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Sample records for facial skin defects

  1. Flexible Curved V-Y Subcutaneous Flap for Facial Skin Defects

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoyuki; Kawazoe, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Background and Methods: We devised an improved type of the V-Y subcutaneous pedicle flap with the elements of both advancement and rotation flaps. This flexible curved V-Y subcutaneous flap was used for facial skin defect reconstruction in 15 patients. Curved flaps were designed according to the elasticity of the surrounding skin and the postoperative scar direction. Results: In all the 15 patients, the flap survived without circulatory impairment, and follow-up for more than 1 year indicated an inconspicuous scar and good course. Conclusions: With elements of both advancement and rotation flaps, transfer and wound closure of the flexible curved V-Y subcutaneous flap are easy. In addition, the postoperative scar can be positioned along natural wrinkle lines and relaxed skin tension lines. This may be a useful local flap for facial and general plastic surgery. PMID:26579337

  2. Reconstruction of Large Facial Defects after Delayed Mohs Surgery for Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    The face is a common localization for skin malignancies. Mohs surgery or delayed Mohs surgery are considered the gold standard of treatment despite new drug developments. We analyzed our patient files over a three-year period. Only large facial defects ?3 cm in diameter after complete tumor removal were considered. Twenty patients (9 men and 11 women) were found, with a mean age of 83.6 years. The following tumor entities were responsible for large defects: basal and squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma, atypical fibroxanthoma, and cutaneous angiosarcoma. Surgery was performed in all cases using regional or local anesthesia. Defect repair was done using linear sutures (n=1), skin grafts (n=1), and flaps (n=18). The various types of repair are illustrated in this review, advantages and limitations of each type of repair are discussed. Patient satisfaction was high. Complications or adverse events were rare. The need for repair of large facial defects after tumor surgery is not uncommon. Careful planning and the use of a number of techniques allows a tailored approach for each patient. PMID:26724878

  3. Gelatin Facial Skin Simulator for Cutaneous Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven R; Chang, C W David

    2016-02-01

    Reconstruction of facial defects can be an intimidating endeavor, especially to resident physicians. When local flap reconstruction is preferred, design of the optimal flap can be a difficult choice. Poor selection can lead to unsightly scarring as well as increased morbidity. A low-cost, easy-to-fabricate gelatin prosthetic facial skin simulator is presented to offer training experience in wound closure, local tissue rearrangement, and facial defect reconstruction for resident instruction. In conjunction with a didactic lecture, 10 participants were asked to perform a Z-plasty, bilobed, rhomboid, and paramedian forehead flap, followed by an 18-question survey. While initial impressions are favorable, further validation studies are warranted. PMID:26645528

  4. [Craniofacial prostheses for facial defects].

    PubMed

    Federspil, P A

    2010-06-01

    Craniofacial prostheses (or epitheses) are artificial substitutes for facial defects. Today, prostheses made of silicone are state-of-the-art. They may be fixed anatomically (to already existing structures), mechanically (to spectacle frames), chemically (using adhesives), or surgically (to osseointegrated titanium implants). With the existing extraoral implant systems, prostheses may be securely anchored to the bone regardless of size and location of the defect. The classic atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation by avoidance of any heat trauma to the bone. This review outlines the indications and contra-indications as well as advantages and disadvantages of craniofacial prostheses and their retention methods in various facial regions. It summarizes the basic principles of extraoral implantology in respect to implant positioning and the management of children and radiated patients. PMID:20393689

  5. Operative treatment of functional facial skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scheithauer, Marc Oliver; Rettinger, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The skin is the principal interface between the body and the surrounding world and thus serves as a protective barrier against trauma, temperature extremes and radiation. With receptors for pressure, movement, heat and cold, it also acts as sensory organ and through sweat secretion plays a role in thermoregulation and electrolyte metabolism. Not all of these functions are relevant to facial skin, however, cosmetic aspects are of vital importance. Disorders primarily affect the protective skin function in defect and scar areas. For operative correction, the following principles should be applied: Minimization of scar development by adherence to indicated incision lines in the face, preferred use of local skin flaps for defect coverage in order to obtain optimal results regarding texture, complexion and sensitivity of skin, as well as consideration of aesthetic units. Recent developments in this field are tissue culture, occlusive dressings, and the use of growth factors. Age-related skin changes with impairment of cosmetic function are characterized by the development of creases and looseness of skin. Rejuvenation has become an important segment of skin surgery. For surface treatment, especially of creases and acne scars, various types of laser treatment are employed. Deeper lines can be filled with filler materials. The integration of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) into face lift procedures has lead to more viable and natural results. Due to protruding tissue, blepharoplasty of the upper lid is often carried out in combination with forehead lift and eyebrow lift procedures. The optimized use of growth factors and synthetic materials, which serve as a matrix, are aimed at skin replacement which mimics the quality and functions of skin as closely as possible. On the whole, however, the reconstruction of defect through local tissue transfer is still considered as the treatment of choice. PMID:22073066

  6. Reconstruction of Facial Defect Using Deltopectoral Flap.

    PubMed

    Aldelaimi, Tahrir N; Khalil, Afrah A

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the head and neck is a challenge for otolarygology surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons as well as plastic surgeons. Defects caused by the resection and/or trauma should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Deltopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the facial defects. This study report a patient presenting with tragic Road Traffic Accident (RTA) admitted to maxillofacial surgery department at Ramadi Teaching Hospital, Anbar province, Iraq. An incision, medially based, was done and deltopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure and closure of defects after RTA. There was no major complication. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Deltopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation. PMID:26595007

  7. The application of reverse tubular medial upper arm flap in the reconstruction of ripped facial defects

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xianglin; Ma, Juan; Ma, Shaolin; Wen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Reverse medial upper arm flap is usually utilized in the reconstruction of defects in soft tissues of head and facial skin and is with good clinical efficacy. However, it has not been used in the reconstruction of ripped defects. In this study, we used the reverse tubular medial upper arm flap to repair the ripped facial defects. The reverse tubular skin flap from the medial upper arm was longitudinally cut into two parts. One part was used for the reconstruction of ripped facial defects. The other part was used as inner lining to repair the defects of mucosa. Using this method, 3 patients with ripped facial defects were successfully repaired. Thus the reverse tubular medial upper arm flap was successfully used in the reconstruction of ripped facial defects with little surgical trauma, simple manipulation of the operation, increased success rate of the operation and reduced incidence of complications. PMID:25550953

  8. Facial Skin Lesions Dentists Should Know.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Louna; Kudsi, Zaki

    2015-01-01

    Facial skin lesions are common; patients may present with a.nodule, crack, ulcer or abnormal discoloration of the skin that is not normally present. Ideally, dentists should include face examination in their routine clinical examination. Any suspicious lesion should be referred to a dermatologist as an early diagnosis and treatment could be life-saving. This article will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of common lesions of the face. PMID:26506807

  9. [Implant retained epistheses for facial defects].

    PubMed

    Federspil, P A

    2009-05-01

    Epitheses, also known as craniofacial prostheses, are artificial substitutes for facial defects. The breakthrough for rehabilitation of facial defects with implant retained epitheses came with the development of the modern silicones and bone anchorage. After the discovery of the osseointegration of titanium in the 1960s, dental implants have been made of titanium. In 1977, the first extraoral titanium implant was inserted in a patient. Later, various solitary extraoral implant systems have been developed. Besides, grouped implant systems have been developed, which may be placed more reliably in areas with low bone offering, as in the nasal and orbital region, or the ideally pneumatised mastoid process. Today, even large facial epitheses may be securely retained. The classical atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation of any system. This review outlines the basic principles of osseointegration as well as the main features of extraoral implantology. PMID:19353454

  10. Ultrastructure of elastosis in facial rhytidectomy skin

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.; Woodward, M.

    1981-03-01

    Skin from 19 facial rhytidectomies performed in patients with chronic solar damage was compared with postauricular skin from patients of similar age. Light microscopy demonstrated large areas of amorphous material that stained PAS positive in all 19 face-lift specimens, while none of the controls had such material. Electron microscopy of the ''elastotic'' material revealed large amorphous masses of granular material, with loss of the microfilament component of normal elastin. Current theories suggest that the elastotic material in solar-damaged skin is a product of radiation-damaged fibroblasts, rather than being either collagen or degenerated elastin. Such knowledge may help the plastic surgeons encourage rhytidectomy patients to protect themselves from solar radiation.

  11. Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction.

  12. Segmental facial hemangiomas and associated structural defects.

    PubMed

    van Doesburg, Margriet H M; Breugem, Corstiaan C; Breur, Johannes M P J; Braun, Kees P J; Speleman, Lucienne A; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A

    2009-07-01

    PHACE syndrome refers to the association of large segmental facial hemangiomas with 1 or more of the following anomalies: posterior fossa malformations, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, and eye abnormalities. In this review, we present a newborn with a large segmental facial hemangioma and abnormal genesis of the cerebropetal arteries. Furthermore, we give an overview of the anomalies associated with the PHACE syndrome. Patients with large segmental facial hemangiomas are at risk for 1 of these anomalies and should be investigated accordingly. We present a clinical algorithm for screening of patients with large segmental hemangiomas suggestive of the PHACE syndrome. PMID:19625839

  13. Variability in coefficient of restitution in human facial skin

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, K. R.; Oleson, J. J.; Anthony, T. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background If particles rebound on human facial skin, they can be re-entrained into the airflow and subsequently inhaled, increasing aspiration efficiency estimates. A realistic estimate of facial skin coefficient of restitution (CoR) is necessary to accurately model particle bounce. This study investigated the effects of sampling location, temperature, humidity levels, age, gender, and BMI on facial skin CoR. Methods A torsional ballistometer was used to measure facial CoR for 30 participants divided into three age groups (18–30, 31–40, and 41–65 years), at three temperatures and three humidity levels. The study was repeated twice: once in the late winter and once in the early summer to capture the seasonal variability. Results The CoR significantly varied across five facial locations, with values ranging from 0.55 to 0.75. Gender, sampling season and the interaction between sampling location and age were found to be significant, but changes in values were relatively small (0.05 at most) and are not considered practically significant. Conclusion CoR was non-uniform across the face. The use of uniform CoR value as modeling input parameters or for mannequin facial surfaces in experimental wind tunnel studies may not be accurate due to the high variability in CoR between facial sampling locations. PMID:24628680

  14. Lightweight acrylic resin facial prosthesis for maxillofacial defects: a fabrication and retention method.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takayoshi; Sato, Junichi; Matsuura, Masaro; Kawaguchi, Koji; Sekiguchi, Rei; Horie, Akihisa; Seto, Kanichi

    2013-10-01

    Extraoral maxillofacial rehabilitation for compromised or lost facial anatomy resulting from the surgical eradication of malignancy, trauma, or congenital anomalies is commonly accomplished with a silicone prosthesis. However, with increasing size and weight, a silicone prosthesis can lose retention. This report presents 2 patient treatments to introduce a fabrication and retention method for a lightweight acrylic resin facial prosthesis. The prosthesis was fabricated by bonding an acrylic resin facial shell to a computer-edited facial image printed with iron-on transfers. The completed prosthesis was attached to the skin with medical-grade double-sided adhesive tape, which maintained a tight marginal seal even when in contact with saliva and water. The strong prosthetic retention of the lightweight prosthesis enabled orofacial and speech rehabilitation, which makes it a promising alternative to the conventional silicone prosthesis, especially for the restoration of extensive maxillofacial defects. PMID:24079569

  15. Chronic actinic damage of facial skin.

    PubMed

    Bilaç, Cemal; ?ahin, Mustafa Turhan; Öztürkcan, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Chronic actinic damage of the skin manifests itself as extrinsic skin aging (photoaging) and photocarcinogenesis. During the last decade, substantial progress has been made in understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of photoaging. DNA photodamage and ultraviolet-generated reactive oxygen species are the initial events that lead to most of the typical histologic and clinical manifestations of chronic photodamage of the skin. Chronic actinic damage affects all layers of the skin. Keratinocytes, melanocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells are altered by ultraviolet radiation and can result in numerous changes in human skin, particularly the skin of fair-skinned individuals. These changes include actinic keratosis, thickening and wrinkling, elastosis, telengiectasia, solar comedones, diffuse or mottled hyperpigmentation, and skin cancers. There are many options in the treatment of changes caused by chronic actinic damage. The most effective measure of prevention of the photoaging and photocarcinogenesis is sun protection. PMID:25441468

  16. Comparison of Local Flaps and Skin Grafts to Repair Cheek Skin Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Ashayeri, Mehdi; Rasouli, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Selecting the appropriate technique for surgical incisions, and reconstruction of facial defects after skin tumour excision has always been one of the surgeon's biggest concerns. The aim of this study is to compare the results between the local flap and skin graft to reconstruct cheek defects after basal cell carcinoma excision. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, 40 patients with skin defects resulting from skin tumour (Basal cell carcinoma) excision in cheek zones (16 sub-orbital, 18 bucco-mandibular and six auricular) were treated using local flap (n = 20) and skin graft (n = 20) from October 2010 to April 2012. All patients were followed up for 12 months, postoperatively. In addition, general assessments including complications, patient satisfaction, tissue co-ordination, skin colour and hospitalisation days were obtained. Results: Five patients had postoperative hyper-pigmentation complication in the skin graft group and none occurred in the local flap (P = 0.046). In the early postoperative period (2 weeks), mean scores in patient satisfaction, tissue co-ordination and skin colour were statistically significant increase in the local flaps (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively) and in the later postoperative period (12 months) only mean scores in skin colour significantly increased in the local flaps (P < 0.001). The mean postoperative length of hospitalisation days was 1.7 ± 0.4 days in the local flap group, and 3.63 ± 1.16 days in the skin graft group (P = 0.001). Conclusion: In the local flap group: Patient satisfaction, tissue co-ordination and skin colour were improved after 2 weeks. Also in 12-months follow up visits, skin colour was improved significantly and the hyperpigmentation was reduced. Generally, in this study the local flaps had better results in clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. However, for each cheek defect the surgeon must choose the appropriate reconstruction strategy to avoid undesirable outcomes. PMID:26157308

  17. The Usefulness of Leukosan SkinLink for Simple Facial Laceration Repair in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Choi, Jaehoon; Jung, Woonhyuk

    2015-01-01

    Background Repair of facial laceration in the emergency department can pose a number of difficulties. Children can be uncooperative, but adults can also be if they have sustained head trauma or are intoxicated. Leukosan SkinLink consists of topical adhesive and adhesive tape that can be applied easily to long or tense wounds. In this study, the authors compared conventional suturing with Leukosan SkinLink for facial laceration patients in the emergency department. Methods The prospective study was carried out from March 2013 to September 2013 with linear facial laceration patients visiting the emergency department. Exclusion criteria were open fractures, joint injuries, skin defects, hairy skin, and mucosa. The author used Leukosan SkinLink for skin closure in the experimental group and used conventional suturing in the control group. The scar evaluation using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) along with satisfaction scores, procedure times, and complications were compared. Results A total of 77 patients (30 in the control group and 47 in the experimental group) participated and underwent follow-up for 6 months postoperatively. The scar assessment using the POSAS and the satisfaction score in both groups were similar. The average procedure time in the experimental group was shorter. In the control group, there were four cases of wound dehiscence, two of infection, and one of skin necrosis, whereas four cases of wound dehiscence and one allergic reaction occurred in the experimental group. Conclusions With a simple application technique, Leukosan SkinLink is a new effective method for facial laceration repair especially useful for children and uncooperative adults. PMID:26217563

  18. Implant-retained craniofacial prostheses for facial defects

    PubMed Central

    Federspil, Philipp A.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial prostheses, also known as epistheses, are artificial substitutes for facial defects. The breakthrough for rehabilitation of facial defects with implant-retained prostheses came with the development of the modern silicones and bone anchorage. Following the discovery of the osseointegration of titanium in the 1950s, dental implants have been made of titanium in the 1960s. In 1977, the first extraoral titanium implant was inserted in a patient. Later, various solitary extraoral implant systems were developed. Grouped implant systems have also been developed which may be placed more reliably in areas with low bone presentation, as in the nasal and orbital region, or the ideally pneumatised mastoid process. Today, even large facial prostheses may be securely retained. The classical atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation of any system. This review outlines the basic principles of osseointegration as well as the main features of extraoral implantology. PMID:22073096

  19. Facial skin beautification using adaptive region-aware masks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lingyu; Jin, Lianwen; Li, Xuelong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a unified facial beautification framework with respect to skin homogeneity, lighting, and color. A novel region-aware mask is constructed for skin manipulation, which can automatically select the edited regions with great precision. Inspired by the state-of-the-art edit propagation techniques, we present an adaptive edge-preserving energy minimization model with a spatially variant parameter and a high-dimensional guided feature space for mask generation. Using region-aware masks, our method facilitates more flexible and accurate facial skin enhancement while the complex manipulations are simplified considerably. In our beautification framework, a portrait is decomposed into smoothness, lighting, and color layers by an edge-preserving operator. Next, facial landmarks and significant features are extracted as input constraints for mask generation. After three region-aware masks have been obtained, a user can perform facial beautification simply by adjusting the skin parameters. Furthermore, the combinations of parameters can be optimized automatically, depending on the data priors and psychological knowledge. We performed both qualitative and quantitative evaluation for our method using faces with different genders, races, ages, poses, and backgrounds from various databases. The experimental results demonstrate that our technique is superior to previous methods and comparable to commercial systems, for example, PicTreat, Portrait+ , and Portraiture. PMID:24710839

  20. Serum levels of IGF-1 are related to human skin characteristics including the conspicuousness of facial pores.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama-Nakagiri, Y; Naoe, A; Ohuchi, A; Kitahara, T

    2011-04-01

    Conspicuous facial pores are one type of serious aesthetic defects for many women. However, the mechanism(s) that underlie the conspicuousness of facial pores remains unclear. We previously characterized the epidermal architecture around facial pores that correlates with the appearance of those pores in various ethnic groups including Japanese. The goal of this study was to evaluate the possible relationships between facial pore size, the severity of impairment of epidermal architecture around facial pores and sebum output levels to investigate the possible role of IGF-1 in the pathogenesis of conspicuous facial pores. The subjects consisted of 38 healthy Japanese women (aged 22-41 years). IGF-1 was measured using immunoradiometric assay. Surface replicas were collected to compare pore sizes of cheek skin and horizontal cross-section images of cheek skin were obtained non-invasively from the same subjects using in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy and the severity of impairment of epidermal architecture around facial pores was determined. The skin surface lipids of each subject were collected from their cheeks and lipid classes were determined using gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. The serum level of IGF-1 correlated significantly with total pore area (R = 0.36, P < 0.05), with the severity of impairment of epidermal architecture around facial pores (R = 0.43, P < 0.05) and with sebum output levels (R = 0.41, P < 0.01). The sebum output levels correlated with total pore area (R = 0.32, P < 0.05). Our study found that serum levels of IGF-1 are correlated with facial skin characteristics including facial pore size and with the severity of impairment of epidermal architecture around facial pores. PMID:20646082

  1. Visible skin condition and perception of human facial appearance.

    PubMed

    Samson, N; Fink, B; Matts, P J

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary psychology suggests that certain human beauty standards have evolved to provide reliable cues of fertility and health. Hence, preferences for some physical characteristics of the face and body are thought to reflect adaptations for the promotion of mate choice. Studies that have investigated facial attractiveness have concentrated mainly on features such as symmetry, averageness and sex-typical traits, which are developed under the influence of sex steroids. Few studies, however, have addressed the effect of human skin condition on perception of facial appearance in this context, and possible implications for sexual selection. There is now accumulating evidence that skin pigmentation and skin surface topography cues, particularly in women, have a significant influence on attractiveness judgements, as they seem primarily to signal aspects of age and health. This article (i) reviews briefly some of the main determinants of visible skin condition, (ii) presents recent evidence on its signalling value in face perception and (iii) suggests areas for future research with reference to an evolutionary psychology framework. PMID:19889046

  2. Multimodal digital color imaging system for facial skin lesion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Lee, Youn-Heum; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    In dermatology, various digital imaging modalities have been used as an important tool to quantitatively evaluate the treatment effect of skin lesions. Cross-polarization color image was used to evaluate skin chromophores (melanin and hemoglobin) information and parallel-polarization image to evaluate skin texture information. In addition, UV-A induced fluorescent image has been widely used to evaluate various skin conditions such as sebum, keratosis, sun damages, and vitiligo. In order to maximize the evaluation efficacy of various skin lesions, it is necessary to integrate various imaging modalities into an imaging system. In this study, we propose a multimodal digital color imaging system, which provides four different digital color images of standard color image, parallel and cross-polarization color image, and UV-A induced fluorescent color image. Herein, we describe the imaging system and present the examples of image analysis. By analyzing the color information and morphological features of facial skin lesions, we are able to comparably and simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions. In conclusion, we are sure that the multimodal color imaging system can be utilized as an important assistant tool in dermatology.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy for endogenous porphyrins in human facial skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, I.; Tseng, S. H.; Cula, G. O.; Bargo, P. R.; Kollias, N.

    2009-02-01

    The activity of certain bacteria in skin is known to correlate to the presence of porphyrins. In particular the presence of coproporphyrin produced by P.acnes inside plugged pores has been correlated to acne vulgaris. Another porphyrin encountered in skin is protoporphyrin IX, which is produced by the body in the pathway for production of heme. In the present work, a fluorescence spectroscopy system was developed to measure the characteristic spectrum and quantify the two types of porphyrins commonly present in human facial skin. The system is comprised of a Xe lamp both for fluorescence excitation and broadband light source for diffuse reflectance measurements. A computer-controlled filter wheel enables acquisition of sequential spectra, first excited by blue light at 405 nm then followed by the broadband light source, at the same location. The diffuse reflectance spectrum was used to correct the fluorescence spectrum due to the presence of skin chromophores, such as blood and melanin. The resulting fluorescence spectra were employed for the quantification of porphyrin concentration in a population of healthy subjects. The results show great variability on the concentration of these porphyrins and further studies are being conducted to correlate them with skin conditions such as inflammation and acne vulgaris.

  4. Skin and Bones: The Contribution of Skin Tone and Facial Structure to Racial Prototypicality Ratings

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Michael A.; Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Zhang, Shunan; Bronstad, P. Matthew; Lee, Hoon Koo

    2012-01-01

    Previous research reveals that a more ‘African’ appearance has significant social consequences, yielding more negative first impressions and harsher criminal sentencing of Black or White individuals. This study is the first to systematically assess the relative contribution of skin tone and facial metrics to White, Black, and Korean perceivers’ ratings of the racial prototypicality of faces from the same three groups. Our results revealed that the relative contribution of metrics and skin tone depended on both perceiver race and face race. White perceivers’ racial prototypicality ratings were less responsive to variations in skin tone than were Black or Korean perceivers’ ratings. White perceivers ratings’ also were more responsive to facial metrics than to skin tone, while the reverse was true for Black perceivers. Additionally, across all perceiver groups, skin tone had a more consistent impact than metrics on racial prototypicality ratings of White faces, with the reverse for Korean faces. For Black faces, the relative impact varied with perceiver race: skin tone had a more consistent impact than metrics for Black and Korean perceivers, with the reverse for White perceivers. These results have significant implications for predicting who will experience racial prototypicality biases and from whom. PMID:22815966

  5. Automatic Facial Skin Segmentation Based on EM Algorithm under Varying Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsi, Mousa; Zoroofi, Reza Aghaiezadeh; Lucas, Caro; Hasanabadi, Mohammad Sadeghi; Alsharif, Mohammad Reza

    Facial skin detection is an important step in facial surgical planning like as many other applications. There are many problems in facial skin detection. One of them is that the image features can be severely corrupted due to illumination, noise, and occlusion, where, shadows can cause numerous strong edges. Hence, in this paper, we present an automatic Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for facial skin color segmentation that uses knowledge of chromatic space and varying illumination conditions to correct and segment frontal and lateral facial color images, simultaneously. The proposed EM algorithm leads to a method that allows for more robust and accurate segmentation of facial images. The initialization of the model parameters is very important in convergence of algorithm. For this purpose, we use a method for robust parameter estimation of Gaussian mixture components. Also, we use an additional class, which includes all pixels not modeled explicitly by Gaussian with small variance, by a uniform probability density, and amending the EM algorithm appropriately, in order to obtain significantly better results. Experimental results on facial color images show that accurate estimates of the Gaussian mixture parameters are computed. Also, other results on images presenting a wide range of variations in lighting conditions, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed color skin segmentation algorithm compared to conventional EM algorithm.

  6. Objective assessment of facial skin aging and the associated environmental factors in Japanese monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Ichibori, Ryoko; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanigawa, Tomoko; Kanazawa, Shigeyuki; Shingaki, Kenta; Torii, Kosuke; Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Sakai, Yasuo; Hosokawa, Ko

    2014-01-01

    Twin studies, especially those involving monozygotic (MZ) twins, facilitate the analysis of factors affecting skin aging while controlling for age, gender, and genetic susceptibility. The purpose of this study was to objectively assess various features of facial skin and analyze the effects of environmental factors on these features in MZ twins. At the Osaka Twin Research Center, 67 pairs of MZ twins underwent medical interviews and photographic assessments, using the VISIA® Complexion Analysis System. First, the average scores of the right and left cheek skin spots, wrinkles, pores, texture, and erythema were calculated; the differences between the scores were then compared in each pair of twins. Next, using the results of medical interviews and VISIA data, we investigated the effects of environmental factors on skin aging. The data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The intrapair differences in facial texture scores significantly increased as the age of the twins increased (P = 0.03). Among the twin pairs who provided answers to the questions regarding history differences in medical interviews, the twins who smoked or did not use skin protection showed significantly higher facial texture or wrinkle scores compared with the twins not exposed to cigarettes or protectants (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). The study demonstrated that skin aging among Japanese MZ twins, especially in terms of facial texture, was significantly influenced by environmental factors. In addition, smoking and skin protectant use were important environmental factors influencing skin aging. PMID:24910280

  7. Optical characterization of facial foundation applied to skin replicas by using visible FF-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ryota; Iwai, Toshiaki; Tsugita, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a new type of optical coherence tomography using visible-LED sources to investigate light propagation in a make-up skin and measure the thickness of facial foundation. The thickness is estimated by the difference between the three-dimensional tomographic images of a skin replica before and after applying facial foundation. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally that this work is the first step to investigate the relation between the appearance and the light propagation in the make-up skin.

  8. Variations of structural components: specific intercultural differences in facial morphology, skin type, and structures.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Aisha; Momoh, Adeyiza O; Bullocks, Jamal M

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the differences in facial morphology and skin structure and tone among ethnic groups within the realm of plastic surgery is relevant due to the increasing number of ethnic individuals seeking cosmetic surgery. Previous classifications of ideal facial morphologic characteristics have been revised and challenged over the years to accurately reflect the differences in facial structure that are aesthetically pleasing to individuals of differing ethnic groups. The traditional neoclassic canons reflected the European Caucasian facial morphology and cannot be used to classify facial characteristics in ethnic groups due to drastic differences in measurement and proportion. In addition, differences in biophysiologic properties of ethnic skin types influence the progression of aging and the ability of skin to withstand environmental insults. Thickness of the stratum corneum, water content, and melanin composition are important factors that were analyzed in varying ethnic groups. Although it appears that Caucasian Americans are subject to earlier onset of skin wrinkling and sagging than are African Americans due to thinner stratum corneum layers and decreased water content, more research needs to be conducted to be inclusive of other ethnic groups. These data will enable plastic surgeons to treat these groups more effectively while preserving their unique characteristics. PMID:20676309

  9. Correlation map analysis between appearances of Japanese facial images and amount of melanin and hemoglobin components in the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Norimichi; Uetsuki, Keiji; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Miyake, Yoichi

    2001-06-01

    Skin color reproduction becomes increasingly important with the recent progress in various imaging systems. In this paper, based on subjective experiments, correlation maps are analyzed between appearance of Japanese facial images and amount of melanin and hemoglobin components in the facial skin. Facial color images were taken by digital still camera. The spatial distributions of melanin and hemoglobin components in the facial color image were separated by independent component analysis of skin colors. The separated components were synthesized to simulate the various facial color images by changing the quantities of the two separated pigments. The synthesized images were evaluated subjectively by comparing with the original facial images. From the analysis of correlation map, we could find the visual or psychological terms that are well related to melanin components influence the appearance of facial color image.

  10. Rehabilitation of a large maxillo-facial defect using acrylic resin prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bilal; Farshad, Ali Fateh; Yazdanie, Nazia

    2011-04-01

    Large facial defects require definitive surgical reconstruction. However, at times such reconstruction is not possible due to extensive loss of tissues that can not be corrected by surgery alone. In this case, prosthetic restoration of lost facial tissues was carried out. Introduction of newer material which gives life-like appearance to such prosthetic restoration e.g. silicone and poly-ether rubbers, and use of implants to retain these prosthesis have given a new dimension to rehabilitation of such patients. This report presents a case of prosthetic rehabilitation of extensive extra oral defect due to basal cell carcinoma of cheek, using acrylic resin material. PMID:21453630

  11. Hydroquinone-free Skin Brightener System for the Treatment of Moderate-to-severe Facial Hyperpigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Herndon JR., James H.; Stephens, Thomas J.; Mehta, Rahul C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a multimodal skin-brightening regimen in subjects with facial hyperpigmentation. Design: Open-label, single-center clinical study with clinical assessments at baseline, Week 4, Week 8, and Week 12. Treatment: Subjects were instructed to apply the skin-brightening complex onto their facial skin, twice daily, for 12 weeks. Subjects also applied a nonprescription retinol product, moisturizer, and sunscreen. Participants: Twenty-one subjects, aged 41 to 65 years, with Fitzpatrick skin types II to IV and moderate-to-severe facial hyperpigmentation completed the study. Measurements: Overall hyperpigmentation and tolerability (objective and subjective) assessments were conducted at all visits. In addition, global improvement in hyperpigmentation was assessed at all follow-up visits. A self-assessment questionnaire was completed by subjects at Week 12. Results: At baseline and Weeks 4, 8, and 12, subjects were assessed for overall hyperpigmentation and global improvement. Standardized digital photographs were also taken of the subjects’ facial skin at all visits. Subjects completed a self-assessment questionnaire at Week 12. Statistically significant reductions in mean Overall Hyperpigmentation scores and significant improvements in mean Global Improvement scores compared to baseline were observed at all follow-up visits (all p<0.001). These clinical observations were supported by standardized digital photography. In addition, the skin-brightening regimen was highly rated by subjects on all of the questionnaire parameters. Conclusion: The results from this study suggest that the multimodality skin-brightening regimen may provide a comprehensive and optimal treatment option to help reduce facial hyperpigmentation. PMID:24847406

  12. Tolerance of fragranced and fragrance-free facial cleansers in adults with clinically sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe D; Fowler, Joseph; Larsen, Walter G; Hornby, Sidney; Walters, Russel M; Appa, Yohini

    2015-10-01

    Although mild, fragrance-free, nonfoaming cleansers generally are recommended for individuals with sensitive skin, many consumers choose fragranced foaming cleansers. The addition of hydrophobically modified polymers (HMPs) to mild facial cleansers has been shown to improve product tolerability in individuals with sensitive skin while facilitating foaming. The objective of the 2 studies reported here was to assess the tolerability of a mild, HMP-containing, foaming facial cleanser with a fragrance that was free of common allergens and irritating essential oils in patients with sensitive skin. In the first study, 8 participants with clinically diagnosed fragrance sensitivity used a gentle foaming HMP-containing facial cleanser with or without fragrance for 3 weeks. Both cleansers improved global disease severity, irritation, and erythema with similar cleansing effectiveness. The second study was a 3-week, prospective, double-blind, randomized, 2-center study of 153 participants with clinically diagnosed sensitive skin. In this study, the fragranced gentle foaming cleanser with HMP was as well tolerated as a benchmark gentle, fragrance-free, nonfoaming cleanser. Itching, irritation, and desquamation were most improved from baseline in both groups. The participant-rated effectiveness of the cleanser with HMP was similar or better than the benchmark cleanser after 3 weeks of use. In conclusion, the gentle facial cleanser with HMPs and a fragrance offers a new option for adults with sensitive skin who may prefer, and commonly use, a fragranced and foaming product. PMID:26682289

  13. Human facial skin detection in thermal video to effectively measure electrodermal activity (EDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Hutchinson, J. Andrew; Leonard, Kevin R.; Nelson, Jill K.

    2011-06-01

    In the past, autonomic nervous system response has often been determined through measuring Electrodermal Activity (EDA), sometimes referred to as Skin Conductance (SC). Recent work has shown that high resolution thermal cameras can passively and remotely obtain an analog to EDA by assessing the activation of facial eccrine skin pores. This paper investigates a method to distinguish facial skin from non-skin portions on the face to generate a skin-only Dynamic Mask (DM), validates the DM results, and demonstrates DM performance by removing false pore counts. Moreover, this paper shows results from these techniques using data from 20+ subjects across two different experiments. In the first experiment, subjects were presented with primary screening questions for which some had jeopardy. In the second experiment, subjects experienced standard emotion-eliciting stimuli. The results from using this technique will be shown in relation to data and human perception (ground truth). This paper introduces an automatic end-to-end skin detection approach based on texture feature vectors. In doing so, the paper contributes not only a new capability of tracking facial skin in thermal imagery, but also enhances our capability to provide non-contact, remote, passive, and real-time methods for determining autonomic nervous system responses for medical and security applications.

  14. Characterizing Facial Skin Ageing in Humans: Disentangling Extrinsic from Intrinsic Biological Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Trojahn, Carina; Dobos, Gabor; Lichterfeld, Andrea; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Facial skin ageing is caused by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Intrinsic ageing is highly related to chronological age. Age related skin changes can be measured using clinical and biophysical methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether and how clinical characteristics and biophysical parameters are associated with each other with and without adjustment for chronological age. Twenty-four female subjects of three age groups were enrolled. Clinical assessments (global facial skin ageing, wrinkling, and sagging), and biophysical measurements (roughness, colour, skin elasticity, and barrier function) were conducted at both upper cheeks. Pearson's correlations and linear regression models adjusted for age were calculated. Most of the measured parameters were correlated with chronological age (e.g., association with wrinkle score, r = 0.901) and with each other (e.g., residual skin deformation and wrinkle score, r = 0.606). After statistical adjustment for age, only few associations remained (e.g., mean roughness (Rz) and luminance (L*),  β = −0.507, R2 = 0.377). Chronological age as surrogate marker for intrinsic ageing has the most important influence on most facial skin ageing signs. Changes in skin elasticity, wrinkling, sagging, and yellowness seem to be caused by additional extrinsic ageing. PMID:25767806

  15. An antiaging skin care system containing alpha hydroxy acids and vitamins improves the biomechanical parameters of facial skin

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Diana; Townley, Joshua P; Barnes, Tanya M; Greive, Kerryn A

    2015-01-01

    Background The demand for antiaging products has dramatically increased in recent years, driven by an aging population seeking to maintain the appearance of youth. This study investigates the effects of an antiaging skin care system containing alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) in conjunction with vitamins B3, C, and E on the biomechanical parameters of facial skin. Methods Fifty two volunteers followed an antiaging skin care regimen comprising of cleanser, eye cream, day moisturizer, and night moisturizer for 21 days. Wrinkle depth (Ry) and skin roughness (Ra) were measured by skin surface profilometry of the crow’s feet area, and skin elasticity parameters R2 (gross elasticity), R5 (net elasticity), R6 (viscoelastic portion), and R7 (recovery after deformation) were determined for facial skin by cutometer, preapplication and after 7, 14, and 21 days. Volunteers also completed a self-assessment questionnaire. Results Compared to baseline, Ry and Ra significantly improved by 32.5% (P<0.0001) and 42.9% (P<0.0001), respectively, after 21 days of antiaging skin care treatment. These results were observed by the volunteers with 9 out of 10 discerning an improvement in skin texture and smoothness. Compared to baseline, R2 and R5 significantly increased by 15.2% (P<0.0001) and 12.5% (P=0.0449), respectively, while R6 significantly decreased by 17.7% (P<0.0001) after 21 days. R7 increased by 9.7% after 21 days compared to baseline but this was not significant over this time period. Conclusion An antiaging skin care system containing AHAs and vitamins significantly improves the biomechanical parameters of the skin including wrinkles and skin texture, as well as elasticity without significant adverse effects. PMID:25552908

  16. The importance of skin color and facial structure in perceiving and remembering others: an electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Brebner, Joanne L; Krigolson, Olav; Handy, Todd C; Quadflieg, Susanne; Turk, David J

    2011-05-01

    The own-race bias (ORB) is a well-documented recognition advantage for own-race (OR) over cross-race (CR) faces, the origin of which remains unclear. In the current study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while Caucasian participants age-categorized Black and White faces which were digitally altered to display either a race congruent or incongruent facial structure. The results of a subsequent surprise memory test indicated that regardless of facial structure participants recognized White faces better than Black faces. Additional analyses revealed that temporally-early ERP components associated with face-specific perceptual processing (N170) and the individuation of facial exemplars (N250) were selectively sensitive to skin color. In addition, the N200 (a component that has been linked to increased attention and depth of encoding afforded to in-group and OR faces) was modulated by color and structure, and correlated with subsequent memory performance. However, the LPP component associated with the cognitive evaluation of perceptual input was influenced by racial differences in facial structure alone. These findings suggest that racial differences in skin color and facial structure are detected during the encoding of unfamiliar faces, and that the categorization of conspecifics as members of our social in-group on the basis of their skin color may be a determining factor in our ability to subsequently remember them. PMID:21382358

  17. Enhancement of human skin facial revitalization by moringa leaf extract cream

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Naveed; Chowdhary, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solar ultraviolet exposure is the main cause of skin damage by initiation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to skin collagen imperfection and eventually skin roughness. This can be reduced by proper revitalization of skin enhancing younger and healthier appearance. Aim To evaluate the skin facial revitalization effect of a cream formulation containing the Moringa oleifera leaf extract on humans. Material and methods Active cream containing 3% of the concentrated extract of moringa leaves was developed by entrapping in the inner aqueous phase of cream. Base contained no extract. Skin revitalizing parameters, i.e. surface, volume, texture parameters and surface evaluation of the living skin (SELS) were assessed comparatively after application of the base and active cream on human face using Visioscan® VC 98 for a period of 3 months. Results Surface values were increased by the base and decreased by the active cream. Effects produced for the base and active cream were significant and insignificant, respectively, as observed in the case of surface. Unlike the base, the active cream showed significant effects on skin volume, texture parameters (energy, variance and contrast) and SELS, SEr (skin roughness), SEsc (skin scaliness), SEsm (skin smoothness), and SEw (skin wrinkles) parameters. Conclusions The results suggested that moringa cream enhances skin revitalization effect and supports anti-aging skin effects. PMID:25097471

  18. A photographic scale for the evaluation of facial skin aging in Indian women.

    PubMed

    Bernois, Armand; Huber, Alexia; Derome, Caroline; Drouault, Yorik; de Quéral, Delphine; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Perrier, Eric; Heusèle, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The process of facial skin aging differs between different ethnic populations. Standardized tools to objectively evaluate facial skin aging in clinical and epidemiological studies in different ethnic populations are needed. We designed and validated a photonumeric scale for assessment of facial aging in the Indian population. A total of 149 subjects were selected from an electronic photographic database of 300 women from the Mumbai region. An expert consensus panel selected nine subjects representing a spectrum of skin damage from none to severe, on the basis of wrinkling and tissue slackening. The nine-point scale, composed of one face-on and one oblique photo of the same subject per grade, was validated by nine independent judges in 99 subjects with a repetition two weeks later. Inter-observer reliability and intra-observer reproducibility were calculated using Kappa coefficients. Validation of the scale showed a high level of inter-observer reliability between the consensus and independent panels, and intra-observer reproducibility between the two evaluations performed by the independent judges. In conclusion, this nine-point facial aging scale is a reliable tool for clinical evaluations of skin damage in Indian women, suitable for use in clinical and epidemiological studies. PMID:21719407

  19. Stress Evaluation while Prolonged Driving Operation Using the Facial Skin Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hirotoshi; Muto, Takumi; Ide, Hideto

    There is a relation to the accident of a car and the physiological and psychological state of a driver. The stress may lead to the fall of a fatigue or attentiveness. Therefore, it is an important subject from viewpoint such as accident prevention to evaluate the mental state of a driver. The study aimed at the development of a quantitative instrumentation technology of the stress when a subject is driving for a long time. First of all, we measured the physiological and psychological stress of a driver. The facial skin temperature and ventricular rate that was driver's physiological amount were measured and compared it with visual analog scale of the subjective amount. It was able to be obtaining of the high correlation in facial skin temperature and visual analog scale from the outcome of the experiment. Therefore, the possibility of appreciable of driver's stress at a facial skin temperature was shown. As a result of the experiment, we showed a possibility that facial skin temperature could evaluate long driving stress.

  20. [Anthropometric examinations of the sick with congenital inborn facial-maxillary-occlusal defects].

    PubMed

    Michalski, T W; Plewi?ska, H

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe rules, usefulness and advantages from carrying out anthropometric examinations in the sick with facial-maxillary-occlusal defects in the paper. They present a card especially elaborated for these examinations and used in case of each sick. PMID:3270598

  1. Multimodal facial color imaging modality for objective analysis of skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngwoo; Nelson, J. Stuart; Jung, Byungjo

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a multimodal facial color imaging modality that provides a conventional color image, parallel and cross-polarization color images, and a fluorescent color image. We characterize the imaging modality and describe the image analysis methods for objective evaluation of skin lesions. The parallel and cross-polarization color images are useful for the analysis of skin texture, pigmentation, and vascularity. The polarization image, which is derived from parallel and cross-polarization color images, provides morphological information of superficial skin lesions. The fluorescent color image is useful for the evaluation of skin chromophores excited by UV-A radiation. In order to demonstrate the validity of the new imaging modality in dermatology, sample images were obtained from subjects with various skin disorders and image analysis methods were applied for objective evaluation of those lesions. In conclusion, we are confident that the imaging modality and analysis methods should be useful tools to simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions in dermatology. PMID:19123654

  2. [Current surgical and adjuvant therapy concepts of malignant tumors of the facial skin and the pinna].

    PubMed

    Kolk, A; Wermker, K; Bier, H; Götz, C; Eckert, A W

    2015-02-01

    Malignant tumors of the skin had been a rare entity 2 decades ago. Today they are spread rapidly worldwide. Malignant neoplasms of the skin, the largest human organ, may occur from all structures and layers. While previously skin cancer -occurred mainly after the age of 60, the incidence increases now in younger ages. Strong sunburns in the childhood and before the age of 20 are important risk factors for the development of malignancies of the skin. An increased exposure to UV rays is found especially in the facial skin, where basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma and Merkel cell carcinomas are the most common malignancies. Early diagnosis of malignancies and therapy-oriented mostly surgical approaches are crucial for the prognosis of all skin cancers. Therefore under the aspect of the increasing incidence these topics will be pointed out according to the latest findings including current multimodal therapy concepts and future treatment options. PMID:25658862

  3. Rehabilitation of a Partial Nasal Defect with Facial Prosthesis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Negahdari, Ramin; Pournasrollah, Alireza; Bohlouli, Sepideh; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    >Malignancies of the midface result in cosmetic deformities that make maxillofacial prosthesis as an integral part of the treatment plan. Facial defects can be devastating in their impact on physical structure and function of the affected individual, leading to potentional compromises in quality of life. Reconstruction of nasal defects is a challenge for the prosthodontist because of esthetic and retention problems associated with the facial prosthesis. This paper reports the rehabilitation of a partial nasal defect caused by basal cell carcinoma treatment using a nasal prosthesis made with silicone elastomers and mechanical and anatomical retentive aids. The patient had no problem with the prosthesis, except for a partial loss of extrinsic coloration in the two-year follow-up. PMID:25587390

  4. Basic histological structure and functions of facial skin.

    PubMed

    Arda, Oktay; Göksügür, Nadir; Tüzün, Yalçın

    2014-01-01

    The skin and its appendages that derive from the epidermis (hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, nails, and mammary glands) establish the integumentary system. Histologically, skin has two main layers-the epidermis and the dermis-with a subcutaneous fascia called the hypodermis, which lies deep in the dermis. The epidermis is formed of four to five layers of cells made mostly out of keratinocytes, along with three other different and less abundant cells. The dermis underlies the epidermis. The hypodermis is a looser connective tissue that is located beneath the dermis. It blends to the dermis with an unclear boundary. PMID:24314373

  5. The effects of skin colour distribution and topography cues on the perception of female facial age and health.

    PubMed

    Fink, B; Matts, P J

    2008-04-01

    According to evolutionary psychology, the preference for some facial characteristics reflects adaptations for mate choice because they signal aspects of mate quality. Although morphological features such as facial symmetry and sexually dimorphic traits have been studied extensively in recent years, little is known about skin condition in this context. The preferences for young and healthy looking skin could offer an explanation as to why women place such an importance on the condition of their skin and its refinement through e.g., cosmetic products. Recent research showed that facial skin colour distribution significantly influences the perception of age and attractiveness of female faces, independent of skin surface topography cues. However, the relative effect of skin colour distribution and topography cues on age and health perception remains to be investigated. We present data showing that both skin colour distribution and skin surface topography cues not only significantly influence the perception of female facial age and health but also convey differential information with regard to the strength of these effects. Our data indicate that skin surface topography cues account for a large proportion of variation in facial age perception, whereas skin colour distribution seems to be a stronger health cue. PMID:18081752

  6. Random fractional ultrapulsed CO2 resurfacing of photodamaged facial skin: long-term evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tretti Clementoni, Matteo; Galimberti, Michela; Tourlaki, Athanasia; Catenacci, Maximilian; Lavagno, Rosalia; Bencini, Pier Luca

    2013-02-01

    Although numerous papers have recently been published on ablative fractional resurfacing, there is a lack of information in literature on very long-term results. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy, adverse side effects, and long-term results of a random fractional ultrapulsed CO2 laser on a large population with photodamaged facial skin. Three hundred twelve patients with facial photodamaged skin were enrolled and underwent a single full-face treatment. Six aspects of photodamaged skin were recorded using a 5 point scale at 3, 6, and 24 months after the treatment. The results were compared with a non-parametric statistical test, the Wilcoxon's exact test. Three hundred one patients completed the study. All analyzed features showed a significant statistical improvement 3 months after the procedure. Three months later all features, except for pigmentations, once again showed a significant statistical improvement. Results after 24 months were similar to those assessed 18 months before. No long-term or other serious complications were observed. From the significant number of patients analyzed, long-term results demonstrate not only how fractional ultrapulsed CO2 resurfacing can achieve good results on photodamaged facial skin but also how these results can be considered stable 2 years after the procedure. PMID:22622960

  7. Silicone based artificial skin for humanoid facial expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Yonas; Moore, David; Thayer, Nick; Priya, Shashank

    2009-03-01

    Artificial skin materials were synthesized using platinum-cured silicone elastomeric material (Reynolds Advanced Materials Inc.) as the base consisting of mainly polyorganosiloxanes, amorphous silica and platinum-siloxane complex compounds. Systematic incorporation of porosity in this material was found to lower the force required to deform the skin in axial direction. In this study, we utilized foaming agents comprising of sodium bicarbonate and dilute form of acetic acid for modifying the polymeric chain and introducing the porosity. Experimental determination of functional relationship between the concentration of foaming agent, slacker and non-reactive silicone fluid and that of force - deformation behavior was conducted. Tensile testing of material showed a local parabolic relationship between the concentrations of foaming agents used (per milliliter of siloxane compound) and strain. This data can be used to optimize the amount of additives in platinum cured silicone to obtain desired force - displacement characteristics. Addition of "silicone thinner" and "slacker" showed a monotonically increasing strain behavior. A mathematical model was developed to arrive at the performance metrics of artificial skin.

  8. Upper eyelid reconstruction by making a skin defect similar to skin removal in blepharoplasty.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mito, Hidenori; Nakamura, Yasuhisa; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2014-09-01

    A 49-year-old man had a sebaceous gland carcinoma in the right upper eyelid. The tumor was excised with an additional 5-mm safety margin. The posterior lamellar reconstruction was performed with a reverse modified Hughes flap and residual conjunctiva. The anterior lamellar reconstruction was performed by making a skin defect similar to a skin removal in blepharoplasty. The skin excision part was designed next to the upper portion of the defect, and the excised skin was grafted to the lower portion of the defect. The skin was closed after making 3 buried double eyelid anchors. The conjunctival pedicle was severed 2 weeks postoperatively. Three months later, the appearance was acceptable without a harmful functional outcome. The basic concepts of our procedure were to make an accustomed scenery, such as a defect similar to a skin removal in blepharoplasty, from an unfamiliar one, such as a defect after a tumor excision, and to make good use of the excised tissue. PMID:25148618

  9. Reconstructing a complex central facial defect with a multiple-folding radial forearm flap.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; He, Mingwu; Liao, Youqiao; Yao, Zhongjun

    2014-04-01

    The central face is the dominant feature of humans. A complex central facial defect can severely affect a person's appearance and function and can pose significant challenges for reconstructive surgeons. The aims and principles of central facial reconstruction are to achieve adequate function and esthetics. This report describes the case of a 45-year-old man who was bitten in the central face by a wild boar. A free radial forearm flap was designed as a multiple-folding flap that was divided into several portions. The folded portions of the flap were used to reconstruct the nasal mucosa, oral mucosa, and upper lip defects and provided the lining for an eventual staged nasal reconstruction. The patient achieved good functional recovery and had a good esthetic outcome. PMID:24491846

  10. Emotional benefit of cosmetic camouflage in the treatment of facial skin conditions: personal experience and review

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies highlighting the psychological benefits of medical treatment for dermatological skin conditions have demonstrated a clear role for medical therapy in psychological health. Skin conditions, particularly those that are overtly visible, such as those located on the face, neck, and hands, often have a profound effect on the daily functioning of those affected. The literature documents significant emotional benefits using medical therapy in conditions such as acne, psoriasis, vitiligo, and rosacea, but there is little evidence documenting similar results with the use of cosmetic camouflage. Here we present a review highlighting the practical use of cosmetic camouflage makeup in patients with facial skin conditions and review its implications for psychological health. Methods A search of the Medline and Scopus databases was performed to identify articles documenting the emotional benefit of cosmetic camouflage. Results Cosmetic camouflage provides a significant emotional benefit for patients with facial skin conditions, and this is substantiated by a literature review and personal experience. More clinical studies are needed to assess and validate the findings reported here. Conclusion Patients with visible skin conditions have increased rates of depression, anxiety, and decreased self-esteem. It is prudent for us to consider therapies that can offer rapid and dramatic results, such as cosmetic camouflage. PMID:23152694

  11. Digital Image Correlation Strain Analysis for the Study of Wrinkle Formation on Facial Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Nagisa; Arikawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Satoru; Koike, Miyako; Murakami, Motoko; Tanno, Osamu

    Strain measurements around the eye during the blink are performed for four human subjects in order to investigate the relationship between the wrinkle formation with aging and the strains by daily motion. In addition to the strain measurement, the moisture content, the flexibility and the elasticity of the skin surface are measured for investigating the skin condition. For observing the wrinkle formed on the facial skin, the replicas of the skin surfaces are also collected. Results show that the relationship between the wrinkle and the strain distribution at the inner corner of the eye is different from that at the corner of the eye. The results indicate that different methods for the corner of the eye and the inner corner of the eye are required for avoiding the wrinkle formation.

  12. SKIN-SET, WOUND-HEALING AND RELATED DEFECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiology and biochemistry of resistance and susceptibility to tuber skinning/excoriation wounds, wound-healing and wound-related defects are of global importance because of the magnitude of the resulting food and financial losses. Wound related losses are difficult to determine because of the...

  13. Circular Excision and Purse-String Closure for Pediatric Facial Skin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Hassanein, Aladdin H; Couto, Javier A; Greene, Arin K

    2015-07-01

    Standard resection of pediatric facial skin lesions consists of lenticular excision and linear closure. This one-stage procedure for circular lesions results in a linear scar 3 times longer than the diameter of the removed specimen. Circular excision and purse-string closure has been described for infantile hemangiomas to reduce the length of scar. The purpose of this study was to analyze the application of this technique for any type of circular facial skin lesion in the pediatric population. Records of consecutive pediatric patients with facial skin lesions treated with circular excision and purse-string closure from 2007-2014 were reviewed. Patient age, sex, type of lesion, location, and size were recorded. Number of stages necessary to remove the area and complications were analyzed. Seventy-seven children (74% female) underwent circular excision and purse-string closure for an infantile hemangioma (46%), pigmented nevus (27%), Spitz nevus (7%), pilomatrixoma (5%), pyogenic granuloma (5%), vascular malformation (4%), or another type of skin lesion (6%). Age at the time of resection was 6.0 years (range 4 months-17 years) and mean lesion area was 3.9? cm (range 0.2-19.6); 30% of patients underwent a second procedure and no infection or wound dehiscence occurred. Circular excision and purse-string closure is an effective technique to manage any type of circular skin lesion in the pediatric population. It is particularly useful for lesions on the face because it limits the length of a scar. A subset of patients may benefit from second procedure to convert the circular scar from a circle into a line. PMID:26107002

  14. Ice slurry ingestion reduces both core and facial skin temperatures in a warm environment.

    PubMed

    Onitsuka, Sumire; Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Internal body cooling by ingesting ice slurry has recently attracted attention. Because ice slurries are ingested through the mouth, it is possible that this results in conductive cooling of the facial skin and brain. However, no studies have investigated this possibility. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ice slurry ingestion on forehead skin temperature at the point of conductive cooling between the forehead skin and brain. Eight male subjects ingested either 7.5g/kg of ice slurry (-1°C; ICE), a cold sports drink (4°C; COOL), or a warm sports drink (37°C; CON) for 15min in a warm environment (30°C, 80% relative humidity). Then, they remained at rest for 1h. As physiological indices, rectal temperature (Tre), mean skin temperature, forehead skin temperature (Thead), heart rate, nude body mass, and urine specific gravity were measured. Subjective thermal sensation (TS) was measured at 5-min intervals throughout the experiment. With ICE, Tre and Thead were significantly reduced compared with CON and COOL conditions (p<0.05). The results of the other physiological indices were not significantly different. TS with ICE was significantly lower than that with CON and COOL (p<0.05) and was correlated with Tre or Thead (p<0.05). These results indicate that ice slurry ingestion may induce conductive cooling between forehead skin and brain, and reduction in core and forehead skin temperature reduced thermal sensation. PMID:25965023

  15. Efficacy and Safety of 10,600-nm Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser on Facial Skin with Previous Volume Injections

    PubMed Central

    Hélou, Josiane; Maatouk, Ismaël; Moutran, Roy; Obeid, Grace; Stephan, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers are a new treatment modality for skin resurfacing. The cosmetic rejuvenation market abounds with various injectable devices (poly-L-lactic acid, polymethyl-methacrylate, collagens, hyaluronic acids, silicone). The objective of this study is to examine the efficacy and safety of 10,600-nm CO2 fractional laser on facial skin with previous volume injections. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study including 14 patients treated with fractional CO2 laser and who have had previous facial volume restoration. The indication for the laser therapy, the age of the patients, previous facial volume restoration, and side effects were all recorded from their medical files. Objective assessments were made through clinical physician global assessment records and improvement scores records. Patients’ satisfaction rates were also recorded. Results: Review of medical records of the 14 patients show that five patients had polylactic acid injection prior to the laser session. Eight patients had hyaluronic acid injection prior to the laser session. Two patients had fat injection, two had silicone injection and one patient had facial thread lift. Side effects included pain during the laser treatment, post-treatment scaling, post-treatment erythema, hyperpigmentation which spontaneously resolved within a month. Concerning the previous facial volume restoration, no granulomatous reactions were noted, no facial shape deformation and no asymmetry were encountered whatever the facial volume product was. Conclusion: CO2 fractional laser treatments do not seem to affect facial skin which had previous facial volume restoration with polylactic acid for more than 6 years, hyaluronic acid for more than 0.5 year, silicone for more than 6 years, or fat for more than 1.4 year. Prospective larger studies focusing on many other variables (skin phototype, injected device type) are required to achieve better conclusions. PMID:23723602

  16. Development of the Facial Skin Care Index: A Health-Related Outcomes Index for Skin Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, B. Alex; Rhee, John S.; Neuburg, Marcy; Burzynski, Mary L.; Nattinger, Ann B.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Existing health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) tools do not appear to capture patients' specific skin cancer concerns. OBJECTIVE To describe the conceptual foundation, item generation, reduction process, and reliability testing for the Facial Skin Cancer Index (FSCI), a HRQOL outcomes tool for skin cancer researchers and clinicians. METHODS Participants in Phases I to III consisted of adult patients (N = 134) diagnosed with biopsy-proven nonmelanoma cervicofacial skin cancer. Data were collected via self-report surveys and clinical records. RESULTS Seventy-one distinct items were generated in Phase I and rated for their importance by an independent sample during Phase II; 36 items representing six theoretical HRQOL domains were retained. Test–retest I results indicated that four subscales showed adequate reliability coefficients (? = 0.60 to 0.91). Twenty-six items remained for test–retest II. Results indicated excellent internal consistency for emotional, social, appearance, and modified financial/work subscales (range 0.79 to 0.95); test–retest correlation coefficients were consistent across time (range 0.81 to 0.97; lifestyle omitted). CONCLUSION Pretesting afforded the opportunity to select items that optimally met our a priori conceptual and psychometric criteria for high data quality. Phase IV testing (validity and sensitivity before surgery and 4 months after Mohs micrographic surgery) for the 20-item FSCI is under way. PMID:16875475

  17. Comparison of three skin-stretching devices for closing skin defects on the limbs of dogs

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglou, Lysimachos G.; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Psalla, Dimitra; Savvas, Ioannis; Pavlidis, Leonidas; Karayannopoulpou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of skin-stretching devices for closing defects on the extremities of dogs. Antebrachial skin defects were created on the limbs of 24 dogs randomly divided into three groups. Skin stretchers included staples and sutures passing through them (group A), sutures and hypodermic needles (group B), and Pavletic device (group C). Wounds on the left were further undermined in all groups. Tension and blood perfusion were assessed. After removing the stretchers on day 3, the defects were sutured and wound healing was clinically scored. Histological variables evaluated were cellular infiltration, edema, collagen orientation, and thickness of epidermis. Significant differences in tension were found among groups (p < 0.0005) and between measurement times for undermined (p = 0.001) or non-undermined (p < 0.0005) wounds. In contrast, blood perfusion values did not differ significantly. Clinical scores for group B seemed to be better than those for groups A and C, but differences were not significant. Primary wound closure using the Pavletic device was not feasible. No significant differences in histological variables were found between groups. Skin stretching with staples or hypodermic needles resulted in successful wound management with minor side effects on skin histology and circulation. PMID:25269717

  18. Evaluation of Seasonal Changes in Facial Skin With and Without Acne.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Karen; Pappas, Apostolos; Dunn, Kelly; Cula, Gabriela O; Seo, InSeok; Ruvolo, Eduardo; Batchvarova, Nikoleta

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare facial skin of adolescent males with (acne) and without acne (non-acne) over the course of 1 year. At study entry, presence of acne was determined by clinical image analysis (acne n=7, non-acne n=10). Monthly evaluations of skin condition were made using standard and fluorescent imaging, fluorescence spectroscopic analysis, sebum analysis, skin high frequency conductivity (moisture content), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and sampling of skin bacteria (aerobic and anaerobic). Data were evaluated seasonally. Over the course of the study, subjects in the acne and non-acne groups had no significant increase in their clinical acne score. Sebum production was significantly greater in subjects with acne than in those without for each season examined (P<0.019) and was lowest in the winter and highest in the fall. TEWL was higher in those with acne than without acne across all seasons (P=0.001). Skin moisture in both groups was increased during summer and fall compared with winter (P?0.016 for both seasons). Subjects with acne had a higher recovery of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria compared with subjects without acne (P?0.015). Analysis of cheek skin in the nasal area revealed significantly higher fluorescence (500-800 nm) in image-based and spectroscopic analysis from subjects with acne, suggesting the greater presence of the bacterial metabolite porphyrin in those with acne. In these cohorts of adolescent males, significant differences in sebum production, skin barrier function, moisture content, and microbial load (anaerobic and aerobic) were noted between those with and without acne. Evidence for seasonality was observed, with lower lipid production and reduced barrier function during the winter. More studies to quantify differences in skin lipid components and bacterial species among these cohorts are planned. PMID:26091385

  19. Predicting the Occurrence of Cosmetic Defects in Automotive Skin Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, S.; Williams, D.; Roy, R.; Aylmore, R.; Allen, M.; Hollingdale, D.

    2011-05-04

    The appearance of defects such as 'hollows' and 'shock lines' can affect the perceived quality and attractiveness of automotive skin panels. These defects are the result of the stamping process and appear as small, localized deviations from the intended styling of the panels. Despite their size, they become visually apparent after the application of paint and the perceived quality of a panel may become unacceptable. Considerable time is then dedicated to minimizing their occurrence through tool modifications. This paper will investigate the use of the wavelet transform as a tool to analyze physically measured panels. The transform has two key aspects. The first is its ability to distinguish small scale local defects from large scale styling curvature. The second is its ability to characterize the shape of a defect in terms of its wavelength and a 'correlation value'. The two features of the transform enable it to be used as a tool for locating and predicting the severity of defects. The paper will describe the transform and illustrate its application on test cases.

  20. Anosognosia for apraxia: experimental evidence for defective awareness of one's own bucco-facial gestures.

    PubMed

    Canzano, Loredana; Scandola, Michele; Pernigo, Simone; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Moro, Valentina

    2014-12-01

    Anosognosia is a multifaceted, neuro-psychiatric syndrome characterized by defective awareness of a variety of perceptuo-motor, cognitive or emotional deficits. The syndrome is also characterized by modularity, i.e., deficits of awareness in one domain (e.g., spatial perception) co-existing with spared functions in another domain (e.g., memory). Anosognosia has mainly been reported after right hemisphere lesions. It is however somewhat surprising that no studies have thus far specifically explored the possibility that lack of awareness involves apraxia, i.e., a deficit in the ability to perform gestures caused by an impaired higher-order motor control and not by low-level motor deficits, sensory loss, or failure to comprehend simple commands. We explored this issue by testing fifteen patients with vascular lesions who were assigned to one of three groups depending on their neuropsychological profile and brain lesion. The patients were asked to execute various actions involving the upper limb or bucco-facial body parts. In addition they were also asked to judge the accuracy of these actions, either performed by them or by other individuals. The judgment of the patients was compared to that of two external observers. Results show that our bucco-facial apraxic patients manifest a specific deficit in detecting their own gestural errors. Moreover they were less aware of their defective performance in bucco-facial as compared to limb actions. Our results hint at the existence of a new form of anosognosia specifically involving apraxic deficits. PMID:25100505

  1. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  2. Changes in Women's Facial Skin Color over the Ovulatory Cycle are Not Detectable by the Human Visual System.

    PubMed

    Burriss, Robert P; Troscianko, Jolyon; Lovell, P George; Fulford, Anthony J C; Stevens, Martin; Quigley, Rachael; Payne, Jenny; Saxton, Tamsin K; Rowland, Hannah M

    2015-01-01

    Human ovulation is not advertised, as it is in several primate species, by conspicuous sexual swellings. However, there is increasing evidence that the attractiveness of women's body odor, voice, and facial appearance peak during the fertile phase of their ovulatory cycle. Cycle effects on facial attractiveness may be underpinned by changes in facial skin color, but it is not clear if skin color varies cyclically in humans or if any changes are detectable. To test these questions we photographed women daily for at least one cycle. Changes in facial skin redness and luminance were then quantified by mapping the digital images to human long, medium, and shortwave visual receptors. We find cyclic variation in skin redness, but not luminance. Redness decreases rapidly after menstrual onset, increases in the days before ovulation, and remains high through the luteal phase. However, we also show that this variation is unlikely to be detectable by the human visual system. We conclude that changes in skin color are not responsible for the effects of the ovulatory cycle on women's attractiveness. PMID:26134671

  3. Changes in Women’s Facial Skin Color over the Ovulatory Cycle are Not Detectable by the Human Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Burriss, Robert P.; Troscianko, Jolyon; Lovell, P. George; Fulford, Anthony J. C.; Stevens, Martin; Quigley, Rachael; Payne, Jenny; Saxton, Tamsin K.; Rowland, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Human ovulation is not advertised, as it is in several primate species, by conspicuous sexual swellings. However, there is increasing evidence that the attractiveness of women’s body odor, voice, and facial appearance peak during the fertile phase of their ovulatory cycle. Cycle effects on facial attractiveness may be underpinned by changes in facial skin color, but it is not clear if skin color varies cyclically in humans or if any changes are detectable. To test these questions we photographed women daily for at least one cycle. Changes in facial skin redness and luminance were then quantified by mapping the digital images to human long, medium, and shortwave visual receptors. We find cyclic variation in skin redness, but not luminance. Redness decreases rapidly after menstrual onset, increases in the days before ovulation, and remains high through the luteal phase. However, we also show that this variation is unlikely to be detectable by the human visual system. We conclude that changes in skin color are not responsible for the effects of the ovulatory cycle on women’s attractiveness. PMID:26134671

  4. Advances in treating skin defects of the hand: skin substitutes and negative-pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Watt, Andrew J; Friedrich, Jeffrey B; Huang, Jerry I

    2012-11-01

    Surgeons and scientists have been developing alternative methods of hand reconstruction that may play an adjunctive role to, or completely supplant, more traditional reconstructive modalities. This article provides an overview of these emerging techniques, with an emphasis on skin substitutes and negative-pressure wound therapy as they apply to the treatment of soft tissue defects of the hand. The indications, contraindications, and relative advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are discussed in detail. PMID:23101602

  5. The use of digital image speckle correlation to measure the mechanical properties of skin and facial muscular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staloff, Isabelle Afriat

    Skin mechanical properties have been extensively studied and have led to an understanding of the structure and role of the collagen and elastin fibers network in the dermis and their changes due to aging. All these techniques have either isolated the skin from its natural environment (in vitro), or, when studied in vivo, attempted to minimize the effect of the underlying tissues and muscles. The human facial region is unique compared to the other parts of the body in that the underlying musculature runs through the subcutaneous tissue and is directly connected to the dermis with collagen based fibrous tissues. These fibrous tissues comprise the superficial musculoaponeurotic system, commonly referred to as the SMAS layer. Retaining ligaments anchor the skin to the periosteum, and hold the dermis to the SMAS. In addition, traditional techniques generally collect an average response of the skin. Data gathered in this manner is incomplete as the skin is anisotropic and under constant tension. We therefore introduce the Digital Image Speckle Correlation (DISC) method that maps in two dimensions the skin deformation under the complex set of forces involved during muscular activity. DISC, a non-contact in vivo technique, generates spatial resolved information. By observing the detailed motion of the facial skin we can infer the manner in which the complex ensemble of forces induced by movement of the muscles distribute and dissipate on the skin. By analyzing the effect of aging on the distribution of these complex forces we can measure its impact on skin elasticity and quantify the efficacy of skin care products. In addition, we speculate on the mechanism of wrinkle formation. Furthermore, we investigate the use of DISC to map the mechanism of film formation on skin of various polymers. Finally, we show that DISC can detect the involuntary facial muscular activity induced by various fragrances.

  6. Association between Oro-Facial Defects and Systemic Alterations in Children Affected by Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Docimo, Raffaella; Maturo, Paolo; D’Auria, Francesca; Grego, Susanna; Costacurta, Micaela; Perugia, Cesare; Chiariello, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is important to establish an early diagnosis of the Marfan Syndrome (MFS) for providing an adequate pharmacological or surgical therapy. Nevertheless, this diagnosis may be complex, given the multi-organic involvement of this disease. Aims: In this work, we evaluated the oral phenotype in a group of paediatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of MFS, to quantify the association of the oro-facial defects with other systemic alterations. Settings and Design: Paediatric subjects who were aged, with a clinical diagnosis of MFS, were selected from our regional Marfan monitoring unit. Methods and Material: All the patients were subjected to Paediatric Dentistry examinations and a radiological screening with Panoramic and Cephalometric X-Rays. The aortic dilation (Aortic Z-score value), the hyperlaxity of the ligaments and scoliosis were evaluated by cardio-surgical and orthopaedics specialists. Statistical Analysis: The correlations between the oral and systemic alterations were analyzed by using the chi square test for the nominal variables. Results and Conclusions: We found a significant correlation of the Aortic Z – score with multiple oral defects which included retrognathia, malar hypoplasia, cross bite, oral respiration and an ogival palate. An association of the oral defects with hyperlaxity of the ligaments and scoliosis was also found. Thus, the data suggested that dentists should be more involved in a multidisciplinary approach, to provide an early MFS diagnosis in paediatric patients. PMID:23730650

  7. Xeroderma Pigmentosum: defective DNA repair causes skin cancer and neurodegeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, J.H.

    1988-07-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a rare autosomal recessive disease with numerous malignancies on sun-exposed areas of the skin and eye because of an inability to repair DNA damage inflicted by harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation of the sun. Because it is the only disease in which cancer is known to result from defective DNA repair, XP has received intense clinical and biochemical study during the last two decades. Furthermore, some patients with XP develop a primary neuronal degeneration, probably due to the inability of nerve cells to repair damage to their DNA caused by intraneuronal metabolites and physicochemical events that mimic the effects of UV radiation. Studies of XP neurodegeneration and DNA-repair defects have led to the conclusion that efficient DNA repair is required to prevent premature death of human nerve cells. Since XP neurodegeneration has similarities to premature death of nerve cells that occurs in such neurodegenerative disorders, XP may be the prototype for these more common neurodegenerations. Recent studies indicate that these degenerations also may have DNA-repair defects.

  8. Facial dysplasia in wild chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Krief, Sabrina; Krief, Jean-Michel; Seguya, Andrew; Couly, Gérard; Levi, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    At least 10% of the Sebitoli chimpanzee community of the Kibale National Park (Uganda) present a characteristic facial phenotype with flattened nose, reduced nostrils, and concave mid-face. Affected individuals do not present skin lesions, and also young infants are affected. We suggest, therefore, a congenital origin of this defect. PMID:24849542

  9. Optic cup and facial patterning defects in ocular ectoderm ?-catenin gain-of-function mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Leigh-Anne D; Smith, April N; Taketo, M Mark; Lang, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Background The canonical Wnt signaling pathway has a number of critical functions during embryonic development and, when activated aberrantly, in the genesis of cancer. Current evidence suggests that during eye development, regulation of Wnt signaling is critical for patterning the surface ectoderm that will contribute to multiple components of the eye. Wnt signaling loss-of-function experiments show that a region of periocular ectoderm will form ectopic lentoid bodies unless the Wnt pathway modifies its fate towards other structures. Consistent with this, Wnt signaling gain of function in the ocular region ectoderm results in a suppression of lens fate. Results Here we demonstrate that ectoderm-specific Wnt signaling gain-of-function embryos exhibit additional defects besides those noted in the lens. There are profound facial defects including a foreshortened snout, malformation of the nasal region, and clefting of the epidermis along the ocular-nasal axis. Furthermore, despite the restriction of Wnt pathway gain-of-function to the surface ectoderm, the optic cup is inappropriately patterned and ultimately forms a highly convoluted, disorganized array of epithelium with the characteristics of retina and retinal pigmented epithelium. Conclusion We suggest that activation of the Wnt pathway in surface ectoderm may disrupt the normal exchange of signals between the presumptive lens and retina that coordinate development of a functional eye. PMID:16539717

  10. Oral administration of French maritime pine bark extract (Flavangenol®) improves clinical symptoms in photoaged facial skin

    PubMed Central

    Furumura, Minao; Sato, Noriko; Kusaba, Nobutaka; Takagaki, Kinya; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background French maritime pine bark extract (PBE) has gained popularity as a dietary supplement in the treatment of various diseases due to its polyphenol-rich ingredients. Oligometric proanthocyanidins (OPCs), a class of bioflavonoid complexes, are enriched in French maritime PBE and have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Previous studies have suggested that French maritime PBE helps reduce ultraviolet radiation damage to the skin and may protect human facial skin from symptoms of photoaging. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of French maritime PBE in the improvement of photodamaged facial skin, we conducted a randomized trial of oral supplementation with PBE. Methods One hundred and twelve women with mild to moderate photoaging of the skin were randomized to either a 12-week open trial regimen of 100 mg PBE supplementation once daily or to a parallel-group trial regimen of 40 mg PBE supplementation once daily. Results A significant decrease in clinical grading of skin photoaging scores was observed in both time courses of 100 mg daily and 40 mg daily PBE supplementation regimens. A significant reduction in the pigmentation of age spots was also demonstrated utilizing skin color measurements. Conclusion Clinically significant improvement in photodamaged skin could be achieved with PBE. Our findings confirm the efficacy and safety of PBE. PMID:22956863

  11. Facial Artery Musculomucosal (FAMM) flap for nasal lining in reconstruction of large full thickness lateral nasal defects

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Obviously, restoring the nasal lining is a great challenge in the reconstruction of nasal defects. Full thickness nasal defects usually require special flaps for reconstructing the nasal lining. Intranasal mucosal flaps, hinge over flaps, perinasal second flaps, folded or second forehead flaps and finally free flaps are examples that can be used for this purpose. Moreover, the case presented in this article expresses a new role for the superiorly based Facial Artery Musculomucosal (FAMM) flap in this topic. Furthermore, mucosal island variant of this flap is presented to reduce the tension on this flap while restoring the nasal lining in large full thickness nasal defect. PMID:26566439

  12. Sorafenib (Nexavar®, BAY 43-9006)-induced Hand-foot Skin Reaction with Facial Erythema.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Ha; Son, In Pyeong; Lee, Jin Woong; Lee, Hye In; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2011-02-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar®, BAY 43-9006) is a novel, orally administered multi-kinase inhibitor that has recently been approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. It is also used to delay disease progression in patients with advanced solid organ malignancies and metastatic melanoma. Sorafenib is associated with a relatively high incidence of dermatologic adverse events. The commonly occurring dermatologic adverse events associated with sorafenib include hand-foot skin reaction, facial erythema, splinter subungual hemorrhages, alopecia, pruritus and xerosis. We report here on a case of a 50-year-old man who was diagnosed with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. He developed both facial erythema and hand-foot skin reaction after the administration of sorafenib. PMID:21738381

  13. Effect of a conjugated oestrogen (Premarin) cream on ageing facial skin. A comparative study with a placebo cream.

    PubMed

    Creidi, P; Faivre, B; Agache, P; Richard, E; Haudiquet, V; Sauvanet, J P

    1994-10-01

    The effects of Premarin cream on ageing facial skin were studied in a randomised, double-blind, parallel group study. Fifty-four women aged 52-70 years who had moderate to severe facial cutaneous ageing, applied 1 g of either Premarin cream (0.625 mg conjugated oestrogens per gram of cream), or placebo cream (same composition with the exclusion of conjugated oestrogens) to the face nightly for 24 weeks. Each morning these women protected their face with a sunblock SPF 15. Skin thickness was measured by B-scan ultrasonic echography, and skin microrelief by profilometry. Each subject's facial appearance was also evaluated by the subject herself and by the clinician. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.013) in favour of Premarin cream was detected in skin thickness at week 24. Skin thickness (dermal plus epidermal) for the women who used Premarin cream increased from 1.56 +/- 0.20 mm at baseline to 1.68 +/- 0.19 mm, compared with 1.52 +/- 0.20 mm at baseline to 1.59 +/- 0.19 mm in the placebo group. Premarin cream was also significantly more effective than placebo cream in improving fine wrinkles according to the results at weeks 12 and 24 (P = 0.010 and P = 0.012, respectively). Significant improvement from baseline was detected in both groups for roughness, laxity and mottled pigmentation and/or lentigines; however, there was no significant difference in these parameters between the two treatment groups. No subjects discontinued treatment for a safety reason. In conclusion, Premarin cream produced better results than the placebo cream; the difference was statistically significant for skin thickness and fine wrinkles. Premarin cream was well tolerated locally, and its general safety was good. PMID:7799828

  14. 3D imaging acquisition, modeling, and prototyping for facial defects reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Cavagnini, Gianluca; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach that combines optical three-dimensional imaging, reverse engineering (RE) and rapid prototyping (RP) for mold production in the prosthetic reconstruction of facial prostheses is presented. A commercial laser-stripe digitizer is used to perform the multiview acquisition of the patient's face; the point clouds are aligned and merged in order to obtain a polygonal model, which is then edited to sculpture the virtual prothesis. Two physical models of both the deformed face and the 'repaired' face are obtained: they differ only in the defect zone. Depending on the material used for the actual prosthesis, the two prototypes can be used either to directly cast the final prosthesis or to fabricate the positive wax pattern. Two case studies are presented, referring to prostetic reconstructions of an eye and of a nose. The results demonstrate the advantages over conventional techniques as well as the improvements with respect to known automated manufacturing techniques in the mold construction. The proposed method results into decreased patient's disconfort, reduced dependence on the anaplasthologist skill, increased repeatability and efficiency of the whole process.

  15. Use of Topical Rapamycin in Facial Angiofibromas in Indian Skin Type

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Vishalakshi; Thakur, Parul; Pund, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Facial angiofibromas (FA) are the most visible cutaneous manifestations in patients with tuberous sclerosis (TS), often resulting in stigmatization of the affected individuals. Recent studies have suggested that topical rapamycin may be an effective treatment for angiofibromas. Aim: To study the safety and efficacy of topical rapamycin in treatment of FA in Type IV–VI skin type. Materials and Methods: Five female patients with FA were included in the study, four of whom had TS, whereas one had isolated angiofibromas without systemic involvement. The age of the patients varied from 6 to 44 years. After baseline evaluation, they were advised to apply topical rapamycin (0.1–1%) in white soft paraffin base twice daily. Follow-up varied from 1 month to 6 months and is ongoing. Results: A sustained improvement was observed with respect to erythema, size as well as extent of the lesions as early as within 2 weeks of starting treatment. No side effects were observed. A correlation between duration of angiofibromas and effectiveness of treatment was noted. Conclusion: Topical rapamycin appears to be a safe and effective alternative to surgical or laser-based treatments in patients with FA. This treatment shows potential to be a first-line management for FA and appears safe to start in early childhood.

  16. Initial findings on teratological and developmental relationships and differences between neural tube defects and facial clefting. First experimental results.

    PubMed

    Weingaertner, Jens; Fanghaenel, Jochen; Bienengraeber, Volker; Gundlach, Karsten K H

    2005-10-01

    Unless genetically caused, the occurrence of neural tube defects and clefts of the lip, alveolus and palate are not associated. These malformations do, however, share some common causes, one of which is folic acid deficiency. Nevertheless, it is not known why a neural tube defect resulting from folic acid deficiency does not occur in combination with facial clefts. Based on animal experiments and a review of the literature, it is assumed that other factors--such as vitamin B6 deficiency--though clinically not diagnosed, can more often cause malformations. PMID:16129613

  17. High resolution imaging of acne lesion development and scarring in human facial skin using OCT-based microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Utku; Li, Yuandong; Choi, Woo June; Kalkan, Goknur; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Acne is a common skin disease that often leads to scarring. Collagen and other tissue damage from the inflammation of acne give rise to permanent skin texture and microvascular changes. In this study, we demonstrate the capabilities of optical coherence tomography based microangiography in detecting high-resolution, three-dimensional structural and microvascular features of in vivo human facial skin during acne lesion initiation and scar development. Materials and Methods A real time swept source optical coherence tomography system is used in this study to acquire volumetric images of human skin. The system operates on a central wavelength of 1310 nm with an A-line rate of 100 kHz, and with an extended imaging range (~12 mm in air). The system uses a handheld imaging probe to image acne lesion on a facial skin of a volunteer. We utilize optical microangiography (OMAG) technique to evaluate the changes in microvasculature and tissue structure. Results Thanks to the high sensitivity of OMAG, we are able to image microvasculature up to capillary level and visualize the remodeled vessels around the acne lesion. Moreover, vascular density change derived from OMAG measurement is provided as an alternative biomarker for the assessment of human skin diseases. In contrast to other techniques like histology or microscopy, our technique made it possible to image 3D tissue structure and microvasculature up to 1.5 mm depth in vivo without the need of exogenous contrast agents. Conclusion The presented results are promising to facilitate clinical trials aiming to treat acne lesion scarring, as well as other prevalent skin diseases, by detecting cutaneous blood flow and structural changes within human skin in vivo. PMID:25740313

  18. Temporomandibular joint inflammation potentiates the excitability of trigeminal root ganglion neurons innervating the facial skin in rats.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mamoru; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Ikeda, Mizuho; Nasu, Masanori; Kadoi, Jun; Shima, Yukio; Ohta, Hidehiko; Matsumoto, Shigeji

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation alters the excitability of trigeminal root ganglion (TRG) neurons innervating the facial skin, by using behavioral, electrophysiological, molecular, and immunohistochemical approaches. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the rat TMJ to produce inflammation. The threshold for escape from mechanical stimulation applied to the orofacial area in TMJ-inflamed rats was significantly lower than that in naïve rats. The TRG neurons innervating the inflamed TMJ were labeled by 2% Fluorogold (FG) injection into the TMJ. The number of FG-labeled substance P (SP)-immunoreactive neurons in the inflamed rats was significantly increased compared with that in the naïve rats. On the other hand, medium- and large-diameter TRG neurons (>30 microm) innervating the facial skin were labeled by FG injection into the facial skin. In the FG-labeled cutaneous TRG neurons, the occurrence of SP (100 nM) induced membrane depolarization in inflamed rats (medium: 73.3%, large : 85.7%) was larger than that in the naïve rats (medium: 29.4%, large : 0%). In addition, SP application significantly increased the firing rate evoked by depolarizing pulses in the neurons of inflamed rats compared with those of naïve rats. Quantitative single-cell RT-PCR analysis showed the increased expression of mRNA for the NK1 receptor in FG-labeled TRG neurons in inflamed rats compared with that in naive rats. The numbers of SP and NK1 receptors/neurofilament 200 positive immunoreactive TRG neurons innervating the facial skin (FG-labeled) in the inflamed rats were significantly increased compared with those seen in naïve rats. These results suggest that TMJ inflammation can alter the excitability of medium- and large-diameter TRG neurons innervating the facial skin and that an increase in SP/NK1 receptors in their soma may contribute to the mechanism underlying the trigeminal inflammatory allodynia in the TMJ disorder. PMID:15625101

  19. Facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Swelstad, Matthew R; Gutowski, Karol A

    2006-06-01

    Nonsurgical facial rejuvenation is often used as an alternative to more invasive procedures. Topical agents improve cell maturation and cell turnover, chemical peels and microdermabrasion improve poorly textured skin and pigment anomalies. Surgical facial rejuvenation provides dramatic changes but requires more recovery time. PMID:16721114

  20. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Wrinkles and Skin Laxity in Seven Different Facial Areas

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunchul; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Jeongeun; Ro, Youngsuck

    2015-01-01

    Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment has recently emerged in response to the increasing demand for noninvasive procedures for skin lifting and tightening. Objective This study was aimed at evaluating the clinical efficacy of and patient satisfaction with HIFU treatment for wrinkles and laxity in seven different areas of the face in Asian skin. Methods Twenty Korean patients with facial wrinkle and laxity were analyzed after a single session of HIFU treatment. Two independent, blinded clinicians evaluated the clinical improvement in seven areas of the face by comparison of standardized photographs obtained before, and at 3 and 6 months after treatment. Assessment of subjective satisfaction and adverse effects of treatment were done by using questionnaires. Results The physicians' evaluation and patients' satisfaction with the clinical effects of HIFU in each area were similar regardless of the number of treatment shots. The jawline, cheek, and perioral areas were the sites where HIFU was most effective, in decreasing order. The adverse effects included erythema and swelling in six cases, and purpura and bruising in two cases. However, the adverse effects were mild and transient. Conclusion HIFU could be a safe, effective, and noninvasive procedure that can be used to improve facial wrinkles and skin laxity in Asian skin. It is particularly effective for clinical improvement in the jawline, cheek, and perioral areas. PMID:26719637

  1. Single Treatment with 100-Microsecond Alexandrite Laser Clears Selected Acquired Melanocytic Nevi in Type IV Asian Facial Skin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Etienne CE; Sen, Priya; Goh, Chee-Leok; Chua, Sze-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Context: Small common acquired melanocytic nevi (AMNs) are common on Asian facial skin. Aims: To show that the 755 nm Alexandrite laser stacked at the 100-?s long-pulsed mode (?sAL) is an effective modality for the removal of selected AMNs. Settings and Design: This was a retrospective case series, followed up with a telephone interview. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all patients treated between January 2010 and April 2012 with the ?sAL laser for small AMNs was conducted. Pre- and post-treatment facial photographs and photographs of the individual lesions were analyzed by two independent dermatological surgeons for degree of clearance and complications. A telephone interview was conducted with the patients to assess their satisfaction with the procedure. Results: A total of 18 patients with 53 lesions were included. 7/18 (38.9%) of patients had ‘excellent’ results. No patients had ‘mild’ or ‘poor’ results. At 4 week post-treatment, 49/53 (92.5%) were totally cleared, with 14/53 (26.4%) reporting mild atrophy, and 11/53 (20.8%) reporting mild post-inflammatory hypopigmentation. The majority of lesions had negligible complications. 9/18 (50%) judged the procedure to be ‘excellent’, and all patients reported that they would recommend this procedure to a friend seeking removal of small facial AMNs. Conclusion: The ?sAL is an effective modality for the removal of small facial AMNs. PMID:23723600

  2. Treatment of facial skin using combinations of CO2, Q-switched alexandrite, and/or flashlamp-pumped dye and/or erbium lasers in the same treatment session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard E.; Manuskiatti, Woraphong; Goldman, Mitchel P.

    1998-07-01

    Skin aging caused from chronological and photodamage processes results in many alterations in skin appearance. In many circumstances, patients who pursue CO2 laser resurfacing for facial rejuvenation are also concerned with other photoaging alternations that are beyond the efficacy of the CO2 laser. We demonstrated an approach to aged facial skin by using combined treatments of appropriate lasers.

  3. Surgical-prosthetic management of facial soft tissue defects on anterior single implant-supported restorations: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Paniz, Gianluca; Mazzocco, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The surgical correction of soft tissue defects on the facial aspects of dental implants is documented as an unpredictable procedure. Since the customization of the prosthetic emergence profile contributes significantly to the final esthetic outcome of the soft tissue, a combined surgical-prosthetic approach has been described in the literature. In the case presented in this article, a multidisciplinary approach was used to treat a patient's anterior sextant. It included the treatment of a previously placed implant, perfectly osseointegrated, with a 2 mm recession of the facial soft tissue. Two connective tissue grafting procedures were performed, in conjunction with the modification of the prosthetic profile of the provisional restoration and the definitive abutment. The final esthetic outcome satisfied the patient and resolved the main complaint, and is documented to have been stable for 5 years. PMID:25874274

  4. Microsurgical reconstruction of noma-related facial defects with folded free flaps: an overview of 31 cases.

    PubMed

    Giessler, Goetz A; Fieger, Alexander; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Schmidt, Andreas B

    2005-08-01

    Noma is primarily affecting children in underprivileged countries and results in disfiguring facial defects, loss of mandibular movement, and subsequent social disintegration. Plastic surgery in West Africa traditionally uses pedicled flaps. In large, complex, or central facial defects, though, pedicled flaps are apt to be too small or have a significant donor site morbidity. Since 1999, we have been using free microvascular flaps in Nigeria. In 5 Interplast missions, 31 patients (age 5-45 years, median 20 years, female to male ratio 18:13) underwent 31 free flap procedures in Nigeria, 27 of them for primary treatment. The operative time ranged from 3.75-8.75 hours (mean 5.5 hours). An external distractor/fixator to maintain mouth opening was mounted in 13 cases. All anastomoses were done with loupe magnification. Three flaps failed completely, 1 partly, and 4 patients showed minor wound infections. No donor-site complications occurred. Free flaps can be a suitable and safe closure for complex noma defects even in underprivileged circumstances, if patient profile and own microsurgical routine allows it. Patient disfigurement can be less than in pedicled flaps regarding the donor sites. PMID:16034240

  5. Usage of the Bi-Unilobed Cutaneous Flap Model for Maxillofacial Skin Defect Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Emsen, Ilteris M

    2015-06-01

    There are many methods on skin defects and their reconstructions. The basic rule for reconstruction of these defects is to perform with the most easy and simple method. Local flaps are one of the most convenient for skin defects. Free flaps, interpolation flaps are usually can not preferred because of no time saving, and need the second operation to delay. For this reason, local flap methods have been always popular methods for the reconstruction of small to large skin defects.10 patients were included to this study. All patients were operated by one senior author. Average follow-up was 10.9 months (1-26 months). Four of patients were female, and others were male.There was no seen any flap ischeamia at follow up. Histopathologic review of removed masses was reported as malignant skin tumor for 7 patients, and as benign skin tumor for 3 patients. Even at the early postoperative period, no distal flap ischeamia was observed. Additionally, no any wound infection, dehiscence and other problems related to wound healing process were seen. In conclusion, our proposed technique that named "bi-unilobed cutaneous flap " has more superior properties than the other local flap methods including: easy planning, no need wide dissection, and has more less donor area morbidity. This suggested method is a different and a good alternative for small to large skin defect according to the standard local flaps such as banner, VY, advancement, transposition, Limberg, and other modified local flaps. PMID:26080262

  6. Cervical, mandibular, and parotid lymph nodes of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum: a histopathologic and immunohistochemistry study and its correlation with facial skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Costa, M M S; Lima, W G; Figueiredo, M M; Michalick, M S M; Tafuri, W L; Tafuri, W L

    2008-09-01

    The parasite load in cervical, mandibular, and parotid lymph nodes and in the skin of the nose and the pinna from dogs infected with Leishmania infantum were investigated by histologic and immunohistochemical studies. Twenty-two infected dogs with and without signs of infection were examined to demonstrate correlation of signs with parasite load and the correlation of facial skin lesions with parasites in regional lymph nodes. Chronic inflammation of the skin was demonstrated in infected dogs that had no gross skin lesions, confirming that normal-appearing skin can harbor the parasite, likely playing a role in transmission. Dogs with facial skin lesions showed a higher parasite load in parotid lymph nodes than dogs without lesions of the facial skin, based on Leishman-Donovan unit analysis. Based on immunohistochemical analysis, parasite load in parotid and cervical nodes was correlated with that of skin of the nose and pinna, as was the parasite load in mandibular lymph nodes and skin of the external nose. We demonstrated a logical involvement of the lymphatic vessels and their specific anatomic draining sites. PMID:18725463

  7. Defective channels lead to an impaired skin barrier

    PubMed Central

    Blaydon, Diana C.; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Channels are integral membrane proteins that form a pore, allowing the passive movement of ions or molecules across a membrane (along a gradient), either between compartments within a cell, between intracellular and extracellular environments or between adjacent cells. The ability of cells to communicate with one another and with their environment is a crucial part of the normal physiology of a tissue that allows it to carry out its function. Cell communication is particularly important during keratinocyte differentiation and formation of the skin barrier. Keratinocytes in the skin epidermis undergo a programme of apoptosis-driven terminal differentiation, whereby proliferating keratinocytes in the basal (deepest) layer of the epidermis stop proliferating, exit the basal layer and move up through the spinous and granular layers of the epidermis to form the stratum corneum, the external barrier. Genes encoding different families of channel proteins have been found to harbour mutations linked to a variety of rare inherited monogenic skin diseases. In this Commentary, we discuss how human genetic findings in aquaporin (AQP) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels reveal different mechanisms by which these channel proteins function to ensure the proper formation and maintenance of the skin barrier. PMID:25179597

  8. Signals of Personality and Health: The Contributions of Facial Shape, Skin Texture, and Viewing Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Alex L.; Kramer, Robin S. S.; Ward, Robert

    2012-01-01

    To what extent does information in a person's face predict their likely behavior? There is increasing evidence for association between relatively neutral, static facial appearance and personality traits. By using composite images rendered from three dimensional (3D) scans of women scoring high and low on health and personality dimensions, we aimed…

  9. Daily Consumption of a Fruit and Vegetable Smoothie Alters Facial Skin Color.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Wei; Graf, Brigitte A; Mitra, Soma R; Stephen, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of dietary carotenoids or carotenoid supplements can alter the color (yellowness) of human skin through increased carotenoid deposition in the skin. As fruit and vegetables are the main dietary sources of carotenoids, skin yellowness may be a function of regular fruit and vegetable consumption. However, most previous studies have used tablets or capsules to supplement carotenoid intake, and less is known of the impact of increased fruit and vegetable consumption on skin color. Here, we examined skin color changes in an Asian population (Malaysian Chinese ethnicity) over a six week dietary intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie. Eighty one university students (34 males, 47 females; mean age 20.48) were assigned randomly to consuming either a fruit smoothie (intervention group) or mineral water (control group) daily for six weeks. Participants' skin yellowness (CIELab b*), redness (a*) and luminance (L*) were measured at baseline, twice during the intervention period and at a two-week follow-up, using a handheld reflectance spectrophotometer. Results showed a large increment in skin yellowness (p<0.001) and slight increment in skin redness (p<0.001) after 4 weeks of intervention for participants in the intervention group. Skin yellowness and skin redness remained elevated at the two week follow up measurement. In conclusion, intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie is associated with increased skin redness and yellowness in an Asian population. Changes in the reflectance spectrum of the skin suggest that this color change was caused by carotenoid deposition in the skin. PMID:26186449

  10. Daily Consumption of a Fruit and Vegetable Smoothie Alters Facial Skin Color

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kok Wei; Graf, Brigitte A.; Mitra, Soma R.; Stephen, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of dietary carotenoids or carotenoid supplements can alter the color (yellowness) of human skin through increased carotenoid deposition in the skin. As fruit and vegetables are the main dietary sources of carotenoids, skin yellowness may be a function of regular fruit and vegetable consumption. However, most previous studies have used tablets or capsules to supplement carotenoid intake, and less is known of the impact of increased fruit and vegetable consumption on skin color. Here, we examined skin color changes in an Asian population (Malaysian Chinese ethnicity) over a six week dietary intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie. Eighty one university students (34 males, 47 females; mean age 20.48) were assigned randomly to consuming either a fruit smoothie (intervention group) or mineral water (control group) daily for six weeks. Participants’ skin yellowness (CIELab b*), redness (a*) and luminance (L*) were measured at baseline, twice during the intervention period and at a two-week follow-up, using a handheld reflectance spectrophotometer. Results showed a large increment in skin yellowness (p<0.001) and slight increment in skin redness (p<0.001) after 4 weeks of intervention for participants in the intervention group. Skin yellowness and skin redness remained elevated at the two week follow up measurement. In conclusion, intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie is associated with increased skin redness and yellowness in an Asian population. Changes in the reflectance spectrum of the skin suggest that this color change was caused by carotenoid deposition in the skin. PMID:26186449

  11. Effects of diffuse and specular reflections on the perceived age of facial skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce-Lopera, Carlos; Igarashi, Takanori; Nakao, Keisuke; Okajima, Katsunori

    2012-05-01

    Age perception is a better biomarker of skin aging than chronological age. However, the optical cues that determine the perception of human skin age are difficult to assess given the complex interactions between light and the multi layered structure of the skin. The aim of the present study is to clarify the independent contribution of both diffuse and specular reflection components to the skin age perception. First, according to our results, subjects were able to estimate the age of skin only by using the diffuse reflection component. Moreover, we showed that inclusion of the specular reflection component added on average 5 years to their age estimation. Second, by artificially manipulating the specular component, we concluded that the luminance distribution affects the perceived age of the skin.

  12. FEM modeling and histological analyses on thermal damage induced in facial skin resurfacing procedure with different CO2 laser pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Zingoni, Tiziano; Di Cicco, Emiliano; Manetti, Leonardo; Pini, Roberto; Fortuna, Damiano

    2011-07-01

    Laser light is nowadays routinely used in the aesthetic treatments of facial skin, such as in laser rejuvenation, scar removal etc. The induced thermal damage may be varied by setting different laser parameters, in order to obtain a particular aesthetic result. In this work, it is proposed a theoretical study on the induced thermal damage in the deep tissue, by considering different laser pulse duration. The study is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM): a bidimensional model of the facial skin is depicted in axial symmetry, considering the different skin structures and their different optical and thermal parameters; the conversion of laser light into thermal energy is modeled by the bio-heat equation. The light source is a CO2 laser, with different pulse durations. The model enabled to study the thermal damage induced into the skin, by calculating the Arrhenius integral. The post-processing results enabled to study in space and time the temperature dynamics induced in the facial skin, to study the eventual cumulative effects of subsequent laser pulses and to optimize the procedure for applications in dermatological surgery. The calculated data where then validated in an experimental measurement session, performed in a sheep animal model. Histological analyses were performed on the treated tissues, evidencing the spatial distribution and the entity of the thermal damage in the collageneous tissue. Modeling and experimental results were in good agreement, and they were used to design a new optimized laser based skin resurfacing procedure.

  13. Development of ichthyosiform skin compensates for defective permeability barrier function in mice lacking transglutaminase 1

    PubMed Central

    Kuramoto, Nobuo; Takizawa, Toshihiro; Takizawa, Takami; Matsuki, Masato; Morioka, Hiroyuki; Robinson, John M.; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    2002-01-01

    Transglutaminase 1 (TGase 1) is one of the genes implicated in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis. Skin from TGase 1–/– mice, which die as neonates, lacks the normal insoluble cornified envelope and has impaired barrier function. Characterization of in situ dye permeability and transepidermal water loss revealed defects in the development of the skin permeability barrier in TGase 1–/– mice. In the stratum corneum of the skin, tongue, and forestomach, intercellular lipid lamellae were disorganized, and the corneocyte lipid envelope and cornified envelope were lacking. Neonatal TGase 1–/– mouse skin was taut and erythrodermic, but transplanted TGase 1–/– mouse skin resembled that seen in severe ichthyosis, with epidermal hyperplasia and marked hyperkeratosis. Abnormalities in those barrier structures remained, but transepidermal water loss was improved to control levels in the ichthyosiform skin. From these results, we conclude that TGase 1 is essential to the assembly and organization of the barrier structures in stratified squamous epithelia. We suggest that the ichthyosiform skin phenotype in TGase 1 deficiency develops the massive hyperkeratosis as a physical compensation for the defective cutaneous permeability barrier required for survival in a terrestrial environment. PMID:11805136

  14. Minimally invasive options for cutaneous defects: secondary intention healing, partial closure, and skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Cordoro, Kelly M; Russell, Mark A

    2005-05-01

    Several wound management options are available for defects of the head and neck, and choosing the best option requires consideration of several variables. The physical characteristics of the defect, the experience and preferences of the surgeon, and the desires and medicosocial situation of the patient may influence the final reconstructive decision. As the concepts and techniques in the field of reconstructive surgery advance, conservative wound management options should not be overlooked. This article reviews the minimally invasive options for the management of cutaneous defects, including second intention healing, partial closures, and skin grafts. The authors review the basic concepts of wound healing. PMID:15817402

  15. [Autosomal dominant Mendelian midline complex. Secundum atrial septal defect associated with cardiac and facial-thoracic defects. A familial case].

    PubMed

    Stéphan, E; Ashoush, R; Mégarbané, A; Kassab, R; Salem, N; Loiselet, J; Bouvagnet, P

    2000-05-01

    The kindred of 38 individuals reported here have various anomalies: 1. facio-thoracic malformations: hypertelorism, nasal deviation, cleft lip and palate, upper-incisors diastema and pectus excavatum; 2. cardiac anomalies: sinus node bradycardia, atrial fibrillation, nodal rhythm, atrial septal defect. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, low insertion of the septal tricuspid valve corresponding to an Ebstein syndrome, pulmonic "en dôme" valve stenosis, aortic valve stenosis, long QT, and intraventricular conduction blocks. Almost all these defects are septal or para-septal. Mitral stenosis is probably rheumatoid. Such median varied pathology has not been yet reported. All the extra-cardiac anomalies are situated along the vertical upper half-body midline. All cardiac anomalies are in the septal or para-septal region. It is an autosomal dominant trait that implies the early embryonic development of the midline of cardiac and extra-cardiac structures. PMID:10858865

  16. A case of extensive Aplasia Cutis Congenita with underlying skull defect and central nervous system malformation: discussion of large skin defects, complications, treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Burkhead, A; Poindexter, G; Morrell, D S

    2009-08-01

    Aplasia Cutis Congenita (ACC) is a rare condition characterized by the absence of a portion of skin at birth. Skin defects are usually small (0.5 to 3 cm) and located on the scalp. Although there can be other physical or genetic abnormalities, ACC is most often a benign isolated condition. Rarely is an underlying bony defect present, and this association increases the rate of complications. We report a case of a newborn male with ACC of the entire crown and vertex scalp, non-ossified parietal skull and dysplastic corpus callosum. The patient's skull and skin defects were treated non-surgically, and he recovered well. PMID:19638992

  17. Human growth factor and cytokine skin cream for facial skin rejuvenation as assessed by 3D in vivo optical skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael H; Goldman, Mitchel P; Biron, Julie

    2007-10-01

    Growth factors, in addition to their crucial role in cutaneous wound healing, are also beneficial for skin rejuvenation. Due to their multifunctional activities such as promoting skin cell proliferation and stimulating collagen formation, growth factors may participate in skin rejuvenation at various levels. The present placebo-controlled study aimed to further investigate the antiaging effects of a novel skin cream containing a mixture of human growth factors and cytokines, which was obtained through a biotechnology process using cultured human fetal fibroblasts. Aside from clinical assessment of skin wrinkles, the skin surface topography was analyzed by 3D in vivo optical skin imaging using the Phaseshift Rapid in vivo Measurement of Skin (PRIMOS) device. This device allows fast, contact-free, and direct measurement of the skin surface topography in vivo at high resolution. This technique is quantitative and more reliable than a visual assessment of wrinkles using a scoring system, which is subjective and strongly dependent on investigator and assessment conditions. Using the PRIMOS device, which is also regarded as a more accurate method than the commonly used silicon replica technique, skin surface roughness was shown to significantly decrease between 10% and 18% depending on the roughness parameter after 2 months of twice-daily application of the human growth factor and cytokine cream. This was compared to treatment with the placebo formulation resulting in an approximate 10% decrease of 2 roughness parameters, whereas the remaining parameters remained unchanged. We found that topical application of growth factors and cytokines are beneficial in reducing signs of skin aging. PMID:17966179

  18. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies the Skin Color Genes IRF4, MC1R, ASIP, and BNC2 Influencing Facial Pigmented Spots.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Leonie C; Hamer, Merel A; Gunn, David A; Deelen, Joris; Lall, Jaspal S; van Heemst, Diana; Uh, Hae-Won; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Beekman, Marian; Slagboom, P Eline; Kayser, Manfred; Liu, Fan; Nijsten, Tamar

    2015-07-01

    Facial pigmented spots are a common skin aging feature, but genetic predisposition has yet to be thoroughly investigated. We conducted a genome-wide association study for pigmented spots in 2,844 Dutch Europeans from the Rotterdam Study (mean age: 66.9±8.0 years; 47% male). Using semi-automated image analysis of high-resolution digital facial photographs, facial pigmented spots were quantified as the percentage of affected skin area (mean women: 2.0% ±0.9, men: 0.9% ±0.6). We identified genome-wide significant association with pigmented spots at three genetic loci: IRF4 (rs12203592, P=1.8 × 10(-27)), MC1R (compound heterozygosity score, P=2.3 × 10(-24)), and RALY/ASIP (rs6059655, P=1.9 × 10(-9)). In addition, after adjustment for the other three top-associated loci the BNC2 locus demonstrated significant association (rs62543565, P=2.3 × 10(-8)). The association signals observed at all four loci were successfully replicated (P<0.05) in an independent Dutch cohort (Leiden Longevity Study n=599). Although the four genes have previously been associated with skin color variation and skin cancer risk, all association signals remained highly significant (P<2 × 10(-8)) when conditioning the association analyses on skin color. We conclude that genetic variations in IRF4, MC1R, RALY/ASIP, and BNC2 contribute to the acquired amount of facial pigmented spots during aging, through pathways independent of the basal melanin production. PMID:25705849

  19. Signaling by SHH Rescues Facial Defects Following Blockade in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chong, H. Jonathan; Young, Nathan M.; Hu, Diane; Jeong, Juhee; McMahon, Andrew P.; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Frontonasal Ectodermal Zone (FEZ) is a signaling center in the face that expresses Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and regulates patterned growth of the upper jaw. Blocking SHH in the forebrain blocks Shh expression in the FEZ and creates malformations resembling holoprosencephaly (HPE), while inhibition of BMP signaling in the mesenchyme blocks FEZ formation and causes similar dysmorphology. Thus, the brain could regulate FEZ formation by SHH or BMP signaling, and if so, activating one of these pathways in the face might alleviate the effects of repression of SHH in the brain. Results We blocked SHH signaling in the brain while adding SHH or BMP between the neural and facial ectoderm of the frontonasal process. When applied early, SHH restored Shh expression in the FEZ and significantly improved shape outcomes, which contrasts with our previous experiments that showed later SHH treatments have no effect. BMP-soaked beads introduced early and late caused apoptosis that exacerbated malformations. Finally, removal of Smoothened from neural crest cells did not inhibit Shh expression in the FEZ. Conclusions Collectively, this work suggests that a direct, time-sensitive SHH signal from the brain is required for the later induction of Shh in the FEZ. We propose a testable model of FEZ activation and discuss signaling mediators that may regulate these interactions. PMID:22275045

  20. The Cosmetic Results of a Simple Method for Repairing Preputial Skin Defect in Hypospadias

    PubMed Central

    Ghavami-Adel, Maryam; Mollaeean, Mansour; Hooman, Nakysa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hypospadias is a common birth defect of the penis. Besides the abnormal position of the urethral opening, there is usually a ventral preputial defect with preputial redundancy in dorsal shaft. There are many flap procedures for correcting this defect. Here, we present our experience of skin coverage procedure with better cosmetic results. Methods: It is a prospective study on patients with mid-shaft to glandular hypospadias operated from June 2008 to December 2012. The operations were performed by one surgeon in two hospitals and the cosmetic results were evaluated by the surgeon, parents, and another pediatric surgeon by a satisfaction questionnaire. In this procedure, inner prepuce was incised curvilinearly, remaining 5 mm in medial and 8 mm in lateral aspects of the inner prepuce. For skin repair, dorsal flaps were approximated in midline along median raphe. Findings: Sixty-three patients with mean age of 25.75±8.46 (7-93) months were followed up for 7.06±3.34 (2-15( months. There were 4 complications. The overall satisfaction with penile skin coverage was 93.7% for parents and 98.4% for surgeons. Patients’ age and primary site of meatus had a significant correlation with cosmetic results (P<0.05), while urethroplasty techniques and post-operative complications were not significant. Conclusion: Reapproximation of dorsal flaps in midline is a simple method and can be used in most cases of uncomplicated primary hypospadias. By this technique a more normal appearance can be achieved. PMID:25755862

  1. Nonradioactive arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction: a novel technique for detecting genetic defects in skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Vogt, T; Stolz, W; Landthaler, M; Rüschoff, J; Schlegel, J

    1996-01-01

    Initiation and progression of melanocytic and non-melanocytic skin tumors are accompanied and probably caused by a variety of genetic defects. In contrast to other human tumors, however, limited amounts of available tissue in skin cancer often hamper extensive genetic studies of native material of early lesions. Therefore, we applied a novel DNA fingerprinting technique based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR). This technique enabled us to scan large parts of the genome (about 30 kb/PCR reaction) for somatic mutations starting with minute amounts of tissue. In contrast to previous reports on AP-PCR, we were able to visualize PCR products by a rapid nonradioactive silver-staining technique using a simple device for staining of large polyacrylamide gels. In nine benign and malignant melanocytic skin tumors, the method provided a set of reproducible DNA fingerprints. Genetic defects were detected by comparing the fingerprints of tumor cells and constitutive DNA from blood leukocytes. Since nonradioactive AP-PCR fingerprinting also offers the unique capability to isolate and sequence polymorphic DNA fragments from fingerprint gels, we conclude that this technique seems to be important and practically feasible for elucidating the genetic roots of skin tumors. PMID:8592074

  2. Microvascular reconstruction of facial defects in settings where resources are limited.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W; Lloyd, T; Mizen, K; Fourie, L; Nishikawa, H; Rakhorst, H; Schmidt, A; Kuoraite, D; Bulstrode, N; Dunaway, D

    2016-01-01

    The surgical treatment of defects caused by noma is challenging for the surgeon and the patient. Local flaps are preferred, but sometimes, because of the nature of the disease, there is not enough local tissue available. We describe our experience of free tissue transfer in Ethiopia. Between 2008 and 2014, 34 microsurgical procedures were done over 11 missions with the charity Facing Africa, predominantly for the treatment of defects caused by noma (n=32). The mean duration of operation was 442minutes (range 200 - 720). Six minor wound infections were treated conservatively and did not affect outcome, a return to theatre was required in 4 patients with wound infections and one with a haemorrhage; 2 flaps failed and 2 partially failed, one patient developed an oronasal fistula, and one had an infection at the donor site that required a repeat graft. In settings where resources are limited, free flaps can be used when local tissue is not available and they cause less morbidity than pedicled tissue transfer. PMID:26608690

  3. Clinical spectrum of females with HCCS mutation: from no clinical signs to a neonatal lethal form of the microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Segmental Xp22.2 monosomy or a heterozygous HCCS mutation is associated with the microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) or MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea) syndrome, an X-linked disorder with male lethality. HCCS encodes the holocytochrome c-type synthase involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and programmed cell death. Methods We characterized the X-chromosomal abnormality encompassing HCCS or an intragenic mutation in this gene in six new female patients with an MLS phenotype by cytogenetic analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization, sequencing, and quantitative real-time PCR. The X chromosome inactivation (XCI) pattern was determined and clinical data of the patients were reviewed. Results Two terminal Xp deletions of ?11.2 Mb, two submicroscopic copy number losses, one of ~850 kb and one of ?3 Mb, all covering HCCS, 1 nonsense, and one mosaic 2-bp deletion in HCCS are reported. All females had a completely (>98:2) or slightly skewed (82:18) XCI pattern. The most consistent clinical features were microphthalmia/anophthalmia and sclerocornea/corneal opacity in all patients and congenital linear skin defects in 4/6. Additional manifestations included various ocular anomalies, cardiac defects, brain imaging abnormalities, microcephaly, postnatal growth retardation, and facial dysmorphism. However, no obvious clinical sign was observed in three female carriers who were relatives of one patient. Conclusion Our findings showed a wide phenotypic spectrum ranging from asymptomatic females with an HCCS mutation to patients with a neonatal lethal MLS form. Somatic mosaicism and the different ability of embryonic cells to cope with an OXPHOS defect and/or enhanced cell death upon HCCS deficiency likely underlie the great variability in phenotypes. PMID:24735900

  4. Ptbp1 and Exosc9 knockdowns trigger skin stability defects through different pathways.

    PubMed

    Noiret, Maud; Mottier, Stéphanie; Angrand, Gaelle; Gautier-Courteille, Carole; Lerivray, Hubert; Viet, Justine; Paillard, Luc; Mereau, Agnes; Hardy, Serge; Audic, Yann

    2016-01-15

    In humans, genetic diseases affecting skin integrity (genodermatoses) are generally caused by mutations in a small number of genes that encode structural components of the dermal-epidermal junctions. In this article, we first show that inactivation of both exosc9, which encodes a component of the RNA exosome, and ptbp1, which encodes an RNA-binding protein abundant in Xenopus embryonic skin, impairs embryonic Xenopus skin development, with the appearance of dorsal blisters along the anterior part of the fin. However, histological and electron microscopy analyses revealed that the two phenotypes are distinct. Exosc9 morphants are characterized by an increase in the apical surface of the goblet cells, loss of adhesion between the sensorial and peridermal layers, and a decrease in the number of ciliated cells within the blisters. Ptbp1 morphants are characterized by an altered goblet cell morphology. Gene expression profiling by deep RNA sequencing showed that the expression of epidermal and genodermatosis-related genes is also differentially affected in the two morphants, indicating that alterations in post-transcriptional regulations can lead to skin developmental defects through different routes. Therefore, the developing larval epidermis of Xenopus will prove to be a useful model for dissecting the post-transcriptional regulatory network involved in skin development and stability with significant implications for human diseases. PMID:26546114

  5. Management of facial injuries.

    PubMed

    Modransky, P; Welker, B; Pickett, J P

    1989-12-01

    Because of the excellent blood supply to the head region, superficial lacerations to the soft tissue structures of the head generally heal rapidly without treatment. Lacerations of the equine tongue frequently go unnoticed because difficulty in eating usually is not apparent. The majority of lacerations heal if left untreated, with no loss in function. Surgical repair is indicated to promote healing and prevent deformity, to amputate a severely compromised apex, and to alter a scar or defect that is unacceptable to the owner. Surgical principles to be adhered to include thorough debridement and copious lavage, multiple layer closure, and placement of tension sutures away from the primary suture line and tied on the dorsum of the tongue. Full-thickness lip lacerations should be repaired using multiple-layer closure and tension sutures tied on the skin surface away from the primary suture line. Reconstructive techniques have been described for extensive lip lacerations when primary repair was inadequate or tissue loss was severe. Thorough evaluation of the equine lid, adnexa, and orbit is essential in determining severity of injury and appropriate treatment methods as well as for establishment of a prognosis. The injury may be minor or more severe, leading to blindness, disfigurement, or loss of the eye itself. Depression fractures involving the frontal, maxillary, or nasal bones are frequently open fractures. Skin abrasions, epistaxis, facial deformity, crepitus, and pain are clinical signs seen with this type of injury. Bone and soft tissue reconstruction should be performed to minimize potential complications. Facial fractures left untreated can result in facial deformity, sequestration, sinusitis, and osteomyelitis. PMID:2691037

  6. Facial Ringworm (Tinea Faciale)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Ringworm, Facial (Tinea Faciei) Information for adults A A A A ... with scaling along the edge is typical of tinea faciale. Overview Tinea infections are commonly called ringworm ...

  7. Pollution as a risk factor for the development of melasma and other skin disorders of facial hyperpigmentation ? is there a case to be made?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Wendy E

    2015-04-01

    Worldwide air pollution is a major health concern. There is accumulating scientific evidence that air pollution plays an important role in extrinsic aging. This article invites the reader to consider pollution as a possible emerging etiologic agent for the development of melasma. Pollution may be a risk factor for melasma and other facial pigmentary dyschromias. Air pollution in the form of airborne particulate matter (PM) and Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enter the skin via nanoparticles and generate quinones, which are redox-cycling chemicals that produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PM increases the amount of ROS that triggers the increase of metalloproteinases that leads to extrinsic aging, which includes skin pigmentation. The incidence of disorders of facial hyperpigmentation specifically, melasma, is increased in persons of skin type III-VI living in India and South East Asia. Interestingly, these are also geographic regions with very heavy pollution. India, South East Asia, China, and United States lead the world in air pollution. PMID:25844605

  8. Reduced inflammatory threshold indicates skin barrier defect in transglutaminase 3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bognar, Peter; Nemeth, Ilona; Mayer, Balazs; Haluszka, Dora; Wikonkal, Norbert; Ostorhazi, Eszter; John, Susan; Paulsson, Mats; Smyth, Neil; Pasztoi, Maria; Buzas, Edit I; Szipocs, Robert; Kolonics, Attila; Temesvari, Erzsebet; Karpati, Sarolta

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a transglutaminase 3 knockout (TGM3/KO) mouse was generated that showed impaired hair development, but no gross defects in the epidermal barrier, although increased fragility of isolated corneocytes was demonstrated. Here we investigated the functionality of skin barrier in vivo by percutaneous sensitization to FITC in TGM3/KO (n=64) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice (n=36). Cutaneous inflammation was evaluated by mouse ear swelling test (MEST), histology, serum IgE levels, and by flow cytometry from draining lymph nodes. Inflammation-induced significant MEST difference (P<0.0001) was detected between KO and WT mice and was supported also by histopathology. A significant increase of CD4+ CD25+-activated T cells (P<0.01) and elevated serum IgE levels (P<0.05) in KO mice indicated more the development of FITC sensitization than an irritative reaction. Propionibacter acnes-induced intracutaneous inflammation showed no difference (P=0.2254) between the reactivity of WT and KO immune system. As in vivo tracer, FITC penetration from skin surface followed by two-photon microscopy demonstrated a more invasive percutaneous penetration in KO mice. The clinically uninvolved skin in TGM3/KO mice showed impaired barrier function and higher susceptibility to FITC sensitization indicating that TGM3 has a significant contribution to the functionally intact cutaneous barrier. PMID:23884312

  9. Facial and Hand Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pomahac, Bohdan; Gobble, Ryan M.; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) is a novel therapeutic option for treatment of patients suffering from limb loss or severe facial disfigurement. To date, 72 hand and 19 facial transplantations have been performed worldwide. VCA in hand and facial transplantation is a complex procedure requiring a multidisciplinary team approach and extensive surgical planning. Despite good functional outcome, courses after hand and facial transplantation have been complicated by skin rejection. Long-term immunosuppression remains a necessity in VCA for allograft survival. To widen the scope of these quality-of-life-improving procedures, minimization of immunosuppression to limit risks and side effects is needed. PMID:24478387

  10. Female infant with oncocytic cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): A clue to the pathogenesis of oncocytic cardiomyopathy?

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.M.; Krous, H.F.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Swalwell, C.I.; Jones, M.C.

    1994-11-01

    A infant girl had red stellate skin lesions on the cheeks and neck, and mildly short palpebral fissures. Her skin abnormality was typical of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS), a newly recognized syndrome consisting of congenital linear skin defects and ocular abnormalities in females monosomic for Xp22. She died suddenly and unexpectedly at age 4 months; the cause of death was ascribed to oncocytic cardiomyopathy. Oncocytic cardiomyopathy occurs only in young children, who present with refractory arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. The coexistence of two rare conditions, one of which is mapped to the X chromosome, and an excess of affected females with oncocytic cardiomyopathy is also X-linked, with Xp22 being a candidate region. Overlapping manifestations in the two conditions (ocular abnormalities in cases of oncocytic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias in MLS) offer additional support for this hypothesis. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Aplasia cutis congenita--plastic reconstruction of three scalp and skull defects with two opposed scalp rotation flaps and split thickness skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Schnabl, S M; Horch, R E; Ganslandt, O; Schroth, M; Dragu, A; Bach, A D; Kneser, U

    2009-06-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare congenital defect of skin and subcutaneous tissue, more rarely of periosteum, skull and dura. The lesions can involve any location, but most common are scalp defects. We report on the successful treatment of three large defects of the scalp with skull involvement in a newborn girl by early debridement and defect closure with two opposed scalp rotation flaps and an occipital split-thickness skin graft. PMID:20020399

  12. Implant-supported fixed restoration of post-traumatic mandibular defect accompanied with skin grafting: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kwantae; Choi, Woo-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic defects are mostly accompanied by hard and soft tissue loss. This report describes the surgical and prosthetic treatment of a patient with post-traumatic mandibular defect. A split-thickness skin graft was performed prior to implant placement and prefabricated acrylic stent was placed to hold the graft in place. The esthetic and functional demands of the patient were fulfilled by implant-supported screw-retained fixed prosthesis using CAD-CAM technology. PMID:23508120

  13. Improved texture and appearance of human facial skin after daily topical application of barley produced, synthetic, human-like epidermal growth factor (EGF) serum.

    PubMed

    Schouest, Jonathan M; Luu, Teresa K; Moy, Ronald L

    2012-05-01

    A three month, open-label, single center study was conducted to determine whether a uniquely derived serum containing barley bioengineered, human-like epidermal growth factor protein could improve visible signs of photodamage and aging in facial skin. Twenty-nine females, aged 39 to 75 years, with mild to severe, fine and course rhytids, photodamage, and pigmentation were enrolled. Subjects then applied the treatment serum per the prescribed protocol twice-daily for 3 months, in addition to the use of a basic sunscreen and facial cleanser. In-person clinical evaluations and subject self-assessment questionnaires were administered at each follow up visit. In addition, clinical photography was completed at baseline, and each subsequent visit. Clinical evaluations showed statistically significant improvement in the appearance of fine lines and rhytids, skin texture, pore size, and various dyschromatic conditions apparent within the first month of use, and continuing improvement trends for the duration of the study. The treatment serum was well tolerated with minimal treatment-related complications reported throughout. Efficacy of this novel serum and treatment protocol resulted in meaningful improvements in photodamage and visible signs of aging. PMID:22527430

  14. Facial Specialty. Teacher Edition. Cosmetology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is one of a series of curriculum guides designed to direct and support instruction in vocational cosmetology programs in the State of Oklahoma. It contains seven units for the facial specialty: identifying enemies of the skin, using aromatherapy on the skin, giving facials without the aid of machines, giving facials with the aid…

  15. Facial restoration.

    PubMed

    Diner, J

    1975-07-01

    Medical science has demonstrated that fiction can be turned into fact. It is prophesied that man will be able to liver longer due to the development of synthetic organs. Sophisticated facial prostheses will be included in this progressive field. Perhaps the next century will make synthetic substitutes past history with the transplantation of organs as established practice. Or, perhaps some of the latest developments of growing skin or the use of carbonated teflon inserts will replace currently used plastics. In the meantime, we must continue to work within the limitations of our present technology. PMID:1228185

  16. Preparation of a silk fibroin spongy wound dressing and its therapeutic efficiency in skin defects.

    PubMed

    Min, Sijia; Gao, Xin; Han, Chunmao; Chen, Yu; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Liangjun; Zhang, Haiping; Liu, Lin; Yao, Juming

    2012-01-01

    A novel silk fibroin spongy wound dressing (SFSD) incorporated with nano-Ag particles was prepared by coagulating with 1.25-5.0% (v/v) poly(ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether) (PGDE). The mechanical properties, moisture permeability and hygroscopicity of SFSD, and the nano-Ag release behavior from SFSD were evaluated. The results showed that the soft SFSD had satisfying tensile strength and flexibility, as well as excellent moisture permeability and absorption capability of wound exudates. The moisture permeability was 101 g/m(2) per h and the water absorption capacity of SFSD was 595.2% and 251.9% of its own weight in dry and wet states, respectively. The nano-Ag in the SFSD was released continuously at a relatively stable rate in PBS resulting in a remarkable antibacterial property. A rabbit model was used to dynamically observe the healing process of full-thickness skin defects. Full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsal side of rabbits, which were covered with SFSD and porcine acellular dermal matrix (PADM) for comparison. The mean healing time of the wounds covered with SFSD was 17.7 ± 2.4 days, significantly shorter than that with PADM. The histological analysis showed that the epidermal cell layer formed with SFSD was very similar to normal skin, suggesting that SFSD may provide a good component for the development of new wound dressings. PMID:21176393

  17. Aplasia cutis congenita: a conservative approach of a case with large, extensive skin, and underlying skull defect

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Dalila; Rodrigues, Joana; Marques, Jorge Sales; Pinto, Rui; Gomes, Anabela

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Aplasia cutis congenita is a disease in which skin, bone, and dura mater can be absent. In majority of the cases it affects the scalp. We report a baby girl born at term with a large scalp and skull defect measuring 9 × 10 cm. Conservative treatment led to complete epithelization. PMID:26509020

  18. Aplasia cutis congenita: a conservative approach of a case with large, extensive skin, and underlying skull defect.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Dalila; Rodrigues, Joana; Marques, Jorge Sales; Pinto, Rui; Gomes, Anabela

    2015-10-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita is a disease in which skin, bone, and dura mater can be absent. In majority of the cases it affects the scalp. We report a baby girl born at term with a large scalp and skull defect measuring 9 × 10 cm. Conservative treatment led to complete epithelization. PMID:26509020

  19. An Open Label Clinical Trial of a Multi-Ingredient Anti-Aging Moisturizer Designed to Improve the Appearance of Facial Skin.

    PubMed

    Herndon, James H; Jiang, Lily; Kononov, Tatiana; Fox, Theresa

    2015-07-01

    An open label clinical trial was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer designed to improve the appearance of facial skin. Parameters studied included fine lines and wrinkles, clarity/brightness, visual roughness, tactile roughness, evenness of skin tone (redness), evenness of skin tone (hyperpigmentation) and overall appearance. Thirty-seven female subjects, ages 35-60 years completed the study. Effective ingredients incorporated into the facial anti-aging moisturizer include: Astragalus membranaceus root extract, a peptide blend including palmitoyl tripeptide-38, standardized rosemary leaf extract (ursolic acid), tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate (THD ascorbate) and ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10). Subjects were instructed to apply the moisturizer twice daily, once in the morning and once in the evening. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of product usage. Clinical evaluations were conducted at each visit. A self-assessment questionnaire was conducted at week 4, week 8, and week 12. The self-assessment questionnaire included product efficacy inquiries and product aesthetic inquiries. Digital photography was conducted at baseline, week 8, and week 12. After 8 weeks of twice daily use, clinical evaluation results show that the multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer produced a statistically significant improvement in the scores of all clinical grading parameters assessed compared to baseline. A greater statistically significant improvement was seen at 12 weeks. At week 12, there was a statistically significant percentage of favorable results versus unfavorable results in all product efficacy and product aesthetic self-assessment questionnaire results. Digital photography supported the clinical grading and self-assessment questionnaire results. Additionally, the multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer is judged to be mild and well tolerated. Several tolerability parameters were assessed at all time points with no statistically significant increase in any of the scores compared to baseline. PMID:26151786

  20. Red ginseng root extract mixed with Torilus fructus and Corni fructus improves facial wrinkles and increases type I procollagen synthesis in human skin: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soyun; Won, Chong-Hyun; Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Serah; So, Seung-Ho; Lee, Seong-Kye; Koo, Bon-Suk; Kim, Na-Mi; Chung, Jin Ho

    2009-12-01

    Red ginseng contains many bioactive constituents, including various ginsenosides that are believed to have antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and anti-aging activities. Yet, no controlled human study has explored its effects on photoaged skin. This study determined whether long-term intake of a red ginseng extract-containing Torilus fructus and Corni fructus mixture reduces facial wrinkles and increases collagen synthesis in human skin. Healthy female volunteers over 40 years of age were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive either red ginseng extract-containing herbal mixture at 3 g/day or placebo for 24 weeks. Facial wrinkles, elasticity, epidermal water content, erythema, and pigmentation were measured objectively. Facial skin samples were taken before and after treatment, and real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analyses were undertaken for expression of type I procollagen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and fibrillin-1, which are wrinkle-related biochemical markers. A total of 82 subjects completed the study. Facial wrinkles were significantly improved, type I procollagen gene and protein expression was increased, MMP-9 gene induction was prevented, and fibrillin-1 fiber length was elongated only in the treatment group. No changes were seen in the facial elasticity, epidermal water content, facial erythema and pigmentation, and epidermal thickness in either group. Thus a red ginseng extract-containing Torilus fructus and Corni fructus mixture improves facial wrinkles, a clinical sign of photoaging, and this improvement is associated with biochemical and histological evidence of increased collagen synthesis in the dermis. These results substantiate the alleged beneficial effects of red ginseng on photoaging and support its use as an effective "beauty food." PMID:20041778

  1. A stabilized 0.1% retinol facial moisturizer improves the appearance of photodamaged skin in an eight-week, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Tucker-Samaras S; Zedayko T; Cole C; Miller D; Wallo W; Leyden JJ

    2009-10-01

    Retinol is a cosmetic ingredient that is structurally similar to all-trans-retinoic acid, which has been shown to be effective in the treatment of photodamage. Since skin keratinocytes are reported to metabolize retinol to retinoic acid, investigators have hypothesized that retinol may also be helpful in improving skin photodamage. In this eight-week, double-blind, split-face, randomized clinical study, a stabilized 0.1% retinol-containing moisturizer was tested (36 subjects) against the vehicle (28 subjects) in women with moderate facial photodamage. Each product was applied once daily to the designated half side of the face. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and after four and eight weeks of treatment using a 0-9 scale for photoaging parameters. The results showed that, after eight weeks, the retinol moisturizer was significantly more efficacious than the vehicle in improving lines and wrinkles, pigmentation, elasticity, firmness and overall photodamage. Many of these differences were significant at week 4, with a progressive improvement to week 8. This study demonstrates that a formulation containing stabilized retinol is safe and effective to ameliorate the appearance of photoaged skin.

  2. Resistance to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Association with heterogeneous defects in cultured skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, U.A.; Eil, C.; Marx, S.J.

    1983-02-01

    The authors evaluated the interaction of (/sub 3/H)1,25(OH)/sup 2/D3 with skin fibroblasts cultured from normal subjects or from affected members of six kindreds with rickets and resistance to 1-alpha, 25(OH)/sub 2/D (1,25(OH)/sub 2/D). They analyzed two aspects of the radioligand interaction; nuclear uptake with dispersed, intact cells at 37 degrees C and binding at 0 degrees C with soluble extract (cytosol) prepared from cells disrupted in buffer. With normal fibroblasts the affinity and capacity of nuclear uptake of (/sub 3/H)1,25(OH)/sup 2/D3 were 0.5 nM and 10,300 sites per cell, respectively; for binding with cytosol these were 0.13 nM and 8,900 sites per cell, respectively. The following four patterns of interaction with (/sub 3/H)1,25(OH)/sup 2/D3 were observed with cells cultured from affected patients. In all cases where the radioligand bound with high affinity in nucleus or cytosol, the nucleus- or cytosol-associated radioligand exhibited normal sedimentation velocity on sucrose density gradients. When two kindreds exhibited similar patterns (i.e. pattern a or c) with the analyses of cultured fibroblasts, clinical features in affected members suggested that the underlying genetic defects were not identical. In conclusion: (a) Fibroblasts cultured from human skin manifest nuclear uptake and cytosol binding of (/sub 3/H)1,25(OH)/sup 2/D3 that is an expression of the genes determining these processes in target tissues. (b) Based upon data from clinical evaluations and from analyses of cultured fibroblasts, severe resistance to 1,25(OH)/sup 2/D resulted from five or six distinct genetic mutations in six kindreds.

  3. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Intense Pulsed Light Source for Facial Skin Hair Removal for Home Use

    PubMed Central

    Biron, Julie A.; Thompson, Brynne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this Institutional Review Board-approved, open label, prospective study was to study the safety and efficacy of a novel pulsed light home hair removal device in patients with unwanted facial hair. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients were recruited into the clinical trial; two patients were lost to follow-up. Patients received six biweekly treatments with the novel home-pulsed light device in the facial areas below the level of the cheekbone. Follow-up visits were made at one and three months following the last treatment. Results: The results showed statistically significant hair reduction numbers (22.7 at baseline to 4.4 at the end of the one-month follow-up time period and 7.0 at the end of the three-month follow-up time period) and percentages of 83.3 percent at one month post home-pulsed light device treatments and 78.1 percent at three months following the novel home-pulsed light device treatments. No adverse events with the device in the clinical evaluation were observed. Conclusion: This novel home use pulsed light device is a safe and effective at-home intense pulsed light device for facial hair removal. PMID:26203318

  4. Reduction of conspicuous facial pores by topical fullerene: possible role in the suppression of PGE2 production in the skin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Conspicuous facial pores are therapeutic targets for cosmeceuticals. Here we examine the effect of topical fullerene on conspicuous facial pores using a new image analyser called the VISIA® system. Ten healthy Japanese females participated in this study, and they received applications of 1% fullerene lotion to the face twice a day for 8 weeks. Findings Fullerene lotion significantly decreased conspicuous pores by 17.6% (p?facial pores after an 8-week treatment possibly through the suppression of PGE2 production in the epidermis. PMID:24559044

  5. Cosmetic Facial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians have committed themselves to a healthier lifestyle, and many are seeking to look as well as they feel. For patients with realistic expectations, modern techniques of cosmetic facial surgery can enhance appearance and be of psychological benefit. Today most procedures can be done under local anesthesia on an out-patient basis. Facial contour defects can be improved by means of procedures such as rhinoplasty, mentoplasty, otoplasty and malarplasty. Facial rejuvenation surgery to decrease the signs of aging includes the forehead lift, eyebrow and eyelid lift, rhytidectomy, liposuction and chemical peeling. Newer controversial trends in cosmetic facial surgery include collagen implantation and fat transfer for contour defects, and eyelid tattooing. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263984

  6. Epidermal Stem Cells Cultured on Collagen-Modified Chitin Membrane Induce In Situ Tissue Regeneration of Full-Thickness Skin Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing; Li, Xiaojian; Liang, Rong; Guan, Guangxiong; Zhang, Zhi; Cao, Wenjuan; Liu, Zhihe; Mei, Shirley; Liang, Weiguo; Qin, Shennan; Xu, Jiake; Chen, Honghui

    2014-01-01

    A Large scale of full-thickness skin defects is lack of auto-grafts and which requires the engineered skin substitutes for repair and regeneration. One major obstacle in skin tissue engineering is to expand epidermal stem cells (ESCs) and develop functional substitutes. The other one is the scaffold of the ESCs. Here, we applied type I collagen-modified chitin membrane to form collagen-chitin biomimetic membrane (C-CBM), which has been proved to have a great biocompatibility and degraded totally when it was subcutaneously transplanted into rat skin. ESCs were cultured, and the resulting biofilm was used to cover full-thickness skin defects in nude mice. The transplantation of ESCs- collagen- chitn biomimetic membrane (ESCs-C-CBM) has achieved in situ skin regeneration. In nude mice, compared to controls with collagen-chitin biomimetic membrane (C-CBM) only, the ESCs-C-CBM group had significantly more dermatoglyphs on the skin wound 10 w after surgery, and the new skin was relatively thick, red and elastic. In vivo experiments showed obvious hair follicle cell proliferation in the full-thickness skin defect. Stem cell markers examination showed active ESCs in repair and regeneration of skin. The results indicate that the collagen-modified chitin membrane carry with ESCs has successfully regenerated the whole skin with all the skin appendages and function. PMID:24516553

  7. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Ji Min; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No; Shim, Hyung Sup; Kim, Sang Wha

    2015-01-01

    For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosis underwent minor revision. We reviewed the literature on freestyle perforator flaps for facial defect reconstruction and focused on English articles published in the last five years. With the advance of knowledge regarding the vascular anatomy of pedicled perforator flaps in the face, we found that some perforator flaps can improve functional and aesthetic reconstruction for the facial defects. We suggest that freestyle facial perforator flaps can serve as alternative, safe, and versatile treatment modalities for covering small to moderate facial defects. PMID:26236734

  8. Reduction of facial pigmentation of melasma by topical lignin peroxidase: A novel fast-acting skin-lightening agent

    PubMed Central

    ZHONG, SHAO-MIN; SUN, NAN; LIU, HUI-XIAN; NIU, YUE-QING; WU, YAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lignin peroxidase (LIP) as a skin-lightening agent in patients with melasma. A self-controlled clinical study was performed in 31 women who had melasma on both sides of the face. This study involved 8 weeks of a full-face product treatment. The skin color was measured at days 0, 7, 28 and 56 using a chromameter on the forehead and cheeks. Standardized digital photographic images of each side of the face of all subjects were captured by a complexion analysis system. Clinical scores of the pigmentation were determined by two dermatologists. After using the LIP whitening lotion for 7 days, the luminance (L*) values of the melasma and the normal skin were significantly increased from baseline. The L* values continued to increase at days 28 and 56. The melasma area severity index (MASI) score was statistically decreased after 28 days of treatment. No treatment-related adverse events were observed. LIP whitening lotion was able to eliminate the skin pigmentation after 7 days of treatment, and provides a completely innovative approach to rapid skin lightening. The LIP whitening lotion exhibited good compatibility and was well tolerated. PMID:25574195

  9. Pre-slaughter, slaughter and post-slaughter defects of skins and hides at the Sheba Tannery and Leather Industry, Tigray region, northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kahsay, Tesfay; Negash, Guesh; Hagos, Yohannes; Hadush, Birhanu

    2015-01-01

    Skins and hides are perishable resources that can be damaged by parasitic diseases and human error, which result in downgrading or rejection. This study was conducted to identify defect types and to determine their prevalence in pickled sheep and wet blue goat skins and wet blue hides. Each selected skin or hide was examined for defects in natural light and the defects were graded according to established quality criteria in Ethiopian standard manuals. Major defects were captured by digital photography. The major pre-slaughter defects included scratches (64.2%), cockle (ekek) (32.8%), wounds or scars (12.6%), lesions from pox or lumpy skin disease (6.1%), poor substance (5%), branding marks (2.3%) and tick bites (1.5%). The presence of grain scratches in wet blue hides (76.3%) was significantly higher than in pickled sheep (67.2%) and wet blue goat (59.1%) skins. The major slaughter defects included flay cuts or scores, holes, poor pattern and vein marks, with a higher occurrence in wet blue goat skins (28.7%; P < 0.001) than in wet blue hides (22.8%) and pickled sheep skins (11.1%). The most prevalent postslaughter defects were grain cracks (14.9%), hide beetle damage (8%), damage caused by heat or putrefaction (3.7%) and machine-induced defects (0.5%). Grain cracks (27.04%) and hide beetle damage (13.9%) in wet blue goat skins were significantly more common than in wet blue hides and pickled sheep skins. These defects cause depreciation in the value of the hides and skins. Statistically significant (P < 0.001) higher rejection rates were recorded for wet blue hides (82.9%) than for pickled sheep skins (18.3%) and wet blue goat skins (8.5%). Improved animal health service delivery, effective disease control strategies and strong collaboration between stakeholders are suggested to enhance the quality of skins and hides. PMID:26304167

  10. Nestin Positive Bone Marrow Derived Cells Responded to Injury Mobilize into Peripheral Circulation and Participate in Skin Defect Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yajie; He, Tao; An, Yulin; Tang, Zhangui; Deng, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Exogenously infused mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are thought to migrate to injury site through peripheral blood stream and participate in tissue repair. However, whether and how endogenous bone marrow MSCs mobilized to circulating and targeted to tissue injury has raised some controversy, and related studies were restricted by the difficulty of MSCs identifying in vivo. Nestin, a kind of intermediate filament protein initially identified in neuroepithelial stem cells, was recently reported as a credible criteria for MSCs in bone marrow. In this study, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled bone marrow replacement model to trace the nestin positive bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) of skin defected-mice. We found that after skin injured, numbers of nestin+ cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow both increased. A remarkable concentration of nestin+ BMDCs around skin wound was detected, while few of these cells could be observed in uninjured skin or other organs. This recruitment effect could not be promoted by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), suggests a different mobilization mechanism from ones G-CSF takes effect on hematopoietic cells. Our results proposed nestin+ BMDCs as mobilized candidates in skin injury repair, which provide a new insight of endogenous MSCs therapy. PMID:26633897

  11. Nestin Positive Bone Marrow Derived Cells Responded to Injury Mobilize into Peripheral Circulation and Participate in Skin Defect Healing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Pang, Danlin; Hu, Chenghu; Lv, Yajie; He, Tao; An, Yulin; Tang, Zhangui; Deng, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Exogenously infused mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are thought to migrate to injury site through peripheral blood stream and participate in tissue repair. However, whether and how endogenous bone marrow MSCs mobilized to circulating and targeted to tissue injury has raised some controversy, and related studies were restricted by the difficulty of MSCs identifying in vivo. Nestin, a kind of intermediate filament protein initially identified in neuroepithelial stem cells, was recently reported as a credible criteria for MSCs in bone marrow. In this study, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled bone marrow replacement model to trace the nestin positive bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) of skin defected-mice. We found that after skin injured, numbers of nestin+ cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow both increased. A remarkable concentration of nestin+ BMDCs around skin wound was detected, while few of these cells could be observed in uninjured skin or other organs. This recruitment effect could not be promoted by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), suggests a different mobilization mechanism from ones G-CSF takes effect on hematopoietic cells. Our results proposed nestin+ BMDCs as mobilized candidates in skin injury repair, which provide a new insight of endogenous MSCs therapy. PMID:26633897

  12. Self-Improvement of Keratinocyte Differentiation Defects During Skin Maturation in ABCA12-Deficient Harlequin Ichthyosis Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Teruki; Akiyama, Masashi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Junko; Sakai, Kaori; Miyamura, Yuki; Naoe, Ayano; Kitahara, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the keratinocyte lipid transporter ABCA12. The patients often die in the first 1 or 2 weeks of life, although HI survivors’ phenotypes improve within several weeks after birth. In order to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic recovery, we studied grafted skin and keratinocytes from Abca12-disrupted (Abca12−/−) mice showing abnormal lipid transport. Abca12−/− neonatal epidermis showed significantly reduced total ceramide amounts and aberrant ceramide composition. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting of Abca12−/− neonatal epidermis revealed defective profilaggrin/filaggrin conversion and reduced protein expression of the differentiation-specific molecules, loricrin, kallikrein 5, and transglutaminase 1, although their mRNA expression was up-regulated. In contrast, Abca12−/− skin grafts kept in a dry environment exhibited dramatic improvements in all these abnormalities. Increased transepidermal water loss, a parameter representing barrier defect, was remarkably decreased in grafted Abca12−/− skin. Ten-passage sub-cultured Abca12−/− keratinocytes showed restoration of intact ceramide distribution, differentiation-specific protein expression and profilaggrin/filaggrin conversion, which were defective in primary-cultures. Using cDNA microarray analysis, lipid transporters including four ATP-binding cassette transporters were up-regulated after sub-culture of Abca12−/− keratinocytes compared with primary-culture. These results indicate that disrupted keratinocyte differentiation during the fetal development is involved in the pathomechanism of HI and, during maturation, Abca12−/− epidermal keratinocytes regain normal differentiation processes. This restoration may account for the skin phenotype improvement observed in HI survivors. PMID:20489143

  13. 1,213 Cases of Treatment of Facial Acne Using Indocyanine Green and Intense Pulsed Light in Asian Skin.

    PubMed

    Park, Kui Young; Kim, Ji Young; Hyun, Moo Yeol; Oh, Won Jong; Jeong, Se Yeong; Han, Tae Young; Ahn, Ji Young; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for acne, with various combinations of photosensitizers and light sources. Objective. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of indocyanine green (ICG) and intense pulsed light (IPL) in the treatment of acne. Materials and Methods. A total of 1,213 patients with facial acne were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three or five treatments of ICG and IPL at two-week intervals. Clinical response to treatment was assessed by comparing pre- and posttreatment clinical photographs and patient satisfaction scores. Results. Marked to excellent improvement was noted in 483 of 1,213 (39.8%) patients, while minimal to moderate improvement was achieved in the remaining 730 (60.2%) patients. Patient satisfaction scores revealed that 197 (16.3%) of 1,213 patients were highly satisfied, 887 (73.1%) were somewhat satisfied, and 129 (10.6%) were unsatisfied. There were no significant side effects. Conclusion. These results suggest that PDT with ICG and IPL can be effectively and safely used in the treatment of acne. PMID:26558274

  14. 1,213 Cases of Treatment of Facial Acne Using Indocyanine Green and Intense Pulsed Light in Asian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kui Young; Kim, Ji Young; Hyun, Moo Yeol; Oh, Won Jong; Jeong, Se Yeong; Han, Tae Young; Ahn, Ji Young; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for acne, with various combinations of photosensitizers and light sources. Objective. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of indocyanine green (ICG) and intense pulsed light (IPL) in the treatment of acne. Materials and Methods. A total of 1,213 patients with facial acne were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three or five treatments of ICG and IPL at two-week intervals. Clinical response to treatment was assessed by comparing pre- and posttreatment clinical photographs and patient satisfaction scores. Results. Marked to excellent improvement was noted in 483 of 1,213 (39.8%) patients, while minimal to moderate improvement was achieved in the remaining 730 (60.2%) patients. Patient satisfaction scores revealed that 197 (16.3%) of 1,213 patients were highly satisfied, 887 (73.1%) were somewhat satisfied, and 129 (10.6%) were unsatisfied. There were no significant side effects. Conclusion. These results suggest that PDT with ICG and IPL can be effectively and safely used in the treatment of acne. PMID:26558274

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta reverses a posttranscriptional defect in elastin synthesis in a cutis laxa skin fibroblast strain.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, M C; Giro, M; Quaglino, D; Davidson, J M

    1995-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts from two cases of autosomal recessive cutis laxa (CL), having insignificant elastin production and mRNA levels, were challenged with transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta 1). Elastin production was brought from undetectable values to amounts typical of normal human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent fashion. Basic fibroblast growth factor (100 ng/ml) alone or in combination with TGF-beta 1 reduced elastin production and mRNA expression in CL skin fibroblasts more extensively than in normal cells. In situ hybridization showed that these effects were at the transcript level. One of the CL strains was examined in detail. Transcription rates for elastin were similar in normal and CL and unchanged by TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 2 (10 ng/ml), while in CL elastin mRNA half-life was increased > 10-fold by TGF-beta 2 and reduced 6-fold after TGF-beta 2 withdrawal, as compared with a control strain. Cycloheximide partially reversed elastin mRNA instability. These data are consistent with a defect in elastin mRNA stability that requires synthesis of labile factors or intact translational machinery, resulting in an extremely low steady state level of mRNA present in this strain of CL. Furthermore, TGF-beta can relieve elastin mRNA instability in at least one CL strain and elastin production defects in both CL strains. Images PMID:7884000

  16. Surface Facial Electromyography, Skin Conductance, and Self-Reported Emotional Responses to Light- and Season-Relevant Stimuli in Seasonal Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Kathryn Tierney; Rohan, Kelly J.; Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Mahon, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Learned associations between depressive behavior and environmental stimuli signaling low light availability and winter season may play a role in seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The purpose of this study was to determine whether light and season environmental cues elicit emotional responses that are distinct in individuals with SAD. Methods Twenty-four currently depressed SAD participants were compared to 24 demographically-matched controls with no depression history on emotional responses to outdoor scenes captured under two light intensity (i.e., clear, sunny vs. overcast sky) and three season (i.e., summer with green leaves, fall with autumn foliage, and winter with bare trees) conditions. Emotion measures included surface facial electromyography (EMG) activity in the corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major muscle regions, skin conductance, and self-reported mood state on the Profile of Mood States Depression–Dejection Subscale. Results Light intensity was a more salient cue than season in determining emotional reactions among SAD participants. Relative to controls, SAD participants displayed more corrugator activity, more frequent significant skin conductance responses (SCR), greater SCR magnitude, and more self-reported depressed mood in response to overcast stimuli and less corrugator activity, lower SCR magnitude, and less self-reported depressed mood in response to sunny stimuli. Limitations Study limitations include the single, as opposed to repeated, assessment and the lack of a nonseasonal depression group. Conclusions These findings suggest that extreme emotional reactivity to light-relevant stimuli may be a correlate of winter depression; and future work should examine its potential onset or maintenance significance. PMID:21600661

  17. Facial bradykinesia.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Matteo; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Marsili, Luca; Defazio, Giovanni; Thompson, Philip D; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to summarise the main clinical and pathophysiological features of facial bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease (PD) and in atypical parkinsonism. Clinical observation suggests that reduced spontaneous and emotional facial expressions are features of facial bradykinesia in PD and atypical parkinsonism. In atypical parkinsonism, facial bradykinesia is complicated by additional dystonic features. Experimental studies evaluating spontaneous and emotional facial movements demonstrate that PD is characterised by a reduction in spontaneous blinking and emotional facial expression. In PD, neurophysiological studies show that voluntary orofacial movements are smaller in amplitude and slower in velocity. In contrast, movements of the upper face (eg, voluntary blinking) are normal in terms of velocity and amplitude but impaired in terms of switching between the closing and opening phases. In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), voluntary blinking is not only characterised by a severely impaired switching between the closing and opening phases of voluntary blinking, but is also slow in comparison with PD. In conclusion, in PD, facial bradykinesia reflects abnormalities of spontaneous, emotional and voluntary facial movements. In PSP, spontaneous and voluntary facial movements are abnormal but experimental studies on emotional facial movements are lacking. Data on facial bradykinesia in other atypical parkinsonism diseases, including multiple system atrophy and corticobasal degeneration, are limited. In PD, facial bradykinesia is primarily mediated by basal ganglia dysfunction whereas in PSP, facial bradykinesia is a consequence of a widespread degeneration involving the basal ganglia, cortical and brainstem structures. PMID:23236012

  18. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin. PMID:26805416

  19. Fabrication of quercetin and curcumin bionanovesicles for the prevention and rapid regeneration of full-thickness skin defects on mice.

    PubMed

    Castangia, Ines; Nácher, Amparo; Caddeo, Carla; Valenti, Donatella; Fadda, Anna Maria; Díez-Sales, Octavio; Ruiz-Saurí, Amparo; Manconi, Maria

    2014-03-01

    In the present work biocompatible quercetin and curcumin nanovesicles were developed as a novel approach to prevent and restore skin tissue defects on chronic cutaneous pathologies. Stable and suitable quercetin- and curcumin-loaded phospholipid vesicles, namely liposomes and penetration enhancer-containing vesicles (PEVs), were prepared. Vesicles were made from a highly biocompatible mixture of phospholipids and alternatively a natural polyphenol, quercetin or curcumin. Liposomes were obtained by adding water, while PEVs by adding polyethylene glycol 400 and Oramix®CG110 to the water phase. Transmission electron microscopy, cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering showed that vesicles were spherical, oligo- or multilamellar and small in size (112-220 nm). In vitro and in vivo tests underlined a good effectiveness of quercetin and curcumin nanovesicles in counteracting phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced lesions and inflammation. Myeloperoxydase activity, used to gauge inflammation, was markedly inhibited by quercetin liposomes (59%) and curcumin liposomes and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PEVs (? 68%). Histology showed that PEG-PEVs provided an extensive re-epithelization of the TPA-damaged skin, with multiple layers of thick epidermis. In conclusion, nanoentrapped polyphenols prevented the formation of skin lesions abrogating the various biochemical processes that cause epithelial loss and skin damage. PMID:24239901

  20. Hypochlorite solution as a decontaminant in sulfur mustard contaminated skin defects in the euthymic hairless guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, M.B.; Bongiovanni, R.; Scharf, B.A.; Gresham, V.C.; Woodward, C.L.

    1994-12-31

    Hypochlorite solutions are thought to be efficacious when used to topically decontaminate intact skin. However, few studies have examined the efficacy of decontamination of chemically contaminated wounds. Therefore, we compared the decontamination efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (0.5% and 2.5% solutions), calcium hypochlorite (0.5% and 2.5% solutions) and sterile water to untreated controls in wounds exposed to sulfur mustard (HD). Anesthetized euthymic hairless guinea pigs (EHGP) (n=6) were exposed to 20 mg/kg (approximately 0.4 LD%) HD in a full-thickness 8 mm surgical biopsy skin defect (i.e., wound). Each animal was subsequently decontaminated, after a two-minute intra-wound exposure to liquid HD, with nothing or one of the decontamination solutions. Decontamination efficacy was determined by the visual grading of the HD-traumatized wound lesion and by comparison of the expected HD-induced leukocyte suppression. Leukocyte suppression was inconsistent in all animals; therefore, the visual grading was the only viable evaluation method. No significant differences were observed among wounds decontaminated with any of the solutions. However, the skin surrounding non-decontaminated (but exposed) control animals showed the least visual pathology. The lesions induced following decontamination are presumed to be due to the mechanical flushing of HD onto the peri-lesional skin, or by chemical damage induced by the solution, or ND-solution interaction. Further studies are required to best delineate the optimal decontamination process for HD contaminated wounds.

  1. Hypochlorite solution as a decontaminant in sulfur mustard contaminated skin defects in the euthymic hairless guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, M.B.; Bongiovanni, R.; Scharf, B.A.; Gresham, V.C.; Woodard, C.L.

    1993-05-13

    Hypochlorite solutions are thought to be efficacious when used to topically decontaminate intact skin. However, few studies have examined the efficacy of decontamination of chemically contaminated wounds. Therefore, we compared the decontamination efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (0.5% and 2.5% solutions), calcium hypochlorite (0.5% and 2.5% solutions) and sterile water to untreated controls in wounds exposed to sulfur mustard (HD). Anesthetized euthymic hairless guinea pigs (EHGP) (n=6) were exposed to 0.4 LD50 HD in a full-thickness 8 mm surgical biopsy skin defect (i.e., wound). Each animal was subsequently decontaminated, after a two-minute intra-wound exposure to liquid HD, with one of the decontamination solutions. Decontamination efficacy was determined by the visual grading of the HD-traumatized wound lesion and by comparison of the expected HD-induced leukocyte suppression. Leukocyte suppression was inconsistent in all animals; therefore, the visual grading was the only viable evaluation method. No significant differences were observed among wounds decontaminated with any of the solutions. However, the skin surrounding undecontaminated (but exposed) control animals showed the least visual pathology. The lesions induced following decontamination are presumed to be due to the mechanical flushing HD onto the peri-lesional skin, or by chemical damage induced by the solution, or HD-solution interaction. Further studies are required to best delineate the optimal decontamination process for HD contaminated wounds.

  2. Facial paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... otherwise healthy, facial paralysis is often due to Bell palsy . This is a condition in which the ... speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts for more than 6 to 12 ...

  3. A single center, pilot, double-blinded, randomized, comparative, prospective clinical study to evaluate improvements in the structure and function of facial skin with tazarotene 0.1% cream alone and in combination with GliSODin® Skin Nutrients Advanced Anti-Aging Formula

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Lawrence D; Crysler, Corina

    2014-01-01

    Background Superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduces the reactive oxygen species formation associated with oxidative stress. An imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants can lead to accelerated aging. GliSODin® Skin Nutrients Advanced Anti-Aging Formula (GAAF) is an SOD-containing dietary nutricosmetic formulated with other nutraceuticals that promote improvements in the structure and function of the skin, including hydration, elasticity, structural integrity, and photoaging caused by oxidative stress. Tazarotene cream 0.1% (TAZ) is a United States Food and Drug Administration-approved drug indicated for use in the mitigation of facial fine wrinkling, facial mottled hyper- and hypopigmentation, and benign facial lentigines when taken in conjunction with a comprehensive skin care and sun avoidance program. Objective To determine if the antioxidant, anti-aging, hydrating and skin-rejuvenating properties of GAAF complement the retinoic actions of TAZ to improve the structure and function of facial skin. Method A 90-day comparative study of ten subjects with facial photodamage; daily topical application of TAZ was used in combination with three capsules of GAAF (780 mg each) or placebo orally, with food, per the randomization allocation. Results After 90 days of treatment, TAZ alone and in combination with GAAF improved fine wrinkles (↓1.2 versus 2.0), mottled hyperpigmentation (↓2.2 versus 2.8) and overall photodamage (↓1.0 versus 1.8), as well as patient-reported response to treatment (↓2.0 versus 1.6). At week 12, TAZ/GAAF combination treatment (Group A) versus TAZ treatment alone (Group C) was of significant clinical benefit, with respect to fine wrinkling (14.7%/41.7%), overall photodamage (15.6%/53.0%), skin moisture (19.1%/103.2%), skin elasticity (12.8%/87.7%), and response to treatment (8.8%/21.4%). Conclusion The study suggests GAAF in combination with TAZ is safe and provides significant clinical benefit with relative improvement in facial fine wrinkling, overall photodamage, skin moisture and elasticity. PMID:24872715

  4. Facial skin resurfacing with a very short-pulsed CO2 laser: beam characterization and initial histological results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Bell, Thomas; From, Lynn; Schachter, Daniel

    1996-05-01

    The beam characteristics and spot geometry of a short pulsed (15 - 1000 microsecond) carbon- dioxide, multimode laser were measured. At a distance of 1.0 - 3.0 cm from the handpiece the laser produced a 5 mm2 square spot with an even fluence across the entire spot area (Mesa Mode). Human eyelid skin was irradiated both in vivo and ex-vivo immediately after excision with 1, 2, 3, or 4 pulses, a pulse duration of 62.5 microseconds, and at a fluence of 6 J/cm2. H&E stained sections showed an even removal of tissue across the impact site. The depth of thermal damage was measured as 38 micrometer plus or minus 22.7 with a range of 0 - 100 micrometer.

  5. 11?-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase blockade prevents age-induced skin structure and function defects

    PubMed Central

    Tiganescu, Ana; Tahrani, Abd A.; Morgan, Stuart A.; Otranto, Marcela; Desmoulière, Alexis; Abrahams, Lianne; Hassan-Smith, Zaki; Walker, Elizabeth A.; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H.; Cooper, Mark S.; Amrein, Kurt; Lavery, Gareth G.; Stewart, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess adversely affects skin integrity, inducing thinning and impaired wound healing. Aged skin, particularly that which has been photo-exposed, shares a similar phenotype. Previously, we demonstrated age-induced expression of the GC-activating enzyme 11?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11?-HSD1) in cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Here, we determined 11?-HSD1 levels in human skin biopsies from young and older volunteers and examined the aged 11?-HSD1 KO mouse skin phenotype. 11?-HSD1 activity was elevated in aged human and mouse skin and in PE compared with donor-matched photo-protected human biopsies. Age-induced dermal atrophy with deranged collagen structural organization was prevented in 11?-HSD1 KO mice, which also exhibited increased collagen density. We found that treatment of HDFs with physiological concentrations of cortisol inhibited rate-limiting steps in collagen biosynthesis and processing. Furthermore, topical 11?-HSD1 inhibitor treatment accelerated healing of full-thickness mouse dorsal wounds, with improved healing also observed in aged 11?-HSD1 KO mice. These findings suggest that elevated 11?-HSD1 activity in aging skin leads to increased local GC generation, which may account for adverse changes occurring in the elderly, and 11?-HSD1 inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of age-associated impairments in dermal integrity and wound healing. PMID:23722901

  6. Overexpression of Galectin-7 in Mouse Epidermis Leads to Loss of Cell Junctions and Defective Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Tien; Deshayes, Frédérique; Delacour, Delphine; Pichard, Evelyne; Advedissian, Tamara; Sidhu, Sukhvinder S.; Viguier, Mireille; Magnaldo, Thierry; Poirier, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    Background The proteins of the galectin family are implicated in many cellular processes, including cell interactions, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. In human and mouse, galectin-7 is almost exclusively expressed in stratified epithelia, notably in the epidermis. Galectin-7 expression is also altered in several human tumors of epithelial origin. This study aimed at dissecting the consequences of galectin-7 overexpression on epidermis structure and functions in vivo. Methods We established transgenic mice specifically overexpressing galectin-7 in the basal epidermal keratinocytes and analyzed the consequences on untreated skin and after UVB irradiation or mechanical injury. Results The intercellular cohesion of the epidermis is impaired in transgenic animals, with gaps developing between adjacent keratinocytes, associated with loss of adherens junctions. The epidermal architecture is aberrant with perturbations in the multilayered cellular organisation of the tissue, and structural defects in the basement membrane. These transgenic animals displayed a reduced re-epithelialisation potential following superficial wound, due to a defective collective migration of keratinocytes. Finally, a single mild dose of UVB induced an abnormal apoptotic response in the transgenic epidermis. Conclusion These results indicate that an excess of galectin-7 leads to a destabilisation of adherens junctions associated with defects in epidermal repair. As this phenotype shares similarities with that of galectin-7 null mutant mice, we conclude that a critical level of this protein is required for maintaining proper epidermal homeostasis. This study brings new insight into the mode of action of galectins in normal and pathological situations. PMID:25741714

  7. [The application of multichannel electrostimulation and nivalin electrophoresis for the rehabilitative treatment of the patient following plastic surgery in the facial region].

    PubMed

    Lazarenko, N N; Gerasimenko, M Iu

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time the combined treatment of the patients who underwent plastic surgery for the correction of cosmetic defects in the form of grade II and III senile atrophy of the skin in conjunction with complicated neuropathies of the facial nerve. The essence of the proposed combined treatment consists in using lymphatic drainage massage, medicinal electrophoresis of a nivalin solution, multichannel electrostimulation, and microcurrent therapy with bipolar pulsed currents. The method made it possible to significantly improve the properties of the skin in the facial region, neuro-muscular conductivity, general microcirculation and cerebral circulation in the treated patients. PMID:22165146

  8. Autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation for the treatment of postoperative hand infection with a skin defect in diabetes mellitus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YIHONG; LIU, YUCHEN; WANG, PUJIE; TIAN, HAOMING; AI, JIANZHONG; LIU, YANGBO; ZHOU, YI; LIU, ZHONGWEN; GUO, WENJUN; YANG, SHENKE

    2014-01-01

    Among stem cells, autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal for transplantation by virtue of limited rejection reactions and marked proliferative ability. This study presents a novel method by which MSCs were harvested from the bone marrow of a patient who presented with severe post-traumatic infection and a non-healing skin defect in the hand, secondary to uncontrolled diabetes mellitus (DM). An autologous MSC suspension was injected into the persistent skin defect after stabilizing the blood glucose level and appropriate infection control. During the course of a regular 18-month postoperative follow-up, the patient exhibited immediate recovery with no transplant-associated complications, as well as no evidence of tumorigenicity. Thus, transplantation of autologous MSCs may play a role in the clinical application of stem cells, particularly for treatment of skin defects following surgery in cases of DM and for those caused by various other traumas. PMID:24932248

  9. Reconstruction of periauricular and temporal bone defects.

    PubMed

    Iseli, Tim A; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2009-05-01

    Large periauricular and temporal bone defects most commonly follow resection of advanced nonmelanoma skin cancers. Reconstruction aims to cover the cutaneous defect and adjacent vital structures with the ability to heal in an irradiated field and withstand further treatment. Preferred reconstructions are class I, cervicofacial rotation or radial forearm free flap; class II, anterolateral thigh; and class II, rectus abominis free flap. Ancillary procedures, especially for associated facial paralysis, often are required. Although free flap reconstruction provides rapid wound healing, local and regional flaps are alternatives for patients unable to tolerate prolonged anesthesia and for use after recurrence or complications. PMID:19393947

  10. Analysis of the Effects of Residual Strains and Defects on Skin/Stiffener Debonding using Decohesion Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.

    2003-01-01

    Delamination is one of the predominant forms of failure in laminated composites especially when there is no reinforcement in the thickness direction. To develop composite structures that are more damage tolerant, it is necessary to understand how delamination develops and how it can affect the residual performance. A number of factors such as residual thermal strains, matrix curing shrinkage, and manufacturing defects affect how damage will grow in a composite structure. It is important to develop analysis methods that are computationally efficient that can account for all such factors. The objective of the current work is to apply a newly developed decohesion element to investigate the debond strength of skin/stiffener composite specimens. The process of initiation of delaminations and the propagation of delamination fronts is investigated. The numerical predictions are compared with published experimental results.

  11. Facial Transplantation Surgery Introduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotransplantation permits optimal anatomical reconstruction and provides desired functional, esthetic, and psychosocial benefits that are far superior to those achieved with conventional methods. Along with dramatic improvements in their functional statuses, patients regain the ability to make facial expressions such as smiling and to perform various functions such as smelling, eating, drinking, and speaking. The ideas in the 1997 movie "Face/Off" have now been realized in the clinical field. The objective of this article is to introduce this new surgical field, provide a basis for examining the status of the field of face transplantation, and stimulate and enhance facial transplantation studies in Korea. PMID:26028914

  12. Facial transplantation surgery introduction.

    PubMed

    Eun, Seok-Chan

    2015-06-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotransplantation permits optimal anatomical reconstruction and provides desired functional, esthetic, and psychosocial benefits that are far superior to those achieved with conventional methods. Along with dramatic improvements in their functional statuses, patients regain the ability to make facial expressions such as smiling and to perform various functions such as smelling, eating, drinking, and speaking. The ideas in the 1997 movie "Face/Off" have now been realized in the clinical field. The objective of this article is to introduce this new surgical field, provide a basis for examining the status of the field of face transplantation, and stimulate and enhance facial transplantation studies in Korea. PMID:26028914

  13. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  14. Facial animation on an anatomy-based hierarchical face model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Prakash, Edmond C.; Sung, Eric

    2003-04-01

    In this paper we propose a new hierarchical 3D facial model based on anatomical knowledge that provides high fidelity for realistic facial expression animation. Like real human face, the facial model has a hierarchical biomechanical structure, incorporating a physically-based approximation to facial skin tissue, a set of anatomically-motivated facial muscle actuators and underlying skull structure. The deformable skin model has multi-layer structure to approximate different types of soft tissue. It takes into account the nonlinear stress-strain relationship of the skin and the fact that soft tissue is almost incompressible. Different types of muscle models have been developed to simulate distribution of the muscle force on the skin due to muscle contraction. By the presence of the skull model, our facial model takes advantage of both more accurate facial deformation and the consideration of facial anatomy during the interactive definition of facial muscles. Under the muscular force, the deformation of the facial skin is evaluated using numerical integration of the governing dynamic equations. The dynamic facial animation algorithm runs at interactive rate with flexible and realistic facial expressions to be generated.

  15. Localization of facial region in digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Raj Kumar; Chowdhury, Aditya; Roy, Rahul

    2011-06-01

    We have developed and implemented an algorithm for the localization of facial region in a digital image consisting of multiple faces. The algorithm utilizes the basic colour-segmentation methods where the skin and hair regions are identified using the standard colour models. However, the implementation of merely the skin and hair models yields both the facial and non-facial regions. In order to filter out the non-facial region, we have introduced a quantization and a filtering module. The filter module essentially evaluates the proximity of the connected components associated with that of skin and hair regions. We have tested the algorithm on various images under various conditions. We found that the algorithm is capable of localizing the facial region even in a harsh condition.

  16. In vivo observation of age-related structural changes of dermal collagen in human facial skin using collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation microscope equipped with 1250-nm mode-locked Cr:Forsterite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Yonetsu, Makoto; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yuji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Ogura, Yuki; Hirao, Tetsuji; Murota, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-03-01

    In vivo visualization of human skin aging is demonstrated using a Cr:Forsterite (Cr:F) laser-based, collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope. The deep penetration into human skin, as well as the specific sensitivity to collagen molecules, achieved by this microscope enables us to clearly visualize age-related structural changes of collagen fiber in the reticular dermis. Here we investigated intrinsic aging and/or photoaging in the male facial skin. Young subjects show dense distributions of thin collagen fibers, whereas elderly subjects show coarse distributions of thick collagen fibers. Furthermore, a comparison of SHG images between young and elderly subjects with and without a recent life history of excessive sun exposure show that a combination of photoaging with intrinsic aging significantly accelerates skin aging. We also perform image analysis based on two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the SHG images and extracted an aging parameter for human skin. The in vivo collagen-sensitive SHG microscope will be a powerful tool in fields such as cosmeceutical sciences and anti-aging dermatology.

  17. The absence of a microbiota enhances TSLP expression in mice with defective skin barrier but does not affect the severity of their allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yockey, Laura J.; Demehri, Shadmehr; Turkoz, Mustafa; Turkoz, Ahu; Ahern, Philip P.; Jassim, Omar; Manivasagam, Sindhu; Kearney, John; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Kopan, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that our indigenous microbial communities (microbiota) may play a role in modulating allergic and immune disorders of the skin (Gallo and Nakatsuji, 2011; Macia et al., 2012). To examine the link between the microbiota and atopic dermatitis, we examined a mouse model of defective cutaneous barrier function with an atopic dermatitis-like disease due to loss of Notch signaling. Comparisons of conventionally-raised (CONV-R) and germ-free (GF) mice revealed a similar degree of allergic skin inflammation, systemic atopy, and airway hypersensitivity. GF mutant animals expressed significantly higher levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a major proinflammatory cytokine released by skin with defective barrier function, resulting in a more severe B-lymphoproliferative disorder that persisted into adulthood. These findings suggest a role for the microbiota in ameliorating stress signals released by keratinocytes in response to perturbation in cutaneous barrier function. PMID:23698100

  18. Injectable fillers for facial soft tissue enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, A P; Romo, T

    2000-01-01

    Soft tissue augmentation materials have been advocated for correction of post-surgical or post-traumatic facial defects, as well as for age-related folds and wrinkles. While autogenous tissues may be the safest option, they require a second operative site. Animal-derived or synthetic materials have been advocated since the late 19th century, and have waxed and waned in popularity. In recent years, we have gained a better understanding of the physical events that occur when material is placed within or below the skin. With this knowledge, we stand at the threshold of a new era, where soft tissue fillers can be designed and customized to suit the individual patient. This article will review the major materials that have been or are now advocated for use as soft tissue fillers, and will detail their relative strengths and weaknesses in order to give the clinician a better perspective when considering a material for soft tissue augmentation. PMID:11802343

  19. Motion-artifact-robust, polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation microscopy based on rapid polarization switching with electro-optic Pockells cell and its application to in vivo visualization of collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuji; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Ogura, Yuki; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Hirao, Tetsuji; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation (PR-SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating collagen fiber orientation quantitatively with low invasiveness. However, the waiting time for the mechanical polarization rotation makes it too sensitive to motion artifacts and hence has hampered its use in various applications in vivo. In the work described in this article, we constructed a motion-artifact-robust, PR-SHG microscope based on rapid polarization switching at every pixel with an electro-optic Pockells cell (PC) in synchronization with step-wise raster scanning of the focus spot and alternate data acquisition of a vertical-polarization-resolved SHG signal and a horizontal-polarization-resolved one. The constructed PC-based PR-SHG microscope enabled us to visualize orientation mapping of dermal collagen fiber in human facial skin in vivo without the influence of motion artifacts. Furthermore, it implied the location and/or age dependence of the collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin. The robustness to motion artifacts in the collagen orientation measurement will expand the application scope of SHG microscopy in dermatology and collagen-related fields. PMID:24761292

  20. Skin Graft

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Ruka; Kishi, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Skin graft is one of the most indispensable techniques in plastic surgery and dermatology. Skin grafts are used in a variety of clinical situations, such as traumatic wounds, defects after oncologic resection, burn reconstruction, scar contracture release, congenital skin deficiencies, hair restoration, vitiligo, and nipple-areola reconstruction. Skin grafts are generally avoided in the management of more complex wounds. Conditions with deep spaces and exposed bones normally require the use of skin flaps or muscle flaps. In the present review, we describe how to perform skin grafting successfully, and some variation of skin grafting. PMID:22570780

  1. Facial Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... common facial injuries. Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For example, nerve diseases like trigeminal neuralgia or Bell's palsy sometimes cause facial pain, spasms and trouble with ...

  2. Cerebral Angiographic Findings of Cosmetic Facial Filler-related Ophthalmic and Retinal Artery Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Kyu; Jung, Cheolkyu; Woo, Se Joon; Park, Kyu Hyung

    2015-12-01

    Cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion is rare but is a devastating complication, while the exact pathophysiology is still elusive. Cerebral angiography provides more detailed information on blood flow of ophthalmic artery as well as surrounding orbital area which cannot be covered by fundus fluorescein angiography. This study aimed to evaluate cerebral angiographic features of cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion patients. We retrospectively reviewed cerebral angiography of 7 patients (4 hyaluronic acid [HA] and 3 autologous fat-injected cases) showing ophthalmic artery and its branches occlusion after cosmetic facial filler injections, and underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis. On selective ophthalmic artery angiograms, all fat-injected patients showed a large filling defect on the proximal ophthalmic artery, whereas the HA-injected patients showed occlusion of the distal branches of the ophthalmic artery. Three HA-injected patients revealed diminished distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries, which clinically corresponded with skin necrosis. However, all fat-injected patients and one HA-injected patient who were immediately treated with subcutaneous hyaluronidase injection showed preserved distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries and mild skin problems. The size difference between injected materials seems to be associated with different angiographic findings. Autologous fat is more prone to obstruct proximal part of ophthalmic artery, whereas HA obstructs distal branches. In addition, hydrophilic and volume-expansion property of HA might exacerbate blood flow on injected area, which is also related to skin necrosis. Intra-arterial thrombolysis has a limited role in reconstituting blood flow or regaining vision in cosmetic facial filler-associated ophthalmic artery occlusions. PMID:26713062

  3. Cerebral Angiographic Findings of Cosmetic Facial Filler-related Ophthalmic and Retinal Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion is rare but is a devastating complication, while the exact pathophysiology is still elusive. Cerebral angiography provides more detailed information on blood flow of ophthalmic artery as well as surrounding orbital area which cannot be covered by fundus fluorescein angiography. This study aimed to evaluate cerebral angiographic features of cosmetic facial filler-related ophthalmic artery occlusion patients. We retrospectively reviewed cerebral angiography of 7 patients (4 hyaluronic acid [HA] and 3 autologous fat-injected cases) showing ophthalmic artery and its branches occlusion after cosmetic facial filler injections, and underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis. On selective ophthalmic artery angiograms, all fat-injected patients showed a large filling defect on the proximal ophthalmic artery, whereas the HA-injected patients showed occlusion of the distal branches of the ophthalmic artery. Three HA-injected patients revealed diminished distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries, which clinically corresponded with skin necrosis. However, all fat-injected patients and one HA-injected patient who were immediately treated with subcutaneous hyaluronidase injection showed preserved distal runoff of the internal maxillary and facial arteries and mild skin problems. The size difference between injected materials seems to be associated with different angiographic findings. Autologous fat is more prone to obstruct proximal part of ophthalmic artery, whereas HA obstructs distal branches. In addition, hydrophilic and volume-expansion property of HA might exacerbate blood flow on injected area, which is also related to skin necrosis. Intra-arterial thrombolysis has a limited role in reconstituting blood flow or regaining vision in cosmetic facial filler-associated ophthalmic artery occlusions. PMID:26713062

  4. Experimental facial transplantation surgery.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rong-Min; Eun, Seok-Chan; Heo, Chan-Yeong; Chang, Hak

    2010-05-01

    Facial composite tissue allograft transplantation represents a novel frontier in the reconstruction of complex human facial defects. To develop more refined surgical techniques and yield fine results, it is definite to make a suitable animal model. Rabbit is a medium-sized animal and considered to have many advantages than any other animal, but published reports are very few and contain less detailed description. We made an easy and accessible facial transplantation approach and tried to ascertain its virtue of use as an appropriate transplantation model. The facial-scalp flap including ipsilateral ear was harvested and transferred as a single unit with unilateral common carotid artery and external jugular vein. Most allografts survived with perfect viability without vascular problems in the early postoperative period, and rejection response was also identified by clinical and histopathologic analysis. The total mean time of transplantation was 2 hours +/- 10 minutes. We documented that this model is well qualified for use as a standard transplantation training model and future research work in every aspect. PMID:20485023

  5. A novel malformation complex of bilateral and symmetric preaxial radial ray-thumb aplasia and lower limb defects with minimal facial dysmorphic features: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Klaushofer, Klaus; Krebs, Alexander; Grill, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Radial hemimelia is a congenital abnormality characterised by the partial or complete absence of the radius. The longitudinal hemimelia indicates the absence of one or more bones along the preaxial (medial) or postaxial (lateral) side of the limb. Preaxial limb defects occurred more frequently with a combination of microtia, esophageal atresia, anorectal atresia, heart defects, unilateral kidney dysgenesis, and some axial skeletal defects. Postaxial acrofacial dysostoses are characterised by distinctive facies and postaxial limb deficiencies, involving the 5th finger, metacarpal/ulnar/fibular/and metatarsal. Case presentation The patient, an 8-year-old-boy with minimal craniofacial dysmorphic features but with profound upper limb defects of bilateral and symmetrical absence of the radius and the thumbs respectively. In addition, there was a unilateral tibio-fibular hypoplasia (hemimelia) associated with hypoplasia of the terminal phalanges and malsegmentation of the upper thoracic vertebrae, causing effectively the development of thoracic kyphosis. Conclusion In the typical form of the preaxial acrofacial dysostosis, there are aberrations in the development of the first and second branchial arches and limb buds. The craniofacial dysmorphic features are characteristic such as micrognathia, zygomatic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and preaxial limb defects. Nager and de Reynier in 1948, who used the term acrofacial dysostosis (AFD) to distinguish the condition from mandibulofacial dysostosis. Neither the facial features nor the limb defects in our present patient appear to be absolutely typical with the previously reported cases of AFD. Our patient expands the phenotype of syndromic preaxial limb malformation complex. He might represent a new syndromic entity of mild naso-maxillary malformation in connection with axial and extra-axial malformation complex. PMID:18950501

  6. Skin Care.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amelia; Hessler, Jill L

    2015-08-01

    Aging skin is among the most common patient concerns in a facial plastic surgery practice. Ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage expedites the pace of intrinsic aging, resulting in many of the visible signs of aging, such as rough skin texture, pigmentation irregularities, fine and deep wrinkling, and inelasticity. Primary prevention of UV and environmental damage with proper skin care and the use of sunscreen are critical. There is great interest in topically applied products to reverse or delay the visible signs of photoaging. We discuss the most common topically applied agents for photoaging, reviewing their mechanisms and supporting evidence. PMID:26208767

  7. Facial blindsight.

    PubMed

    Solcà, Marco; Guggisberg, Adrian G; Schnider, Armin; Leemann, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people's categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex. PMID:26483655

  8. Facial blindsight

    PubMed Central

    Solcà, Marco; Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Schnider, Armin; Leemann, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Blindsight denotes unconscious residual visual capacities in the context of an inability to consciously recollect or identify visual information. It has been described for color and shape discrimination, movement or facial emotion recognition. The present study investigates a patient suffering from cortical blindness whilst maintaining select residual abilities in face detection. Our patient presented the capacity to distinguish between jumbled/normal faces, known/unknown faces or famous people’s categories although he failed to explicitly recognize or describe them. Conversely, performance was at chance level when asked to categorize non-facial stimuli. Our results provide clinical evidence for the notion that some aspects of facial processing can occur without perceptual awareness, possibly using direct tracts from the thalamus to associative visual cortex, bypassing the primary visual cortex. PMID:26483655

  9. Full-Thickness Skin Grafting with De-Epithelization of the Wound Margin for Finger Defects with Bone or Tendon Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Hee; Kang, Sang Yoon; Yang, Won Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Full-thickness skin grafts (FTSGs) are generally considered unreliable for coverage of full-thickness finger defects with bone or tendon exposure, and there are few clinical reports of its use in this context. However, animal studies have shown that an FTSG can survive over an avascular area ranging up to 12 mm in diameter. In our experience, the width of the exposed bones or tendons in full-thickness finger defects is <7 mm. Therefore, we covered the bone- or tendon-exposed defects of 16 fingers of 10 patients with FTSGs. Methods The surgical objectives were healthy granulation tissue formation in the wound bed, marginal de-epithelization of the normal skin surrounding the defect, preservation of the subdermal plexus of the central graft, and partial excision of the dermis along the graft margin. The donor site was the mastoid for small defects and the groin for large defects. Results Most of the grafts (15 of 16 fingers) survived without significant surgical complications and achieved satisfactory functional and aesthetic results. Minor complications included partial graft loss in one patient, a minimal extension deformity in two patients, a depression deformity in one patient, and mild hyperpigmentation in four patients. Conclusions We observed excellent graft survival with this method with no additional surgical injury of the normal finger, satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcomes, and no need for secondary debulking procedures. Potential disadvantages include an insufficient volume of soft tissue and graft hyperpigmentation. Therefore, FTSGs may be an option for treatment of full-thickness finger defects with bone or tendon exposure. PMID:26015890

  10. Amniotic membrane covering for facial nerve repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Murat; Tuncel, Arzu; Sheidaei, Shahrouz; Şenol, Mehmet Güney; Karabulut, Murat Hakan; Deveci, Ildem; Karaman, Nihan

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic membranes have been widely used in ophthalmology and skin injury repair because of their anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we measured therapeutic efficacy and determined if amniotic membranes could be used for facial nerve repair. The facial nerves of eight rats were dissected and end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Amniotic membranes were covered on the anastomosis sites in four rats. Electromyography results showed that, at the end of the 3rd and 8th weeks after amniotic membrane covering, the latency values of the facial nerves covered by amniotic membranes were significantly shortened and the amplitude values were significantly increased. Compared with simple facial nerve anastomosis, after histopathological examination, facial nerve anastomosed with amniotic membrane showed better continuity, milder inflammatory reactions, and more satisfactory nerve conduction. These findings suggest that amniotic membrane covering has great potential in facial nerve repair. PMID:25206390

  11. Effect of topical application of capsaicin and its related compounds on dermal insulin-like growth factor-I levels in mice and on facial skin elasticity in humans.

    PubMed

    Harada, Naoaki; Okajima, Kenji

    2007-04-01

    Capsaicin increases calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory neurons by stimulating vanilloid receptor-1 (VR-1). Since CGRP increases production of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in fetal osteoblasts in vitro, it is possible that sensory neuron activation by capsaicin increases production of IGF-I. In the present study, we attempted to determine whether topical application of capsaicin and related compounds increases dermal IGF-I level in mice and whether it increases facial skin elasticity in humans. Topical application of 0.01% capsaicin significantly increased dermal IGF-I levels from 30 to 180min (p<0.01), but not at 360min, after application in mice. Topical application of 0.01% capsaicinoids (dihydrocapsaicin and nordihydrocapsaicin), 0.01% capsinoids (capsiate, dihydrocapsiate and nordihydrocapsiate), 0.01% anandamide (an endogenous agonist of VR-1), and 0.01% nonylic acid vanillylamide (a synthetic capsaicin) significantly increased dermal IGF-I levels at 30min after topical application in mice (p<0.01). Topical application of 0.01% capsaicin to faces of 17 healthy female volunteers for seven days significantly increased cheek skin elasticity (p<0.01). These observations suggest that topical application of capsaicin and related compounds might be useful in the treatment of detrimental morphological changes of the skin in patients with growth hormone deficiency and those in the elderly by increasing dermal IGF-I levels. PMID:17307377

  12. Growth Retardation, Impaired Triacylglycerol Catabolism, Hepatic Steatosis, and Lethal Skin Barrier Defect in Mice Lacking Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58)*

    PubMed Central

    Radner, Franz P. W.; Streith, Ingo E.; Schoiswohl, Gabriele; Schweiger, Martina; Kumari, Manju; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Rechberger, Gerald; Koefeler, Harald C.; Eder, Sandra; Schauer, Silvia; Theussl, H. Christian; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Hoefler, Gerald; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2010-01-01

    Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58), also designated as α/β-hydrolase domain containing-5 (ABHD-5), is a lipid droplet-associated protein that activates adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and acylates lysophosphatidic acid. Activation of ATGL initiates the hydrolytic catabolism of cellular triacylglycerol (TG) stores to glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids. Mutations in both ATGL and CGI-58 cause “neutral lipid storage disease” characterized by massive accumulation of TG in various tissues. The analysis of CGI-58-deficient (Cgi-58−/−) mice, presented in this study, reveals a dual function of CGI-58 in lipid metabolism. First, systemic TG accumulation and severe hepatic steatosis in newborn Cgi-58−/− mice establish a limiting role for CGI-58 in ATGL-mediated TG hydrolysis and supply of nonesterified fatty acids as energy substrate. Second, a severe skin permeability barrier defect uncovers an essential ATGL-independent role of CGI-58 in skin lipid metabolism. The neonatal lethal skin barrier defect is linked to an impaired hydrolysis of epidermal TG. As a consequence, sequestration of fatty acids in TG prevents the synthesis of acylceramides, which are essential lipid precursors for the formation of a functional skin permeability barrier. This mechanism may also underlie the pathogenesis of ichthyosis in neutral lipid storage disease patients lacking functional CGI-58. PMID:20023287

  13. Facial trauma

    MedlinePLUS

    Facial injuries can affect upper jaw, lower jaw, cheek, nose, or forehead. They may be caused by blunt force or be the result of a wound. Common causes of injury to the face include: Car and motorcycle crashes Wounds Sports injuries Violence

  14. Facial transplantation: A concise update

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Pulido, Fernando; Gomez-Cia, Tomas; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gacto-Sanchez, Purificacion; Hernandez-Guisado, Jose-Maria; Lagares-Borrego, Araceli; Narros-Gimenez, Rocio; Gonzalez-Padilla, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Update on clinical results obtained by the first worldwide facial transplantation teams as well as review of the literature concerning the main surgical, immunological, ethical, and follow-up aspects described on facial transplanted patients. Study design: MEDLINE search of articles published on “face transplantation” until March 2012. Results: Eighteen clinical cases were studied. The mean patient age was 37.5 years, with a higher prevalence of men. Main surgical indication was gunshot injuries (6 patients). All patients had previously undergone multiple conventional surgical reconstructive procedures which had failed. Altogether 8 transplant teams belonging to 4 countries participated. Thirteen partial face transplantations and 5 full face transplantations have been performed. Allografts are varied according to face anatomical components and the amount of skin, muscle, bone, and other tissues included, though all were grafted successfully and remained viable without significant postoperative surgical complications. The patient with the longest follow-up was 5 years. Two patients died 2 and 27 months after transplantation. Conclusions: Clinical experience has demonstrated the feasibility of facial transplantation as a valuable reconstructive option, but it still remains considered as an experimental procedure with unresolved issues to settle down. Results show that from a clinical, technical, and immunological standpoint, facial transplantation has achieved functional, aesthetic, and social rehabilitation in severely facial disfigured patients. Key words:Face transplantation, composite tissue transplantation, face allograft, facial reconstruction, outcomes and complications of face transplantation. PMID:23229268

  15. Facial transplantation and immunosuppressed patients: a new frontier in reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Pomahac, Bohdan; Aflaki, Pejman; Chandraker, Anil; Pribaz, Julian J

    2008-06-27

    Composite tissue transplantation in reconstructing complex facial defects has developed tremendous interest over the recent years, since the first report of partial face transplantation performed in France in 2005. However, the controversy over the ethical, immunological, and psychological issues remains. Recently, we obtained IRB approval to perform partial face transplantation at Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston. Here we present the rationale and IRB application process of our unique approach to this highly controversial procedure, which focuses on partial face transplantation on patients currently on immunosuppressants due to previous transplanted organ. 'Patient selection criteria', selection process, technical and immunological protocols are discussed. We currently share the concern that life-long immunosuppression associated with facial transplantation may not outweigh its benefits as compared to the alternative reconstructive methods. We asked ourselves the question of which patient population would risk less and overall benefit more from undergoing face transplantation, and identified those currently on immunosuppressive therapy the most suitable candidates. Organ transplant recipients are at increased risk of malignancy, particularly skin cancer commonly located in the facial region, necessitating surgical resection and facial reconstruction. They also have to take immunosuppressants to prevent rejection of their primary transplanted organ, which will minimize the need for additional immunosuppression associated with facial allograft. Being a previous organ recipient also diminishes the difficulty of complying with the strict postoperative immunosuppressive regimen, commonly encountered by organ transplant recipients. This approach could be very beneficial for previously immunosuppressed patients and perhaps take its place in our reconstructive ladder options. PMID:18580458

  16. Effects of a Facial Cream Containing the Minor Alkaloid Anatabine on Improving the Appearance of the Skin in Mild to Moderate Rosacea: An Open-Label Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Ryan K.; Cohen, Amy E.; Weinkle, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Current medical and scientific research indicates that rosacea, a chronic and often debilitating skin condition that primarily affects the central face, may be caused by an overactive or excessive inflammatory immune response. Regardless of etiology, the accompanying redness and inflammation is unsightly and difficult for the patient. Anatabine is an alkaloid from the plant family Solanaceae that has been shown in several preclinical studies to modulate proinflammatory signaling pathways. Objective A cream containing anatabine was developed and evaluated in an open-label case series study for safety and effects on the appearance of the skin in 10 patients with mild to moderate rosacea. Methods Patients applied the cream to the face twice daily for a period of 30 days. Patients and the study physician completed safety and efficacy assessments at study end. Results Results showed that 50% of the patients self-reported improvement in the appearance of their skin, and the physician noted improvement in 70% of the patients. Photographs taken before and after 30 days of cream use provide visual evidence of the improvement in several patients. There were no complications or adverse events reported by any of the patients in the study, indicating that the anatabine cream was safe and very well tolerated. Conclusion The results of this open-label case series show that a facial cream containing anatabine can improve the appearance of the skin in patients with mild to moderate rosacea and suggest that a double-blind, vehicle-controlled trial in a larger number of subjects is warranted. PMID:24348385

  17. Advanced sclerosis of the chest wall skin secondary to chronic graft-versus-host disease: a case with severe restrictive lung defect.

    PubMed

    Ödek, Ça?lar; Kendirli, Tanil; ?leri, Talia; Yaman, Ayhan; Fatih Çakmakli, Hasan; Ince, Elif; ?nce, Erdal; Ertem, Mehmet

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD) is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT). Herein, we describe a patient with severe restrictive lung defect secondary to cGvHD. A 21-year-old male patient was admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with pneumonia and respiratory distress. He had a history of aHSCT for chronic myelogeneous leukemia at the age of 17 years. Six months after undergoing aHSCT, he had developed cGvHD involving skin, mouth, eye, lung, liver, and gastrointestinal tract. At the time of PICU admission he had respiratory distress and required ventilation support. Thorax high-resolution computed tomography was consistent with bronchiolitis obliterans. Although bronchiolitis obliterans is an obstructive lung defect, a restrictive pattern became prominent in the clinical course because of the sclerotic chest wall skin. The activity of cGvHD kept increasing despite the therapy and we lost the patient because of severe respiratory distress and massive hemoptysis secondary to bronchiectasis. In conclusion, pulmonary cGvHD can present with restrictive changes related with the advanced sclerosis of the chest wall skin. Performing a fasciotomy or a scar revision for the rigid chest wall in selected patients may improve the patients ventilation. PMID:24577553

  18. Global Gene Expression Analysis in PKCα-/- Mouse Skin Reveals Structural Changes in the Dermis and Defective Wound Granulation Tissue.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Nichola H; Balachandra, Jeya P; Hardman, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    The skin's mechanical integrity is maintained by an organized and robust dermal extracellular matrix (ECM). Resistance to mechanical disruption hinges primarily on homeostasis of the dermal collagen fibril architecture, which is regulated, at least in part, by members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family. Here we present data linking protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) to the regulated expression of multiple ECM components including SLRPs. Global microarray profiling reveals deficiencies in ECM gene expression in PKCα-/- skin correlating with abnormal collagen fibril morphology, disorganized dermal architecture, and reduced skin strength. Detailed analysis of the skin and wounds from wild-type and PKCα-/- mice reveals a failure to upregulate collagen and other ECM components in response to injury, resulting in delayed granulation tissue deposition in PKCα-/- wounds. Thus, our data reveal a previously unappreciated role for PKCα in the regulation of ECM structure and deposition during skin wound healing. PMID:26354149

  19. Reevaluation of the non-lesional dry skin in atopic dermatitis by acute barrier disruption: an abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis with defective processing to generate ceramide.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Ayumi; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Atsuko; Imokawa, Genji

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is characterized by disruption of the cutaneous barrier due to reduced ceramide levels even in non-lesional dry skin. Following further acute barrier disruption by repeated tape strippings, we re-characterized the non-lesional dry skin of subjects with atopic dermatitis, which shows significantly reduced levels of barrier function and ceramide but not of beta-glucocerebrosidase activity. For the first time, we report an abnormal trans-epidermal water loss homeostasis in which delayed recovery kinetics of trans-epidermal water loss occurred on the first day during the 4 days after acute barrier disruption compared with healthy control skin. Interestingly, whereas the higher ceramide level in the stratum corneum of healthy control skin was further significantly up-regulated at 4 days post-tape stripping, the lower ceramide level in the stratum corneum of subjects with atopic dermatitis was not significantly changed. In a parallel study, whereas beta-glucocerebrosidase activity at 4 days post-tape stripping was significantly up-regulated in healthy control skin compared with before tape stripping, the level of that activity remained substantially unchanged in atopic dermatitis. These findings indicate that subjects with atopic dermatitis have a defect in sphingolipid-metabolic processing that generates ceramide in the interface between the stratum corneum and the epidermis. The results also support the notion that the continued disruption of barrier function in atopic dermatitis non-lesional skin is associated with the impaired homeostasis of a ceramide-generating process, which underscores an atopy-specific inflammation-triggered ceramide deficiency that is distinct from other types of dermatitis. PMID:24271939

  20. Facial drooping (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Facial drooping can be caused by a disorder such as Bell's palsy. This disorder is a mononeuropathy (involvement of a single nerve) that damages the seventh cranial (facial) nerve. The facial nerve controls movement of the muscles of ...

  1. Wound dressings composed of copper-doped borate bioactive glass microfibers stimulate angiogenesis and heal full-thickness skin defects in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shichang; Li, Le; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yadong; Cheng, Xiangguo; Zhou, Nai; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Liu, Zhongtang; Huang, Wenhai; Zhang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for better wound dressings that possess the requisite angiogenic capacity for rapid in situ healing of full-thickness skin wounds. Borate bioactive glass microfibers are showing a remarkable ability to heal soft tissue wounds but little is known about the process and mechanisms of healing. In the present study, wound dressings composed of borate bioactive glass microfibers (diameter = 0.4-1.2 μm; composition 6Na2O, 8K2O, 8MgO, 22CaO, 54B2O3, 2P2O5; mol%) doped with 0-3.0 wt.% CuO were created and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. When immersed in simulated body fluid, the fibers degraded and converted to hydroxyapatite within ∼7 days, releasing ions such as Ca, B and Cu into the medium. In vitro cell culture showed that the ionic dissolution product of the fibers was not toxic to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and fibroblasts, promoted HUVEC migration, tubule formation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and stimulated the expression of angiogenic-related genes of the fibroblasts. When used to treat full-thickness skin defects in rodents, the Cu-doped fibers (3.0 wt.% CuO) showed a significantly better capacity to stimulate angiogenesis than the undoped fibers and the untreated defects (control) at 7 and 14 days post-surgery. The defects treated with the Cu-doped and undoped fibers showed improved collagen deposition, maturity and orientation when compared to the untreated defects, the improvement shown by the Cu-doped fibers was not markedly better than the undoped fibers at 14 days post-surgery. These results indicate that the Cu-doped borate glass microfibers have a promising capacity to stimulate angiogenesis and heal full-thickness skin defects. They also provide valuable data for understanding the role of the microfibers in healing soft tissue wounds. PMID:25890736

  2. A grayscale skin and facial detection mechanism for use in conjunction with security system technology via graphical block methodologies on field programmable gate arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tickle, Andrew J.; Smith, Jeremy S.; Wu, Q. Henry

    2008-04-01

    Presented in this paper is the design of a skin filter which unlike many systems already developed for use, this system will not use RGB or HSI colour but an 8-bit greyscale instead. This is done in order to make the system more convenient to employ on an FPGA, to increase the speed to better enable real-time imaging and to make it easier to combine with the previously designed binary based algorithms. This paper will discuss the many approaches and methods that could be considered such as Bayes format and thresholds, pixel extraction, mathematical morphological strings, edge detection or a combination of the previous and a discussion about which provided the best performance. The research for this skin filter was carried out in two stages, firstly on people who had an ethnic origin of White - British, Asian or Asian British, Chinese and Mixed White and Asian. The second phase which won't be included here in great detail will cover the same principles for the other ethnic backgrounds of Black or Black British - Caribbean or Africa, Other Black background, Asian or Asian British - Indian, Pakistani or Bangladeshi. This is due to the fact that we have to modify the parameters that govern the detection process to account for greyscale changes in the skin tone, texture and intensity; however the same principles would still be applied for general detection and integration into the previous algorithm. The latter is discussed and what benefits it will give.

  3. A facial mask comprising Dead Sea mud.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Mohameed, Hazim A

    2006-01-01

    Many investigators have proved that Dead Sea salt and mud are useful in treating skin disorders and skin diseases. Therefore, the black mud has been extensively used as a base for the preparation of soaps, creams, and unguents for skin care. This study concerns a facial mask made mainly of Dead Sea mud. The effects of temperature and shearing conditions on the rheological behavior of the facial mask were investigated. The mud facial mask exhibited a shear thinning behavior with a yield stress. It was found that the apparent viscosity of the mask has a strong dependence on the shear rate as well as on the temperature. The facial mask exhibited a maximum yield stress and very shear thinning behavior at 40 degrees C, which is attributed to the gelatinization of the polysaccharide used to stabilize the mud particles. On the other hand, the mud mask exhibited a time-independent behavior at low temperatures and shear rates and changed to a thixotropic behavior upon increasing both the temperature and the shear rate. The shear thinning and thixotropic behaviors have a significant importance in the ability of the facial mask to spread on the skin: the Dead Sea mud mask can break down for easy spreading, and the applied film can gain viscosity instantaneously to resist running. Moreover, particle sedimentation, which in this case would negatively affect consumer acceptance of the product, occurs slowly due to high viscosity at rest conditions. PMID:17256074

  4. Microphthalmia with Linear Skin Defects (MLS) associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in a patient with Familial 12.9Mb Terminal Xp deletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is a rare X-linked dominant male-lethal developmental disorder characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia and linear skin defects of the face and neck. Additional features affecting the eyes, heart, brain or genitourinary system can occur, corroborating the intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability. The majority of patients display monosomy of the Xp22.2 region, where the holocytochrome c-type synthase (HCCS) gene is located. Case presentation We describe a 15-year-old-female affected by MLS syndrome and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ASD has not previously been reported as a component of MLS. Our patient shows a large deletion of 12.9 Mb, involving Xp22.32-p22.2, which encompasses both the HCCS gene and autism X-linked genes. Conclusion Thus, patients with a large deletion at Xp22 might display MLS with ASD, due to the deletion of contiguous genes, although the highly variable phenotype of these patients could be influenced by several genetic mechanisms, including different tissue-specific X-inactivation and somatic mosaicism. PMID:25182979

  5. Clinical case-study describing the use of skin-perichondrium-cartilage graft from the auricular concha to cover large defects of the nose

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The composite graft from the conchal cartilage is a graft that is often used, especially in surgery on the nose, due to its capacity to resolve problems of cover and tissue deficit, arising from the removal of neoplasms or as the result of trauma, burns or following over-aggressive rhinoplasty. We have started to use skin-perichondrium-cartilage graft from the ear to cover large areas of the nose with very satisfying results as well as we describe in the reported clinical case. Methods The operation consisted of reconstruction of the cartilaginous nasal septum, which had previously been removed, using two vestibular labial mucosa flaps to reconstruct the mucosa, and cartilage from the ear conch for the cartilaginous septum. After this, the skin edges of the fistula were turned to recreate the inner lining of the nose and form a vascular base of wide area to accept the composite graft. The case concerns a female 74-year old patient who had undergone several oncological surgery for a relapsing basal cell carcinoma on the dorsum of the nose. The operation consisted of reconstruction of the cartilaginous nasal septum using two vestibular labial mucosa flaps to reconstruct the mucosa, and cartilage from the ear conch for the cartilaginous septum. Results The perichondrial cutaneous graft has shown in this surgical case very favorable peculiarities that make it usable even in facial plastic surgery. Conclusions We believe that the positive experience that we achieved in the use of composite grafts for the reconstruction of large areas of the nose could be interesting for others surgeons. PMID:22429738

  6. Experience With Esthetic Reconstruction of Complex Facial Soft Tissue Trauma: Application of the Pulsed Dye Laser

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kazemi, Hossein Mohammad; Nejadsarvari, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Facial soft tissue injury can be one of the most challenging cases presenting to the plastic surgeon. The life quality and self-esteem of the patients with facial injury may be compromised temporarily or permanently. Immediate reconstruction of most defects leads to better restoration of form and function as well as early rehabilitation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to present our experience in management of facial soft tissue injuries from different causes. Patients and Methods: We prospectively studied patients treated by plastic surgeons from 2010 to 2012 suffering from different types of blunt or sharp (penetrating) facial soft tissue injuries to the different areas of the face. All soft tissue injuries were treated primarily. Photography from all patients before, during, and after surgical reconstruction was performed and the results were collected. We used early pulsed dye laser (PDL) post-operatively. Results: In our study, 63 patients including 18 (28.5%) women and 45 (71.5%) men aged 8-70 years (mean 47 years) underwent facial reconstruction due to soft tissue trauma in different parts of the face. Sharp wounds were seen in 15 (23%) patients and blunt trauma lacerations were seen in 52 (77%) patients. Overall, 65% of facial injuries were repaired primary and the remainder were reconstructed with local flaps or skin graft from adjacent tissues. Postoperative PDL therapy done two weeks following surgery for all scars yielded good results in our cases. Conclusions: Analysis of the injury including location, size, and depth of penetration as well as presence of associated injuries can aid in the formulation of a proper surgical plan. We recommend PDL in the early post operation period (two weeks) after suture removal for better aesthetic results. PMID:25337516

  7. A comparative study of the effects of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin and cyanoacrylate on wound healing of skin defects.

    PubMed

    Kidokoro, Ryo; Nakajima, Kei; Kobayashi, Fumitaka; Takeda, Yukihiro; Matsuzaka, Kenichi; Katakura, Akira; Inoue, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the healing process of wounded skin following the application of cyanoacrylate or a 4-(2-methacryloxyethyl) trimellitic anhydride/methyl methacrylate-tributylborane resin (4-META resin). Those materials were applied to skin wound areas in rats, and the regenerating tissues were biopsied and examined at days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14. Paraffin-embedded specimens were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin or with Azan-Mallory stain. Sections were also immunohistochemically stained with Pan-cytokeratin and CD68 antibodies. In cyanoacrylate-treated wounds, CD68-positive cells were observed in the connective tissue and their number increased up to day 5. The wound surface was completely covered by epithelial tissue at day 14. In 4-META resin-treated wounds, CD68-positive cells appeared in the soft-tissue hybrid layer (STHL) and epithelial tissue had migrated under the STHL by day 5. The wound surface was completely covered by epithelial tissue at day 7. CD68-positive cells were distributed over the entire area of the cyanoacrylate-treated wounds, but accumulated under the STHL in the 4-META resin-treated wounds. In conclusion, the results suggest that covering skin defects with a 4-META resin is an effective strategy to promote wound healing compared to cyanoacrylate. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 197-203, 2016. PMID:25715705

  8. A Note on the Association of Extensive Hæmangiomatous Nævus of the Skin with Cerebral (Meningeal) Hæmangioma, especially Cases of Facial Vascular Nævus with Contralateral Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Weber, F. Parkes

    1929-01-01

    The main type of the cases under consideration is that in which extensive capillary nævus of the skin, especially of trigeminal distribution, is associated with contralateral spastic hemiplegia, developing in early life, probably sometimes connected with intracranial hæmorrhage from the abnormal blood-vessels of a diffuse leptomeningeal angioma on the same side as the main vascular nævus of the face. Various points related to such cases are referred to. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 2Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:19986835

  9. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  10. Young Children's Ability to Match Facial Features Typical of Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacoste, Ronald J.

    This study examined (1) the ability of 3- and 4-year-old children to racially classify Negro and Caucasian facial features in the absence of skin color as a racial cue; and (2) the relative value attached to the facial features of Negro and Caucasian races. Subjects were 21 middle income, Caucasian children from a privately owned nursery school in…

  11. Visual facial grasp.

    PubMed

    Riestra, Alonso R; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2004-10-01

    Some patients with degenerative neurological diseases have a release of the vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR), as detected by passive head movement during visual fixation on a moving target ("doll's eyes"maneuver). However, a positive doll's eyes sign might be induced by other defects and the purpose of this article is to describe a new ocular sign of cortical dysfunction, the visual facial grasp. We observed three patients, one with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), another with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a third with cortico-basal degeneration (CBD) all of whom appeared to demonstrate a release of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) with passive head movements. Whereas the patient with PSP, who was unable to inhibit the VOR regardless of the visual target used probably had a true release of the VOR, the patients with AD and CBD were able to inhibit this reflex when the visual target was the examiner's moving face. These two patients also exhibited spontaneous preference for visual fixation on the examiner's face and improvement in smooth pursuit when the examiner's face was the visual target. This clinical observation suggests that the deficits in these two patients with AD and CBD were related to the emergence of a primitive stimulus-bound behavior, the visual facial grasp. PMID:15788274

  12. Polyurethane membrane/knitted mesh-reinforced collagen-chitosan bilayer dermal substitute for the repair of full-thickness skin defects via a two-step procedure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Wu, Pan; Hu, Xiuyuan; You, Chuangang; Guo, Rui; Shi, Haifei; Guo, Songxue; Zhou, Hanlei; Chaoheng, Yu; Zhang, Yuanhai; Han, Chunmao

    2016-03-01

    The advent of dermal substitutes provides a revolutionary strategy for the repair and reconstruction of deep skin defects. Dermal substitutes form a regenerative template that provides the porous structure and mechanical support necessary to guide cell migration, deposition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and angiogenesis. Commercially available dermal substitutes, particularly collagen-based dermal scaffolds, are widely used in clinical practice. However, the poor mechanical properties of collagen-based dermal scaffolds compromise their biological effects, as well as the repair outcomes. Here, we describe a bilayer dermal substitute prepared by integrating a hybrid dermal scaffold with a polyurethane (PU) membrane to obtain a PU membrane/knitted mesh-reinforced collagen-chitosan bilayer dermal substitute (PU-PLGAm/CCS). The morphology of PU-PLGAm/CCS was investigated and, to characterize the effects of PU-PLGAm/CCS on tissue regeneration, dermal substitutes were transplanted to repair full-thickness skin wounds in Sprague-Dawley rats using a two-step surgical procedure. These results were then compared with those obtained using the PELNAC™ Artificial Dermis. In the weeks after the first operation, wound changes were analysed based on macroscopic observations, and tissue specimens were harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence real-time quantitative PCR, and Western blotting analysis. Following the second operation (i.e., transplantation of split-thickness skin grafts), the repair outcomes were investigated based on the mechanical strength and ECM expression. PU-PLGAm/CCS significantly inhibited wound contracture, promoted angiogenesis, and facilitated the ordered arrangement of neotissue, such that the repair outcomes were improved in the PU-PLGAm/CCS group compared with the PELNAC™ group. In conclusion, the favourable microstructure and structural stability of dermal substitutes facilitated tissue regeneration. PU-PLGAm/CCS achieved a balance between porous structure, biocompatibility and mechanical properties for dermal regeneration by integrating the advantages of biological and synthetic biomaterials, which demonstrates its potential for skin tissue engineering. PMID:26703227

  13. Comparison of Shoulder Management Strategies after Stage I of Fingertip Skin Defect Repair with a Random-Pattern Abdominal Skin Flap

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; He, Wei; Zhang, Guoping; Liu, Shaojun; Yu, Kunlun; Bai, Jiangbo; Zhang, Hongjuan; Tian, Dehu

    2015-01-01

    Background In the absence of scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of shoulder management strategies after stage I of fingertip reconstruction, the purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of various rehabilitation procedures. Material/Methods Patients who underwent fingertip reconstruction with a random-pattern abdominal skin flap between March 2007 and February 2013 were enrolled in the study (n=95). Thirty performed only active exercise (group A), 29 performed only passive exercise (group B), and 32 received a combination of active exercise and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) (group C). The mean age at the time of treatment was 30.2 years in group A, 29.6 years in group B, and 31.8 years in group C. Results At the final follow-up, there were significant differences between group A and B in terms of Constant score (P=.001), VAS (P=.047), forward flexion of the shoulder (P=0.049), and muscle strength with forward flexion and external rotation (P=0.049 and P=0.042, respectively). A higher Constant score was observed in group C compared to group A, and although there were no differences in the other evaluations between groups A and C, a trend toward better function of the shoulder was demonstrated in group C. Conclusions The most important findings in our study are that a combination of active exercise and PEME produces superior patient-reported outcomes regarding relief of shoulder signs and symptoms. Given the limitations of this study, better-designed studies with large sample sizes and long-term follow-up are required. PMID:26449682

  14. Facial contrast is a cue for health perception.

    PubMed

    Russell, Richard; Porcheron, Aurélie; Sweda, Jennifer; Mauger, Emmanuelle; Morizot, Frederique

    2015-09-01

    Facial contrast-the luminance and color contrast between internal facial features and the surrounding skin-is a cue for several aspects of face perception, including face detection, sex classification, age estimation, and judgments of attractiveness. It is also increased by makeup. Here we report evidence that facial contrast is also a cue for the perception of health from the face. Facial contrast was measured from a large sample of Caucasian female faces, and was found to predict ratings of perceived health. Most aspects of facial contrast were positively related to perceived health, meaning that faces with higher facial contrast appeared healthier. For a subsequent experiment we increased and decreased the facial contrast of a subset of these images and presented them to participants in a two-alternative forced-choice task. Participants selected faces with increased facial contrast as appearing healthier than faces with decreased facial contrast. Together these results show that facial contrast is a cue for perceiving how healthy people look. This provides additional weight to the notion that facial contrast is an important cue for face perception. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326901

  15. Differentiation and characterization of human facial subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Pappas, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with the loss of facial subcutaneous fat and with increased abdominal subcutaneous fat. Site specific differences in adipocyte phenotype and/or gene expression may play a role in these age-related changes. In this study, we isolated and characterized human facial preadipocytes and investigated distinct metabolic properties such as a differentiation pattern in relation to abdominal preadipocytes. Subcutaneous preadipocytes were isolated from human facial and abdominal skin and cultured in the presence of differentiation factors including rosiglitazone, a known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-?) agonist, isobutyl-methyl xanthine (IBMX) and insulin. Differentiation was characterized microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR. Unexpected superior adipogenic capacity of facial preadipocytes was observed; more facial preadipocytes differentiated in response to rosiglitazone than abdominal preadipocytes and facial preadipocytes retained their ability to differentiate through passage 11 compared with passage 5 for abdominal preadipocytes. Experiments confirmed a reduced lipolysis response in facial versus abdominal adipocytes after exposure to isoproterenol, which was consistent with the reduced ?2-adrenergic receptor expression by 60% in the facial cells. The expression of other lipid metabolic gene markers was similar in both facial and abdominal adipocytes with the exception of ?3-adrenergic receptor which was only found in abdominal adipose tissue. Gene profiling, by microarray analysis, identified that several HOX genes are robustly reduced in facial adipocytes compared to abdominal adipocytes, suggesting different characteristics between the 2 fat depots. These differences may have implications for development of treatments for facial fat loss during aging. PMID:26167398

  16. Anetoderma in a patient with terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects.

    PubMed

    Connor, Cody J; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Ciliberto, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects (TODPD) is a rare, X-linked syndrome classically characterized by distal limb anomalies, pigmented skin defects of the face, and recurrent digital fibromas. X-inactivation plays a major role in determining the range of phenotypic expression. Thus, patients can demonstrate a wide spectrum of disease severity, making accurate diagnosis more challenging. Recent studies have identified a FLNA c.5217G>A mutation as the cause of TODPD, allowing for diagnostic genetic testing. We present a case of molecularly confirmed TODPD in a girl with the 47,XXX chromosomal complement and deformities of the hands and feet, craniofacial abnormalities, and discolored, linear facial lesions. Skin biopsy of the patient's facial lesion revealed absent papillary dermal elastic fibers, consistent with anetoderma, which contrasts with the dermal hypoplasia described in the only other such facial biopsy reported in the literature. The finding of absent elastic fibers in the skin lesions suggests that mutated filamin A, in part, exerts its effects through dysregulated elastin biology, which may explain the nature of many connective tissue pleotropic effects in FLNA-related disorders. PMID:26059211

  17. Cloning and characterization of a putative human holocytochrome c-type synthetase gene (HCCS) isolated from the critical region for microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, L.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.

    1996-06-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) is an X-linked male-lethal disorder associated with X chromosomal rearrangements resulting in monosomy from Xpter to Xp22. Features include microphthalmia, sclerocornea, linear skin defects, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Using a cross-species conservation strategy, an expressed sequence from the 450- to the 550-kb MLS critical region on Xp22 was identified by screening a human embryo cDNA library. Northern analysis revealed a transcript of {approx}2.6 kb in all tissues examined, with weaker expression of {approx}1.2- and {approx}5.2-kb transcripts. The strongest expression was observed in heart and skeletal muscle. Sequence analysis of a 3-kb cDNA contig revealed an 807-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 268-amino-acid-protein. Comparison of the sequence with sequences in the databases revealed homology with holocytochrome c-type synthetases, which catalyze the covalent addition of a heme group onto c-type cytochromes in the mitochondria. The c-type cytochromes are required for proper functioning of the electron transport pathway. The human gene (HGMW-approved symbol HCCS) and the corresponding murine gene characterized in this paper are the first mammalian holocytochrome c-type synthetases to be described in the literature. Because of the lack of a neuromuscular phenotype in MLS, it is uncertain whether the deletion of a mitochondrial holocytochrome synthetase would contribute to the phenotype seen in MLS. The expression pattern of this gene and knowledge about the function of holocytochrome synthetases, however, suggest that it is a good candidate for X-linked encephalomyopathies typically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  18. The Zitelli design for bilobed flap applied on skin defects after digital mucous cyst excision. A review of 9 cases.

    PubMed

    Jager, Thomas; Vogels, Jérôme; Dautel, Gilles

    2012-09-01

    Mucous cysts do not always require treatment. Nevertheless, patients often ask for excision because of pain or esthetics. Flap coverage is usually a concomitant procedure, which improves the quality of the skin overlying the distal interphalangeal joint. We propose the Zimany bilobed flap in this indication, and particularly its newer geometric design developed by Zitelli. We report the use of this flap in 9 cysts. Wound healing was fast with a good outcome. This flap design is an easy, safe procedure, and the Zitelli geometric design is a clear improvement for the reproducibility and learning curve. PMID:22913990

  19. Autosomal-recessive SASH1 variants associated with a new genodermatosis with pigmentation defects, palmoplantar keratoderma and skin carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Courcet, Jean-Benoît; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Duplomb, Laurence; Tajir, Mariam; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Thevenon, Julien; Gigot, Nadège; Marle, Nathalie; Aral, Bernard; Duffourd, Yannis; Sarasin, Alain; Naim, Valeria; Courcet-Degrolard, Emilie; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Martin, Laurent; Abrid, Jamal Eddin; Thauvin, Christel; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Vabres, Pierre; Faivre, Laurence

    2015-07-01

    SASH1 (SAM and SH3 domain-containing protein 1) is a tumor suppressor gene involved in the tumorigenesis of a spectrum of solid cancers. Heterozygous SASH1 variants are known to cause autosomal-dominant dyschromatosis. Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were performed in a consanguineous Moroccan family with two affected siblings presenting an unclassified phenotype associating an abnormal pigmentation pattern (hypo- and hyperpigmented macules of the trunk and face and areas of reticular hypo- and hyperpigmentation of the extremities), alopecia, palmoplantar keratoderma, ungueal dystrophy and recurrent spinocellular carcinoma. We identified a homozygous variant in SASH1 (c.1849G>A; p.Glu617Lys) in both affected individuals. Wound-healing assay showed that the patient's fibroblasts were better able than control fibroblasts to migrate. Following the identification of SASH1 heterozygous variants in dyschromatosis, we used reverse phenotyping to show that autosomal-recessive variants of this gene could be responsible for an overlapping but more complex phenotype that affected skin appendages. SASH1 should be added to the list of genes responsible for autosomal-dominant and -recessive genodermatosis, with no phenotype in heterozygous patients in the recessive form, and to the list of genes responsible for a predisposition to skin cancer. PMID:25315659

  20. The beneficial effects of honeybee-venom serum on facial wrinkles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Mi; Hong, In Phyo; Woo, Soon Ok; Chun, Sung Nam; Park, Kwan Kyu; Nicholls, Young Mee; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Facial wrinkles are an undesirable outcome caused by extrinsic photodamage and intrinsic aging processes. Currently, no effective strategies are known to prevent facial wrinkles. We assessed the beneficial effects of bee-venom serum on the clinical signs of aging skin. Our results show that bee-venom serum treatment clinically improved facial wrinkles by decreasing total wrinkle area, total wrinkle count, and average wrinkle depth. Therefore, bee-venom serum may be effective for the improvement of skin wrinkles. PMID:26491274

  1. Missing facial parts computed by a morphable model and transferred directly to a polyamide laser-sintered prosthesis: an innovation study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, A A; Paysan, P; Schumacher, R; Zeilhofer, H-F; Berg-Boerner, B-I; Maurer, J; Vetter, T; Schkommodau, E; Juergens, P; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K

    2011-12-01

    Mirroring of missing facial parts and rapid prototyping of templates have become widely used in the manufacture of prostheses. However, mirroring is not applicable for central facial defects, and the manufacture of a template still requires labour-intensive transformation into the final facial prosthesis. We have explored innovative techniques to meet these remaining challenges. We used a morphable model of a face for the reconstruction of missing facial parts that did not have mirror images, and skin-coloured polyamide laser sintering for direct manufacture of the prosthesis. From the knowledge gleaned from a data set of 200 coloured, three-dimensional scans, we generated a missing nose that was statistically compatible with the remaining parts of the patient's face. The planned prosthesis was manufactured directly from biocompatible skin-coloured polyamide powder by selective laser sintering, and the prosthesis planning system produced a normal-looking reconstruction. The polyamide will need adjustable colouring, and we must be able to combine it with a self-curing resin to fulfil the requirements of realistic permanent use. PMID:21458119

  2. Application of skeletal buttress analogy in composite facial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bluebond-Langner, Rachel; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2009-03-01

    Reconstructive algorithms for composite craniofacial defects have focused on soft tissue flaps with or without bone grafts. However, volumetric loss over time limits long-term preservation of facial contour. Application of craniofacial skeletal buttress principles to high-energy trauma or oncologic defects with composite vascularized bone flaps restores the soft tissue as well as the buttresses and ultimately preserves facial contour. We conducted a retrospective review of 34 patients with craniofacial defects treated by a single surgeon with composite bone flaps at R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center and Johns Hopkins Hospital from 2001 to 2007. Data collected included age, sex, mechanism of injury, type of defect, type of reconstructive procedures, and outcome. Thirty-four patients with composite tissue loss, primarily males (n?=?24) with an average age of 37.4 years, underwent reconstruction with vascularized bone flaps (28 fibula flaps and 6 iliac crest flaps). There were 4 cranial defects, 8 periorbital defects, 18 maxillary defects, and 4 maxillary and periorbital defects. Flap survival rate was 94.1% with an average follow-up time of 20.5 months. Restoration of facial height, width, and projection is achieved through replacement of skeletal buttresses and is essential for facial harmony. Since 2001, our unit has undergone a paradigm shift with regard to treatment of composite oncologic and traumatic defects, advocating vascularized bone flaps to achieve predictable long-term outcomes. PMID:22110793

  3. Mutations in NDUFB11, encoding a complex I component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cause microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Rahden, Vanessa A; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject's mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations. PMID:25772934

  4. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the body heals by forming scar tissue. The appearance of the scar can range from nearly invisible ... more to fully heal and achieve maximum improved appearance. Facial plastic surgery makes it possible to correct ...

  5. Efficacy of a poly glycolic acid (PGA)/collagen composite nanofibre scaffold on cell migration and neovascularisation in vivo skin defect model.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Naomi; Ichioka, Shigeru; Terada, Dohiko; Tsuchiya, Sunao; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi

    2013-12-01

    Application of tissue engineering currently provides promising therapeutic options in the fields of plastic surgery and wound management. The ability of scaffold material for cell proliferation and differentiation is the key for tissue engineering. This study has developed a novel nanofibre composed of poly glycolic acid (PGA) and collagen, both of which have their own respective beneficial properties. This study aimed to estimate the in vivo efficiency of the PGA/collagen nanofibre on granulation histology and its ability to induce neovascularisation. The electrospinning technique produced the PGA/collagen nanofiber with a diameter of 500 nm and weight mixing ratio of 40%. The skin defects on the mouse model were covered with PGA/collagen or a commercially available collagen matrix (n = 9). The PGA/collagen group histologically showed significantly higher cell density and a fine microstructure with greater number of migrating cells as compared to collagen matrix. Then, both materials were applied to the microcirculatory angiogenesis model. The PGA/collagen group (n = 8) revealed significantly higher functional capillary density on days 5 and 7 after application. The findings substantiated the fact that our material had a superior ability regarding cellular migration and induction of neovascularisation compared with the elementary collagen matrix product. This better result might be attributed to the nano-size effect of fine structure and the incorporation of PGA, which has been associated with enhanced angiogenesis. PMID:23596989

  6. Aspects of Facial Contrast Decrease with Age and Are Cues for Age Perception

    PubMed Central

    Porcheron, Aurélie; Mauger, Emmanuelle; Russell, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Age is a primary social dimension. We behave differently toward people as a function of how old we perceive them to be. Age perception relies on cues that are correlated with age, such as wrinkles. Here we report that aspects of facial contrast–the contrast between facial features and the surrounding skin–decreased with age in a large sample of adult Caucasian females. These same aspects of facial contrast were also significantly correlated with the perceived age of the faces. Individual faces were perceived as younger when these aspects of facial contrast were artificially increased, but older when these aspects of facial contrast were artificially decreased. These findings show that facial contrast plays a role in age perception, and that faces with greater facial contrast look younger. Because facial contrast is increased by typical cosmetics use, we infer that cosmetics function in part by making the face appear younger. PMID:23483959

  7. Facial Burns - Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zatriqi, Violeta; Arifi, Hysni; Zatriqi, Skender; Duci, Shkelzen; Rrecaj, Sh.; Martinaj, M.

    2013-01-01

    Facial burns are generally considered severe. This is due to the possibility of respiratory complications. First responders check the nostrils for singed hairs. In severe cases there may be soot around the nose and mouth and coughing may produce phlegm that includes ash. Facial and inhalational burns compromise airways. They pose difficulties in pre-hospital resuscitation and are challenge to clinicians managing surviving burn victims in the intensive care setting. Management problems – resuscitation, airway maintenance and clinical treatment of facial injuries are compounded if the victim is child. Inhalational burns reduce survivability, certainly in adult victim. In our retrospective study we found that facial burns dominated in male gender, liquids and scalds are the most common causes of facial burns in children whereas the flame and electricity were the most common causes of facial burns in adults. We came to the conclusion in our study that surgical treatment minimizes complications and duration of recovery. PMID:23687458

  8. Facial expression recognition with facial parts based sparse representation classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Ruicong; Ruan, Qiuqi

    2009-10-01

    Facial expressions play important role in human communication. The understanding of facial expression is a basic requirement in the development of next generation human computer interaction systems. Researches show that the intrinsic facial features always hide in low dimensional facial subspaces. This paper presents facial parts based facial expression recognition system with sparse representation classifier. Sparse representation classifier exploits sparse representation to select face features and classify facial expressions. The sparse solution is obtained by solving l1 -norm minimization problem with constraint of linear combination equation. Experimental results show that sparse representation is efficient for facial expression recognition and sparse representation classifier obtain much higher recognition accuracies than other compared methods.

  9. Geometry-driven photorealistic facial expression synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingshan; Liu, Zicheng; Guo, Baining; Terzopoulos, Demetri; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2006-01-01

    Expression mapping (also called performance driven animation) has been a popular method for generating facial animations. A shortcoming of this method is that it does not generate expression details such as the wrinkles due to skin deformations. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem. We have developed a geometry-driven facial expression synthesis system. Given feature point positions (the geometry) of a facial expression, our system automatically synthesizes a corresponding expression image that includes photorealistic and natural looking expression details. Due to the difficulty of point tracking, the number of feature points required by the synthesis system is, in general, more than what is directly available from a performance sequence. We have developed a technique to infer the missing feature point motions from the tracked subset by using an example-based approach. Another application of our system is expression editing where the user drags feature points while the system interactively generates facial expressions with skin deformation details. PMID:16382607

  10. Evaluation of craniofacial surgery in the treatment of facial deformities.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J E; Swanson, L T; Strand, R D; Hricko, G M

    1975-01-01

    Surgical access to the cranial, orbital, and facial areas, as developed by Tessier, has produced not only definitive repair of previously uncorrectable congenital deformities such as orbital hypertelorism and facial stenosis (e.g., Crouzon's, Apert's syndromes) but also has improved markedly the treatment of traumatic and neoplastic defects. The surgical approach allows complete dissection of facial soft tisses including the orbits from the underlying bones followed by corrective osteotomies and fixation. Mobilization of the frontal lobes through a frontal bone flap exposure may be required. The ramifications of this latest intrusion by surgeons into a previously inviolate anatomic area have involved neurosurgeons, ophthalmologists, anesthesiologists, and dental and psycho-social disciplines. The disciplines of genetics and embryology are being influenced by this new field of surgery, much as the study of immunology was influenced by transplantation surgery two decades ago. This report analyzes a 10 year experience with over 100 patients with emphasis on patient selection by disease, age, intellectual status, morbidity, complications, and the psycho-social reactions of patient and family. Procedures initially planned to correct dental and aesthetic defects are proving beneficial for other functions including hearing, taste and smell, articulation and tongue movement, respiratory function, vision, and possibly bone growth. The development of self image, a normal process always in operation, is also strikingly altered. These operations may last as long as 14 to 16 hours. We have had no deaths or postoperative blindness. One postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak was successfully repaired. Three partial losses of bone grafts and four instances of late cellulitis have occurred. Prevention of infection seems related to avoidance of dead spaces and primary closure of all mucosal, dural, conjunctival and skin surfaces. Images Figs. 1 a and b. Fig. 1c., Fig. 1d. Fig. 1f. Fig. 1g. Fig. 1h. Fig. 1i. Fig. 1m. Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b., Fig. 2c., Fig. 2d. Fig. 2e. Figs. 3 a and b. Fig. 3d., Fig. 3e. Fig. 3f. Fig. 4a., Fig. 4b. Fig. 5a. Fig. 5b., Fig. 5c. Figs. 5d and e. Fig. 5f. Figs. 5g. and 5h. Fig. 6a., Fig. 6b. Fig. 6c. Fig. 7a. Fig. 7b. Figs. 7e and f. Fig. 8a. Fig. 8b. Fig. 8c. Fig. 8d., Fig. 8e. Fig. 9a. Fig. 9b. Figs. 9c. and d. Fig. 9e. Fig. 9f. Figs. 9g. and h. Figs. 11a, b, and c. Figs. 11d, e, f. PMID:169753

  11. The surgeon's role and responsibility in facial tissue allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Justin M; Keith, Jonathan D; Fisher, Christine; Lee, W P Andrew

    2007-06-01

    Facial composite tissue allograft (CTA) transplantation represents a novel frontier in the reconstruction of the human form. The face plays a central role in human interactions, with significant social ramifications resulting from facial disfigurement. The surgeon performing facial tissue transplantation bears additional responsibilities unique to plastic and reconstructive procedures. Reconstruction by facial tissue transplantation may immensely improve quality of life, provided the process of patient selection is conspicuous and appropriate and allograft rejection is prevented. However, facial CTA transplantation represents an elective procedure to reconstruct a non-life-threatening defect. Given the potential for organ failure, opportunistic infection, and malignancy resulting from long-term immunosuppression, the surgeon must carefully weigh the balance of risk to benefit for the individual patient. Pioneering surgeons developing this procedure must thoroughly evaluate its impact as it relates to clinical and social issues. PMID:17522479

  12. Focal facial dermal dysplasia, type IV, is caused by mutations in CYP26C1

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, Anne M.; Mehrotra, Pavni; Nazarenko, Irina; Tang, Paul Ling-Fung; Lao, Richard; Cameron, Don; Li, Ben; Chu, Catherine; Chou, Chris; Marqueling, Ann L.; Yahyavi, Mani; Cordoro, Kelly; Frieden, Ilona; Glaser, Tom; Prescott, Trine; Morren, Marie-Anne; Devriendt, Koen; Kwok, Pui-yan; Petkovich, Martin; Desnick, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Focal facial dermal dysplasia (FFDD) Type IV is a rare syndrome characterized by facial lesions resembling aplasia cutis in a preauricular distribution along the line of fusion of the maxillary and mandibular prominences. To identify the causative gene(s), exome sequencing was performed in a family with two affected siblings. Assuming autosomal recessive inheritance, two novel sequence variants were identified in both siblings in CYP26C1—a duplication of seven base pairs, which was maternally inherited, c.844_851dupCCATGCA, predicting p.Glu284fsX128 and a missense mutation, c.1433G>A, predicting p.Arg478His, that was paternally inherited. The duplication predicted a frameshift mutation that led to a premature stop codon and premature chain termination, whereas the missense mutation was not functional based on its in vitro expression in mammalian cells. The FFDD skin lesions arise along the sites of fusion of the maxillary and mandibular prominences early in facial development, and Cyp26c1 was expressed exactly along the fusion line for these facial prominences in the first branchial arch in mice. Sequencing of four additional, unrelated Type IV FFDD patients and eight Type II or III TWIST2-negative FFDD patients revealed that three of the Type IV patients were homozygous for the duplication, whereas none of the Type II or III patients had CYP26C1 mutations. The seven base pairs duplication was present in 0.3% of healthy controls and 0.3% of patients with other birth defects. These findings suggest that the phenotypic manifestations of FFDD Type IV can be non-penetrant or underascertained. Thus, FFDD Type IV results from the loss of function mutations in CYP26C1. PMID:23161670

  13. Holistic facial expression classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, John; McDonald, J.

    2005-06-01

    This paper details a procedure for classifying facial expressions. This is a growing and relatively new type of problem within computer vision. One of the fundamental problems when classifying facial expressions in previous approaches is the lack of a consistent method of measuring expression. This paper solves this problem by the computation of the Facial Expression Shape Model (FESM). This statistical model of facial expression is based on an anatomical analysis of facial expression called the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). We use the term Action Unit (AU) to describe a movement of one or more muscles of the face and all expressions can be described using the AU's described by FACS. The shape model is calculated by marking the face with 122 landmark points. We use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to analyse how the landmark points move with respect to each other and to lower the dimensionality of the problem. Using the FESM in conjunction with Support Vector Machines (SVM) we classify facial expressions. SVMs are a powerful machine learning technique based on optimisation theory. This project is largely concerned with statistical models, machine learning techniques and psychological tools used in the classification of facial expression. This holistic approach to expression classification provides a means for a level of interaction with a computer that is a significant step forward in human-computer interaction.

  14. Static Facial Slings: Approaches to Rehabilitation of the Paralyzed Face.

    PubMed

    Langille, Morgan; Singh, Prabhjyot

    2016-02-01

    Facial paralysis results from a variety of different causes. Patients with facial paralysis have cosmetic and functional defects that significantly affect quality of life. Surgical intervention has the potential to help improve cosmetic and functional outcomes. The 2 main categories of surgical rehabilitation are static and dynamic surgical procedures. Static rehabilitation of the midface is typically performed using autologous tissue grafts, allografts, synthetic grafts, permanent suspension sutures, and a novel technique using percutaneous suture-based slings. PMID:26611699

  15. Facial composite tissue allograft.

    PubMed

    Pomahac, Bohdan; Pribaz, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Despite complex facial anatomy, transplantation of soft tissues of the entire face, including the maxilla and mandibular segment anterior to the masseter muscle insertion, can be safely performed based on facial vessels alone. Inclusion of hair-bearing scalp requires dissection of the superficial temporal vessels. Unlike other groups, we advocate for supercharging dissected superficial temporal vessels in the preauricular area avoiding difficult dissections in the depth of external auditory canal that presents significant challenges associated with lengthy dissection and bleeding. Neurorrhaphy at the trunk of the facial nerve leads to less targeted postoperative reinnervation, with potential for synkinesis, and whenever possible, individual peripheral facial nerve branches should be reconnected. Adequate planning for integration of the facial allograft requires both complete sensory and motor nerve connection and should be part of each operation. Bilateral external carotid anastomosis may cause a variety of functional problems including oropharyngeal dysfunction and ocular ischemia and hence is not recommended. PMID:22337422

  16. Perception of facial attractiveness from static and dynamic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ko?ci?ski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Although people we meet in real life are usually seen in motion, research on facial attractiveness has predominantly been conducted on static facial images. This raises a question about ecological validity of results obtained in such studies. Recently, several studies endeavoured to determine the concordance between attractiveness of faces seen on photos and video clips, but their results are markedly divergent, frequently indicating no concordance. In the present study, the association between attractiveness of facial images and clips was tested on a larger sample than has previously been reported (106 females, 102 males), and features under the face owner's control (scalp and facial hair, makeup, mouth expression) were controlled for. Two types of facial images were used: photographs and frames extracted from films. Correlation coefficients between attractiveness of static and dynamic faces were high (about 0.7), did not depend on facial sex or image type (photograph/frame), and did not diminish when the covariates were controlled for. Furthermore, the importance of facial averageness, femininity/ masculinity, symmetry, fattiness, skin health, and mouth expression for attractiveness proved similar for static and dynamic stimuli. This leads to the optimistic conclusion that results of studies relying on attractiveness assessments of static facial images are ecologically valid. PMID:23700955

  17. Differentiation and characterization of human facial subcutaneous adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Pappas, Apostolos

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with the loss of facial subcutaneous fat and with increased abdominal subcutaneous fat. Site specific differences in adipocyte phenotype and/or gene expression may play a role in these age-related changes. In this study, we isolated and characterized human facial preadipocytes and investigated distinct metabolic properties such as a differentiation pattern in relation to abdominal preadipocytes. Subcutaneous preadipocytes were isolated from human facial and abdominal skin and cultured in the presence of differentiation factors including rosiglitazone, a known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist, isobutyl-methyl xanthine (IBMX) and insulin. Differentiation was characterized microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR. Unexpected superior adipogenic capacity of facial preadipocytes was observed; more facial preadipocytes differentiated in response to rosiglitazone than abdominal preadipocytes and facial preadipocytes retained their ability to differentiate through passage 11 compared with passage 5 for abdominal preadipocytes. Experiments confirmed a reduced lipolysis response in facial versus abdominal adipocytes after exposure to isoproterenol, which was consistent with the reduced β2-adrenergic receptor expression by 60% in the facial cells. The expression of other lipid metabolic gene markers was similar in both facial and abdominal adipocytes with the exception of β3-adrenergic receptor which was only found in abdominal adipose tissue. Gene profiling, by microarray analysis, identified that several HOX genes are robustly reduced in facial adipocytes compared to abdominal adipocytes, suggesting different characteristics between the 2 fat depots. These differences may have implications for development of treatments for facial fat loss during aging. PMID:26167398

  18. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  19. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  20. Reconstructing the extended nasal tip defect.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Reconstruction of large facial defects requires surgical skill, an understanding of engineering principles, an artistic eye, and patience to design the most elegant solution for each patient. Extended nasal tip defects, which may involve additional facial subunits, require even more thoughtful analysis and planning. Reconstructive surgeons need to be aware of the pros and cons of various options for flaps, the use of a delay stage, and sequencing and scheduling of staged operations to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:24037937

  1. An Inferiorly Based Rotation Flap for Defects Involving the Lower Eyelid and Medial Cheek.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Jesse M; Sclafani, Anthony P; Carucci, John A

    2015-08-01

    We report a series of 20 patients who underwent inferiorly based rotation flaps for reconstruction of defects of the medial and infraorbital cheek and lower eyelid following Mohs micrographic surgery for nonmelanoma skin cancer. Defects ranged from 1.2 to 3.2 cm in longest diameter and patients ranged from 27 to 91 years of age. All 20 patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome with up to 2-year follow-up and no subsequent surgical or laser revision. There were no instances of partial or complete flap necrosis, hematoma, or ectropion. Our series includes defects that originated on the cheek as far laterally as directly below the lateral canthus, and terminated as far medially as the nasal sidewall. An inferiorly based rotation flap is a viable alternative to a laterally based rotation flap and should be in the armamentarium of reconstructive dermatologic and facial plastic surgeons. PMID:26372717

  2. Facial attractiveness: evolutionary based research

    PubMed Central

    Little, Anthony C.; Jones, Benedict C.; DeBruine, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Face preferences affect a diverse range of critical social outcomes, from mate choices and decisions about platonic relationships to hiring decisions and decisions about social exchange. Firstly, we review the facial characteristics that influence attractiveness judgements of faces (e.g. symmetry, sexually dimorphic shape cues, averageness, skin colour/texture and cues to personality) and then review several important sources of individual differences in face preferences (e.g. hormone levels and fertility, own attractiveness and personality, visual experience, familiarity and imprinting, social learning). The research relating to these issues highlights flexible, sophisticated systems that support and promote adaptive responses to faces that appear to function to maximize the benefits of both our mate choices and more general decisions about other types of social partners. PMID:21536551

  3. PCA facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hori, Inas H.; El-Momen, Zahraa K.; Ganoun, Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. The comparative study of Facial Expression Recognition (FER) techniques namely Principal Component's analysis (PCA) and PCA with Gabor filters (GF) is done. The objective of this research is to show that PCA with Gabor filters is superior to the first technique in terms of recognition rate. To test and evaluates their performance, experiments are performed using real database by both techniques. The universally accepted five principal emotions to be recognized are: Happy, Sad, Disgust and Angry along with Neutral. The recognition rates are obtained on all the facial expressions.

  4. Use of Amniotic Microparticles Coated With Fibroblasts Overexpressing SDF-1? to Create an Environment Conducive to Neovascularization for Repair of Full-Thickness Skin Defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Qing; Ji, Shi-Zhao; Fang, He; Zheng, Yong-Jun; Luo, Peng-Fei; Wu, Hai-Bin; Wu, Min-Juan; Wang, Zhi-Hong; Xiao, Shi-Chu; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    As angiogenesis and vasculogenesis involve the complex network structures of various types of cells, extracellular matrix components, and cytokines, it is still difficult to exactly mimic the microenvironment of vascularization in vivo. In our study, we constructed a complex containing highly proliferative fibroblasts that can secrete extracellular matrix components and growth factors to chemotaxize endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in an attempt to create an ideal microenvironment for quick vascularization. Amniotic membrane microparticles (mAM) rich in type IV collagen (COL IV) and laminin (LN) were prepared, and human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were infected with lentivirus (LV) of overexpression of SDF-1? to construct SDF-1?(ov)HDF. Using the rotary cell culture system (RCCS), mAM was loaded with HDF or SDF-1?(ov)HDF to construct HDF-mAM and SDF-1?(ov)HDF-mAM complexes. The complexes were able to secrete various types of active peptides (IL-6, IL-8, TGF-?, and bFGF) during in vitro culture. In addition, SDF-1?(ov)HDF-mAM complex highly expressed SDF-1?. Transwell assay showed SDF-1?(ov)HDF-mAM complex had an apparent chemotactic effect on EPCs. Transplantation of complexes onto full-thickness skin defects of C57BL mice further demonstrated that SDF-1? expression and the number of peripheral EPCs at days 3, 5, and 7 in the SDF-1?(ov)HDF-mAM group were significantly higher than that in other groups (p?

  5. Anaplastology in times of facial transplantation: Still a reasonable treatment option?

    PubMed

    Toso, Sabine Maria; Menzel, Kerstin; Motzkus, Yvonne; Klein, Martin; Menneking, Horst; Raguse, Jan-Dirk; Nahles, Susanne; Hoffmeister, Bodo; Adolphs, Nicolai

    2015-09-01

    Optimum functional and aesthetic facial reconstruction is still a challenge in patients who suffer from inborn or acquired facial deformity. It is known that functional and aesthetic impairment can result in significant psychosocial strain, leading to the social isolation of patients who are affected by major facial deformities. Microvascular techniques and increasing experience in facial transplantation certainly contribute to better restorative outcomes. However, these technologies also have some drawbacks, limitations and unsolved problems. Extensive facial defects which include several aesthetic units and dentition can be restored by combining dental prostheses and anaplastology, thus providing an adequate functional and aesthetic outcome in selected patients without the drawbacks of major surgical procedures. Referring to some representative patient cases, it is shown how extreme facial disfigurement after oncological surgery can be palliated by combining intraoral dentures with extraoral facial prostheses using individualized treatment and without the need for major reconstructive surgery. PMID:26105813

  6. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out ... surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As a result, OMSs are uniqely ...

  7. The Facially Disfigured Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moncada, Georgia A.

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews diagnosis and treatments for facially disfigured children including craniofacial reconstruction and microsurgical techniques. Noted are associated disease processes that affect the social and intellectual outcomes of the afflicted child. (Author/DB)

  8. Facial bacterial infections: folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Ana Cristina; Schwartz, Robert A; Cohen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Facial bacterial infections are most commonly caused by infections of the hair follicles. Wherever pilosebaceous units are found folliculitis can occur, with the most frequent bacterial culprit being Staphylococcus aureus. We review different origins of facial folliculitis, distinguishing bacterial forms from other infectious and non-infectious mimickers. We distinguish folliculitis from pseudofolliculitis and perifolliculitis. Clinical features, etiology, pathology, and management options are also discussed. PMID:25441463

  9. Facial Filler Complications.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julie; Khan, Tanya; Martin, John

    2015-11-01

    The use of facial fillers has greatly expanded over the past several years. Along with increased use comes a rise in documented complications, ranging from poor cosmetic result to nodules, granulomas, necrosis, and blindness. Awareness of the potential types of complications and options for management, in addition to the underlying facial anatomy, are imperative to delivering the best patient care. This article defines the complications and how to treat them and provides suggestions to avoid serious adverse outcomes. PMID:26505541

  10. Simultaneous facial feature tracking and facial expression recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Wang, Shangfei; Zhao, Yongping; Ji, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    The tracking and recognition of facial activities from images or videos have attracted great attention in computer vision field. Facial activities are characterized by three levels. First, in the bottom level, facial feature points around each facial component, i.e., eyebrow, mouth, etc., capture the detailed face shape information. Second, in the middle level, facial action units, defined in the facial action coding system, represent the contraction of a specific set of facial muscles, i.e., lid tightener, eyebrow raiser, etc. Finally, in the top level, six prototypical facial expressions represent the global facial muscle movement and are commonly used to describe the human emotion states. In contrast to the mainstream approaches, which usually only focus on one or two levels of facial activities, and track (or recognize) them separately, this paper introduces a unified probabilistic framework based on the dynamic Bayesian network to simultaneously and coherently represent the facial evolvement in different levels, their interactions and their observations. Advanced machine learning methods are introduced to learn the model based on both training data and subjective prior knowledge. Given the model and the measurements of facial motions, all three levels of facial activities are simultaneously recognized through a probabilistic inference. Extensive experiments are performed to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model on all three level facial activities. PMID:23529088

  11. Robot assisted physiotherapy to support rehabilitation of facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Jayatilake, Dushyantha; Isezaki, Takashi; Teramoto, Yohei; Eguchi, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-05-01

    We have been developing the Robot Mask with shape memory alloy based actuators that follows an approach of manipulating the skin through a minimally obtrusive wires, transparent strips and tapes based pulling mechanism to enhance the expressiveness of the face. For achieving natural looking facial expressions by taking the advantage of specific characteristics of the skin, the Robot Mask follows a human anatomy based criteria in selecting these manipulation points and directions. In this paper, we describe a case study of using the Robot Mask to assist physiotherapy of a hemifacial paralyzed patient. The significant differences in shape and size of the human head between different individuals demands proper customizations of the Robot Mask. This paper briefly describes the adjusting and customizing stages employed from the design level to the implementation level of the Robot Mask. We will also introduce a depth image sensor data based analysis, which can remotely evaluate dynamic characteristics of facial expressions in a continuous manner. We then investigate the effectiveness of the Robot Mask by analyzing the range sensor data. From the case study, we found that the Robot Mask could automate the physiotherapy tasks of rehabilitation of facial paralysis. We also verify that, while providing quick responses, the Robot Mask can reduce the asymmetry of a smiling face and manipulate the facial skin to formations similar to natural facial expressions. PMID:24122562

  12. [Facial paralysis in children].

    PubMed

    Muler, H; Paquelin, F; Cotin, G; Luboinski, B; Henin, J M

    1975-01-01

    Facial paralyses in children may be grouped under headings displaying a certain amount of individuality. Chronologically, first to be described are neonatal facial paralyses. These are common and are nearly always cured within a few days. Some of these cases are due to the mastoid being crushed at birth with or without the use of forceps. The intra-osseous pathway of the facial nerve is then affected throughout its length. However, a cure is often spontaneous. When this desirable development does not take place within three months, the nerve should be freed by decompressive surgery. The special anatomy of the facial nerve in the new-born baby makes this a delicate operation. Later, in all stages of acute otitis, acute mastoiditis or chronic otitis, facial paralysis can be seen. Treatment depends on the stage reached by the otitis: paracentesis, mastoidectomy, various scraping procedures, and, of course, antibiotherapy. The other causes of facial paralysis in children are very much less common: a frigore or viral, traumatic, occur ring in the course of acute poliomyelitis, shingles or tumours of the middle ear. To these must be added exceptional causes such as vitamin D intoxication, idiopathic hypercalcaemia and certain haemopathies. PMID:1217818

  13. Autologous Fat Grafting in Facial Volumetric Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Piombino; Gaetano, Marenzi; Giovanni, Dell’Aversana Orabona; Luigi, Califano; Gilberto, Sammartino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The authors reported their surgical experience about structural fat grafting in the management of facial volumetric deficit. The purpose of this study was to assess the real indications, cosmetic results, complications, and global patient satisfaction of the Coleman technique in redefining facial contours in congenital and postoperative deformities. A retrospective analysis of 32 patients grafted according to Coleman's technique was performed, and the long-term outcomes and patient satisfaction were evaluated. The mean postoperative clinical follow-up was 14 months. The morphological changes were analyzed by comparing the photographic presurgical facial contour and the postoperative correction of soft tissue defects. All consecutive cases reported showed a progressive fat resorption for 3 months after surgery and its stable integration only after this period. Best results were performed in the treatment of genetically determined syndromes, such as the Franceschetti and Romberg syndromes. The authors suggest this surgical technique also for the treatment of unaesthetic cutaneous abscess cavity after incision and drainage. Unsatisfactory outcomes were obtained in the treatment of the posttraumatic facial scar, which needed more surgical procedures. PMID:25974786

  14. Facial region watermarking robust against rotation, scaling and translation attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Iwan; Timotius, Ivanna K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a watermarking system for images containing a single frontal facial region that is robust against rotation, scaling and translation attacks. The system presented can automatically detect the facial region within the host image, using an algorithm that does not rely on skin color information and is therefore insensitive to the variations of apparent skin color of the subject. The system then normalizes the rotation, scale and translation of the facial region. Therefore, the system is able to re-synchronize the watermark in the event of a rotation, scaling and translation attack. The experiments showed that the proposed system performed well under such attack. The system also showed good performance against common signal processing attacks such as filtering and JPEG compression.

  15. Prefabricated vertical myocutaneous flap of the nose in facially burned patients.

    PubMed

    Erol, O O

    1995-08-01

    In facially burned patients, a simple and effective technique is described for reconstruction of deformities of the lower third of the nose. The first stage consists of replacing the dorsal scarred skin with a skin graft from the buttocks or other area. The second stage is a vertical columella-based prefabricated flap that is outlined beginning near the tip of the nose and extending superiorly to the glabellar region. This flap is raised with the underlying muscle as a composite tissue, transposed to the defect, and sutured to the vestibular mucous membrane or the integument of the remaining portions of the nose at the alar rim. This very well vascularized vertical prefabricated myocutaneous flap can cover a cartilage graft taken from the ear to reconstruct an alar rim. The donor site is closed by undermining the nasal skin laterally on each side and suturing the edges at the dorsum to leave an acceptable midline scar. In patients for whom a nasolabial flap or other technique is not suitable or is impossible, this new and simple technique may be used successfully. PMID:7624406

  16. Rhodamine intense pulsed light versus conventional intense pulsed light for facial telangiectasias.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Domenico; Crisman, Giuliana; Kostaki, Dimitra; Cannarozzo, Giovanni; Sannino, Mario; Chimenti, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Facial telangiectasias represent the major aesthetic alterations of several chronic inflammatory disorders arising on facial skin. We herein report on relevant clinical results of a new subtype of intense pulsed light treatments, the so-called rhodamine intense pulsed light (r-IPL), in comparison with conventional IPL (c-IPL) treatments on forty-five patients affected by facial telangiectasias. The aim of this study is to determinate whether r-IPL represents an effective and safe treatment for the most common superficial vascular alterations and could be advised as a first choice therapy for facial telangiectasias. PMID:26736070

  17. Management of Facial Paralysis due to Extracranial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Michael; Rolfes, Bryan N

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of advanced parotid or cutaneous malignancies often requires sacrifice of the facial nerve as well as resection of the parotid gland and surrounding structures. In addition to considerations regarding reinnervation and dynamic reanimation, reconstruction in this setting must take into account unique factors such as soft tissue volume deficits and the high likelihood of adjunctive radiation therapy. Furthermore, considerations of patient comorbidities including advanced age and poor long-term prognosis often influence reconstructive modality. The optimal reconstructive technique would provide potential for restoration of facial tone and voluntary movement as well as immediate restoration of facial support and function. Beyond considerations of facial movement and rest position, restoration of lost soft tissue volume is critical to obtain facial symmetry. To control long-term volume in the setting of adjunctive radiation therapy, vascularized tissue is required. In this chapter, we describe a comprehensive approach to the management of radical parotidectomy and similar facial defects that addresses these concerns and also describes management strategies over time. Specific techniques employed include anterolateral thigh free flaps, nerve grafting utilizing motor nerves to the vastus lateralis muscle, and orthodromic temporalis tendon transfer. Further considerations relative to the eye, forehead, and long-term facial refinement are also discussed. PMID:25958895

  18. Facial reconstruction – anatomical art or artistic anatomy?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Facial reconstruction is employed in the context of forensic investigation and for creating three-dimensional portraits of people from the past, from ancient Egyptian mummies and bog bodies to digital animations of J. S. Bach. This paper considers a facial reconstruction method (commonly known as the Manchester method) associated with the depiction and identification of the deceased from skeletal remains. Issues of artistic licence and scientific rigour, in relation to soft tissue reconstruction, anatomical variation and skeletal assessment, are discussed. The need for artistic interpretation is greatest where only skeletal material is available, particularly for the morphology of the ears and mouth, and with the skin for an ageing adult. The greatest accuracy is possible when information is available from preserved soft tissue, from a portrait, or from a pathological condition or healed injury. PMID:20447245

  19. Facial dynamics and emotional expressions in facial aging treatments.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Thierry; Gassia, Véronique; Belhaouari, Lakhdar

    2015-03-01

    Facial expressions convey emotions that form the foundation of interpersonal relationships, and many of these emotions promote and regulate our social linkages. Hence, the facial aging symptomatological analysis and the treatment plan must of necessity include knowledge of the facial dynamics and the emotional expressions of the face. This approach aims to more closely meet patients' expectations of natural-looking results, by correcting age-related negative expressions while observing the emotional language of the face. This article will successively describe patients' expectations, the role of facial expressions in relational dynamics, the relationship between facial structures and facial expressions, and the way facial aging mimics negative expressions. Eventually, therapeutic implications for facial aging treatment will be addressed. PMID:25620090

  20. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Meek, Marcel F

    2009-08-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two cases of sound-induced facial synkinesis (SFS) after facial nerve injury. As far as we know, this phenomenon has not been described in the English literature before. Patient A presented with right hemifacial palsy after lesion of the facial nerve due to skull base fracture. He reported involuntary muscle activity at the right corner of the mouth, specifically on hearing ringing keys. Patient B suffered from left hemifacial palsy following otitis media and developed involuntary muscle contraction in the facial musculature specifically on hearing clapping hands or a trumpet sound. Both patients were evaluated by means of video, audio and EMG analysis. Possible mechanisms in the pathophysiology of SFS are postulated and therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:18539550

  1. Aging and facial changes--documenting clinical signs, part 1: clinical changes of the aging face.

    PubMed

    Nkengne, Alex; Bertin, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The process of aging induces the transformation of the face with changes that are usually classified as either chronological or photo induced and that affect the shape, the texture, and the color of the face. Facial shape is mainly transformed by the evolution of bones and soft tissues (muscles, fat, and skin) in addition to noticeable effects of gravity. Skin texture is mainly determined by wrinkles, which arise from atrophy of the skin layers, elastosis, and facial expressions. Skin color is related to the distribution of skin chromophores and the structure of the dermis, which affects light scattering. All facial changes are dependant on sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle. They affect self-perception and social interactions and can sometimes be slowed down or reversed using appropriate clinical procedures (e.g., dermatological, surgical, and cosmetic interventions). PMID:23163070

  2. Aging and facial changes--documenting clinical signs, part 1: clinical changes of the aging face.

    PubMed

    Nkengne, Alex; Bertin, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    The process of aging induces the transformation of the face with changes that are usually classified as either chronological or photo-induced and that affect the shape, the texture, and the color of the face. Facial shape is mainly transformed by the evolution of bones and soft tissues (muscles, fat, and skin) in addition to noticeable effects of gravity. Skin texture is mainly determined by wrinkles, which arise from atrophy of the skin layers, elastosis, and facial expressions. Skin color is related to the distribution of skin chromophores and the structure of the dermis, which affects light scattering. All facial changes are dependant on sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle. They affect self-perception and social interactions and can sometimes be slowed down or reversed using appropriate clinical procedures (eg, dermatological, surgical, cosmetic interventions). PMID:24340467

  3. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the sun. Photo: PhotoDisc Care for conditions from acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin ... other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. Your skin can also ...

  4. Facial Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter; Osczevski, Randall J.

    2003-07-01

    A dynamic model of facial cooling was developed in conjunction with the release of the new wind chill temperature (WCT) index, whereby the WCT provides wind chill estimates based on steady-state considerations and the dynamic model can be used to predict the rate of facial cooling and particularly the onset of freezing. In the present study, the dynamic model is applied to various combinations of air temperature and wind speed, and predictions of the resultant steady-state cheek skin temperatures are tabulated. Superimposed on these tables are times to a cheek skin temperature of 10°C, which has been reported as painful, and times to freezing. For combinations of air temperature and wind speed that result in the same final steady-state cheek temperature or the same WCT, the initial rate of change of skin temperature is higher for those combinations having higher wind speeds. This suggests that during short exposures, high winds combined with low temperatures might be perceived as more stressful than light winds with lower temperatures that result in the same "wind chill." This paper also discloses the paradox that individuals having a low cheek thermal resistance are predicted to experience a more severe WCT, but be at less risk of cooling injury than individuals with higher thermal resistances. The advantages of cooling-time predictions using the dynamic model are discussed with the recommendation/conclusion that safe exposure limits are more meaningful and less ambiguous than the reporting of the WCT.

  5. [Advantage of facial rehabilitation after facial palsy].

    PubMed

    Gatignol, Peggy; Lannadère, Elodie; Bernat, Isabelle; Tankéré, Frédéric; Lamas, Georges

    2011-10-01

    Visible and immediate trauma, facial palsy (FP) covers functional but also psychological damage and it is essential to evaluate before a comprehensive therapeutic care tailored. Few patients, however, are emerging with a prescription for rehabilitation after a consultation. Why? This rehabilitation is it ignored? Is it absolutely necessary? It is evident in the extension of medical care to minimize the effects. Yet the foundation of rehabilitation is sadly little known and often poorly enforced. In addition to its specificity, this therapy preceded by a report called "pretreatments offers a prognosis for recovery to patient" regardless of the origin and degree of involvement of the PF. PMID:22046678

  6. Promising Technique for Facial Nerve Reconstruction in Extended Parotidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Ithzel Maria; Rodríguez-Valiente, Antonio; Castelló, Jose Ramon; Górriz, Carmen; Montero, Oscar Alvarez; García-Berrocal, Jose Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant tumors of the parotid gland account scarcely for 5% of all head and neck tumors. Most of these neoplasms have a high tendency for recurrence, local infiltration, perineural extension, and metastasis. Although uncommon, these malignant tumors require complex surgical treatment sometimes involving a total parotidectomy including a complete facial nerve resection. Severe functional and aesthetic facial defects are the result of a complete sacrifice or injury to isolated branches becoming an uncomfortable distress for patients and a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Case Report: A case of a 54-year-old, systemically healthy male patient with a 4 month complaint of pain and swelling on the right side of the face is presented. The patient reported a rapid increase in the size of the lesion over the past 2 months. Imaging tests and histopathological analysis reported an adenoid cystic carcinoma. A complete parotidectomy was carried out with an intraoperative notice of facial nerve infiltration requiring a second intervention for nerve and defect reconstruction. A free ALT flap with vascularized nerve grafts was the surgical choice. A 6 month follow-up showed partial facial movement recovery and the facial defect mended. Conclusion: It is of critical importance to restore function to patients with facial nerve injury. Vascularized nerve grafts, in many clinical and experimental studies, have shown to result in better nerve regeneration than conventional non-vascularized nerve grafts. Nevertheless, there are factors that may affect the degree, speed and regeneration rate regarding the free fasciocutaneous flap. In complex head and neck defects following a total parotidectomy, the extended free fasciocutaneous ALT (anterior-lateral thigh) flap with a vascularized nerve graft is ideally suited for the reconstruction of the injured site. Donor–site morbidity is low and additional surgical time is minimal compared with the time of a single ALT flap transfer. PMID:26788494

  7. Capturing Physiology of Emotion along Facial Muscles: A Method of Distinguishing Feigned from Involuntary Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Masood Mehmood; Ward, Robert D.; Ingleby, Michael

    The ability to distinguish feigned from involuntary expressions of emotions could help in the investigation and treatment of neuropsychiatric and affective disorders and in the detection of malingering. This work investigates differences in emotion-specific patterns of thermal variations along the major facial muscles. Using experimental data extracted from 156 images, we attempted to classify patterns of emotion-specific thermal variations into neutral, and voluntary and involuntary expressions of positive and negative emotive states. Initial results suggest (i) each facial muscle exhibits a unique thermal response to various emotive states; (ii) the pattern of thermal variances along the facial muscles may assist in classifying voluntary and involuntary facial expressions; and (iii) facial skin temperature measurements along the major facial muscles may be used in automated emotion assessment.

  8. Acceptance of Disability by Teenagers with Oral-Facial Clefts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Philip; Heiserman, Kitty

    1977-01-01

    This study ascertains whether the findings of Linkowski and Dunn (1974) were applicable to a sample of teenagers with oral-facial clefts. The following brief description of the nature of this birth defect and the treatment involved will help to explain why these patients are potential candidates for rehabilitation. (Author)

  9. Managing the Pediatric Facial Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Hollier, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Facial fracture management is often complex and demanding, particularly within the pediatric population. Although facial fractures in this group are uncommon relative to their incidence in adult counterparts, a thorough understanding of issues relevant to pediatric facial fracture management is critical to optimal long-term success. Here, we discuss several issues germane to pediatric facial fractures and review significant factors in their evaluation, diagnosis, and management. PMID:22110800

  10. Simultaneous anterolateral thigh flap and temporalis tendon transfer to optimize facial form and function after radical parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Revenaugh, Peter C; Knott, P Daniel; Scharpf, Joseph; Fritz, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Background Extirpation of aggressive parotid or cutaneous facial tumors often involves facial nerve sacrifice and the creation of a large soft-tissue defect. We describe a method for single-stage reconstruction during radical parotidectomy to restore facial form and function without additional morbidity. Methods We conducted a review of immediate reconstruction/reanimation of radical parotidectomy defects with the use of anterolateral thigh (ALT) fat and fascia flaps for facial contouring, orthodromic temporalis tendon transfer (OTTT), cable grafting of the facial nerve, and fascia lata lower lip suspension. Results Five patients (mean age, 67.4 years) underwent extirpation of malignant tumors with facial nerve sacrifice resulting in large soft-tissue deficits. All patients had ALT free tissue transfer to correct facial contour defects and OTTT to restore facial form and function. Four patients underwent cable grafting of facial nerve branches. Branches of the motor nerve to the vastus lateralis harvested from the ALT surgical site were used for cable nerve grafting in 3 patients. Fascia lata from the same ALT harvest site was used for lower lip suspension to the OTTT in 4 patients. There were no donor site complications. All patients achieved midfacial symmetry at rest, oral competence with dynamic corner-of-mouth movement, and full eye closure. Conclusions Tumor clearance, symmetric facial appearance, as well as dynamic facial rehabilitation were accomplished in a single-stage procedure using the method described herein. The ALT free flap provides versatile options for soft-tissue defects as well as access to motor nerves optimal for grafting without additional morbidity. Patients undergoing extirpation of malignant tumors requiring facial nerve sacrifice can undergo immediate free tissue contour reconstruction and facial reanimation procedures with no additional morbidity. PMID:22431814

  11. Aging Differences in Ethnic Skin

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Maymone, Mayra Buainain; Kundu, Roopal V.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and complex process that can be described clinically as features of wrinkles, sunspots, uneven skin color, and sagging skin. These cutaneous effects are influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors and often are varied based on ethnic origin given underlying structural and functional differences. The authors sought to provide updated information on facets of aging and how it relates to ethnic variation given innate differences in skin structure and function. Publications describing structural and functional principles of ethnic and aging skin were primarily found through a PubMed literature search and supplemented with a review of textbook chapters. The most common signs of skin aging despite skin type are dark spots, loss of elasticity, loss of volume, and rhytides. Skin of color has many characteristics that make its aging process unique. Those of Asian, Hispanic, and African American descent have distinct facial structures. Differences in the concentration of epidermal melanin makes darkly pigmented persons more vulnerable to dyspigmentation, while a thicker and more compact dermis makes facial lines less noticeable. Ethnic skin comprises a large portion of the world population. Therefore, it is important to understand the unique structural and functional differences among ethnicities to adequately treat the signs of aging. PMID:26962390

  12. Facial reanimations: part I-recent paralyses.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, F

    2015-12-01

    Unilateral facial paralysis is a common condition: 1 in every 60 people will experience Bell's palsy during the course of their life, and the residual deficits are particularly problematic for those who do not spontaneously recover the function of the facial nerve. Functionally the most relevant defect is lack of corneal lubrication because of inability to close the eyelid or blink. Morphologically, this presents as obvious ptosis caused by absence of the muscle tone at rest. "Restitutio ad integrum" of a paralysed face by operation is currently impossible, but realistic targets are improvement of facial symmetry and partial recovery of closure of the eyelids and smiling. Movements of the forehead and lower lip tend to be neglected targets for intervention because they are of less functional importance. Recent paralyses are those in which the mimetic musculature may be reactivated by provision of neural input, and the time limit is generally 18-24 months. Electromyography helps to detect it by assessing the presence of muscular fibrillations. If those are not detectable paralyses are considered to be long-standing, and new musculature must be transferred into the face, generally by transplantation of a muscular free flap or of the temporalis muscle in several different ways. When the facial nerve has been severed by trauma or during operation, immediate reconstruction must be considered and the simplest and most efficient is direct neurorrhaphy. If an appreciable part of the nerve is missing and the proximal and distal nerve stumps do not meet, an interpositional nerve graft must be placed to guarantee neural continuity. When reconstruction of the total extracranial branch of the facial nerve is required, the thoracodorsal nerve has proved to be highly effective. In case immediate reconstruction cannot be accomplished and the trunk of the facial nerve is not available as a donor nerve, mimetic musculature may be reactivated by provision of new neural input. Strong inputs from the masseteric or hypoglossus nerves may be mixed with those that arise from branches of the contralateral facial nerve after 2 cross-face nerve grafts have been placed, and good functional recovery is generally obtained. Several ancillary procedures are required to improve the end results in most cases. PMID:26188934

  13. Goltz syndrome: a newborn with ectrodactyly and skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shatanik; Patra, Chaitali; Das, Amit; Roy, Sutirtha

    2015-01-01

    Goltz syndrome or Focal Dermal Hypoplasia is a rare multisystem disorder, involving all the three germ cell layers. The disease is thought to be inherited in X-linked dominant fashion with heterogeneous mutations of the PORCN gene at Xp11.23 locus. Majority of the cases are sporadic, mainly due to postzygotic somatic mutations. The clinical spectrum includes characteristic cutaneous manifestations, multiple skeletal anomalies, and involvement of the eyes, hair, nails, kidneys, and so on. Considerable variability is noted in the clinical expression of the disease probably due to genomic mosaicism. Around 300 cases of Goltz syndrome have been reported in the literature. Here, we report such a case with characteristic skin lesions, multiple bony defects, distinctive facial features, coloboma of iris, and bilateral hydronephrosis. The diagnosis was evident immediately after birth due to the characteristic clinical picture of the baby. PMID:25814752

  14. Penile reconstruction with dermal template and vacuum therapy in severe skin and soft tissue defects caused by Fournier's gangrene and hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Ludolph, Ingo; Titel, Torsten; Beier, Justus P; Dragu, Adrian; Schmitz, Marweh; Wullich, Bernd; Horch, Raymund E

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this article is to improve the treatment of patients with complete skin loss of the penile shaft after Fournier's gangrene or hidradenitis suppurativa using modern biomatrices and topical negative pressure therapy. From January 2010 to December 2011, three patients with Fournier's gangrene or hidradenitis suppurativa were treated. After initial radical debridements, topical negative pressure therapy was applied for wound stabilisation. After that dermal templates (acellular dermal matrix) were used to achieve early healing and topical negative pressure-dressing in a special setting or a special foam compression bandage was used together with a urinary catheter. After integration of the dermal template, a split-thickness skin graft is used for coverage and again secured with a circular total negative pressure-dressing. In all cases, the split-thickness skin grafts healed very well applying this therapy concept. The patients were very satisfied with the functional as well as with the aesthetic outcome. We suggest a new method of staged reconstruction to successfully preserve the functionality of the penis after complete loss of the skin and soft tissue of the penile shaft using modern biomatrices and topical negative pressure therapy. PMID:24618357

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis in oro-maxillo-facial area after radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate.

    PubMed

    Ormeni?an, Alina; Morariu, Silviu Horia; Cotoi, Ovidiu Simion; Vartolomei, Mihai Dorin; Grigora?, Radu Ionu?; Mocan, Simona Liliana; Suciu, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    The fascia's and subcutaneous adipose tissue's impairment by mono or polymicrobial infection, which also can involve the skin and the muscles, is rarely seen in oro-maxillo-facial area. The present case report is presenting a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a patient who had a history of an invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the soft palate, with surgical treatment and with radiotherapy. He was admitted in our Clinic with malaise and subsequently developed a toxico-septic shock. Clinical symptoms, serological and bacteriological analysis and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The patient subsequently underwent a series of surgical reconstruction and aesthetic treatments because of the complications that had arised in the meantime. Postoperative evolution was favorable towards complete closure of the defect. The prognosis of this disease is generally reserved, the favorable evolution depending on the possibility of wound sterilization and the surgery is required despite its mutilating effect. PMID:26429184

  16. 7 CFR 51.2720 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Minor defects. Minor defects means that the peanut kernel is not damaged but is affected by one or more of the following: (a) Skin discoloration which is dark brown, dark gray, dark blue or black...

  17. 7 CFR 51.2740 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 51.2740 Minor defects. Minor defects means that the peanut kernel is not damaged but is affected by one or more of the following: (a) Skin discoloration which is dark brown, dark gray, dark blue...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2762 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Minor defects. Minor defects means that the peanut kernel is not damaged but is affected by one or more of the following: (a) Skin discoloration which is dark brown, dark gray, dark blue or black...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2762 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Minor defects. Minor defects means that the peanut kernel is not damaged but is affected by one or more of the following: (a) Skin discoloration which is dark brown, dark gray, dark blue or black...

  20. 7 CFR 51.2720 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Minor defects. Minor defects means that the peanut kernel is not damaged but is affected by one or more of the following: (a) Skin discoloration which is dark brown, dark gray, dark blue or black...

  1. 7 CFR 51.2740 - Minor defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 51.2740 Minor defects. Minor defects means that the peanut kernel is not damaged but is affected by one or more of the following: (a) Skin discoloration which is dark brown, dark gray, dark blue...

  2. Male facial anthropometry and attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Soler, Caries; Kekäläinen, Jukka; Núñez, Manuel; Sancho, María; Núñez, Javier; Yaber, Iván; Gutiérrez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The symmetry and masculinity of the face are often considered important elements of male facial attractiveness. However, facial preferences are rarely studied on natural faces. We studied the effect of these traits and facial metric parameters on facial attractiveness in Spanish and Colombian raters. In total, 13 metric and 11 asymmetry parameters from natural, unmanipulated frontal face photographs of 50 Spanish men were measured with the USIA semiautomatic anthropometric software. All raters (women and men) were asked to rank these images as potential long-term partners for females. In both sexes, facial attractiveness was negatively associated with facial masculinity, and preference was not associated with facial symmetry. In Spanish raters, both sexes preferred male traits that were larger in the right side of the face, which may reflect a human tendency to prefer a certain degree of facial asymmetry. We did not find such preference in Colombian raters, but they did show stronger preference for facial femininity than Spanish raters. Present results suggest that facial relative femininity, which is expected to signal, eg good parenting and cooperation skills, may be an important signal of mate quality when females seek long-term partners. Facial symmetry appears unimportant in such long-term mating preferences. PMID:23469703

  3. A simple external tissue expansion technique based on viscoelastic properties of skin to attain direct closure of a large scalp defect: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, Bandikatla Venkata

    2015-01-01

    Background: Direct closure of large scalp defects is not an easy task. Complicated flap designs or staged surgeries over a period of 6 months are often required. A case of a large scalp defect that was closed directly in 3 months by applying a simple external tissue expansion technique is presented in this report. Patient Profile: A 28-year-old male patient presented with a painful swelling of about 13 cm × 14 cm, on frontoparietal scalp. A biopsy done elsewhere reported it to be a neurofibroma. He sought tumour excision and scalp defect coverage by hair-bearing scalp in a period of less than 5 months. Materials and Methods: The tumour was excised and the adjacent scalp was gradually expanded with the help of an external fixator. The patient had immediate pain relief after excision. The goal of repairing scalp defect and replacing it with hairy scalp was achieved in 3 months. Conclusion: The mechanical device required for this technique is relatively easily accessible. It is not difficult to achieve desirable outcomes, and the same can be applied to large wounds on other areas.

  4. TRPA1 contributes to capsaicin-induced facial cold hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kuniya; Shinoda, Masamichi; Furukawa, Akihiko; Kita, Kozue; Noma, Noboru; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial cold hyperalgesia is known to cause severe persistent pain in the face following trigeminal nerve injury or inflammation, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankylin 1 (TRPA1) are thought to be involved in cold hyperalgesia. However, how these two receptors are involved in cold hyperalgesia is not fully understood. To clarify the mechanisms underlying facial cold hyperalgesia, nocifensive behaviors to cold stimulation, the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, and TG neuronal excitability to cold stimulation following facial capsaicin injection were examined in rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to cold stimulation of the lateral facial skin was significantly decreased following facial capsaicin injection. This reduction of HWRT was significantly recovered following local injection of TRPV1 antagonist as well as TRPA1 antagonist. Approximately 30% of TG neurons innervating the lateral facial skin expressed both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and about 64% of TRPA1-positive neurons also expressed TRPV1. The TG neuronal excitability to noxious cold stimulation was significantly increased following facial capsaicin injection and this increase was recovered by pretreatment with TRPA1 antagonist. These findings suggest that TRPA1 sensitization via TRPV1 signaling in TG neurons is involved in cold hyperalgesia following facial skin capsaicin injection. PMID:25371244

  5. Realistic facial expression of virtual human based on color, sweat, and tears effects.

    PubMed

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Mohamed, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Generating extreme appearances such as scared awaiting sweating while happy fit for tears (cry) and blushing (anger and happiness) is the key issue in achieving the high quality facial animation. The effects of sweat, tears, and colors are integrated into a single animation model to create realistic facial expressions of 3D avatar. The physical properties of muscles, emotions, or the fluid properties with sweating and tears initiators are incorporated. The action units (AUs) of facial action coding system are merged with autonomous AUs to create expressions including sadness, anger with blushing, happiness with blushing, and fear. Fluid effects such as sweat and tears are simulated using the particle system and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods which are combined with facial animation technique to produce complex facial expressions. The effects of oxygenation of the facial skin color appearance are measured using the pulse oximeter system and the 3D skin analyzer. The result shows that virtual human facial expression is enhanced by mimicking actual sweating and tears simulations for all extreme expressions. The proposed method has contribution towards the development of facial animation industry and game as well as computer graphics. PMID:25136663

  6. Realistic Facial Expression of Virtual Human Based on Color, Sweat, and Tears Effects

    PubMed Central

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Mohamed, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Generating extreme appearances such as scared awaiting sweating while happy fit for tears (cry) and blushing (anger and happiness) is the key issue in achieving the high quality facial animation. The effects of sweat, tears, and colors are integrated into a single animation model to create realistic facial expressions of 3D avatar. The physical properties of muscles, emotions, or the fluid properties with sweating and tears initiators are incorporated. The action units (AUs) of facial action coding system are merged with autonomous AUs to create expressions including sadness, anger with blushing, happiness with blushing, and fear. Fluid effects such as sweat and tears are simulated using the particle system and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods which are combined with facial animation technique to produce complex facial expressions. The effects of oxygenation of the facial skin color appearance are measured using the pulse oximeter system and the 3D skin analyzer. The result shows that virtual human facial expression is enhanced by mimicking actual sweating and tears simulations for all extreme expressions. The proposed method has contribution towards the development of facial animation industry and game as well as computer graphics. PMID:25136663

  7. Depigmented Skin and Phantom Color Measurements for Realistic Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Paul; Leachman, Sancy; Boucher, Kenneth; Ozçelik, Tunçer Burak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regardless of human skin phototype, areas of depigmented skin, as seen in vitiligo, are optically indistinguishable among skin phototypes. The average of the depigmented skin measurements can be used to develop the base color of realistic prostheses. Methods and Materials Data from 20 of 32 recruited vitiligo study participants. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements were made from depigmented skin and adjacent pigmented skin, then compared to 66 pigmented polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to determine pigment concentrations in turbid media for making realistic facial prostheses. Results The Area Under spectral intensity Curve (AUC) was calculated for average spectroscopy measurements of pigmented sites in relation to skin phototype (p=0.0505) and depigmented skin in relation to skin phototype (p=0.59). No significant relationship exists between skin phototypes and depigmented skin spectroscopy measurements. The average of the depigmented skin measurements (AUC 19,129) was the closest match to phantom 6.4 (AUC 19,162) Conclusions Areas of depigmented skin are visibly indistinguishable per skin phototype, yet spectrometry shows that depigmented skin measurements varied and were unrelated to skin phototype. Possible sources of optical variation of depigmented skin include age, body site, blood flow, quantity/quality of collagen, and other chromophores. The average of all depigmented skin measurements can be used to derive the pigment composition and concentration for realistic facial prostheses. PMID:23750920

  8. Management of Facial Telangiectasias with Hand Cautery

    PubMed Central

    E. Liapakis, Ioannis; Englander, Miriam; Sinani, Roven; I. Paschalis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Facial telangiectasias are superficial cutaneous vessels that can result in noticeable aesthetical imperfections. This study presents a technique for the removal of facial telangiectasias using hand cautery. METHODS Twenty-five patients with facial telangiectasias were treated using hand cautery (Medicell Inc, Athens, Greece) during 2009-2013. Photo documentation was performed for each patient before and immediately after treatment. Treatment was performed by cauterization at 800°C, delivered via a 30G tip directly to the lesions for milliseconds. RESULTS Twenty two out of 25 patients (88%) exhibited complete resolution of telangiectasias using hand cautery. In 5 (20%) patients, single application achieved complete resolution of lesions and in 10 patients (40%) re-treatment was required after 3 weeks. Four patients (16%) required 3 consecutive treatments from which 2 patients (8%) showed slight improvement and one patient (4%) no improvement. No major complications were associated with this procedure except the formation of a white scar in two patients that became inconspicuous after 3 months. Minor complications included skin irritation and edema immediately after the treatment, which resolved within 2-3 days without intervention. CONCLUSION Hand cautery is a very safe, effective and inexpensive tool for the treatment of facial telangiectasias. It is simple, cheap, and requires minimal training, although it is limited to the treatment of more superficial and small lesions. We believe that this technique is suitable for office based setting. The advantage of using inexpensive and portable instruments will also be beneficial in developing counties where access to more expensive equipment is limited. Results are satisfactory but more patients are needed to validate the technique. PMID:26284181

  9. Cytokines and the Skin Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hänel, Kai H.; Cornelissen, Christian; Lüscher, Bernhard; Baron, Jens Malte

    2013-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:23531535

  10. Mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft palate, short stature, and facial anomalies: A new X-linked multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome: Clinical description and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Ropers, H.H.; Schoonbrood-Lenssen, A.M.J.

    1994-07-15

    We report on two brothers and their two maternal uncles with severe mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft or highly arched palate, short stature and craniofacial anomalies consisting of microcephaly, abnormal ears, bulbous nose, broad nasal bridge, malar hypoplasia, and micro-gnathia. Three of the four patients died at an early age. The mother of the two brothers had an atrial septal defect. She is assumed to be manifesting carrier of a mutant gene, which is expressed in her two sons and two brothers. By multipoint linkage analysis it is found that the most likely location of the responsible gene is the pericentromeric region Xp21.3-q21.3 with DMD and DXS3 as flanking markers. Maximum information is obtained with marker DXS453 (Z = 1.20 at {theta} = 0.0). 24 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Skin lumps

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin lumps are any abnormal bumps or swellings on the skin. ... Common causes of skin lumps include: Lipomas, which are fatty lumps under the skin Enlarged lymph glands , usually in the armpits, neck, and ...

  12. Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Your Skin KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Skin Print A A ... are really dead skin cells. continue Bye-Bye Skin Cells These old cells are tough and strong, ...

  13. Dry skin

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin - dry; Winter itch ... Dry skin is common. It happens more often in the winter when cold air outside and heated air inside cause low humidity. Forced-air furnaces make skin even drier. The skin loses moisture and may ...

  14. Skin Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Skin Biopsy KidsHealth > Teens > Body > Skin Stuff > Skin Biopsy ... Preparation The Procedure Safety Results What Is a Skin Biopsy and Who Would Need One? In a ...

  15. Realistic facial animation generation based on facial expression mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Garrod, Oliver; Jack, Rachael; Schyns, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions reflect internal emotional states of a character or in response to social communications. Though much effort has been taken to generate realistic facial expressions, it still remains a challenging topic due to human being's sensitivity to subtle facial movements. In this paper, we present a method for facial animation generation, which reflects true facial muscle movements with high fidelity. An intermediate model space is introduced to transfer captured static AU peak frames based on FACS to the conformed target face. And then dynamic parameters derived using a psychophysics method is integrated to generate facial animation, which is assumed to represent natural correlation of multiple AUs. Finally, the animation sequence in the intermediate model space is mapped to the target face to produce final animation.

  16. Complex reconstruction of facial deformity and function after severe gunshot injury: one case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijian; Duan, Jianmin; Wang, Qiao; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we described clinical outcomes of a multi-stage surgery integrating multiple techniques in restoration of facial morphology and function of a 17-year-old boy with severe gunshot injuries. This multi-stage surgery was applied in treatment of one rare case of gunshot-caused complicated facial deformities involving most parts of the face (labrum, left nose wing, nasal columella, nasal septum, maxillary alveolar process, hard palate, soft palate, bilateral maxillary bones, left zygoma, suborbital bone defects) and clinical efficacy upon restoring facial form and function were retrospectively evaluated. The patient was diagnosed with massive facial defects and deformities caused by gunshot, which led to feeding difficulty, severe articulation disorders and serious facial disfigurement. To reconstruct facial form and restore functions of mastication and articulation, multiple examinations and surgical procedures including mirror imaging, rapid prototyping technique, porous titanium implants, microscopic surgical technique, dental implants, osteomyocutaneous flap, muscular flap, shifting and repairing of adjacent tissue flaps and free bone graft reconstruction were undertaken. Postoperatively, reconstruction of severe facial disfigurement and restoring basic functions including articulation and feeding for the first time and relatively sound clinical outcomes have been obtained, which may add clinical evidence to the treatment of similar cases of severe facial deformities. PMID:25785151

  17. Asian cosmetic facial surgery.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Edward S

    2010-05-01

    Within the past decade, Asian economies have grown exponentially, resulting in increased personal wealth and subsequent consumption of cosmetic procedures. Asian cosmetic surgery procedures in Western countries have also seen a growth pattern parallel to Asia. As this growth continues, facial plastic surgeons in Western nations will inevitably witness increased Asians in their patient population base. To meet this demand, the surgeon must incorporate a set of different aesthetic norms from the traditional Western philosophies. In addition, the plastic surgeon must also understand the unique cultural motivations for surgery. The Asian face has distinguishing features that are unique. As such, surgical techniques and aesthetic goals for a particular cosmetic procedure will be different than those for other ethnic groups. This article will review three of the most common cosmetic procedures unique to the Asian face: Asian blepharoplasty, lower facial contouring, and Asian rhinoplasty. PMID:20446204

  18. Facial plastic surgery database.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, M; Conrad, K

    1994-02-01

    Every facial plastic surgeon accumulates a vast library of professional slides and photographs that document his work. Manual cataloguing of the clinical and operative documentation is time consuming and provides limited analysis capabilities. The facial plastic surgery database is a state-of-the-art computer programme that allows the surgeon to sort and locate slides and photographs. Designed for the computer novice, it utilises a simple coding system to permit rapid data input. The codes can be tailored to allow for new procedures or alternative practice styles. There are sophisticated searching routines to quickly find slides and photographs based on any combination of patients and operative criteria. The database also includes an online colour atlas and workspace for recording of presentations. There are automated routines to analyse patients' clinical features, operative trends, and surgical results. Ultimately, examination of this data can be used to facilitate peer review, research, and self-education. PMID:8170012

  19. Relation between facial morphology, personality and the functions of facial make-up in women.

    PubMed

    Korichi, R; Pelle-de-Queral, D; Gazano, G; Aubert, A

    2011-08-01

    Our external appearance plays a key role in everyday life's social interactions. Hence, taking care of our appearance allows us to adjust and protect ourselves, as well as communicate emotional disposition (i.e. sympathy or aversion) and social information (i.e. values, status). However, some discrete body parts or characteristics appear to be more salient than others in contributing to global body image. For example, authors showed that facial attractiveness is one of the best predictors of overall physical attractiveness and represent one of the primary factors influencing global self-esteem. Make-up is therefore ought to play a major influence in these parameters. Moreover, in a previous study whose subject was to explain the reasons that motivate women to make-up, we showed a high implication of specific psychological traits in correlation with two make-up functions (i.e. psycho-behavioural profiles 'Seduction' and 'Camouflage'; group S and group C, respectively). The purpose of this study was to assess the possible relation between our two psycho-behavioural profiles and some morphological parameters know to be involved in facial attraction (i.e. facial asymmetry and skin visual quality). First of all, our study revealed for women from the group C a greater asymmetry of the lower face (i.e. mouth area) that could be related to a possible larger amount of negative emotional experiences. Concerning make-up behaviour, women from the group S more extensively manipulated their relative facial attractiveness, by using a large range of colours, but also through a significantly longer make-up process used to adjust their visual asymmetry and therefore increase their potential of attractiveness. On the overall, our results suggest that make-up is used differentially, according to stable psychological profiles of women, to manipulate specific visual/morphological facial features involved in attractiveness. PMID:21284661

  20. Facial dermatosis associated with Demodex: a case-control study*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya-e; Peng, Yan; Wang, Xiang-lan; Wu, Li-ping; Wang, Mei; Yan, Hu-ling; Xiao, Sheng-xiang

    2011-01-01

    Demodex has been considered to be related with multiple skin disorders, but controversy persists. In this case-control study, a survey was conducted with 860 dermatosis patients aged 12 to 84 years in Xi’an, China to identify the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex. Amongst the patients, 539 suffered from facial dermatosis and 321 suffered from non-facial dermatosis. Demodex mites were sampled and examined using the skin pressurization method. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to analyze the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex infestation, and to identify the risk factors of Demodex infestation. The results showed that total detection rate of Demodex was 43.0%. Patients aged above 30 years had higher odds of Demodex infestation than those under 30 years. Compared to patients with neutral skin, patients with mixed, oily, or dry skin were more likely to be infested with Demodex (odds ratios (ORs) were 2.5, 2.4, and 1.6, respectively). Moreover, Demodex infestation was found to be statistically associated with rosacea (OR=8.1), steroid-induced dermatitis (OR=2.7), seborrheic dermatitis (OR=2.2), and primary irritation dermatitis (OR=2.1). In particular, ORs calculated from the severe infestation (?5 mites/cm2) rate were significantly higher than those of the total rate. Therefore, we concluded that Demodex is associated with rosacea, steroid-induced dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and primary irritation dermatitis. The rate of severe infestation is found to be more correlated with various dermatosis than the total infestation rate. The risk factors of Demodex infestation, age, and skin types were identified. Our study also suggested that good hygiene practice might reduce the chances of demodicosis and Demodex infestation. PMID:22135150

  1. Conservative procedures in skin reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    Skin exerts a number of essential protective functions ensuring homeostasis of the whole body. In the present review barrier function of skin and its expression of antimicrobial peptides are discussed. Barrier function is provided by the dynamic stratum corneum structure composed of lipids and corneocytes. Stratum corneum is a conditio sine qua non for terrestrial life. Impairment of barrier function can be due to injury and inflammatory skin diseases. Therapeutic options are discussed with special emphasis of radiodermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis in patients with hearing device. The use of antimicrobial peptides is illustrated by facial inflammatory skin diseases. In wound healing new developments include biotechnological developments of matrix- and growth factors and tissue-engineered skin substitutes. In everyday wound care of chronic wounds the concept of wound bed preparation (TIME) constitutes the base of successful treatment. PMID:22073065

  2. Sequelae of radiation facial epilation (North American Hiroshima maiden syndrome)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, I.B.; Walfish, P.G. )

    1989-12-01

    Radiation for benign problems of the head and neck area has been uniformly recognized as unacceptable practice. This includes epilation for facial hirsutism. Twelve such patients, recently encountered, have characteristic radiodermatitis facies and have demonstrated multisite neoplastic involvement--including skin, thyroid, parathyroid, salivary gland, oral cavity, facial skeleton, and breast--and have also undergone extensive dermatologic treatment of complications of radiodermatitis. There was one cancer death, and three patients are alive with cancer. Such patients have a superficial resemblance to the Hiroshima maiden group of young women who survived atomic bombing and experienced severe facial burns, necessitating extensive plastic surgery. As atomic survivors they are at increased risk for cancer of thyroid, salivary gland, lung, breast, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal tract. The North American Hiroshima maiden should warrant easy clinical recognition and require lifetime scrutiny for multisite neoplastic disease.

  3. Multiracial Facial Golden Ratio and Evaluation of Facial Appearance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of facial proportion and its relation to the golden ratio with the evaluation of facial appearance among Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study with 286 randomly selected from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Health Campus students (150 females and 136 males; 100 Malaysian Chinese, 100 Malaysian Malay and 86 Malaysian Indian), with the mean age of 21.54 ± 1.56 (Age range, 18–25). Facial indices obtained from direct facial measurements were used for the classification of facial shape into short, ideal and long. A validated structured questionnaire was used to assess subjects’ evaluation of their own facial appearance. The mean facial indices of Malaysian Indian (MI), Malaysian Chinese (MC) and Malaysian Malay (MM) were 1.59 ± 0.19, 1.57 ± 0.25 and 1.54 ± 0.23 respectively. Only MC showed significant sexual dimorphism in facial index (P = 0.047; P<0.05) but no significant difference was found between races. Out of the 286 subjects, 49 (17.1%) were of ideal facial shape, 156 (54.5%) short and 81 (28.3%) long. The facial evaluation questionnaire showed that MC had the lowest satisfaction with mean score of 2.18 ± 0.97 for overall impression and 2.15 ± 1.04 for facial parts, compared to MM and MI, with mean score of 1.80 ± 0.97 and 1.64 ± 0.74 respectively for overall impression; 1.75 ± 0.95 and 1.70 ± 0.83 respectively for facial parts. In conclusion: 1) Only 17.1% of Malaysian facial proportion conformed to the golden ratio, with majority of the population having short face (54.5%); 2) Facial index did not depend significantly on races; 3) Significant sexual dimorphism was shown among Malaysian Chinese; 4) All three races are generally satisfied with their own facial appearance; 5) No significant association was found between golden ratio and facial evaluation score among Malaysian population. PMID:26562655

  4. Adolescents with HIV and facial lipoatrophy: response to facial stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gabana-Silveira, Jesus Claudio; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Sassi, Fernanda C.; Braga, Arnaldo Feitosa; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of facial stimulation over the superficial muscles of the face in individuals with facial lipoatrophy associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and with no indication for treatment with polymethyl methacrylate. METHOD: The study sample comprised four adolescents of both genders ranging from 13 to 17 years in age. To participate in the study, the participants had to score six or less points on the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. The facial stimulation program used in our study consisted of 12 weekly 30-minute sessions during which individuals received therapy. The therapy consisted of intra- and extra-oral muscle contraction and stretching maneuvers of the zygomaticus major and minor and the masseter muscles. Pre- and post-treatment results were obtained using anthropometric static measurements of the face and the Facial Lipoatrophy Index. RESULTS: The results suggest that the therapeutic program effectively improved the volume of the buccinators. No significant differences were observed for the measurements of the medial portion of the face, the lateral portion of the face, the volume of the masseter muscle, or Facial Lipoatrophy Index scores. CONCLUSION: The results of our study suggest that facial maneuvers applied to the superficial muscles of the face of adolescents with facial lipoatrophy associated with HIV improved the facial area volume related to the buccinators muscles. We believe that our results will encourage future research with HIV patients, especially for patients who do not have the possibility of receiving an alternative aesthetic treatment. PMID:25141118

  5. Some issues in facial transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chenggang, Y; Yan, H; Xudong, Z; Binglun, L; Hui, Z; Xianjie, M; Li, Y; Xing, F; Yunjing, L; Kaihua, L; Huiyuan, L; Yan, Z; Guoyou, Z; Shuzhong, G

    2008-10-01

    Human facial transplantation, a form of composite tissue allotransplantation, has now become a clinical reality. We carried out the world's second partial facial transplantation in April 2006. We reviewed some issues associated with facial transplantation, especially focusing on the individual who underwent the transplant in our department. We discussed surgical indications, techniques, risks versus benefits, informed consent and psychosocial, societal and financial issues of facial transplantation. In our opinion, with the progresses in composite tissue allotransplantation, partial or full facial transplantation is becoming a timely and effective remedy for the significantly disfigured patients. However, there are a lot of problems unsolved, and as we have performed the transplant on only three individuals, no long-term outcome data are available. Facial transplantation needs further research. PMID:18828775

  6. Bilateral radial agenesis with absent thumbs, complex heart defect, short stature, and facial dysmorphism in a patient with pure distal microduplication of 5q35.2-5q35.3

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A partial duplication of the distal long arm of chromosome 5 (5q35--?>?qter) is known to be associated with a distinct phenotype referred to as Hunter-McAlpine syndrome. Clinical spectrum of this disorder mainly consists of mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature, skeletal anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphism featuring flat facies, micrognathia, large, low-set dysplastic ears, hypertelorism, almond-shaped, down-slanted palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, small nose, long philtrum, small mouth, and thin upper lip. Less frequent remarkable findings include craniosynostosis, heart defect, hypoplastic phalanges, preaxial polydactyly, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, and inguinal hernia. In most patients with a partial duplication of 5q the aberration occurred due to an inherited unbalanced translocation, therefore the phenotype was not reflective of pure trisomy 5q. Case presentation We report on a 9.5-year-old boy with some feature of Hunter-McAlpine syndrome including short stature, complex heart defect (dextrocardia, dextroversion, PFO), bilateral cryptorchidism, hypothyroidism, and craniofacial dysmorphism. Additionally, bilateral radial agenesis with complete absence of Ist digital rays, ulnar hypoplasia with bowing, choroidal and retinal coloboma, abnormal biliary vesicle were identified, which have never been noted in 5q trisomy patients. Karyotype analysis, sequencing and MLPA for TBX5 and SALL4 genes were unremarkable. Array comparative genomic hybridization detected a duplication on 5q35.2-5q35.3, resulting from a de novo chromosomal rearrangement. Our proband carried the smallest of all previously reported pure distal 5q trisomies encompassing terminal 5.4-5.6 Mb and presented with the most severe limb malformation attributed to the increased number of distal 5q copies. Conclusions We postulate that a terminal distal trisomy of 5q35.2-5q35.3, which maps 1.1 Mb telomeric to the MSX2 gene is causative for both radial agenesis and complex heart defect in our proband. A potential candidate gene causative for limb malformation in our proband could be FGFR4, which maps relatively in the closest position to the chromosomal breakage site (about 1.3 Mb) from all known 5q duplications. Since the limb malformation as well as the underlying genetic defect are distinct from other 5q trisomy patient we propose that a position effect resulting in altered long-range regulation of the FGFR4 (alternatively MSX2) may be responsible for the limb malformation in our proband. PMID:23342975

  7. Pediatric facial transplantation: Ethical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jennifer; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Hanson, Mark D; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Facial transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as a method of reconstructing otherwise unreconstructable adult faces. As this modality is made more available, we must turn our attention to pediatric patients who may benefit from facial transplantation. In the current article, the authors present and briefly examine the most pressing ethical challenges posed by the possibility of performing facial transplantation on pediatric patients. Furthermore, they issue a call for a policy statement on pediatric facial transplantation. The present article may serve as a first step in that direction, highlighting ethical issues that would need to be considered in the creation of such a statement. PMID:25114614

  8. Pediatric facial transplantation: Ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jennifer; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Hanson, Mark D; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Facial transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as a method of reconstructing otherwise unreconstructable adult faces. As this modality is made more available, we must turn our attention to pediatric patients who may benefit from facial transplantation. In the current article, the authors present and briefly examine the most pressing ethical challenges posed by the possibility of performing facial transplantation on pediatric patients. Furthermore, they issue a call for a policy statement on pediatric facial transplantation. The present article may serve as a first step in that direction, highlighting ethical issues that would need to be considered in the creation of such a statement. PMID:25114614

  9. Comparing sensitivity to facial asymmetry and facial identity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nicole D.; Gleddie, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral symmetry is a facial feature that plays an important role in the aesthetic judgments of faces. The extent to which symmetry contributes to the identification of faces is less clear. We investigated the relationship between facial asymmetry and identity using synthetic face stimuli where the geometric identity of the face can be precisely controlled. Thresholds for all observers were 2 times lower for discriminating facial asymmetry than they were for discriminating facial identity. The advantage for discriminating asymmetrical forms was not observed using nonface shape stimuli, suggesting this advantage is face-specific. Moreover, asymmetry thresholds were not affected when faces were either inverted or constructed about a nonmean face. These results, taken together, suggest that facial asymmetry is a characteristic that we are exquisitely sensitive to, and that may not contribute to face identification. This conclusion is consistent with neuroimaging evidence that suggests that face symmetry and face identity are processed by different neural mechanisms. PMID:24349698

  10. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery. PMID:26195012

  11. Down syndrome detection from facial photographs using machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Rosenbaum, Kenneth; Sze, Raymond; Zand, Dina; Summar, Marshall; Linguraru, Marius George

    2013-02-01

    Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition; one in every 691 babies in United States is born with it. Patients with Down syndrome have an increased risk for heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems and the early detection of the syndrome is fundamental for managing the disease. Clinically, facial appearance is an important indicator in diagnosing Down syndrome and it paves the way for computer-aided diagnosis based on facial image analysis. In this study, we propose a novel method to detect Down syndrome using photography for computer-assisted image-based facial dysmorphology. Geometric features based on facial anatomical landmarks, local texture features based on the Contourlet transform and local binary pattern are investigated to represent facial characteristics. Then a support vector machine classifier is used to discriminate normal and abnormal cases; accuracy, precision and recall are used to evaluate the method. The comparison among the geometric, local texture and combined features was performed using the leave-one-out validation. Our method achieved 97.92% accuracy with high precision and recall for the combined features; the detection results were higher than using only geometric or texture features. The promising results indicate that our method has the potential for automated assessment for Down syndrome from simple, noninvasive imaging data.

  12. The versatile temporoparietal fascial flap: adaptability to a variety of composite defects.

    PubMed

    Rose, E H; Norris, M S

    1990-02-01

    The unique properties of the temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF) offer adaptability in reconstruction of a variety of composite defects. The broad, thin sheet of vascularized tissue may be transferred alone or as a carrier of subjacent bone or overlying skin and scalp. As a pedicled flap, it is ideal for defects of the orbital, malar, mandibular, and mastoid regions. As a free-tissue transfer, the large vessels and lack of bulk find broad utility in reconstruction of the extremities. This flap is our choice for reconstruction of the dorsal hand and non-weight-bearing surfaces of the foot. A viscous gliding surface decreases friction for tendon excursion. The thin contour is aesthetically superior to thicker flaps, allowing unmodified footwear or gloves. The pliable fascia convolutes into surface defects (e.g., bone craters) or drapes over skeletal frameworks (e.g., ear cartilage). The rich capillary network offers nutrition to saucerized bone, cartilage or tendon grafts, and overlying skin grafts. The geometry of the skull lends to fabrication of membranous bone for complex facial puzzles. The donor site is well disguised by hair growth. Twelve cases performed over a 2-year period demonstrate the versatility of this flap. These include complex foot reconstruction, ear and scalp avulsion, shotgun wound of the cheek and orbit, posttraumatic jaw recontouring, chronic osteomyelitis of the hand and foot, and acute resurfacing of dorsal hand with tendon reconstruction. PMID:1967843

  13. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement. PMID:22998924

  14. Quantitative anatomical analysis of facial expression using a 3D motion capture system: Application to cosmetic surgery and facial recognition technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Gi; Jung, Su-Jin; Lee, Hyung-Jin; Seo, Jung-Hyuk; Choi, You-Jin; Bae, Hyun-Sook; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-09-01

    The topography of the facial muscles differs between males and females and among individuals of the same gender. To explain the unique expressions that people can make, it is important to define the shapes of the muscle, their associations with the skin, and their relative functions. Three-dimensional (3D) motion-capture analysis, often used to study facial expression, was used in this study to identify characteristic skin movements in males and females when they made six representative basic expressions. The movements of 44 reflective markers (RMs) positioned on anatomical landmarks were measured. Their mean displacement was large in males [ranging from 14.31 mm (fear) to 41.15 mm (anger)], and 3.35-4.76 mm smaller in females [ranging from 9.55 mm (fear) to 37.80 mm (anger)]. The percentages of RMs involved in the ten highest mean maximum displacement values in making at least one expression were 47.6% in males and 61.9% in females. The movements of the RMs were larger in males than females but were more limited. Expanding our understanding of facial expression requires morphological studies of facial muscles and studies of related complex functionality. Conducting these together with quantitative analyses, as in the present study, will yield data valuable for medicine, dentistry, and engineering, for example, for surgical operations on facial regions, software for predicting changes in facial features and expressions after corrective surgery, and the development of face-mimicking robots. PMID:25872024

  15. Categorizing identity from facial motion.

    PubMed

    Girges, Christine; Spencer, Janine; O'Brien, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Advances in marker-less motion capture technology now allow the accurate replication of facial motion and deformation in computer-generated imagery (CGI). A forced-choice discrimination paradigm using such CGI facial animations showed that human observers can categorize identity solely from facial motion cues. Animations were generated from motion captures acquired during natural speech, thus eliciting both rigid (head rotations and translations) and nonrigid (expressional changes) motion. To limit interferences from individual differences in facial form, all animations shared the same appearance. Observers were required to discriminate between different videos of facial motion and between the facial motions of different people. Performance was compared to the control condition of orientation-inverted facial motion. The results show that observers are able to make accurate discriminations of identity in the absence of all cues except facial motion. A clear inversion effect in both tasks provided consistency with previous studies, supporting the configural view of human face perception. The accuracy of this motion capture technology thus allowed stimuli to be generated that closely resembled real moving faces. Future studies may wish to implement such methodology when studying human face perception. PMID:25687732

  16. Management of Midline Facial Clefts.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sobhan; Sabhlok, Samrat; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Khatri, Isha

    2015-12-01

    Median or midline facial clefts are rare anomalies of developmental origin, etiology of whose occurrence is still unknown precisely. The most basic presentation of midline facial clefts is in the form of a Median cleft lip which is defined as any congenital vertical cleft through the centre of the upper lip. First described by Bechard in 1823, it is the most common amongst all atypical clefts reported. The incidence is about 1:10,00,000 births. This may occur as a sporadic event or as a part of an inherited sequence of anomalies. It arises embryologically from incomplete fusion of the medial nasal prominences. The authors present a series of eight cases with varying degrees of midline facial clefts. This review article aims to give a broad idea on the various classifications used for further understanding of midline facial clefts and a brief idea about the various surgical management techniques used in the repair of these facial clefts. PMID:26604459

  17. Management of Chronic Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher G.; Dellon, A. Lee; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2009-01-01

    Pain persisting for at least 6 months is defined as chronic. Chronic facial pain conditions often take on lives of their own deleteriously changing the lives of the sufferer. Although much is known about facial pain, it is clear that those physicians who treat these conditions should continue elucidating the mechanisms and defining successful treatment strategies for these life-changing conditions. This article will review many of the classic causes of chronic facial pain due to the trigeminal nerve and its branches that are amenable to surgical therapies. Testing of facial sensibility is described and its utility introduced. We will also introduce some of the current hypotheses of atypical facial pain and headaches secondary to chronic nerve compressions and will suggest possible treatment strategies. PMID:22110799

  18. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  19. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are specialized skin cells that produce pigment called melanin. The melanin pigment produced by melanocytes gives skin its color. ... absorbing and scattering the energy. People with more melanin have darker skin and better protection from UV ...

  20. Conservative Treatment of a Large Facial Midroot Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Bronnec, François

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To report on the endodontic and periodontal management of a root and alveolar process perforation in a maxillary front tooth. Summary. Perforation during access cavity preparation is an infrequent complication during endodontic therapy, leading to potential periodontal tissue breakdown. The case described the two-stage management of a massive facial root perforation requiring a connective tissue graft to correct a mucosal fenestration persisting after orthograde repair of the root defect with MTA. PMID:25838948

  1. Facial cutaneous reconstructive surgery: general aesthetic principles.

    PubMed

    Summers, B K; Siegle, R J

    1993-11-01

    The performance of cutaneous reconstructive surgery requires understanding and application of many important principles. This article reviews the critical factors to consider in the management of surgical wounds by second-intention healing, primary closure, skin grafting, and repair with local flaps. For certain defects, reconstruction with local flaps offers several advantages over other alternatives. Key concepts useful in flap choice and implementation are discussed, and surgical techniques that maximize the aesthetic outcome of reconstructive surgery are reviewed. PMID:8227538

  2. The Facial Profile in the Context of Facial Aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Heppt, Werner J; Vent, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Beauty has been an intriguing issue since the evolving of a culture in mankind. Even the Neanderthals are believed to have applied makeover to enhance facial structures and thus underline beauty. The determinants of beauty and aesthetics have been defined by artists and scientists alike. This article will give an overview of the evolvement of a beauty concept and the significance of the facial profile. It aims at sharpening the senses of the facial plastic surgeon for analyzing the patient's face, consulting the patient on feasible options, planning, and conducting surgery in the most individualized way. PMID:26579858

  3. Metabolism of [1-(14)C] and [2-(14)C] leucine in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with isovaleric acidemia. Characterization of metabolic defects.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Mandell, R; Shih, V E

    1976-01-01

    Leucine metabolism in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with isovaleric acidemia was compared with that in normal fibroblasts and in cells from patients with maple syrup urine disease using [1-(14)C] and [2-(14)C] leucine as substrates. Inhibitory effects of methylenecyclopropylacetic acid on leucine metabolism in normal cells were also investigated. Production of 14CO2 from [2-(14)C] leucine was very reduced (96-99%) in both types of mutant cells. Radioactive isovaleric acid accumulated in assay media with isovaleric acidemia cells but not in those with maple syrup urine disease cells. Unexpectedly, 14CO2 production from [1-(14)C] leucine was partially depressed (80%) in isovaleric acidemia cells whereas in maple syrup urine disease cells it was strongly depressed (99%) as expected. These two mutant cells were clearly distinguished by detection of 14C-isovaleric acid accumulation after incubation with [2-(14)C] leucine. A pattern of inhibition of leucine oxidation similar to that seen in isovaleric acidemia cells was induced in normal cells by the addition of 0.7 mM methylenecyclopropylacetic acid to the assay medium. The partial inhibition of [1-(14)C] leucine oxidation seen in isovaleric acidemia cells and also in normal cells in the presence of the inhibitor appears to be, at least in part, due to an accumulation of isovalerate in the cells. Isovaleric acid (5-10) mM) inhibited [1-(14)C] leucine oxidation 32-68% when added to the assay medium with normal cells. Addition of flavin adenine dinucleoside to culture medium or assay medium or both did not restore oxidation of either leucine substrate in isovaleric acidemia cells. PMID:932204

  4. 7 CFR 52.3187 - Definitions and explanations of defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of Size, Defects § 52.3187 Definitions and explanations of defects. Dried prunes damaged or affected by the following are scorable as defects: (a) Off-color. “Off-color” means a skin color different from characteristic black, blue-black, reddish-purple, or other characteristic skin color for the...

  5. 7 CFR 52.3187 - Definitions and explanations of defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of Size, Defects § 52.3187 Definitions and explanations of defects. Dried prunes damaged or affected by the following are scorable as defects: (a) Off-color. “Off-color” means a skin color different from characteristic black, blue-black, reddish-purple, or other characteristic skin color for the...

  6. Bilateral cleft lip and palate: A morphometric analysis of facial skeletal form using cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-07-01

    Bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) is caused by a lack of merging of maxillary and nasal facial prominences during development and morphogenesis. BCLP is associated with congenital defects of the oronasal facial region that can impair ingestion, mastication, speech, and dentofacial development. Using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, 7- to 18-year old individuals born with BCLP (n?=?15) and age- and sex-matched controls (n?=?15) were retrospectively assessed. Coordinate values of three-dimensional facial skeletal anatomical landmarks (n?=?32) were measured from each CBCT image. Data were evaluated using principal coordinates analysis (PCOORD) and Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA). PCOORD axes 1-3 explain approximately 45% of the morphological variation between samples, and specific patterns of morphological differences were associated with each axis. Approximately, 30% of facial skeletal measures significantly differ by confidence interval testing (??=?0.10) between samples. While significant form differences occur across the facial skeleton, strong patterns of differences are localized to the lateral and superioinferior aspects of the nasal aperture. In conclusion, the BCLP deformity significantly alters facial skeletal morphology of the midface and oronasal regions of the face, but morphological differences were also found in the upper facial skeleton and to a lesser extent, the lower facial skeleton. This pattern of strong differences in the oronasal region of the facial skeleton combined with differences across the rest of the facial complex underscores the idea that bones of the craniofacial skeleton are integrated. PMID:25752824

  7. An Experiment in Facial Reconstructive Surgery in a Prison Population

    PubMed Central

    Lewison, Edward

    1965-01-01

    A 10-year study of the effects of reconstructive surgery on selected inmates in a British Columbia provincial prison is described. It is proposed that physical defects can be dominant causes of crime, and that the correction of facial defects in inmates of a penal institution can effect a striking improvement in their conduct during imprisonment, and make them more confident on re-entry into society. This survey, covering 450 patients operated on in a 10-year period, demonstrates a marked decrease in the rate of criminal recidivism. PMID:14270207

  8. Facial granulomas secondary to Dermalive microimplants: Report of a case with histopathologic differential diagnosis among the granulomas secondary to different injectable permanent filler materials.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Machuca, Inmaculada; González-Guerra, Elena; Angulo, Jorge; del Carmen Fariña, María; Martín, Lucia; Requena, Luis

    2006-04-01

    Wrinkle reduction and the correction of skin defects using injectable aesthetic microimplants are now widely performed by dermatologists and plastic surgeons. In recent years, dermal filler substances containing polymer particle suspensions such as Bioplastique, Artecoll, and Dermalive are the most commonly used materials. These microimplants are permanent, non-biodegradable, and generally well tolerated, although various adverse reactions are still possible. We describe here a patient with facial granulomas secondary to Dermalive injections for correction of naso-labial folds and wrinkles. The particular shape of the injected particles allows for correct identification of the implanted material. Therefore, histopathologic examination is the best means to obtain the correct diagnosis of foreign body granuloma and to identify the type of filler particles. We discuss the histopathologic differential diagnosis among the granulomas secondary to the most commonly used aesthetic permanent filler materials. PMID:16625084

  9. Practical applications of skin biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Thacker, J G; Stalnecker, M C; Allaire, P E; Edgerton, M T; Rodeheaver, G T; Edlich, R F

    1977-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of skin have an important influence on plastic surgical decisions. They aid the surgeon in planning elective incisions, excisions, or scar revisions. They provide insight into the most appropriate method of coverage of skin defects as well as the design of an artificial skin substitute. Skin biomechanics can, in part, be characterized in vivo by either a skin extensiometer or by studying the deformation of skin defects. These methods indicate the magnitude and directional orientation of skin tensions which are dependent partly on the mechanical characteristics of the dermal fibers and partly on the pattern in which they are woven. The tensions to which the skin are subjected can be classified as either static or dynamic in origin. Static skin tensions are the natural tensions existing in skin. The magnitude of static tensions varies between individuals, at different sites in the same person, and in different directions in many sites. The dynamic tensions are caused by a combination of forces which are associated with joint movement, mimetic and other voluntary muscle activity, and gravity. Knowledge of these tensions allows the surgeon to align the operative site in the direction of maximal tension and to approximate the wound with the least amount of tension. As a consequence of this, the scar healing between the cut edges of the wound should be narrow and inconspicuous. PMID:856528

  10. Does Facial Resemblance Enhance Cooperation?

    PubMed Central

    Giang, Trang; Bell, Raoul; Buchner, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces). A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system. PMID:23094095

  11. Diagnosis and management of facial pigmented macules.

    PubMed

    Lallas, Aimilios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Moscarella, Elvira; Longo, Caterina; Simonetti, Vito; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pigmented macules on the mottled chronic sun-damaged skin of the face is challenging and includes lentigo maligna (LM), pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, solar lentigo, and lichen-planus-like keratosis. Although dermatoscopy improves the diagnostic accuracy of the unaided eye, the accurate diagnosis and management of pigmented facial macules remains one of the most challenging scenarios in daily practice. This is related to the fact that pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, lichen-planus-like keratosis, and LM may reveal overlapping criteria, making their differential diagnosis clinically difficult. For this reason, practical rules have been introduced, which should help to minimize the risk for inappropriate diagnosis and management of LM. PMID:24314382

  12. Facial neuropathy with imaging enhancement of the facial nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sehreen; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    A young women developed unilateral facial neuropathy 2 weeks after a motor vehicle collision involving fractures of the skull and mandible. MRI showed contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. We review the literature describing facial neuropathy after trauma and facial nerve enhancement patterns with different causes of facial neuropathy. PMID:25574155

  13. Facial nerve neuromas: radiologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Latack, J T; Gabrielsen, T O; Knake, J E; Kemink, J L; Graham, M D; Gebarski, S S; Yang, P J

    1983-12-01

    Eight patients who had facial nerve neuromas were examined, and the radiographic findings are reported. Thin section tomography, high resolution computed tomography, posterior fossa computed tomography, and cerebellopontine angle cisternography using Pantopaque (iophendylate) demonstrated bone erosions and soft tissue masses conforming to the course of the facial nerve. The lesions generally exhibited either a proximal or a distal pattern of nerve involvement. Radiologic imaging frequently permits a correct preoperative diagnosis and accurate definition of the extent of facial nerve neuromas, assessments that are important for proper patient management. PMID:6606188

  14. Facial Transplants in Xenopus laevis Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sive, Hazel

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial birth defects occur in 1 out of every 700 live births, but etiology is rarely known due to limited understanding of craniofacial development. To identify where signaling pathways and tissues act during patterning of the developing face, a 'face transplant' technique has been developed in embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. A region of presumptive facial tissue (the "Extreme Anterior Domain" (EAD)) is removed from a donor embryo at tailbud stage, and transplanted to a host embryo of the same stage, from which the equivalent region has been removed. This can be used to generate a chimeric face where the host or donor tissue has a loss or gain of function in a gene, and/or includes a lineage label. After healing, the outcome of development is monitored, and indicates roles of the signaling pathway within the donor or surrounding host tissues. Xenopus is a valuable model for face development, as the facial region is large and readily accessible for micromanipulation. Many embryos can be assayed, over a short time period since development occurs rapidly. Findings in the frog are relevant to human development, since craniofacial processes appear conserved between Xenopus and mammals. PMID:24748020

  15. Ionic skin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jeong-Yun; Keplinger, Christoph; Whitesides, George M; Suo, Zhigang

    2014-12-01

    Electronic skins (i.e., stretchable sheets of distributed sensors) report signals using electrons, whereas natural skins report signals using ions. Here, ionic conductors are used to create a new type of sensory sheet, called "ionic skin". Ionic skins are highly stretchable, transparent, and biocompatible. They readily measure strains from 1% to 500%, and pressures as low as 1 kPa. PMID:25355528

  16. The role of the anterolateral thigh flap in complex defects of the scalp and cranium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Yuan; Miguel, Ros; Chew, Khong-Yik; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Yang, Johnson Chia-Shen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we introduced scalp reconstruction using free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps and evaluated postoperative outcomes in nine patients between March 2000 and April 2012. Five patients had problems of exposed prosthesis, three required reconstruction after resection of scalp tumor and one patient presented with third degree flame burns of the scalp. All flaps survived without re-exploration, except three flaps with tip necrosis requiring secondary procedures of debridement and small Z-plasty reconstructions. The superficial temporal artery and its concomitant vein were used as recipient vessels, apart from two cases where previous surgery and flame burns excluded these choices, for which facial arteries and veins were used instead. Primary closure of the donor-site was possible in six cases; with skin grafting performed for the other three patients. All donor sites healed without complications. The ALT flap offers the advantage of customizable size, option of fascia lata as vascularized dural replacement, and minimal flap atrophy typical of muscle flaps. Indications include very large defects, defects with exposed prosthesis, or defects with bone or dural loss. Our experience lends credible support to the use of customized free ALT flaps to achieve functional and cosmetically superior result for the reconstruction of large scalp defects, especially with bone exposure. PMID:23640870

  17. Full-thickness nasal defect: place of prosthetic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Malard, O; Lanhouet, J; Michel, G; Dreno, B; Espitalier, F; Rio, E

    2015-04-01

    Extensive rhinectomy or full-thickness defects are not uncommon, in particular in the treatment of skin cancer. The present study lays out the principles of choice and creation of prostheses for nasal reconstruction. Prosthetic nasal reconstruction in France depends on a specialist prescription drawn up under the "Ocular and Facial Prostheses" rubric of the official List of Products and Procedures. National health insurance cover is 100% on condition that the prosthesis is produced by an approved prosthetist. The present study describes production stages, forms and means of fixation, and the timeline of implantation. Nasal prosthetic repair is simple, fast and functional, allowing social rehabilitation despite full respect of carcinologic margins, and without ruling out subsequent multilayer reconstruction. Benefits and drawbacks, and the factors determining repair options according to pathologic context are discussed. Nasal prostheses are an integral option in the repair of full-thickness nasal defects and total rhinectomies. The head and neck surgeon needs expertise in indications and techniques of reconstruction, so as to prescribe nasal prostheses as the context demands. PMID:25547274

  18. Birth Defects

    MedlinePLUS

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  19. Illuminant color estimation based on pigmentation separation from human skin color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satomi; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Kamijo, Naohiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2015-03-01

    Human has the visual system called "color constancy" that maintains the perceptive colors of same object across various light sources. The effective method of color constancy algorithm was proposed to use the human facial color in a digital color image, however, this method has wrong estimation results by the difference of individual facial colors. In this paper, we present the novel color constancy algorithm based on skin color analysis. The skin color analysis is the method to separate the skin color into the components of melanin, hemoglobin and shading. We use the stationary property of Japanese facial color, and this property is calculated from the components of melanin and hemoglobin. As a result, we achieve to propose the method to use subject's facial color in image and not depend on the individual difference among Japanese facial color.

  20. Facial asymmetry: a current review

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; Gribel, Bruno Frazão; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The term "asymmetry" is used to make reference to dissimilarity between homologous elements, altering the balance between structures. Facial asymmetry is common in the overall population and is often presented subclinically. Nevertheless, on occasion, significant facial asymmetry results not only in functional, but also esthetic issues. Under these conditions, its etiology should be carefully investigated in order to achieve an adequate treatment plan. Facial asymmetry assessment comprises patient's first interview, extra- as well as intraoral clinical examination, and supplementary imaging examination. Subsequent asymmetry treatment depends on patient's age, the etiology of the condition and on the degree of disharmony, and might include from asymmetrical orthodontic mechanics to orthognathic surgery. Thus, the present study aims at addressing important aspects to be considered by the orthodontist reaching an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan of facial asymmetry, in addition to reporting treatment of some patients carriers of such challenging disharmony. PMID:26691977

  1. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  2. Measuring and modeling facial affect.

    PubMed

    Schiano, D J; Ehrlich, S; Rahardja, K; Sheridan, K

    2000-11-01

    In recent years, researchers in computer science and human-computer interaction have become increasingly interested in characterizing perception of facial affect. Ironically, this applied interest comes at a time when the classic findings on perception of human facial affect are being challenged in the psychological research literature, largely on methodological grounds. This paper first describes two experiments that empirically address Russell's methodological criticisms of the classic work on measuring "basic emotions," as well as his alternative approach toward modeling "facial affect space." Finally, a user study on affect in a prototype model of a robot face is reported; these results are compared with the human findings from Experiment 1. This work provides new data on measuring facial affect, while also demonstrating how basic and more applied research can mutually inform one another. PMID:11189850

  3. Measuring facial expression of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Research into emotions has increased in recent decades, especially on the subject of recognition of emotions. However, studies of the facial expressions of emotion were compromised by technical problems with visible video analysis and electromyography in experimental settings. These have only recently been overcome. There have been new developments in the field of automated computerized facial recognition; allowing real-time identification of facial expression in social environments. This review addresses three approaches to measuring facial expression of emotion and describes their specific contributions to understanding emotion in the healthy population and in persons with mental illness. Despite recent progress, studies on human emotions have been hindered by the lack of consensus on an emotion theory suited to examining the dynamic aspects of emotion and its expression. Studying expression of emotion in patients with mental health conditions for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes will profit from theoretical and methodological progress. PMID:26869846

  4. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  5. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  6. Porous high-density polyethylene in facial reconstruction and revision rhinoplasty: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Initial methods which used human tissues as reconstruction materials caused different problems including rejection, limited shapes and infection. In 1970s, PHDPE (Medpor®) was introduced by its exclusive advantageous including no donor site morbidity, easily shaped and the minimal foreign body reaction. Hereby, we report our experience of using Medpor® in facial reconstruction especially in frontal reconstruction and orbital rim with a large sample size. Methods This study was a prospective cohort study. Surgical techniques included using Medpor® in reconstruction of lamina papiracea (LP) (15 patients), frontal bone (15 patients), orbital rim (18 patients) and open rhinoplasty (8 patients). All interventions on LP were performed by endoscopic procedures. All frontal operations were carried out by bicoronal incision. In orbital defects, we used subciliary incision. Results From all 56 patients, 1 case had primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of maxillary sinus. In that case, reconstruction of inferior orbital rim was not successful and extrusion was occurred after radiotherapy. In rhinoplasty and other experiences no extrusion or infection were detected within the next 1 to 3?years of follow up. There were not any palpable and visible irregularities under the skin in our experiences. Conclusions In this study the patients did not experience any complications during the follow up periods and the satisfaction was remarkable. Gathering these data gives rise to future review studies which can provide more organized evidences for replacing classic reconstructive methods by the presented material. PMID:22642753

  7. Rib Bone Graft Adjusted to Fit the Facial Asymmetry: A Frame Structure Graft.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Ho; Choi, Jong Hwan; Hwang, Kun; Choi, Jun Ho

    2015-10-01

    The authors introduce the concept of a "frame structure graft" in which a harvested rib bone was adjusted to fit facial asymmetry. On the costochondral junction of the sixth or seventh rib, a 5 cm incision was made. Through a subperiosteal dissection, the rib bone was harvested. Using a reciprocating saw, the harvested rib was scored on its anterior surface as well as its posterior surface with a partial depth at different intervals. The harvested rib bone was placed on the skin surface of the unaffected side of the face and a curvature was created exactly matching that of the unaffected side by bending the bone using a greenstick fracture. Thereafter, the graft was adjusted to conceal the asymmetry of the deficient side. The adjusted "frame structure" was transferred to the defect through the incisions on the affected side, and the "frame structure" graft was placed on the mandible or zygoma. The graft fixation was done externally with at least 2 Kirschner wires (K-wires). From January 2005 to August 2013, a total of 30 patients (13 men, 17 women, mean age 25.6 years) received a frame structure graft. All 30 patients achieved good healing at the operation site without complications. Donor-site morbidity as pneumothorax from the rib bone harvest was not found. Merits of this frame structure graft, the authors think, are that this method could allow a similar curvature to the normal side. In addition, the procedure itself is easy. PMID:26468802

  8. Medical facial surface scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannier, Michael W.; Bhatia, Gulab H.; Commean, Paul K.; Pilgram, Thomas K.; Brunsden, Barry S.

    1992-05-01

    Optical, non-contact three-dimensional range surface digitizers are employed in the 360-degree examination of object surfaces, especially the heads and faces of individuals. The resultant 3- D surface data is suitable for computer graphics display and manipulation, for numerically controlled object replications, or for further processing such as surface measurement extraction. We employed a scanner with a basic active sensor element consisting of a synchronized pattern projector employing flashtubes that illuminate a surface, with a CID camera to detect, digitize, and transmit the sequence of 24 images (per camera) to a digital image processor for surface triangulation, calibration, and fusion into a single surface description of the headform. A major feature of this unit is its use of multiple (typically 6) stationary active sensor elements, with efficient calibration algorithms that achieve nearly seamless superposition of overlapping surface segments seen by individual cameras. The result is accurate and complete coverage of complex contoured surfaces. Application of this system to digitization of the human head in the planning and evaluation of facial plastic surgery is presented.

  9. Bizarre paediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Ho, W S; Ying, S Y; Wong, T W

    2000-08-01

    Child abuse and neglect account for a significant number of paediatric burn injuries. It is of great importance because of the high mortality, high frequency of repeated abuse, as well as the physical, psychological and social sequelae that it causes. Burn abuse is often under-recognized and under-reported because it is difficult to define non-accidental injury. On the other hand, false accusation of burn abuse is extremely damaging to the family. Bizarre and unusual burn injuries can be caused by accident and should not automatically be assumed to be deliberate injury. Three boys of age 1-7 years with bizarre facial burns were admitted to the Burns Unit at the Prince of Wales Hospital between February 1995 and July 1999. One was burned by his baby-sitter with hot water steam and the other two were burned by their mothers with hot boiled eggs. The unusual causes of their burns raised the suspicion of child abuse and formal investigations were carried out by the Social Services Department. Detail assessment including a developmental history of the child and the psychosocial assessment of the family revealed that these three boys were burned because of poor medical advice and innocent cultural belief. PMID:10812279

  10. Subtotal facial nerve decompression in preventing further recurrence and promoting facial nerve recovery of severe idiopathic recurrent facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-hui; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Jie; Liu, Hua; Qian, Xiao-zhong; Pan, Xin-liang

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study is to document the role of subtotal facial nerve decompression in preventing further recurrence and promoting facial nerve recovery of severe idiopathic recurrent facial palsy. Twenty-two cases with idiopathic recurrent facial palsy, which had over 95% degeneration of facial nerve on electroneurography, were included in the study, among which 12 accepting subtotal facial nerve decompression were involved in surgery group, and 10 who refused surgery and received prednisolone were classified into control group. The recurrence of facial palsy and facial nerve recovery was compared. The patients were followed up for 5.3 years (range 3-8 years) and 5.2 years (range 3-7 years) in surgery group and control group, respectively. Further recurrence of facial palsy occurred in none of 12 patients (0%) in surgery group in contrast to 4 of 10 cases (40%) in control group, with statistical difference (p < 0.05). 11 of 12 cases (91.7%) in surgery group recovered to Grade I or Grade II compared to 3 of 10 cases (30.0%) in control group, with significant difference (p < 0.05). Subtotal facial nerve decompression is effective to prevent further recurrence of facial palsy and promote facial nerve recovery of severe idiopathic recurrent facial palsy. PMID:24619203

  11. Detection and inpainting of facial wrinkles using texture orientation fields and Markov random field modeling.

    PubMed

    Batool, Nazre; Chellappa, Rama

    2014-09-01

    Facial retouching is widely used in media and entertainment industry. Professional software usually require a minimum level of user expertise to achieve the desirable results. In this paper, we present an algorithm to detect facial wrinkles/imperfection. We believe that any such algorithm would be amenable to facial retouching applications. The detection of wrinkles/imperfections can allow these skin features to be processed differently than the surrounding skin without much user interaction. For detection, Gabor filter responses along with texture orientation field are used as image features. A bimodal Gaussian mixture model (GMM) represents distributions of Gabor features of normal skin versus skin imperfections. Then, a Markov random field model is used to incorporate the spatial relationships among neighboring pixels for their GMM distributions and texture orientations. An expectation-maximization algorithm then classifies skin versus skin wrinkles/imperfections. Once detected automatically, wrinkles/imperfections are removed completely instead of being blended or blurred. We propose an exemplar-based constrained texture synthesis algorithm to inpaint irregularly shaped gaps left by the removal of detected wrinkles/imperfections. We present results conducted on images downloaded from the Internet to show the efficacy of our algorithms. PMID:24968171

  12. Wells’ Syndrome Mimicking Facial Cellulitis: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cormerais, Maxence; Poizeau, Florence; Darrieux, Laure; Tisseau, Laurent; Safa, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Wells’ syndrome (WS), or eosinophilic cellulitis, is an uncommon inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology that typically presents with pruritic cellulitis-like plaques on the extremities. Therefore, WS is often misdiagnosed as bacterial cellulitis due to its similarity in presentation. Here, we report two cases of WS that masqueraded as bacterial facial cellulitis. Under treatment with oral prednisone and/or a combination therapy with levocetirizine and hydroxyzine, both patients showed a dramatic improvement of the skin lesions. These cases highlight the need for clinicians to consider WS in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with facial cellulitis that does not respond to an initial antimicrobial regimen. In addition, our cases suggest that combination therapy with levocetirizine and hydroxyzine may be successfully used as corticosteroid-sparing treatment or to prevent relapse after the discontinuation of corticosteroid treatment. PMID:26120307

  13. Wells' Syndrome Mimicking Facial Cellulitis: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Cormerais, Maxence; Poizeau, Florence; Darrieux, Laure; Tisseau, Laurent; Safa, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Wells' syndrome (WS), or eosinophilic cellulitis, is an uncommon inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology that typically presents with pruritic cellulitis-like plaques on the extremities. Therefore, WS is often misdiagnosed as bacterial cellulitis due to its similarity in presentation. Here, we report two cases of WS that masqueraded as bacterial facial cellulitis. Under treatment with oral prednisone and/or a combination therapy with levocetirizine and hydroxyzine, both patients showed a dramatic improvement of the skin lesions. These cases highlight the need for clinicians to consider WS in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with facial cellulitis that does not respond to an initial antimicrobial regimen. In addition, our cases suggest that combination therapy with levocetirizine and hydroxyzine may be successfully used as corticosteroid-sparing treatment or to prevent relapse after the discontinuation of corticosteroid treatment. PMID:26120307

  14. Neisseria meningitidis as a cause of facial cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Brent; Kittai, Adam; Chang, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with facial cellulitis and found to have Neisseria meningitidis bacteraemia with no evidence of infection outside of the facial soft tissue. He was treated with a course of intravenous ceftriaxone and transitioned to oral amoxicillin on discharge with significant improvement of his symptoms. N meningitidis is best recognised as a causal agent of bacterial meningitis. To our knowledge N meningitidis cellulitis has only been described in 12 other cases. In this case series we describe and summarise our case, along with the 12 cases already reported in the literature. We report this case series to highlight the importance of recognising N meningitidis in the differential in patients presenting with acute skin and soft tissue infections especially involving the periorbital, head and neck regions. PMID:24626385

  15. A Contemporary Approach to Facial Reanimation.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Nate; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2015-01-01

    The management of acute facial nerve insult may entail medical therapy, surgical exploration, decompression, or repair depending on the etiology. When recovery is not complete, facial mimetic function lies on a spectrum ranging from flaccid paralysis to hyperkinesis resulting in facial immobility. Through systematic assessment of the face at rest and with movement, one may tailor the management to the particular pattern of dysfunction. Interventions for long-standing facial palsy include physical therapy, injectables, and surgical reanimation procedures. The goal of the management is to restore facial balance and movement. This article summarizes a contemporary approach to the management of facial nerve insults. PMID:26042960

  16. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips Squamous cell carcinoma Stasis dermatitis Tattoo removal Tinea versicolor U - W ... of this very serious skin cancer. Learn more. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) This skin cancer tends to form on ...

  17. Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Abscess Cellulitis Taking Care of Your Skin Abscess Impetigo Ringworm Cellulitis Should I Pop My Pimple? Tips for Taking Care of Your Skin Impetigo Paronychia Pityriasis Rosea Abscess Contact Us Print Resources ...

  18. Skin Aging

    MedlinePLUS

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  19. Your Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your body. Without skin, people's muscles, bones, and organs would be hanging out all over the place. Skin holds everything together. It also: protects our bodies helps keep our bodies at just the right temperature allows us to have the sense of touch What's your biggest skin worry? Don' ...

  20. Compound facial expressions of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

  1. Cortical control of facial expression.

    PubMed

    Müri, René M

    2016-06-01

    The present Review deals with the motor control of facial expressions in humans. Facial expressions are a central part of human communication. Emotional face expressions have a crucial role in human nonverbal behavior, allowing a rapid transfer of information between individuals. Facial expressions can be either voluntarily or emotionally controlled. Recent studies in nonhuman primates and humans have revealed that the motor control of facial expressions has a distributed neural representation. At least five cortical regions on the medial and lateral aspects of each hemisphere are involved: the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area on the medial wall, and the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex. The results of studies in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that the innervation of the face is bilaterally controlled for the upper part and mainly contralaterally controlled for the lower part. Furthermore, the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area are essential for the voluntary control of facial expressions. In contrast, the cingulate cortical areas are important for emotional expression, because they receive input from different structures of the limbic system. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1578-1585, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26418049

  2. [The history of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques. PMID:26088742

  3. Differential Reanimation of the Upper and Lower Face Using 2 Interpositional Nerve Grafts in Total Facial Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Radical parotidectomy often results in complex facial nerve defects involving the main nerve trunk and multiple distal nerve branches. Although cable nerve grafting often leads to good nerve regeneration, severe synkinesis due to aberrant axonal regrowth is inevitable. In such situations, the use of 2 motor sources to differentially reanimate the upper and lower face could minimize synkinesis. Here we describe a method of total facial nerve reconstruction in which the upper and lower face are differentially reconstructed with the hypoglossal nerve and facial nerve, respectively, using 2 interpositional nerve grafts. Reconstruction of the lower face with the facial nerve restored voluntary and coordinated animation, and reconstruction of the upper face with the hypoglossal nerve restored frontalis muscle tone and eye closure. These results suggest that our method could serve as an alternative to conventional techniques that use only the facial or hypoglossal nerve. PMID:26579350

  4. Differential Reanimation of the Upper and Lower Face Using 2 Interpositional Nerve Grafts in Total Facial Nerve Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Koichi; Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-10-01

    Radical parotidectomy often results in complex facial nerve defects involving the main nerve trunk and multiple distal nerve branches. Although cable nerve grafting often leads to good nerve regeneration, severe synkinesis due to aberrant axonal regrowth is inevitable. In such situations, the use of 2 motor sources to differentially reanimate the upper and lower face could minimize synkinesis. Here we describe a method of total facial nerve reconstruction in which the upper and lower face are differentially reconstructed with the hypoglossal nerve and facial nerve, respectively, using 2 interpositional nerve grafts. Reconstruction of the lower face with the facial nerve restored voluntary and coordinated animation, and reconstruction of the upper face with the hypoglossal nerve restored frontalis muscle tone and eye closure. These results suggest that our method could serve as an alternative to conventional techniques that use only the facial or hypoglossal nerve. PMID:26579350

  5. Suction based mechanical characterization of superficial facial soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Weickenmeier, J; Jabareen, M; Mazza, E

    2015-12-16

    The present study is aimed at a combined experimental and numerical investigation of the mechanical response of superficial facial tissues. Suction based experiments provide the location, time, and history dependent behavior of skin and SMAS (superficial musculoaponeurotic system) by means of Cutometer and Aspiration measurements. The suction method is particularly suitable for in vivo, multi-axial testing of soft biological tissue including a high repeatability in subsequent tests. The campaign comprises three measurement sites in the face, i.e. jaw, parotid, and forehead, using two different loading profiles (instantaneous loading and a linearly increasing and decreasing loading curve), multiple loading magnitudes, and cyclic loading cases to quantify history dependent behavior. In an inverse finite element analysis based on anatomically detailed models an optimized set of material parameters for the implementation of an elastic-viscoplastic material model was determined, yielding an initial shear modulus of 2.32kPa for skin and 0.05kPa for SMAS, respectively. Apex displacements at maximum instantaneous and linear loading showed significant location specificity with variations of up to 18% with respect to the facial average response while observing variations in repeated measurements in the same location of less than 12%. In summary, the proposed parameter sets for skin and SMAS are shown to provide remarkable agreement between the experimentally observed and numerically predicted tissue response under all loading conditions considered in the present study, including cyclic tests. PMID:26584965

  6. Facial coloration tracks changes in women's estradiol.

    PubMed

    Jones, Benedict C; Hahn, Amanda C; Fisher, Claire I; Wincenciak, Joanna; Kandrik, Michal; Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; DeBruine, Lisa M

    2015-06-01

    Red facial coloration is an important social cue in many primate species, including humans. In such species, the vasodilatory effects of estradiol may cause red facial coloration to change systematically during females' ovarian cycle. Although increased red facial coloration during estrus has been observed in female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), evidence linking primate facial color changes directly to changes in measured estradiol is lacking. Addressing this issue, we used a longitudinal design to demonstrate that red facial coloration tracks within-subject changes in women's estradiol, but not within-subject changes in women's progesterone or estradiol-to-progesterone ratio. Moreover, the relationship between estradiol and facial redness was observed in two independent samples of women (N = 50 and N = 65). Our results suggest that changes in facial coloration may provide cues of women's fertility and present the first evidence for a direct link between estradiol and female facial redness in a primate species. PMID:25796069

  7. Genetic Modifiers of the Physical Malformations in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome/DiGeorge Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans, is characterized by craniofacial, parathyroid, and thymic defects as well as cardiac outflow tract malformations. Most patients have a similar hemizygous 3 million base pair deletion on 22q11.2. Studies in mouse have shown that "Tbx1", a…

  8. Facial hair policy in a respirator program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, P.R. )

    1989-10-01

    In this paper the prohibition against facial hair for respirator users is explored. Reasons for the prohibition are given, along with suggestions for establishing or reviewing a policy. Recommendations are given for properly wording a facial hair policy, and the issue of facial hair on female workers is also addressed.

  9. Sexual dimorphism of facial appearance in ageing human adults: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mydlová, Miriama; Dupej, Ján; Koudelová, Jana; Velemínská, Jana

    2015-12-01

    In the forensic sciences, knowledge of facial ageing is very important in searching for both dead and living individuals. Ageing estimations typically model the biological profile, which can be compared to missing persons. The main goals of this current study were to construct ageing trajectories for adult human faces of both sexes and evaluate sexual dimorphism in relation to static allometry. Our study was based on the analysis of three-dimensional facial surface models of 194 individuals 20-80 years of age. The evaluation consisted of a dense correspondence analysis of facial scans and multivariate statistics. It was shown that both age and sex have a significant influence on facial form and shape. Male features included a longer face, with more protruded foreheads, eyebrow ridges and nose, including the region under the upper lip and mandible region, but more retruded cheeks compared to females. Ageing in both sexes shared common traits, such as more pronounced roundness of the face (rectangular in males), decreased facial convexity, increased visibility of skin folds and wrinkles connected with the loss of skin elasticity, and soft tissue stretching, especially in the orbital area and lower face; however, male faces exhibited more intense ageing changes. The above-mentioned sexual dimorphic traits tended to diminish in the elderly age category, though overall sexual dimorphism was heightened with age. The static allometric relationships between size and form or shape were similar in both sexes, except that the larger faces of elderly males displayed more intensive ageing changes. PMID:26548377

  10. Blocking facial mimicry reduces perceptual sensitivity for facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Ipser, Alberta; Cook, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Built on models of 'action understanding', motor theories of expression perception propose that facial simulation, a process similar to covert imitation, aids perception and interpretation of others' facial expressions. As predicted by these accounts, some reports suggest that blocking facial mimicry impairs expression recognition. However, these reports have been criticized and motor theories remain controversial. Crucially, it remains to be determined whether the labeling errors observed reflect a loss of perceptual sensitivity - a genuine perceptual phenomenon - or whether they are a product of response bias. The current study addressed this question using a novel psychophysical paradigm, where observers judged whether smiles drawn from a morph continuum were sincere or insincere. In Experiment 1, we confirmed that cues from both the eye and mouth regions contribute to sincerity judgments. Experiment 2 measured discrimination of smile sincerity across free-viewing and blocked-mimicry conditions. In the blocked-mimicry condition, participants pronounced vowel sounds during stimulus presentation, thereby loading the motor system and preventing mimicry. Each participant's responses were modeled by fitting psychometric functions. Sensitivity to changes in smile sincerity and bias were inferred from the slope and the point of subjective equality (PSE), respectively. Motor interference significantly decreased sensitivity relative to baseline, but did systematically affect bias. Experiment 3 examined whether the motor manipulation has similar effects on judgments of facial gender, a task equated for difficulty but which is not thought to recruit motor processes. Neither slope nor PSE estimates for gender judgments were affected, indicating that the loss of sensitivity seen in Experiment 2 is relatively specific to judgments of expression and does not reflect generic distraction. These findings accord with the view that judgments of facial expression benefit from motor contributions to perception. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26327064

  11. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. Results: In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. Conclusions: The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh. PMID:26550216

  12. [Small fiber neuropathy in a patient with complete Heerfordt syndrome manifesting as refractory facial pain].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Toshiaki; Miyagawa, Shinji; Matsui, Kazutaka; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of complete Heerfordt syndrome accompanied by the involvement of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) manifesting as refracory facial pain. A 30-year-old man presented with pyrexia, a 2-week history of facial burning pain, and difficulty of mastication. After admission to our hospital, neurological examinations showed bilateral facial pain, trigeminal motor palsy, left facial nerve palsy, bilateral sensory neural deafness, uveitis and swelling of the parotid gland. Other examinations revealed bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, high serum titer of angiotensin coenzyme, and no response in a tuberculin-tested, non-caseating epithelioid granuloma from lip biopsy, leading to the diagnosis of complete Heerfordt syndrome. Mandibular skin biopsy with immunostaining for PGP 9.5 showed SFN. High-dose corticosteroids proved somewhat effective against SFN as facial pain, but reducing the corticosteroid dose proved difficult, as symptoms were refractory to other immunosuppressants and pain-control drugs such as anti-epileptics and anti-depressants. The patient died of acute pancreatitis 3 years after disease onset. Autopsy showed no granuloma in hilar lymph node, trigeminal nerve, cranial base, nerve root, and muscle. SFN in this case probably represent a cause of refractory facial pain. PMID:25087562

  13. Facial plastic surgery area acquisition method based on point cloud mathematical model solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuwu; Liu, Fei

    2013-09-01

    It is one of the hot research problems nowadays to find a quick and accurate method of acquiring the facial plastic surgery area to provide sufficient but irredundant autologous or in vitro skin source for covering extensive wound, trauma, and burnt area. At present, the acquisition of facial plastic surgery area mainly includes model laser scanning, point cloud data acquisition, pretreatment of point cloud data, three-dimensional model reconstruction, and computation of area. By using this method, the area can be computed accurately, but it is hard to control the random error, and it requires a comparatively longer computation period. In this article, a facial plastic surgery area acquisition method based on point cloud mathematical model solution is proposed. This method applies symmetric treatment to the point cloud based on the pretreatment of point cloud data, through which the comparison diagram color difference map of point cloud error before and after symmetry is obtained. The slicing mathematical model of facial plastic area is got through color difference map diagram. By solving the point cloud data in this area directly, the facial plastic area is acquired. The point cloud data are directly operated in this method, which can accurately and efficiently complete the surgery area computation. The result of the comparative analysis shows the method is effective in facial plastic surgery area. PMID:24036743

  14. Transformation of Face Transplants: Volumetric and Morphologic Graft Changes Resemble Aging After Facial Allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Kueckelhaus, M; Turk, M; Kumamaru, K K; Wo, L; Bueno, E M; Lian, C G; Alhefzi, M; Aycart, M A; Fischer, S; De Girolami, U; Murphy, G F; Rybicki, F J; Pomahac, B

    2016-03-01

    Facial allotransplantation restores normal anatomy to severely disfigured faces. Although >30 such operations performed worldwide have yielded promising short-term results, data on long-term outcomes remain scarce. Three full-face transplant recipients were followed for 40 months. Severe changes in volume and composition of the facial allografts were noted. Data from computed tomography performed 6, 18 and 36 months after transplantation were processed to separate allograft from recipient tissues and further into bone, fat and nonfat soft tissues. Skin and muscle biopsies underwent diagnostic evaluation. All three facial allografts sustained significant volume loss (mean 19.55%) between 6 and 36 months after transplant. Bone and nonfat soft tissue volumes decreased significantly over time (17.22% between months 6 and 18 and 25.56% between months 6 and 36, respectively), whereas fat did not. Histological evaluations showed atrophy of muscle fibers. Volumetric and morphometric changes in facial allografts have not been reported previously. The transformation of facial allografts in this study resembled aging through volume loss but differed substantially from regular aging. These findings have implications for risk-benefit assessment, donor selection and measures counteracting muscle and bone atrophy. Superior long-term outcomes of facial allotransplantation will be crucial to advance toward future clinical routine. PMID:26639618

  15. Bilateral facial nerve palsy as the sole initial symptom of syphilis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy is an exceedingly rare condition and presents a diagnostic challenge. Bilateral facial nerve palsy may result from cranial trauma, congenital abnormalities, inflammation, infiltration, or infection, but is rarely associated with syphilis. Here, we report a case of syphilis in which bilateral facial nerve palsy was the only initial symptom. A 22-year-old man presented at our emergency department with isolated bilateral facial nerve palsy. Results for initial serum and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were normal, including the rapid plasma reagin titer. One week later, the patient developed rashes on the torso, palms, and soles. At this time, a high serum rapid plasma reagin titer was detected, and the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination test was positive. Once the tests were confirmed, the patient admitted to a history of unprotected sexual behavior. Penicillin G treatment was effective, and a 3-month follow-up examination demonstrated a complete recovery. We recommend that syphilis be considered when diagnosing sexually experienced young men presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy, even in the absence of skin manifestations. Failure to recognize facial signs of syphilis could result in inappropriate management, affecting the patient's clinical outcome. PMID:26166431

  16. Delayed facial palsy in Miller Fisher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng-Yin; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Shahrizaila, Nortina

    2015-11-15

    Miller Fisher syndrome is characterised by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. However, facial palsy can occur during the course of the illness although development of facial palsy when other cardinal signs of Miller Fisher syndrome have reached nadir or improving, is unusual. This delayed appearance of facial palsy can be easily overlooked by the treating clinician. Here, we report four patients with Miller Fisher syndrome and delayed-onset facial palsy. We discuss the possible underlying reasons behind the delay in facial palsy. PMID:26277343

  17. Facial primer provides immediate and long-term improvements in mild-to-moderate facial hyperpigmentation and fine lines associated with photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Wendy E; Jiang, Lily I; Herndon, James H

    2015-01-01

    Background Photoaged skin results from various environmental factors, most importantly chronic sun exposure. Dyschromia and fine lines/wrinkles are common clinical manifestations of photodamaged skin. Purpose This single-center clinical trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a new multifunctional facial primer (camouflage, broad-spectrum SPF 50, and a treatment for hyperpigmentation) when used by females with mild-to-moderate facial hyperpigmentation and fine lines due to photoaging over a course of 12 weeks. Patients and methods Subjects were provided test material (Even Up-Clinical Pigment Perfector) and supporting products to use on their face and neck. Products were used according to specific application instructions. Clinical grading for efficacy and tolerability assessments were performed by an expert grader at baseline, baseline (post-application primer), week 4, week 8, week 12, and week 12 (post-application primer). Standardized digital photographs were taken, and self-assessment questionnaires were conducted. Results Twenty-eight female subjects completed the 12-week trial. The facial primer improved scores for the appearance of hyperpigmentation and other photoaging parameters immediately after the first application. The treatment also showed a progressive improvement in the clinical assessment of hyperpigmentation and other photoaging parameters over the 12-week trial. These long-term benefits can be attributed to an improvement in the underlying skin condition. The facial primer was well tolerated. Subject questionnaires showed that the product was highly rated at all visits. Conclusion The facial primer was shown to be effective and well tolerated for immediate and long-term improvement in the appearance of mild-to-moderate hyperpigmentation and fine lines associated with photodamage when used over a 12-week period. PMID:26366102

  18. Skin optics

    SciTech Connect

    van Gemert, M.J.; Jacques, S.L.; Sterenborg, H.J.; Star, W.M.

    1989-12-01

    Quantitative dosimetry in the treatment of skin disorders with (laser) light requires information on propagation of light in the skin related to the optical properties of the individual skin layers. This involves the solution of the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer in a model representing skin geometry, as well as experimental methods to determine the optical properties of each skin layer. These activities are unified under the name skin optics. This paper first reviews the current status of tissue optics, distinguishing between the cases of: dominant absorption, dominant scattering, and scattering about equal to absorption. Then, previously published data as well as some current unpublished data on (human) stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis, have been collected and/or (re)analyzed in terms of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and anisotropy factor of scattering. The results are that the individual skin layers show strongly forward scattering (anisotropy factors between 0.7 and 0.9). The absorption and scattering data show that for all wavelengths considered scattering is much more important than absorption. Under such circumstances, solutions to the transport equation for a multilayer skin model and finite beam laser irradiation are currently not yet available. Hence, any quantitative dosimetry for skin treated with (laser) light is currently lacking.

  19. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system. PMID:22764352

  20. Facial paralysis for the plastic surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Kosins, Aaron M; Hurvitz, Keith A; Evans, Gregory RD; Wirth, Garrett A

    2007-01-01

    Facial paralysis presents a significant and challenging reconstructive problem for plastic surgeons. An aesthetically pleasing and acceptable outcome requires not only good surgical skills and techniques, but also knowledge of facial nerve anatomy and an understanding of the causes of facial paralysis. The loss of the ability to move the face has both social and functional consequences for the patient. At the Facial Palsy Clinic in Edinburgh, Scotland, 22,954 patients were surveyed, and over 50% were found to have a considerable degree of psychological distress and social withdrawal as a consequence of their facial paralysis. Functionally, patients present with unilateral or bilateral loss of voluntary and nonvoluntary facial muscle movements. Signs and symptoms can include an asymmetric smile, synkinesis, epiphora or dry eye, abnormal blink, problems with speech articulation, drooling, hyperacusis, change in taste and facial pain. With respect to facial paralysis, surgeons tend to focus on the surgical, or ‘hands-on’, aspect. However, it is believed that an understanding of the disease process is equally (if not more) important to a successful surgical outcome. The purpose of the present review is to describe the anatomy and diagnostic patterns of the facial nerve, and the epidemiology and common causes of facial paralysis, including clinical features and diagnosis. Treatment options for paralysis are vast, and may include nerve decompression, facial reanimation surgery and botulinum toxin injection, but these are beyond the scope of the present paper. PMID:19554190

  1. Palatability of tastes is associated with facial circulatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Hideaki; Hamada, Yuka; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2014-03-01

    To examine whether various types of taste stimuli in the oral cavity elicit unique changes in facial skin blood flow (SkBF) according to the palatability perceived by an individual, the facial SkBF was observed by laser speckle flowgraphy in 15 healthy subjects (11 males and 4 females) before and during the ingestion of bitter tea, chilli sauce, coffee, orange juice, soup, and a water control. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and SkBF in the index finger were recorded continuously. Subjects reported their subjective palatability and taste intensity scores after each stimulus. The vascular conductance indexes (CIs) in the face and finger were calculated as ratios of SkBF to MAP. CI in the eyelid increased significantly in response to chilli sauce, orange juice, and soup, whereas CIs in the forehead, nose, and cheek decreased in response to bitter tea. There was a significant correlation between the palatability scores and CI values in the eyelid when changes induced by chilli sauce were excluded. These results suggest that the facial circulatory response reflects the degree of palatability of a foodstuff. PMID:24391145

  2. Genetic Factors That Increase Male Facial Masculinity Decrease Facial Attractiveness of Female Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  3. Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Mitchem, Dorian G; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2014-02-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  4. Using the avian mutant talpid2 as a disease model for understanding the oral-facial phenotypes of oral-facial-digital syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schock, Elizabeth N.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Struve, Jaime N.; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Julie; Delany, Mary E.; Brugmann, Samantha A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral-facial-digital syndrome (OFD) is a ciliopathy that is characterized by oral-facial abnormalities, including cleft lip and/or palate, broad nasal root, dental anomalies, micrognathia and glossal defects. In addition, these individuals have several other characteristic abnormalities that are typical of a ciliopathy, including polysyndactyly, polycystic kidneys and hypoplasia of the cerebellum. Recently, a subset of OFD cases in humans has been linked to mutations in the centriolar protein C2 Ca2+-dependent domain-containing 3 (C2CD3). Our previous work identified mutations in C2CD3 as the causal genetic lesion for the avian talpid2 mutant. Based on this common genetic etiology, we re-examined the talpid2 mutant biochemically and phenotypically for characteristics of OFD. We found that, as in OFD-affected individuals, protein-protein interactions between C2CD3 and oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 protein (OFD1) are reduced in talpid2 cells. Furthermore, we found that all common phenotypes were conserved between OFD-affected individuals and avian talpid2 mutants. In light of these findings, we utilized the talpid2 model to examine the cellular basis for the oral-facial phenotypes present in OFD. Specifically, we examined the development and differentiation of cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) when C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis was impaired. Our studies suggest that although disruptions of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis do not affect CNCC specification or proliferation, CNCC migration and differentiation are disrupted. Loss of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis affects the dispersion and directional persistence of migratory CNCCs. Furthermore, loss of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis results in dysmorphic and enlarged CNCC-derived facial cartilages. Thus, these findings suggest that aberrant CNCC migration and differentiation could contribute to the pathology of oral-facial defects in OFD. PMID:26044959

  5. Preliminary experiments on quantification of skin condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Kenzo; Iyatomi, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated a preliminary assessment method for skin conditions such as a moisturizing property and its fineness of the skin with an image analysis only. We captured a facial images from volunteer subjects aged between 30s and 60s by Pocket Micro (R) device (Scalar Co., Japan). This device has two image capturing modes; the normal mode and the non-reflection mode with the aid of the equipped polarization filter. We captured skin images from a total of 68 spots from subjects' face using both modes (i.e. total of 136 skin images). The moisture-retaining property of the skin and subjective evaluation score of the skin fineness in 5-point scale for each case were also obtained in advance as a gold standard (their mean and SD were 35.15 +/- 3.22 (?S) and 3.45 +/- 1.17, respectively). We extracted a total of 107 image features from each image and built linear regression models for estimating abovementioned criteria with a stepwise feature selection. The developed model for estimating the skin moisture achieved the MSE of 1.92 (?S) with 6 selected parameters, while the model for skin fineness achieved that of 0.51 scales with 7 parameters under the leave-one-out cross validation. We confirmed the developed models predicted the moisture-retaining property and fineness of the skin appropriately with only captured image.

  6. Skin graft

    MedlinePLUS

    ... layers of skin from the donor site (the epidermis) and the layer under the epidermis (the dermis). The donor site can be any ... Orgill DP. Skin graft. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2013:chap ...

  7. Skin Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Nicole; Cohen, George

    2014-01-01

    In a relatively short timespan, a wealth of new skin substitutes made of synthetic and biologically derived materials have arisen for the purpose of wound healing of various etiologies. This review article focuses on providing an overview of skin substitutes including their indications, contraindications, benefits, and limitations. The result of this overview was an appreciation of the vast array of options available for clinicians, many of which did not exist a short time ago. Yet, despite the rapid expansion this field has undergone, no ideal skin substitute is currently available. More research in the field of skin substitutes and wound healing is required not only for the development of new products made of increasingly complex biomolecular material, but also to compare the existing skin substitutes. PMID:25371771

  8. Facial and Dental Injuries Facial and Dental Injuries in Karate.

    PubMed

    Vidovic-Stesevic, Vesna; Verna, Carlalberta; Krastl, Gabriel; Kuhl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Karate is a martial art that carries a high trauma risk. Trauma-related Swiss and European karate data are currently unavailable. This survey seeks to increase knowledge of the incidence of traumatic facial and dental injuries, their emergency management, awareness of tooth rescue boxes, the use of mouthguards and their modifications. Interviews were conducted with 420 karate fighters from 43 European countries using a standardized questionnaire. All the participants were semi-professionals. The data were evaluated with respect to gender, kumite level (where a karate practitioner trains against an adversary), and country. Of the 420 fighters interviewed, 213 had experienced facial trauma and 44 had already had dental trauma. A total of 192 athletes had hurt their opponent by inflicting a facial or dental injury, and 290 knew about the possibility of tooth replantation following an avulsion. Only 50 interviewees knew about tooth rescue boxes. Nearly all the individuals interviewed wore a mouthguard (n = 412), and 178 of them had made their own modifications to the guard. The results of the present survey suggest that more information and education in wearing protective gear are required to reduce the incidence of dental injuries in karate. PMID:26345152

  9. Clinical characteristics of megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy due to choline kinase beta gene defects in a series of 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, Goknur; Talim, Beril; Sel, Cigdem Genc; Topaloglu, Haluk

    2015-11-01

    A new form of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) with multisystem involvement and characteristic mitochondrial structural changes, due to choline kinase beta (CHKB) gene defects has been characterized by intellectual disability, autistic features, ichthyosis-like skin changes, and dilated cardiomyopathy. We define the clinical characteristics in 15 patients, from 14 unrelated families with so-called 'megaconial CMD', all having mutations in CHKB. Core clinical phenotype included global developmental delay prominent in gross-motor and language domains, severe intellectual disability (ID), and/or muscle weakness in all cases. Muscle biopsies were equivocally 'megaconial' in all. Other peculiarities were: ichthyosis-like skin changes (n?=?11), increased serum CK levels (n?=?12), microcephaly (n?=?6), dysmorphic facial features (n?=?7), neonatal hypotonia (n?=?3), seizures (n?=?3), epileptiform activity without clinically overt seizures (n?=?2), dilated cardiomyopathy (n?=?2), decreased left ventricular systolic function (n?=?2), congenital heart defects (n?=?3), sensorineural (n?=?1), and conductive hearing loss (n?=?1). Ten patients had cranial neuroimaging (MRI-MRS) study, which was notably normal in all, other than one patient having a decreased choline: creatine peak. Intra-familial variability in clinical expression of the disease is noted in four families. Two siblings from the same family, one presenting with global developmental delay and dilated cardiomyopathy, and the other with ichthyosis, ID and proximal weakness without cardiomyopathy died at the ages of 2 years 1 month, and 7 years 4 months respectively. Evolution was progressive (n?=?13) and static (n?=?2). PMID:26067811

  10. Treatments for unwanted facial hair.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, J; Lui, H

    Twenty-two percent of women in North America have unwanted facial hair, which can cause embarrassment and result in a significant emotional burden. Treatment options include plucking, waxing (including the sugar forms), depilatories, bleaching, shaving, electrolysis, laser, intense pulsed light (IPL), and eflornithine 13.9% cream (Vaniqa, Barrier Therapeutics in Canada and Shire Pharmaceuticals elsewhere). Eflornithine 13.9% cream is a topical treatment that does not remove the hairs, but acts to reduce the rate of growth and appears to be effective for unwanted facial hair on the mustache and chin area. Eflornithine 13.9% cream can be used in combination with other treatments such as lasers and IPL to give the patient the best chance for successful hair removal. PMID:16408139

  11. [Facial paralysis surgery. Current concepts].

    PubMed

    Robla-Costales, David; Robla-Costales, Javier; Socolovsky, Mariano; di Masi, Gilda; Fernández, Javier; Campero, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Facial palsy is a relatively common condition, from which most cases recover spontaneously. However, each year, there are 127,000 new cases of irreversible facial paralysis. This condition causes aesthetic, functional and psychologically devastating effects in the patients who suffer it. Various reconstructive techniques have been described, but there is no consensus regarding their indication. While these techniques provide results that are not perfect, many of them give a very good aesthetic and functional result, promoting the psychological, social and labour reintegration of these patients. The aim of this article is to describe the indications for which each technique is used, their results and the ideal time when each one should be applied. PMID:25498528

  12. [Facial palsy in Equatorial Africa].

    PubMed

    Pietruski, J

    1993-01-01

    The author presents the analysis of 29 cases of facial palsy collected in Shaba, Zaire (former Katanga, Belgian Congo) between 1984-1988 in the region called Copperbelt. Because to date there has been no work done on these problems in this part of Africa, it would be interesting to present a short report. Patients with facial palsy came to the ENT Department mostly for other reasons, and very late. Only 5 patients came before 3 mos after the onset. The different etiologies were as follows: 2--post traumatic, 7--otogenic, 9--tumors, 4--iatrogenic, 6--Bells palsy, 1--other. The assessment, comparison and the treatment of such cases in an underdeveloped country is very difficult or almost impossible. The small number of cases is insufficient for any conclusions, but the author tried to get some data, which would be a starting point in the future researches. PMID:8255587

  13. Mapping and manipulating facial expression.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R; Brick, Timothy R; Cohn, Jeffrey F; Boker, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Nonverbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this article we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and nonverbal facial gestures in video sequences of people engaged in conversation. We are developing a system for use in psychological experiments, where the effects of manipulating individual components of nonverbal visual behavior during live face-to-face conversation can be studied. In particular, the techniques we describe operate in real-time at video frame-rate and the manipulation can be applied so both participants in a conversation are kept blind to the experimental conditions. PMID:19624037

  14. Mapping and Manipulating Facial Expression

    PubMed Central

    Theobald, Barry-John; Matthews, Iain; Mangini, Michael; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Brick, Timothy R.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-verbal visual cues accompany speech to supplement the meaning of spoken words, signify emotional state, indicate position in discourse, and provide back-channel feedback. This visual information includes head movements, facial expressions and body gestures. In this paper we describe techniques for manipulating both verbal and non-verbal facial gestures in video sequences of people engaged in conversation. We are developing a system for use in psychological experiments, where the effects of manipulating individual components of non-verbal visual behaviour during live face-to-face conversation can be studied. In particular, the techniques we describe operate in real-time at video frame-rate and the manipulation can be applied so both participants in a conversation are kept blind to the experimental conditions. PMID:19624037

  15. Molecular control of facial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B.; Rooker, S.M.; Helms, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a developmental perspective on the concept of phylotypic and phenotypic stages of craniofacial development. Within Orders of avians and mammals, a phylotypic period exists when the morphology of the facial prominences is minimally divergent. We postulate that species-specific facial variations arise as a result of subtle shifts in the timing and the duration of molecular pathway activity (e.g., heterochrony), and present evidence demonstrating a critical role for Wnt and FGF signaling in this process. The same molecular pathways that shape the vertebrate face are also implicated in craniofacial deformities, indicating that comparisons between and among animal species may represent a novel method for the identification of human craniofacial disease genes. PMID:19747977

  16. Removal of unwanted facial hair.

    PubMed

    Shenenberger, Donald W; Utecht, Lynn M

    2002-11-15

    Unwanted facial hair is a common problem that is seldom discussed in the primary care setting. Although men occasionally request removal of unwanted facial hair, women most often seek help with this condition. Physicians generally neglect to address the problem if the patient does not first request help. The condition may be caused by androgen overproduction, increased sensitivity to circulating androgens, or other metabolic and endocrine disorders, and should be properly evaluated. Options for hair removal vary in efficacy, degree of discomfort, and cost. Clinical studies on the efficacy of many therapies are lacking. Short of surgical removal of the hair follicle, the only permanent treatment is electrolysis. However, the practice of electrolysis lacks standardization, and regulation of the procedure varies from state to state. Shaving, epilation, and depilation are the most commonly attempted initial options for facial hair removal. Although these methods are less expensive, they are only temporary. Laser hair removal, although better studied than most methods and more strictly regulated, has yet to be proved permanent in all patients. Eflornithine, a topical treatment, is simple to apply and has minimal side effects. By the time most patients consult a physician, they have tried several methods of hair removal. Family physicians can properly educate patients and recommend treatment for this common condition if they are armed with basic knowledge about the treatment options. PMID:12469966

  17. Comparative Discussion on Psychophysiological Effect of Self-administered Facial Massage by Treatment Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Akio; Takei, Yuya

    The aim of study was to quantitatively evaluate the effects of self-administered facial massage, which was done by hand or facial roller. In this study, the psychophysiological effects of facial massage were evaluated. The central nerves system and the autonomic nervous system were administered to evaluate physiological system. The central nerves system was assessed by Electroencephalogram (EEG). The autonomic nervous system were assessed by peripheral skin temperature(PST) and heart rate variability (HRV) with spectral analysis. In the spectral analysis of HRV, the high-frequency components (HF) were evaluated. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Profile of Mood Status (POMS) and subjective sensory amount with Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were administered to evaluate psychological status. These results suggest that kept brain activity and had strong effects on stress alleviation.

  18. A possible cranio-oro-facial phenotype in Cockayne syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cockayne Syndrome CS (Type A – CSA; or CS Type I OMIM #216400) (Type B – CSB; or CS Type II OMIM #133540) is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disease caused by defects in DNA repair characterized by progressive cachectic dwarfism, progressive intellectual disability with cerebral leukodystrophy, microcephaly, progressive pigmentary retinopathy, sensorineural deafness photosensitivity and possibly orofacial and dental anomalies. Methods We studied the cranio-oro-facial status of a group of 17 CS patients from 15 families participating in the National Hospital Program for Clinical Research (PHRC) 2005 « Clinical and molecular study of Cockayne syndrome ». All patients were examined by two investigators using the Diagnosing Dental Defects Database (D[4]/phenodent) record form. Results Various oro-facial and dental anomalies were found: retrognathia; micrognathia; high- arched narrow palate; tooth crowding; hypodontia (missing permanent lateral incisor, second premolars or molars), screwdriver shaped incisors, microdontia, radiculomegaly, and enamel hypoplasia. Eruption was usually normal. Dental caries was associated with enamel defects, a high sugar/carbohydrate soft food diet, poor oral hygiene and dry mouth. Cephalometric analysis revealed mid-face hypoplasia, a small retroposed mandible and hypo-development of the skull. Conclusion CS patients may have associated oro-dental features, some of which may be more frequent in CS children – some of them being described for the first time in this paper (agenesis of second permanent molars and radiculomegaly). The high susceptibility to rampant caries is related to a combination of factors as well as enamel developmental defects. Specific attention to these anomalies may contribute to diagnosis and help plan management. PMID:23311583

  19. Current Practice: The Bilobed Flap from the Classic Indication to Cover a Small Defect on Face to Covering a Large Defect on the Chest.

    PubMed

    Bast, Florian; Roos, Susann; Weikert, Sebastian; Schrom, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    A variety of flaps are available to cover skin defects after surgery or trauma in the head and neck area. The bilobed flap is a double transposition flap commonly used in reconstruction of small-to-medium skin defects of the face where skin is less mobile. However, larger defects can also be effectively treated with a bilobed flap in certain cases. The classic indication to cover a small defect on the nose and covering a large skin-defect after tumour resection in the jugular notch. After sufficient mobilization, the defects could easily be closed with no wound complications and with very good aesthetic and functional outcome. The bilobed flap, as a local flap, is possible in suitable locations even for larger skin defects. In addition to the simplicity of the procedure, good aesthetic results can be expected. PMID:26975956

  20. Assessment Method of Facial Palsy by Amount of Feature Point Movements at Facial Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Nemoto, Junko; Ohta, Manami; Kunihiro, Takanobu

    At present in medical field, the 40 point method and facial nerve grading system (House-Brackmann method) are generally used for assessment of facial palsy. However, those methods have limitation in the precise assessment, because of subjectivity in diagnosis. Purpose of this paper is to propose objective and quantitative assessment of facial palsy based on the amount of feature point movements on the face. Facial nerve symptoms generally appear in either of right and left side on the face. In facial expression of palsy subjects, the motion on the diseased side becomes smaller than that on the healthy side. We defined some indices of palsy severity from the observation of facial expression. Those indices showed the asymmetry of the facial motion quantitatively. We confirmed that our proposed method was valid for assessment of the facial palsy by comparison with the 40 point method.

  1. Facial Baroparesis Caused by Scuba Diving

    PubMed Central

    Kamide, Daisuke; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Middle ear barotrauma is one of the common complications of SCUBA diving representing acute otalgia, hearing loss, and bleeding. But occurrence of facial palsy is rare. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old navy diver suffered middle ear barotrauma with transient facial palsy after SCUBA diving. He felt difficulty in equalizing the pressure in middle ear with Valsalva maneuver during diving, and suffered right facial palsy and aural fullness after diving. Clinical examination showed remarkable bulging of the right tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear. PMID:22953110

  2. Facial baroparesis caused by scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Kamide, Daisuke; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Middle ear barotrauma is one of the common complications of SCUBA diving representing acute otalgia, hearing loss, and bleeding. But occurrence of facial palsy is rare. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old navy diver suffered middle ear barotrauma with transient facial palsy after SCUBA diving. He felt difficulty in equalizing the pressure in middle ear with Valsalva maneuver during diving, and suffered right facial palsy and aural fullness after diving. Clinical examination showed remarkable bulging of the right tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear. PMID:22953110

  3. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  4. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Review. 21 Wu S, Han J, Laden F, Qureshi AA. Long-term ultraviolet flux, other potential risk factors, ... MR, Shive ML, Chren MM, Han J, Qureshi AA, Linos E. Indoor tanning and non-melanoma skin ...

  5. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. They also have joints that can be ... genetic disorder that causes fragmentation and mineralization of elastic fibers in some tissues) Subcutaneous T-cell lymphoma ...

  6. Skin turgor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... decreased tearing )? Tests that may be performed: Blood chemistry (such as a chem-20 ) CBC Urinalysis Intravenous fluids may be needed for severe dehydration. You may need medicines to treat other conditions that affect skin turgor and elasticity.

  7. Cryotherapy - skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... It usually takes less than a minute. The freezing may cause some discomfort. Your health care provider ... to pain and infection Scarring, especially if the freezing was prolonged or deeper areas of the skin ...

  8. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... exposure to ultraviolet light, which is found in sunlight and in lights used in tanning salons. What ... the safe-sun guidelines. 1. Avoid the sun. Sunlight damages your skin. The sun is strongest during ...

  9. Neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements

    PubMed Central

    Krippl, Martin; Karim, Ahmed A.; Brechmann, André

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the somatotopy of finger movements has been extensively studied with neuroimaging, the neural foundations of facial movements remain elusive. Therefore, we systematically studied the neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al., 2002). The facial movements performed in the MRI scanner were defined as Action Units (AUs) and were controlled by a certified FACS coder. The main goal of the study was to investigate the detailed somatotopy of the facial primary motor area (facial M1). Eighteen participants were asked to produce the following four facial movements in the fMRI scanner: AU1+2 (brow raiser), AU4 (brow lowerer), AU12 (lip corner puller) and AU24 (lip presser), each in alternation with a resting phase. Our facial movement task induced generally high activation in brain motor areas (e.g., M1, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, putamen), as well as in the thalamus, insula, and visual cortex. BOLD activations revealed overlapping representations for the four facial movements. However, within the activated facial M1 areas, we could find distinct peak activities in the left and right hemisphere supporting a rough somatotopic upper to lower face organization within the right facial M1 area, and a somatotopic organization within the right M1 upper face part. In both hemispheres, the order was an inverse somatotopy within the lower face representations. In contrast to the right hemisphere, in the left hemisphere the representation of AU4 was more lateral and anterior compared to the rest of the facial movements. Our findings support the notion of a partial somatotopic order within the M1 face area confirming the “like attracts like” principle (Donoghue et al., 1992). AUs which are often used together or are similar are located close to each other in the motor cortex. PMID:26578940

  10. Postirradiation periocular granuloma faciale associated with uveitis.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Natasha V; Frohman, Larry P; Lambert, William C; Langer, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma faciale is a rare dermatopathologic condition that presents as brown-red plaques, nodules, or papules primarily on the face, with the potential for extrafacial and mucous membrane involvement. A case of an 83-year-old woman with periocular granuloma faciale accompanied by a marked anterior uveitis is presented; an association of periocular granuloma faciale with anterior uveitis has not been previously reported. PMID:24195989

  11. Facial Asymmetry in Young Adults with Condylar Hyperplasia-Unusual Changes in the Facial Bones

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha Lakhanpal; JK, Dayashankar Rao; Goel, Sumit; Srivastava, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Facial asymmetry can be caused by various pathological conditions, condylar hyperplasia (CH) is one of such condition, characterized by unilateral or bilateral mandibular condylar overgrowth, causing facial asymmetry, mandibular deviation, malocclusion and functional impairment. Advanced imaging and scintigraphic methods, helps the clinicians in diagnosing and monitoring its macroscopic aspects. Here we report three interesting and illustrative cases of facial asymmetry with unilateral CH discussing the unusual changes in the facial bones. PMID:25738093

  12. Senescent Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, William

    1974-01-01

    The cutaneous surface is continually influenced by aging and environmental factors. A longer life span is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of problems associated with aging skin. Although most of these changes and lesions are not life threatening, the premalignant lesions must be recognized and treated. The common aging and actinic skin changes are discussed and appropriate management is described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:20469067

  13. Facial palsy after neck arteriovenous fistula embolization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lim, Sang Chul; Kim, Tae Sun

    2015-09-01

    Facial palsy after embolization of neck arteriovenous fistula is an extremely rare complication. In our case, complete facial palsy occurred after embolization and was successfully treated with superficial parotidectomy, vessel ligation, and plug removal. We report the first case of unusual facial palsy that developed 13 days after neck arteriovenous fistula embolization. As a result of our findings, we recommend, when a patient suffers from acute ipsilateral facial palsy after arteriovenous fistula embolization, the clinician should consider the possibility of complications of embolization, and immediate and appropriate management should be performed. PMID:26154368

  14. [Facial palsy rehabilitation: Assessment before surgery].

    PubMed

    Lamas, G; Barbut, J; Mamelle, E; Tankéré, F; Gatignol, P

    2015-10-01

    A patient who needs a surgery for facial rehabilitation must have a complete assessment. The etiology of the facial palsy must be clear. It is necessary to have a MRI of the facial nerve for the statement of the initial pathology or to search a lesion on the nerve. The facial palsy must be definite which is depending of the delay of the palsy and the etiology. An electromyography must be done. The choice of the procedure depends on the delay of the palsy, the site on the nerve, the associated diseases and the opinion of the patient after a good explanation. PMID:26254849

  15. Social Use of Facial Expressions in Hylobatids

    PubMed Central

    Scheider, Linda; Waller, Bridget M.; Oña, Leonardo; Burrows, Anne M.; Liebal, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates use various communicative means in interactions with others. While primate gestures are commonly considered to be intentionally and flexibly used signals, facial expressions are often referred to as inflexible, automatic expressions of affective internal states. To explore whether and how non-human primates use facial expressions in specific communicative interactions, we studied five species of small apes (gibbons) by employing a newly established Facial Action Coding System for hylobatid species (GibbonFACS). We found that, despite individuals often being in close proximity to each other, in social (as opposed to non-social contexts) the duration of facial expressions was significantly longer when gibbons were facing another individual compared to non-facing situations. Social contexts included grooming, agonistic interactions and play, whereas non-social contexts included resting and self-grooming. Additionally, gibbons used facial expressions while facing another individual more often in social contexts than non-social contexts where facial expressions were produced regardless of the attentional state of the partner. Also, facial expressions were more likely ‘responded to’ by the partner’s facial expressions when facing another individual than non-facing. Taken together, our results indicate that gibbons use their facial expressions differentially depending on the social context and are able to use them in a directed way in communicative interactions with other conspecifics. PMID:26978660

  16. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals with ASD remained emotionally unaffected. Thus, individuals with ASD do not experience feedback from activated facial expressions as controls do. This facial feedback-impairment enhances our understanding of the social and emotional lives of individuals with ASD. PMID:18293075

  17. Fat harvesting techniques for facial fat transfer.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel M; Glasgold, Robert A; Glasgold, Mark J

    2010-10-01

    Fat grafting has become popular as a stand-alone technique or as part of a combined procedure for facial rejuvenation, as volume restoration has increasingly become recognized as an important component in overall facial aging. Many facial plastic surgeons who are experienced in operating only in the head and neck region are unaccustomed to working elsewhere in the body. Accordingly, this article sets out to detail the specific technique for safe and effective lipoharvesting for facial fat transfer. In addition, site-specific considerations for the lower abdomen, inner/anterior/outer thighs, triceps, inner knee, buttock, and lower back are also discussed. PMID:20853226

  18. Facial Affect and Verbal Context in Conversation: Facial Expression as Interjection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motley, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    Examines affective facial expression in conversation. Demonstrates that the accuracy of affect-identification for conversational facial expressions generally is no better than chance. Demonstrates that most conversational facial expressions, regardless of true source emotion or the affect signaled in isolation, tend to be interpreted according to…

  19. Restoration of facial symmetry in a patient with bell palsy using a modified maxillary complete denture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Gautam; Nath, Dilip Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Permanent facial paralysis can be devastating for a patient. Modern society's emphasis on appearance and physical beauty contributes to this problem and often leads to isolation of patients embarrassed by their appearance. Lagophthalmos with ocular exposure, loss of oral competence with resultant drooling, alar collapse with nasal airway obstruction, and difficulties with mastication and speech production are all potential consequences of facial paralysis. Affected patients are confronted with both a cosmetic defect and the functional deficits associated with loss of facial nerve function. In this case history report, a modified maxillary complete denture permitted a patient with Bell palsy to carry on daily activities with minimal facial distortion, pain, speech difficulty, and associated emotional trauma. PMID:22545260

  20. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  1. Reconstruction of perineal defects

    PubMed Central

    Baker, RJ; Muneer, A; Mosahebi, A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Perineal defects are commonly encountered in an oncological setting although they may also present as a result of trauma and infection (eg following Fournier’s gangrene). Reconstruction of these poses functional as well as aesthetic challenges. Skin coverage and tissue volume may both be required in addition to anogenital preservation or reconstruction. General prerequisites of an adequate reconstruction of perineal defects include provision of skin cover, well vascularised tissue to fill the dead space (reducing fluid collection and infection), vulvovaginal reconstruction and no faecal or urinary contamination. Methods A literature search was performed using PubMed and MEDLINE®. The search terms included ‘perineal defects’, ‘perineal reconstruction’, ‘perforator flaps for perineum’, ‘vulval flaps’, ‘secondary healing of wound’ and ‘vacuum assisted closure’. Backward chaining of reference lists from retrieved papers was also used to expand the search. Findings Modern developments have led to an increased expectation in improved quality of life as the main goal of reconstruction, therefore necessitating surgery with less morbidity and early return to normal activity. Progress in microsurgical procedures has been the main recent advance in perineal reconstruction and, in future, refinements in perforator flap design and tissue engineering techniques will lead to even better reconstructions. PMID:24165333

  2. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePLUS

    Incontinence - skin care ... in a wheelchair, regular chair, or bed TAKING CARE OF THE SKIN Using diapers and other products ... skin. Over time, the skin breaks down. Special care must be taken to keep the skin clean ...

  3. Combined immunodeficiency develops with age in Immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome 2 (ICF2).

    PubMed

    von Bernuth, Horst; Ravindran, Ethiraj; Du, Hang; Fröhler, Sebastian; Strehl, Karoline; Krämer, Nadine; Issa-Jahns, Lina; Amulic, Borko; Ninnemann, Olaf; Xiao, Mei-Sheng; Eirich, Katharina; Kölsch, Uwe; Hauptmann, Kathrin; John, Rainer; Schindler, Detlev; Wahn, Volker; Chen, Wei; Kaindl, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    The autosomal recessive immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is characterized by immunodeficiency, developmental delay, and facial anomalies. ICF2, caused by biallelic ZBTB24 gene mutations, is acknowledged primarily as an isolated B-cell defect. Here, we extend the phenotype spectrum by describing, in particular, for the first time the development of a combined immune defect throughout the disease course as well as putative autoimmune phenomena such as granulomatous hepatitis and nephritis. We also demonstrate impaired cell-proliferation and increased cell death of immune and non-immune cells as well as data suggesting a chromosome separation defect in addition to the known chromosome condensation defect. PMID:25330735

  4. Slowing down Presentation of Facial Movements and Vocal Sounds Enhances Facial Expression Recognition and Induces Facial-Vocal Imitation in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tardif, Carole; Laine, France; Rodriguez, Melissa; Gepner, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of slowing down presentation of facial expressions and their corresponding vocal sounds on facial expression recognition and facial and/or vocal imitation in children with autism. Twelve autistic children and twenty-four normal control children were presented with emotional and non-emotional facial expressions on…

  5. Automatic facial expression recognition based on features extracted from tracking of facial landmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Deepak; Lee, Joonwhoan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automatic facial expression recognition system using support vector machines, with geometric features extracted from the tracking of facial landmarks. Facial landmark initialization and tracking is performed by using an elastic bunch graph matching algorithm. The facial expression recognition is performed based on the features extracted from the tracking of not only individual landmarks, but also pair of landmarks. The recognition accuracy on the Extended Kohn-Kanade (CK+) database shows that our proposed set of features produces better results, because it utilizes time-varying graph information, as well as the motion of individual facial landmarks.

  6. Microneedling in facial recalcitrant melasma: report of a series of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Lima, Emerson de Andrade

    2015-12-01

    Melasma is a chronic skin disorder that results in symmetrical, blotchy, brownish facial pigmentation. It is more common in women than in men, it generally starts between 20 and 40 years, and it can lead to considerable embarrassment and distress. The aims of this article is to evaluate the treatment with the microneedling method in 18 female and 4 male with recalcitrant melasma. All patients demonstrated good results. In conclusion, microneedles appears to be a promising therapeutic method for melasma. PMID:26734882

  7. Facial Mechanosensory Influence on Forelimb Movement in Newborn Opossums, Monodelphis domestica

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, Marie-Josée; Beauregard, France; Cabana, Thérèse; Pflieger, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    The opossum, Monodelphis domestica, is born very immature but crawls, unaided, with its forelimbs (FL) from the mother's birth canal to a nipple where it attaches to pursue its development. What sensory cues guide the newborn to the nipple and trigger its attachment to it? Previous experiments showed that low intensity electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion induces FL movement in in vitro preparations and that trigeminal innervation of the facial skin is well developed in the newborn. The skin does not contain Vater-Pacini or Meissner touch corpuscles at this age, but it contains cells which appear to be Merkel cells (MC). We sought to determine if touch perceived by MC could exert an influence on FL movements. Application of the fluorescent dye AM1-43, which labels sensory cells such as MC, revealed the presence of a large number of labeled cells in the facial epidermis, especially in the snout skin, in newborn opossums. Moreover, calibrated pressure applied to the snout induced bilateral and simultaneous electromyographic responses of the triceps muscle in in vitro preparations of the neuraxis and FL from newborn. These responses increase with stimulation intensity and tend to decrease over time. Removing the facial skin nearly abolished these responses. Metabotropic glutamate 1 receptors being involved in MC neurotransmission, an antagonist of these receptors was applied to the bath, which decreased the EMG responses in a reversible manner. Likewise, bath application of the purinergic type 2 receptors, used by AM1-43 to penetrate sensory cells, also decreased the triceps EMG responses. The combined results support a strong influence of facial mechanosensation on FL movement in newborn opossums, and suggest that this influence could be exerted via MC. PMID:26848758

  8. Facial Mechanosensory Influence on Forelimb Movement in Newborn Opossums, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Desmarais, Marie-Josée; Beauregard, France; Cabana, Thérèse; Pflieger, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    The opossum, Monodelphis domestica, is born very immature but crawls, unaided, with its forelimbs (FL) from the mother's birth canal to a nipple where it attaches to pursue its development. What sensory cues guide the newborn to the nipple and trigger its attachment to it? Previous experiments showed that low intensity electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion induces FL movement in in vitro preparations and that trigeminal innervation of the facial skin is well developed in the newborn. The skin does not contain Vater-Pacini or Meissner touch corpuscles at this age, but it contains cells which appear to be Merkel cells (MC). We sought to determine if touch perceived by MC could exert an influence on FL movements. Application of the fluorescent dye AM1-43, which labels sensory cells such as MC, revealed the presence of a large number of labeled cells in the facial epidermis, especially in the snout skin, in newborn opossums. Moreover, calibrated pressure applied to the snout induced bilateral and simultaneous electromyographic responses of the triceps muscle in in vitro preparations of the neuraxis and FL from newborn. These responses increase with stimulation intensity and tend to decrease over time. Removing the facial skin nearly abolished these responses. Metabotropic glutamate 1 receptors being involved in MC neurotransmission, an antagonist of these receptors was applied to the bath, which decreased the EMG responses in a reversible manner. Likewise, bath application of the purinergic type 2 receptors, used by AM1-43 to penetrate sensory cells, also decreased the triceps EMG responses. The combined results support a strong influence of facial mechanosensation on FL movement in newborn opossums, and suggest that this influence could be exerted via MC. PMID:26848758

  9. Microneedling in facial recalcitrant melasma: report of a series of 22 cases*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Emerson de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Melasma is a chronic skin disorder that results in symmetrical, blotchy, brownish facial pigmentation. It is more common in women than in men, it generally starts between 20 and 40 years, and it can lead to considerable embarrassment and distress. The aims of this article is to evaluate the treatment with the microneedling method in 18 female and 4 male with recalcitrant melasma. All patients demonstrated good results. In conclusion, microneedles appears to be a promising therapeutic method for melasma. PMID:26734882

  10. Customized Approach to Facial Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Shamban, Ava

    2015-11-01

    Creating a refreshed, best version of an individual face requires knowledge of facial anatomy, understanding of the interactions of fillers and neurotoxins with tissue and muscle, and dedication to the primary principal of aesthetic responsibility. The forehead ages in a similar fashion to the rest of the face with loss of volume in both subcutaneous fat and bone. Different injection techniques are recommended for the forehead, midface, lip, and lower face. Although we understand the changes associated with aging from a global perspective, each individual ages at his or her own pace and in consideration to their specific anatomy. PMID:26505543

  11. Early Observations on Facial Palsy.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2015-01-01

    Before Charles Bell's eponymous account of facial palsy, physicians of the Graeco-Roman era had chronicled the condition. The later neglected accounts of the Persian physicians Abu al-Hasan Ali ibn Sahl Rabban al-Tabari and Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakar?ya R?zi ("Rhazes") and Avicenna in the first millennium are presented here as major descriptive works preceding the later description by Stalpart van der Wiel in the seventeenth century and those of Friedreich and Bell at the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries. PMID:25513852

  12. Reconstruction of a Columellar Defect With a Nasolabial Island Flap

    PubMed Central

    Kang, IL Gyu; Jung, Joo Hyun; Kim, Seon Tae

    2014-01-01

    Columellar skin defects may be caused by excision of cutaneous malignancy, trauma, or tissue necrosis associated with surgery. Although columellar skin necrosis rarely occurs following rhinoplasty, this condition might be more common when using an external approach than a closed approach. Columellar skin incision performed with exaggerated tip augmentation may cause columellar necrosis. The nasolabial island flap, used unilaterally to cover columellar skin defects, is used for a single-stage reconstruction procedure and is generally not associated with the need for secondary surgeries. This technique is well suited for repairing columellar skin defects. We experienced a patient with columellar skin necrosis occurring after rhinoplasty which was reconstructed using a unilateral single-stage nasolabial island flap. PMID:24917913

  13. The effect of total facial nerve decompression in preventing further recurrence of idiopathic recurrent facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Zhi; Yan, Cheng; Hui, Liu

    2015-05-01

    The objective is to study the role of total facial nerve decompression in preventing further episodes and promoting facial nerve recovery of idiopathic recurrent facial palsy. 24 cases with idiopathic recurrent facial palsy were involved in the study, among which 16 undergoing total facial nerve decompression were classified into the surgery group, and 8 who refused surgery and received prednisolone were included in the control group. The recurrence rate and facial nerve function recovery of the two groups were compared. The mean follow-up of surgery and control group was 4.9 years (range 3-7 years) and 5.0 years (range 3-8 years), respectively. Further attacks of facial palsy affected 1 of 16 cases (6.2 %) among surgery group in comparison to 4 of 8 cases (50 %) among control group, with statistical difference (p < 0.05). 15 of 16 cases (93.8 %) recovered to Grade I or Grade II in surgery group in contrast to 6 of 8 cases (75.0 %) in control group, without statistical difference (p > 0.05). In conclusion, total facial nerve decompression is effective to prevent further episodes of facial palsy in idiopathic recurrent facial palsy, but ineffective to promote facial nerve recovery. PMID:24493560

  14. Human Facial Expressions as Adaptations:Evolutionary Questions in Facial Expression Research

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, KAREN L.; COHN, JEFFREY F.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of the face in social interaction and social intelligence is widely recognized in anthropology. Yet the adaptive functions of human facial expression remain largely unknown. An evolutionary model of human facial expression as behavioral adaptation can be constructed, given the current knowledge of the phenotypic variation, ecological contexts, and fitness consequences of facial behavior. Studies of facial expression are available, but results are not typically framed in an evolutionary perspective. This review identifies the relevant physical phenomena of facial expression and integrates the study of this behavior with the anthropological study of communication and sociality in general. Anthropological issues with relevance to the evolutionary study of facial expression include: facial expressions as coordinated, stereotyped behavioral phenotypes, the unique contexts and functions of different facial expressions, the relationship of facial expression to speech, the value of facial expressions as signals, and the relationship of facial expression to social intelligence in humans and in nonhuman primates. Human smiling is used as an example of adaptation, and testable hypotheses concerning the human smile, as well as other expressions, are proposed. PMID:11786989

  15. Vertical facial pattern and orthodontic stability. Part II: Facial axis changes and stability.

    PubMed

    Beatrice, M; Woods, M

    2000-11-01

    Lateral cephalograms and study casts of 55 patients were evaluated to determine if any relationships exist between Facial Axis changes occurring during and after active treatment and either the pretreatment Jarabak Facial Height Quotient or the amount of post-treatment occlusal change, as measured with a weighted PAR score. No significant relationships could be found. There was instead a wide range of individual variation in the post-treatment behaviour of both the Facial Axis and the weighted PAR score, in both the total sample and three Jarabak Facial Height subgroups. Long-term Facial Axis changes occurring in individual patients, however, were not necessarily associated with occlusal deterioration. Since the Facial Axis is likely to change to some extent in the long-term, it was suggested that widely recommended methods for Facial Axis control during treatment should be considered primarily for functional and aesthetic reasons, rather than on the basis of directly ensuring long-term occlusal stability. PMID:12476496

  16. Facial mimicry in its social setting

    PubMed Central

    Seibt, Beate; Mühlberger, Andreas; Likowski, Katja U.; Weyers, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In interpersonal encounters, individuals often exhibit changes in their own facial expressions in response to emotional expressions of another person. Such changes are often called facial mimicry. While this tendency first appeared to be an automatic tendency of the perceiver to show the same emotional expression as the sender, evidence is now accumulating that situation, person, and relationship jointly determine whether and for which emotions such congruent facial behavior is shown. We review the evidence regarding the moderating influence of such factors on facial mimicry with a focus on understanding the meaning of facial responses to emotional expressions in a particular constellation. From this, we derive recommendations for a research agenda with a stronger focus on the most common forms of encounters, actual interactions with known others, and on assessing potential mediators of facial mimicry. We conclude that facial mimicry is modulated by many factors: attention deployment and sensitivity, detection of valence, emotional feelings, and social motivations. We posit that these are the more proximal causes of changes in facial mimicry due to changes in its social setting. PMID:26321970

  17. Brain Systems for Assessing Facial Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Joel S.; O'Doherty, John; Kilner, James M.; Perrett, David I.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    Attractiveness is a facial attribute that shapes human affiliative behaviours. In a previous study we reported a linear response to facial attractiveness in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a region involved in reward processing. There are strong theoretical grounds for the hypothesis that coding stimulus reward value also involves the amygdala. The…

  18. Brain Systems for Assessing Facial Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Joel S.; O'Doherty, John; Kilner, James M.; Perrett, David I.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    Attractiveness is a facial attribute that shapes human affiliative behaviours. In a previous study we reported a linear response to facial attractiveness in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a region involved in reward processing. There are strong theoretical grounds for the hypothesis that coding stimulus reward value also involves the amygdala. The…

  19. Training Individuals to Label Nonverbal Facial Cues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred E.; Pellegreno, Dominick

    1982-01-01

    Examined the effects of training high school students (N=56) to accurately label facial affects of happiness, sadness, fear, anger, surprise, disgust, and neutrality. The treatment period extended over three, one-hour group presentations. Found the experimental group significantly improved its ability to accurately label facial affect following…

  20. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stel, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals…

  1. Hepatitis Diagnosis Using Facial Color Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingjia; Guo, Zhenhua

    Facial color diagnosis is an important diagnostic method in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). However, due to its qualitative, subjective and experi-ence-based nature, traditional facial color diagnosis has a very limited application in clinical medicine. To circumvent the subjective and qualitative problems of facial color diagnosis of Traditional Chinese Medicine, in this paper, we present a novel computer aided facial color diagnosis method (CAFCDM). The method has three parts: face Image Database, Image Preprocessing Module and Diagnosis Engine. Face Image Database is carried out on a group of 116 patients affected by 2 kinds of liver diseases and 29 healthy volunteers. The quantitative color feature is extracted from facial images by using popular digital image processing techni-ques. Then, KNN classifier is employed to model the relationship between the quantitative color feature and diseases. The results show that the method can properly identify three groups: healthy, severe hepatitis with jaundice and severe hepatitis without jaundice with accuracy higher than 73%.

  2. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  3. Facial beauty--establishing a universal standard.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Yosh

    2004-01-01

    There is a universal standard for facial beauty regardless of race, age, sex and other variables. Beautiful faces have ideal facial proportion. Ideal proportion is directly related to divine proportion, and that proportion is 1 to 1.618. All living organisms, including humans, are genetically encoded to develop to this proportion because there are extreme esthetic and physiologic benefits. The vast majority of us are not perfectly proportioned because of environmental factors. Establishment of a universal standard for facial beauty will significantly simplify the diagnosis and treatment of facial disharmonies and abnormalities. More important, treating to this standard will maximize facial esthetics, TMJ health, psychologic and physiologic health, fertility, and quality of life. PMID:15085778

  4. Robust facial expression recognition via compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiqing; Zhao, Xiaoming; Lei, Bicheng

    2012-01-01

    Recently, compressive sensing (CS) has attracted increasing attention in the areas of signal processing, computer vision and pattern recognition. In this paper, a new method based on the CS theory is presented for robust facial expression recognition. The CS theory is used to construct a sparse representation classifier (SRC). The effectiveness and robustness of the SRC method is investigated on clean and occluded facial expression images. Three typical facial features, i.e., the raw pixels, Gabor wavelets representation and local binary patterns (LBP), are extracted to evaluate the performance of the SRC method. Compared with the nearest neighbor (NN), linear support vector machines (SVM) and the nearest subspace (NS), experimental results on the popular Cohn-Kanade facial expression database demonstrate that the SRC method obtains better performance and stronger robustness to corruption and occlusion on robust facial expression recognition tasks. PMID:22737035

  5. Facial Animations: Future Research Directions & Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Rehman, Amjad; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, computer facial animation is used in a significant multitude fields that brought human and social to study the computer games, films and interactive multimedia reality growth. Authoring the computer facial animation, complex and subtle expressions are challenging and fraught with problems. As a result, the current most authored using universal computer animation techniques often limit the production quality and quantity of facial animation. With the supplement of computer power, facial appreciative, software sophistication and new face-centric methods emerging are immature in nature. Therefore, this paper concentrates to define and managerially categorize current and emerged surveyed facial animation experts to define the recent state of the field, observed bottlenecks and developing techniques. This paper further presents a real-time simulation model of human worry and howling with detail discussion about their astonish, sorrow, annoyance and panic perception.

  6. Facial, Cervical, and Mediastinal Emphysema of the Clarinet Player: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Biçer, Yusuf Özgür; Kesgin, Selcan; Tezcan, Erkan; Köyba??, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cervicofacial emphysema may arise due to the leakage of air from a defect in the aerodigestive tract to the fascial layers of neck and face. Rarely, it may be caused by insufflation of air through the Stensen’s duct. Case Report: We present a case with diffuse facial, cervical and mediastinal emphysema due to playing a wind instrument immediately after a facial trauma. There was no mucosal defect or laceration noticed by examination which could explain the origin of the emphysema. Despite the widespread cervicofacial emphysema with mediastinal involvement, the patient significantly improved within 48 hours without any intervention. Conclusion: Even though cervicofacial emphysema ameliorates spontaneously, increased care must be taken, especially when there is pneumomediastinum and/or pneumothorax. PMID:25667794

  7. Skin Blood Perfusion and Oxygenation Colour Affect Perceived Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Ian D.; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I.

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice. PMID:19337378

  8. Diminished immune response in sun-damaged skin

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, B.L.; Jessen, R.T.; Becker, L.E.; Jackson, R.T.; Smith, E.B.

    1980-05-01

    In previously sensitized volunteers, higher concentrations of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene were necessary to elicit positive patch test reactions on the sun-damaged skin of the neck than on the protected skin of the upper part of the back. This difference was not found in subjects without evidence of sun damage, and there was no difference between sun-damaged and nondamaged skin in response to a primary irritant. Responses to intradermally injected common antigens were also less intense in sun-damaged skin that in nonexposed skin. These findings suggest the existence of a local defect in cell-mediated immunity in skin altered by long-term sun exposure.

  9. Averaging facial expression over time

    PubMed Central

    Haberman, Jason; Harp, Tom; Whitney, David

    2010-01-01

    The visual system groups similar features, objects, and motion (e.g., Gestalt grouping). Recent work suggests that the computation underlying perceptual grouping may be one of summary statistical representation. Summary representation occurs for low-level features, such as size, motion, and position, and even for high level stimuli, including faces; for example, observers accurately perceive the average expression in a group of faces (J. Haberman & D. Whitney, 2007, 2009). The purpose of the present experiments was to characterize the time-course of this facial integration mechanism. In a series of three experiments, we measured observers’ abilities to recognize the average expression of a temporal sequence of distinct faces. Faces were presented in sets of 4, 12, or 20, at temporal frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 21.3 Hz. The results revealed that observers perceived the average expression in a temporal sequence of different faces as precisely as they perceived a single face presented repeatedly. The facial averaging was independent of temporal frequency or set size, but depended on the total duration of exposed faces, with a time constant of ~800 ms. These experiments provide evidence that the visual system is sensitive to the ensemble characteristics of complex objects presented over time. PMID:20053064

  10. Olfactory cues modulate facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Demattè, M Luisa; Osterbauer, Robert; Spence, Charles

    2007-07-01

    We report an experiment designed to investigate whether olfactory cues can influence people's judgments of facial attractiveness. Sixteen female participants judged the attractiveness of a series of male faces presented briefly on a computer monitor using a 9-point visual rating scale. While viewing each face, the participants were simultaneously presented with either clean air or else with 1 of 4 odorants (the odor was varied on a trial-by-trial basis) from a custom-built olfactometer. We included 2 pleasant odors (geranium and a male fragrance) and 2 unpleasant odors (rubber and body odor) as confirmed by pilot testing. The results showed that the participants rated the male faces as being significantly less attractive in the presence of an unpleasant odor than when the faces were presented together with a pleasant odor or with clean air (these conditions did not differ significantly). These results demonstrate the cross-modal influence that unpleasant odors can have on people's judgments of facial attractiveness. Interestingly, this pattern of results was unaffected by whether the odors were body relevant (the body odor and the male fragrance) or not (the rubber and geranium odors). PMID:17507456

  11. The facial nerve axotomy model.

    PubMed

    Moran, Linda B; Graeber, Manuel B

    2004-03-01

    Experimental models such as the facial nerve axotomy paradigm in rodents allow the systematic and detailed study of the response of neurones and their microenvironment to various types of challenges. Well-studied experimental examples include peripheral nerve trauma, the retrograde axonal transport of neurotoxins and locally enhanced inflammation following the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in combination with axotomy. These studies have led to novel insights into the regeneration programme of the motoneurone, the role of microglia and astrocytes in synaptic plasticity and the biology of glial cells. Importantly, many of the findings obtained have proven to be valid in other functional systems and even across species barriers. In particular, microglial expression of major histocompatibility complex molecules has been found to occur in response to various types of neuronal damage and is now regarded as a characteristic component of "glial inflammation". It is found in the context of numerous neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. The detachment of afferent axonal endings from the surface membrane of regenerating motoneurones and their subsequent displacement by microglia ("synaptic stripping") and long-lasting insulation by astrocytes have also been confirmed in humans. The medical implications of these findings are significant. Also, the facial nerve system of rats and mice has become the best studied and most widely used test system for the evaluation of neurotrophic factors. PMID:15003391

  12. The usefulness of the bilobed flap for lateral cheek defects

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin P; Rosen, Nathan; Muhn, Channy Y

    2012-01-01

    The cheek and nose are common areas for skin cancers. There are multiple approaches to surgical excision and reconstruction, depending on the size of defect, tissue quality, adjacent cosmetic units and hairline. An effective solution to skin defects of the lateral cheek is the bilobed flap. This flap tends to be underused in the lateral cheek area because primary closure and skin grafts are perceived to be easier methods of reconstruction. However, the use of the bilobed flap for lateral cheek and other defect closures is encouraged. There are several basic principles that are key when performing this flap. These components of the procedure are highlighted. PMID:23598770

  13. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  14. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  15. Modified Free Latissimus Dorsi Musculocutaneous Flap in the Reconstruction of Extensive Postoncologic Defects in the Head and Neck Region

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiquan; Li, Chunhua; Chen, Jin; Cai, Yongcong; Li, Ling; Wang, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oncological resection of advanced carcinoma in the head and neck region results in vast defects. The free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap (FLDMF) is one of the most commonly used flaps for the repair of complex head and neck defects. We tried to modify FLDMF to multiple segments or combine it with acellular dermis to fit through-and-through defects in the oral-facial region during the last decade. A retrospective review of patients with FLDMF reconstruction between 2004 and 2012 was undertaken. Demographics, histology, surgical management, disease control and overall survival, complications, radiotherapy, aesthetic outcome, as well as economic results were analyzed. The majority of the patients (66.7%) had recurrent tumors, and the rest of the patients had primary tumor with stage IV. Fourteen patients (38.9%) had a history of prior radiation therapy, whereas 27.8% of the patients had postoperative radiation therapy. The areas of the defects vary from 52 cm2 to 180 cm2 (mean, 86.4 cm2). The flap failed in 1 of the 37 patients. The complications at the recipient site include hematoma (n = 6, 16.7%), venous insufficiency (n = 4, 11.1%), infection (n = 3, 8.3), and partial flap necrosis (n = 2, 5.5%). The donor-site complications include delayed healing, necrosis of skin graft, and limited shoulder function. The 5-year overall survival rate was 39.1%, and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 22.1%. In conclusion, the FLDMF could be modified to fit vast defects where voluminous tissue is needed to be transferred in the head and neck region. PMID:25723665

  16. [The menopause and the skin (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aron-Brunetière, R

    It is currently admitted that the skin and its appendages plays an important part in steroid metabolism, especially in genital androgens, estrogens and progestogens. This activity produces the cutaneous changes sometimes associated with the premenopause period : facial hyper-seborrhea, seborrhea of the scalp, loss of scalp hairs, increaed pilosity on the cheeks and upper lip, whether they occur spontaneously or after hormonal treatment. Following the menopause-onset a progressive decreases in hair growth, can be observed, especially in the axillary and pubic regions, with occasional diffuse alopecia, increase in degeneration of elastic tissue, and atrophy of the vaginal mucosa, in fact as some changes appearing in the skin show correlations with the hormonal changes, others appear to be more closely related to aging of the skin. Thus, hormonal therapy will not be able to treat efficiently all these disorders. PMID:6252628

  17. A Study Of Facial Asymmetries By The Stereometric Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crete, N.; Deloison, Y.; Mollard, R.

    1980-07-01

    In order to determine the part played in facial dissymmetry observed on a living person by the various constitutive elements of the cephalic tip (the soft parts - skin, muscles and the underlying bone structure) we undertook, using a biostereometric method, to evaluate asymmetries between homologous right and left dimensions on a living person's face and on a skeleton. While in an individual, a marked degree of facial dissymmetry can sometimes be observed; average differences between the right and left sides of the face may nethertheless balance out, and remain slight. Conventional anthropometrics techniques do not show up such slight values. With a view to securing a higher degree of accuracy, study of the stereometric technique of measurements. Using this technique, quasi imperceptible differences between the right and the left sides of the face on a living person as well as on a skeleton, together with variations in the orientation or angulation of anatomical segments in a three-dimensional space can be measured. We were thus able to detect, in a number of dry skulls, average differences of approxi-mately a millimetre between the two sides of the face which cannot be attributed to back of accuracy in measurements. Although statistically the difference are not always significant, the para-metric values of facial dimensions are invariably greater for the left side. On the other hand, for the sample of living subjects as a whole, the differences between homologous distances are not statistically significant. But it may be that, on a living subject, the experimenter is inclined to take measurements that are susceptible of symmetrization (for instance, the nasion in the median sagittal plane) whereas on a dry skull anatomical reference marks can be determined with the utmost accuracy. It may be inferred from there results that the softer parts tend, as a rule, to correct the dissymmetry of the underlying skeleton.

  18. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with an orbital defect: a simplified approach.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Amita; Hingrajia, Devang; Chawla, Nitesh; Shah, Rupal J

    2012-09-01

    Large oro-facial defects consequences in serious functional as well as cosmetic deformities. Acceptable cosmetic results usually can be obtained with a facial prosthesis. This article describes prosthetic rehabilitation of a 35 year-old female having a left orbital defect with HTV silicone material. A modified technique to fabricate an acrylic substructure in heat-polymerizing polymethyl-methacrylate to support silicone facial prosthesis was illustrated. The resultant facial prosthesis was structurally durable and esthetically acceptable with satisfactory retention. This technique is advantageous as there is no need to fabricate the whole prosthesis again in case of damage of the silicone layer because the outer silicone layer can be removed and repacked on the substructure if the gypsum-mold is preserved. PMID:23997470

  19. Common Skin Rashes in Children.

    PubMed

    Allmon, Amanda; Deane, Kristen; Martin, Kari L

    2015-08-01

    Because childhood rashes may be difficult to differentiate by appearance alone, it is important to consider the entire clinical presentation to help make the appropriate diagnosis. Considerations include the appearance and location of the rash; the clinical course; and associated symptoms, such as pruritus or fever. A fever is likely to occur with roseola, erythema infectiosum (fifth disease), and scarlet fever. Pruritus sometimes occurs with atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, erythema infectiosum, molluscum contagiosum, and tinea infection. The key feature of roseola is a rash presenting after resolution of a high fever, whereas the distinguishing features in pityriasis rosea are a herald patch and a bilateral and symmetric rash in a Christmas tree pattern. The rash associated with scarlet fever usually develops on the upper trunk, then spreads throughout the body, sparing the palms and soles. Impetigo is a superficial bacterial infection that most commonly affects the face and extremities of children. Erythema infectiosum is characterized by a viral prodrome followed by the "slapped cheek" facial rash. Flesh-colored or pearly white papules with central umbilication occur with molluscum contagiosum, a highly contagious viral infection that usually resolves without intervention. Tinea is a common fungal skin infection in children that affects the scalp, body, groin, feet, hands, or nails. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin condition that may present with a variety of skin changes. PMID:26280141

  20. Concepts in skin care maintenance.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2005-12-01

    The correct use of moisturizers and cleansers is an integral component of the skin care regimen for any patient with dermatologic disease. As discussed in this article, moisturizers that contain certain ingredients, including occlusives and humectants, offer the most complete benefits with regard to repair of the damaged stratum corneum. When used appropriately, these products not only improve skin hydration by reducing transepidermal water loss (TEWL) but also help to restore the skin barrier and improve the aesthetic appearance of the skin, which is an important concern from the patient's perspective. The use of skin cleansers also is a central consideration in patients with dermatologic disease, but these agents vary widely and must be selected carefully on the basis of the patient's clinical presentation. In most cases, syndets, combars, and lipid-free cleansers offer clear advantages over true soaps. In addition, a variety of cleansing implements such as mesh sponges, particulate abrasive scrubs, and woven face cloths are available, though most are not well suited for use by patients with barrier damage. Because improper skin care can worsen the condition or impede the treatment outcome, proper moisturizing and cleansing are essential components of an overall treatment plan to ensure a satisfactory therapeutic outcome in patients with any barrier defect. PMID:16869178

  1. Facial soft tissue thickness among various vertical facial patterns in adult Pakistani subjects.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, Waqar; Fida, Mubassar; Shaikh, Attiya

    2015-12-01

    Facial reconstruction techniques are used to obtain an approximation of an individual's appearance thus helping identification of unidentified decedents from their dried skeletal remains. Many of these techniques rely on the sets of average facial soft tissue thickness (FST) values at different anatomical landmarks provided by the previous studies. FST is influenced by the age, sex, ethnicity and the body mass index of the individual. Recent literature has shown that the anthropological variations of the skull may also affect FST at certain points. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of such variations in vertical skull morphology on FST as around one third of different population groups have either a long or short facial pattern as compared to the average facial pattern. Moreover, this study also provides a FST database for the adult Pakistani subjects that may have potential implications in the facial reconstruction of the local subjects. A retrospective analysis of 276 lateral cephalograms of adult subjects having normal sagittal facial pattern was performed. Subjects were categorized into three vertical facial patterns (long face=95, average face=102, short face=79) according to the vertical dimensions of the skull and the FST was measured at 11 midline points. To compare the FST between males and females Mann-Whitney U test was used. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to compare FST among three vertical facial patterns. The results of our study revealed significant differences in FST at nine landmarks between males and females. These sex-based differences were more pronounced in the long and short facial patterns as compared to the average facial pattern. FST at stomion, pogonion, gnathion and menton was significantly greater in the short facial pattern as compared to the long facial pattern in both the sexes. The results of the present study highlight the importance of anthropological analysis of the skull and taking the vertical skeletal dimension into consideration while performing facial reconstruction. PMID:26476716

  2. Modified wind chill temperatures determined by a whole body thermoregulation model and human-based facial convective coefficients.

    PubMed

    Shabat, Yael Ben; Shitzer, Avraham; Fiala, Dusan

    2014-08-01

    Wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCETs) were estimated by a modified Fiala's whole body thermoregulation model of a clothed person. Facial convective heat exchange coefficients applied in the computations concurrently with environmental radiation effects were taken from a recently derived human-based correlation. Apart from these, the analysis followed the methodology used in the derivation of the currently used wind chill charts. WCET values are summarized by the following equation:[Formula: see text]Results indicate consistently lower estimated facial skin temperatures and consequently higher WCETs than those listed in the literature and used by the North American weather services. Calculated dynamic facial skin temperatures were additionally applied in the estimation of probabilities for the occurrence of risks of frostbite. Predicted weather combinations for probabilities of "Practically no risk of frostbite for most people," for less than 5 % risk at wind speeds above 40 km h(-1), were shown to occur at air temperatures above -10 °C compared to the currently published air temperature of -15 °C. At air temperatures below -35 °C, the presently calculated weather combination of 40 km h(-1)/-35 °C, at which the transition for risks to incur a frostbite in less than 2 min, is less conservative than that published: 60 km h(-1)/-40 °C. The present results introduce a fundamentally improved scientific basis for estimating facial skin temperatures, wind chill temperatures and risk probabilities for frostbites over those currently practiced. PMID:23812421

  3. Modified wind chill temperatures determined by a whole body thermoregulation model and human-based facial convective coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, Yael Ben; Shitzer, Avraham; Fiala, Dusan

    2014-08-01

    Wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCETs) were estimated by a modified Fiala's whole body thermoregulation model of a clothed person. Facial convective heat exchange coefficients applied in the computations concurrently with environmental radiation effects were taken from a recently derived human-based correlation. Apart from these, the analysis followed the methodology used in the derivation of the currently used wind chill charts. WCET values are summarized by the following equation: Results indicate consistently lower estimated facial skin temperatures and consequently higher WCETs than those listed in the literature and used by the North American weather services. Calculated dynamic facial skin temperatures were additionally applied in the estimation of probabilities for the occurrence of risks of frostbite. Predicted weather combinations for probabilities of "Practically no risk of frostbite for most people," for less than 5 % risk at wind speeds above 40 km h-1, were shown to occur at air temperatures above -10 °C compared to the currently published air temperature of -15 °C. At air temperatures below -35 °C, the presently calculated weather combination of 40 km h-1/-35 °C, at which the transition for risks to incur a frostbite in less than 2 min, is less conservative than that published: 60 km h-1/-40 °C. The present results introduce a fundamentally improved scientific basis for estimating facial skin temperatures, wind chill temperatures and risk probabilities for frostbites over those currently practiced.

  4. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 mGy for the parotid gland, 0.15 mGy for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field. The mean energy imparted from a full series of paranasal sinus projections was 4.8 mJ and from a total series of the facial skeleton, 7.9 mJ.

  5. Facial EMG as an Index of Affective Response to Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jason D.; Cinciripini, Paul M.; Carter, Brian L.; Lam, Cho Y.; Wetter, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Negative affect reduction has been postulated to be a key feature of cigarette smoking. In the present study, facial electromyography (EMG), heart rate (HR), and skin conductance (SCR) were used to evaluate the affective significance of acute nicotine administration and overnight withdrawal. Smokers (n=115) attended four 90-min laboratory assessment sessions scheduled approximately three days apart. The four sessions provided a complete crossing of two pre-laboratory deprivation conditions (12-hour deprived vs. nondeprived) with two drug conditions (nicotine vs. placebo nasal spray). During each session, smokers viewed affective slides while facial EMG, HR, and SCR were recorded. Results indicated that for women, nicotine nasal spray resulted in lower corrugator EMG activity during both smoking-deprived and nondeprived sessions, compared to placebo. However, nondeprived women also showed an increase in zygomaticus EMG when given nicotine compared to placebo spray, while smoking-deprived women demonstrated a decrease in the zygomaticus response to nicotine compared to placebo. With men, nicotine also appeared to lower corrugator during deprivation, but not nondeprivation, compared to placebo spray, though the contrast only approached significance. With zygomaticus EMG, nicotine spray decreased men’s zygomaticus responding during nondeprivation but not during deprivation, compared to placebo spray. The HR results reflected the stimulatory properties of the drug rather than nicotine’s affective properties, while SCR was unresponsive to our experimental manipulations. The corrugator EMG results support negative reinforcement models of smoking that postulate that acute nicotine use reduces withdrawal-driven negative affect. PMID:17696686

  6. Lymphedema fat graft: an ideal filler for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Fabio; Chilgar, Ram M; Sapountzis, Stamatis; Lazzeri, Davide; Sze Wei, Matthew Yeo; Ciudad, Pedro; Nicoli, Marzia; Lim, Seong Yoon; Chen, Pei-Yu; Constantinides, Joannis; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2014-09-01

    Lymphedema is a chronic disorder characterized by lymph stasis in the subcutaneous tissue. Lymphatic fluid contains several components including hyaluronic acid and has many important properties. Over the past few years, significant research has been performed to identify an ideal tissue to implant as a filler. Because of its unique composition, fat harvested from the lymphedema tissue is an interesting topic for investigation and has significant potential for application as a filler, particularly in facial rejuvenation. Over a 36-month period, we treated and assessed 8 patients with lymphedematous limbs who concurrently underwent facial rejuvenation with lymphedema fat (LF). We conducted a pre- and post-operative satisfaction questionnaire survey and a histological assessment of the harvested LF fat. The overall mean general appearance score at an average of 6 months after the procedure was 7.2±0.5, demonstrating great improvement. Patients reported significant improvement in their skin texture with a reading of 8.5±0.7 and an improvement in their self-esteem. This study demonstrates that LF as an ideal autologous injectable filler is clinically applicable and easily available in patients with lymphedema. We recommend the further study and clinical use of this tissue as it exhibits important properties and qualities for future applications and research. PMID:25276654

  7. Lymphedema Fat Graft: An Ideal Filler for Facial Rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Nicoli, Fabio; Chilgar, Ram M.; Sapountzis, Stamatis; Lazzeri, Davide; Sze Wei, Matthew Yeo; Ciudad, Pedro; Nicoli, Marzia; Lim, Seong Yoon; Chen, Pei-Yu; Constantinides, Joannis

    2014-01-01

    Lymphedema is a chronic disorder characterized by lymph stasis in the subcutaneous tissue. Lymphatic fluid contains several components including hyaluronic acid and has many important properties. Over the past few years, significant research has been performed to identify an ideal tissue to implant as a filler. Because of its unique composition, fat harvested from the lymphedema tissue is an interesting topic for investigation and has significant potential for application as a filler, particularly in facial rejuvenation. Over a 36-month period, we treated and assessed 8 patients with lymphedematous limbs who concurrently underwent facial rejuvenation with lymphedema fat (LF). We conducted a pre- and post-operative satisfaction questionnaire survey and a histological assessment of the harvested LF fat. The overall mean general appearance score at an average of 6 months after the procedure was 7.2±0.5, demonstrating great improvement. Patients reported significant improvement in their skin texture with a reading of 8.5±0.7 and an improvement in their self-esteem. This study demonstrates that LF as an ideal autologous injectable filler is clinically applicable and easily available in patients with lymphedema. We recommend the further study and clinical use of this tissue as it exhibits important properties and qualities for future applications and research. PMID:25276654

  8. Treatment of Facial Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vanessa; Walton, Shernaz

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are locally destructive malignancies of the skin. They are the most common type of cancer in the western world. The lifetime incidence may be up to 39%. UV exposure is the most common risk factor. The majority of these tumours occur on the head and neck. Despite BCCs being relatively indolent the high incidence means that their treatment now contributes a significant and increasing workload for the health service. A good understanding of the options available is important. Management decisions may be influenced by various factors including the patient's age and comorbidities and the lesion subtype and location. Due to the importance of a good cosmetic and curative outcome for facial BCCs treatment decisions may differ significantly to those that would be made for BCCs arising elsewhere. There is little good randomized controlled data available comparing treatment modalities. Although traditionally standard excision has been the treatment of choice various other options are available including: Mohs micrographic surgery, curettage and cautery, cryosurgery, radiotherapy, topical imiquimod, photodynamic therapy and topical 5-fluorouracil. We discuss and review the literature and evidence base for the treatment options that are currently available for facial BCCs. PMID:21773034

  9. Psychologic consequences of facial dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Orion, Edith; Wolf, Ronni

    2014-01-01

    The attractiveness of the human body has always been an important issue in the fields of sociology, psychology, and psychiatry and also in the field of dermatology. In psychodermatology, one often discovers how all these fields intermingle to produce elaborate situations and extreme human difficulties. Perfect skin is widely adored in literature, poetry, and biblical texts, as well as in advertisements, movies, and television. Because in most societies the face is the body part that is visible, imperfections of the skin are also visible; therefore, its flawed appearance bears the potential to become a source of misery to some. PMID:25441470

  10. Evaluation of Facial Beauty Using Anthropometric Proportions

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Jovana

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of a patient's facial appearance is one of the main goals of contemporary orthodontic treatment. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the difference in facial proportions between attractive and anonymous females in order to establish objective facial features which are widely considered as beautiful. The study included two groups: first group consisted of 83 Caucasian female subjects between 22 and 28 years of age who were selected from the population of students at the University of Belgrade, and the second group included 24 attractive celebrity Caucasian females. The en face facial photographs were taken in natural head position (NHP). Numerous parameters were recorded on these photographs, in order to establish facial symmetry and correlation with the ideal set of proportions. This study showed significant difference between anonymous and attractive females. Attractive females showed smaller face in general and uniformity of the facial thirds and fifths, and most of the facial parameters meet the criteria of the ideal proportions. PMID:24701166

  11. Evaluation of facial beauty using anthropometric proportions.

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, Jovana; Zelic, Ksenija; Nedeljkovic, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of a patient's facial appearance is one of the main goals of contemporary orthodontic treatment. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the difference in facial proportions between attractive and anonymous females in order to establish objective facial features which are widely considered as beautiful. The study included two groups: first group consisted of 83 Caucasian female subjects between 22 and 28 years of age who were selected from the population of students at the University of Belgrade, and the second group included 24 attractive celebrity Caucasian females. The en face facial photographs were taken in natural head position (NHP). Numerous parameters were recorded on these photographs, in order to establish facial symmetry and correlation with the ideal set of proportions. This study showed significant difference between anonymous and attractive females. Attractive females showed smaller face in general and uniformity of the facial thirds and fifths, and most of the facial parameters meet the criteria of the ideal proportions. PMID:24701166

  12. The identification of unfolding facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Schmidt, Susanna; Viviani, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We asked whether the identification of emotional facial expressions (FEs) involves the simultaneous perception of the facial configuration or the detection of emotion-specific diagnostic cues. We recorded at high speed (500 frames s-1) the unfolding of the FE in five actors, each expressing six emotions (anger, surprise, happiness, disgust, fear, sadness). Recordings were coded every 10 frames (20 ms of real time) with the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al 2002, Salt Lake City, UT: Research Nexus eBook) to identify the facial actions contributing to each expression, and their intensity changes over time. Recordings were shown in slow motion (1/20 of recording speed) to one hundred observers in a forced-choice identification task. Participants were asked to identify the emotion during the presentation as soon as they felt confident to do so. Responses were recorded along with the associated response times (RTs). The RT probability density functions for both correct and incorrect responses were correlated with the facial activity during the presentation. There were systematic correlations between facial activities, response probabilities, and RT peaks, and significant differences in RT distributions for correct and incorrect answers. The results show that a reliable response is possible long before the full FE configuration is reached. This suggests that identification is reached by integrating in time individual diagnostic facial actions, and does not require perceiving the full apex configuration. PMID:23025158

  13. The Reverse-Flow Facial Artery Buccinator Flap for Skull Base Reconstruction: Key Anatomical and Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Farzal, Zainab; Lemos-Rodriguez, Ana M; Rawal, Rounak B; Overton, Lewis J; Sreenath, Satyan B; Patel, Mihir R; Zanation, Adam M

    2015-12-01

    Objective?To highlight key anatomical and technical considerations for facial artery identification, and harvest and transposition of the facial artery buccinator (FAB) flap to facilitate its future use in anterior skull base reconstruction. Only a few studies have evaluated the reverse-flow FAB flap for skull base defects. Design?Eight FAB flaps were raised in four cadaveric heads and divided into thirds; the facial artery's course at the superior and inferior borders of the flap was measured noting in which incisional third of the flap it laid. The flap's reach to the anterior cranial fossa, sella turcica, clival recess, and contralateral cribriform plate were studied. A clinical case and operative video are also presented. Results?The facial artery had a near vertical course and stayed with the middle (?) or posterior third (?) of the flap in the inferior and superior incisions. Seven of eight flaps covered the sellar/planar regions. Only four of eight flaps covered the contralateral cribriform region. Lastly, none reached the middle third of the clivus. Conclusions?The FAB flap requires an understanding of the facial artery's course, generally seen in the middle third of the flap, and is an appropriate alternative for sellar/planar and ipsilateral cribriform defects. PMID:26682122

  14. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 MgY for the parotid gland, 0.15 MgY for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field.

  15. Reduction in facial photodamage by a topical growth factor product.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rahul C; Smith, Stacy R; Grove, Gary L; Ford, Rosanne O; Canfield, William; Donofrio, Lisa M; Flynn, Timothy C; Leyden, James J

    2008-09-01

    A topical gel containing a proprietary mixture of over 110 growth factors, cytokines, and soluble matrix proteins secreted by human dermal fibroblasts was evaluated for safety and efficacy in the treatment of mild to severe facial photodamage. In a double-blind study, 60 subjects were randomly assigned to receive either active gel or the vehicle and applied twice daily for 6 months along with a moisturizing cleanser and sunscreen. Efficacy (profilometry, photography, and clinical assessment) and safety (adverse event reporting) measures were evaluated at 0, 3, and 6 months. Treatment with the active gel for 3 months produced greater reduction in fine lines and wrinkles than the vehicle treatment as measured by objective and subjective assessment techniques. The results were either statistically significant (P < or = .05) or trending towards statistical significance (P < or = .1). This study demonstrates that addition of a topical formulation of growth factors and cytokines to a basic skin care regimen reduces the signs of photoaging. PMID:19112801

  16. [Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy in children].

    PubMed

    Tabarki, B

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy may (secondary) or may not have a detectable cause (idiopathic facial palsy or Bell's palsy). Idiopathic facial palsy is the common form of facial palsy. It remains diagnosis by exclusion. The prognosis is more favourable in children than in adults. We present current diagnostic procedures and recommendations regarding treatment in children. PMID:25048647

  17. Nasal Septal Deviation and Facial Skeletal Asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Christopher; Holton, Nathan; Miller, Steven; Yokley, Todd; Marshall, Steven; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Southard, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    During ontogeny, the nasal septum exerts a morphogenetic influence on the surrounding facial skeleton. While the influence of the septum is well established in long snouted animal models, its role in human facial growth is less clear. If the septum is a facial growth center in humans, we would predict that deviated septal growth would be associated with facial skeletal asymmetries. Using computed tomographic (CT) scans of n = 55 adult subjects, the purpose of this study was to test whether there is a correlation between septal deviation and facial asymmetries using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric techniques. We calculated deviation as a percentage of septal volume relative to the volume of a modeled non-deviated septum. We then recorded skeletal landmarks representing the nasal, palatal, and lateral facial regions. Landmark data were superimposed using Procrustes analysis. First, we examined the correlation between nasal septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry. Next, we assessed whether there was a relationship between nasal septal deviation and more localized aspects of asymmetry using multivariate regression analysis. Our results indicate that while there was no correlation between septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry, septal deviation was associated with asymmetry primarily in the nasal floor and the palatal region. Septal deviation was unassociated with asymmetries in the lateral facial skeleton. Though we did not test the causal relationship between nasal septal deviation and facial asymmetry, our results suggest that the nasal septum may have an influence on patterns of adult facial form. Anat Rec, 299:295-306, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26677010

  18. Facial recognition at the CIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gragg, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Law enforcement agencies need to identify suspects as they travel around the world. Terrorists and others change all sorts of information about themselves but their faces remain the same. The first operational facial recognition system (face trace) was developed at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in the late eighties. It combines image analysis technology with collateral information to create an 'electronic mug book.' Using some simple collateral information about a suspect (height, age and sex) and a photograph, the system gives users the ability to identify an unknown person with a reasonable probability. The system matches information extracted from the photographs with similar information extracted from a database of photographs of existing suspects. The technology was subsequently transferred to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for use by the Border Patrol.

  19. Facial Motor Neuron Migration Advances

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Sarah J.; Saeger, Ivan; Guthrie, Sarah; Prince, Victoria E.

    2013-01-01

    During development, the migration of specific neuronal subtypes is required for the correct establishment of neural circuits. In mice and zebrafish, facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons undergo a tangential migration from rhombomere 4 caudally through the hindbrain. Recent advances in the field have capitalized on genetic studies in zebrafish and mouse, and high-resolution time-lapse imaging in zebrafish. Planar cell polarity signaling has emerged as a critical conserved factor in FBM neuron migration, functioning both within the neurons and their environment. In zebrafish, migration depends on specialized ‘pioneer’ neurons to lead follower FBM neurons through the hindbrain, and on interactions with structural components including pre-laid axon tracts and the basement membrane. Despite fundamental conservation, species-specific differences in migration mechanisms are being uncovered. PMID:24090878

  20. Rapid facial mimicry in geladas.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Giada; Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Rapid facial mimicry (RFM) is an automatic response, in which individuals mimic others' expressions. RFM, only demonstrated in humans and apes, is grounded in the automatic perception-action coupling of sensorimotor information occurring in the mirror neuron system. In humans, RFM seems to reflect the capacity of individuals to empathize with others. Here, we demonstrated that, during play, RFM is also present in a cercopithecoid species (Theropithecus gelada). Mother-infant play sessions were not only characterized by the highest levels of RFM, but also by the fastest responses. Our findings suggest that RFM in humans have homologous not only in apes, but also in cercopitecoids. Moreover, data point to similarities in the modality in which mother-infant synchronous behaviours are expressed among primates, suggesting a common evolutionary root in the basic elements of mother-infant affective exchanges. PMID:23538990

  1. Rapid Facial Mimicry In Geladas

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Giada; Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Palagi, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Rapid facial mimicry (RFM) is an automatic response, in which individuals mimic others' expressions. RFM, only demonstrated in humans and apes, is grounded in the automatic perception-action coupling of sensorimotor information occurring in the mirror neuron system. In humans, RFM seems to reflect the capacity of individuals to empathize with others. Here, we demonstrated that, during play, RFM is also present in a cercopithecoid species (Theropithecus gelada). Mother-infant play sessions were not only characterized by the highest levels of RFM, but also by the fastest responses. Our findings suggest that RFM in humans have homologous not only in apes, but also in cercopitecoids. Moreover, data point to similarities in the modality in which mother-infant synchronous behaviours are expressed among primates, suggesting a common evolutionary root in the basic elements of mother-infant affective exchanges. PMID:23538990

  2. Acute unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Siew Swan; Tassone, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Mrs PS, 78 years of age, presented with acute left-sided otalgia, ear swelling and subsequent unilateral facial paralysis (Figure 1). She denied any otorrhoea or hearing loss. Past medical history relevant to the presenting complaint included: * Bell palsy diagnosed 20 years ago with no residual effect * biopsy confirmed benign parotid lump (diagnosed 3 years previously). Histopathology revealed a pleomorphic adenoma. Mrs PS declined surgical intervention at the time * chicken pox as a child * normal fasting blood glucose 1 month previously and no known immune compromise. Examination revealed yellow crusts and small vesicles on the external acoustic meatus (Figure 2). A 10 mm well defined firm and nontender nodule was palpable at the ramus of the mandible. PMID:21597548

  3. Facial ulcer treated with olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Lowry, C L; Bewley, A; Taylor, R

    2013-07-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with a nonhealing ulcer on her right cheek. On histological examination of a biopsy, no evidence of granuloma formation or malignancy was found, and the overall picture was felt to be consistent with dermatitis artefacta (DA). The patient was referred to a joint psychodermatology clinic, where treatment with risperidone was started. However, at follow-up the ulcer remained unchanged, and treatment was changed to olanzapine 2.5 mg twice daily. Within 10 months, the large facial ulcer, which had been refractory to treatment for several years, had completely healed. Anxiolytics, antidepressants and low-dose antipsychotics have been shown to be helpful in the management of DA. Successful treatment with olanzapine has been described. The good clinical response to olanzapine may be attributed to its anti-impulsive effect, antihistaminic properties and low risk of parkinsonian side-effects. PMID:23611260

  4. Facial reanimation procedures depicted on radiologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ginat, D T; Bhama, P; Cunnane, M E; Hadlock, T A

    2014-09-01

    Various facial reanimation procedures can be performed for treating patients with chronic facial nerve paralysis. The radiologic imaging features of static and dynamic techniques are reviewed in this article with clinical correlation, including brow lift, eyelid weights and springs, gracilis free flaps, fascia lata grafts, temporalis flaps, and Gore-Tex suspension slings. Although the anatomic alterations resulting from facial reanimation surgery may not necessarily be the focus of the imaging examination, it is important to recognize such changes and be familiar with MR imaging compatibility of the associated implanted materials. Furthermore, imaging is sometimes used to specifically evaluate the postoperative results, such as vessel patency following free gracilis transfer. PMID:23945230

  5. Psychological issues in acquired facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2010-01-01

    The face is a vital component of one’s personality and body image. There are a vast number of variables that influence recovery and rehabilitation from acquired facial trauma many of which are psychological in nature. The present paper presents the various psychological issues one comes across in facial trauma patients. These may range from body image issues to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms accompanied by anxiety and depression. Issues related to facial and body image affecting social life and general quality of life are vital and the plastic surgeon should be aware of such issues and competent to deal with them in patients and families. PMID:21217982

  6. Skin lesion aspiration

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin lesion aspiration is the withdrawal of fluid from a skin lesion (sore). ... A needle is put into skin sore or skin abscess , which may contain fluid or pus. The fluid may be examined under a microscope. A sample of ...

  7. Aging Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Use sunscreen that has a high SPF number (15 or higher). It should also protect your skin from both UVA and UVB rays. Experts recommend using sunscreen daily, year-round — especially on your face. If you're out in the sun for a long time, protect your ears and scalp with a hat. For ...

  8. Impaired Overt Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Sayaka; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Previous electromyographic studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibited atypical patterns of facial muscle activity in response to facial expression stimuli. However, whether such activity is expressed in visible facial mimicry remains unknown. To investigate this issue, we videotaped facial responses in…

  9. Impaired Overt Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Sayaka; Sato, Wataru; Uono, Shota; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Previous electromyographic studies have reported that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibited atypical patterns of facial muscle activity in response to facial expression stimuli. However, whether such activity is expressed in visible facial mimicry remains unknown. To investigate this issue, we videotaped facial responses in…

  10. Transfer of free fillet lateral arm flap for facial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Fazli Cengiz; Dadaci, Mehmet; Ince, Bilsev; Altuntas, Zeynep

    2014-07-01

    We describe a 16-year-old male patient who had a major right facial degloving injury resulting in a soft-tissue defect with exposed zygoma as well as temporal and frontal bones. Multiple operations were undertaken in a staged manner for reconstruction. Lateral arm free fillet flap transfer was initially performed with fixation of bones with miniplates, which is followed by flap debulking, lateral canthopexy, scalp tissue expansion for hairline reconstruction, as well as ear reconstruction with costal cartilage and local flap techniques. After a follow-up period of 2 years, a good and impressive reconstructive result was achieved through the use of multiple contemporary reconstructive procedures after a successful free fillet flap transfer from an amputated part. PMID:25006958

  11. [Summery and recommendations for acupuncture for peripheral facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Qiang; Yu, Su; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2011-12-01

    Articles on acupuncture for peripheral facial paralysis were picked up from CNKI database. The retrieved original studies were evaluated and summarized. The problems of acupuncture for peripheral facial paralysis were analyzed, and concrete solutions were proposed. Problems that differential diagnosis, prognosis, treatment of severe facial paralysis, and identification of sequelae and compliation were not embasized in clinical treatment of facial paralysis. Consequently, the effectiveness of acupuncture for peripheral facial paralysis will be improved by sloving above problems. PMID:22256658

  12. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePLUS

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  13. Evaluation of the facial dimensions of young adult women with a preferred facial appearance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Yong; Bayome, Mohamed; Park, Jae Hyun; Kang, Ju Hee; Kim, Kang Hyuk; Moon, Hong-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the facial dimensions of young adult women with a preferred facial appearance and compare the results with those from the general population. Methods Twenty-five linear, nine angular, and three area measurements were made and four ratios were calculated using a sample of standardized frontal and lateral photographs of 46 young adult women with a preferred facial appearance (Miss Korea group) and 44 young adult women from the general population (control group). Differences between the two groups were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Results Compared with the control group, the Miss Korea group exhibited a significantly greater facial height, total facial height (TFH; trichion-menton), facial width (tragus right-tragus left), facial depth (tragus-true vertical line), and trichion-nasion/TFH ratio and smaller subnasale-menton/TFH and facial width/TFH ratios. Furthermore, the control group had smaller intercanthal and interpupillary widths. Conclusions The Miss Korea group exhibited longer, wider, and deeper faces compared with those from the general population. Furthermore, the Miss Korea group had larger eyes, longer but less protruded noses, longer and more retruded lower lips and chins, larger lip vermilion areas, and smaller labiomental angles. These results suggest that the latest trends in facial esthetics should be considered during diagnosis and treatment planning for young women with dentofacial abnormalities. PMID:26445720

  14. ANS responses and facial expressions differentiate between the taste of commercial breakfast drinks.

    PubMed

    de Wijk, René A; He, Wei; Mensink, Manon G J; Verhoeven, Rob H G; de Graaf, Cees

    2014-01-01

    The high failure rate of new market introductions, despite initial successful testing with traditional sensory and consumer tests, necessitates the development of other tests. This study explored the ability of selected physiological and behavioral measures of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) to distinguish between repeated exposures to foods from a single category (breakfast drinks) and with similar liking ratings. In this within-subject study 19 healthy young adults sipped from five breakfast drinks, each presented five times, while ANS responses (heart rate, skin conductance response and skin temperature), facial expressions, liking, and intensities were recorded. The results showed that liking was associated with increased heart rate and skin temperature, and more neutral facial expressions. Intensity was associated with reduced heart rate and skin temperature, more neutral expressions and more negative expressions of sadness, anger and surprise. Strongest associations with liking were found after 1 second of tasting, whereas strongest associations with intensity were found after 2 seconds of tasting. Future studies should verify the contribution of the additional information to the prediction of market success. PMID:24714107

  15. MHC-assortative facial preferences in humans.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; Gosling, L Morris; Jones, Benedict C; Perrett, David I; Carter, Vaughan; Petrie, Marion

    2005-12-22

    Individuals tend to choose mates who are sufficiently genetically dissimilar to avoid inbreeding. As facial attractiveness is a key factor in human mate preference, we investigated whether facial preferences were related to genetic dissimilarity. We asked female volunteers to rate the attractiveness of men from photographs and compared these results with individual genotypes at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In contrast to previously reported preferences based on odour, we found a non-significant tendency for women to rate MHC-similar faces as more attractive, suggesting a preference for cues to a self-similar MHC in faces. Further analysis revealed that male faces received higher attractiveness scores when rated by women who were MHC-similar than by MHC-dissimilar women. Although unexpected, this MHC-similar facial preference is consistent with other studies documenting assortative preferences in humans, including for facial phenotype. PMID:17148217

  16. The neural response to facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Thomas, Amy; Smith, Sabrina E; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2009-03-01

    What are the neural correlates of attractiveness? Using functional MRI (fMRI), the authors addressed this question in the specific context of the apprehension of faces. When subjects judged facial beauty explicitly, neural activity in a widely distributed network involving the ventral occipital, anterior insular, dorsal posterior parietal, inferior dorsolateral, and medial prefrontal cortices correlated parametrically with the degree of facial attractiveness. When subjects were not attending explicitly to attractiveness, but rather were judging facial identity, the ventral occipital region remained responsive to facial beauty. The authors propose that this region, which includes the fusiform face area (FFA), the lateral occipital cortex (LOC), and medially adjacent regions, is activated automatically by beauty and may serve as a neural trigger for pervasive effects of attractiveness in social interactions. PMID:19254086

  17. Computed tomography of orbital-facial neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Metzger, R.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Schut, L.; Bruce, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with orbital-facial manifestations of neurofibromations were examined by computed tomography. Delineation of the extent of the disease, and differentiation of the disease processes (orbital tumor, osseous orbital dysplasia, plexiform neurofibromatosis, and buphthalmos) was possible.

  18. The vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for reconstruction of the inferior alveolar nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Hiroto, Saijo; Morooka, Shin; Kuwabara, Kaoru; Fujioka, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    The sural nerve has been described for nerve reconstruction of the maxillofacial region since it provides many advantages. We report a case of a vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for immediate reconstruction after the removal of intraosseous neuroma originating in the inferior alveolar nerve. The patient had a neuroma caused by iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. A 4-cm long neuroma existed in the inferior alveolar nerve and was resected. A peroneal perforator was chosen as the pedicle of the vascularized sural nerve graft for the nerve gap. The graft including the skin paddle for monitoring the perfusion supplied by this perforator was transferred to the lesion. The nerve gap between the two stumps of the inferior alveolar nerve was repaired using the 6-cm long vascularized sural nerve. The perforator of the peroneal artery was anastomosed to the branch of the facial artery in a perforator-to-perforator fashion. There was no need to sacrifice any main arteries. The skin paddle with 1 cm × 3 cm in size was inset into the incised medial neck. Perceptual function tests with a Semmes-Weinstein pressure esthesiometer and two-point discrimination in the lower lip and chin at 10 months after surgery showed recovery almost to the level of the normal side. This free vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator may be a good alternative for reconstruction of inferior alveolar nerve defects. PMID:25346479

  19. Ventricular septal defect (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Ventricular septal defect is a congenital defect of the heart, that occurs as an abnormal opening in the wall that separates the right and left ventricles. Ventricular septal defect may also be associated with other heart defects. ...

  20. Locating facial features for age classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young Ho; da Vitoria Lobo, Niels

    1993-08-01

    In this paper, we outline computations for visual age classification from facial images. For now, input images can only be classified into one of three age-groups: babies, adults, and senior adults. The computations are based on cranio-facial development theory, and wrinkle analysis. In the implementation, first primary features of the face are found, followed by secondary feature analyses. Preliminary results with real data are presented.

  1. Laptop Computer - Based Facial Recognition System Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Cain; G. B. Singleton

    2001-03-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the performance of the leading commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) facial recognition software package when used as a laptop application. We performed the assessment to determine the system's usefulness for enrolling facial images in a database from remote locations and conducting real-time searches against a database of previously enrolled images. The assessment involved creating a database of 40 images and conducting 2 series of tests to determine the product's ability to recognize and match subject faces under varying conditions. This report describes the test results and includes a description of the factors affecting the results. After an extensive market survey, we selected Visionics' FaceIt{reg_sign} software package for evaluation and a review of the Facial Recognition Vendor Test 2000 (FRVT 2000). This test was co-sponsored by the US Department of Defense (DOD) Counterdrug Technology Development Program Office, the National Institute of Justice, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Administered in May-June 2000, the FRVT 2000 assessed the capabilities of facial recognition systems that were currently available for purchase on the US market. Our selection of this Visionics product does not indicate that it is the ''best'' facial recognition software package for all uses. It was the most appropriate package based on the specific applications and requirements for this specific application. In this assessment, the system configuration was evaluated for effectiveness in identifying individuals by searching for facial images captured from video displays against those stored in a facial image database. An additional criterion was that the system be capable of operating discretely. For this application, an operational facial recognition system would consist of one central computer hosting the master image database with multiple standalone systems configured with duplicates of the master operating in remote locations. Remote users could perform real-time searches where network connectivity is not available. As images are enrolled at the remote locations, periodic database synchronization is necessary.

  2. Facial preferences in early adolescent girls: pubertal maturity predicts preferences maturity.

    PubMed

    Kościński, Krzysztof

    2013-09-01

    Despite numerous studies on perception of facial attractiveness in adults, preferences in adolescents remain poorly recognized. The aim of present study was to explore facial preferences in girls at early adolescence (11-14 years old) and compare them with preferences of women. All females evaluated the same 30 male faces, which were also assessed by independent judges for several perceived features. Regardless of age, girls assessed attractiveness much the same as women, and the strengths of their preferences for specific facial features were similar to those of women. Except for the youngest girls, pubertal maturity (measured as the time elapsed since the menarche and breast development) correlated positively with the similarity of the girls' attractiveness evaluations to those of adult women and with strength of preference for cues to good biological quality (skin healthiness and sexy appearance). This remained true even after controlling for age and psychosexual development, suggesting thus that sex hormones are involved in development of facial preferences in pubescent girls. PMID:24308210

  3. Part 1 of a 4-part series Facial Cosmetics: Trends and Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sharon; Katta, Rajani; Nedorost, Susan; Warshaw, Erin; Zirwas, Matt; Cha, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To provide updated data on usage of ingredients that are common potential contact allergens in several categories of facial cosmetics. To identify useful alternative products with few or no common contact allergens. Design: In November 2009, the full ingredient lists of 5,416 skin, hair, and cosmetic products marketed by the CVS pharmacy chain were copied from CVS.com into Microsoft Word format for analysis. Computer searches were made in Microsoft Word using search/replace and sorting functions to accurately identify the presence of specific allergens in each website product. Measurements: Percentages of American Contact Alternatives Group core series allergens were calculated. Results: The usage of American Contact Alternatives Group core series allergens in facial cosmetics is reported along with suitable alternative products for individuals with contact allergy. Conclusion: Data on allergen usage and alternatives for facial cosmetics is not widely published. This article reviews some of the common potential allergens in facial cosmetics, including blushers and bronzers, concealers, eyeliners, eyeshadows, foundations, loose and pressed powders, and mascaras. Suitable available alternative products for patients with contact allergy are listed. PMID:21779413

  4. On the origin, homologies and evolution of primate facial muscles, with a particular focus on hominoids and a suggested unifying nomenclature for the facial muscles of the Mammalia

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, R; Wood, B A; Aziz, M A; Burrows, A

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian facial muscles are a subgroup of hyoid muscles (i.e. muscles innervated by cranial nerve VII). They are usually attached to freely movable skin and are responsible for facial expressions. In this study we provide an account of the origin, homologies and evolution of the primate facial muscles, based on dissections of various primate and non-primate taxa and a review of the literature. We provide data not previously reported, including photographs showing in detail the facial muscles of primates such as gibbons and orangutans. We show that the facial muscles usually present in strepsirhines are basically the same muscles that are present in non-primate mammals such as tree-shrews. The exceptions are that strepsirhines often have a muscle that is usually not differentiated in tree-shrews, the depressor supercilii, and lack two muscles that are usually differentiated in these mammals, the zygomatico-orbicularis and sphincter colli superficialis. Monkeys such as macaques usually lack two muscles that are often present in strepsirhines, the sphincter colli profundus and mandibulo-auricularis, but have some muscles that are usually absent as distinct structures in non-anthropoid primates, e.g. the levator labii superioris alaeque nasi, levator labii superioris, nasalis, depressor septi nasi, depressor anguli oris and depressor labii inferioris. In turn, macaques typically lack a risorius, auricularis anterior and temporoparietalis, which are found in hominoids such as humans, but have muscles that are usually not differentiated in members of some hominoid taxa, e.g. the platysma cervicale (usually not differentiated in orangutans, panins and humans) and auricularis posterior (usually not differentiated in orangutans). Based on our observations, comparisons and review of the literature, we propose a unifying, coherent nomenclature for the facial muscles of the Mammalia as a whole and provide a list of more than 300 synonyms that have been used in the literature to designate the facial muscles of primates and other mammals. A main advantage of this nomenclature is that it combines, and thus creates a bridge between, those names used by human anatomists and the names often employed in the literature dealing with non-human primates and non-primate mammals. PMID:19531159

  5. Severe fetal valproate syndrome: combination of complex cardiac defect, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and trigonocephaly.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Hilal; Cetinkaya, Merih; Köksal, Nilgün; Yapici, Senay

    2011-03-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a teratogenic drug used in pregnant women for the treatment of epilepsy and mood disorders. Fetal valproate syndrome (FVS) is characterized by a number of abnormalities associated with VPA exposure in utero including neural tube defects, congenital heart defects, limb defects, genitourinary defects, brain, eye and respiratory anomalies, and abdominal wall defects. Complex cardiac defect and trigonocephaly have rarely been reported and multicystic dysplastic kidney has never been detected in FVS. We here report a female infant who was born to a mother with a history of low-dose VPA monotherapy (250 mg/day) during pregnancy and who had presented with a combination of unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney, multicomplex cardiac defect including severe coarctation of aorta, Ebstein anomaly, secundum atrial septal defect, mesocardia along with trigonocephaly due to metopic craniosynostosis, typical facial appearance and limb defects. To our knowledge, this is the first case presented with multicystic dysplastic kidney, complex cardiac defect, trigonocephaly and other limb and facial defects because of exposure to very low-dose VPA monotherapy (250 mg/day) in utero. We conclude that VPA must be used very cautiously in pregnant women even as monotherapy and in low doses to prevent major congenital defects. PMID:21291342

  6. Forensic Facial Reconstruction: The Final Frontier.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonia; Gupta, Vineeta; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Tyagi, Nutan

    2015-09-01

    Forensic facial reconstruction can be used to identify unknown human remains when other techniques fail. Through this article, we attempt to review the different methods of facial reconstruction reported in literature. There are several techniques of doing facial reconstruction, which vary from two dimensional drawings to three dimensional clay models. With the advancement in 3D technology, a rapid, efficient and cost effective computerized 3D forensic facial reconstruction method has been developed which has brought down the degree of error previously encountered. There are several methods of manual facial reconstruction but the combination Manchester method has been reported to be the best and most accurate method for the positive recognition of an individual. Recognition allows the involved government agencies to make a list of suspected victims'. This list can then be narrowed down and a positive identification may be given by the more conventional method of forensic medicine. Facial reconstruction allows visual identification by the individual's family and associates to become easy and more definite. PMID:26501035

  7. [Facial nerve paralysis and mandibular fracture].

    PubMed

    Salonna, I; Fanizzi, P; Quaranta, A

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe three cases of peripheral facial nerve paralysis in patients with a mandibular fracture. In two cases, in which the onset of palsy was uncertain, the facial nerve injury was contralateral to the fractured side. Topodiagnostic tests showed neural damage at the third intrapetrosal portion and at the genicular ganglion. In one of the two patients tomography revealed a fracture line through the anterio-superior wall of the external auditory canal homolateral to the facial palsy. In the third subject palsy set in immediately after the trauma and was ipsilateral to the mandibular fracture; the facial lesion was localized at the genicular ganglion. In the first two cases, functional recovery was spontaneous (40 and 0 days after the trauma respectively). In the third subject, the nerve was decompressed surgically with a complete functional recovery two months later. The functional and clinical findings of these three cases show that a contralateral facial palsy secondary to a mandibular fracture resolves spontaneously while the traumatic displacement of the mandibular condyle may determine a temporal bone fracture sometimes followed by a lesion in the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve. An event such as the latter may delay functional recovery and thus warrant surgery such as in cases of Bell's palsy. PMID:1298156

  8. [Asymmetry of the human facial nerve].

    PubMed

    An, S V

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the right and left facial skull were carried out in 6 different series of skulls: two europeoid, Russian and Georgian; two mongoloid, Buryat and Eskimo; and two skulls of mixed origin, Khakass and Udmurt ones, in order to assess the bilateral asymmetry. The measurements included 18 signs characterizing the width, height, and length of the facial skull. Sums of all right-side and left-side signs were the integral parameters of the right and left halves of the facial skull. A compensatory type of asymmetry variations was revealed. All the components of the facial skull regarded individually demonstrate clear asymmetry, whereas the total summary size of both halves of the facial skull is similar. The cause of the symmetrical combination of whole parts in the presence of evident asymmetry of various elements of the facial skull is differently directed asymmetry of various extent. The results are discussed in the context of the evolution of human functions and the relevant transformation of the morphologic structure in the anthropogenesis. PMID:8713398

  9. Facial expression recognition in perceptual color space.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Seyed Mehdi; Wu, Hong Ren

    2012-08-01

    This paper introduces a tensor perceptual color framework (TPCF) for facial expression recognition (FER), which is based on information contained in color facial images. The TPCF enables multi-linear image analysis in different color spaces and demonstrates that color components provide additional information for robust FER. Using this framework, the components (in either RGB, YCbCr, CIELab or CIELuv space) of color images are unfolded to two-dimensional (2- D) tensors based on multi-linear algebra and tensor concepts, from which the features are extracted by Log-Gabor filters. The mutual information quotient (MIQ) method is employed for feature selection. These features are classified using a multi-class linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. The effectiveness of color information on FER using low-resolution and facial expression images with illumination variations is assessed for performance evaluation. Experimental results demonstrate that color information has significant potential to improve emotion recognition performance due to the complementary characteristics of image textures. Furthermore, the perceptual color spaces (CIELab and CIELuv) are better overall for facial expression recognition than other color spaces by providing more efficient and robust performance for facial expression recognition using facial images with illumination variation. PMID:22575677

  10. Facial Morphogenesis of the Earliest Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Martinón-Torres, María; O’Higgins, Paul; Paine, Michael L.; Carbonell, Eudald; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Bromage, Timothy G.

    2013-01-01

    The modern human face differs from that of our early ancestors in that the facial profile is relatively retracted (orthognathic). This change in facial profile is associated with a characteristic spatial distribution of bone deposition and resorption: growth remodeling. For humans, surface resorption commonly dominates on anteriorly-facing areas of the subnasal region of the maxilla and mandible during development. We mapped the distribution of facial growth remodeling activities on the 900–800 ky maxilla ATD6-69 assigned to H. antecessor, and on the 1.5 My cranium KNM-WT 15000, part of an associated skeleton assigned to African H. erectus. We show that, as in H. sapiens, H. antecessor shows bone resorption over most of the subnasal region. This pattern contrasts with that seen in KNM-WT 15000 where evidence of bone deposition, not resorption, was identified. KNM-WT 15000 is similar to Australopithecus and the extant African apes in this localized area of bone deposition. These new data point to diversity of patterns of facial growth in fossil Homo. The similarities in facial growth in H. antecessor and H. sapiens suggest that one key developmental change responsible for the characteristic facial morphology of modern humans can be traced back at least to H. antecessor. PMID:23762314

  11. Pediatric facial fractures: evolving patterns of treatment.

    PubMed

    Posnick, J C; Wells, M; Pron, G E

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the treatment of facial trauma between October 1986 and December 1990 at a major pediatric referral center. The mechanism of injury, location and pattern of facial fractures, pattern of facial injury, soft tissue injuries, and any associated injuries to other organ systems were recorded, and fracture management and perioperative complications reviewed. The study population consisted of 137 patients who sustained 318 facial fractures. Eighty-one patients (171 fractures) were seen in the acute stage, and 56 patients (147 fractures) were seen for reconstruction of a secondary deformity. Injuries in boys were more prevalent than in girls (63% versus 37%), and the 6- to 12-year cohort made up the largest group (42%). Most fractures resulted from traffic-related accidents (50%), falls (23%), or sports-related injuries (15%). Mandibular (34%) and orbital fractures (23%) predominated; fewer midfacial fractures (7%) were sustained than would be expected in a similar adult population. Three quarters of the patients with acute fractures required operative intervention. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation were frequently chosen for mandibular condyle fractures and open reduction techniques (35%) for other regions of the facial skeleton. When open reduction was indicated, plate-and-screw fixation was the preferred method of stabilization (65%). The long-term effects of the injuries and the treatment given on facial growth remain undetermined. Perioperative complication rates directly related to the surgery were low. PMID:8336220

  12. Forensic Facial Reconstruction: The Final Frontier

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vineeta; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Tyagi, Nutan

    2015-01-01

    Forensic facial reconstruction can be used to identify unknown human remains when other techniques fail. Through this article, we attempt to review the different methods of facial reconstruction reported in literature. There are several techniques of doing facial reconstruction, which vary from two dimensional drawings to three dimensional clay models. With the advancement in 3D technology, a rapid, efficient and cost effective computerized 3D forensic facial reconstruction method has been developed which has brought down the degree of error previously encountered. There are several methods of manual facial reconstruction but the combination Manchester method has been reported to be the best and most accurate method for the positive recognition of an individual. Recognition allows the involved government agencies to make a list of suspected victims’. This list can then be narrowed down and a positive identification may be given by the more conventional method of forensic medicine. Facial reconstruction allows visual identification by the individual’s family and associates to become easy and more definite. PMID:26501035

  13. Trisomy 21 and Facial Developmental Instability

    PubMed Central

    Starbuck, John M.; Cole, Theodore M.; Reeves, Roger H.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2013-01-01

    The most common live-born human aneuploidy is trisomy 21, which causes Down syndrome (DS). Dosage imbalance of genes on chromosome 21 (Hsa21) affects complex gene-regulatory interactions and alters development to produce a wide range of phenotypes, including characteristic facial dysmorphology. Little is known about how trisomy 21 alters craniofacial morphogenesis to create this characteristic appearance. Proponents of the “amplified developmental instability” hypothesis argue that trisomy 21 causes a generalized genetic imbalance that disrupts evolutionarily conserved developmental pathways by decreasing developmental homeostasis and precision throughout development. Based on this model, we test the hypothesis that DS faces exhibit increased developmental instability relative to euploid individuals. Developmental instability was assessed by a statistical analysis of fluctuating asymmetry. We compared the magnitude and patterns of fluctuating asymmetry among siblings using three-dimensional coordinate locations of 20 anatomic landmarks collected from facial surface reconstructions in four age-matched samples ranging from 4 to 12 years: 1) DS individuals (n=55); 2) biological siblings of DS individuals (n=55); 3) and 4) two samples of typically developing individuals (n=55 for each sample), who are euploid siblings and age-matched to the DS individuals and their euploid siblings (samples 1 and 2). Identification in the DS sample of facial prominences exhibiting increased fluctuating asymmetry during facial morphogenesis provides evidence for increased developmental instability in DS faces. We found the highest developmental instability in facial structures derived from the mandibular prominence and lowest in facial regions derived from the frontal prominence. PMID:23505010

  14. Facial allograft transplantation, personal identity and subjectivity

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, J S

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the identity issues involved in facial allograft transplantation is provided in this paper. The identity issues involved in organ transplantation in general, under both theoretical accounts of personal identity and subjective accounts provided by organ recipients, are examined. It is argued that the identity issues involved in facial allograft transplantation are similar to those involved in organ transplantation in general, but much stronger because the face is so closely linked with personal identity. Recipients of facial allograft transplantation have the potential to feel that their identity is a mix between their own and the donor's, and the donor's family is potentially likely to feel that their loved one “lives on”. It is also argued that facial allograft transplantation allows the recipients to regain an identity, because they can now be seen in the social world. Moreover, they may regain expressivity, allowing for them to be seen even more by others, and to regain an identity to an even greater extent. Informing both recipients and donors about the role that identity plays in facial allograft transplantation could enhance the consent process for facial allograft transplantation and donation. PMID:17664301

  15. Double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3 result in Waardenburg syndrome with increased penetrance in pigmentary defects.

    PubMed

    Yang, T; Li, X; Huang, Q; Li, L; Chai, Y; Sun, L; Wang, X; Zhu, Y; Wang, Z; Huang, Z; Li, Y; Wu, H

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary defects of the hair, skin, and iris. Heterozygous mutations of MITF and its transactivator gene PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) and type I (WS1), respectively. Most patients with MITF or PAX3 mutations, however, show variable penetrance of WS-associated phenotypes even within families segregating the same mutation, possibly mediated by genetic background or specific modifiers. In this study, we reported a rare Waardenburg syndrome simplex family in which a pair of WS parents gave birth to a child with double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3. Compared to his parents who carried a single mutation in either MITF or PAX3, this child showed increased penetrance of pigmentary defects including white forelock, white eyebrows and eyelashes, and patchy facial depigmentation. This observation suggested that the expression level of MITF is closely correlated to the penetrance of WS, and variants in transcription regulator genes of MITF may modify the relevant clinical phenotypes. PMID:22320238

  16. The use of Botulinum toxin-a injection for facial wrinkles: a histological and immunohistochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; Attia, Sameh K; El-Sawy, Ashraf E; Moftah, Noha H; Nasif, Ghada A; Medhat, Walid; Marwan, Belkais

    2015-06-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX)-A has been used for years in the reduction of facial wrinkles; however, histological and immunohistochemical changes after its use were not previously investigated. To evaluate histological and immunohistochemical changes after BTX-A injection for facial wrinkles, sixteen volunteers, with wrinkles on the upper third of the face, were subjected to single injection of BTX-A. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained from peri-orbital wrinkle site (crow's feet area) before and after 3 months of BTX-A injection. Using histological and immunohistochemical evaluation coupled with computerized morphometric analysis, measurement of epidermal thickness, wrinkle depth and width as well as quantitative evaluation of collagen types I and III and elastin was performed for skin biopsies. After BTX-A injections, there were significant increase in wrinkle width and granular layer thickness (P < 0.001), while the other histometrical measures as well as the immunohistochemical expression of collagen types I and III and elastin showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). However, collagen fibers showed better organization and orientation after BTX-A injection. The histological changes observed after BTX-A injection for facial wrinkles may help in better understanding of its mechanism of action. PMID:25916463

  17. Preliminary performance assessment of computer automated facial approximations using computed tomography scans of living individuals.

    PubMed

    Parks, Connie L; Richard, Adam H; Monson, Keith L

    2013-12-10

    ReFace (Reality Enhancement Facial Approximation by Computational Estimation) is a computer-automated facial approximation application jointly developed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and GE Global Research. The application derives a statistically based approximation of a face from a unidentified skull using a dataset of ~400 human head computer tomography (CT) scans of living adult American individuals from four ancestry groups: African, Asian, European and Hispanic (self-identified). To date only one unpublished subjective recognition study has been conducted using ReFace approximations. It indicated that approximations produced by ReFace were recognized above chance rates (10%). This preliminary study assesses: (i) the recognizability of five ReFace approximations; (ii) the recognizability of CT-derived skin surface replicas of the same individuals whose skulls were used to create the ReFace approximations; and (iii) the relationship between recognition performance and resemblance ratings of target individuals. All five skin surface replicas were recognized at rates statistically significant above chance (22-50%). Four of five ReFace approximations were recognized above chance (5-18%), although with statistical significance only at the higher rate. Such results suggest reconsideration of the usefulness of the type of output format utilized in this study, particularly in regard to facial approximations employed as a means of identifying unknown individuals. PMID:24314512

  18. Multipoint and multilevel injection technique of botulinum toxin A in facial aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Iozzo, Ivano; Tengattini, Vera; Antonucci, Valentina A

    2014-06-01

    Botulinum toxin represents one of the most frequently requested cosmetic procedures. We treated 223 patients with facial wrinkles using a new technique of injection of botulinum toxin A (BTA) called multipoint and multilevel injection technique (MMIT). The aim of MMIT was to relax the muscle and not paralyze it. Patient satisfaction was evaluated by Facial Line Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (FTSQ). Treatment with botulinum toxin determined a good response in all patients. Facial rhytids were completely resolved in case of young skin and well reduced in case of aged skin, leaving a natural aspect both in static and dynamic wrinkles. Patient mean overall satisfaction evaluated with FTSQ was 6.4 ± 1.1. In our experience, the use of botulin toxin by MMIT consents a better calibration of action with a soft and natural result. This can be achieved by distributing the BTA dose through various injection points for each area ("multipoint injections"). Furthermore, injections can be performed at different levels ("multilevel injections"). The level of injections regulates the potency of effect on the muscle: if the level is deep (intramuscular), the effect will be strong while if it is medium or superficial (subcutaneous and intradermal), the effect will be soft. This consents a fine calibration of action on muscle activity with a personal aesthetic result. PMID:24910277

  19. Development of the facial midline.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Michael H

    2002-01-01

    "Intellectual excellence lies in having faith in the observation of apparently nontranscendental and unimportant facts. To observe an anatomic element calmly, with an open, analytical spirit, and with spiritual freedom, can lead to an explosive vortex of new knowledge."-Miguel Orticochea, M.D.(1) Traditional descriptive embryology based upon the interaction of frontonasal, lateral nasal, and medial nasal prominences is incapable of explaining the three-dimensional development of the facial midline. The internal structure of the nose and that of the oronasal midline can best be explained by the presence of paired A fields originating from the prechordal mesendoderm, associated with the nasal and optic placodes, supplied by the internal carotid artery, and sharing a common genetic coding with the prosomeres of the forebrain. Mesial drift of these fields leads to fusion of their medial walls; this in turn provides bilateral functional matrics within which form the orbits ethmoids, lacrimals, turbinates, premaxillae, vomerine bones, and the cartilages of the nose. This two-part paper reports six lines of evidence supporting the field theory model of facial development: (1) An apparent watershed exists in the midline of the base between the territories of the internal and external carotid systems. Isolation of the ICA in injected fetal specimens confirmed that the demarcation was distinct and restricted to the embryonic nasal capsule. (2) Field theory explains the developmental anatomy of the contents of the nasal capsule. (3) The neuromeric model of CNS development provides a genetic basis for the anatomy and behavior of fields. (4) Mutants for the Dlx5 gene demonstrate A field deletion patterns. These experiments relate the nasal placode to the structures of the A fields. (5) Separate regions of the original nasal placodes give rise to neurons, which are dedicated to separate sensory and endocrine systems. The A fields constitute the pathways by which these neurons reach the brain. (6) Non-cleft lip-related cleft palate, holoprosencephaly, and the Kallmann syndrome are clinical models that demonstrate the effects of anatomic disturbances within the A fields. PMID:11887012

  20. Excellent Aesthetic and Functional Outcome After Fractionated Carbon Dioxide Laser Skin Graft Revision Surgery: Case Report and Review of Laser Skin Graft Revision Techniques.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-11-01

    Skin grafts are utilized in dermatology to reconstruct a defect secondary to surgery or trauma of the skin. Common indications for skin grafts include surgical removal of cutaneous malignancies, replacement of tissue after burns or lacerations, and hair transplantation in alopecia. Skin grafts may be cosmetically displeasing, functionally limiting, and significantly impact patient's quality-of-life. There is limited published data regarding skin graft revision to enhance aesthetics and function. Here, we present a case demonstrating excellent aesthetic and functional outcome after fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser skin graft revision surgery and review of the medical literature on laser skin graft revision techniques. PMID:26580878