; Rubin, Michael; Victor, Jonathan D.

    1998-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the ability of postoperative electroneuronography (ENoG) and electromyography (EMG) to predict clinical facial function 1 year postoperatively in patients with facial paralysis and an intact facial nerve after cerebellopontine angle surgery. The study was a prospective, nonrandomized, uncontrolled clinical trial on an outpatient basis, at a tertiary care hospital. Primary eligibility criteria include: (1) cerebellopontine angle (CPA) surgery with anatomical preservation of facial nerve, (2) complete facial nerve paralysis; and (3) 1 year follow-up. ENoG and EMG were measured at 1 and 3 months postoperatively, House-Brackmann facial nerve grade at 1 year postoperatively. The Kendall coefficient of rank correlation demonstrated that the 1 and 3 month postoperative ENoG data were significant predictors of ultimate facial nerve outcome. Tracking multiple ENoG examinations in a single patient, over time was of little predictive value. EMG was a poor predictor of facial nerve outcome. In general, patients with delayed facial nerve paralysis had better ultimate facial function than patients with immediate paralysis. Postoperative ENoG, but not EMG was a statistically significant predictor of ultimate facial nerve outcome after CPA surgery. Patients with delayed facial paralysis had better outcomes than those with immediate facial paralysis. PMID:17171049

  15. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  16. Healthy Bones at Every Age

    MedlinePLUS

    ... keep our bones strong and healthy. Peak Bone Mass Our maximum bone size and strength is called peak bone mass. Genes play a large role in how much ... is determined by genetic factors. Although peak bone mass is largely determined by our genes, there are ...

  17. Bone scanning in clinical practice

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelman, I. )

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include the history of bone scanning, mechanisms of uptake of diphosphonate in bone, the normal bone scan, and the role of bone scanning in clinical practice. The aim of this book is to provide a source of reference relating to bone scan imaging for all those who are interested in the skeleton.

  18. Anxiety and Depression in Facial Injuries: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Prashanth, N T; Raghuveer, H P; Kumar, Dilip; Shobha, E S; Rangan, Vinod; Rao, T S S

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was performed to identify the presence of anxiety and depression in patients who had sustained facial injuries; additionally we aimed to identify other variables that may modify the psychological response to trauma that include gender and age. Materials and Methods: The participants were 153 patients from multimodal trauma centers in Bangalore city who sustained disfiguring facial injuries were taken up. Of the 153 patients, 81 patients were male (51 less than 50 years of age and 30 more than 50 years of age) and 72 patients were female (40 less than 50 years of age and 32 more than 50 years of age) and 111 patients with non-disfiguring facial injuries out of which 54 were male patients and 57 were female patients. The assessments were carried out at 3 time intervals (the date of discharge [DOD], 1-month post-operatively and 6 months post-operatively) of the follow-up. The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was used to assess the anxiety and depression of the facial trauma patients. Results: Statistically significant higher means of HADS both for anxiety and depression were present in patients with disfiguring facial injuries compared to non-disfiguring facial injuries, female patients compared to male patients after the 1-month and 6 months post-operatively, the mean anxiety and depression scores of males and female patients were significantly higher for those who aged less than 50 years compared to those who aged more than 50 years. Conclusion: The results of this study led to the conclusion that in comparison with patients who had facial disfiguring injuries and non-disfiguring facial injuries, the mean HADS scores were significantly higher in the disfiguring facial injury patient. This indicates increased Anxiety and Depression levels and this was observed at all three study intervals (DOD, 1-month and 6 months post-operatively). The HADS was higher in female patients who were lesser than 50 years age compared to male patients of the same age group, which implies higher anxiety and depression levels. PMID:26435626

  19. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  20. Osteocytes and Bone Diseases 

    E-print Network

    Ren, Yinshi

    2015-05-06

    and maintaining bone homeostasis; thus, osteocytes could be a potential target for treating bone diseases such as osteomalacia, periodontitis or osteoporosis. To address our hypothesis, three specific aims are proposed: Specific Aim 1: To investigate... into Ocy), and thus maintains overall healthy bone homeostasis. Last we utilized three different animal models (Dmp1 null mice as osteomalacia disease model, Periostin null mice as the periodontal disease model, and OVX rat as an osteoporosis model...