Science.gov

Sample records for facility distributed computer

  1. DNET: A communications facility for distributed heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tole, John; Nagappan, S.; Clayton, J.; Ruotolo, P.; Williamson, C.; Solow, H.

    1989-01-01

    This document describes DNET, a heterogeneous data communications networking facility. DNET allows programs operating on hosts on dissimilar networks to communicate with one another without concern for computer hardware, network protocol, or operating system differences. The overall DNET network is defined as the collection of host machines/networks on which the DNET software is operating. Each underlying network is considered a DNET 'domain'. Data communications service is provided between any two processes on any two hosts on any of the networks (domains) that may be reached via DNET. DNET provides protocol transparent, reliable, streaming data transmission between hosts (restricted, initially to DECnet and TCP/IP networks). DNET also provides variable length datagram service with optional return receipts.

  2. The Overview of the National Ignition Facility Distributed Computer Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Lagin, L J; Bettenhausen, R C; Carey, R A; Estes, C M; Fisher, J M; Krammen, J E; Reed, R K; VanArsdall, P J; Woodruff, J P

    2001-10-15

    The Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a layered architecture of 300 front-end processors (FEP) coordinated by supervisor subsystems including automatic beam alignment and wavefront control, laser and target diagnostics, pulse power, and shot control timed to 30 ps. FEP computers incorporate either VxWorks on PowerPC or Solaris on UltraSPARC processors that interface to over 45,000 control points attached to VME-bus or PCI-bus crates respectively. Typical devices are stepping motors, transient digitizers, calorimeters, and photodiodes. The front-end layer is divided into another segment comprised of an additional 14,000 control points for industrial controls including vacuum, argon, synthetic air, and safety interlocks implemented with Allen-Bradley programmable logic controllers (PLCs). The computer network is augmented asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) that delivers video streams from 500 sensor cameras monitoring the 192 laser beams to operator workstations. Software is based on an object-oriented framework using CORBA distribution that incorporates services for archiving, machine configuration, graphical user interface, monitoring, event logging, scripting, alert management, and access control. Software coding using a mixed language environment of Ada95 and Java is one-third complete at over 300 thousand source lines. Control system installation is currently under way for the first 8 beams, with project completion scheduled for 2008.

  3. Computer security in DOE distributed computing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    The modernization of DOE facilities amid limited funding is creating pressure on DOE facilities to find innovative approaches to their daily activities. Distributed computing systems are becoming cost-effective solutions to improved productivity. This paper defines and describes typical distributed computing systems in the DOE. The special computer security problems present in distributed computing systems are identified and compared with traditional computer systems. The existing DOE computer security policy supports only basic networks and traditional computer systems and does not address distributed computing systems. A review of the existing policy requirements is followed by an analysis of the policy as it applies to distributed computing systems. Suggested changes in the DOE computer security policy are identified and discussed. The long lead time in updating DOE policy will require guidelines for applying the existing policy to distributed systems. Some possible interim approaches are identified and discussed. 2 refs.

  4. Distributed computer control system in the Nova Laser Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The EE Technical Review has two purposes - to inform readers of various activities within the Electronics Engineering Department and to promote the exchange of ideas. The articles, by design, are brief summaries of EE work. The articles included in this report are as follows: Overview - Nova Control System; Centralized Computer-Based Controls for the Nova Laser Facility; Nova Pulse-Power Control System; Nova Laser Alignment Control System; Nova Beam Diagnostic System; Nova Target-Diagnostics Control System; and Nova Shot Scheduler. The 7 papers are individually abstracted.

  5. Distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F.B.; Duce, D.A.; Jones, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    CONTENTS: The Dataflow Approach: Fundamentals of dataflow. Architecture and performance. Assembler level programming. High level dataflow programming. Declarative systems: Functional programming. Logic programming and prolog. The ''language first'' approach. Towards a successor to von Neumann. Loosely-coupled systems: Architectures. Communications. Distributed filestores. Mechanisms for distributed control. Distributed operating systems. Programming languages. Closely-coupled systems: Architecture. Programming languages. Run-time support. Development aids. Cyba-M. Polyproc. Modeling and verification: Using algebra for concurrency. Reasoning about concurrent systems. Each chapter includes references. Index.

  6. Redirecting Under-Utilised Computer Laboratories into Cluster Computing Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, John S.; Spenneman, Dirk H. R.; Cornforth, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To provide administrators at an Australian university with data on the feasibility of redirecting under-utilised computer laboratories facilities into a distributed high performance computing facility. Design/methodology/approach: The individual log-in records for each computer located in the computer laboratories at the university were…

  7. Physics Division computer facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  8. AMRITA -- A computational facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, J.E.; Quirk, J.J.

    1998-02-23

    Amrita is a software system for automating numerical investigations. The system is driven using its own powerful scripting language, Amrita, which facilitates both the composition and archiving of complete numerical investigations, as distinct from isolated computations. Once archived, an Amrita investigation can later be reproduced by any interested party, and not just the original investigator, for no cost other than the raw CPU time needed to parse the archived script. In fact, this entire lecture can be reconstructed in such a fashion. To do this, the script: constructs a number of shock-capturing schemes; runs a series of test problems, generates the plots shown; outputs the LATEX to typeset the notes; performs a myriad of behind-the-scenes tasks to glue everything together. Thus Amrita has all the characteristics of an operating system and should not be mistaken for a common-or-garden code.

  9. Coping with distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Cormell, L.

    1992-09-01

    The rapid increase in the availability of high performance, cost-effective RISC/UNIX workstations has been both a blessing and a curse. The blessing of having extremely powerful computing engines available on the desk top is well-known to many users. The user has tremendous freedom, flexibility, and control of his environment. That freedom can, however, become the curse of distributed computing. The user must become a system manager to some extent, he must worry about backups, maintenance, upgrades, etc. Traditionally these activities have been the responsibility of a central computing group. The central computing group, however, may find that it can no longer provide all of the traditional services. With the plethora of workstations now found on so many desktops throughout the entire campus or lab, the central computing group may be swamped by support requests. This talk will address several of these computer support and management issues by providing some examples of the approaches taken at various HEP institutions. In addition, a brief review of commercial directions or products for distributed computing and management will be given.

  10. Distributed instruction set computer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.

    1989-01-01

    The Distributed Instruction Set Computer, or DISC for short, is an experimental computer system for fine-grained parallel processing. DISC employs a new parallel instruction set, an Early Binding and Scheduling data tagging scheme, and a distributed control mechanism to explore a software dataflow control method in a multiple-functional unit system. With zero system control overhead, multiple instructions are executed in parallel and/or out of order at the highest speed of n instructions/cycle, where n is the number of functional units. The quantitative simulation result indicates that a DISC system with 16 functional units can deliverer a maximal 7.7X performance speedup over a single functional-unit system at the same clock speed. Exploring a new parallel instruction set and distributed control mechanism, DISC represents three major breakthroughs in the domain of fine-grained parallel processing: (1) Fast multiple instruction issuing mechanism; (2) Parallel and/or out-of-order execution; (3) Software dataflow control scheme.

  11. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, James R.; Papka, Michael E.; Cerny, Beth A.; Coffey, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  12. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, James R.; Papka, Michael E.; Cerny, Beth A.; Coffey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  13. Central Computational Facility CCF communications subsystem options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    A MITRE study which investigated the communication options available to support both the remaining Central Computational Facility (CCF) computer systems and the proposed U1108 replacements is presented. The facilities utilized to link the remote user terminals with the CCF were analyzed and guidelines to provide more efficient communications were established.

  14. Distributed Real-Time Computing with Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Di Saverio, Emanuele; Cesati, Marco; Di Biagio, Christian; Pennella, Guido; Engelmann, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Modern parallel and distributed computing solutions are often built onto a ''middleware'' software layer providing a higher and common level of service between computational nodes. Harness is an adaptable, plugin-based middleware framework for parallel and distributed computing. This paper reports recent research and development results of using Harness for real-time distributed computing applications in the context of an industrial environment with the needs to perform several safety critical tasks. The presented work exploits the modular architecture of Harness in conjunction with a lightweight threaded implementation to resolve several real-time issues by adding three new Harness plug-ins to provide a prioritized lightweight execution environment, low latency communication facilities, and local timestamped event logging.

  15. Distributed Computing Framework for Synthetic Radar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurrola, Eric M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Aivazis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We are developing an extensible software framework, in response to Air Force and NASA needs for distributed computing facilities for a variety of radar applications. The objective of this work is to develop a Python based software framework, that is the framework elements of the middleware that allows developers to control processing flow on a grid in a distributed computing environment. Framework architectures to date allow developers to connect processing functions together as interchangeable objects, thereby allowing a data flow graph to be devised for a specific problem to be solved. The Pyre framework, developed at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and now being used as the basis for next-generation radar processing at JPL, is a Python-based software framework. We have extended the Pyre framework to include new facilities to deploy processing components as services, including components that monitor and assess the state of the distributed network for eventual real-time control of grid resources.

  16. Heterogeneous Distributed Computing for Computational Aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderam, Vaidy S.

    1998-01-01

    The research supported under this award focuses on heterogeneous distributed computing for high-performance applications, with particular emphasis on computational aerosciences. The overall goal of this project was to and investigate issues in, and develop solutions to, efficient execution of computational aeroscience codes in heterogeneous concurrent computing environments. In particular, we worked in the context of the PVM[1] system and, subsequent to detailed conversion efforts and performance benchmarking, devising novel techniques to increase the efficacy of heterogeneous networked environments for computational aerosciences. Our work has been based upon the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite, but has also recently expanded in scope to include the NAS I/O benchmarks as specified in the NHT-1 document. In this report we summarize our research accomplishments under the auspices of the grant.

  17. Distributed GPU Computing in GIScience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Yang, C.; Huang, Q.; Li, J.; Sun, M.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscientists strived to discover potential principles and patterns hidden inside ever-growing Big Data for scientific discoveries. To better achieve this objective, more capable computing resources are required to process, analyze and visualize Big Data (Ferreira et al., 2003; Li et al., 2013). Current CPU-based computing techniques cannot promptly meet the computing challenges caused by increasing amount of datasets from different domains, such as social media, earth observation, environmental sensing (Li et al., 2013). Meanwhile CPU-based computing resources structured as cluster or supercomputer is costly. In the past several years with GPU-based technology matured in both the capability and performance, GPU-based computing has emerged as a new computing paradigm. Compare to traditional computing microprocessor, the modern GPU, as a compelling alternative microprocessor, has outstanding high parallel processing capability with cost-effectiveness and efficiency(Owens et al., 2008), although it is initially designed for graphical rendering in visualization pipe. This presentation reports a distributed GPU computing framework for integrating GPU-based computing within distributed environment. Within this framework, 1) for each single computer, computing resources of both GPU-based and CPU-based can be fully utilized to improve the performance of visualizing and processing Big Data; 2) within a network environment, a variety of computers can be used to build up a virtual super computer to support CPU-based and GPU-based computing in distributed computing environment; 3) GPUs, as a specific graphic targeted device, are used to greatly improve the rendering efficiency in distributed geo-visualization, especially for 3D/4D visualization. Key words: Geovisualization, GIScience, Spatiotemporal Studies Reference : 1. Ferreira de Oliveira, M. C., & Levkowitz, H. (2003). From visual data exploration to visual data mining: A survey. Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE

  18. BESIII production with distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. M.; Yan, T.; Zhao, X. H.; Ma, Z. T.; Yan, X. F.; Lin, T.; Deng, Z. Y.; Li, W. D.; Belov, S.; Pelevanyuk, I.; Zhemchugov, A.; Cai, H.

    2015-12-01

    Distributed computing is necessary nowadays for high energy physics experiments to organize heterogeneous computing resources all over the world to process enormous amounts of data. The BESIII experiment in China, has established its own distributed computing system, based on DIRAC, as a supplement to local clusters, collecting cluster, grid, desktop and cloud resources from collaborating member institutes around the world. The system consists of workload management and data management to deal with the BESIII Monte Carlo production workflow in a distributed environment. A dataset-based data transfer system has been developed to support data movements among sites. File and metadata management tools and a job submission frontend have been developed to provide a virtual layer for BESIII physicists to use distributed resources. Moreover, the paper shows the experience to cope with lack of grid experience and low manpower among the BESIII community.

  19. The Fermilab Central Computing Facility architectural model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, J.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the current Central Computing Upgrade at Fermilab is to create a computing environment that maximizes total productivity, particularly for high energy physics analysis. The Computing Department and the Next Computer Acquisition Committee decided upon a model which includes five components: an interactive front end, a Large-Scale Scientific Computer (LSSC, a mainframe computing engine), a microprocessor farm system, a file server, and workstations. With the exception of the file server, all segments of this model are currently in production: a VAX/VMS Cluster interactive front end, an Amdahl VM computing engine, ACP farms, and (primarily) VMS workstations. This presentation will discuss the implementation of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Architectural Model. Implications for Code Management in such a heterogeneous environment, including issues such as modularity and centrality, will be considered. Special emphasis will be placed on connectivity and communications between the front-end, LSSC, and workstations, as practiced at Fermilab. 2 figs.

  20. Distributed computing at the SSCL

    SciTech Connect

    Cormell, L.; White, R.

    1993-05-01

    The rapid increase in the availability of high performance, cost- effective RISC/UNIX workstations has been both a blessing and a curse. The blessing of having extremely powerful computing engines available on the desk top is well-known to many users. The user has tremendous freedom, flexibility, and control of his environment. That freedom can, however, become the curse of distributed computing. The user must become a system manager to some extent, he must worry about backups, maintenance, upgrades, etc. Traditionally these activities have been the responsibility of a central computing group. The central computing group, however, may find that it can no linger provide all of the traditional services. With the plethora of workstations now found on so many desktops throughout the entire campus or lab, the central computing group may be swamped by support requests. This talk will address several of these computer support and management issues by discussing the approach taken at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. In addition, a brief review of the future directions of commercial products for distributed computing and management will be given.

  1. Computer Uses in School Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vornberg, James A.

    Educational institutions and larger public school districts have implemented computerized systems of planning and management functions. The application of computers to facility management roughly may be divided into two general areas: (1) planning efforts of administrators and designers through methods of simulation, and (2) systems management…

  2. National Directory of Rehabilitation Facilities Using Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCray, Paul M.; Blakemore, Thomas F.

    This directory represents the culmination of a national research project designed to assess the extent to which computer technology is being integrated into rehabilitation facility operations. The directory is divided into six major sections. The first section is a research summary that provides a concise description of how the information…

  3. Hydronic distribution system computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Strasser, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A computer model of a hot-water boiler and its associated hydronic thermal distribution loop has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It is intended to be incorporated as a submodel in a comprehensive model of residential-scale thermal distribution systems developed at Lawrence Berkeley. This will give the combined model the capability of modeling forced-air and hydronic distribution systems in the same house using the same supporting software. This report describes the development of the BNL hydronics model, initial results and internal consistency checks, and its intended relationship to the LBL model. A method of interacting with the LBL model that does not require physical integration of the two codes is described. This will provide capability now, with reduced up-front cost, as long as the number of runs required is not large.

  4. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrokni, Vahab; Andersen, Reid; Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  5. Cooperative Fault Tolerant Distributed Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Fagg, Graham E.

    2006-03-15

    HARNESS was proposed as a system that combined the best of emerging technologies found in current distributed computing research and commercial products into a very flexible, dynamically adaptable framework that could be used by applications to allow them to evolve and better handle their execution environment. The HARNESS system was designed using the considerable experience from previous projects such as PVM, MPI, IceT and Cumulvs. As such, the system was designed to avoid any of the common problems found with using these current systems, such as no single point of failure, ability to survive machine, node and software failures. Additional features included improved inter-component connectivity, with full support for dynamic down loading of addition components at run-time thus reducing the stress on application developers to build in all the libraries they need in advance.

  6. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Position Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Oral, H Sarp; Hill, Jason J; Thach, Kevin G; Podhorszki, Norbert; Klasky, Scott A; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the business, administration, reliability, and usability aspects of storage systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The OLCF has developed key competencies in architecting and administration of large-scale Lustre deployments as well as HPSS archival systems. Additionally as these systems are architected, deployed, and expanded over time reliability and availability factors are a primary driver. This paper focuses on the implementation of the Spider parallel Lustre file system as well as the implementation of the HPSS archive at the OLCF.

  7. A distributed data base management facility for the CAD/CAM environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balza, R. M.; Beaudet, R. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    Current/PAD research in the area of distributed data base management considers facilities for supporting CAD/CAM data management in a heterogeneous network of computers encompassing multiple data base managers supporting a variety of data models. These facilities include coordinated execution of multiple DBMSs to provide for administration of and access to data distributed across them.

  8. Computer modeling of commercial refrigerated warehouse facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoulin, C.V.; Jacobs, P.C.; Tory, S.

    1997-07-01

    The use of computer models to simulate the energy performance of large commercial refrigeration systems typically found in food processing facilities is an area of engineering practice that has seen little development to date. Current techniques employed in predicting energy consumption by such systems have focused on temperature bin methods of analysis. Existing simulation tools such as DOE2 are designed to model commercial buildings and grocery store refrigeration systems. The HVAC and Refrigeration system performance models in these simulations tools model equipment common to commercial buildings and groceries, and respond to energy-efficiency measures likely to be applied to these building types. The applicability of traditional building energy simulation tools to model refrigerated warehouse performance and analyze energy-saving options is limited. The paper will present the results of modeling work undertaken to evaluate energy savings resulting from incentives offered by a California utility to its Refrigerated Warehouse Program participants. The TRNSYS general-purpose transient simulation model was used to predict facility performance and estimate program savings. Custom TRNSYS components were developed to address modeling issues specific to refrigerated warehouse systems, including warehouse loading door infiltration calculations, an evaporator model, single-state and multi-stage compressor models, evaporative condenser models, and defrost energy requirements. The main focus of the paper will be on the modeling approach. The results from the computer simulations, along with overall program impact evaluation results, will also be presented.

  9. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m3 per mg/m3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities. PMID:26478760

  10. A comparison of queueing, cluster and distributed computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Nelson, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    Using workstation clusters for distributed computing has become popular with the proliferation of inexpensive, powerful workstations. Workstation clusters offer both a cost effective alternative to batch processing and an easy entry into parallel computing. However, a number of workstations on a network does not constitute a cluster. Cluster management software is necessary to harness the collective computing power. A variety of cluster management and queuing systems are compared: Distributed Queueing Systems (DQS), Condor, Load Leveler, Load Balancer, Load Sharing Facility (LSF - formerly Utopia), Distributed Job Manager (DJM), Computing in Distributed Networked Environments (CODINE), and NQS/Exec. The systems differ in their design philosophy and implementation. Based on published reports on the different systems and conversations with the system's developers and vendors, a comparison of the systems are made on the integral issues of clustered computing.

  11. National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The NIF design team is developing the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is based on an object-oriented software framework applicable to event-driven control systems. The framework provides an open, extensible architecture that is sufficiently abstract to construct future mission-critical control systems. The ICCS will become operational when the first 8 out of 192 beams are activated in mid 2000. The ICCS consists of 300 front-end processors attached to 60,000 control points coordinated by a supervisory system. Computers running either Solaris or VxWorks are networked over a hybrid configuration of switched fast Ethernet and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). ATM carries digital motion video from sensors to operator consoles. Supervisory software is constructed by extending the reusable framework components for each specific application. The framework incorporates services for database persistence, system configuration, graphical user interface, status monitoring, event logging, scripting language, alert management, and access control. More than twenty collaborating software applications are derived from the common framework. The framework is interoperable among different kinds of computers and functions as a plug-in software bus by leveraging a common object request brokering architecture (CORBA). CORBA transparently distributes the software objects across the network. Because of the pivotal role played, CORBA was tested to ensure adequate performance.

  12. National Ignition Facility integrated computer control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Arsdall, Paul J.; Bettenhausen, R. C.; Holloway, Frederick W.; Saroyan, R. A.; Woodruff, J. P.

    1999-07-01

    The NIF design team is developing the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is based on an object-oriented software framework applicable to event-driven control system. The framework provides an open, extensive architecture that is sufficiently abstract to construct future mission-critical control systems. The ICCS will become operational when the first 8 out of 192 beams are activated in mid 2000. THe ICCS consists of 300 front-end processors attached to 60,000 control points coordinated by a supervisory system. Computers running either Solaris or VxWorks are networked over a hybrid configuration of switched fast Ethernet and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). ATM carries digital motion video from sensor to operator consoles. Supervisory software is constructed by extending the reusable framework components for each specific application. The framework incorporates services for database persistence, system configuration, graphical user interface, status monitoring, event logging, scripting language, alert management, and access control. More than twenty collaborating software applications are derived from the common framework. The framework is interoperable among different kinds of computers and functions as a plug-in software bus by leveraging a common object request brokering architecture (CORBA). CORBA transparently distributes the software objects across the network. Because of the pivotal role played, CORBA was tested to ensure adequate performance.

  13. Computational analysis of irradiation facilities at the JSI TRIGA reactor.

    PubMed

    Snoj, Luka; Zerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej

    2012-03-01

    Characterization and optimization of irradiation facilities in a research reactor is important for optimal performance. Nowadays this is commonly done with advanced Monte Carlo neutron transport computer codes such as MCNP. However, the computational model in such calculations should be verified and validated with experiments. In the paper we describe the irradiation facilities at the JSI TRIGA reactor and demonstrate their computational characterization to support experimental campaigns by providing information on the characteristics of the irradiation facilities. PMID:22154389

  14. Distributed Computing at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Vikas; Belle Collaboration, II

    2016-03-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Tsukuba, Japan, will start physics data taking in 2018 and will accumulate 50 ab-1 of e+e- collision data, about 50 times larger than the data set of the earlier Belle experiment. The computing requirements of Belle II are comparable to those of a RUN I high-pT LHC experiment. Computing will make full use of high speed networking and of the Computing Grids in North America, Asia and Europe. Results of an initial MC simulation campaign with 5 ab-1 equivalent luminosity will be described.

  15. Distributed computing and nuclear reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Derstine, K.L.; Blomquist, R.N.

    1994-03-01

    Large-scale scientific and engineering calculations for nuclear reactor analysis can now be carried out effectively in a distributed computing environment, at costs far lower than for traditional mainframes. The distributed computing environment must include support for traditional system services, such as a queuing system for batch work, reliable filesystem backups, and parallel processing capabilities for large jobs. All ANL computer codes for reactor analysis have been adapted successfully to a distributed system based on workstations and X-terminals. Distributed parallel processing has been demonstrated to be effective for long-running Monte Carlo calculations.

  16. Design Criteria for OSE-User Computer Facility-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, C E

    1989-05-01

    This project provides for the upgrading of the 4th floor OSE User Computer Facility to house new computers for the Paperlesss Manufacturing initiative, to support a classified processing environment. This is intended to enhance Mound's manufacturing environment, while addressing several DOE strategic initiatives such as (CIM) Computer Integrated Manufacturing. By consolidating the Paperless Manufacturing Approach to the existing OSE User Computer Facility and to meet UCI needs to house classified processing a considerable reduction in Operating Cost should be achieved.

  17. LaRC local area networks to support distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, E. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Local Area Network (LAN) effort is discussed. LaRC initiated the development of a LAN to support a growing distributed computing environment at the Center. The purpose of the network is to provide an improved capability (over inteactive and RJE terminal access) for sharing multivendor computer resources. Specifically, the network will provide a data highway for the transfer of files between mainframe computers, minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers. An important influence on the overall network design was the vital need of LaRC researchers to efficiently utilize the large CDC mainframe computers in the central scientific computing facility. Although there was a steady migration from a centralized to a distributed computing environment at LaRC in recent years, the work load on the central resources increased. Major emphasis in the network design was on communication with the central resources within the distributed environment. The network to be implemented will allow researchers to utilize the central resources, distributed minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers to obtain the proper level of computing power to efficiently perform their jobs.

  18. Next generation distributed computing for cancer research.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide solutions for addressing these challenges. In this review, the next generation of distributed computing technologies that can address these informatics problems is described from the perspective of three key components of a computational platform, namely computing, data storage and management, and networking. A broad overview of scalable computing is provided to set the context for a detailed description of Hadoop, a technology that is being rapidly adopted for large-scale distributed computing. A proof-of-concept Hadoop cluster, set up for performance benchmarking of NGS read alignment, is described as an example of how to work with Hadoop. Finally, Hadoop is compared with a number of other current technologies for distributed computing. PMID:25983539

  19. Next Generation Distributed Computing for Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pankaj; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided many new opportunities and angles for extending the scope of translational cancer research while creating tremendous challenges in data management and analysis. The resulting informatics challenge is invariably not amenable to the use of traditional computing models. Recent advances in scalable computing and associated infrastructure, particularly distributed computing for Big Data, can provide solutions for addressing these challenges. In this review, the next generation of distributed computing technologies that can address these informatics problems is described from the perspective of three key components of a computational platform, namely computing, data storage and management, and networking. A broad overview of scalable computing is provided to set the context for a detailed description of Hadoop, a technology that is being rapidly adopted for large-scale distributed computing. A proof-of-concept Hadoop cluster, set up for performance benchmarking of NGS read alignment, is described as an example of how to work with Hadoop. Finally, Hadoop is compared with a number of other current technologies for distributed computing. PMID:25983539

  20. Evaluation of distributed computing tools

    SciTech Connect

    Stanberry, L.

    1992-10-28

    The original goal stated in the collaboration agreement from LCC`s perspective was ``to show that networking tools available in UNICOS perform well enough to meet the requirements of LCC customers.`` This translated into evaluating how easy it was to port ELROS over CRI`s ISO 2.0, which itself is a port of ISODE to the Cray. In addition we tested the interoperability of ELROS and ISO 2.0 programs running on the Cray, and communicating with each other, and with servers or clients running on other machines. To achieve these goals from LCC`s side, we ported ELROS to the Cray, and also obtained and installed a copy of the ISO 2.0 distribution from CRI. CRI`s goal for the collaboration was to evaluate the usability of ELROS. In particular, we were interested in their potential feedback on the use of ELROS in implementing ISO protocols--whether ELROS would be easter to use and perform better than other tools that form part of the standard ISODE system. To help achieve these goals for CRI, we provided them with a distribution tar file containing the ELROS system, once we had completed our port of ELROS to the Cray.

  1. Evaluation of distributed computing tools

    SciTech Connect

    Stanberry, L.

    1992-10-28

    The original goal stated in the collaboration agreement from LCC's perspective was to show that networking tools available in UNICOS perform well enough to meet the requirements of LCC customers.'' This translated into evaluating how easy it was to port ELROS over CRI's ISO 2.0, which itself is a port of ISODE to the Cray. In addition we tested the interoperability of ELROS and ISO 2.0 programs running on the Cray, and communicating with each other, and with servers or clients running on other machines. To achieve these goals from LCC's side, we ported ELROS to the Cray, and also obtained and installed a copy of the ISO 2.0 distribution from CRI. CRI's goal for the collaboration was to evaluate the usability of ELROS. In particular, we were interested in their potential feedback on the use of ELROS in implementing ISO protocols--whether ELROS would be easter to use and perform better than other tools that form part of the standard ISODE system. To help achieve these goals for CRI, we provided them with a distribution tar file containing the ELROS system, once we had completed our port of ELROS to the Cray.

  2. A Software Rejuvenation Framework for Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio

    2009-01-01

    A performability-oriented conceptual framework for software rejuvenation has been constructed as a means of increasing levels of reliability and performance in distributed stateful computing. As used here, performability-oriented signifies that the construction of the framework is guided by the concept of analyzing the ability of a given computing system to deliver services with gracefully degradable performance. The framework is especially intended to support applications that involve stateful replicas of server computers.

  3. GRIMD: distributed computing for chemists and biologists

    PubMed Central

    Piotto, Stefano; Biasi, Luigi Di; Concilio, Simona; Castiglione, Aniello; Cattaneo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biologists and chemists are facing problems of high computational complexity that require the use of several computers organized in clusters or in specialized grids. Examples of such problems can be found in molecular dynamics (MD), in silico screening, and genome analysis. Grid Computing and Cloud Computing are becoming prevalent mainly because of their competitive performance/cost ratio. Regrettably, the diffusion of Grid Computing is strongly limited because two main limitations: it is confined to scientists with strong Computer Science background and the analyses of the large amount of data produced can be cumbersome it. We have developed a package named GRIMD to provide an easy and flexible implementation of distributed computing for the Bioinformatics community. GRIMD is very easy to install and maintain, and it does not require any specific Computer Science skill. Moreover, permits preliminary analysis on the distributed machines to reduce the amount of data to transfer. GRIMD is very flexible because it shields the typical computational biologist from the need to write specific code for tasks such as molecular dynamics or docking calculations. Furthermore, it permits an efficient use of GPU cards whenever is possible. GRIMD calculations scale almost linearly and, therefore, permits to exploit efficiently each machine in the network. Here, we provide few examples of grid computing in computational biology (MD and docking) and bioinformatics (proteome analysis). Availability GRIMD is available for free for noncommercial research at www.yadamp.unisa.it/grimd Supplementary information www.yadamp.unisa.it/grimd/howto.aspx PMID:24516326

  4. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, CY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Ann E; Barker, Ashley D; Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Hack, James J; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; Wells, Jack C; White, Julia C; Hudson, Douglas L

    2012-02-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.4 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2011 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Users reported more than 670 publications this year arising from their use of OLCF resources. Of these we report the 300 in this review that are consistent with guidance provided. Scientific achievements by OLCF users cut across all range scales from atomic to molecular to large-scale structures. At the atomic scale, researchers discovered that the anomalously long half-life of Carbon-14 can be explained by calculating, for the first time, the very complex three-body interactions between all the neutrons and protons in the nucleus. At the molecular scale, researchers combined experimental results from LBL's light source and simulations on Jaguar to discover how DNA replication continues past a damaged site so a mutation can be repaired later. Other researchers combined experimental results from ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and simulations on Jaguar to reveal the molecular structure of ligno-cellulosic material used in bioethanol production. This year, Jaguar has been used to do billion-cell CFD calculations to develop shock wave compression turbo machinery as a means to meet DOE goals for reducing carbon sequestration costs. General Electric used Jaguar to calculate the unsteady flow through turbo machinery to learn what efficiencies the traditional steady flow assumption is hiding from designers. Even a 1% improvement in turbine design can save the nation billions of gallons of

  5. Object-oriented Tools for Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.

    1993-01-01

    Distributed computing systems are proliferating, owing to the availability of powerful, affordable microcomputers and inexpensive communication networks. A critical problem in developing such systems is getting application programs to interact with one another across a computer network. Remote interprogram connectivity is particularly challenging across heterogeneous environments, where applications run on different kinds of computers and operating systems. NetWorks! (trademark) is an innovative software product that provides an object-oriented messaging solution to these problems. This paper describes the design and functionality of NetWorks! and illustrates how it is being used to build complex distributed applications for NASA and in the commercial sector.

  6. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Hack, James J; Baker, Ann E; Barker, Ashley D; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; White, Julia C

    2010-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools and resources for next

  7. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Healthcare Facilities in Nanjing: Network Point Pattern Analysis and Correlation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Qian, Tianlu; Xi, Changbai; Rui, Yikang; Wang, Jiechen

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of urban service facilities is largely constrained by the road network. In this study, network point pattern analysis and correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between road network and healthcare facility distribution. The weighted network kernel density estimation method proposed in this study identifies significant differences between the outside and inside areas of the Ming city wall. The results of network K-function analysis show that private hospitals are more evenly distributed than public hospitals, and pharmacy stores tend to cluster around hospitals along the road network. After computing the correlation analysis between different categorized hospitals and street centrality, we find that the distribution of these hospitals correlates highly with the street centralities, and that the correlations are higher with private and small hospitals than with public and large hospitals. The comprehensive analysis results could help examine the reasonability of existing urban healthcare facility distribution and optimize the location of new healthcare facilities. PMID:27548197

  8. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Healthcare Facilities in Nanjing: Network Point Pattern Analysis and Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianhua; Qian, Tianlu; Xi, Changbai; Rui, Yikang; Wang, Jiechen

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of urban service facilities is largely constrained by the road network. In this study, network point pattern analysis and correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between road network and healthcare facility distribution. The weighted network kernel density estimation method proposed in this study identifies significant differences between the outside and inside areas of the Ming city wall. The results of network K-function analysis show that private hospitals are more evenly distributed than public hospitals, and pharmacy stores tend to cluster around hospitals along the road network. After computing the correlation analysis between different categorized hospitals and street centrality, we find that the distribution of these hospitals correlates highly with the street centralities, and that the correlations are higher with private and small hospitals than with public and large hospitals. The comprehensive analysis results could help examine the reasonability of existing urban healthcare facility distribution and optimize the location of new healthcare facilities. PMID:27548197

  9. National remote computational flight research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rediess, Herman A.

    1989-01-01

    The extension of the NASA Ames-Dryden remotely augmented vehicle (RAV) facility to accommodate flight testing of a hypersonic aircraft utilizing the continental United States as a test range is investigated. The development and demonstration of an automated flight test management system (ATMS) that uses expert system technology for flight test planning, scheduling, and execution is documented.

  10. Solving the Quadratic Capacitated Facilities Location Problem by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Leon C.; Smith, Wayland P.

    Several computer programs were developed to solve various versions of the quadratic capacitated facilities location problem. Matrices, which represent various business costs, are defined for the factors of sites, facilities, customers, commodities, and production units. The objective of the program is to find an optimization matrix for the lowest…

  11. Distribution of Corbicula fluminea at nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, C.L. III

    1985-11-01

    A review of the zoogeographic records for the exotic Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea (Muller, 1774), reveals its presence in 27 states where nuclear powered electric generating plants are either operating or under construction. Nineteen plant sites reported infestation of varying severity in facilities, or source water bodies immediately adjacent to the facility, by C. fluminea. Thirteen plant sites are located within the zoogeographic limits of C. fluminea but have a low risk of infestation due to either salt water cooling systems or locations a great distance from known populations. Eighteen plant sites are located wholly outside of the known zoogeographic range of C. fluminea. Thirty plant sites are located in close proximity to known populations of C. fluminea and therefore should maintain surveillance of the source water body and within plant water systems for possible infestations by these bivalves. 27 figs.

  12. High-performance computing and distributed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.C.; Greiman, W.; Jacobson, V.L.; Johnston, W.E.; Robertson, D.W.; Tierney, B.L.

    1992-09-01

    We present a scenario for a fully distributed computing environment in which computing, storage, and I/O elements are configured on demand into ``virtual systems`` that are optimal for the solution of a particular problem. We also describe present two pilot projects that illustrate some of the elements and issues of this scenario. The goal of this work is to make the most powerful computing systems those that are logically assembled from network based components, and to make those systems available independent of the geographic location of the constituent elements.

  13. High-performance computing and distributed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.C.; Greiman, W.; Jacobson, V.L.; Johnston, W.E.; Robertson, D.W.; Tierney, B.L.

    1992-09-01

    We present a scenario for a fully distributed computing environment in which computing, storage, and I/O elements are configured on demand into virtual systems'' that are optimal for the solution of a particular problem. We also describe present two pilot projects that illustrate some of the elements and issues of this scenario. The goal of this work is to make the most powerful computing systems those that are logically assembled from network based components, and to make those systems available independent of the geographic location of the constituent elements.

  14. Review of Test Facilities for Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    AKHIL,ABBAS ALI; MARNAY,CHRIS; KIPMAN,TIMOTHY

    2003-05-01

    Since initiating research on integration of distributed energy resources (DER) in 1999, the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) has been actively assessing and reviewing existing DER test facilities for possible demonstrations of advanced DER system integration concepts. This report is a compendium of information collected by the CERTS team on DER test facilities during this period.

  15. Configuration and Management of a Cluster Computing Facility in Undergraduate Student Computer Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornforth, David; Atkinson, John; Spennemann, Dirk H. R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Many researchers require access to computer facilities beyond those offered by desktop workstations. Traditionally, these are offered either through partnerships, to share the cost of supercomputing facilities, or through purpose-built cluster facilities. However, funds are not always available to satisfy either of these options, and…

  16. Biomedical computing facility interface design plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puckett, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented of a design study performed to establish overall system interface requirements for the Biomedical Laboratories Division's Sigma-3 computer system. Emphasis has been placed upon the definition of an overall implementation plan and associated schedule to meet both near-term and long-range requirements within the constraints at available resources.

  17. Data Integration in Computer Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecień, Błażej

    In this article the author analyze a problem of data integration in a computer distributed systems. Exchange of information between different levels in integrated pyramid of enterprise process is fundamental with regard to efficient enterprise work. Communication and data exchange between levels are not always the same cause of necessity of different network protocols usage, communication medium, system response time, etc.

  18. Great Expectations: Distributed Financial Computing at Cornell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulden, Louise; Sidle, Clint

    1988-01-01

    The Cornell University Distributed Accounting (CUDA) system is an attempt to provide departments a software tool for better managing their finances, creating microcomputer standards, creating a vehicle for better administrative microcomputer support, and insuring local systems are consistent with central computer systems. (Author/MLW)

  19. Computer Systems for Distributed and Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, M.; Jackson, David

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of network-based learning focuses on a survey of computer systems for distributed and distance learning. Both Web-based systems and non-Web-based systems are reviewed in order to highlight some of the major trends of past projects and to suggest ways in which progress may be made in the future. (Contains 92 references.) (Author/LRW)

  20. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Ann E; Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Hack, James J; Barker, Ashley D; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; Wells, Jack C; White, Julia C

    2011-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.5 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2010 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Scientific achievements by OLCF users range from collaboration with university experimentalists to produce a working supercapacitor that uses atom-thick sheets of carbon materials to finely determining the resolution requirements for simulations of coal gasifiers and their components, thus laying the foundation for development of commercial-scale gasifiers. OLCF users are pushing the boundaries with software applications sustaining more than one petaflop of performance in the quest to illuminate the fundamental nature of electronic devices. Other teams of researchers are working to resolve predictive capabilities of climate models, to refine and validate genome sequencing, and to explore the most fundamental materials in nature - quarks and gluons - and their unique properties. Details of these scientific endeavors - not possible without access to leadership-class computing resources - are detailed in Section 4 of this report and in the INCITE in Review. Effective operations of the OLCF play a key role in the scientific missions and accomplishments of its users. This Operational Assessment Report (OAR) will delineate the policies, procedures, and innovations implemented by the OLCF to continue delivering a petaflop-scale resource for cutting-edge research. The 2010 operational assessment of the OLCF yielded recommendations that have been addressed (Reference Section 1) and where

  1. ATLAS Distributed Computing in LHC Run2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Simone

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing infrastructure has evolved after the first period of LHC data taking in order to cope with the challenges of the upcoming LHC Run-2. An increase in both the data rate and the computing demands of the Monte-Carlo simulation, as well as new approaches to ATLAS analysis, dictated a more dynamic workload management system (Prodsys-2) and data management system (Rucio), overcoming the boundaries imposed by the design of the old computing model. In particular, the commissioning of new central computing system components was the core part of the migration toward a flexible computing model. A flexible computing utilization exploring the use of opportunistic resources such as HPC, cloud, and volunteer computing is embedded in the new computing model; the data access mechanisms have been enhanced with the remote access, and the network topology and performance is deeply integrated into the core of the system. Moreover, a new data management strategy, based on a defined lifetime for each dataset, has been defined to better manage the lifecycle of the data. In this note, an overview of an operational experience of the new system and its evolution is presented.

  2. Research computing in a distributed cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransham, K.; Agarwal, A.; Armstrong, P.; Bishop, A.; Charbonneau, A.; Desmarais, R.; Hill, N.; Gable, I.; Gaudet, S.; Goliath, S.; Impey, R.; Leavett-Brown, C.; Ouellete, J.; Paterson, M.; Pritchet, C.; Penfold-Brown, D.; Podaima, W.; Schade, D.; Sobie, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    The recent increase in availability of Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) computing clouds provides a new way for researchers to run complex scientific applications. However, using cloud resources for a large number of research jobs requires significant effort and expertise. Furthermore, running jobs on many different clouds presents even more difficulty. In order to make it easy for researchers to deploy scientific applications across many cloud resources, we have developed a virtual machine resource manager (Cloud Scheduler) for distributed compute clouds. In response to a user's job submission to a batch system, the Cloud Scheduler manages the distribution and deployment of user-customized virtual machines across multiple clouds. We describe the motivation for and implementation of a distributed cloud using the Cloud Scheduler that is spread across both commercial and dedicated private sites, and present some early results of scientific data analysis using the system.

  3. Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Butt, Ali R; Ma, Xiaosong

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

  4. Distributed computation of supremal conditionally controllable sublanguages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komenda, Jan; Masopust, Tomáš

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we further develop the coordination control framework for discrete-event systems with both complete and partial observations. First, a weaker sufficient condition for the computation of the supremal conditionally controllable sublanguage and conditionally normal sublanguage is presented. Then we show that this condition can be imposed by synthesising a-posteriori supervisors. The paper further generalises the previous study by considering general, non-prefix-closed languages. Moreover, we prove that for prefix-closed languages the supremal conditionally controllable sublanguage and conditionally normal sublanguage can always be computed in the distributed way without any restrictive conditions we have used in the past.

  5. Survey of computer codes applicable to waste facility performance evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharif, M.; Pung, D.L.; Rivera, A.L.; Dole, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    This study is an effort to review existing information that is useful to develop an integrated model for predicting the performance of a radioactive waste facility. A summary description of 162 computer codes is given. The identified computer programs address the performance of waste packages, waste transport and equilibrium geochemistry, hydrological processes in unsaturated and saturated zones, and general waste facility performance assessment. Some programs also deal with thermal analysis, structural analysis, and special purposes. A number of these computer programs are being used by the US Department of Energy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and their contractors to analyze various aspects of waste package performance. Fifty-five of these codes were identified as being potentially useful on the analysis of low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. The code summaries include authors, identification data, model types, and pertinent references. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. Open Source Live Distributions for Computer Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, Giancarlo; Andreolini, Mauro; Colajanni, Michele

    Current distributions of open source forensic software provide digital investigators with a large set of heterogeneous tools. Their use is not always focused on the target and requires high technical expertise. We present a new GNU/Linux live distribution, named CAINE (Computer Aided INvestigative Environment) that contains a collection of tools wrapped up into a user friendly environment. The CAINE forensic framework introduces novel important features, aimed at filling the interoperability gap across different forensic tools. Moreover, it provides a homogeneous graphical interface that drives digital investigators during the acquisition and analysis of electronic evidence, and it offers a semi-automatic mechanism for the creation of the final report.

  7. Computationally intensive econometrics using a distributed matrix-programming language.

    PubMed

    Doornik, Jurgen A; Hendry, David F; Shephard, Neil

    2002-06-15

    This paper reviews the need for powerful computing facilities in econometrics, focusing on concrete problems which arise in financial economics and in macroeconomics. We argue that the profession is being held back by the lack of easy-to-use generic software which is able to exploit the availability of cheap clusters of distributed computers. Our response is to extend, in a number of directions, the well-known matrix-programming interpreted language Ox developed by the first author. We note three possible levels of extensions: (i) Ox with parallelization explicit in the Ox code; (ii) Ox with a parallelized run-time library; and (iii) Ox with a parallelized interpreter. This paper studies and implements the first case, emphasizing the need for deterministic computing in science. We give examples in the context of financial economics and time-series modelling. PMID:12804277

  8. Subtlenoise: sonification of distributed computing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The operation of distributed computing systems requires comprehensive monitoring to ensure reliability and robustness. There are two components found in most monitoring systems: one being visually rich time-series graphs and another being notification systems for alerting operators under certain pre-defined conditions. In this paper the sonification of monitoring messages is explored using an architecture that fits easily within existing infrastructures based on mature opensource technologies such as ZeroMQ, Logstash, and Supercollider (a synth engine). Message attributes are mapped onto audio attributes based on broad classification of the message (continuous or discrete metrics) but keeping the audio stream subtle in nature. The benefits of audio rendering are described in the context of distributed computing operations and may provide a less intrusive way to understand the operational health of these systems.

  9. Distributed Data Mining using a Public Resource Computing Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, Eugenio; de Caria, Nicola; Mastroianni, Carlo; Talia, Domenico

    The public resource computing paradigm is often used as a successful and low cost mechanism for the management of several classes of scientific and commercial applications that require the execution of a large number of independent tasks. Public computing frameworks, also known as “Desktop Grids”, exploit the computational power and storage facilities of private computers, or “workers”. Despite the inherent decentralized nature of the applications for which they are devoted, these systems often adopt a centralized mechanism for the assignment of jobs and distribution of input data, as is the case for BOINC, the most popular framework in this realm. We present a decentralized framework that aims at increasing the flexibility and robustness of public computing applications, thanks to two basic features: (i) the adoption of a P2P protocol for dynamically matching the job specifications with the worker characteristics, without relying on centralized resources; (ii) the use of distributed cache servers for an efficient dissemination and reutilization of data files. This framework is exploitable for a wide set of applications. In this work, we describe how a Java prototype of the framework was used to tackle the problem of mining frequent itemsets from a transactional dataset, and show some preliminary yet interesting performance results that prove the efficiency improvements that can derive from the presented architecture.

  10. Computer-Assisted School Facility Planning with ONPASS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban Decision Systems, Inc., Los Angeles, CA.

    The analytical capabilities of ONPASS, an on-line computer-aided school facility planning system, are described by its developers. This report describes how, using the Canoga Park-Winnetka-Woodland Hills Planning Area as a test case, the Department of City Planning of the city of Los Angeles employed ONPASS to demonstrate how an on-line system can…

  11. Distributed Computing for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudoba, J.

    2015-12-01

    Pierre Auger Observatory operates the largest system of detectors for ultra-high energy cosmic ray measurements. Comparison of theoretical models of interactions with recorded data requires thousands of computing cores for Monte Carlo simulations. Since 2007 distributed resources connected via EGI grid are successfully used. The first and the second versions of production system based on bash scripts and MySQL database were able to submit jobs to all reliable sites supporting Virtual Organization auger. For many years VO auger belongs to top ten of EGI users based on the total used computing time. Migration of the production system to DIRAC interware started in 2014. Pilot jobs improve efficiency of computing jobs and eliminate problems with small and less reliable sites used for the bulk production. The new system has also possibility to use available resources in clouds. Dirac File Catalog replaced LFC for new files, which are organized in datasets defined via metadata. CVMFS is used for software distribution since 2014. In the presentation we give a comparison of the old and the new production system and report the experience on migrating to the new system.

  12. Pseudo-interactive monitoring in distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Sfiligoi, I.; Bradley, D.; Livny, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-05-01

    Distributed computing, and in particular Grid computing, enables physicists to use thousands of CPU days worth of computing every day, by submitting thousands of compute jobs. Unfortunately, a small fraction of such jobs regularly fail; the reasons vary from disk and network problems to bugs in the user code. A subset of these failures result in jobs being stuck for long periods of time. In order to debug such failures, interactive monitoring is highly desirable; users need to browse through the job log files and check the status of the running processes. Batch systems typically don't provide such services; at best, users get job logs at job termination, and even this may not be possible if the job is stuck in an infinite loop. In this paper we present a novel approach of using regular batch system capabilities of Condor to enable users to access the logs and processes of any running job. This does not provide true interactive access, so commands like vi are not viable, but it does allow operations like ls, cat, top, ps, lsof, netstat and dumping the stack of any process owned by the user; we call this pseudo-interactive monitoring. It is worth noting that the same method can be used to monitor Grid jobs in a glidein-based environment. We further believe that the same mechanism could be applied to many other batch systems.

  13. Interoperable PKI Data Distribution in Computational Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pala, Massimiliano; Cholia, Shreyas; Rea, Scott A.; Smith, Sean W.

    2008-07-25

    One of the most successful working examples of virtual organizations, computational grids need authentication mechanisms that inter-operate across domain boundaries. Public Key Infrastructures(PKIs) provide sufficient flexibility to allow resource managers to securely grant access to their systems in such distributed environments. However, as PKIs grow and services are added to enhance both security and usability, users and applications must struggle to discover available resources-particularly when the Certification Authority (CA) is alien to the relying party. This article presents how to overcome these limitations of the current grid authentication model by integrating the PKI Resource Query Protocol (PRQP) into the Grid Security Infrastructure (GSI).

  14. Airport Simulations Using Distributed Computational Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDermott, William J.; Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Tran, Peter; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Virtual National Airspace Simulation (VNAS) will improve the safety of Air Transportation. In 2001, using simulation and information management software running over a distributed network of super-computers, researchers at NASA Ames, Glenn, and Langley Research Centers developed a working prototype of a virtual airspace. This VNAS prototype modeled daily operations of the Atlanta airport by integrating measured operational data and simulation data on up to 2,000 flights a day. The concepts and architecture developed by NASA for this prototype are integral to the National Airspace Simulation to support the development of strategies improving aviation safety, identifying precursors to component failure.

  15. High Performance Distributed Computing in a Supercomputer Environment: Computational Services and Applications Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Williams T. C.; Simon, Horst D.

    1994-01-01

    This tutorial proposes to be a practical guide for the uninitiated to the main topics and themes of high-performance computing (HPC), with particular emphasis to distributed computing. The intent is first to provide some guidance and directions in the rapidly increasing field of scientific computing using both massively parallel and traditional supercomputers. Because of their considerable potential computational power, loosely or tightly coupled clusters of workstations are increasingly considered as a third alternative to both the more conventional supercomputers based on a small number of powerful vector processors, as well as high massively parallel processors. Even though many research issues concerning the effective use of workstation clusters and their integration into a large scale production facility are still unresolved, such clusters are already used for production computing. In this tutorial we will utilize the unique experience made at the NAS facility at NASA Ames Research Center. Over the last five years at NAS massively parallel supercomputers such as the Connection Machines CM-2 and CM-5 from Thinking Machines Corporation and the iPSC/860 (Touchstone Gamma Machine) and Paragon Machines from Intel were used in a production supercomputer center alongside with traditional vector supercomputers such as the Cray Y-MP and C90.

  16. Icing simulation: A survey of computer models and experimental facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of the current methods for simulation of the response of an aircraft or aircraft subsystem to an icing encounter is presented. The topics discussed include a computer code modeling of aircraft icing and performance degradation, an evaluation of experimental facility simulation capabilities, and ice protection system evaluation tests in simulated icing conditions. Current research focussed on upgrading simulation fidelity of both experimental and computational methods is discussed. The need for increased understanding of the physical processes governing ice accretion, ice shedding, and iced airfoil aerodynamics is examined.

  17. Molecular Science Computing Facility Scientific Challenges: Linking Across Scales

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the evolving science drivers for performing environmental molecular research at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and to provide guidance associated with the next-generation high-performance computing center that must be developed at EMSL's Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in order to address this critical research. The MSCF is the pre-eminent computing facility?supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)?tailored to provide the fastest time-to-solution for current computational challenges in chemistry and biology, as well as providing the means for broad research in the molecular and environmental sciences. The MSCF provides integral resources and expertise to emerging EMSL Scientific Grand Challenges and Collaborative Access Teams that are designed to leverage the multiple integrated research capabilities of EMSL, thereby creating a synergy between computation and experiment to address environmental molecular science challenges critical to DOE and the nation.

  18. Distributed Computing Software Building-Blocks for Ubiquitous Computing Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H. (Kane

    The steady approach of advanced nations toward realization of ubiquitous computing societies has given birth to rapidly growing demands for new-generation distributed computing (DC) applications. Consequently, economic and reliable construction of new-generation DC applications is currently a major issue faced by the software technology research community. What is needed is a new-generation DC software engineering technology which is at least multiple times more effective in constructing new-generation DC applications than the currently practiced technologies are. In particular, this author believes that a new-generation building-block (BB), which is much more advanced than the current-generation DC object that is a small extension of the object model embedded in languages C++, Java, and C#, is needed. Such a BB should enable systematic and economic construction of DC applications that are capable of taking critical actions with 100-microsecond-level or even 10-microsecond-level timing accuracy, fault tolerance, and security enforcement while being easily expandable and taking advantage of all sorts of network connectivity. Some directions considered worth pursuing for finding such BBs are discussed.

  19. High Performance Computing Facilities for the Next Millennium

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, William; Verdier, Francesca; Fitzgerald, Keith; Craw, James; Welcome, Tammy.

    1999-10-01

    High Performance Computing facilities face increased pressures to survive and thrive in the next millennium. HPC facilities must combine effective techniques of the past with innovative methods of the future. This tutorial explores requirements and pressures on HPC centers, and presents effective methods being employed and new approaches to employ to overcome these challenges. Topics include: The current state of HPC computing and projections; System management that allows MPPs running many large jobs to achieve greater than 90% utilization of CPUs; Archive storage issues of improving transfer bandwidth and practical advice for running Terabyte archives; Innovations for client services to ensure the ''intellectual resource'' is equally val2048by clients as the systems; Introduce the Effective System Performance Test a new way to objectively measure and compare not just system performance (e.g. sustained performance of applications) but also system effectiveness (e.g. how many system resources, especially CPU time can really be used by the workload over time); Integrating production with a good is critical to maintaining a robust HPC facility: The tutorial will address how to achieve and maintain this delicate balance. It explores what a facility needs to do to thrive in the new millennium.

  20. An Applet-based Anonymous Distributed Computing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, David; Wills, Craig E.; Ciaraldi, Michael J.; Amorin, Kevin; Covati, Adam; Lee, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Defines anonymous distributed computing systems and focuses on the specifics of a Java, applet-based approach for large-scale, anonymous, distributed computing on the Internet. Explains the possibility of a large number of computers participating in a single computation and describes a test of the functionality of the system. (Author/LRW)

  1. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  2. LHCbDirac: distributed computing in LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagni, F.; Charpentier, P.; Graciani, R.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Closier, J.; Mathe, Z.; Ubeda, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Lanciotti, E.; Romanovskiy, V.; Ciba, K. D.; Casajus, A.; Roiser, S.; Sapunov, M.; Remenska, D.; Bernardoff, V.; Santana, R.; Nandakumar, R.

    2012-12-01

    We present LHCbDirac, an extension of the DIRAC community Grid solution that handles LHCb specificities. The DIRAC software has been developed for many years within LHCb only. Nowadays it is a generic software, used by many scientific communities worldwide. Each community wanting to take advantage of DIRAC has to develop an extension, containing all the necessary code for handling their specific cases. LHCbDirac is an actively developed extension, implementing the LHCb computing model and workflows handling all the distributed computing activities of LHCb. Such activities include real data processing (reconstruction, stripping and streaming), Monte-Carlo simulation and data replication. Other activities are groups and user analysis, data management, resources management and monitoring, data provenance, accounting for user and production jobs. LHCbDirac also provides extensions of the DIRAC interfaces, including a secure web client, python APIs and CLIs. Before putting in production a new release, a number of certification tests are run in a dedicated setup. This contribution highlights the versatility of the system, also presenting the experience with real data processing, data and resources management, monitoring for activities and resources.

  3. Automating usability of ATLAS Distributed Computing resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupputi, S. A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Kouba, T.; Schovancová, J.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The automation of ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) operations is essential to reduce manpower costs and allow performance-enhancing actions, which improve the reliability of the system. In this perspective a crucial case is the automatic handling of outages of ATLAS computing sites storage resources, which are continuously exploited at the edge of their capabilities. It is challenging to adopt unambiguous decision criteria for storage resources of non-homogeneous types, sizes and roles. The recently developed Storage Area Automatic Blacklisting (SAAB) tool has provided a suitable solution, by employing an inference algorithm which processes history of storage monitoring tests outcome. SAAB accomplishes both the tasks of providing global monitoring as well as automatic operations on single sites. The implementation of the SAAB tool has been the first step in a comprehensive review of the storage areas monitoring and central management at all levels. Such review has involved the reordering and optimization of SAM tests deployment and the inclusion of SAAB results in the ATLAS Site Status Board with both dedicated metrics and views. The resulting structure allows monitoring the storage resources status with fine time-granularity and automatic actions to be taken in foreseen cases, like automatic outage handling and notifications to sites. Hence, the human actions are restricted to reporting and following up problems, where and when needed. In this work we show SAAB working principles and features. We present also the decrease of human interactions achieved within the ATLAS Computing Operation team. The automation results in a prompt reaction to failures, which leads to the optimization of resource exploitation.

  4. Implementation of Grid Tier 2 and Tier 3 facilities on a Distributed OpenStack Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limosani, Antonio; Boland, Lucien; Coddington, Paul; Crosby, Sean; Huang, Joanna; Sevior, Martin; Wilson, Ross; Zhang, Shunde

    2014-06-01

    The Australian Government is making a AUD 100 million investment in Compute and Storage for the academic community. The Compute facilities are provided in the form of 30,000 CPU cores located at 8 nodes around Australia in a distributed virtualized Infrastructure as a Service facility based on OpenStack. The storage will eventually consist of over 100 petabytes located at 6 nodes. All will be linked via a 100 Gb/s network. This proceeding describes the development of a fully connected WLCG Tier-2 grid site as well as a general purpose Tier-3 computing cluster based on this architecture. The facility employs an extension to Torque to enable dynamic allocations of virtual machine instances. A base Scientific Linux virtual machine (VM) image is deployed in the OpenStack cloud and automatically configured as required using Puppet. Custom scripts are used to launch multiple VMs, integrate them into the dynamic Torque cluster and to mount remote file systems. We report on our experience in developing this nation-wide ATLAS and Belle II Tier 2 and Tier 3 computing infrastructure using the national Research Cloud and storage facilities.

  5. A Central Processing Facility within a Distributed Data Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Witte, S.; Rispens, S. M.; van Hees, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    In a complex scientific data processing project, where raw satellite data (Level 1) is processed to end products (Level 2), you may need specific expertise from various groups in different locations. Collaboration between these groups can lead to better results and give the opportunity to try several different scientific approaches and choose, objectively, the best result. Furthermore, such a distributed data processing system or DDPS can be used for independent validation before the end products are released. All participating groups need common and specific data products for their processing. This involves many interfaces needing and producing different data products. Without a central storage location all groups involved have to implement their own checking routines and transformations in order to use the data products. A central processing facility, acting as a single point of interface between the DDPS and the main data provider as well as for all groups within the DDPS, can facilitate in collecting all scientific data necessary for high-level processing, transforming the Level 1 input data to a DDPS internally agreed format, checking all data products on integrity, format and validity, distributing these data products within the DDPS, monitoring the whole data distribution chain and distributing all end products to the main data provider. A DDPS has been implemented for ESA's gravity mission, GOCE (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer). GOCE's DDPS is called the High-level Processing Facility (HPF) and is part of the GOCE Ground Segment, developed under ESA contract by the European GOCE Gravity consortium (EGG-c). The HPF is set up as a distributed facility consisting of several sub-processing centers for scientific pre-processing, orbit determination, gravity field analysis and validation. The sub-processing facilities are connected through a central node, the Central Processing Facility (CPF). The CPF has been thoroughly tested and is

  6. An Overview of Cloud Computing in Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakarla, Usha; Kumari, Geetha

    2010-11-01

    Cloud computing is the emerging trend in the field of distributed computing. Cloud computing evolved from grid computing and distributed computing. Cloud plays an important role in huge organizations in maintaining huge data with limited resources. Cloud also helps in resource sharing through some specific virtual machines provided by the cloud service provider. This paper gives an overview of the cloud organization and some of the basic security issues pertaining to the cloud.

  7. Distributed Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Doak, Justin

    2002-11-11

    DDACE is a C++ object-oriented software library for the design and analysis of computer experiments. DDACE can be used to generate samples from a variety of sampling techniques. These samples may be used as input to a application code. DDACE also contains statistical tools such as response surface models and correlation coefficients to analyze input/output relationships between variables in an application code. DDACE can generate input values for uncertain variables within a user's application. For example, a user might like to vary a temperature variable as well as some material variables in a series of simulations. Through the series of simulations the user might be looking for optimal settings of parameters based on some user criteria. Or the user may be interested in the sensitivity to input variability shown by an output variable. In either case, the user may provide information about the suspected ranges and distributions of a set of input variables, along with a sampling scheme, and DDACE will generate input points based on these specifications. The input values generated by DDACE and the one or more outputs computed through the user's application code can be analyzed with a variety of statistical methods. This can lead to a wealth of information about the relationships between the variables in the problem. While statistical and mathematical packages may be employeed to carry out the analysis on the input/output relationships, DDACE also contains some tools for analyzing the simulation data. DDACE incorporates a software package called MARS (Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines), developed by Jerome Friedman. MARS is used for generating a spline surface fit of the data. With MARS, a model simplification may be calculated using the input and corresponding output, values for the user's application problem. The MARS grid data may be used for generating 3-dimensional response surface plots of the simulation data. DDACE also contains an implementation of an

  8. Distributed Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-11-11

    DDACE is a C++ object-oriented software library for the design and analysis of computer experiments. DDACE can be used to generate samples from a variety of sampling techniques. These samples may be used as input to a application code. DDACE also contains statistical tools such as response surface models and correlation coefficients to analyze input/output relationships between variables in an application code. DDACE can generate input values for uncertain variables within a user's application. Formore » example, a user might like to vary a temperature variable as well as some material variables in a series of simulations. Through the series of simulations the user might be looking for optimal settings of parameters based on some user criteria. Or the user may be interested in the sensitivity to input variability shown by an output variable. In either case, the user may provide information about the suspected ranges and distributions of a set of input variables, along with a sampling scheme, and DDACE will generate input points based on these specifications. The input values generated by DDACE and the one or more outputs computed through the user's application code can be analyzed with a variety of statistical methods. This can lead to a wealth of information about the relationships between the variables in the problem. While statistical and mathematical packages may be employeed to carry out the analysis on the input/output relationships, DDACE also contains some tools for analyzing the simulation data. DDACE incorporates a software package called MARS (Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines), developed by Jerome Friedman. MARS is used for generating a spline surface fit of the data. With MARS, a model simplification may be calculated using the input and corresponding output, values for the user's application problem. The MARS grid data may be used for generating 3-dimensional response surface plots of the simulation data. DDACE also contains an implementation

  9. Concept for a distributed processor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, P. N.; Burnett, G. J.; Koczela, L. J.

    1970-01-01

    Future generation computer utilizes cell of single metal oxide semiconductor wafer containing general purpose processor section and small memory of approximately 512 words of 16 bits each. Cells are organized into groups and groups interconnected to form computer.

  10. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  11. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Drugan, C.

    2011-05-09

    Researchers found more ways than ever to conduct transformative science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) in 2010. Both familiar initiatives and innovative new programs at the ALCF are now serving a growing, global user community with a wide range of computing needs. The Department of Energy's (DOE) INCITE Program remained vital in providing scientists with major allocations of leadership-class computing resources at the ALCF. For calendar year 2011, 35 projects were awarded 732 million supercomputer processor-hours for computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. Argonne also continued to provide Director's Discretionary allocations - 'start up' awards - for potential future INCITE projects. And DOE's new ASCR Leadership Computing (ALCC) Program allocated resources to 10 ALCF projects, with an emphasis on high-risk, high-payoff simulations directly related to the Department's energy mission, national emergencies, or for broadening the research community capable of using leadership computing resources. While delivering more science today, we've also been laying a solid foundation for high performance computing in the future. After a successful DOE Lehman review, a contract was signed to deliver Mira, the next-generation Blue Gene/Q system, to the ALCF in 2012. The ALCF is working with the 16 projects that were selected for the Early Science Program (ESP) to enable them to be productive as soon as Mira is operational. Preproduction access to Mira will enable ESP projects to adapt their codes to its architecture and collaborate with ALCF staff in shaking down the new system. We expect the 10-petaflops system to stoke economic growth and improve U.S. competitiveness in key areas such as advancing clean energy and addressing global climate change. Ultimately, we envision Mira as a stepping-stone to exascale-class computers that will be faster than petascale

  12. Distributing an executable job load file to compute nodes in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2016-09-13

    Distributing an executable job load file to compute nodes in a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes, including: determining, by a compute node in the parallel computer, whether the compute node is participating in a job; determining, by the compute node in the parallel computer, whether a descendant compute node is participating in the job; responsive to determining that the compute node is participating in the job or that the descendant compute node is participating in the job, communicating, by the compute node to a parent compute node, an identification of a data communications link over which the compute node receives data from the parent compute node; constructing a class route for the job, wherein the class route identifies all compute nodes participating in the job; and broadcasting the executable load file for the job along the class route for the job.

  13. Distributing an executable job load file to compute nodes in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Gooding, Thomas M.

    2016-08-09

    Distributing an executable job load file to compute nodes in a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes, including: determining, by a compute node in the parallel computer, whether the compute node is participating in a job; determining, by the compute node in the parallel computer, whether a descendant compute node is participating in the job; responsive to determining that the compute node is participating in the job or that the descendant compute node is participating in the job, communicating, by the compute node to a parent compute node, an identification of a data communications link over which the compute node receives data from the parent compute node; constructing a class route for the job, wherein the class route identifies all compute nodes participating in the job; and broadcasting the executable load file for the job along the class route for the job.

  14. Distributed computing environments for future space control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viallefont, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of a CNES research project on distributed computing systems. The purpose of this research was to study the impact of the use of new computer technologies in the design and development of future space applications. The first part of this study was a state-of-the-art review of distributed computing systems. One of the interesting ideas arising from this review is the concept of a 'virtual computer' allowing the distributed hardware architecture to be hidden from a software application. The 'virtual computer' can improve system performance by adapting the best architecture (addition of computers) to the software application without having to modify its source code. This concept can also decrease the cost and obsolescence of the hardware architecture. In order to verify the feasibility of the 'virtual computer' concept, a prototype representative of a distributed space application is being developed independently of the hardware architecture.

  15. Computer model to simulate testing at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Hannon, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the processes involved in the operation of the National Transonic Facility (NTF), a large cryogenic wind tunnel at the Langley Research Center. The simulation was verified by comparing the simulated results with previously acquired data from three experimental wind tunnel test programs in the NTF. The comparisons suggest that the computer model simulates reasonably well the processes that determine the liquid nitrogen (LN2) consumption, electrical consumption, fan-on time, and the test time required to complete a test plan at the NTF. From these limited comparisons, it appears that the results from the simulation model are generally within about 10 percent of the actual NTF test results. The use of actual data acquisition times in the simulation produced better estimates of the LN2 usage, as expected. Additional comparisons are needed to refine the model constants. The model will typically produce optimistic results since the times and rates included in the model are typically the optimum values. Any deviation from the optimum values will lead to longer times or increased LN2 and electrical consumption for the proposed test plan. Computer code operating instructions and listings of sample input and output files have been included.

  16. Optimization of an interactive distributive computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, V.

    1985-01-01

    The activities under a cooperative agreement for the development of a computer network are briefly summarized. Research activities covered are: computer operating systems optimization and integration; software development and implementation of the IRIS (Infrared Imaging of Shuttle) Experiment; and software design, development, and implementation of the APS (Aerosol Particle System) Experiment.

  17. A Generalized Management Information System for Computer Facilities at Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Patrick Awalt

    The problem of managing computer facilities at educational institutions is examined. User categories are defined, and the interrelations between user requirements and the goals/objectives of the facility are discussed. Enumerations of the factors that influence computer facility operations is also accomplished. In addition, management information…

  18. Distributed-Computer System Optimizes SRB Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.; Young, Katherine C.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1991-01-01

    Initial calculations of redesign of joint on solid rocket booster (SRB) that failed during Space Shuttle tragedy showed redesign increased weight. Optimization techniques applied to determine whether weight could be reduced while keeping joint closed and limiting stresses. Analysis system developed by use of existing software coupling structural analysis with optimization computations. Software designed executable on network of computer workstations. Took advantage of parallelism offered by finite-difference technique of computing gradients to enable several workstations to contribute simultaneously to solution of problem. Key features, effective use of redundancies in hardware and flexible software, enabling optimization to proceed with minimal delay and decreased overall time to completion.

  19. Designing a model to minimize inequities in hemodialysis facilities distribution.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Teresa M; Moles, Rebekah; Benrimoj, Shalom I; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2011-11-01

    Portugal has an uneven, city-centered bias in the distribution of hemodialysis centers found to contribute to health care inequities. A model has been developed with the aim of minimizing access inequity through the identification of the best possible localization of new hemodialysis facilities. The model was designed under the assumption that individuals from different geographic areas, ceteris paribus, present the same likelihood of requiring hemodialysis in the future. Distances to reach the closest hemodialysis facility were calculated for every municipality lacking one. Regions were scored by aggregating weights of the "individual burden", defined as the burden for an individual living in a region lacking a hemodialysis center to reach one as often as needed, and the "population burden", defined as the burden for the total population living in such a region. The model revealed that the average travelling distance for inhabitants in municipalities without a hemodialysis center is 32 km and that 145,551 inhabitants (1.5%) live more than 60 min away from a hemodialysis center, while 1,393,770 (13.8%) live 30-60 min away. Multivariate analysis showed that the current localization of hemodialysis facilities is associated with major urban areas. The model developed recommends 12 locations for establishing hemodialysis centers that would result in drastically reduced travel for 34 other municipalities, leaving only six (34,800 people) with over 60 min of travel. The application of this model should facilitate the planning of future hemodialysis services as it takes into consideration the potential impact of travel time for individuals in need of dialysis, as well as the logistic arrangements required to transport all patients with end-stage renal disease. The model is applicable in any country and health care planners can opt to weigh these two elements differently in the model according to their priorities. PMID:22109858

  20. Activities and operations of Argonne's Advanced Computing Research Facility: February 1990 through April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1991-05-01

    This report reviews the activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) from February 1990 through April 1991. The ACRF is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The facility's principal objective is to foster research in parallel computing. Toward this objective, the ACRF operates experimental advanced computers, supports investigations in parallel computing, and sponsors technology transfer efforts to industry and academia. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Distributed neural computations for embedded sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckens, Courtney A.; Lynch, Jerome P.; Pei, Jin-Song

    2011-04-01

    Wireless sensing technologies have recently emerged as an inexpensive and robust method of data collection in a variety of structural monitoring applications. In comparison with cabled monitoring systems, wireless systems offer low-cost and low-power communication between a network of sensing devices. Wireless sensing networks possess embedded data processing capabilities which allow for data processing directly at the sensor, thereby eliminating the need for the transmission of raw data. In this study, the Volterra/Weiner neural network (VWNN), a powerful modeling tool for nonlinear hysteretic behavior, is decentralized for embedment in a network of wireless sensors so as to take advantage of each sensor's processing capabilities. The VWNN was chosen for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems because its architecture is computationally efficient and allows computational tasks to be decomposed for parallel execution. In the algorithm, each sensor collects it own data and performs a series of calculations. It then shares its resulting calculations with every other sensor in the network, while the other sensors are simultaneously exchanging their information. Because resource conservation is important in embedded sensor design, the data is pruned wherever possible to eliminate excessive communication between sensors. Once a sensor has its required data, it continues its calculations and computes a prediction of the system acceleration. The VWNN is embedded in the computational core of the Narada wireless sensor node for on-line execution. Data generated by a steel framed structure excited by seismic ground motions is used for validation of the embedded VWNN model.

  2. Distributed computing environment monitoring and user expectations

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, R.L.A.; Logg, C.A.

    1995-11-01

    This paper discusses the growing needs for distributed system monitoring and compares it to current practices. It then goes on to identify the components of distributed system monitoring and shows how they are implemented and successfully used at one site today to address the Local Area Network (LAN), network services and applications, the Wide Area Network (WAN), and host monitoring. It shows how this monitoring can be used to develop realistic service level expectations and also identifies the costs. Finally, the paper briefly discusses the future challenges in network monitoring.

  3. A lightweight communication library for distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Derek; Rieder, Steven; Grosso, Paola; de Laat, Cees; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2010-01-01

    We present MPWide, a platform-independent communication library for performing message passing between computers. Our library allows coupling of several local message passing interface (MPI) applications through a long-distance network and is specifically optimized for such communications. The implementation is deliberately kept lightweight and platform independent, and the library can be installed and used without administrative privileges. The only requirements are a C++ compiler and at least one open port to a wide-area network on each site. In this paper we present the library, describe the user interface, present performance tests and apply MPWide in a large-scale cosmological N-body simulation on a network of two computers, one in Amsterdam and the other in Tokyo.

  4. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2011 annual report : Shaping future supercomputing.

    SciTech Connect

    Papka, M.; Messina, P.; Coffey, R.; Drugan, C.

    2012-08-16

    The ALCF's Early Science Program aims to prepare key applications for the architecture and scale of Mira and to solidify libraries and infrastructure that will pave the way for other future production applications. Two billion core-hours have been allocated to 16 Early Science projects on Mira. The projects, in addition to promising delivery of exciting new science, are all based on state-of-the-art, petascale, parallel applications. The project teams, in collaboration with ALCF staff and IBM, have undertaken intensive efforts to adapt their software to take advantage of Mira's Blue Gene/Q architecture, which, in a number of ways, is a precursor to future high-performance-computing architecture. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) enables transformative science that solves some of the most difficult challenges in biology, chemistry, energy, climate, materials, physics, and other scientific realms. Users partnering with ALCF staff have reached research milestones previously unattainable, due to the ALCF's world-class supercomputing resources and expertise in computation science. In 2011, the ALCF's commitment to providing outstanding science and leadership-class resources was honored with several prestigious awards. Research on multiscale brain blood flow simulations was named a Gordon Bell Prize finalist. Intrepid, the ALCF's BG/P system, ranked No. 1 on the Graph 500 list for the second consecutive year. The next-generation BG/Q prototype again topped the Green500 list. Skilled experts at the ALCF enable researchers to conduct breakthrough science on the Blue Gene system in key ways. The Catalyst Team matches project PIs with experienced computational scientists to maximize and accelerate research in their specific scientific domains. The Performance Engineering Team facilitates the effective use of applications on the Blue Gene system by assessing and improving the algorithms used by applications and the techniques used to implement those algorithms

  5. Moments of inclination error distribution computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program is described which calculates orbital inclination error statistics using a closed-form solution. This solution uses a data base of trajectory errors from actual flights to predict the orbital inclination error statistics. The Scott flight history data base consists of orbit insertion errors in the trajectory parameters - altitude, velocity, flight path angle, flight azimuth, latitude and longitude. The methods used to generate the error statistics are of general interest since they have other applications. Program theory, user instructions, output definitions, subroutine descriptions and detailed FORTRAN coding information are included.

  6. Parallel Computing Environments and Methods for Power Distribution System Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Taylor, Zachary T.; Chassin, David P.; Guttromson, Ross T.; Studham, Scott S.

    2005-11-10

    The development of cost-effective high-performance parallel computing on multi-processor super computers makes it attractive to port excessively time consuming simulation software from personal computers (PC) to super computes. The power distribution system simulator (PDSS) takes a bottom-up approach and simulates load at appliance level, where detailed thermal models for appliances are used. This approach works well for a small power distribution system consisting of a few thousand appliances. When the number of appliances increases, the simulation uses up the PC memory and its run time increases to a point where the approach is no longer feasible to model a practical large power distribution system. This paper presents an effort made to port a PC-based power distribution system simulator (PDSS) to a 128-processor shared-memory super computer. The paper offers an overview of the parallel computing environment and a description of the modification made to the PDSS model. The performances of the PDSS running on a standalone PC and on the super computer are compared. Future research direction of utilizing parallel computing in the power distribution system simulation is also addressed.

  7. SynapSense Wireless Environmental Monitoring System of the RHIC & ATLAS Computing Facility at BNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, K.; Garcia, E.; Hogue, R.; Hollowell, C.; Strecker-Kellogg, W.; Wong, A.; Zaytsev, A.

    2014-06-01

    RHIC & ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) at BNL is a 15000 sq. ft. facility hosting the IT equipment of the BNL ATLAS WLCG Tier-1 site, offline farms for the STAR and PHENIX experiments operating at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the BNL Cloud installation, various Open Science Grid (OSG) resources, and many other small physics research oriented IT installations. The facility originated in 1990 and grew steadily up to the present configuration with 4 physically isolated IT areas with the maximum rack capacity of about 1000 racks and the total peak power consumption of 1.5 MW. In June 2012 a project was initiated with the primary goal to replace several environmental monitoring systems deployed earlier within RACF with a single commercial hardware and software solution by SynapSense Corporation based on wireless sensor groups and proprietary SynapSense™ MapSense™ software that offers a unified solution for monitoring the temperature and humidity within the rack/CRAC units as well as pressure distribution underneath the raised floor across the entire facility. The deployment was completed successfully in 2013. The new system also supports a set of additional features such as capacity planning based on measurements of total heat load, power consumption monitoring and control, CRAC unit power consumption optimization based on feedback from the temperature measurements and overall power usage efficiency estimations that are not currently implemented within RACF but may be deployed in the future.

  8. Activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility, October 1986-October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains a description of the work being carried out at the advanced computing research facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Topics covered are upgrading of computers, networking changes, algorithms, parallel programming, programming languages, and user training. (LSP)

  9. A distributed computing model for telemetry data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Scott, Kevin L.; Weismuller, Steven P.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new approach to distributing processed telemetry data among spacecraft flight controllers within the control centers at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This approach facilitates the development of application programs which integrate spacecraft-telemetered data and ground-based synthesized data, then distributes this information to flight controllers for analysis and decision-making. The new approach combines various distributed computing models into one hybrid distributed computing model. The model employs both client-server and peer-to-peer distributed computing models cooperating to provide users with information throughout a diverse operations environment. Specifically, it provides an attractive foundation upon which we are building critical real-time monitoring and control applications, while simultaneously lending itself to peripheral applications in playback operations, mission preparations, flight controller training, and program development and verification. We have realized the hybrid distributed computing model through an information sharing protocol. We shall describe the motivations that inspired us to create this protocol, along with a brief conceptual description of the distributed computing models it employs. We describe the protocol design in more detail, discussing many of the program design considerations and techniques we have adopted. Finally, we describe how this model is especially suitable for supporting the implementation of distributed expert system applications.

  10. A distributed computing model for telemetry data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Scott, Kevin L.; Weismuller, Steven P.

    1994-05-01

    We present a new approach to distributing processed telemetry data among spacecraft flight controllers within the control centers at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This approach facilitates the development of application programs which integrate spacecraft-telemetered data and ground-based synthesized data, then distributes this information to flight controllers for analysis and decision-making. The new approach combines various distributed computing models into one hybrid distributed computing model. The model employs both client-server and peer-to-peer distributed computing models cooperating to provide users with information throughout a diverse operations environment. Specifically, it provides an attractive foundation upon which we are building critical real-time monitoring and control applications, while simultaneously lending itself to peripheral applications in playback operations, mission preparations, flight controller training, and program development and verification. We have realized the hybrid distributed computing model through an information sharing protocol. We shall describe the motivations that inspired us to create this protocol, along with a brief conceptual description of the distributed computing models it employs. We describe the protocol design in more detail, discussing many of the program design considerations and techniques we have adopted. Finally, we describe how this model is especially suitable for supporting the implementation of distributed expert system applications.

  11. Space power distribution system technology. Volume 3: Test facility design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Cannady, M. D.; Cassinelli, J. E.; Farber, B. F.; Lurie, C.; Fleck, G. W.; Lepisto, J. W.; Messner, A.; Ritterman, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The AMPS test facility is a major tool in the attainment of more economical space power. The ultimate goals of the test facility, its primary functional requirements and conceptual design, and the major equipment it contains are discussed.

  12. Clock distribution system for digital computers

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Robert H.; Loomis, Jr., Herschel H.

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for eliminating, in each clock distribution amplifier of a clock distribution system, sequential pulse catch-up error due to one pulse "overtaking" a prior clock pulse. The apparatus includes timing means to produce a periodic electromagnetic signal with a fundamental frequency having a fundamental frequency component V'.sub.01 (t); an array of N signal characteristic detector means, with detector means No. 1 receiving the timing means signal and producing a change-of-state signal V.sub.1 (t) in response to receipt of a signal above a predetermined threshold; N substantially identical filter means, one filter means being operatively associated with each detector means, for receiving the change-of-state signal V.sub.n (t) and producing a modified change-of-state signal V'.sub.n (t) (n=1, . . . , N) having a fundamental frequency component that is substantially proportional to V'.sub.01 (t-.theta..sub.n (t) with a cumulative phase shift .theta..sub.n (t) having a time derivative that may be made uniformly and arbitrarily small; and with the detector means n+1 (1.ltoreq.n

  13. Activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility, January 1989--January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1990-02-01

    This report reviews the activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) for the period January 1, 1989, through January 31, 1990. The ACRF is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The facility's principal objective is to foster research in parallel computing. Toward this objective, the ACRF continues to operate experimental advanced computers and to sponsor new technology transfer efforts and new research projects. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Distributed sensor networks with collective computation

    SciTech Connect

    Lanman, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of a network of N sensors have been performed. The simulation space contains a number of sound sources and a large number of sensors. Each sensor is equipped with an omni-directional microphone and is capable of measuring only the time of arrival of a signal. Sensors are able to wirelessly transmit and receive packets of information, and have some computing power. The sensors were programmed to merge all information (received packets as well as local measurements) into a 'world view' for that node. This world view is then transmitted. In this way, information can slowly diffuse across the network. One node was monitored in the network as a proxy for when information had diffused across the network. Simulations demonstrated that the energy expended per sensor per time step was approximately independent of N.

  15. Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.; Smith, Merritt H.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a loosely and tightly-coupled workstation cluster is compared against a conventional vector supercomputer for the solution the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The application geometries include a transonic airfoil, a tiltrotor wing/fuselage, and a wing/body/empennage/nacelle transport. Decomposition is of the manager-worker type, with solution of one grid zone per worker process coupled using the PVM message passing library. Task allocation is determined by grid size and processor speed, subject to available memory penalties. Each fluid zone is computed using an implicit diagonal scheme in an overset mesh framework, while relative body motion is accomplished using an additional worker process to re-establish grid communication.

  16. The process group approach to reliable distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1992-01-01

    The difficulty of developing reliable distribution software is an impediment to applying distributed computing technology in many settings. Experience with the ISIS system suggests that a structured approach based on virtually synchronous process groups yields systems that are substantially easier to develop, exploit sophisticated forms of cooperative computation, and achieve high reliability. Six years of research on ISIS, describing the model, its implementation challenges, and the types of applications to which ISIS has been applied are reviewed.

  17. Improvement of the Computing - Related Procurement Process at a Government Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gittins, C.

    2000-04-03

    The purpose of the project was to develop, implement, and market value-added services through the Computing Resource Center in an effort to streamline computing-related procurement processes across the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The power of the project was in focusing attention on and value of centralizing the delivery of computer related products and services to the institution. The project required a plan and marketing strategy that would drive attention to the facility's value-added offerings and services. A significant outcome of the project has been the change in the CRC internal organization. The realignment of internal policies and practices, together with additions to its product and service offerings has brought an increased focus to the facility. This movement from a small, fractious organization into one that is still small yet well organized and focused on its mission and goals has been a significant transition. Indicative of this turnaround was the sharing of information. One-on-one and small group meetings, together with statistics showing work activity was invaluable in gaining support for more equitable workload distribution, and the removal of blame and finger pointing. Sharing monthly reports on sales and operating costs also had a positive impact.

  18. A Web-based Distributed Voluntary Computing Platform for Large Scale Hydrological Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Agliamzanov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Distributed volunteer computing can enable researchers and scientist to form large parallel computing environments to utilize the computing power of the millions of computers on the Internet, and use them towards running large scale environmental simulations and models to serve the common good of local communities and the world. Recent developments in web technologies and standards allow client-side scripting languages to run at speeds close to native application, and utilize the power of Graphics Processing Units (GPU). Using a client-side scripting language like JavaScript, we have developed an open distributed computing framework that makes it easy for researchers to write their own hydrologic models, and run them on volunteer computers. Users will easily enable their websites for visitors to volunteer sharing their computer resources to contribute running advanced hydrological models and simulations. Using a web-based system allows users to start volunteering their computational resources within seconds without installing any software. The framework distributes the model simulation to thousands of nodes in small spatial and computational sizes. A relational database system is utilized for managing data connections and queue management for the distributed computing nodes. In this paper, we present a web-based distributed volunteer computing platform to enable large scale hydrological simulations and model runs in an open and integrated environment.

  19. Computer Power: Part 1: Distribution of Power (and Communications).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Bennett J.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the distribution of power to personal computers and computer terminals addresses options such as extension cords, perimeter raceways, and interior raceways. Sidebars explain: (1) the National Electrical Code; (2) volts, amps, and watts; (3) transformers, circuit breakers, and circuits; and (4) power vs. data wiring. (MES)

  20. Pladipus Enables Universal Distributed Computing in Proteomics Bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Verheggen, Kenneth; Maddelein, Davy; Hulstaert, Niels; Martens, Lennart; Barsnes, Harald; Vaudel, Marc

    2016-03-01

    The use of proteomics bioinformatics substantially contributes to an improved understanding of proteomes, but this novel and in-depth knowledge comes at the cost of increased computational complexity. Parallelization across multiple computers, a strategy termed distributed computing, can be used to handle this increased complexity; however, setting up and maintaining a distributed computing infrastructure requires resources and skills that are not readily available to most research groups. Here we propose a free and open-source framework named Pladipus that greatly facilitates the establishment of distributed computing networks for proteomics bioinformatics tools. Pladipus is straightforward to install and operate thanks to its user-friendly graphical interface, allowing complex bioinformatics tasks to be run easily on a network instead of a single computer. As a result, any researcher can benefit from the increased computational efficiency provided by distributed computing, hence empowering them to tackle more complex bioinformatics challenges. Notably, it enables any research group to perform large-scale reprocessing of publicly available proteomics data, thus supporting the scientific community in mining these data for novel discoveries. PMID:26510693

  1. Developing a Distributed Computing Architecture at Arizona State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armann, Neil; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of Arizona State University's computing architecture, designed to ensure that all new distributed computing pieces will work together, is described. Aspects discussed include the business rationale, the general architectural approach, characteristics and objectives of the architecture, specific services, and impact on the university…

  2. Facility optimization to improve activation rate distributions during IVNAA

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi Khankook, Atiyeh; Rafat Motavalli, Laleh; Miri Hakimabad, Hashem

    2013-01-01

    Currently, determination of body composition is the most useful method for distinguishing between certain diseases. The prompt-gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) facility for non-destructive elemental analysis of the human body is the gold standard method for this type of analysis. In order to obtain accurate measurements using the IVNAA system, the activation probability in the body must be uniform. This can be difficult to achieve, as body shape and body composition affect the rate of activation. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum pre-moderator, in terms of material for attaining uniform activation probability with a CV value of about 10% and changing the collimator role to increase activation rate within the body. Such uniformity was obtained with a high thickness of paraffin pre-moderator, however, because of increasing secondary photon flux received by the detectors it was not an appropriate choice. Our final calculations indicated that using two paraffin slabs with a thickness of 3 cm as a pre-moderator, in the presence of 2 cm Bi on the collimator, achieves a satisfactory distribution of activation rate in the body. PMID:23386375

  3. Perspectives on distributed computing : thirty people, four user types, and the distributed computing user experience.

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, L.; Liming, L.; Foster, I.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-10-15

    This report summarizes the methodology and results of a user perspectives study conducted by the Community Driven Improvement of Globus Software (CDIGS) project. The purpose of the study was to document the work-related goals and challenges facing today's scientific technology users, to record their perspectives on Globus software and the distributed-computing ecosystem, and to provide recommendations to the Globus community based on the observations. Globus is a set of open source software components intended to provide a framework for collaborative computational science activities. Rather than attempting to characterize all users or potential users of Globus software, our strategy has been to speak in detail with a small group of individuals in the scientific community whose work appears to be the kind that could benefit from Globus software, learn as much as possible about their work goals and the challenges they face, and describe what we found. The result is a set of statements about specific individuals experiences. We do not claim that these are representative of a potential user community, but we do claim to have found commonalities and differences among the interviewees that may be reflected in the user community as a whole. We present these as a series of hypotheses that can be tested by subsequent studies, and we offer recommendations to Globus developers based on the assumption that these hypotheses are representative. Specifically, we conducted interviews with thirty technology users in the scientific community. We included both people who have used Globus software and those who have not. We made a point of including individuals who represent a variety of roles in scientific projects, for example, scientists, software developers, engineers, and infrastructure providers. The following material is included in this report: (1) A summary of the reported work-related goals, significant issues, and points of satisfaction with the use of Globus software; (2

  4. Computation and Optimization of Dose Distributions for Rotational Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Timothy Harold

    1994-01-01

    The stereotactic radiosurgery technique presented in this work is the patient rotator method which rotates the patient in a sitting position with a stereotactic head frame attached to the skull while collimated non-coplanar radiation beams from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator are delivered to the target point. The hypothesis of this dissertation is that accurate, three-dimensional dose distributions can be computed and optimized for the patient rotator method used in stereotactic radiosurgery. This dissertation presents research results in three areas related to computing and optimizing dose distributions for the patient rotator method. A three-dimensional dose model was developed to calculate the dose at any point in the cerebral cortex using a circular and adjustable collimator system and the geometry of the radiation beam with respect to the target point. The computed dose distributions compared to experimental measurements had an average maximum deviation of <0.7 mm for the relative isodose distributions greater than 50%. A system was developed to qualitatively and quantitatively visualize the computed dose distributions with patient anatomy. A registration method was presented for transforming each dataset to a common reference system. A method for computing the intersections of anatomical contour's boundaries was developed to calculate dose-volume information. The system efficiently and accurately reduced the large computed, volumetric sets of dose data, medical images, and anatomical contours to manageable images and graphs. A computer-aided optimization method was developed for rigorously selecting beam angles and weights for minimizing the dose to normal tissue. Linear programming was applied as the optimization method. The computed optimal beam angles and weights for a defined objective function and dose constraints exhibited a superior dose distribution compared to a standard plan. The developed dose model, qualitative and quantitative visualization

  5. Public Computer Assisted Learning Facilities for Children with Visual Impairment: Universal Design for Inclusive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Kin Wai Michael; Lam, Mei Seung

    2012-01-01

    Although computer assisted learning (CAL) is becoming increasingly popular, people with visual impairment face greater difficulty in accessing computer-assisted learning facilities. This is primarily because most of the current CAL facilities are not visually impaired friendly. People with visual impairment also do not normally have access to…

  6. UTILIZATION OF COMPUTER FACILITIES IN THE MATHEMATICS AND BUSINESS CURRICULUM IN A LARGE SUBURBAN HIGH SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RENO, MARTIN; AND OTHERS

    A STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO EXPLORE IN A QUALITATIVE WAY THE POSSIBLE UTILIZATION OF COMPUTER AND DATA PROCESSING METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION. OBJECTIVES WERE--(1) TO ESTABLISH A WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH A COMPUTER FACILITY SO THAT ABLE STUDENTS AND THEIR TEACHERS WOULD HAVE ACCESS TO THE FACILITIES, (2) TO DEVELOP A UNIT FOR THE UTILIZATION…

  7. Distriblets: Java-Based Distributed Computing on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, David; Wills, Craig E.; Brennan, Brian; Brennan, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Describes a system for using the World Wide Web to distribute computational tasks to multiple hosts on the Web that is written in Java programming language. Describes the programs written to carry out the load distribution, the structure of a "distriblet" class, and experiences in using this system. (Author/LRW)

  8. Computational determination of absorbed dose distributions from gamma ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2001-04-01

    A biomedical procedure known as brachytherapy involves insertion of many radioactive seeds into a sick gland for eliminating sick tissue. For such implementations, the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is very important. A simulation tool has been developed to determine the spatial distribution of absorbed dose in heterogeneous environments where the gamma ray source consists of many small internal radiation emitters. The computation is base on integral transport method and the computations are done in a parallel fashion. Preliminary results involving 137Cs and 125I sources surrounded by water and comparison of the results to the experimental and computational data available in the literature are presented.

  9. Arcade: A Web-Java Based Framework for Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zhikai; Maly, Kurt; Mehrotra, Piyush; Zubair, Mohammad; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Distributed heterogeneous environments are being increasingly used to execute a variety of large size simulations and computational problems. We are developing Arcade, a web-based environment to design, execute, monitor, and control distributed applications. These targeted applications consist of independent heterogeneous modules which can be executed on a distributed heterogeneous environment. In this paper we describe the overall design of the system and discuss the prototype implementation of the core functionalities required to support such a framework.

  10. Parallel and Distributed Computational Fluid Dynamics: Experimental Results and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, Mohammad Jahed; Biswas, R.; VanderWijngaart, R.; Yarrow, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes several results of parallel and distributed computing using a large scale production flow solver program. A coarse grained parallelization based on clustering of discretization grids combined with partitioning of large grids for load balancing is presented. An assessment is given of its performance on distributed and distributed-shared memory platforms using large scale scientific problems. An experiment with this solver, adapted to a Wide Area Network execution environment is presented. We also give a comparative performance assessment of computation and communication times on both the tightly and loosely-coupled machines.

  11. Experiment Dashboard for Monitoring of the LHC Distributed Computing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, J.; Devesas Campos, M.; Tarragon Cros, J.; Gaidioz, B.; Karavakis, E.; Kokoszkiewicz, L.; Lanciotti, E.; Maier, G.; Ollivier, W.; Nowotka, M.; Rocha, R.; Sadykov, T.; Saiz, P.; Sargsyan, L.; Sidorova, I.; Tuckett, D.

    2011-12-01

    LHC experiments are currently taking collisions data. A distributed computing model chosen by the four main LHC experiments allows physicists to benefit from resources spread all over the world. The distributed model and the scale of LHC computing activities increase the level of complexity of middleware, and also the chances of possible failures or inefficiencies in involved components. In order to ensure the required performance and functionality of the LHC computing system, monitoring the status of the distributed sites and services as well as monitoring LHC computing activities are among the key factors. Over the last years, the Experiment Dashboard team has been working on a number of applications that facilitate the monitoring of different activities: including following up jobs, transfers, and also site and service availabilities. This presentation describes Experiment Dashboard applications used by the LHC experiments and experience gained during the first months of data taking.

  12. Jungle Computing: Distributed Supercomputing Beyond Clusters, Grids, and Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinstra, Frank J.; Maassen, Jason; van Nieuwpoort, Rob V.; Drost, Niels; van Kessel, Timo; van Werkhoven, Ben; Urbani, Jacopo; Jacobs, Ceriel; Kielmann, Thilo; Bal, Henri E.

    In recent years, the application of high-performance and distributed computing in scientific practice has become increasingly wide spread. Among the most widely available platforms to scientists are clusters, grids, and cloud systems. Such infrastructures currently are undergoing revolutionary change due to the integration of many-core technologies, providing orders-of-magnitude speed improvements for selected compute kernels. With high-performance and distributed computing systems thus becoming more heterogeneous and hierarchical, programming complexity is vastly increased. Further complexities arise because urgent desire for scalability and issues including data distribution, software heterogeneity, and ad hoc hardware availability commonly force scientists into simultaneous use of multiple platforms (e.g., clusters, grids, and clouds used concurrently). A true computing jungle.

  13. 32 CFR 766.8 - Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.8 Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility... license and Certificate of Insurance to the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command or his... Facilities Engineering Command or his designated representative. (1) Upon receipt, the Commander,...

  14. 32 CFR 766.8 - Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.8 Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility... license and Certificate of Insurance to the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command or his... Facilities Engineering Command or his designated representative. (1) Upon receipt, the Commander,...

  15. 32 CFR 766.8 - Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.8 Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility... license and Certificate of Insurance to the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command or his... Facilities Engineering Command or his designated representative. (1) Upon receipt, the Commander,...

  16. 32 CFR 766.8 - Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.8 Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility... license and Certificate of Insurance to the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command or his... Facilities Engineering Command or his designated representative. (1) Upon receipt, the Commander,...

  17. 32 CFR 766.8 - Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.8 Procedure for review, approval, execution and distribution of aviation facility... license and Certificate of Insurance to the Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command or his... Facilities Engineering Command or his designated representative. (1) Upon receipt, the Commander,...

  18. Bringing the CMS distributed computing system into scalable operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belforte, S.; Fanfani, A.; Fisk, I.; Flix, J.; Hernández, J. M.; Kress, T.; Letts, J.; Magini, N.; Miccio, V.; Sciabà, A.

    2010-04-01

    Establishing efficient and scalable operations of the CMS distributed computing system critically relies on the proper integration, commissioning and scale testing of the data and workload management tools, the various computing workflows and the underlying computing infrastructure, located at more than 50 computing centres worldwide and interconnected by the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. Computing challenges periodically undertaken by CMS in the past years with increasing scale and complexity have revealed the need for a sustained effort on computing integration and commissioning activities. The Processing and Data Access (PADA) Task Force was established at the beginning of 2008 within the CMS Computing Program with the mandate of validating the infrastructure for organized processing and user analysis including the sites and the workload and data management tools, validating the distributed production system by performing functionality, reliability and scale tests, helping sites to commission, configure and optimize the networking and storage through scale testing data transfers and data processing, and improving the efficiency of accessing data across the CMS computing system from global transfers to local access. This contribution reports on the tools and procedures developed by CMS for computing commissioning and scale testing as well as the improvements accomplished towards efficient, reliable and scalable computing operations. The activities include the development and operation of load generators for job submission and data transfers with the aim of stressing the experiment and Grid data management and workload management systems, site commissioning procedures and tools to monitor and improve site availability and reliability, as well as activities targeted to the commissioning of the distributed production, user analysis and monitoring systems.

  19. 41 CFR 101-26.503 - Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. 101-26.503 Section 101-26.503 Public Contracts and... SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.5-GSA Procurement Programs § 101-26.503 Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. GSA supply...

  20. 41 CFR 101-26.503 - Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. 101-26.503 Section 101-26.503 Public Contracts and... SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.5-GSA Procurement Programs § 101-26.503 Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. GSA supply...

  1. 41 CFR 101-26.503 - Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. 101-26.503 Section 101-26.503 Public Contracts and... SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.5-GSA Procurement Programs § 101-26.503 Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. GSA supply...

  2. 41 CFR 101-26.503 - Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. 101-26.503 Section 101-26.503 Public Contracts and... SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.5-GSA Procurement Programs § 101-26.503 Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. GSA supply...

  3. New security infrastructure model for distributed computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubenskaya, J.; Kryukov, A.; Demichev, A.; Prikhodko, N.

    2016-02-01

    At the paper we propose a new approach to setting up a user-friendly and yet secure authentication and authorization procedure in a distributed computing system. The security concept of the most heterogeneous distributed computing systems is based on the public key infrastructure along with proxy certificates which are used for rights delegation. In practice a contradiction between the limited lifetime of the proxy certificates and the unpredictable time of the request processing is a big issue for the end users of the system. We propose to use unlimited in time hashes which are individual for each request instead of proxy certificate. Our approach allows to avoid using of the proxy certificates. Thus the security infrastructure of distributed computing system becomes easier for development, support and use.

  4. Issues and recommendations associated with distributed computation and data management systems for the space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The primary purpose of the report is to explore management approaches and technology developments for computation and data management systems designed to meet future needs in the space sciences.The report builds on work presented in previous reports on solar-terrestrial and planetary reports, broadening the outlook to all of the space sciences, and considering policy issues aspects related to coordiantion between data centers, missions, and ongoing research activities, because it is perceived that the rapid growth of data and the wide geographic distribution of relevant facilities will present especially troublesome problems for data archiving, distribution, and analysis.

  5. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  6. Nonlinear structural analysis on distributed-memory computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Brian C.; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    A computational strategy is presented for the nonlinear static and postbuckling analyses of large complex structures on massively parallel computers. The strategy is designed for distributed-memory, message-passing parallel computer systems. The key elements of the proposed strategy are: (1) a multiple-parameter reduced basis technique; (2) a nested dissection (or multilevel substructuring) ordering scheme; (3) parallel assembly of global matrices; and (4) a parallel sparse equation solver. The effectiveness of the strategy is assessed by applying it to thermo-mechanical postbuckling analyses of stiffened composite panels with cutouts, and nonlinear large-deflection analyses of HSCT models on Intel Paragon XP/S computers. The numerical studies presented demonstrate the advantages of nested dissection-based solvers over traditional skyline-based solvers on distributed memory machines.

  7. Exact score distribution computation for ontological similarity searches

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Semantic similarity searches in ontologies are an important component of many bioinformatic algorithms, e.g., finding functionally related proteins with the Gene Ontology or phenotypically similar diseases with the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO). We have recently shown that the performance of semantic similarity searches can be improved by ranking results according to the probability of obtaining a given score at random rather than by the scores themselves. However, to date, there are no algorithms for computing the exact distribution of semantic similarity scores, which is necessary for computing the exact P-value of a given score. Results In this paper we consider the exact computation of score distributions for similarity searches in ontologies, and introduce a simple null hypothesis which can be used to compute a P-value for the statistical significance of similarity scores. We concentrate on measures based on Resnik's definition of ontological similarity. A new algorithm is proposed that collapses subgraphs of the ontology graph and thereby allows fast score distribution computation. The new algorithm is several orders of magnitude faster than the naive approach, as we demonstrate by computing score distributions for similarity searches in the HPO. It is shown that exact P-value calculation improves clinical diagnosis using the HPO compared to approaches based on sampling. Conclusions The new algorithm enables for the first time exact P-value calculation via exact score distribution computation for ontology similarity searches. The approach is applicable to any ontology for which the annotation-propagation rule holds and can improve any bioinformatic method that makes only use of the raw similarity scores. The algorithm was implemented in Java, supports any ontology in OBO format, and is available for non-commercial and academic usage under: https://compbio.charite.de/svn/hpo/trunk/src/tools/significance/ PMID:22078312

  8. Computation of glint, glare, and solar irradiance distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Khalsa, Siri Sahib Singh

    2015-08-11

    Described herein are technologies pertaining to computing the solar irradiance distribution on a surface of a receiver in a concentrating solar power system or glint/glare emitted from a reflective entity. At least one camera captures images of the Sun and the entity of interest, wherein the images have pluralities of pixels having respective pluralities of intensity values. Based upon the intensity values of the pixels in the respective images, the solar irradiance distribution on the surface of the entity or glint/glare corresponding to the entity is computed.

  9. First Experiences with LHC Grid Computing and Distributed Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, Ian

    2010-12-01

    In this presentation the experiences of the LHC experiments using grid computing were presented with a focus on experience with distributed analysis. After many years of development, preparation, exercises, and validation the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments are in operations. The computing infrastructure has been heavily utilized in the first 6 months of data collection. The general experience of exploiting the grid infrastructure for organized processing and preparation is described, as well as the successes employing the infrastructure for distributed analysis. At the end the expected evolution and future plans are outlined.

  10. Distributed computer taxonomy based on O/S structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, Edwin C.

    1985-01-01

    The taxonomy considers the resource structure at the operating system level. It compares a communication based taxonomy with the new taxonomy to illustrate how the latter does a better job when related to the client's view of the distributed computer. The results illustrate the fundamental features and what is required to construct fully distributed processing systems. The problem of using network computers on the space station is addressed. A detailed discussion of the taxonomy is not given here. Information is given in the form of charts and diagrams that were used to illustrate a talk.

  11. Distributed computing system with dual independent communications paths between computers and employing split tokens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert D. (Inventor); Manning, Robert M. (Inventor); Lewis, Blair F. (Inventor); Bolotin, Gary S. (Inventor); Ward, Richard S. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This is a distributed computing system providing flexible fault tolerance; ease of software design and concurrency specification; and dynamic balance of the loads. The system comprises a plurality of computers each having a first input/output interface and a second input/output interface for interfacing to communications networks each second input/output interface including a bypass for bypassing the associated computer. A global communications network interconnects the first input/output interfaces for providing each computer the ability to broadcast messages simultaneously to the remainder of the computers. A meshwork communications network interconnects the second input/output interfaces providing each computer with the ability to establish a communications link with another of the computers bypassing the remainder of computers. Each computer is controlled by a resident copy of a common operating system. Communications between respective ones of computers is by means of split tokens each having a moving first portion which is sent from computer to computer and a resident second portion which is disposed in the memory of at least one of computer and wherein the location of the second portion is part of the first portion. The split tokens represent both functions to be executed by the computers and data to be employed in the execution of the functions. The first input/output interfaces each include logic for detecting a collision between messages and for terminating the broadcasting of a message whereby collisions between messages are detected and avoided.

  12. An optimization model for energy generation and distribution in a dynamic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is described using linear programming for the optimum generation and distribution of energy demands among competing energy resources and different economic criteria. The model, which will be used as a general engineering tool in the analysis of the Deep Space Network ground facility, considers several essential decisions for better design and operation. The decisions sought for the particular energy application include: the optimum time to build an assembly of elements, inclusion of a storage medium of some type, and the size or capacity of the elements that will minimize the total life-cycle cost over a given number of years. The model, which is structured in multiple time divisions, employ the decomposition principle for large-size matrices, the branch-and-bound method in mixed-integer programming, and the revised simplex technique for efficient and economic computer use.

  13. The future of PanDA in ATLAS distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Schovancova, J.; Vaniachine, A.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) face unprecedented computing challenges. Heterogeneous resources are distributed worldwide at hundreds of sites, thousands of physicists analyse the data remotely, the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, while data processing requires more than a few billion hours of computing usage per year. The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system was developed to meet the scale and complexity of LHC distributed computing for the ATLAS experiment. In the process, the old batch job paradigm of locally managed computing in HEP was discarded in favour of a far more automated, flexible and scalable model. The success of PanDA in ATLAS is leading to widespread adoption and testing by other experiments. PanDA is the first exascale workload management system in HEP, already operating at more than a million computing jobs per day, and processing over an exabyte of data in 2013. There are many new challenges that PanDA will face in the near future, in addition to new challenges of scale, heterogeneity and increasing user base. PanDA will need to handle rapidly changing computing infrastructure, will require factorization of code for easier deployment, will need to incorporate additional information sources including network metrics in decision making, be able to control network circuits, handle dynamically sized workload processing, provide improved visualization, and face many other challenges. In this talk we will focus on the new features, planned or recently implemented, that are relevant to the next decade of distributed computing workload management using PanDA.

  14. Chandrasekhar equations and computational algorithms for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Ito, K.; Powers, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar equations arising in optimal control problems for linear distributed parameter systems are considered. The equations are derived via approximation theory. This approach is used to obtain existence, uniqueness, and strong differentiability of the solutions and provides the basis for a convergent computation scheme for approximating feedback gain operators. A numerical example is presented to illustrate these ideas.

  15. MPWide: Light-weight communication library for distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Derek; Rieder, Steven; Grosso, Paola; de Laat, Cees; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2012-12-01

    MPWide is a light-weight communication library for distributed computing. It is specifically developed to allow message passing over long-distance networks using path-specific optimizations. An early version of MPWide was used in the Gravitational Billion Body Project to allow simulations across multiple supercomputers.

  16. SAGA: A standardized access layer to heterogeneous Distributed Computing Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzky, Andre; Weidner, Ole; Jha, Shantenu

    2015-09-01

    Distributed Computing Infrastructure is characterized by interfaces that are heterogeneous-syntactically and semantically. SAGA represents the most comprehensive community effort to date to address the heterogeneity by defining a simple, uniform access layer. In this paper, we describe the basic concepts underpinning its design and development. We also discuss RADICAL-SAGA which is the most widely used implementation of SAGA.

  17. Data distribution in the NBS Automated Manufacturing Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. J.; Barkmeyer, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The Automated Manufacturing Research Facility (AMRF) at the National Bureau of Standards was constructed as a testbed for research in the automation of small batch maufacturing, in particular for systems producing machined parts in lots of 1000 or less. Potential standard interfaces between existing and future components of small batch of factory floor metrology in an automated environment, delivering proven measurement techniques and standard reference materails industry to are identified. Commercially available product are used to construct the facility to expedite transfer of research results into the private sector.

  18. Distributed computation of graphics primitives on a transputer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Graham K.

    1988-01-01

    A method is developed for distributing the computation of graphics primitives on a parallel processing network. Off-the-shelf transputer boards are used to perform the graphics transformations and scan-conversion tasks that would normally be assigned to a single transputer based display processor. Each node in the network performs a single graphics primitive computation. Frequently requested tasks can be duplicated on several nodes. The results indicate that the current distribution of commands on the graphics network shows a performance degradation when compared to the graphics display board alone. A change to more computation per node for every communication (perform more complex tasks on each node) may cause the desired increase in throughput.

  19. A fault detection service for wide area distributed computations.

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, P.

    1998-06-09

    The potential for faults in distributed computing systems is a significant complicating factor for application developers. While a variety of techniques exist for detecting and correcting faults, the implementation of these techniques in a particular context can be difficult. Hence, we propose a fault detection service designed to be incorporated, in a modular fashion, into distributed computing systems, tools, or applications. This service uses well-known techniques based on unreliable fault detectors to detect and report component failure, while allowing the user to tradeoff timeliness of reporting against false positive rates. We describe the architecture of this service, report on experimental results that quantify its cost and accuracy, and describe its use in two applications, monitoring the status of system components of the GUSTO computational grid testbed and as part of the NetSolve network-enabled numerical solver.

  20. Parallel matrix transpose algorithms on distributed memory concurrent computers

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Dongarra, J. |; Walker, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes parallel matrix transpose algorithms on distributed memory concurrent processors. We assume that the matrix is distributed over a P {times} Q processor template with a block scattered data distribution. P, Q, and the block size can be arbitrary, so the algorithms have wide applicability. The algorithms make use of non-blocking, point-to-point communication between processors. The use of nonblocking communication allows a processor to overlap the messages that it sends to different processors, thereby avoiding unnecessary synchronization. Combined with the matrix multiplication routine, C = A {center_dot} B, the algorithms are used to compute parallel multiplications of transposed matrices, C = A{sup T} {center_dot} B{sup T}, in the PUMMA package. Details of the parallel implementation of the algorithms are given, and results are presented for runs on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer.

  1. Distribution and Efficacy of Aerosol Insecticides in Commercial Facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosol insecticides are being viewed as a potential alternative to fumigations in commercial milling, processing, and storage facilities. Although there are a number of insecticides and delivery systems available for use, there are little published data regarding efficacy and performance in actual ...

  2. Effects of wind-energy facilities on grassland bird distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Jill A.; Buhl, Deb

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of renewable energy to meet worldwide demand continues to grow. Wind energy is one of the fastest growing renewable sectors, but new wind facilities are often placed in prime wildlife habitat. Long-term studies that incorporate a rigorous statistical design to evaluate the effects of wind facilities on wildlife are rare. We conducted a before-after-control-impact (BACI) assessment to determine if wind facilities placed in native mixed-grass prairies displaced breeding grassland birds. During 2003–2012, we monitored changes in bird density in 3 study areas in North Dakota and South Dakota (U.S.A.). We examined whether displacement or attraction occurred 1 year after construction (immediate effect) and the average displacement or attraction 2–5 years after construction (delayed effect). We tested for these effects overall and within distance bands of 100, 200, 300, and >300 m from turbines. We observed displacement for 7 of 9 species. One species was unaffected by wind facilities and one species exhibited attraction. Displacement and attraction generally occurred within 100 m and often extended up to 300 m. In a few instances, displacement extended beyond 300 m. Displacement and attraction occurred 1 year after construction and persisted at least 5 years. Our research provides a framework for applying a BACI design to displacement studies and highlights the erroneous conclusions that can be made without the benefit of adopting such a design. More broadly, species-specific behaviors can be used to inform management decisions about turbine placement and the potential impact to individual species. Additionally, the avoidance distance metrics we estimated can facilitate future development of models evaluating impacts of wind facilities under differing land-use scenarios.

  3. Using high performance interconnects in a distributed computing and mass storage environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, M.

    1994-12-31

    Detector Collaborations of the HERA Experiments typically involve more than 500 physicists from a few dozen institutes. These physicists require access to large amounts of data in a fully transparent manner. Important issues include Distributed Mass Storage Management Systems in a Distributed and Heterogeneous Computing Environment. At the very center of a distributed system, including tens of CPUs and network attached mass storage peripherals are the communication links. Today scientists are witnessing an integration of computing and communication technology with the {open_quote}network{close_quote} becoming the computer. This contribution reports on a centrally operated computing facility for the HERA Experiments at DESY, including Symmetric Multiprocessor Machines (84 Processors), presently more than 400 GByte of magnetic disk and 40 TB of automoted tape storage, tied together by a HIPPI {open_quote}network{close_quote}. Focussing on the High Performance Interconnect technology, details will be provided about the HIPPI based {open_quote}Backplane{close_quote} configured around a 20 Gigabit/s Multi Media Router and the performance and efficiency of the related computer interfaces.

  4. Parallelization of Finite Element Analysis Codes Using Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozguner, Fusun

    1996-01-01

    Performance gains in computer design are quickly consumed as users seek to analyze larger problems to a higher degree of accuracy. Innovative computational methods, such as parallel and distributed computing, seek to multiply the power of existing hardware technology to satisfy the computational demands of large applications. In the early stages of this project, experiments were performed using two large, coarse-grained applications, CSTEM and METCAN. These applications were parallelized on an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube. It was found that the overall speedup was very low, due to large, inherently sequential code segments present in the applications. The overall execution time T(sub par), of the application is dependent on these sequential segments. If these segments make up a significant fraction of the overall code, the application will have a poor speedup measure.

  5. AGIS: Evolution of Distributed Computing information system for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisenkov, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Alandes, M.; Karavakis, E.

    2015-12-01

    ATLAS, a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, produces petabytes of data annually through simulation production and tens of petabytes of data per year from the detector itself. The ATLAS computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and a high degree of decentralization of computing resources in order to meet the ATLAS requirements of petabytes scale data operations. It has been evolved after the first period of LHC data taking (Run-1) in order to cope with new challenges of the upcoming Run- 2. In this paper we describe the evolution and recent developments of the ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS), developed in order to integrate configuration and status information about resources, services and topology of the computing infrastructure used by the ATLAS Distributed Computing applications and services.

  6. Next Generation Workload Management System For Big Data on Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, A.; Buncic, P.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Mount, R.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Porter, R. J.; Read, K. F.; Vaniachine, A.; Wells, J. C.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS and ALICE are the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences and are at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, both experiments rely on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System (WMS) for managing the workflow for all data processing on hundreds of data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. The scale is demonstrated by the following numbers: PanDA manages O(102) sites, O(105) cores, O(108) jobs per year, O(103) users, and ATLAS data volume is O(1017) bytes. In 2013 we started an ambitious program to expand PanDA to all available computing resources, including opportunistic use of commercial and academic clouds and Leadership Computing Facilities (LCF). The project titled ‘Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data’ (BigPanDA) is funded by DOE ASCR and HEP. Extending PanDA to clouds and LCF presents new challenges in managing heterogeneity and supporting workflow. The BigPanDA project is underway to setup and tailor PanDA at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" together with ALICE distributed computing and ORNL computing professionals. Our approach to integration of HPC platforms at the OLCF and elsewhere is to reuse, as much as possible, existing components of the PanDA system. We

  7. Next Generation Workload Management System For Big Data on Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Klimentov, A.; Buncic, P.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Mount, R.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; et al

    2015-05-22

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS and ALICE are the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences and are at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, both experiments rely on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Managementmore » System (WMS) for managing the workflow for all data processing on hundreds of data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. The scale is demonstrated by the following numbers: PanDA manages O(102) sites, O(105) cores, O(108) jobs per year, O(103) users, and ATLAS data volume is O(1017) bytes. In 2013 we started an ambitious program to expand PanDA to all available computing resources, including opportunistic use of commercial and academic clouds and Leadership Computing Facilities (LCF). The project titled 'Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data' (BigPanDA) is funded by DOE ASCR and HEP. Extending PanDA to clouds and LCF presents new challenges in managing heterogeneity and supporting workflow. The BigPanDA project is underway to setup and tailor PanDA at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" together with ALICE distributed computing and ORNL computing professionals. Our approach to integration of HPC platforms at the OLCF and elsewhere is to reuse, as much as possible, existing components of the PanDA system

  8. Next Generation Workload Management System For Big Data on Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Klimentov, A.; Buncic, P.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Mount, R.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Porter, R. J.; Read, K. F.; Vaniachine, A.; Wells, J. C.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-05-22

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS and ALICE are the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences and are at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, both experiments rely on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System (WMS) for managing the workflow for all data processing on hundreds of data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. The scale is demonstrated by the following numbers: PanDA manages O(102) sites, O(105) cores, O(108) jobs per year, O(103) users, and ATLAS data volume is O(1017) bytes. In 2013 we started an ambitious program to expand PanDA to all available computing resources, including opportunistic use of commercial and academic clouds and Leadership Computing Facilities (LCF). The project titled 'Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data' (BigPanDA) is funded by DOE ASCR and HEP. Extending PanDA to clouds and LCF presents new challenges in managing heterogeneity and supporting workflow. The BigPanDA project is underway to setup and tailor PanDA at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" together with ALICE distributed computing and ORNL computing professionals. Our approach to integration of HPC platforms at the OLCF and elsewhere is to reuse, as much as

  9. Status Of The National Ignition Campaign And National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Lagin, L; Brunton, G; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Fisher, J; Fishler, B; Ludwigsen, P; Marshall, C; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Townsend, S

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that will contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an object-oriented, CORBA-based system distributed among over 1800 frontend processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. In the fall of 2010, a set of experiments began with deuterium and tritium filled targets as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). At present, all 192 laser beams routinely fire to target chamber center to conduct fusion and high energy density experiments. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of cryogenic target system and over 20 diagnostic systems to support fusion experiments were deployed and utilized in experiments in the past year. This talk discusses the current status of the NIC and the plan for controls and information systems to support these experiments on the path to ignition.

  10. Computational strategies for three-dimensional flow simulations on distributed computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Weed, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    This research effort is directed towards an examination of issues involved in porting large computational fluid dynamics codes in use within the industry to a distributed computing environment. This effort addresses strategies for implementing the distributed computing in a device independent fashion and load balancing. A flow solver called TEAM presently in use at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company was acquired to start this effort. The following tasks were completed: (1) The TEAM code was ported to a number of distributed computing platforms including a cluster of HP workstations located in the School of Aerospace Engineering at Georgia Tech; a cluster of DEC Alpha Workstations in the Graphics visualization lab located at Georgia Tech; a cluster of SGI workstations located at NASA Ames Research Center; and an IBM SP-2 system located at NASA ARC. (2) A number of communication strategies were implemented. Specifically, the manager-worker strategy and the worker-worker strategy were tested. (3) A variety of load balancing strategies were investigated. Specifically, the static load balancing, task queue balancing and the Crutchfield algorithm were coded and evaluated. (4) The classical explicit Runge-Kutta scheme in the TEAM solver was replaced with an LU implicit scheme. And (5) the implicit TEAM-PVM solver was extensively validated through studies of unsteady transonic flow over an F-5 wing, undergoing combined bending and torsional motion. These investigations are documented in extensive detail in the dissertation, 'Computational Strategies for Three-Dimensional Flow Simulations on Distributed Computing Systems', enclosed as an appendix.

  11. Distributed parallel computing in stochastic modeling of groundwater systems.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanhui; Li, Guomin; Xu, Haizhen

    2013-03-01

    Stochastic modeling is a rapidly evolving, popular approach to the study of the uncertainty and heterogeneity of groundwater systems. However, the use of Monte Carlo-type simulations to solve practical groundwater problems often encounters computational bottlenecks that hinder the acquisition of meaningful results. To improve the computational efficiency, a system that combines stochastic model generation with MODFLOW-related programs and distributed parallel processing is investigated. The distributed computing framework, called the Java Parallel Processing Framework, is integrated into the system to allow the batch processing of stochastic models in distributed and parallel systems. As an example, the system is applied to the stochastic delineation of well capture zones in the Pinggu Basin in Beijing. Through the use of 50 processing threads on a cluster with 10 multicore nodes, the execution times of 500 realizations are reduced to 3% compared with those of a serial execution. Through this application, the system demonstrates its potential in solving difficult computational problems in practical stochastic modeling. PMID:22823593

  12. Distributed Computer Networks in Support of Complex Group Practices

    PubMed Central

    Wess, Bernard P.

    1978-01-01

    The economics of medical computer networks are presented in context with the patient care and administrative goals of medical networks. Design alternatives and network topologies are discussed with an emphasis on medical network design requirements in distributed data base design, telecommunications, satellite systems, and software engineering. The success of the medical computer networking technology is predicated on the ability of medical and data processing professionals to design comprehensive, efficient, and virtually impenetrable security systems to protect data bases, network access and services, and patient confidentiality.

  13. Common Accounting System for Monitoring the ATLAS Distributed Computing Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavakis, E.; Andreeva, J.; Campana, S.; Gayazov, S.; Jezequel, S.; Saiz, P.; Sargsyan, L.; Schovancova, J.; Ueda, I.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    This paper covers in detail a variety of accounting tools used to monitor the utilisation of the available computational and storage resources within the ATLAS Distributed Computing during the first three years of Large Hadron Collider data taking. The Experiment Dashboard provides a set of common accounting tools that combine monitoring information originating from many different information sources; either generic or ATLAS specific. This set of tools provides quality and scalable solutions that are flexible enough to support the constantly evolving requirements of the ATLAS user community.

  14. EFFECTS OF MIXING AND AGING ON WATER QUALITY IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM STORAGE FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging of water in distribution system storage facilities can lead to deterioration of the water quality due to loss of disinfectant residual and bacterial regrowth. Facilities should be operated to insure that the age of the water is not excessive taking into account the quality...

  15. Survey of Computer Facilities in Minnesota and North Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Donald

    In order to attain a better understanding of the data processing manpower needs of business and industry, a survey instrument was designed and mailed to 570 known and possible computer installations in the Minnesota/North Dakota area. The survey was conducted during the spring of 1975, and concentrated on the kinds of equipment and computer…

  16. Radar data processing using a distributed computational system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Gilberto F.

    1992-06-01

    This research specifies and validates a new concurrent decomposition scheme, called Confined Space Search Decomposition (CSSD), to exploit parallelism of Radar Data Processing algorithms using a Distributed Computational System. To formalize the specification, we propose and apply an object-oriented methodology called Decomposition Cost Evaluation Model (DCEM). To reduce the penalties of load imbalance, we propose a distributed dynamic load balance heuristic called Object Reincarnation (OR). To validate the research, we first compare our decomposition with an identified alternative using the proposed DCEM model and then develop a theoretical prediction of selected parameters. We also develop a simulation to check the Object Reincarnation Concept.

  17. The process group approach to reliable distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    The difficulty of developing reliable distributed software is an impediment to applying distributed computing technology in many settings. Experience with the ISIS system suggests that a structured approach based on virtually synchronous process groups yields systems which are substantially easier to develop, fault-tolerance, and self-managing. Six years of research on ISIS are reviewed, describing the model, the types of applications to which ISIS was applied, and some of the reasoning that underlies a recent effort to redesign and reimplement ISIS as a much smaller, lightweight system.

  18. 78 FR 18353 - Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System Validation in the User's Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... the Federal Register of October 29, 2007 (72 FR 61171), FDA announced the availability of the draft... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System... ``Guidance for Industry: Blood Establishment Computer System Validation in the User's Facility'' dated...

  19. BRaTS@Home and BOINC Distributed Computing for Parallel Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coss, David Raymond; Flores, R.

    2008-09-01

    Utilizing Internet connectivity, the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) provides parallel computing power without the expense of purchasing a computer cluster. BOINC, written in C++, is an open source system, acting as an intermediary between the project server and the BOINC client on the volunteer's computer. By using the idle time of computers of volunteer participants, BOINC allows scientists to build a computer cluster at the price of one server. As an example of such computational capabilities, I have developed BRaTS@Home, standing for BRaTS Ray Trace Simulation, using the BOINC distributed computing system to perform gravitational lensing ray-tracing simulations. Though BRaTS@Home is only one of many projects, 182 users in 26 different countries participate in the project. From June 2007 to April 2008, 795 computers have connected to the project server, providing an average computing power of 1.1 billion floating point operations per second(FLOPS), while the entire BOINC system averages over 1000 teraFLOPS, as of April 2008. Preliminary results of the project's gravitational ray-tracing simulations will be shown.

  20. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a “classical” party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution.

  1. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a "classical" party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution. PMID:26813384

  2. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a “classical” party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution. PMID:26813384

  3. Elemental: a new framework for distributed memory dense matrix computations.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, N.; Poulson, J.; Marker, B.; Hammond, J.; Van de Geijn, R.

    2012-02-14

    Parallelizing dense matrix computations to distributed memory architectures is a well-studied subject and generally considered to be among the best understood domains of parallel computing. Two packages, developed in the mid 1990s, still enjoy regular use: ScaLAPACK and PLAPACK. With the advent of many-core architectures, which may very well take the shape of distributed memory architectures within a single processor, these packages must be revisited since the traditional MPI-based approaches will likely need to be extended. Thus, this is a good time to review lessons learned since the introduction of these two packages and to propose a simple yet effective alternative. Preliminary performance results show the new solution achieves competitive, if not superior, performance on large clusters.

  4. Integrating Xgrid into the HENP distributed computing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdu, L.; Kocoloski, A.; Lauret, J.; Miller, M.

    2008-07-01

    Modern Macintosh computers feature Xgrid, a distributed computing architecture built directly into Apple's OS X operating system. While the approach is radically different from those generally expected by the Unix based Grid infrastructures (Open Science Grid, TeraGrid, EGEE), opportunistic computing on Xgrid is nonetheless a tempting and novel way to assemble a computing cluster with a minimum of additional configuration. In fact, it requires only the default operating system and authentication to a central controller from each node. OS X also implements arbitrarily extensible metadata, allowing an instantly updated file catalog to be stored as part of the filesystem itself. The low barrier to entry allows an Xgrid cluster to grow quickly and organically. This paper and presentation will detail the steps that can be taken to make such a cluster a viable resource for HENP research computing. We will further show how to provide to users a unified job submission framework by integrating Xgrid through the STAR Unified Meta-Scheduler (SUMS), making tasks and jobs submission effortlessly at reach for those users already using the tool for traditional Grid or local cluster job submission. We will discuss additional steps that can be taken to make an Xgrid cluster a full partner in grid computing initiatives, focusing on Open Science Grid integration. MIT's Xgrid system currently supports the work of multiple research groups in the Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and has become an important tool for generating simulations and conducting data analyses at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  5. Accuracy of subsurface temperature distributions computed from pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Smithies, D J; Milner, T E; Tanenbaum, B S; Goodman, D M; Nelson, J S

    1998-09-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) is a non-contact method for determining the temperature increase in subsurface chromophore layers immediately following pulsed laser irradiation. In this paper the inherent limitations of PPTR are identified. A time record of infrared emission from a test material due to laser heating of a subsurface chromophore layer is calculated and used as input data for a non-negatively constrained conjugate gradient algorithm. Position and magnitude of temperature increase in a model chromophore layer immediately following pulsed laser irradiation are computed. Differences between simulated and computed temperature increase are reported as a function of thickness, depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The average depth of the chromophore layer and integral of temperature increase in the test material are accurately predicted by the algorithm. When the thickness/depth ratio is less than 25%, the computed peak temperature increase is always significantly less than the true value. Moreover, the computed thickness of the chromophore layer is much larger than the true value. The accuracy of the computed subsurface temperature distribution is investigated with the singular value decomposition of the kernel matrix. The relatively small number of right singular vectors that may be used (8% of the rank of the kernel matrix) to represent the simulated temperature increase in the test material limits the accuracy of PPTR. We show that relative error between simulated and computed temperature increase is essentially constant for a particular thickness/depth ratio. PMID:9755938

  6. Influence of computational fluid dynamics on experimental aerospace facilities: A fifteen year projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An assessment was made of the impact of developments in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the traditional role of aerospace ground test facilities over the next fifteen years. With improvements in CFD and more powerful scientific computers projected over this period it is expected to have the capability to compute the flow over a complete aircraft at a unit cost three orders of magnitude lower than presently possible. Over the same period improvements in ground test facilities will progress by application of computational techniques including CFD to data acquisition, facility operational efficiency, and simulation of the light envelope; however, no dramatic change in unit cost is expected as greater efficiency will be countered by higher energy and labor costs.

  7. Multi-VO support in IHEP's distributed computing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, T.; Suo, B.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhang, X. M.; Ma, Z. T.; Yan, X. F.; Lin, T.; Deng, Z. Y.; Li, W. D.; Belov, S.; Pelevanyuk, I.; Zhemchugov, A.; Cai, H.

    2015-12-01

    Inspired by the success of BESDIRAC, the distributed computing environment based on DIRAC for BESIII experiment, several other experiments operated by Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), such as Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC), Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) and Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) etc, are willing to use DIRAC to integrate the geographically distributed computing resources available by their collaborations. In order to minimize manpower and hardware cost, we extended the BESDIRAC platform to support multi-VO scenario, instead of setting up a self-contained distributed computing environment for each VO. This makes DIRAC as a service for the community of those experiments. To support multi-VO, the system architecture of BESDIRAC is adjusted for scalability. The VOMS and DIRAC servers are reconfigured to manage users and groups belong to several VOs. A lightweight storage resource manager StoRM is employed as the central SE to integrate local and grid data. A frontend system is designed for user's massive job splitting, submission and management, with plugins to support new VOs. A monitoring and accounting system is also considered to easy the system administration and VO related resources usage accounting.

  8. Distributing Data from Desktop to Hand-Held Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Jason L.

    2005-01-01

    A system of server and client software formats and redistributes data from commercially available desktop to commercially available hand-held computers via both wired and wireless networks. This software is an inexpensive means of enabling engineers and technicians to gain access to current sensor data while working in locations in which such data would otherwise be inaccessible. The sensor data are first gathered by a data-acquisition server computer, then transmitted via a wired network to a data-distribution computer that executes the server portion of the present software. Data in all sensor channels -- both raw sensor outputs in millivolt units and results of conversion to engineering units -- are made available for distribution. Selected subsets of the data are transmitted to each hand-held computer via the wired and then a wireless network. The selection of the subsets and the choice of the sequences and formats for displaying the data is made by means of a user interface generated by the client portion of the software. The data displayed on the screens of hand-held units can be updated at rates from 1 to

  9. Algorithm-dependent fault tolerance for distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    P. D. Hough; M. e. Goldsby; E. J. Walsh

    2000-02-01

    Large-scale distributed systems assembled from commodity parts, like CPlant, have become common tools in the distributed computing world. Because of their size and diversity of parts, these systems are prone to failures. Applications that are being run on these systems have not been equipped to efficiently deal with failures, nor is there vendor support for fault tolerance. Thus, when a failure occurs, the application crashes. While most programmers make use of checkpoints to allow for restarting of their applications, this is cumbersome and incurs substantial overhead. In many cases, there are more efficient and more elegant ways in which to address failures. The goal of this project is to develop a software architecture for the detection of and recovery from faults in a cluster computing environment. The detection phase relies on the latest techniques developed in the fault tolerance community. Recovery is being addressed in an application-dependent manner, thus allowing the programmer to take advantage of algorithmic characteristics to reduce the overhead of fault tolerance. This architecture will allow large-scale applications to be more robust in high-performance computing environments that are comprised of clusters of commodity computers such as CPlant and SMP clusters.

  10. Distributed Computation Resources for Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, D.; Doutriaux, C.; Williams, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), prompted by the United Nations General Assembly, has published a series of papers in their Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) on processes, impacts, and mitigations of climate change in 2013. The science used in these reports was generated by an international group of domain experts. They studied various scenarios of climate change through the use of highly complex computer models to simulate the Earth's climate over long periods of time. The resulting total data of approximately five petabytes are stored in a distributed data grid known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). Through the ESGF, consumers of the data can find and download data with limited capabilities for server-side processing. The Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) is already in the planning stages and is estimated to create as much as two orders of magnitude more data than the AR5 distributed archive. It is clear that data analysis capabilities currently in use will be inadequate to allow for the necessary science to be done with AR6 data—the data will just be too big. A major paradigm shift from downloading data to local systems to perform data analytics must evolve to moving the analysis routines to the data and performing these computations on distributed platforms. In preparation for this need, the ESGF has started a Compute Working Team (CWT) to create solutions that allow users to perform distributed, high-performance data analytics on the AR6 data. The team will be designing and developing a general Application Programming Interface (API) to enable highly parallel, server-side processing throughout the ESGF data grid. This API will be integrated with multiple analysis and visualization tools, such as the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT), netCDF Operator (NCO), and others. This presentation will provide an update on the ESGF CWT's overall approach toward enabling the necessary storage proximal computational

  11. Secure distributed genome analysis for GWAS and sequence comparison computation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The rapid increase in the availability and volume of genomic data makes significant advances in biomedical research possible, but sharing of genomic data poses challenges due to the highly sensitive nature of such data. To address the challenges, a competition for secure distributed processing of genomic data was organized by the iDASH research center. Methods In this work we propose techniques for securing computation with real-life genomic data for minor allele frequency and chi-squared statistics computation, as well as distance computation between two genomic sequences, as specified by the iDASH competition tasks. We put forward novel optimizations, including a generalization of a version of mergesort, which might be of independent interest. Results We provide implementation results of our techniques based on secret sharing that demonstrate practicality of the suggested protocols and also report on performance improvements due to our optimization techniques. Conclusions This work describes our techniques, findings, and experimental results developed and obtained as part of iDASH 2015 research competition to secure real-life genomic computations and shows feasibility of securely computing with genomic data in practice. PMID:26733307

  12. Activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility, July-October 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Research activities and operations of the Advanced Computing Research Facility (ACRF) at Argonne National Laboratory are discussed for the period from July 1986 through October 1986. The facility is currently supported by the Department of Energy, and is operated by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne. Over the past four-month period, a new commercial multiprocessor, the Intel iPSC-VX/d4 hypercube was installed. In addition, four other commercial multiprocessors continue to be available for research - an Encore Multimax, a Sequent Balance 21000, an Alliant FX/8, and an Intel iPSC/d5 - as well as a locally designed multiprocessor, the Lemur. These machines are being actively used by scientists at Argonne and throughout the nation in a wide variety of projects concerning computer systems with parallel and vector architectures. A variety of classes, workshops, and seminars have been sponsored to train researchers on computing techniques for the advanced computer systems at the Advanced Computing Research Facility. For example, courses were offered on writing programs for parallel computer systems and hosted the first annual Alliant users group meeting. A Sequent users group meeting and a two-day workshop on performance evaluation of parallel computers and programs are being organized.

  13. ATLAS Distributed Computing Monitoring tools during the LHC Run I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schovancová, J.; Campana, S.; Di Girolamo, A.; Jézéquel, S.; Ueda, I.; Wenaus, T.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    This contribution summarizes evolution of the ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) Monitoring project during the LHC Run I. The ADC Monitoring targets at the three groups of customers: ADC Operations team to early identify malfunctions and escalate issues to an activity or a service expert, ATLAS national contacts and sites for the real-time monitoring and long-term measurement of the performance of the provided computing resources, and the ATLAS Management for long-term trends and accounting information about the ATLAS Distributed Computing resources. During the LHC Run I a significant development effort has been invested in standardization of the monitoring and accounting applications in order to provide extensive monitoring and accounting suite. ADC Monitoring applications separate the data layer and the visualization layer. The data layer exposes data in a predefined format. The visualization layer is designed bearing in mind visual identity of the provided graphical elements, and re-usability of the visualization bits across the different tools. A rich family of various filtering and searching options enhancing available user interfaces comes naturally with the data and visualization layer separation. With a variety of reliable monitoring data accessible through standardized interfaces, the possibility of automating actions under well defined conditions correlating multiple data sources has become feasible. In this contribution we discuss also about the automated exclusion of degraded resources and their automated recovery in various activities.

  14. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System`s pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System.

  15. Analytical and Computational Properties of Distributed Approaches to MDO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

    2000-01-01

    Historical evolution of engineering disciplines and the complexity of the MDO problem suggest that disciplinary autonomy is a desirable goal in formulating and solving MDO problems. We examine the notion of disciplinary autonomy and discuss the analytical properties of three approaches to formulating and solving MDO problems that achieve varying degrees of autonomy by distributing the problem along disciplinary lines. Two of the approaches-Optimization by Linear Decomposition and Collaborative Optimization-are based on bi-level optimization and reflect what we call a structural perspective. The third approach, Distributed Analysis Optimization, is a single-level approach that arises from what we call an algorithmic perspective. The main conclusion of the paper is that disciplinary autonomy may come at a price: in the bi-level approaches, the system-level constraints introduced to relax the interdisciplinary coupling and enable disciplinary autonomy can cause analytical and computational difficulties for optimization algorithms. The single-level alternative we discuss affords a more limited degree of autonomy than that of the bi-level approaches, but without the computational difficulties of the bi-level methods. Key Words: Autonomy, bi-level optimization, distributed optimization, multidisciplinary optimization, multilevel optimization, nonlinear programming, problem integration, system synthesis

  16. Next generation database relational solutions for ATLAS distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, G.; Maeno, T.; Garonne, V.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing (ADC) project delivers production tools and services for ATLAS offline activities such as data placement and data processing on the Grid. The system has been capable of sustaining with high efficiency the needed computing activities during the first run of LHC data taking, and has demonstrated flexibility in reacting promptly to new challenges. Databases are a vital part of the whole ADC system. The Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) has been addressing a majority of the ADC database requirements for many years. Much expertise was gained through the years and without a doubt will be used as a good foundation for the next generation PanDA (Production ANd Distributed Analysis) and DDM (Distributed Data Management) systems. In this paper we present the current production ADC database solutions and notably the planned changes on the PanDA system, and the next generation ATLAS DDM system called Rucio. Significant work was performed on studying different solutions to arrive at the best relational and physical database model for performance and scalability in order to be ready for deployment and operation in 2014.

  17. Parallel matrix transpose algorithms on distributed memory concurrent computers

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.; Walker, D.W.; Dongarra, J.J. |

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes parallel matrix transpose algorithms on distributed memory concurrent processors. It is assumed that the matrix is distributed over a P x Q processor template with a block scattered data distribution. P, Q, and the block size can be arbitrary, so the algorithms have wide applicability. The communication schemes of the algorithms are determined by the greatest common divisor (GCD) of P and Q. If P and Q are relatively prime, the matrix transpose algorithm involves complete exchange communication. If P and Q are not relatively prime, processors are divided into GCD groups and the communication operations are overlapped for different groups of processors. Processors transpose GCD wrapped diagonal blocks simultaneously, and the matrix can be transposed with LCM/GCD steps, where LCM is the least common multiple of P and Q. The algorithms make use of non-blocking, point-to-point communication between processors. The use of nonblocking communication allows a processor to overlap the messages that it sends to different processors, thereby avoiding unnecessary synchronization. Combined with the matrix multiplication routine, C = A{center_dot}B, the algorithms are used to compute parallel multiplications of transposed matrices, C = A{sup T}{center_dot}B{sup T}, in the PUMMA package. Details of the parallel implementation of the algorithms are given, and results are presented for runs on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer.

  18. Computational Tools and Facilities for the Next-Generation Analysis and Design Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This document contains presentations from the joint UVA/NASA Workshop on Computational Tools and Facilities for the Next-Generation Analysis and Design Environment held at the Virginia Consortium of Engineering and Science Universities in Hampton, Virginia on September 17-18, 1996. The presentations focused on the computational tools and facilities for analysis and design of engineering systems, including, real-time simulations, immersive systems, collaborative engineering environment, Web-based tools and interactive media for technical training. Workshop attendees represented NASA, commercial software developers, the aerospace industry, government labs, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the level of maturity of a number of computational tools and facilities and their potential for application to the next-generation integrated design environment.

  19. Computer control and data acquisition system for the R. F. Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, K.A.; Burris, R.D.; Mankin, J.B.; Thompson, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, used to test and evaluate high-power ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components, is monitored and controlled by a multicomponent computer system. This data acquisition and control system consists of three major hardware elements: (1) an Allen-Bradley PLC-3 programmable controller; (2) a VAX 11/780 computer; and (3) a CAMAC serial highway interface. Operating in LOCAL as well as REMOTE mode, the programmable logic controller (PLC) performs all the control functions of the test facility. The VAX computer acts as the operator's interface to the test facility by providing color mimic panel displays and allowing input via a trackball device. The VAX also provides archiving of trend data acquired by the PLC. Communications between the PLC and the VAX are via the CAMAC serial highway. Details of the hardware, software, and the operation of the system are presented in this paper.

  20. Computer/information security design approaches for Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.J.; Zack, N.R.; Jaeger, C.D.

    1993-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories have been designated the technical lead laboratories to develop the design of the computer/information security, safeguards, and physical security systems for all of the DOE Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities. All of the automated information processing systems and networks in these facilities will be required to implement the new DOE orders on computer and information security. The planned approach for a highly integrated information processing capability in each of the facilities will require careful consideration of the requirements in DOE Orders 5639.6 and 1360.2A. The various information protection requirements and user clearances within the facilities will also have a significant effect on the design of the systems and networks. Fulfilling the requirements for proper protection of the information and compliance with DOE orders will be possible because the computer and information security concerns are being incorporated in the early design activities. This paper will discuss the computer and information security addressed in the integrated design effort, uranium/lithium, plutonium, plutonium high explosive/assembly facilities.

  1. In-Memory Computing Architectures for Sparse Distributed Memory.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mingu; Shanbhag, Naresh R

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an energy-efficient and high-throughput architecture for Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM)-a computational model of the human brain [1]. The proposed SDM architecture is based on the recently proposed in-memory computing kernel for machine learning applications called Compute Memory (CM) [2], [3]. CM achieves energy and throughput efficiencies by deeply embedding computation into the memory array. SDM-specific techniques such as hierarchical binary decision (HBD) are employed to reduce the delay and energy further. The CM-based SDM (CM-SDM) is a mixed-signal circuit, and hence circuit-aware behavioral, energy, and delay models in a 65 nm CMOS process are developed in order to predict system performance of SDM architectures in the auto- and hetero-associative modes. The delay and energy models indicate that CM-SDM, in general, can achieve up to 25 × and 12 × delay and energy reduction, respectively, over conventional SDM. When classifying 16 × 16 binary images with high noise levels (input bad pixel ratios: 15%-25%) into nine classes, all SDM architectures are able to generate output bad pixel ratios (Bo) ≤ 2%. The CM-SDM exhibits negligible loss in accuracy, i.e., its Bo degradation is within 0.4% as compared to that of the conventional SDM. PMID:27305686

  2. The Gain of Resource Delegation in Distributed Computing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fölling, Alexander; Grimme, Christian; Lepping, Joachim; Papaspyrou, Alexander

    In this paper, we address job scheduling in Distributed Computing Infrastructures, that is a loosely coupled network of autonomous acting High Performance Computing systems. In contrast to the common approach of mutual workload exchange, we consider the more intuitive operator's viewpoint of load-dependent resource reconfiguration. In case of a site's over-utilization, the scheduling system is able to lease resources from other sites to keep up service quality for its local user community. Contrary, the granting of idle resources can increase utilization in times of low local workload and thus ensure higher efficiency. The evaluation considers real workload data and is done with respect to common service quality indicators. For two simple resource exchange policies and three basic setups we show the possible gain of this approach and analyze the dynamics in workload-adaptive reconfiguration behavior.

  3. Overset grid applications on distributed memory MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana; Weeratunga, Sisira

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of modern aerospace vehicles requires the computation of flowfields about complex three dimensional geometries composed of regions with varying spatial resolution requirements. Overset grid methods allow the use of proven structured grid flow solvers to address the twin issues of geometrical complexity and the resolution variation by decomposing the complex physical domain into a collection of overlapping subdomains. This flexibility is accompanied by the need for irregular intergrid boundary communication among the overlapping component grids. This study investigates a strategy for implementing such a static overset grid implicit flow solver on distributed memory, MIMD computers; i.e., the 128 node Intel iPSC/860 and the 208 node Intel Paragon. Performance data for two composite grid configurations characteristic of those encountered in present day aerodynamic analysis are also presented.

  4. ATLAS Experience with HEP Software at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uram, Thomas D.; LeCompte, Thomas J.; Benjamin, D.

    2014-06-01

    A number of HEP software packages used by the ATLAS experiment, including GEANT4, ROOT and ALPGEN, have been adapted to run on the IBM Blue Gene supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. These computers use a non-x86 architecture and have a considerably less rich operating environment than in common use in HEP, but also represent a computing capacity an order of magnitude beyond what ATLAS is presently using via the LCG. The status and potential for making use of leadership-class computing, including the status of integration with the ATLAS production system, is discussed.

  5. LBNL Computational Research and Theory Facility Groundbreaking. February 1st, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Yelick, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  6. LBNL Computational Research & Theory Facility Groundbreaking - Full Press Conference. Feb 1st, 2012

    ScienceCinema

    Yelick, Kathy

    2013-05-29

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  7. LBNL Computational Research & Theory Facility Groundbreaking - Full Press Conference. Feb 1st, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Yelick, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  8. LBNL Computational Research and Theory Facility Groundbreaking. February 1st, 2012

    ScienceCinema

    Yelick, Kathy

    2013-05-29

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu, along with Berkeley Lab and UC leaders, broke ground on the Lab's Computational Research and Theory (CRT) facility yesterday. The CRT will be at the forefront of high-performance supercomputing research and be DOE's most efficient facility of its kind. Joining Secretary Chu as speakers were Lab Director Paul Alivisatos, UC President Mark Yudof, Office of Science Director Bill Brinkman, and UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau. The festivities were emceed by Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences, Kathy Yelick, and Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates joined in the shovel ceremony.

  9. Accommodating Heterogeneity in a Debugger for Distributed Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robert; Cheng, Doreen; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In an ongoing project at NASA Ames Research Center, we are building debugger for distributed computations running on a heterogeneous set of machines. Historically, such debuggers have been built as front-ends to existing source-level debuggers on the target platforms. In effect, these back-end debuggers are providing a collection of debugger services to a client. The major drawback is that because of inconsistencies among the back-end debuggers, the front-end must use a different protocol when talking to each back-end debugger. This can make the front-end quite complex. We have avoided this complexity problem by defining the client-server debugger protocol. While it does require vendors to adapt their existing debugger code to meet the protocol, vendors are generally interested in doing so because the approach has several advantages. In addition to solving the heterogenous platform debugging problem, it will be possible to write interesting debugger user interfaces that can be easily ported across a variety of machines. This will likely encourage investment in application-domain specific debuggers. In fact, the user interface of our debugger will be geared to scientists developing computational fluid dynamics codes. This paper describes some of the problems encountered in developing a portable debugger for heterogenous, distributed computing and how the architecture of our debugger avoids them. It then provides a detailed description of the debugger client-server protocol. Some of the more interesting attributes of the protocol are: (1) It is object-oriented; (2) It uses callback functions to capture the asynchronous nature of debugging in a procedural fashion; (3) It contains abstractions, such as in-line instrumentation, for the debugging of computationally intensive programs; (4) For remote debugging, it has operations that enable the implementor to optimize message passing traffic between client and server. The soundness of the protocol is being tested through

  10. A scalable parallel graph coloring algorithm for distributed memory computers.

    SciTech Connect

    Bozdag, Doruk; Manne, Fredrik; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H.; Catalyurek, Umit; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-02-01

    In large-scale parallel applications a graph coloring is often carried out to schedule computational tasks. In this paper, we describe a new distributed memory algorithm for doing the coloring itself in parallel. The algorithm operates in an iterative fashion; in each round vertices are speculatively colored based on limited information, and then a set of incorrectly colored vertices, to be recolored in the next round, is identified. Parallel speedup is achieved in part by reducing the frequency of communication among processors. Experimental results on a PC cluster using up to 16 processors show that the algorithm is scalable.

  11. Job monitoring on DIRAC for Belle II distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuji; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Hara, Takanori; Miyake, Hideki; Ueda, Ikuo

    2015-12-01

    We developed a monitoring system for Belle II distributed computing, which consists of active and passive methods. In this paper we describe the passive monitoring system, where information stored in the DIRAC database is processed and visualized. We divide the DIRAC workload management flow into steps and store characteristic variables which indicate issues. These variables are chosen carefully based on our experiences, then visualized. As a result, we are able to effectively detect issues. Finally, we discuss the future development for automating log analysis, notification of issues, and disabling problematic sites.

  12. KNET - DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING AND/OR DATA TRANSFER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, J.

    1994-01-01

    KNET facilitates distributed computing between a UNIX compatible local host and a remote host which may or may not be UNIX compatible. It is capable of automatic remote login. That is, it performs on the user's behalf the chore of handling host selection, user name, and password to the designated host. Once the login has been successfully completed, the user may interactively communicate with the remote host. Data output from the remote host may be directed to the local screen, to a local file, and/or to a local process. Conversely, data input from the keyboard, a local file, or a local process may be directed to the remote host. KNET takes advantage of the multitasking and terminal mode control features of the UNIX operating system. A parent process is used as the upper layer for interfacing with the local user. A child process is used for a lower layer for interfacing with the remote host computer, and optionally one or more child processes can be used for the remote data output. Output may be directed to the screen and/or to the local processes under the control of a data pipe switch. In order for KNET to operate, the local and remote hosts must observe a common communications protocol. KNET is written in ANSI standard C-language for computers running UNIX. It has been successfully implemented on several Sun series computers and a DECstation 3100 and used to run programs remotely on VAX VMS and UNIX based computers. It requires 100K of RAM under SunOS and 120K of RAM under DEC RISC ULTRIX. An electronic copy of the documentation is provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for KNET is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. It is also available on a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format. KNET was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories. Sun and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. DECstation, VAX, VMS, and

  13. Performance Evaluation of Three Distributed Computing Environments for Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatoohi, Rod; Weeratunga, Sisira; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We present performance results for three distributed computing environments using the three simulated CFD applications in the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite. These environments are the DCF cluster, the LACE cluster, and an Intel iPSC/860 machine. The DCF is a prototypic cluster of loosely coupled SGI R3000 machines connected by Ethernet. The LACE cluster is a tightly coupled cluster of 32 IBM RS6000/560 machines connected by Ethernet as well as by either FDDI or an IBM Allnode switch. Results of several parallel algorithms for the three simulated applications are presented and analyzed based on the interplay between the communication requirements of an algorithm and the characteristics of the communication network of a distributed system.

  14. Computational Analyses in Support of Sub-scale Diffuser Testing for the A-3 Facility. Part 1; Steady Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Graham, Jason S.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin

    2008-01-01

    levels in CFD based flowpath modeling of the facility. The analyses tools used here expand on the multi-element unstructured CFD which has been tailored and validated for impingement dynamics of dry plumes, complex valve/feed systems, and high pressure propellant delivery systems used in engine and component test stands at NASA SSC. The analyses performed in the evaluation of the sub-scale diffuser facility explored several important factors that influence modeling and understanding of facility operation such as (a) importance of modeling the facility with Real Gas approximation, (b) approximating the cluster of steam ejector nozzles as a single annular nozzle, (c) existence of mixed subsonic/supersonic flow downstream of the turning duct, and (d) inadequacy of two-equation turbulence models in predicting the correct pressurization in the turning duct and expansion of the second stage steam ejectors. The procedure used for modeling the facility was as follows: (i) The engine, test cell and first stage ejectors were simulated with an axisymmetric approximation (ii) the turning duct, second stage ejectors and the piping downstream of the second stage ejectors were analyzed with a three-dimensional simulation utilizing a half-plane symmetry approximation. The solution i.e. primitive variables such as pressure, velocity components, temperature and turbulence quantities were passed from the first computational domain and specified as a supersonic boundary condition for the second simulation. (iii) The third domain comprised of the exit diffuser and the region in the vicinity of the facility (primary included to get the correct shock structure at the exit of the facility and entrainment characteristics). The first set of simulations comprising the engine, test cell and first stage ejectors was carried out both as a turbulent real gas calculation as well as a turbulent perfect gas calculation. A comparison for the two cases (Real Turbulent and Perfect gas turbulent) of the Ma

  15. Computational Analyses in Support of Sub-scale Diffuser Testing for the A-3 Facility. Part 1; Steady Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Graham, Jason S.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin

    2010-01-01

    levels in CFD based flowpath modeling of the facility. The analyses tools used here expand on the multi-element unstructured CFD which has been tailored and validated for impingement dynamics of dry plumes, complex valve/feed systems, and high pressure propellant delivery systems used in engine and component test stands at NASA SSC. The analyses performed in the evaluation of the sub-scale diffuser facility explored several important factors that influence modeling and understanding of facility operation such as (a) importance of modeling the facility with Real Gas approximation, (b) approximating the cluster of steam ejector nozzles as a single annular nozzle, (c) existence of mixed subsonic/supersonic flow downstream of the turning duct, and (d) inadequacy of two-equation turbulence models in predicting the correct pressurization in the turning duct and expansion of the second stage steam ejectors. The procedure used for modeling the facility was as follows: (i) The engine, test cell and first stage ejectors were simulated with an axisymmetric approximation (ii) the turning duct, second stage ejectors and the piping downstream of the second stage ejectors were analyzed with a three-dimensional simulation utilizing a half-plane symmetry approximation. The solution i.e. primitive variables such as pressure, velocity components, temperature and turbulence quantities were passed from the first computational domain and specified as a supersonic boundary condition for the second simulation. (iii) The third domain comprised of the exit diffuser and the region in the vicinity of the facility (primary included to get the correct shock structure at the exit of the facility and entrainment characteristics). The first set of simulations comprising the engine, test cell and first stage ejectors was carried out both as a turbulent real gas calculation as well as a turbulent perfect gas calculation. A comparison for the two cases (Real Turbulent and Perfect gas turbulent) of the Ma

  16. Fault Diagnosis in a Fully Distributed Local Computer Network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, Hye Keun

    Local computer networks are being installed in diverse application areas. Many of the networks employ a distributed control scheme, which has advantages in performance and reliability over a centralized one. However, distribution of control increases the difficulty in locating faulty hardware elements. Consequently, advantages may not be fully realized unless measures are taken to account for the difficulties of fault diagnosis; yet, not much work has been done in this area. A hardcore is defined as a node or a part of a node which is fault-free and which can diagnose other elements in a system. Faults are diagnosed in most existing distributed local computer networks by assuming that every node, or a part of every node, is a fixed hardcore: a fixed node or a part of a fixed node is always a hardcore. Maintaining such high reliability may not be possible or cost-effective for some systems. A distributed network contains dynamically redundant elements, and it is reasonable to assume that fewer nodes are simultaneously faulty than are fault-free at any point in the life cycle of the network. A diagnostic model is proposed herein which determines bindary evaluation results according to the status of the testing and tested nodes, and which leads the network to dynamically locate a fault-free node (a hardcore). This diagnostic model is, in most cases, simpler to implement and more cost-effective than the fixed hardcore. The selected hardcore can diagnose the other elements and can locate permanent faults. In a hop-by-hop test, the destination node and every intermediate node in a path test the transmitted data. This dissertation presents another method to locate an element with frequent transient faults; it checks data only at the destination, thereby, eliminating the need for a hop-by-hop test.

  17. A digital computer propulsion control facility: Description of capabilities and summary of experimental program results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Arpasi, D. J.; Lehtinen, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flight weight digital computers are being used today to carry out many of the propulsion system control functions previously delegated exclusively to hydromechanical controllers. An operational digital computer facility for propulsion control mode studies has been used successfully in several experimental programs. This paper describes the system and some of the results concerned with engine control, inlet control, and inlet engine integrated control. Analytical designs for the digital propulsion control modes include both classical and modern/optimal techniques.

  18. Performance Evaluation of Communication Software Systems for Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatoohi, Rod

    1996-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in object-oriented distributed computing since it is better quipped to deal with complex systems while providing extensibility, maintainability, and reusability. At the same time, several new high-speed network technologies have emerged for local and wide area networks. However, the performance of networking software is not improving as fast as the networking hardware and the workstation microprocessors. This paper gives an overview and evaluates the performance of the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) standard in a distributed computing environment at NASA Ames Research Center. The environment consists of two testbeds of SGI workstations connected by four networks: Ethernet, FDDI, HiPPI, and ATM. The performance results for three communication software systems are presented, analyzed and compared. These systems are: BSD socket programming interface, IONA's Orbix, an implementation of the CORBA specification, and the PVM message passing library. The results show that high-level communication interfaces, such as CORBA and PVM, can achieve reasonable performance under certain conditions.

  19. A uniform approach for programming distributed heterogeneous computing systems

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Ivan; Pellegrini, Simone; Cosenza, Biagio; Fahringer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale compute clusters of heterogeneous nodes equipped with multi-core CPUs and GPUs are getting increasingly popular in the scientific community. However, such systems require a combination of different programming paradigms making application development very challenging. In this article we introduce libWater, a library-based extension of the OpenCL programming model that simplifies the development of heterogeneous distributed applications. libWater consists of a simple interface, which is a transparent abstraction of the underlying distributed architecture, offering advanced features such as inter-context and inter-node device synchronization. It provides a runtime system which tracks dependency information enforced by event synchronization to dynamically build a DAG of commands, on which we automatically apply two optimizations: collective communication pattern detection and device-host-device copy removal. We assess libWater’s performance in three compute clusters available from the Vienna Scientific Cluster, the Barcelona Supercomputing Center and the University of Innsbruck, demonstrating improved performance and scaling with different test applications and configurations. PMID:25844015

  20. GAiN: Distributed Array Computation with Python

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2009-05-01

    Scientific computing makes use of very large, multidimensional numerical arrays - typically, gigabytes to terabytes in size - much larger than can fit on even the largest single compute node. Such arrays must be distributed across a "cluster" of nodes. Global Arrays is a cluster-based software system from Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that enables an efficient, portable, and parallel shared-memory programming interface to manipulate these arrays. Written in and for the C and FORTRAN programming languages, it takes advantage of high-performance cluster interconnections to allow any node in the cluster to access data on any other node very rapidly. The "numpy" module is the de facto standard for numerical calculation in the Python programming language, a language whose use is growing rapidly in the scientific and engineering communities. numpy provides a powerful N-dimensional array class as well as other scientific computing capabilities. However, like the majority of the core Python modules, numpy is inherently serial. Our system, GAiN (Global Arrays in NumPy), is a parallel extension to Python that accesses Global Arrays through numpy. This allows parallel processing and/or larger problem sizes to be harnessed almost transparently within new or existing numpy programs.

  1. A Riemannian framework for orientation distribution function computing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Jiang, Tianzi; Deriche, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    Compared with Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), High Angular Resolution Imaging (HARDI) can better explore the complex microstructure of white matter. Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) is used to describe the probability of the fiber direction. Fisher information metric has been constructed for probability density family in Information Geometry theory and it has been successfully applied for tensor computing in DTI. In this paper, we present a state of the art Riemannian framework for ODF computing based on Information Geometry and sparse representation of orthonormal bases. In this Riemannian framework, the exponential map, logarithmic map and geodesic have closed forms. And the weighted Frechet mean exists uniquely on this manifold. We also propose a novel scalar measurement, named Geometric Anisotropy (GA), which is the Riemannian geodesic distance between the ODF and the isotropic ODF. The Renyi entropy H1/2 of the ODF can be computed from the GA. Moreover, we present an Affine-Euclidean framework and a Log-Euclidean framework so that we can work in an Euclidean space. As an application, Lagrange interpolation on ODF field is proposed based on weighted Frechet mean. We validate our methods on synthetic and real data experiments. Compared with existing Riemannian frameworks on ODF, our framework is model-free. The estimation of the parameters, i.e. Riemannian coordinates, is robust and linear. Moreover it should be noted that our theoretical results can be used for any probability density function (PDF) under an orthonormal basis representation. PMID:20426075

  2. 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility computer software release cover sheet and revision record

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, R.J.

    1994-11-28

    This supporting document contains the computer software release cover sheet and revision records for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). The previous revision was controlled by CH2M Hill which developed the software. A 7-page listing of the contents of directory C:{backslash}TEDF is contained in this report.

  3. Computer Use and CAD in Assisting Schools in the Creation of Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Robert H.; Essex, Nathan

    1987-01-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) programs are powerful drafting tools, but are also able to assist with many other facility planning functions. Describes the hardware, software, and the learning process that led to understanding the CAD software at the University of Alabama. (MLF)

  4. Beyond input-output computings: error-driven emergence with parallel non-distributed slime mold computer.

    PubMed

    Aono, Masashi; Gunji, Yukio-Pegio

    2003-10-01

    The emergence derived from errors is the key importance for both novel computing and novel usage of the computer. In this paper, we propose an implementable experimental plan for the biological computing so as to elicit the emergent property of complex systems. An individual plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum acts in the slime mold computer. Modifying the Elementary Cellular Automaton as it entails the global synchronization problem upon the parallel computing provides the NP-complete problem solved by the slime mold computer. The possibility to solve the problem by giving neither all possible results nor explicit prescription of solution-seeking is discussed. In slime mold computing, the distributivity in the local computing logic can change dynamically, and its parallel non-distributed computing cannot be reduced into the spatial addition of multiple serial computings. The computing system based on exhaustive absence of the super-system may produce, something more than filling the vacancy. PMID:14563567

  5. Facility management of computer-aided design, drafting/manufacturing systems (CADD/M)

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1980-09-23

    Interactive Computer-Aided Design Drafting/Manufacturing systems have been installed in thousands of companies, applying CADD/M capabilities to many applications. This has been done with varying degrees of success even among companies with identical applications. Investigation of individual companies reveals a gap between the capabilities of CADD/M systems and the actual usage by industry of those capabilities. This company usage often determines the degree of success or failure of an interactive graphics facility and is largely controlled by management. The responsibilities of the interactive graphics facility managemant team are explained in detail. Proper management of a CADD/M facility is more critical to the success or failure of the facility than any other factor.

  6. Evaluation of Secure Computation in a Distributed Healthcare Setting.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eizen; Hamada, Koki; Kikuchi, Ryo; Chida, Koji; Okamoto, Kazuya; Manabe, Shirou; Kuroda, Tomohiko; Matsumura, Yasushi; Takeda, Toshihiro; Mihara, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Issues related to ensuring patient privacy and data ownership in clinical repositories prevent the growth of translational research. Previous studies have used an aggregator agent to obscure clinical repositories from the data user, and to ensure the privacy of output using statistical disclosure control. However, there remain several issues that must be considered. One such issue is that a data breach may occur when multiple nodes conspire. Another is that the agent may eavesdrop on or leak a user's queries and their results. We have implemented a secure computing method so that the data used by each party can be kept confidential even if all of the other parties conspire to crack the data. We deployed our implementation at three geographically distributed nodes connected to a high-speed layer two network. The performance of our method, with respect to processing times, suggests suitability for practical use. PMID:27577361

  7. Research into display sharing techniques for distributed computing environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugg, Steven B.; Fitzgerald, Paul F., Jr.; Rosson, Nina Y.; Johns, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    The X-based Display Sharing solution for distributed computing environments is described. The Display Sharing prototype includes the base functionality for telecast and display copy requirements. Since the prototype implementation is modular and the system design provided flexibility for the Mission Control Center Upgrade (MCCU) operational consideration, the prototype implementation can be the baseline for a production Display Sharing implementation. To facilitate the process the following discussions are presented: Theory of operation; System of architecture; Using the prototype; Software description; Research tools; Prototype evaluation; and Outstanding issues. The prototype is based on the concept of a dedicated central host performing the majority of the Display Sharing processing, allowing minimal impact on each individual workstation. Each workstation participating in Display Sharing hosts programs to facilitate the user's access to Display Sharing as host machine.

  8. CORBA-Based Distributed Software Framework for the NIF Integrated Computer Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, E A; Carey, R W; Estes, C M; Fisher, J M; Lagin, L J; Mathisen, D G; Reynolds, C A; Sanchez, R J

    2007-11-20

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultra-violet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. The NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) which is a scalable, framework-based control system distributed over 800 computers throughout the NIF. The framework provides templates and services at multiple levels of abstraction for the construction of software applications that communicate via CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture). Object-oriented software design patterns are implemented as templates and extended by application software. Developers extend the framework base classes to model the numerous physical control points and implement specializations of common application behaviors. An estimated 140 thousand software objects, each individually addressable through CORBA, will be active at full scale. Many of these objects have persistent configuration information stored in a database. The configuration data is used to initialize the objects at system start-up. Centralized server programs that implement events, alerts, reservations, data archival, name service, data access, and process management provide common system wide services. At the highest level, a model-driven, distributed shot automation system provides a flexible and scalable framework for automatic sequencing of work-flow for control and monitoring of NIF shots. The shot model, in conjunction with data defining the parameters and goals of an experiment, describes the steps to be performed by each subsystem in order to prepare for and fire a NIF shot. Status and usage of this distributed framework are described.

  9. Toward unification of taxonomy databases in a distributed computer environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kitakami, Hajime; Tateno, Yoshio; Gojobori, Takashi

    1994-12-31

    All the taxonomy databases constructed with the DNA databases of the international DNA data banks are powerful electronic dictionaries which aid in biological research by computer. The taxonomy databases are, however not consistently unified with a relational format. If we can achieve consistent unification of the taxonomy databases, it will be useful in comparing many research results, and investigating future research directions from existent research results. In particular, it will be useful in comparing relationships between phylogenetic trees inferred from molecular data and those constructed from morphological data. The goal of the present study is to unify the existent taxonomy databases and eliminate inconsistencies (errors) that are present in them. Inconsistencies occur particularly in the restructuring of the existent taxonomy databases, since classification rules for constructing the taxonomy have rapidly changed with biological advancements. A repair system is needed to remove inconsistencies in each data bank and mismatches among data banks. This paper describes a new methodology for removing both inconsistencies and mismatches from the databases on a distributed computer environment. The methodology is implemented in a relational database management system, SYBASE.

  10. Distributed computer system enhances productivity for SRB joint optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.; Young, Katherine C.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1987-01-01

    Initial calculations of a redesign of the solid rocket booster joint that failed during the shuttle tragedy showed that the design had a weight penalty associated with it. Optimization techniques were to be applied to determine if there was any way to reduce the weight while keeping the joint opening closed and limiting the stresses. To allow engineers to examine as many alternatives as possible, a system was developed consisting of existing software that coupled structural analysis with optimization which would execute on a network of computer workstations. To increase turnaround, this system took advantage of the parallelism offered by the finite difference technique of computing gradients to allow several workstations to contribute to the solution of the problem simultaneously. The resulting system reduced the amount of time to complete one optimization cycle from two hours to one-half hour with a potential of reducing it to 15 minutes. The current distributed system, which contains numerous extensions, requires one hour turnaround per optimization cycle. This would take four hours for the sequential system.

  11. Dynamic resource allocation scheme for distributed heterogeneous computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Howard T. (Inventor); Silvester, John A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to a resource allocation in computer systems, and more particularly, to a method and associated apparatus for shortening response time and improving efficiency of a heterogeneous distributed networked computer system by reallocating the jobs queued up for busy nodes to idle, or less-busy nodes. In accordance with the algorithm (SIDA for short), the load-sharing is initiated by the server device in a manner such that extra overhead in not imposed on the system during heavily-loaded conditions. The algorithm employed in the present invention uses a dual-mode, server-initiated approach. Jobs are transferred from heavily burdened nodes (i.e., over a high threshold limit) to low burdened nodes at the initiation of the receiving node when: (1) a job finishes at a node which is burdened below a pre-established threshold level, or (2) a node is idle for a period of time as established by a wakeup timer at the node. The invention uses a combination of the local queue length and the local service rate ratio at each node as the workload indicator.

  12. POET (parallel object-oriented environment and toolkit) and frameworks for scientific distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Cheung, A.

    1997-01-01

    Frameworks for parallel computing have recently become popular as a means for preserving parallel algorithms as reusable components. Frameworks for parallel computing in general, and POET in particular, focus on finding ways to orchestrate and facilitate cooperation between components that implement the parallel algorithms. Since performance is a key requirement for POET applications, CORBA or CORBA-like systems are eschewed for a SPMD message-passing architecture common to the world of distributed-parallel computing. Though the system is written in C++ for portability, the behavior of POET is more like a classical framework, such as Smalltalk. POET seeks to be a general platform for scientific parallel algorithm components which can be modified, linked, mixed and matched to a user`s specification. The purpose of this work is to identify a means for parallel code reuse and to make parallel computing more accessible to scientists whose expertise is outside the field of parallel computing. The POET framework provides two things: (1) an object model for parallel components that allows cooperation without being restrictive; (2) services that allow components to access and manage user data and message-passing facilities, etc. This work has evolved through application of a series of real distributed-parallel scientific problems. The paper focuses on what is required for parallel components to cooperate and at the same time remain ``black-boxes`` that users can drop into the frame without having to know the exquisite details of message-passing, data layout, etc. The paper walks through a specific example of a chemically reacting flow application. The example is implemented in POET and the authors identify component cooperation, usability and reusability in an anecdotal fashion.

  13. 41 CFR 101-26.503 - Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Multiple award schedule purchases made by GSA supply distribution facilities. 101-26.503 Section 101-26.503 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT...

  14. Distributed Monitoring Infrastructure for Worldwide LHC Computing Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Babik, M.; Bhatt, K.; Chand, P.; Collados, D.; Duggal, V.; Fuente, P.; Hayashi, S.; Imamagic, E.; Joshi, P.; Kalmady, R.; Karnani, U.; Kumar, V.; Lapka, W.; Quick, R.; Tarragon, J.; Teige, S.; Triantafyllidis, C.

    2012-12-01

    The journey of a monitoring probe from its development phase to the moment its execution result is presented in an availability report is a complex process. It goes through multiple phases such as development, testing, integration, release, deployment, execution, data aggregation, computation, and reporting. Further, it involves people with different roles (developers, site managers, VO[1] managers, service managers, management), from different middleware providers (ARC[2], dCache[3], gLite[4], UNICORE[5] and VDT[6]), consortiums (WLCG[7], EMI[11], EGI[15], OSG[13]), and operational teams (GOC[16], OMB[8], OTAG[9], CSIRT[10]). The seamless harmonization of these distributed actors is in daily use for monitoring of the WLCG infrastructure. In this paper we describe the monitoring of the WLCG infrastructure from the operational perspective. We explain the complexity of the journey of a monitoring probe from its execution on a grid node to the visualization on the MyWLCG[27] portal where it is exposed to other clients. This monitoring workflow profits from the interoperability established between the SAM[19] and RSV[20] frameworks. We show how these two distributed structures are capable of uniting technologies and hiding the complexity around them, making them easy to be used by the community. Finally, the different supported deployment strategies, tailored not only for monitoring the entire infrastructure but also for monitoring sites and virtual organizations, are presented and the associated operational benefits highlighted.

  15. A Fruitful Collaboration between ESO and the Max Planck Computing and Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourniol, N.; Zampieri, S.; Panea, M.

    2016-06-01

    The ESO Science Archive Facility (SAF), contains all La Silla Paranal Observatory raw data, as well as, more recently introduced, processed data created at ESO with state-of-the-art pipelines or returned by the astronomical community. The SAF has been established for over 20 years and its current holding exceeds 700 terabytes. An overview of the content of the SAF and the preservation of its content is provided. The latest development to ensure the preservation of the SAF data, provision of an independent backup copy of the whole SAF at the Max Planck Computing and Data Facility in Garching, is described.

  16. COMPUTER MODEL OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN OPTICALLY PUMPED LASER RODS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, U. O.

    1994-01-01

    Managing the thermal energy that accumulates within a solid-state laser material under active pumping is of critical importance in the design of laser systems. Earlier models that calculated the temperature distribution in laser rods were single dimensional and assumed laser rods of infinite length. This program presents a new model which solves the temperature distribution problem for finite dimensional laser rods and calculates both the radial and axial components of temperature distribution in these rods. The modeled rod is either side-pumped or end-pumped by a continuous or a single pulse pump beam. (At the present time, the model cannot handle a multiple pulsed pump source.) The optical axis is assumed to be along the axis of the rod. The program also assumes that it is possible to cool different surfaces of the rod at different rates. The user defines the laser rod material characteristics, determines the types of cooling and pumping to be modeled, and selects the time frame desired via the input file. The program contains several self checking schemes to prevent overwriting memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Output for the program consists of 1) an echo of the input file, 2) diffusion properties, radius and length, and time for each data block, 3) the radial increments from the center of the laser rod to the outer edge of the laser rod, and 4) the axial increments from the front of the laser rod to the other end of the rod. This program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN77 and implemented on a Tandon AT with a 287 math coprocessor. The program can also run on a VAX 750 mini-computer. It has a memory requirement of about 147 KB and was developed in 1989.

  17. Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) Testing Facility for Distributed Energy Storage (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer.J.; Lundstrom, B.; Simpson, M.; Pratt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The growing deployment of distributed, variable generation and evolving end-user load profiles presents a unique set of challenges to grid operators responsible for providing reliable and high quality electrical service. Mass deployment of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) has the potential to solve many of the associated integration issues while offering reliability and energy security benefits other solutions cannot. However, tools to develop, optimize, and validate DESS control strategies and hardware are in short supply. To fill this gap, NREL has constructed a power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) test facility that connects DESS, grid simulator, and load bank hardware to a distribution feeder simulation.

  18. Distributed computing feasibility in a non-dedicated homogeneous distributed system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Scott T.; Sun, Xian-He

    1993-01-01

    The low cost and availability of clusters of workstations have lead researchers to re-explore distributed computing using independent workstations. This approach may provide better cost/performance than tightly coupled multiprocessors. In practice, this approach often utilizes wasted cycles to run parallel jobs. The feasibility of such a non-dedicated parallel processing environment assuming workstation processes have preemptive priority over parallel tasks is addressed. An analytical model is developed to predict parallel job response times. Our model provides insight into how significantly workstation owner interference degrades parallel program performance. A new term task ratio, which relates the parallel task demand to the mean service demand of nonparallel workstation processes, is introduced. It was proposed that task ratio is a useful metric for determining how large the demand of a parallel applications must be in order to make efficient use of a non-dedicated distributed system.

  19. Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

    2010-07-01

    High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

  20. PHENIX On-Line Distributed Computing System Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, Edmond; Haggerty, John; Kehayias, Hyon Joo; Purschke, Martin L.; Witzig, Chris; Kozlowski, Thomas

    1997-05-22

    PHENIX is one of the two large experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detector consists of 11 sub-detectors, that are further subdivided into 29 units (``granules``) that can be operated independently, which includes simultaneous data taking with independent data streams and independent triggers. The detector has 250,000 channels and is read out by front end modules, where the data is buffered in a pipeline while awaiting the level trigger decision. Zero suppression and calibration is done after the level accept in custom built data collection modules (DCMs) with DSPs before the data is sent to an event builder (design throughput of 2 Gb/sec) and higher level triggers. The On-line Computing Systems Group (ONCS) has two responsibilities. Firstly it is responsible for receiving the data from the event builder, routing it through a network of workstations to consumer processes and archiving it at a data rate of 20 MB/sec. Secondly it is also responsible for the overall configuration, control and operation of the detector and data acquisition chain, which comprises the software integration for several thousand custom built hardware modules. The software must furthermore support the independent operation of the above mentioned granules, which includes the coordination of processes that run in 60-100 VME processors and workstations. ONOS has adapted the Shlaer- Mellor Object Oriented Methodology for the design of the top layer software. CORBA is used as communication layer between the distributed objects, which are implemented as asynchronous finite state machines. We will give an overview of the PHENIX online system with the main focus on the system architecture, software components and integration tasks of the On-line Computing group ONCS and report on the status of the current prototypes.

  1. Maintaining Traceability in an Evolving Distributed Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, I.; Wartel, R.

    2015-12-01

    The management of risk is fundamental to the operation of any distributed computing infrastructure. Identifying the cause of incidents is essential to prevent them from re-occurring. In addition, it is a goal to contain the impact of an incident while keeping services operational. For response to incidents to be acceptable this needs to be commensurate with the scale of the problem. The minimum level of traceability for distributed computing infrastructure usage is to be able to identify the source of all actions (executables, file transfers, pilot jobs, portal jobs, etc.) and the individual who initiated them. In addition, sufficiently fine-grained controls, such as blocking the originating user and monitoring to detect abnormal behaviour, are necessary for keeping services operational. It is essential to be able to understand the cause and to fix any problems before re-enabling access for the user. The aim is to be able to answer the basic questions who, what, where, and when concerning any incident. This requires retaining all relevant information, including timestamps and the digital identity of the user, sufficient to identify, for each service instance, and for every security event including at least the following: connect, authenticate, authorize (including identity changes) and disconnect. In traditional grid infrastructures (WLCG, EGI, OSG etc.) best practices and procedures for gathering and maintaining the information required to maintain traceability are well established. In particular, sites collect and store information required to ensure traceability of events at their sites. With the increased use of virtualisation and private and public clouds for HEP workloads established procedures, which are unable to see 'inside' running virtual machines no longer capture all the information required. Maintaining traceability will at least involve a shift of responsibility from sites to Virtual Organisations (VOs) bringing with it new requirements for their

  2. Computational investigations of low-emission burner facilities for char gas burning in a power boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Morozov, I. V.; Zaychenko, M. N.; Sidorkin, V. T.

    2016-04-01

    Various variants for the structure of low-emission burner facilities, which are meant for char gas burning in an operating TP-101 boiler of the Estonia power plant, are considered. The planned increase in volumes of shale reprocessing and, correspondingly, a rise in char gas volumes cause the necessity in their cocombustion. In this connection, there was a need to develop a burner facility with a given capacity, which yields effective char gas burning with the fulfillment of reliability and environmental requirements. For this purpose, the burner structure base was based on the staging burning of fuel with the gas recirculation. As a result of the preliminary analysis of possible structure variants, three types of early well-operated burner facilities were chosen: vortex burner with the supply of recirculation gases into the secondary air, vortex burner with the baffle supply of recirculation gases between flows of the primary and secondary air, and burner facility with the vortex pilot burner. Optimum structural characteristics and operation parameters were determined using numerical experiments. These experiments using ANSYS CFX bundled software of computational hydrodynamics were carried out with simulation of mixing, ignition, and burning of char gas. Numerical experiments determined the structural and operation parameters, which gave effective char gas burning and corresponded to required environmental standard on nitrogen oxide emission, for every type of the burner facility. The burner facility for char gas burning with the pilot diffusion burner in the central part was developed and made subject to computation results. Preliminary verification nature tests on the TP-101 boiler showed that the actual content of nitrogen oxides in burner flames of char gas did not exceed a claimed concentration of 150 ppm (200 mg/m3).

  3. Maintenance of reactor safety and control computers at a large government facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, H G

    1985-01-01

    In 1950 the US Government contracted the Du Pont Company to design, build, and operate the Savannah River Plant (SRP). At the time, it was the largest construction project ever undertaken by man. It is still the largest of the Department of Energy facilities. In the nearly 35 years that have elapsed, Du Pont has met its commitments to the US Government and set world safety records in the construction and operation of nuclear facilities. Contributing factors in achieving production goals and setting the safety records are a staff of highly qualified personnel, a well maintained plant, and sound maintenance programs. There have been many ''first ever'' achievements at SRP. These ''firsts'' include: (1) computer control of a nuclear rector, and (2) use of computer systems as safety circuits. This presentation discusses the maintenance program provided for these computer systems and all digital systems at SRP. An in-house computer maintenance program that was started in 1966 with five persons has grown to a staff of 40 with investments in computer hardware increasing from $4 million in 1970 to more than $60 million in this decade. 4 figs.

  4. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  5. National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

    1998-02-01

    This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

  6. 120. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, section II "foundation & first floor plan" - structural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 65, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. 119. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    119. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, section I "tower plan, sections & details" - structural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 62, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. 118. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, "building sections - sheet I" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 13, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. 122. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, section II "elevations & details" - structural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 73, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  10. 117. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, "building sections - sheet I" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 12, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK