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Sample records for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy fshd

  1. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    MedlinePlus

    Physical Therapy & FSHD Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy A Guide for Patients & Physical Therapists Authors: Wendy M. King, P.T., ... expertise and patient preferences. The goals of any physical therapy plan of care are to assist patients to:  ...

  2. Molecular analysis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Maynard, J.; Osborn, M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disease locus maps to 4q35 and is associated with a de novo DNA rearrangement, detected by a probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) which maps proximal to the disease locus. An informative distal flanking marker for this condition is still required. Using p13E-11, we have analyzed 35 FSHD families in which the disease is apparently associated with a new mutation. Twenty three of these cases were found to have a smaller rearranged DNA fragment which was not present in either of the parents. Pulsed-field gel analysis of 5 of these families also revealed evidence of DNA deletion. During the course of this study, we identified one case with a DNA rearrangement which was also present in the unaffected mother, but at very low intensity. This finding has been confirmed by pulsed-field gel analysis, and indicates that the mother is probably a gonosomal mosaic. In order to saturate the FSHD region with new DNA markers, a laser microdissection and microcloning technique was used to construct a genomic library from the distal end of chromosome 4. Of the 72 microclones analyzed, 42 mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. 4 sequences were conserved and may be considered potential candidate genes for FSHD. The microclones mapping to 4q35 are under study to identify additional polymorphic markers for the FSHD region.

  3. Molecular genetics of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Upadhyaya, M

    1997-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD; MIM 158900), is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder. The disease is characterized by the weakness of the muscles of the face, upper-arm and shoulder girdle. The gene for FSHD has been mapped to 4q35 (FSHD1A) and is closely linked to D4F1O4S1, which detects two highly polymorphic loci (located at 4q35 and 10q26), with restriction enzyme EcoRI. The polymorphic EcoRI fragment detected with D4F1O4S1 is composed almost entirely of D4Z4 (3.3 kb) tandem repeats. In FSHD patients a deletion of the integral number of D4Z4 repeats generates a fragment which is usually smaller than 35 kb, whereas in normal controls, the size usually ranges from 50 to 300 kb. These 'small' EcoRI fragments segregate with FSHD in families but appear as de novo deletions in the majority of sporadic cases. Each 3.3 kb repeat contains two homeobox domains neither of which has yet been proven to encode a protein. D4Z4 is located adjacent to the 4q telomere and cross hybridizes to several different regions of the genome. Although D4Z4 probably does not encode a protein with any direct association to FSHD, a clear correlation has been shown between the deletion size at this locus and the age at onset of the disease in FSHD patients. In approximately 5-10% of FSHD families the disease locus is unlinked to 4q35 (locus designated FSHD1B), however, none of the non 4q35 loci for FSHD have yet been chromosomally located. Thus so far, only one gene, FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1) has been identified from the FSHD candidate region on 4q35. The apparent low level of expressed sequences from within this region, the integral deletions of D4Z4 repeats observed in FSHD patients and the close proximity of these repeats to the 4q telomere, all suggest that the disease may be the result of position effect variegation. To date, the molecular diagnosis of FSHD with D4F104S1 has been most secure in those families which are linked to other 4q35 markers. Recent studies

  4. Reachable Workspace in Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) by Kinect

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jay J.; Kurillo, Gregorij; Abresch, Richard T.; de Bie, Evan; Nicorici, Alina; Bajcsy, Ruzena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A depth-ranging sensor (Kinect) based upper extremity motion analysis system was applied to determine the spectrum of reachable workspace encountered in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Methods Reachable workspaces were obtained from 22 individuals with FSHD and 24 age- and height-matched healthy controls. To allow comparison, total and quadrant reachable workspace relative surface areas (RSA) were obtained by normalizing the acquired reachable workspace by each individual’s arm length. Results Significantly contracted reachable workspace and reduced RSAs were noted for the FSHD cohort compared to controls (0.473±0.188 vs. 0.747±0.082; P<0.0001). With worsening upper extremity function as categorized by the FSHD evaluation subscale II+III, the upper quadrant RSAs decreased progressively, while the lower quadrant RSAs were relatively preserved. There were no side-to-side differences in reachable workspace based on hand-dominance. Discussion This study demonstrates the feasibility and potential of using an innovative Kinect-based reachable workspace outcome measure in FSHD. PMID:24828906

  5. Evidence for heterogeneity in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R.; Stajich, J.M.; Wall, S.; Carter, S.C.; Qiu, H.; Vance, J.M.; Stewart, C.S.; Speer, M.C.; Pufky, J.; Yamaoka, L.H.; Rozear, M.; Roses, A.D.; Pericak-Vance, M.A. ); Samson, F.; Fardeau, M. )

    1993-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a slowly progressive primary disease of muscle which is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. FSHD has been localized to the long arm of chromosome 4, specifically to the 4q3.5-qter region. Initially published linkage studies showed no evidence for heterogeneity in FSHD. In the present study the authors have examined individuals in seven FSHD families. Two-point lod scores show significant evidence for linkage for D4S163 (lod score 3.04 at recombination fraction .21) and D4S139 (lod score 3.84 at recombination fraction .20). D4S171 also gave a positive score (lod score 2.56 at recombination fraction .24). Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found for each of the three markers. Multipoint linkage analysis in this region resulted in a peak multipoint lod score of 6.47. The multipoint analysis supported the two-point studies with odds of 20:1 showing linkage and heterogeneity over linkage and homogeneity. Five of the seven families gave a posterior probability of >95% of being of the linked type, while two families appeared unlinked to this region of 4q (P<.01%). Individuals in the two unlinked families met the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of FSHD, including facial weakness, clavicular flattening, scapula winging, proximal muscle weakness, and myopathic changes on muscle biopsies without inflammatory or mitochondrial pathology. This study demonstrates genetic heterogeneity in FSHD and has important implications for both genetic counseling and the elucidation of the etiology of FSHD. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leo H; Tawil, Rabi

    2016-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a clinically recognizable and relatively common muscular dystrophy. It is inherited mostly as an autosomal dominant disease or in a minority of cases, in a digenic pattern. The disease manifestation is variable and most likely dependent on genetic and epigenetic factors. We review the history, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and genetics of the disease, present the recently elucidated molecular pathogenesis, discuss the pathology and the possible consequence of the inflammation seen in the muscle biopsies, and consider future treatments. PMID:27215221

  7. A cross sectional study of two independent cohorts identifies serum biomarkers for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Petek, Lisa M; Rickard, Amanda M; Budech, Christopher; Poliachik, Sandra L; Shaw, Dennis; Ferguson, Mark R; Tawil, Rabi; Friedman, Seth D; Miller, Daniel G

    2016-07-01

    Measuring the severity and progression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is particularly challenging because muscle weakness progresses over long periods of time and can be sporadic. Biomarkers are essential for measuring disease burden and testing treatment strategies. We utilized the sensitive, specific, high-throughput SomaLogic proteomics platform of 1129 proteins to identify proteins with levels that correlate with FSHD severity in a cross-sectional study of two independent cohorts. We discovered biomarkers that correlate with clinical severity and disease burden measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Sixty-eight proteins in the Rochester cohort (n = 48) and 51 proteins in the Seattle cohort (n = 30) had significantly different levels in FSHD-affected individuals when compared with controls (p-value ≤ .005). A subset of these varied by at least 1.5 fold and four biomarkers were significantly elevated in both cohorts. Levels of creatine kinase MM and MB isoforms, carbonic anhydrase III, and troponin I type 2 reliably predicted the disease state and correlated with disease severity. Other novel biomarkers were also discovered that may reveal mechanisms of disease pathology. Assessing the levels of these biomarkers during clinical trials may add significance to other measures of quantifying disease progression or regression. PMID:27185459

  8. YAC contigs for 4q35 in the region of the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Weiffenbach, B.; DuBois, J.; Manning, S.; Ma, N.S.; Moir, D. ); Schutte, B.C. ); Altherr, M.R. Los Alamos National Lab., NM ); Jacobsen, S.J. ); Stanton, V.P. Jr. )

    1994-02-01

    The authors report here the construction of a genetic linkage map and an overlapping set of clones containing DNA markers linked to the causative locus for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) on 4q35. Multi-point linkage analysis placed eight loci in the following order with odds greater than 1000:1: cen-D4S171-FXI-D4S426-D4S187-D4S130-D4S163-D4S139-D4F35S1-qter. The most likely position of D4S809 was distal to D4F35S1. Thirty-four yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were isolated by PCR-based assays for STSs derived from DNA markers with known genetic and physical order. Walking from the insert ends of 2 YACs identified 7 additional YACs, bridging the gaps between three of the markers. Two new YACs were found by hybridization of a cosmid inter-Alu PCR product to dot blots of inter-Alu PCR products of YAC DNA pools. All YAC clones were positioned using the genetic and physical order of the STSs and inter-Alu PCR fingerprint data. Eleven of the YAC-, and two cosmids were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to confirm the location of the clones and to detect chimerism. The 43 YACs were assembled into two contigs. The larger contig spans approximately 2.4 Mb and contains markers closest to the FSHD gene. 53 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Clinical, muscle pathological, and genetic features of Japanese facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2 (FSHD2) patients with SMCHD1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Kohei; Goto, Kanako; Arai, Mami; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Noguchi, Satoru; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2 (FSHD2) is a genetic muscular disorder characterized by DNA hypomethylation on the 4q-subtelomeric macrosatellite repeat array, D4Z4. FSHD2 is caused by heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (SMCHD1). Because there has been no study on FSHD2 in Asian populations, it is not known whether this disease mechanism is widely seen. To identify FSHD2 patients with SMCHD1 mutations in the Japanese population, bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to measure DNA methylation on the D4Z4 repeat array, and in patients with DNA hypomethylation, the SMCHD1 gene was sequenced by the Sanger method. Twenty patients with D4Z4 hypomethylation were identified. Of these, 13 patients from 11 unrelated families had ten novel and one reported SMCHD1 mutations: four splice-site, two nonsense, two in-frame deletion, two out-of-frame deletion, and one missense mutations. One of the splice-site mutations was homozygous in the single patient identified with this. In summary, we identified novel SMCHD1 mutations in a Japanese cohort of FSHD2 patients, confirming the presence of this disease in a wider population than previously known. PMID:27061275

  10. Transgenic Drosophila for Investigating DUX4 and FRG1, Two Genes Associated with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Takako I; Parilla, Megan; Jones, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is typically an adult onset dominant myopathy. Epigenetic changes in the chromosome 4q35 region linked to both forms of FSHD lead to a relaxation of repression and increased somatic expression of DUX4-fl (DUX4-full length), the pathogenic alternative splicing isoform of the DUX4 gene. DUX4-fl encodes a transcription factor expressed in healthy testis and pluripotent stem cells; however, in FSHD, increased levels of DUX4-fl in myogenic cells lead to aberrant regulation of target genes. DUX4-fl has proven difficult to study in vivo; thus, little is known about its normal and pathogenic roles. The endogenous expression of DUX4-fl in FSHD-derived human muscle and myogenic cells is extremely low, exogenous expression of DUX4-fl in somatic cells rapidly induces cytotoxicity, and, due in part to the lack of conservation beyond primate lineages, viable animal models based on DUX4-fl have been difficult to generate. By contrast, the FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1), which is linked to FSHD, is evolutionarily conserved from invertebrates to humans, and has been studied in several model organisms. FRG1 expression is critical for the development of musculature and vasculature, and overexpression of FRG1 produces a myopathic phenotype, yet the normal and pathological functions of FRG1 are not well understood. Interestingly, DUX4 and FRG1 were recently linked when the latter was identified as a direct transcriptional target of DUX4-FL. To better understand the pathways affected in FSHD by DUX4-fl and FRG1, we generated transgenic lines of Drosophila expressing either gene under control of the UAS/GAL4 binary system. Utilizing these lines, we generated screenable phenotypes recapitulating certain known consequences of DUX4-fl or FRG1 overexpression. These transgenic Drosophila lines provide resources to dissect the pathways affected by DUX4-fl or FRG1 in a genetically tractable organism and may provide insight into both muscle development

  11. Transgenic Drosophila for Investigating DUX4 and FRG1, Two Genes Associated with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Takako I.; Parilla, Megan; Jones, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is typically an adult onset dominant myopathy. Epigenetic changes in the chromosome 4q35 region linked to both forms of FSHD lead to a relaxation of repression and increased somatic expression of DUX4-fl (DUX4-full length), the pathogenic alternative splicing isoform of the DUX4 gene. DUX4-fl encodes a transcription factor expressed in healthy testis and pluripotent stem cells; however, in FSHD, increased levels of DUX4-fl in myogenic cells lead to aberrant regulation of target genes. DUX4-fl has proven difficult to study in vivo; thus, little is known about its normal and pathogenic roles. The endogenous expression of DUX4-fl in FSHD-derived human muscle and myogenic cells is extremely low, exogenous expression of DUX4-fl in somatic cells rapidly induces cytotoxicity, and, due in part to the lack of conservation beyond primate lineages, viable animal models based on DUX4-fl have been difficult to generate. By contrast, the FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1), which is linked to FSHD, is evolutionarily conserved from invertebrates to humans, and has been studied in several model organisms. FRG1 expression is critical for the development of musculature and vasculature, and overexpression of FRG1 produces a myopathic phenotype, yet the normal and pathological functions of FRG1 are not well understood. Interestingly, DUX4 and FRG1 were recently linked when the latter was identified as a direct transcriptional target of DUX4-FL. To better understand the pathways affected in FSHD by DUX4-fl and FRG1, we generated transgenic lines of Drosophila expressing either gene under control of the UAS/GAL4 binary system. Utilizing these lines, we generated screenable phenotypes recapitulating certain known consequences of DUX4-fl or FRG1 overexpression. These transgenic Drosophila lines provide resources to dissect the pathways affected by DUX4-fl or FRG1 in a genetically tractable organism and may provide insight into both muscle development

  12. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sacconi, Sabrina; Salviati, Leonardo; Desnuelle, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by a typical and asymmetric pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression. Two forms of FSHD, FSHD1 and FSHD2, have been identified displaying identical clinical phenotype but different genetic and epigenetic basis. Autosomal dominant FSHD1 (95% of patients) is characterized by chromatin relaxation induced by pathogenic contraction of a macrosatellite repeat called D4Z4 located on the 4q subtelomere (FSHD1 patients harbor 1 to 10 D4Z4 repeated units). Chromatin relaxation is associated with inappropriate expression of DUX4, a retrogene, which in muscles induces apoptosis and inflammation. Consistent with this hypothesis, individuals carrying zero repeat on chromosome 4 do not develop FSHD1. Not all D4Z4 contracted alleles cause FSHD. Distal to the last D4Z4 unit, a polymorphic site with two allelic variants has been identified: 4qA and 4qB. 4qA is in cis with a functional polyadenylation consensus site. Only contractions on 4qA alleles are pathogenic because the DUX4 transcript is polyadenylated and translated into stable protein. FSHD2 is instead a digenic disease. Chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 locus is caused by heterozygous mutations in the SMCHD1 gene encoding a protein essential for chromatin condensation. These patients also harbor at least one 4qA allele in order to express stable DUX4 transcripts. FSHD1 and FSHD2 may have an additive effect: patients harboring D4Z4 contraction and SMCHD1 mutations display a more severe clinical phenotype than with either defect alone. Knowledge of the complex genetic and epigenetic defects causing these diseases is essential in view of designing novel therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:24882751

  13. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) expression and possible function in mouse tooth germ development.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kana; Wada, Hiroko; Nagata, Kengo; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Wada, Naohisa; Someya, Hirotaka; Mikami, Yurie; Sakai, Hidetaka; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal expression of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is involved in the pathogenesis of FSHD. FRG1 is also important for the normal muscular and vascular development. Our previous study showed that FRG1 is one of the highly expressed genes in the mandible on embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) than on E12.0. In this study, we investigated the temporospatial expression pattern of FRG1 mRNA and protein during the development of the mouse lower first molar, and also evaluated the subcellular localization of the FRG1 protein in mouse dental epithelial (mDE6) cells. The FRG1 expression was identified in the dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells at the initiation and bud stages. It was detected in the inner enamel epithelium at the cap and early bell stages. At the late bell and root formation stages, these signals were detected in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during the formation of enamel and dentin matrices, respectively. The FRG1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm in the mouse tooth germ in vivo, while FRG1 was detected predominantly in the nucleus and faintly in the cytoplasm in mDE6 cells in vitro. In mDE6 cells treated with bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), the protein expression of FRG1 increased in cytoplasm, suggesting that FRG1 may translocate to the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that FRG1 is involved in the morphogenesis of the tooth germ, as well as in the formation of enamel and dentin matrices and that FRG1 may play a role in the odontogenesis in the mouse following BMP4 stimulation. PMID:27234941

  14. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  15. An integrated approach in a case of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle fatigue, weakness and atrophy are basilar clinical features that accompany facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) the third most common muscular dystrophy. No therapy is available for FSHD. Case presentation We describe the effects of 6mo exercise therapy and nutritional supplementation in a 43-year-old woman severely affected by FSHD. Conclusion A mixed exercise program combined with nutritional supplementation can be safely used with beneficial effects in selected patients with FSHD. PMID:24886582

  16. A prospective, quantitative study of the natural history of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD): implications for therapeutic trials. The FSH-DY Group.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder localized to 4q35. Neither the gene nor the gene product has been identified. There is presently no established treatment for FSHD. Prospective data on the natural history of this disorder are essential for the effective design of therapeutic trials. We systematically followed 81 well defined FSHD patients for up to 3 years using a standardized protocol that included manual muscle testing (MMT), maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing (MVICT), and functional testing. Muscle strength was strongly associated with measures of muscle mass, age at onset, and duration of disease. Decline in strength over time was slow but detectable with both MVICT and MMT. The magnitude of decline was not associated with either age, gender, age at onset, or duration of disease. This study establishes reliable and valid measures of disease state and progression for use as outcome variables in clinical trials in FSHD, and also provides guidelines for determining sample size and duration of follow-up. A two-armed clinical trial involving 160 patients per group and 1 year of follow-up would provide 80% power to detect complete arrest of the progression of the disease. Trials with fewer patients would thus have adequate power to detect only improvements in strength, unless follow-up duration were extended well beyond 1 year. PMID:9008491

  17. Refined localization of myd, a candidate animal model for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, K.A.; Bailey, H.L.; Murray, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    The mouse mutant myd is a candidate model for FSHD on the basis of phenotypic description and the linkage homology we have established between distal human chromosome 4q and the midregion of mouse chromosome 8. The human disease is associated with a deletion in a subtelomeric repeat element at 4q35, but isolation of genes from this region has been difficult to date. The myd gene will be an excellent candidate gene for the human disease. Refined genetic localization of the mutant is a first step in the positional cloning of the gene for myd. We have mapped myd in 128 affected mice (65 confirmed with muscle histology) from an intersubspecific backcross of B6C3Fe-a/a-myd/+ X Mus musculus castaneus (CAST/Ei). Previous work with 38 animals found two recombinants that placed the gene in the 3-6 cM interval between D8Mit30 and D8Mit75, with complete linkage to D8Mit74. New markers and an enlarged panel of affected animals now indicate 2 recombinants with D8Mit74 and complete linkage to D8Mit101. Our results suggest the order of genes and Mit markers is (F11/Kal-3/Clcn-3) - 30 - 101 - 74 - 75 - Ucp. The interval of interest, between D8Mit30 and D8Mit74, is about 1 cM by the current mouse SSLP map generated at MIT. We are currently screening mouse YAC libraries for clones covering this region. There may be a position effect on the FSHD gene by the subtelomeric deletion in its vicinity. If a structurally normal gene is being so affected, it will be difficult to show that is is the FSHD gene. The mouse gene is likely to be affected by a different type of mutation, and could facilitate analysis of candidate human genes.

  18. Effect of aerobic exercise training and cognitive behavioural therapy on reduction of chronic fatigue in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: protocol of the FACTS-2-FSHD trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) muscle function is impaired and declines over time. Currently there is no effective treatment available to slow down this decline. We have previously reported that loss of muscle strength contributes to chronic fatigue through a decreased level of physical activity, while fatigue and physical inactivity both determine loss of societal participation. To decrease chronic fatigue, two distinctly different therapeutic approaches can be proposed: aerobic exercise training (AET) to improve physical capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to stimulate an active life-style yet avoiding excessive physical strain. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-FSHD (acronym for Fitness And Cognitive behavioural TherapieS/for Fatigue and ACTivitieS in FSHD) trial is to study the effect of AET and CBT on the reduction of chronic fatigue as assessed with the Checklist Individual Strength subscale fatigue (CIS-fatigue) in patients with FSHD. Additionally, possible working mechanisms and the effects on various secondary outcome measures at all levels of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) are evaluated. Methods/Design A multi-centre, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial is conducted. A sample of 75 FSHD patients with severe chronic fatigue (CIS-fatigue ≥ 35) will be recruited and randomized to one of three groups: (1) AET + usual care, (2) CBT + usual care or (3) usual care alone, which consists of no therapy at all or occasional (conventional) physical therapy. After an intervention period of 16 weeks and a follow-up of 3 months, the third (control) group will as yet be randomized to either AET or CBT (approximately 7 months after inclusion). Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 3 and 6 months follow up. Discussion The FACTS-2-FSHD study is the first theory-based randomized clinical trial which evaluates the effect and the maintenance of effects

  19. Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy: Case Report and Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Joseph; Michaels, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is often cited as the third most common form of muscular dystrophy. Therefore, it should be considered in patients with complaints of progressive weakness. We present the case of a man with facial, truncal, and leg weakness that initially sought medical attention for lower back pain. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings in the trapezius, serratus anterior, biceps, triceps, pectoralis major, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles consistent with a myopathic disorder. Subsequent genetic testing identified a FSHD allele size consistent with a FSHD deletion mutation. Therefore, confirming the diagnosis of FSHD. Unfortunately, no effective treatments currently exist for FSHD. However, supportive measures involving physical therapy and the use of orthotics may aid in improving function and mobility. PMID:18815862

  20. Birdshot chorioretinopathy in a male patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Lobo, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of birdshot chorioretinopathy (BSCR) in a patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A 40-year-old male with history of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with significant facial diplegia and lagophthalmos presents for an evaluation of bilateral choroiditis with vasculitis and optic disc edema. Clinical examination included fundus and autofluorescence photographs, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first reported case of birdshot chorioretinopathy with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Patients with FSHD can present with ocular findings and should be screened with dilated fundus examinations for retinal vascular changes and posterior uveitis. PMID:25861398

  1. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cases, the parents do not carry the gene. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy affects about 5 out of 100,000 people. ... Treatment There is no ... worse. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle strength. Other possible treatments ...

  2. Clinical expression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy in carriers of 1–3 D4Z4 reduced alleles: experience of the FSHD Italian National Registry

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Ana; Ricci, Giulia; Sera, Francesco; Bucci, Elisabetta; Govi, Monica; Mele, Fabiano; Rossi, Marta; Ruggiero, Lucia; Vercelli, Liliana; Ravaglia, Sabrina; Brisca, Giacomo; Fiorillo, Chiara; Villa, Luisa; Maggi, Lorenzo; Cao, Michelangelo; D'Amico, Maria Chiara; Siciliano, Gabriele; Antonini, Giovanni; Santoro, Lucio; Mongini, Tiziana; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pegoraro, Elena; Angelini, Corrado; Di Muzio, Antonio; Rodolico, Carmelo; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Grazia D'Angelo, Maria; Bruno, Claudio; Berardinelli, Angela; Tupler, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD1) has been genetically linked to reduced numbers (≤8) of D4Z4 repeats at 4q35. Particularly severe FSHD cases, characterised by an infantile onset and presence of additional extra-muscular features, have been associated with the shortest D4Z4 reduced alleles with 1–3 repeats (1–3 DRA). We searched for signs of perinatal onset and evaluated disease outcome through the systematic collection of clinical and anamnestic records of de novo and familial index cases and their relatives, carrying 1–3 DRA. Setting Italy. Participants 66 index cases and 33 relatives carrying 1–3 DRA. Outcomes The clinical examination was performed using the standardised FSHD evaluation form with validated inter-rater reliability. To investigate the earliest signs of disease, we designed the Infantile Anamnestic Questionnaire (IAQ). Comparison of age at onset was performed using the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum or Kruskal-Wallis test. Comparison of the FSHD score was performed using a general linear model and Wald test. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate the age-specific cumulative motor impairment risk. Results No patients had perinatal onset. Among index cases, 36 (54.5%) showed the first signs by 10 years of age. The large majority of patients with early disease onset (26 out of 36, 72.2%) were de novo; whereas the majority of patients with disease onset after 10 years of age were familial (16, 53.3%). Comparison of the disease severity outcome between index cases with age at onset before and over 10 years of age, failed to detect statistical significance (Wald test p value=0.064). Of 61 index cases, only 17 (27.9%) presented extra-muscular conditions. Relatives carrying 1–3 DRA showed a large clinical variability ranging from healthy subjects, to patients with severe motor impairment. Conclusions The size of the D4Z4 allele is not always predictive of severe clinical outcome. The high

  3. Upper Girdle Imaging in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Laschena, Francesco; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Leoncini, Emanuele; Boccia, Stefania; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Pelliccioni, Marco; Masciullo, Marcella; Frusciante, Roberto; Mercuri, Eugenio; Ricci, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the upper girdle is early involved and often difficult to assess only relying on physical examination. Our aim was to evaluate the pattern and degree of involvement of upper girdle muscles in FSHD compared with other muscle diseases with scapular girdle impairment. Methods We propose an MRI protocol evaluating neck and upper girdle muscles. One hundred-eight consecutive symptomatic FSHD patients and 45 patients affected by muscular dystrophies and myopathies with prominent upper girdle involvement underwent this protocol. Acquired scans were retrospectively analyzed. Results The trapezius (100% of the patients) and serratus anterior (85% of the patients) were the most and earliest affected muscles in FSHD, followed by the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major, whilst spinati and subscapularis (involved in less than 4% of the patients) were consistently spared even in late disease stages. Asymmetry and hyperintensities on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences were common features, and STIR hyperintensities could also be found in muscles not showing signs of fatty replacement. The overall involvement appears to be disease-specific in FSHD as it significantly differed from that encountered in the other myopathies. Conclusions The detailed knowledge of single muscle involvement provides useful information for correctly evaluating patients' motor function and to set a baseline for natural history studies. Upper girdle imaging can also be used as an additional tool helpful in supporting the diagnosis of FSHD in unclear situations, and may contribute with hints on the currently largely unknown molecular pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24932477

  4. Bimaxillary Osteotomy for Jaw Deformity With Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takako; Ohba, Seigo; Fujimura, Yuji; Asahina, Izumi

    2016-05-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a subtype of muscular dystrophies which reduces the muscle strength, especially the regions of scapular, shoulder, and upper arms, progressively. According to progressive muscle weakness in FSHD, postoperative stability of patient with FSHD after orthognathic surgery is not reliably acquired same as healthy subjects. A 32-year-old woman with FSHD underwent orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment due to jaw deformity. She has been followed up more than 3 years after surgery and acquired skeletal stability. This patient is the first report that showed long-term skeletal stability after orthognathic surgery in patient with FSHD. This patient report suggests that it is possible to apply orthognathic surgical treatment to patients with FSHD. PMID:27054436

  5. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: consequences of chromatin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Miller, Daniel G.; Tawil, Rabi; Filippova, Galina N.; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review In recent years we have seen remarkable progress in our understanding of the disease mechanism underlying facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of the disease mechanism and to discuss the observations supporting the possibility of a developmental defect in this disorder. Recent findings In the majority of cases FSHD is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array (FSHD1). This results in local chromatin relaxation and stable expression of the DUX4 retrogene in skeletal muscle, but only when a polymorphic DUX4 polyadenylation signal is present. In some cases (FSHD2), D4Z4 chromatin relaxation and stable DUX4 expression occurs in the absence of D4Z4 array contraction. DUX4 is a germline transcription factor and its expression in skeletal muscle leads to activation of early stem cell and germline programs and transcriptional activation of retroelements. Summary Recent studies have provided a plausible disease mechanism for FSHD where FSHD results from inappropriate expression of the germline transcription factor DUX4. The genes regulated by DUX4 suggest several mechanisms of muscle damage, and provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets that should be investigated in future studies. PMID:22892954

  6. Chronic Pain in Persons With Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Hoffman, Amy J.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Abresch, Richard T.; Carter, Gregory T.; McDonald, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the nature and scope of pain in working-aged adults with myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Design Retrospective, cross-sectional survey. Setting Community-based survey. Participants Convenience sample of subjects with MMD and FSHD. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Overall intensity and duration of pain, pain inference, pain sites, pain treatments, and relief provided by pain treatments. Results More subjects with FSHD (82%) than with MMD (64%) reported pain. The most frequently reported pain sites for both diagnostic groups were lower back (66% MMD, 74% FSHD) and legs (60% MMD, 72% FSHD). Significant differences in pain intensity were found between the diagnostic groups in the hands, legs, knees, ankles, and feet, with patients with MMD reporting greater pain intensity at these sites than patients with FSHD. Age was related to the onset of pain (participants reporting pain were younger than those not reporting pain in the FSHD sample), but pain severity was not significantly associated with age in those reporting pain. Respondents with both diagnoses that reported mobility limitations and used assistive devices (eg, wheelchair, cane) reported more pain severity than those with mobility limitations who did not use assistive devices, who, in turn, reported more pain severity than respondents who reported no mobility limitations at all. The treatments that were reported to provide the greatest pain relief were not necessarily those that were the most frequently tried or still used. Conclusions The findings indicate that pain is a more common problem in persons with FSHD than in persons with MMD, although it is common in both populations. In addition, these pain problems are chronic, underscoring the need to identify and provide effective pain treatments for patients with these neuromuscular diseases. PMID:18226657

  7. Treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Stanley S.; Lefkowitz, Doris L.; Kethley, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the 3rd most common form of muscular dystrophy. Effective treatments for any of the muscular dystrophies have yet to be realized. This report describes such a treatment. Case Report: A 66 year old female was diagnosed with osteoporosis. She had been diagnosed with FSHD muscular dystrophy a number of years previously by both genetic and clinical studies. Following a 2 year course with Forteo for osteoporosis, she was given an injection of Denosumab (Prolia) to maintain her bone density. By 24 hours, she exhibited increased strength and a dramatic reduction of her dystrophic symptoms e.g. she could walk unassisted in high heels. She was able to accomplish other things that had not been possible for a number of years. After approximately 5 weeks she gradually lost the newfound strength with a complete loss by about 6 weeks. A second injection of Denosumab resulted in the same effect, i.e. reversal of symptoms and increased functionality. A number of measurements and videos were taken to establish the beneficial effects of Prolia for future studies. This was repeated with a 3rd and 4th injection in order to establish the unequivocal beneficial effects on muscular dystrophy. Conclusions: Further studies will be required to establish Denosumab as a major “front line” treatment for this disease and possibly other muscular dystrophies. PMID:23569491

  8. Gene discovery for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy by machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    González-Navarro, Félix F; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A; Gámez-Moreno, María G; Flores-Ríos, Brenda L; Ibarra-Esquer, Jorge E; López-Morteo, Gabriel A

    2016-04-28

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a neuromuscular disorder that shows a preference for the facial, shoulder and upper arm muscles. FSHD affects about one in 20-400,000 people, and no effective therapeutic strategies are known to halt disease progression or reverse muscle weakness or atrophy. Many genes may be incorrectly regulated in affected muscle tissue, but the mechanisms responsible for the progressive muscle weakness remain largely unknown. Although machine learning (ML) has made significant inroads in biomedical disciplines such as cancer research, no reports have yet addressed FSHD analysis using ML techniques. This study explores a specific FSHD data set from a ML perspective. We report results showing a very promising small group of genes that clearly separates FSHD samples from healthy samples. In addition to numerical prediction figures, we show data visualizations and biological evidence illustrating the potential usefulness of these results. PMID:26960968

  9. Patient Identified Disease Burden in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Quinn, Christine; Eastwood, Eileen; Tawil, Rabi; Heatwole, Chad R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The multitude of symptoms associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) disease burden are of varying importance. The extent of these symptoms and their cumulative effect on the FSHD population is unknown. Methods We conducted interviews with adult FSHD patients to identify which symptoms have the greatest effect on their lives. Each interview was recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a qualitative framework technique, triangulation, and 3-investigator consensus approach. Results 1375 quotes were obtained through 20 patient interviews. 251 symptoms of importance were identified representing 14 themes of FSHD disease burden. Symptoms associated with mobility impairment, activity limitation, and social role limitation were most frequently mentioned by participants. Conclusions There are multiple themes and symptoms, some previously under-recognized, that play a key role in FSHD disease burden. PMID:23225386

  10. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Odrzywolski, Karen J; Shah, Bharati; Henderson, Don; Fricke, Alex F.; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Tapscott, Stephen J; Tawil, Rabi

    2015-01-01

    Background Posited pathological mechanisms in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) include activation in somatic tissue of normally silenced genes, increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, and induction of apoptosis. Objective To determine the histopathological changes in FSHD muscle biopsies and compare to possible pathological mechanisms of disease. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study on quadriceps muscle biopsies from 32 genetically confirmed FSHD participants, compared to healthy volunteers and myotonic dystrophy type 1 as disease controls. Biopsies were divided into groups to evaluate apoptosis rates, capillary density, myonuclear and satellite cell counts. Results Apoptosis rates were increased in FSHD (n=10, 0.74%) compared to myotonic dystrophy type 1 (n=10, 0.14%, P=0.003) and healthy volunteers (n=14, 0.13%, P=0.002). Apoptosis was higher in FSHD patients with the smallest residual D4Z4 fragments. Capillary density was decreased in FSHD1 (n=10, 316 capillaries/mm2) compared to healthy volunteers (n=15, 448 capillaries/mm2, P=0.001). No differences were seen in myonuclear or satellite cell counts. Conclusions Preliminary evidence for increased apoptosis rates and reduced capillary density may reflect histopathological correlates of disease activity in FSHD. The molecular-pathological correlates to these changes warrants further investigation. PMID:26345300

  11. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the D4F104S1 locus reveals the size and the parental origin of the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)-associated deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmenga, C.; Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Padberg, G.W.; Van Ommen, G.J.B.; Hofker, M.H.; Frants, R.R. ); Hewitt, J.E. )

    1994-01-01

    Recently, probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) was shown to identify de novo DNA rearrangements, which are associated with the development of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). These rearrangements are likely to become instrumental in cloning the FSHD gene itself. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrates that p13E-11 recognizes two highly polymorphic loci, with HindIII restriction fragments ranging in size from about 30 to 320 kb. Haplotype analysis unambiguously assigned one of the two loci to chromosome 4q35. The detection of identical NotI or NruI fragments with both CEB8 (D4F35S1) and p13E-11 demonstrated that the DNA rearrangements are deletions that are restricted to the HindIII fragments detectable by p13E-11. In two cases, the sizes of the deletion could be established and were found to be 25 and 85 kb in length, respectively. So far, the authors have been able to define the parental origin of the mutation in seven different patients and have found that in five cases the maternal allele was involved. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. FSHD: copy number variations on the theme of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cabianca, Daphne Selvaggia

    2010-01-01

    In humans, copy number variations (CNVs) are a common source of phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an important genetic disease caused by CNVs. It is an autosomal-dominant myopathy caused by a reduction in the copy number of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat located at chromosome 4q35. Interestingly, the reduction of D4Z4 copy number is not sufficient by itself to cause FSHD. A number of epigenetic events appear to affect the severity of the disease, its rate of progression, and the distribution of muscle weakness. Indeed, recent findings suggest that virtually all levels of epigenetic regulation, from DNA methylation to higher order chromosomal architecture, are altered at the disease locus, causing the de-regulation of 4q35 gene expression and ultimately FSHD. PMID:21149563

  13. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and respiratory failure; what about the diaphragm?

    PubMed Central

    Hazenberg, A.; van Alfen, N.; Voet, N.B.M.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Wijkstra, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We present a case of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) with a diaphragm paralysis as the primary cause of ventilatory failure. FSHD is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with a restricted pattern of weakness. Although respiratory weakness is a relatively unknown in FSHD, it is not uncommon. Methods We report on the clinical findings of a 68-year old male who presented with severe dyspnea while supine. Results Supplementing our clinical findings with laboratory, electrophysiological and radiological performances led to the diagnosis of diaphragm paralysis. Arterial blood gas in sitting position without supplemental oxygen showed a mild hypercapnia. His sleep improved after starting non-invasive ventilation and his daytime sleepiness disappeared. Discussion We conclude that in patients with FSHD who have symptoms of nocturnal hypoventilation, an adequate assessment of the diaphragm is recommended. This is of great importance as we know that nocturnal hypoventilation can be treated effectively by non-invasive ventilation. PMID:26029575

  14. A radiation hybrid map of 15 loci on the distal long arm of chromosome 4, the region containing the gene responsible for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, S.T.; Wasmuth, J.H. ); Schutte, B. ); Weiffenbach, B. ); Washington, S.S.; Chakravarti, A. ); McElligot, D. ); Altherr, M.R. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1993-10-01

    A physical map of 4q35 was constructed through radiation hybrid analysis of 134 clones generated from the cell line HHW416, a chromosome 4-only human-hamster somatic cell hybrid. This subtelomeric region contains the as-yet-unidentified gene responsible for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. The most likely order of 15 loci within 4q35 was determined. The loci ordered on this radiation hybrid map include both genes and polymorphic loci, as well as monomorphic loci which cannot be placed on a genetic linkage map. The physical distance spanning these loci was estimated to be approximately 4.5 Mb, by using a kilobase/centiray conversion factor derived from 4p16.3 marker analysis through the same set of radiation hybrids. The comparison of this physical map to established genetic maps suggests that this region is smaller than initially estimated and that recombination rates are increased near the telomere. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Direct interplay between two candidate genes in FSHD muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Giulia; Huichalaf, Claudia H.; Caccia, Roberta; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common neuromuscular disorders. The major form of the disease (FSHD1) is linked to decrease in copy number of a 3.3-kb tandem repeated macrosatellite (D4Z4), located on chromosome 4q35. D4Z4 deletion alters chromatin structure of the locus leading to aberrant expression of nearby 4q35 genes. Given the high variability in disease onset and progression, multiple factors could contribute to the pathogenesis of FSHD. Among the FSHD candidate genes are double homeobox 4 (DUX4), encoded by the most telomeric D4Z4 unit, and FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1). DUX4 is a sequence-specific transcription factor. Here, we located putative DUX4 binding sites in the human FRG1 genomic area and we show specific DUX4 association to these regions. We found also that ectopically expressed DUX4 up-regulates the endogenous human FRG1 gene in healthy muscle cells, while DUX4 knockdown leads to a decrease in FRG1 expression in FSHD muscle cells. Moreover, DUX4 binds directly and specifically to its binding site located in the human FRG1 gene and transactivates constructs containing FRG1 genomic regions. Intriguingly, the mouse Frg1 genomic area lacks DUX4 binding sites and DUX4 is unable to activate the endogenous mouse Frg1 gene providing a possible explanation for the lack of muscle phenotype in DUX4 transgenic mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that FRG1 is a direct DUX4 transcriptional target uncovering a novel regulatory circuit contributing to FSHD. PMID:25326393

  16. Direct interplay between two candidate genes in FSHD muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Giulia; Huichalaf, Claudia H; Caccia, Roberta; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common neuromuscular disorders. The major form of the disease (FSHD1) is linked to decrease in copy number of a 3.3-kb tandem repeated macrosatellite (D4Z4), located on chromosome 4q35. D4Z4 deletion alters chromatin structure of the locus leading to aberrant expression of nearby 4q35 genes. Given the high variability in disease onset and progression, multiple factors could contribute to the pathogenesis of FSHD. Among the FSHD candidate genes are double homeobox 4 (DUX4), encoded by the most telomeric D4Z4 unit, and FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1). DUX4 is a sequence-specific transcription factor. Here, we located putative DUX4 binding sites in the human FRG1 genomic area and we show specific DUX4 association to these regions. We found also that ectopically expressed DUX4 up-regulates the endogenous human FRG1 gene in healthy muscle cells, while DUX4 knockdown leads to a decrease in FRG1 expression in FSHD muscle cells. Moreover, DUX4 binds directly and specifically to its binding site located in the human FRG1 gene and transactivates constructs containing FRG1 genomic regions. Intriguingly, the mouse Frg1 genomic area lacks DUX4 binding sites and DUX4 is unable to activate the endogenous mouse Frg1 gene providing a possible explanation for the lack of muscle phenotype in DUX4 transgenic mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that FRG1 is a direct DUX4 transcriptional target uncovering a novel regulatory circuit contributing to FSHD. PMID:25326393

  17. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a distinct regional myopathy with a novel molecular pathogenesis. FSH Consortium.

    PubMed

    Tawil, R; Figlewicz, D A; Griggs, R C; Weiffenbach, B

    1998-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common inherited diseases of muscle. Until recently, FSHD had received little attention because of its relatively benign course and the perception that it represented a syndrome rather than a distinct myopathy. Research interest into this disease was reignited with the demonstration of linkage of FSHD to chromosome 4q35 in 1990. Clinical and molecular genetic research in FSHD has since helped define it as a distinct clinical entity, outlined its natural history, and defined the primary molecular defect associated with the condition. FSHD is now known to be associated with large deletions of variable size on chromosome 4q35. These deletions, however, do not appear to disrupt a transcribed gene but are thought to interfere with the expression of a gene or genes located proximal to the deletions. These observations complicate the search for the FSHD gene but also imply the presence of a potentially novel molecular pathogenesis. PMID:9506542

  18. What's in a name? The clinical features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mul, Karlien; Lassche, Saskia; Voermans, Nicol C; Padberg, George W; Horlings, Corinne Gc; van Engelen, Baziel Gm

    2016-06-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an inherited and progressive muscle disorder. Although its name suggests otherwise, it comprises weakness of the facial, shoulder and upper arm muscles, and also of the trunk and leg muscles. Its severity and disease course vary greatly and mild or early FSHD can be difficult to recognise. Knowledge of its subtle signs and symptoms can lead directly to the correct diagnosis without diagnostic delay and without needing multiple diagnostic procedures. We give an overview of the signs and symptoms of FSHD in severe as well as in mild cases, to facilitate correct and instant recognition of this relatively common muscle disorder. PMID:26862222

  19. Evidence-based guideline summary: Evaluation, diagnosis, and management of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tawil, Rabi; Kissel, John T.; Heatwole, Chad; Pandya, Shree; Gronseth, Gary; Benatar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop recommendations for the evaluation, diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) from a systematic review and analysis of the evidence. Methods: Relevant articles were analyzed in accordance with the American Academy of Neurology classification of evidence schemes for diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment studies. Recommendations were linked to the strength of the evidence and other factors. Results and recommendations: Available genetic testing for FSHD type 1 is highly sensitive and specific. Although respiratory insufficiency occurs rarely in FSHD, patients with severe FSHD should have routine pulmonary function testing. Routine cardiac screening is not necessary in patients with FSHD without cardiac symptoms. Symptomatic retinal vascular disease is very rare in FSHD. Exudative retinopathy, however, is potentially preventable, and patients with large deletions should be screened through dilated indirect ophthalmoscopy. The prevalence of clinically relevant hearing loss is not clear. In clinical practice, patients with childhood-onset FSHD may have significant hearing loss. Because undetected hearing loss may impair language development, screening through audiometry is recommended for such patients. Musculoskeletal pain is common in FSHD and treating physicians should routinely inquire about pain. There is at present no effective pharmacologic intervention in FSHD. Available studies suggest that scapular fixation is safe and effective. Surgical scapular fixation might be cautiously offered to selected patients. Aerobic exercise in FSHD appears to be safe and potentially beneficial. On the basis of the evidence, patients with FSHD might be encouraged to engage in low-intensity aerobic exercises. PMID:26215877

  20. Computer-based assessment for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chambers, O; Milenković, J; Pražnikar, A; Tasič, J F

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents a computer-based assessment for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) diagnosis through characterisation of the fat and oedema percentages in the muscle region. A novel multi-slice method for the muscle-region segmentation in the T1-weighted magnetic resonance images is proposed using principles of the live-wire technique to find the path representing the muscle-region border. For this purpose, an exponential cost function is used that incorporates the edge information obtained after applying the edge-enhancement algorithm formerly designed for the fingerprint enhancement. The difference between the automatic segmentation and manual segmentation performed by a medical specialists is characterised using the Zijdenbos similarity index, indicating a high accuracy of the proposed method. Finally, the fat and oedema are quantified from the muscle region in the T1-weighted and T2-STIR magnetic resonance images, respectively, using the fuzzy c-mean clustering approach for 10 FSHD patients. PMID:25910520

  1. Exome sequencing identifies a novel SMCHD1 mutation in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Boyden, Steven E; Estrella, Elicia A; Jones, Takako I; Rahimov, Fedik; Yu, Timothy W; Darras, Basil T; Amato, Anthony A; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Jones, Peter L; Kunkel, Louis M; Kang, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    FSHD2 is a rare form of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) characterized by the absence of a contraction in the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat region on chromosome 4q35 that is the hallmark of FSHD1. However, hypomethylation of this region is common to both subtypes. Recently, mutations in SMCHD1 combined with a permissive 4q35 allele were reported to cause FSHD2. We identified a novel p.Lys275del SMCHD1 mutation in a family affected with FSHD2 using whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis. This mutation alters a highly conserved amino acid in the ATPase domain of SMCHD1. Subject III-11 is a male who developed asymmetrical muscle weakness characteristic of FSHD at 13 years. Physical examination revealed marked bilateral atrophy at biceps brachii, bilateral scapular winging, some asymmetrical weakness at tibialis anterior and peroneal muscles, and mild lower facial weakness. Biopsy of biceps brachii in subject II-5, the father of III-11, demonstrated lobulated fibers and dystrophic changes. Endomysial and perivascular inflammation was found, which has been reported in FSHD1 but not FSHD2. Given the previous report of SMCHD1 mutations in FSHD2 and the clinical presentations consistent with the FSHD phenotype, we conclude that the SMCHD1 mutation is the likely cause of the disease in this family. PMID:24128691

  2. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy As a Model for Epigenetic Regulation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Himeda, Charis L.; Jones, Takako I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Aberrant epigenetic regulation is an integral aspect of many diseases and complex disorders. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a progressive myopathy that afflicts individuals of all ages, is caused by disrupted genetic and epigenetic regulation of a macrosatellite repeat. FSHD provides a powerful model to investigate disease-relevant epigenetic modifiers and general mechanisms of epigenetic regulation that govern gene expression. Recent Advances: In the context of a genetically permissive allele, the one aspect of FSHD that is consistent across all known cases is the aberrant epigenetic state of the disease locus. In addition, certain mutations in the chromatin regulator SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge-domain protein 1) are sufficient to cause FSHD2 and enhance disease severity in FSHD1. Thus, there are multiple pathways to generate the epigenetic dysregulation required for FSHD. Critical Issues: Why do some individuals with the genetic requirements for FSHD develop disease pathology, while others remain asymptomatic? Similarly, disease progression is highly variable among individuals. What are the relative contributions of genetic background and environmental factors in determining disease manifestation, progression, and severity in FSHD? What is the interplay between epigenetic factors regulating the disease locus and which, if any, are viable therapeutic targets? Future Directions: Epigenetic regulation represents a potentially powerful therapeutic target for FSHD. Determining the epigenetic signatures that are predictive of disease severity and identifying the spectrum of disease modifiers in FSHD are vital to the development of effective therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1463–1482. PMID:25336259

  3. Reevaluating Measures of Disease Progression in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M.; McDermott, Michael P.; Heatwole, Chad; Martens, William B.; Pandya, Shree; van der Kooi, E.L.; Kissel, John T.; Wagner, Kathryn R.; Tawil, Rabi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) have identified potential therapeutic targets. Consequently, an accurate understanding of disease progression in FSHD is crucial for the design of future clinical trials. Data from 228 subjects in 3 clinical trials and 1 natural history study were compared to examine disease progression in FSHD. All studies utilized the same techniques for manual muscle testing and maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing. Both techniques yield a total strength score that can be followed over time as an indicator of disease progression. Whereas natural history data showed a decrease in strength over 1 year, there was an apparent increase in strength at 6 months in 2 of the 3 clinical trials in both the placebo and treatment groups, that persisted for up to 1 year for maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing. Variability estimates from the clinical trial data were consistent with those seen in the natural history data. Patients in clinical trials in FSHD may have better outcomes than those in natural history studies, regardless of treatment assignment, emphasizing the importance of placebo groups and the need for caution when interpreting the strength results of controlled and uncontrolled trials. PMID:23406877

  4. FHL1 Reduces Dystrophy in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing FSHD Muscular Dystrophy Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Sandra J.; McGrath, Meagan J.; Sriratana, Absorn; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Lynch, Gordon S.; D’Arcy, Colleen E.; Price, John T.; McLean, Catriona A.; Tupler, Rossella; Mitchell, Christina A.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1. PMID:25695429

  5. Determining the role of sarcomeric proteins in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although muscle weakness is a hallmark of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the molecular mechanisms that lead to weakness in FSHD remain largely unknown. Recent studies suggest aberrant expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle development and sarcomere contractility, and activation of pathways involved in sarcomeric protein degradation. This study will investigate the contribution of sarcomeric protein dysfunction to the pathogenesis of muscle weakness in FSHD. Methods/Design Evaluation of sarcomeric function using skinned single muscle fiber contractile studies and protein analysis in muscle biopsies (quadriceps femoris and tibialis anterior) from patients with FSHD and age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patients with other forms of muscular dystrophy and inflammatory myopathy will be included as disease controls to assess whether results are due to changes specific for FSHD, or a consequence of muscle disease in general. A total of 56 participants will be included. Extensive clinical parameters will be measured using MRI, quantitative muscle studies and physical activity assessments. Discussion This study is the first to extensively investigate muscle fiber physiology in FSHD following an earlier pilot study suggesting sarcomeric dysfunction in FSHD. The results obtained in this study will increase the understanding of the pathophysiology of muscle weakness in FSHD, and possibly identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24119284

  6. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy myoblasts efficiently repair moderate levels of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bou Saada, Yara; Dib, Carla; Dmitriev, Petr; Hamade, Aline; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscular dystrophy linked to a deletion of a subset of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeats accompanied by a chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 array on chromosome 4q. In vitro, FSHD primary myoblasts show altered expression of oxidative-related genes and are more susceptible to oxidative stress. Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene, encoded within each D4Z4 unit, is normally transcriptionally silenced but is found aberrantly expressed in skeletal muscles of FSHD patients. Its expression leads to a deregulation of DUX4 target genes including those implicated in redox balance. Here, we assessed DNA repair efficiency of oxidative DNA damage in FSHD myoblasts and DUX4-transfected myoblasts. We have shown that the DNA repair activity is altered neither in FSHD myoblasts nor in immortalized human myoblasts transiently expressing DUX4. DNA damage caused by moderate doses of an oxidant is efficiently repaired while FSHD myoblasts exposed for 24 h to high levels of oxidative stress accumulated more DNA damage than normal myoblasts, suggesting that FSHD myoblasts remain more vulnerable to oxidative stress at high doses of oxidants. PMID:26860865

  7. β-catenin is central to DUX4-driven network rewiring in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Knopp, Paul; Moyle, Louise A.; Severini, Simone; Orrell, Richard W.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Zammit, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an incurable disease, characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. Genetically, FSHD is characterized by contraction or hypomethylation of repeat D4Z4 units on chromosome 4, which causes aberrant expression of the transcription factor DUX4 from the last repeat. Many genes have been implicated in FSHD pathophysiology, but an integrated molecular model is currently lacking. We developed a novel differential network methodology, Interactome Sparsification and Rewiring (InSpiRe), which detects network rewiring between phenotypes by integrating gene expression data with known protein interactions. Using InSpiRe, we performed a meta-analysis of multiple microarray datasets from FSHD muscle biopsies, then removed secondary rewiring using non-FSHD datasets, to construct a unified network of rewired interactions. Our analysis identified β-catenin as the main coordinator of FSHD-associated protein interaction signalling, with pathways including canonical Wnt, HIF1-α and TNF-α clearly perturbed. To detect transcriptional changes directly elicited by DUX4, gene expression profiling was performed using microarrays on murine myoblasts. This revealed that DUX4 significantly modified expression of the genes in our FSHD network. Furthermore, we experimentally confirmed that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is affected by DUX4 in murine myoblasts. Thus, we provide the first unified molecular map of FSHD signalling, capable of uncovering pathomechanisms and guiding therapeutic development. PMID:25551153

  8. β-Catenin is central to DUX4-driven network rewiring in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Christopher R S; Knopp, Paul; Moyle, Louise A; Severini, Simone; Orrell, Richard W; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Zammit, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an incurable disease, characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. Genetically, FSHD is characterized by contraction or hypomethylation of repeat D4Z4 units on chromosome 4, which causes aberrant expression of the transcription factor DUX4 from the last repeat. Many genes have been implicated in FSHD pathophysiology, but an integrated molecular model is currently lacking. We developed a novel differential network methodology, Interactome Sparsification and Rewiring (InSpiRe), which detects network rewiring between phenotypes by integrating gene expression data with known protein interactions. Using InSpiRe, we performed a meta-analysis of multiple microarray datasets from FSHD muscle biopsies, then removed secondary rewiring using non-FSHD datasets, to construct a unified network of rewired interactions. Our analysis identified β-catenin as the main coordinator of FSHD-associated protein interaction signalling, with pathways including canonical Wnt, HIF1-α and TNF-α clearly perturbed. To detect transcriptional changes directly elicited by DUX4, gene expression profiling was performed using microarrays on murine myoblasts. This revealed that DUX4 significantly modified expression of the genes in our FSHD network. Furthermore, we experimentally confirmed that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is affected by DUX4 in murine myoblasts. Thus, we provide the first unified molecular map of FSHD signalling, capable of uncovering pathomechanisms and guiding therapeutic development. PMID:25551153

  9. Genetics Home Reference: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Padberg GW, Lunt PW, van der Maarel SM. Best practice guidelines on genetic diagnostics of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: ... Reviewed : August 2014 Published : August 30, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a ... of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  10. Hemizygosity for SMCHD1 in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Type 2: Consequences for 18p Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lemmers, Richard J L F; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L; van der Vliet, Patrick J; Donlin-Smith, Colleen M; Nations, Sharon P; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Heard, Patricia; Bakker, Bert; Tapscott, Stephen; Cody, Jannine D; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2015-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is most often associated with variegated expression in somatic cells of the normally repressed DUX4 gene within the D4Z4-repeat array. The most common form, FSHD1, is caused by a D4Z4-repeat array contraction to a size of 1-10 units (normal range 10-100 units). The less common form, FSHD2, is characterized by D4Z4 CpG hypomethylation and is most often caused by loss-of-function mutations in the structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain 1 (SMCHD1) gene on chromosome 18p. The chromatin modifier SMCHD1 is necessary to maintain a repressed D4Z4 chromatin state. Here, we describe two FSHD2 families with a 1.2-Mb deletion encompassing the SMCHD1 gene. Numerical aberrations of chromosome 18 are relatively common and the majority of 18p deletion syndrome (18p-) cases have, such as these FSHD2 families, only one copy of SMCHD1. Our finding therefore raises the possibility that 18p- cases are at risk of developing FSHD. To address this possibility, we combined genome-wide array analysis data with D4Z4 CpG methylation and repeat array sizes in individuals with 18p- and conclude that approximately 1:8 18p- cases might be at risk of developing FSHD. PMID:25820463

  11. Identification of two novel SMCHD1 sequence variants in families with FSHD-like muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Winston, Jincy; Duerden, Laura; Mort, Matthew; Frayling, Ian M; Rogers, Mark T; Upadhyaya, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 1 (FSHD1) is caused by a contraction in the number of D4Z4 repeats on chromosome 4, resulting in relaxation of D4Z4 chromatin causing inappropriate expression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle. Clinical severity is inversely related to the number of repeats. In contrast, FSHD2 patients also have inappropriate expression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle, but due to constitutional mutations in SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1), which cause global hypomethylation and hence general relaxation of chromatin. Thirty patients originally referred for FSHD testing were screened for SMCHD1 mutations. Twenty-nine had >11 D4Z4 repeats. SMCHD1 c.1040+1G>A, a pathogenic splice-site variant, was identified in a FSHD1 family with a borderline number of D4Z4 repeats (10) and a variable phenotype (in which a LMNA1 sequence variant was previously described), and SMCHD1 c.2606 G>T, a putative missense variant (p.Gly869Val) with strong in vitro indications of pathogenicity, was identified in a family with an unusual muscular dystrophy with some FSHD-like features. The two families described here emphasise the genetic complexity of muscular dystrophies. As SMCHD1 has a wider role in global genomic methylation, the possibility exists that it could be involved in other complex undiagnosed muscle disorders. Thus far, only 15 constitutional mutations have been identified in SMCHD1, and these two sequence variants add to the molecular and phenotypic spectrum associated with FSHD. PMID:24755953

  12. Phenotypic and pathologic evaluation of the myd mouse. A candidate model for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.D.; Rapisarda, D.; Bailey, H.L.

    1995-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown pathogenesis which is characterized by weakness of the face and shoulder girdle. It is associated with a sensorineural hearing loss which may be subclinical. FSHD has been mapped to the distalmost portion of 4q35, although the gene has not yet been identified. Distal 4q has homology with a region of mouse chromosome 8 to which a mouse mutant, myodystrophy (myd), has been mapped. Muscle from homozygotes for the myd mutation appears dystrophic, showing degenerating and regenerating fibers, inflammatory infiltrates, central nuclei, and variation in fiber size. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials reveal a sensorineural hearing loss in myd homozygotes. Based on the homologous genetic map locations, and the phenotypic syndrome of dystrophic muscle with sensorineural hearing loss, we suggest that myd represents an animal model for the human disease FSHD. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  13. High prevalence of incomplete right bundle branch block in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy without cardiac symptoms

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Gaby Pons; van der Kooi, Elly; Behin, Anthony; Smeets, Joep; Timmermans, Janneke; van der Maarel, Silvère; Padberg, George; Voermans, Nicol; van Engelen, Baziel

    2014-01-01

    Summary The exact prevalence and nature of cardiac involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is unknown. Nevertheless, the current opinion is that symptomatic cardiac disease is rare. We performed a cardiac screening [electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography in the event of ECG abnormalities] in 75 genetically confirmed, ambulant FSHD patients without cardiac symptoms, with an eight-year follow-up of 57 patients, and compared the findings with results of previously performed cardiac screenings in the normal population. Baseline ECG demonstrated incomplete right bundle branch block (RBBB) in 33%, complete RBBB in 4%, and other minor abnormalities in 16%. Echocardiography showed no abnormalities. No significant changes were found after eight years of follow-up. Comparison with ECG abnormalities in the normal population showed a higher prevalence of incomplete RBBB (9.7 times higher) and of complete RBBB (4.8 times higher) in FSHD patients. This study in cardiac asymptomatic FSHD patients shows i) increased prevalence of incomplete RBBB in the absence of cardiomyopathy; ii) no progression of these abnormalities during eight years of follow-up. We conclude that FSHD patients without cardiac complaints do not need specific cardiac screening or surveillance. Furthermore, the increased prevalence of incomplete RBBB in the absence of cardiomyopathy suggests a selective involvement of the His-Purkinje system in FSHD. PMID:25473735

  14. Symptom Burden in Persons with Myotonic and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amanda E.; McMullen, Kara; Jensen, Mark P.; Carter, Gregory T.; Molton, Ivan R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examines the prevalence of pain, fatigue, imbalance, memory impairment and vision loss in persons with myotonic and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and their association with functioning. Design A survey (n=170) included measures of severity (0–10 scales) and course of these symptoms, as well as measures of social integration, home competency, mental health and productive activity. Descriptive and regression analyses examined the associations between symptoms and functioning. Results Fatigue (91%), imbalance (82%) and pain (77%) were most commonly reported. The most severe symptom was fatigue (mean severity 5.14 ± 2.81), followed by imbalance (4.95 ± 3.25). Symptoms were most likely to stay the same or worsen since onset. Controlling for potential medical and demographic confounds, symptoms were associated with 17% of the mental health variance, 10% of home competency, 10% of social integration, 16% of productive activity for DM1 and 12% of productive activity for FSHD. Conclusions Pain, fatigue and imbalance are common in persons with muscular dystrophy. Interventions may be useful to mitigate their impact on functioning. Further research should examine these relationships to guide clinical practices. PMID:24247759

  15. Impact of Biopsychosocial Factors on Chronic Pain in Persons With Myotonic and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Jordi; Raichle, Katherine A.; Carter, Gregory T.; O’Brien, Sarah A.; Abresch, Richard T.; McDonald, Craig M.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the role of biopsychosocial factors in patients with type 1 myotonic and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (MMD1/FSHD) with chronic pain. Associations between psychosocial factors were found to be important in other samples of persons with pain and both psychological functioning and pain interference in a sample of patients suffering from MMD/FSHD. Prospective, multiple group, survey study of 182 patients with confirmed MMD1 and FSHD. Participants completed surveys assessing pain interference and psychological functioning, as well as psychosocial, demographic, and injury-related variables. Analyses indicated that greater catastrophizing was associated with increased pain interference and poorer psychological functioning, pain attitudes were significantly related to both pain interference and psychological functioning, and coping responses were significantly related only to pain interference. In addition, greater perceived social support was associated with better psychological functioning. The results support the use of studying pain in persons with MMD/FSHD from a biopsychosocial perspective, and the importance of identifying psychosocial factors that may play a role in the adjustment to and response to pain secondary to MMD/FSHD. PMID:19414560

  16. Transcriptional regulation differs in affected facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patients compared to asymptomatic related carriers

    PubMed Central

    Arashiro, Patricia; Eisenberg, Iris; Kho, Alvin T.; Cerqueira, Antonia M. P.; Canovas, Marta; Silva, Helga C. A.; Pavanello, Rita C. M.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Kunkel, Louis M.; Zatz, Mayana

    2009-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscle disorder that has been associated with a contraction of 3.3-kb repeats on chromosome 4q35. FSHD is characterized by a wide clinical inter- and intrafamilial variability, ranging from wheelchair-bound patients to asymptomatic carriers. Our study is unique in comparing the gene expression profiles from related affected, asymptomatic carrier, and control individuals. Our results suggest that the expression of genes on chromosome 4q is altered in affected and asymptomatic individuals. Remarkably, the changes seen in asymptomatic samples are largely in products of genes encoding several chemokines, whereas the changes seen in affected samples are largely in genes governing the synthesis of GPI-linked proteins and histone acetylation. Besides this, the affected patient and related asymptomatic carrier share the 4qA161 haplotype. Thus, these polymorphisms by themselves do not explain the pathogenicity of the contracted allele. Interestingly, our results also suggest that the miRNAs might mediate the regulatory network in FSHD. Together, our results support the previous evidence that FSHD may be caused by transcriptional dysregulation of multiple genes, in cis and in trans, and suggest some factors potentially important for FSHD pathogenesis. The study of the gene expression profiles from asymptomatic carriers and related affected patients is a unique approach to try to enhance our understanding of the missing link between the contraction in D4Z4 repeats and muscle disease, while minimizing the effects of differences resulting from genetic background. PMID:19339494

  17. DNA Methylation Analysis of the Macrosatellite Repeat Associated with FSHD Muscular Dystrophy at Single Nucleotide Level

    PubMed Central

    Huichalaf, Claudia; Micheloni, Stefano; Ferri, Giulia; Caccia, Roberta; Gabellini, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common inherited diseases of the skeletal muscle. It is characterized by asymmetric muscle weakness and variable penetrance. FSHD is linked to a reduction in copy number of the D4Z4 3.3 kb macrosatellite repeat, located in 4q35. This causes the epigenetic de-repression of FSHD candidate genes leading to disease. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism responsible for silencing of FSHD candidate genes in healthy subjects is not fully understood. While a role for DNA methylation has been suggested, so far there is limited information regarding the methylation status of the 325 CpGs contained in each D4Z4 unit. Using a human/rodent monochromosomal hybrid cell line containing a single human chromosome 4, we performed an in depth analysis of DNA methylation for the majority of the CpGs inside D4Z4 at single nucleotide level. We found that D4Z4 is not uniformly methylated and that the level of DNA methylation does not correlate with the density of CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, in several D4Z4 regions characterized by near complete methylation, we found specific unmethylated CpGs. These elements are enriched in transcription factor binding sites that could be involved in muscle-specific D4Z4 activity. Our approach also detected differential methylation among different D4Z4 units, suggesting that the D4Z4 array is a mosaic of euchromatic and heterochromatic domains. Finally, we found that DNA methylation and histone de-acetylation are required to maintain FSHD candidate genes repressed. Taken together, our data underscore new players involved in the epigenetic regulation of the FSHD locus that could be targeted for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25545674

  18. Deregulation of the Protocadherin Gene FAT1 Alters Muscle Shapes: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Nathalie; Herberth, Balàzs; Bartoli, Marc; Puppo, Francesca; Dumonceaux, Julie; Zimmermann, Angela; Denadai, Simon; Lebossé, Marie; Roche, Stephane; Geng, Linda; Magdinier, Frederique; Attarian, Shahram; Bernard, Rafaelle; Maina, Flavio; Levy, Nicolas; Helmbacher, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Generation of skeletal muscles with forms adapted to their function is essential for normal movement. Muscle shape is patterned by the coordinated polarity of collectively migrating myoblasts. Constitutive inactivation of the protocadherin gene Fat1 uncoupled individual myoblast polarity within chains, altering the shape of selective groups of muscles in the shoulder and face. These shape abnormalities were followed by early onset regionalised muscle defects in adult Fat1-deficient mice. Tissue-specific ablation of Fat1 driven by Pax3-cre reproduced muscle shape defects in limb but not face muscles, indicating a cell-autonomous contribution of Fat1 in migrating muscle precursors. Strikingly, the topography of muscle abnormalities caused by Fat1 loss-of-function resembles that of human patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). FAT1 lies near the critical locus involved in causing FSHD, and Fat1 mutant mice also show retinal vasculopathy, mimicking another symptom of FSHD, and showed abnormal inner ear patterning, predictive of deafness, reminiscent of another burden of FSHD. Muscle-specific reduction of FAT1 expression and promoter silencing was observed in foetal FSHD1 cases. CGH array-based studies identified deletion polymorphisms within a putative regulatory enhancer of FAT1, predictive of tissue-specific depletion of FAT1 expression, which preferentially segregate with FSHD. Our study identifies FAT1 as a critical determinant of muscle form, misregulation of which associates with FSHD. PMID:23785297

  19. A unique library of myogenic cells from facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy subjects and unaffected relatives: family, disease and cell function

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Sachiko; Chen, Jennifer CJ; Rahimov, Fedik; Beermann, Mary Lou; Hanger, Kendal; Bibat, Genila M; Wagner, Kathryn R; Kunkel, Louis M; Emerson, Charles P; Miller, Jeffrey Boone

    2012-01-01

    To explore possible mechanisms of pathology in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), we generated a novel library of myogenic cells composed of paired cultures derived from FSHD subjects and unaffected first-degree relatives. We prepared cells from biopsies of both biceps and deltoid muscles obtained from each of 10 FSHD and 9 unaffected donors. We used this new collection to determine how family background and disease affected patterns of growth and differentiation, expression of a panel of candidate, and muscle-specific genes, and responses to exogenous stressors. We found that FSHD and unaffected cells had, on average, indistinguishable patterns of differentiation, gene expression, and dose-response curves to staurosporine, paraquat, hydrogen peroxide, and glutathione depletion. Differentiated FSHD and unaffected cultures were both more sensitive to glutathione depletion than proliferating cultures, but showed similar responses to paraquat, staurosporine, and peroxide. For stress responses, the sample size was sufficient to detect a 10% change in effect at the observed variability with a power of >99%. In contrast, for each of these properties, we found significant differences among cells from different cohorts, and these differences were independent of disease status, gender, or muscle biopsied. Thus, though none of the properties we examined could be used to reliably distinguish between FSHD and unaffected cells, family of origin was an important contributor to gene-expression patterns and stressor responses in cultures of both FSHD and unaffected myogenic cells. PMID:22108603

  20. A feedback loop between nonsense-mediated decay and the retrogene DUX4 in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qing; Snider, Lauren; Jagannathan, Sujatha; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Tapscott, Stephen J; Bradley, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a muscular dystrophy caused by inefficient epigenetic repression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite array and somatic expression of the DUX4 retrogene. DUX4 is a double homeobox transcription factor that is normally expressed in the testis and causes apoptosis and FSHD when misexpressed in skeletal muscle. The mechanism(s) of DUX4 toxicity in muscle is incompletely understood. We report that DUX4-triggered proteolytic degradation of UPF1, a central component of the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) machinery, is associated with profound NMD inhibition, resulting in global accumulation of RNAs normally degraded as NMD substrates. DUX4 mRNA is itself degraded by NMD, such that inhibition of NMD by DUX4 protein stabilizes DUX4 mRNA through a double-negative feedback loop in FSHD muscle cells. This feedback loop illustrates an unexpected mode of autoregulatory behavior of a transcription factor, is consistent with 'bursts' of DUX4 expression in FSHD muscle, and has implications for FSHD pathogenesis. PMID:25564732

  1. Design, set-up and utility of the UK facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patient registry.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Wood, Libby; Fernandez-Torron, Roberto; Williams, Maggie; Smith, Debbie; Lunt, Peter; Hudson, Judith; Norwood, Fiona; Orrell, Richard; Willis, Tracey; Hilton-Jones, David; Rafferty, Karen; Guglieri, Michela; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2016-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disease estimated to affect 1/15,000 people. Through basic research, remarkable progress has been made towards the development of targeted therapies. Patient identification, through registries or other means is essential for trial-readiness. The UK FSHD Patient Registry is a patient initiated registry that collects standardised and internationally agreed dataset of self-reported clinical details combined with professionally verified genetic information. It includes four additional questionnaires to capture patient reported outcomes related to pain, quality of life and scapular fixation. Between 2013 and 2015, 518 patients registered 243 males, 241 females with a mean age of 47.8 years. Most of the patients have FSHD type 1 (91.7 %), and weakness of the facial (59.2 %) was the most prevalent symptom at onset, followed by shoulder-girdle muscles (53.3 %) and distal (22.45 %) or proximal lower limb weakness (14.8 %). 85.57 % patients were ambulant or ambulant with assistance at the time of registration, 7.9 % report respiratory insufficiency. The registry has demonstrated utility with the recruitment of patients for a natural history study of infantile onset FSHD, and the longitudinal analysis of patient-related outcomes will provide much-needed baseline information to power future trials. The internationally agreed core dataset enables national registries to participate in a "Global FSHD registry". We suggest that the registry's ability to interoperate with other large datasets will be instrumental for sharing and exploiting data globally. PMID:27159994

  2. Evolutionary analysis of the 3.3 kb tandem repeat sequence associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, J.E.; Clark, L.N.; Wienberg, J.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant progressive disorder affecting primarily the facial and shoulder girdle muscles. The FSHD gene has been localized to distal 4q35. Genetic and physical mapping has identified a polymorphic 3.3 kb tandem repeat (D4Z4) which is closely lined to the disease. In the majority of sporadic cases there are de novo DNA rearrangements resulting in loss of an integral number of D4Z4 repeats. Sequencing of D4Z4 showed it to contain two homeoboxes and a previously identified human repeat sequences (L Sau). At present, it is not known how these rearrangements affect the pathogenesis of FSHD; however, D4Z4 clearly has an important function. It is part of a complex, dispersed human tandem repeat family which is evolutionarily conserved with a marked difference in copy number in humans and great apes compared to other species. Given the unique structure and organization of the D4Z4 repeat and its role in the FSHD disease mechanism, we have further investigated the evolutionary conservation of D4Z4. Comparison of Southern blot data from Old and New World monkeys, great apes, and humans shows that this increase in the number of D4Z4-like loci occurred after the divergence of great apes and Old World monkeys. The localization of these loci in great apes has been investigated using fluorescent in situ hybridization. These studies provide evidence that the D4Z4 repeat has evolved very recently in the great ape lineage. An understanding of how this repeat family has arisen and identification of the ancestral locus in Old World monkeys should provide clues as to the role of this sequence in FSHD.

  3. Loss of epigenetic silencing of the DUX4 transcription factor gene in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Jane E

    2015-10-15

    Current genetic and molecular evidence best supports an epigenetic mechanism for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), whereby de-repression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite array leads to aberrant expression of the DUX4 transcription factor in skeletal muscle. This de-repression is triggered by either array contraction or (more rarely) by mutation of the SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1) gene. Activation of DUX4 targets, including germline genes and several mammalian retrotransposons, then drives pathogenesis. A direct role for DUX4 mRNA in suppression of nonsense-mediated decay pathways has recently been demonstrated and may also contribute to muscle pathology. Loss of D4Z4 repression in FSHD is observed as hypomethylation of the array accompanied by loss of repressive chromatin marks. The molecular mechanisms of D4Z4 repression are poorly understood, but recent data have identified an Argonaute (AGO)-dependent siRNA pathway. Targeting this pathway by exogenous siRNAs could be a therapeutic strategy for FSHD. PMID:26113644

  4. A Long ncRNA Links Copy Number Variation to a Polycomb/Trithorax Epigenetic Switch in FSHD Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cabianca, Daphne S.; Casa, Valentina; Bodega, Beatrice; Xynos, Alexandros; Ginelli, Enrico; Tanaka, Yujiro; Gabellini, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Summary Repetitive sequences account for more than 50% of the human genome. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease associated with reduction in the copy number of the D4Z4 repeat mapping to 4q35. By an unknown mechanism, D4Z4 deletion causes an epigenetic switch leading to de-repression of 4q35 genes. Here we show that the Polycomb group of epigenetic repressors targets D4Z4 in healthy subjects and that D4Z4 deletion is associated with reduced Polycomb silencing in FSHD patients. We identify DBE-T, a chromatin-associated noncoding RNA produced selectively in FSHD patients that coordinates de-repression of 4q35 genes. DBE-T recruits the Trithorax group protein Ash1L to the FSHD locus, driving histone H3 lysine 36 dimethylation, chromatin remodeling, and 4q35 gene transcription. This study provides insights into the biological function of repetitive sequences in regulating gene expression and shows how mutations of such elements can influence the progression of a human genetic disease. PMID:22541069

  5. [Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy: Importance of Monitoring Neuromuscular Function at Multiple Sites].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shuhei; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kiyosawa, Kenkichi; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Kawamata, Mikito

    2015-12-01

    A 39-year-old female with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) was scheduled for thoracoscopic resection of an anterior mediastinal tumor. She had slowly progressive weakness and atrophy in the fascial and shoulder girdle muscles. General anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol, remifentanil, and fentanyl combined with thoracic paravertebral block. Rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade was evaluated with acceleromyography at the corrugator supercilii, masseter, and adductor pollicis muscles. There was no reaction at the atrophic corrugator supercilii muscle in response to train-of-four (TOF) stimulation even before rocuronium administration. In contrast twitch responses at the masseter and adductor pollicis muscles to TOF stimulation could be evoked and the duration of action of rocuronium was found to be similar to that of the normal population. The perioperative course was uneventful. Neuromuscular monitoring sites should be carefully selected in FSHD patients because of possible inability to monitor neuromuscular function at the atrophic muscles. PMID:26790332

  6. Gait propulsion in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and ankle plantarflexor weakness.

    PubMed

    Rijken, N H M; van Engelen, B G M; de Rooy, J W J; Weerdesteyn, V; Geurts, A C H

    2015-02-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is a slowly progressive hereditary disorder resulting in fatty infiltration of eventually most skeletal muscles. Weakness of trunk and leg muscles causes problems with postural balance and gait, and is associated with an increased fall risk. Although drop foot and related tripping are common problems in FSHD, gait impairments are poorly documented. The effect of ankle plantarflexor involvement on gait propulsion has never been addressed. In addition to ankle plantarflexion, gait propulsion is generated through hip flexion and hip extension. Compensatory shifts between these propulsion sources occur when specific muscles are affected. Such a shift may be expected in patients with FSHD since the calves may show early fatty infiltration, whereas iliopsoas and gluteus maximus muscles are often spared for a longer time. In the current study, magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the percentage of unaffected calf, iliopsoas and gluteus maximus muscles. Joint powers were analyzed in 10 patients with FSHD at comfortable and maximum walking speed to determine the contribution of ankle plantarflexor, hip flexor and hip extensor power to propulsion. Associations between muscle morphology, power generation and gait speed were assessed. Based on multivariate regression analysis, ankle plantarflexor power was the only factor that uniquely contributed to the explained variance of comfortable (R(2)=80%) and maximum (R(2)=86%) walking speed. Although the iliopsoas muscles were largely unaffected, they appeared to be sub-maximally recruited. This submaximal recruitment may be related to poor trunk stability, resulting in a disproportionate effect of calf muscle affliction on gait speed in patients with FSHD. PMID:25687333

  7. ZNF555 protein binds to transcriptional activator site of 4qA allele and ANT1: potential implication in Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elena; Rich, Jeremy; Karoutas, Adam; Tarlykov, Pavel; Cochet, Emilie; Malysheva, Daria; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Ogryzko, Vasily; Pirozhkova, Iryna

    2015-09-30

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an epi/genetic satellite disease associated with at least two satellite sequences in 4q35: (i) D4Z4 macrosatellite and (ii) β-satellite repeats (BSR), a prevalent part of the 4qA allele. Most of the recent FSHD studies have been focused on a DUX4 transcript inside D4Z4 and its tandem contraction in FSHD patients. However, the D4Z4-contraction alone is not pathological, which would also require the 4qA allele. Since little is known about BSR, we investigated the 4qA BSR functional role in the transcriptional control of the FSHD region 4q35. We have shown that an individual BSR possesses enhancer activity leading to activation of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 1 gene (ANT1), a major FSHD candidate gene. We have identified ZNF555, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a putative transcriptional factor highly expressed in human primary myoblasts that interacts with the BSR enhancer site and impacts the ANT1 promoter activity in FSHD myoblasts. The discovery of the functional role of the 4qA allele and ZNF555 in the transcriptional control of ANT1 advances our understanding of FSHD pathogenesis and provides potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26184877

  8. ZNF555 protein binds to transcriptional activator site of 4qA allele and ANT1: potential implication in Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Elena; Rich, Jeremy; Karoutas, Adam; Tarlykov, Pavel; Cochet, Emilie; Malysheva, Daria; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Ogryzko, Vasily; Pirozhkova, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an epi/genetic satellite disease associated with at least two satellite sequences in 4q35: (i) D4Z4 macrosatellite and (ii) β-satellite repeats (BSR), a prevalent part of the 4qA allele. Most of the recent FSHD studies have been focused on a DUX4 transcript inside D4Z4 and its tandem contraction in FSHD patients. However, the D4Z4-contraction alone is not pathological, which would also require the 4qA allele. Since little is known about BSR, we investigated the 4qA BSR functional role in the transcriptional control of the FSHD region 4q35. We have shown that an individual BSR possesses enhancer activity leading to activation of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 1 gene (ANT1), a major FSHD candidate gene. We have identified ZNF555, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a putative transcriptional factor highly expressed in human primary myoblasts that interacts with the BSR enhancer site and impacts the ANT1 promoter activity in FSHD myoblasts. The discovery of the functional role of the 4qA allele and ZNF555 in the transcriptional control of ANT1 advances our understanding of FSHD pathogenesis and provides potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26184877

  9. Muscle Quantitative MR Imaging and Clustering Analysis in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lareau-Trudel, Emilie; Le Troter, Arnaud; Ghattas, Badih; Pouget, Jean; Attarian, Shahram; Bendahan, David; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD1) is the third most common inherited muscular dystrophy. Considering the highly variable clinical expression and the slow disease progression, sensitive outcome measures would be of interest. Methods and Findings Using muscle MRI, we assessed muscular fatty infiltration in the lower limbs of 35 FSHD1 patients and 22 healthy volunteers by two methods: a quantitative imaging (qMRI) combined with a dedicated automated segmentation method performed on both thighs and a standard T1-weighted four-point visual scale (visual score) on thighs and legs. Each patient had a clinical evaluation including manual muscular testing, Clinical Severity Score (CSS) scale and MFM scale. The intramuscular fat fraction measured using qMRI in the thighs was significantly higher in patients (21.9 ± 20.4%) than in volunteers (3.6 ± 2.8%) (p<0.001). In patients, the intramuscular fat fraction was significantly correlated with the muscular fatty infiltration in the thighs evaluated by the mean visual score (p<0.001). However, we observed a ceiling effect of the visual score for patients with a severe fatty infiltration clearly indicating the larger accuracy of the qMRI approach. Mean intramuscular fat fraction was significantly correlated with CSS scale (p≤0.01) and was inversely correlated with MMT score, MFM subscore D1 (p≤0.01) further illustrating the sensitivity of the qMRI approach. Overall, a clustering analysis disclosed three different imaging patterns of muscle involvement for the thighs and the legs which could be related to different stages of the disease and put forth muscles which could be of interest for a subtle investigation of the disease progression and/or the efficiency of any therapeutic strategy. Conclusion The qMRI provides a sensitive measurement of fat fraction which should also be of high interest to assess disease progression and any therapeutic strategy in FSHD1 patients. PMID:26181385

  10. Defective Regulation of MicroRNA Target Genes in Myoblasts from Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients*

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Petr; Stankevicins, Luiza; Ansseau, Eugenie; Petrov, Andrei; Barat, Ana; Dessen, Philippe; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Lazar, Vladimir; Labourer, Emmanuel; Belayew, Alexandra; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant hereditary neuromuscular disorder linked to the deletion of an integral number of 3.3-kb-long macrosatellite repeats (D4Z4) within the subtelomeric region of chromosome 4q. Most genes identified in this region are overexpressed in FSHD myoblasts, including the double homeobox genes DUX4 and DUX4c. We have carried out a simultaneous miRNome/transcriptome analysis of FSHD and control primary myoblasts. Of 365 microRNAs (miRNAs) analyzed in this study, 29 were found to be differentially expressed between FSHD and normal myoblasts. Twenty-one microRNAs (miR-1, miR-7, miR-15a, miR-22, miR-30e, miR-32, miR-107, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-139, miR-152, miR-206, miR-223, miR-302b, miR-331, miR-362, miR-365, miR-382, miR-496, miR-532, miR-654, and miR-660) were up-regulated, and eight were down-regulated (miR-15b, miR-20b, miR-21, miR-25, miR-100, miR-155, miR-345, and miR-594). Twelve of the miRNAs up-regulated in FHSD were also up-regulated in the cells ectopically expressing DUX4c, suggesting that this gene could regulate miRNA gene transcription. The myogenic miRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 were highly expressed in FSHD myoblasts, which nonetheless did not prematurely enter myogenic differentiation. This could be accounted for by the fact that in FSHD myoblasts, functionally important target genes, including cell cycle, DNA damage, and ubiquitination-related genes, escape myogenic microRNA-induced repression. PMID:24145033

  11. Genetic mapping of human heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator and its relationship to the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Chung, A.B.; Torroni, A.; Stepien, G.; Shoffner, J.M.; Costigan, D.A.; Polak, M.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.; Winokur, S.T.

    1993-05-01

    The mitochondrial heart-skeletal muscle adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT1) was regionally mapped to 4q35-qter using somatic cell hybrids containing deleted chromosome 4. The regional location was further refined through family studies using ANT1 intron and promoter nucleotide polymorphisms recognized by the restriction endonucleases MboII, NdeI, and HaeIII. Two alleles were found, each at a frequency of 0.5. The ANT1 locus was found to be closely linked to D4S139, D4S171, and the dominant skeletal muscle disease locus facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A crossover that separated D4S171 and ANT1 from D4S139 was found. Since previous studies have established the chromosome 4 map order as centromere-D4S171-D4S139-FSHD, it was concluded that ANT1 is located on the side of D4S139, that is opposite from FSHD. This conclusion was confirmed by sequencing the exons and analyzing the transcripts of ANT1 from several FSHD patients and finding no evidence of aberration. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Low D4Z4 copy number and gender difference in Korean patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Jun; Hong, Ji-Man; Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Seok; Shin, Ha Young; Kim, Seung Min; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Ji Hyun; Choi, Young-Chul

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical and genetic features of Korean patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD), and assessed the impact of molecular defects on phenotypic expression. We enrolled 104 FSHD patients from 87 unrelated Korean families with D4Z4 repeat array of less than 11 copies on 4q35. Sixty-one men and forty-three women were enrolled. Median D4Z4 copy number was 4 units and 99 (95%) Korean patients with FSHD carried 1-6 units. The median age at symptom onset was 13 [interquartile range: 8-17] years old. In 100 symptomatic patients, muscle weakness began in facial muscles in 58 patients, shoulder-girdle muscles in 37, and pelvic-girdle muscles in 5. Disease severity was significantly correlated with D4Z4 copy number. In addition, women were more severely affected than men even though there were no differences in age at examination or in D4Z4 copy number between the two genders. This gender difference among Korean patients was the opposite of analysis on individuals of European ancestry. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated the new diagnostic threshold for FSHD in Koreans based on the D4Z4 repeat array size distribution from 1 to 6 units and expanded the clinical spectrum. PMID:26319123

  13. Distinct Disease Phases in Muscles of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients Identified by MR Detected Fat Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Barbara H.; Voet, Nicoline B. M.; Nabuurs, Christine I.; Kan, Hermien E.; de Rooy, Jacky W. J.; Geurts, Alexander C.; Padberg, George W.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an untreatable disease, characterized by asymmetric progressive weakness of skeletal muscle with fatty infiltration. Although the main genetic defect has been uncovered, the downstream mechanisms causing FSHD are not understood. The objective of this study was to determine natural disease state and progression in muscles of FSHD patients and to establish diagnostic biomarkers by quantitative MRI of fat infiltration and phosphorylated metabolites. MRI was performed at 3T with dedicated coils on legs of 41 patients (28 men/13 women, age 34–76 years), of which eleven were re-examined after four months of usual care. Muscular fat fraction was determined with multi spin-echo and T1 weighted MRI, edema by TIRM and phosphorylated metabolites by 3D 31P MR spectroscopic imaging. Fat fractions were compared to clinical severity, muscle force, age, edema and phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP. Longitudinal intramuscular fat fraction variation was analyzed by linear regression. Increased intramuscular fat correlated with age (p<0.05), FSHD severity score (p<0.0001), inversely with muscle strength (p<0.0001), and also occurred sub-clinically. Muscles were nearly dichotomously divided in those with high and with low fat fraction, with only 13% having an intermediate fat fraction. The intramuscular fat fraction along the muscle’s length, increased from proximal to distal. This fat gradient was the steepest for intermediate fat infiltrated muscles (0.07±0.01/cm, p<0.001). Leg muscles in this intermediate phase showed a decreased PCr/ATP (p<0.05) and the fastest increase in fatty infiltration over time (0.18±0.15/year, p<0.001), which correlated with initial edema (p<0.01), if present. Thus, in the MR assessment of fat infiltration as biomarker for diseased muscles, the intramuscular fat distribution needs to be taken into account. Our results indicate that healthy individual leg muscles become diseased by entering a progressive phase

  14. The D4Z4 Macrosatellite Repeat Acts as a CTCF and A-Type Lamins-Dependent Insulator in Facio-Scapulo-Humeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Boussouar, Amina; Foerster, Andrea M.; Rondier, Delphine; Sacconi, Sabrina; Desnuelle, Claude; Gilson, Eric; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2009-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to Facio-Scapulo-Humeral Dystrophy (FSHD), which is linked to the shortening of the array of D4Z4 repeats at the 4q35 locus. The consequence of this rearrangement remains enigmatic, but deletion of this 3.3-kb macrosatellite element might affect the expression of the FSHD-associated gene(s) through position effect mechanisms. We investigated this hypothesis by creating a large collection of constructs carrying 1 to >11 D4Z4 repeats integrated into the human genome, either at random sites or proximal to a telomere, mimicking thereby the organization of the 4q35 locus. We show that D4Z4 acts as an insulator that interferes with enhancer–promoter communication and protects transgenes from position effect. This last property depends on both CTCF and A-type Lamins. We further demonstrate that both anti-silencing activity of D4Z4 and CTCF binding are lost upon multimerization of the repeat in cells from FSHD patients compared to control myoblasts from healthy individuals, suggesting that FSHD corresponds to a gain-of-function of CTCF at the residual D4Z4 repeats. We propose that contraction of the D4Z4 array contributes to FSHD physio-pathology by acting as a CTCF-dependent insulator in patients. PMID:19247430

  15. Mutations in DNMT3B Modify Epigenetic Repression of the D4Z4 Repeat and the Penetrance of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Marlinde L; Lemmers, Richard J L F; Balog, Judit; Wohlgemuth, Mariëlle; Auranen, Mari; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; van der Vliet, Patrick J; Straasheijm, Kirsten R; van den Akker, Rob F P; Kriek, Marjolein; Laurense-Bik, Marlies E Y; Raz, Vered; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Hansson, Kerstin B M; van der Kooi, Elly L; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Udd, Bjarne; van Tol, Maarten J D; Nishino, Ichizo; Tawil, Rabi; Tapscott, Stephen J; van Engelen, Baziel G M; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2016-05-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is associated with somatic chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 repeat array and derepression of the D4Z4-encoded DUX4 retrogene coding for a germline transcription factor. Somatic DUX4 derepression is caused either by a 1-10 unit repeat-array contraction (FSHD1) or by mutations in SMCHD1, which encodes a chromatin repressor that binds to D4Z4 (FSHD2). Here, we show that heterozygous mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) are a likely cause of D4Z4 derepression associated with low levels of DUX4 expression from the D4Z4 repeat and increased penetrance of FSHD. Recessive mutations in DNMT3B were previously shown to cause immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome. This study suggests that transcription of DUX4 in somatic cells is modified by variations in its epigenetic state and provides a basis for understanding the reduced penetrance of FSHD within families. PMID:27153398

  16. Genetic and epigenetic contributors to FSHD.

    PubMed

    Daxinger, Lucia; Tapscott, Stephen J; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2015-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant muscle disorder characterized by distinct chromatin changes including DNA hypomethylation of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array on a disease-permissive 4qA allele and aberrant expression of the D4Z4-embedded DUX4 retrogene in skeletal muscle. Insufficient epigenetic repression of the D4Z4 repeat is the result of at least two different genetic mechanisms leading to two forms of disease, FSHD1 and FSHD2. In the case of FSHD1, a contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array is disease causing whereas FSHD2 is most often caused by mutations in the structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain 1 (SMCHD1) gene. Recent studies indicate that a combination of genetic and epigenetic factors that act on the D4Z4 repeat array determine the probability of DUX4 expression in skeletal muscle and disease penetrance and progression. PMID:26356006

  17. A tetranucleotide repeat (D4S1652) is linked to facioscapulohumeral dystrophy and shows no linkage disequilibrium with the disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.D.; Bailey, H.L.; Mills, K.A.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant dystrophy which is associated with a deletion in a subtelomeric repeat element on 4q35. The gene has not yet been identified. The probe detecting this deletion (D4F104S1) is not chromosome 4-specific, and at least one large family has been identified which is not linked to chromosome 4. Thus, persymptomatic/prenatal diagnosis can only be provided to families that are proven to be chromosome 4-linked or where a new mutation is demonstrated. The markers available to demonstrate linkage to chromosome 4, D4S139, D4S163, and D4F35S1, are VNTRs. We have used D4S1652, a tetranucleotide repeat recently identified by the Cooperative Human Linkage Center, in our FSHD families. We found it is completely linked to the 4q35 VNTRs and to the disease phenotype. Physical mapping, using radiation hybrids and somatic cell hybrids, places D4S1652 between D4S139, an interval of approximately 1 Mb. We have used D4S1652 to look for linkage disequilibrium in our FSHD patient population. This result is of interest because of our hypothesis that the deletion in the subtelomeric repeat element alters transcription of a more proximal gene through a position effect. Previously available markers have been unsatisfactory for this experiment because of difficulty comparing numerous VNTR alleles across families. We observed 4, easily distinguished, D4S1652 alleles in our families. We studied 14 chromosomes associated with disease phenotype and 55 chromosomes from nontransmitting parents. We found no evidence for linkage disequilibrium ({chi}{sup 2}=1.313, nonsignificant). This result will need confirmation with a larger patient population, but is consistent with the clinical observation that there is a high rate of a new mutation in this disorder.

  18. Towards the finer mapping of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy at 4q35: Construction of a laser microdissection library

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Osborn, M.; Maynard, J.

    1995-06-19

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder which has been mapped to the 4q35 region. In order to saturate this distal 4q region with DNA markers, a laser-based chromosomal microdissection and microcloning procedure was used to construct a genomic library from the distal 20% of chromosome 4, derived from a single human metaphase spread. Of the 100 microclones analyzed from this library, 94 clones contained inserts sized from 80-800 bp, with an average size of 340 bp. Less than 20% of these clones hybridized to human repeat sequences. Seventy-two single-copy clones were further characterized by Southern blot hybridization against a DNA panel of somatic cell hybrids, containing various regions of chromosome 4. Forty-two clones mapped to chromosome 4, of which 8 clones mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. Twenty of these chromosome 4-specific clones were screened against {open_quotes}zoo-blots{close_quotes}; 11 clones, of which 3 mapped to 4q35, identified conserved sequences. This is the first report to describe the isolation of potential expressed sequences derived from the FSHD region. These chromosome region-specific microclones will be useful in the construction of the physical map of the region, the positional cloning of potential disease-associated genes, and the identification of additional polymorphic markers from within the distal 4q region. 47 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. SORBS2 transcription is activated by telomere position effect-over long distance upon telomere shortening in muscle cells from patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jérôme D; Ludlow, Andrew T; Batten, Kimberly; Gaillard, Marie-Cécile; Stadler, Guido; Magdinier, Frédérique; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-12-01

    DNA is organized into complex three-dimensional chromatin structures, but how this spatial organization regulates gene expression remains a central question. These DNA/chromatin looping structures can range in size from 10-20 kb (enhancers/repressors) to many megabases during intra- and inter-chromosomal interactions. Recently, the influence of telomere length on chromatin organization prior to senescence has revealed the existence of long-distance chromatin loops that dictate the expression of genes located up to 10 Mb from the telomeres (Telomere Position Effect-Over Long Distances [TPE-OLD]). Here, we demonstrate the existence of a telomere loop at the 4q35 locus involving the sorbin and SH3 domain-containing protein 2 gene, SORBS2, a skeletal muscle protein using a modification of the chromosome conformation capture method. The loop reveals a cis-acting mechanism modifying SORBS2 transcription. The expression of this gene is altered by TPE-OLD in myoblasts from patients affected with the age-associated genetic disease, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD1A, MIM 158900). SORBS2 is expressed in FSHD myoblasts with short telomeres, while not detectable in FSHD myoblasts with long telomeres or in healthy myoblasts regardless of telomere length. This indicates that TPE-OLD may modify the regulation of the 4q35 locus in a pathogenic context. Upon differentiation, both FSHD and healthy myotubes express SORBS2, suggesting that SORBS2 is normally up-regulated by maturation/differentiation of skeletal muscle and is misregulated by TPE-OLD-dependent variegation in FSHD myoblasts. These findings provide additional insights for the complexity and age-related symptoms of FSHD. PMID:26359233

  20. SORBS2 transcription is activated by telomere position effect–over long distance upon telomere shortening in muscle cells from patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Ludlow, Andrew T.; Batten, Kimberly; Gaillard, Marie-Cécile; Stadler, Guido; Magdinier, Frédérique; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    DNA is organized into complex three-dimensional chromatin structures, but how this spatial organization regulates gene expression remains a central question. These DNA/chromatin looping structures can range in size from 10–20 kb (enhancers/repressors) to many megabases during intra- and inter-chromosomal interactions. Recently, the influence of telomere length on chromatin organization prior to senescence has revealed the existence of long-distance chromatin loops that dictate the expression of genes located up to 10 Mb from the telomeres (Telomere Position Effect–Over Long Distances [TPE-OLD]). Here, we demonstrate the existence of a telomere loop at the 4q35 locus involving the sorbin and SH3 domain-containing protein 2 gene, SORBS2, a skeletal muscle protein using a modification of the chromosome conformation capture method. The loop reveals a cis-acting mechanism modifying SORBS2 transcription. The expression of this gene is altered by TPE-OLD in myoblasts from patients affected with the age-associated genetic disease, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD1A, MIM 158900). SORBS2 is expressed in FSHD myoblasts with short telomeres, while not detectable in FSHD myoblasts with long telomeres or in healthy myoblasts regardless of telomere length. This indicates that TPE-OLD may modify the regulation of the 4q35 locus in a pathogenic context. Upon differentiation, both FSHD and healthy myotubes express SORBS2, suggesting that SORBS2 is normally up-regulated by maturation/differentiation of skeletal muscle and is misregulated by TPE-OLD-dependent variegation in FSHD myoblasts. These findings provide additional insights for the complexity and age-related symptoms of FSHD. PMID:26359233

  1. Safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise program in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bankolé, Landry-Cyrille; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Temesi, John; Bachasson, Damien; Ravelojaona, Marion; Wuyam, Bernard; Verges, Samuel; Ponsot, Elodie; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Kadi, Fawzi; Féasson, Léonard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous randomized controlled trials investigating exercise training programs in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) patients are scarce and of short duration only. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise training program on fitness, muscle, and motor function in FSHD patients. Methods: Sixteen FSHD patients were randomly assigned to training (TG) and control (CG) groups (both n = 8) in a home-based exercise intervention. Training consisted of cycling 3 times weekly for 35 minutes (combination of strength, high-intensity interval, and low-intensity aerobic) at home for 24 weeks. Patients in CG also performed an identical training program (CTG) after 24 weeks. The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) measured every 6 weeks. The principal secondary outcomes were maximal quadriceps strength (MVC) and local quadriceps endurance every 12 weeks. Other outcome measures included maximal aerobic power (MAP) and experienced fatigue every 6 weeks, 6-minute walking distance every 12 weeks, and muscle characteristics from vastus lateralis biopsies taken pre- and postintervention. Results: The compliance rate was 91% in TG. Significant improvements with training were observed in the VO2 peak (+19%, P = 0.002) and MAP by week 6 and further to week 24. Muscle endurance, MVC, and 6-minute walking distance increased and experienced fatigue decreased. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area and citrate synthase activity increased by 34% (P = 0.008) and 46% (P = 0.003), respectively. Dystrophic pathophysiologic patterns were not exacerbated. Similar improvements were experienced by TG and CTG. Conclusions: A combined strength and interval cycling exercise-training program compatible with patients’ daily professional and social activities leads to significant functional benefits without compromising muscle tissue. PMID:27495097

  2. Patients with a phenotype consistent with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy display genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Sacconi, Sabrina; Camaño, Pilar; de Greef, Jessica C.; Lemmers, Richard J. L. F.; Salviati, Leonardo; Boileau, Pascal; de Munain Arregui, Adolfo Lopez; van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Desnuelle, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the genetic and epigenetic defects in patients presenting with a facioscapulohumeral (FSHD) clinical phenotype without D4Z4 contractions on chromosome 4q35 tested by linear gel electrophoresis (LGE) and Southern blot analysis. Design and patients We studied 16 patients displaying an FSHD-like phenotype, with normal cardiovascular and respiratory function, a myopathic pattern on EMG, and a muscle biopsy being normal or displaying only mild and a specific dystrophic changes. We sequenced the genes calpain 3 (CAPN3), valosin containing protein (VCP) and four and a half LIM domains protein 1 (FHL1) and we analyzed the D4Z4 repeat arrays by extensive genotyping and DNA methylation analysis. Results We identified one patient carrying a complex rearrangement in the FSHD locus that masked the D4Z4 contraction associated with FSHD1 in standard genetic testing, one patient with somatic mosaicism for the D4Z4 4q35 contraction, six patients that were diagnosed with FSHD2, four patients with CAPN3 mutations, two patients with a VCP mutation, No mutations were detected in FHL1, and in two patients we could not identify the genetic defect. Conclusions In patients presenting an FSHD-like clinical phenotype with a negative molecular testing for FSHD consider: 1) detailed genetic testing including D4Z4 contraction of permissive hybrid D4Z4 repeat arrays, p13E-11 probe deletions, D4Z4 hypomethylation in absence of repeat contraction as observed in FSHD2, 2) mutations in CAPN3 even in the absence of protein deficiency on western blot analysis 3) VCP mutations even in the absence cognitive impairment, Paget disease and typical inclusion in muscle biopsy. PMID:21984748

  3. Emerging preclinical animal models for FSHD

    PubMed Central

    Lek, Angela; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Peter L.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a unique and complex genetic disease that is not entirely solved. Recent advances in the field have led to a consensus genetic premise for the disorder, enabling researchers to now pursue the design of preclinical models. In this review, we explore all available FSHD models (DUX4-dependent and -independent) for their utility in therapeutic discovery and potential to yield novel disease insights. Due to the complex nature of FSHD, there is currently no single model that accurately recapitulates the genetic and pathophysiological spectrum of the disorder. Existing models are limited to emphasize only specific aspects of the disease, thus highlighting the need for more collaborative research and novel paradigms to advance the translational research space of FSHD. PMID:25801126

  4. Emerging preclinical animal models for FSHD.

    PubMed

    Lek, Angela; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Peter L; Kunkel, Louis M

    2015-05-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a unique and complex genetic disease that is not entirely solved. Recent advances in the field have led to a consensus genetic premise for the disorder, enabling researchers to now pursue the design of preclinical models. In this review we explore all available FSHD models (DUX4-dependent and -independent) for their utility in therapeutic discovery and potential to yield novel disease insights. Owing to the complex nature of FSHD, there is currently no single model that accurately recapitulates the genetic and pathophysiological spectrum of the disorder. Existing models emphasize only specific aspects of the disease, highlighting the need for more collaborative research and novel paradigms to advance the translational research space of FSHD. PMID:25801126

  5. Muscular dystrophy in a patient with multiple sclerosis. Another "double-trouble"?

    PubMed

    Parissis, Dimitrios; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Bakirtzis, Christos; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Karacostas, Dimitrios

    2015-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is considered a relatively common muscular dystrophy affecting approximately 1:15,000 individuals in the general population. Single case reports have described the rare co-occurrence of FSHD with other hereditary neuromuscular disorders, leading to atypical phenotypes. We report herein the case of a 26-year-old woman with genetically proven FSHD, who additionally developed otherwise typical multiple sclerosis (MS). Although there is no direct relationship between FSHD and MS, they might, nevertheless, share some common pathophysiological mechanisms, as recent research suggests. In particular, we comment on the potential, but not yet proven, role of immunological factors in the pathogenesis of FSHD. PMID:26195054

  6. The Krüppel-like Factor 15 as a Molecular Link between Myogenic Factors and a Chromosome 4q Transcriptional Enhancer Implicated in Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Petr; Petrov, Andrei; Ansseau, Eugenie; Stankevicins, Luiza; Charron, Sébastien; Kim, Elena; Bos, Tomas Jan; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra; Lazar, Vladimir; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2011-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a dominant hereditary disease with a prevalence of 7 per 100,000 individuals, is associated with a partial deletion in the subtelomeric D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q. The D4Z4 repeat contains a strong transcriptional enhancer that activates promoters of several FSHD-related genes. We report here that the enhancer within the D4Z4 repeat binds the Krüppel-like factor KLF15. KLF15 was found to be up-regulated during myogenic differentiation induced by serum starvation or by overexpression of the myogenic differentiation factor MYOD. When overexpressed, KLF15 activated the D4Z4 enhancer and led to overexpression of DUX4c (Double homeobox 4, centromeric) and FRG2 (FSHD region gene 2) genes, whereas its silencing caused inactivation of the D4Z4 enhancer. In immortalized human myoblasts, the D4Z4 enhancer was activated by the myogenic factor MYOD, an effect that was abolished upon KLF15 silencing or when the KLF15-binding sites within the D4Z4 enhancer were mutated, indicating that the myogenesis-related activation of the D4Z4 enhancer was mediated by KLF15. KLF15 and several myogenesis-related factors were found to be expressed at higher levels in myoblasts, myotubes, and muscle biopsies from FSHD patients than in healthy controls. We propose that KLF15 serves as a molecular link between myogenic factors and the activity of the D4Z4 enhancer, and it thus contributes to the overexpression of the DUX4c and FRG2 genes during normal myogenic differentiation and in FSHD. PMID:21937448

  7. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy. PMID:26787513

  8. Filling in the Gap of Human Chromosome 4: Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of Macrosatellite Repeats in the Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Locus

    PubMed Central

    Morioka, Masaki Suimye; Kitazume, Miwako; Osaki, Ken; Wood, Jonathan; Tanaka, Yujiro

    2016-01-01

    A majority of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by contraction of macrosatellite repeats called D4Z4 that are located in the subtelomeric region of human chromosome 4q35. Sequencing the FSHD locus has been technically challenging due to its long size and nearly identical nature of repeat elements. Here we report sequencing and partial assembly of a BAC clone carrying an entire FSHD locus by a single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing technology which could produce long reads up to about 18 kb containing D4Z4 repeats. De novo assembly by Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process 1 (HGAP.1) yielded a contig of 41 kb containing all but a part of the most distal D4Z4 element. The validity of the sequence model was confirmed by an independent approach employing anchored multiple sequence alignment by Kalign using reads containing unique flanking sequences. Our data will provide a basis for further optimization of sequencing and assembly conditions of D4Z4. PMID:27002334

  9. Filling in the Gap of Human Chromosome 4: Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of Macrosatellite Repeats in the Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Locus.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Masaki Suimye; Kitazume, Miwako; Osaki, Ken; Wood, Jonathan; Tanaka, Yujiro

    2016-01-01

    A majority of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by contraction of macrosatellite repeats called D4Z4 that are located in the subtelomeric region of human chromosome 4q35. Sequencing the FSHD locus has been technically challenging due to its long size and nearly identical nature of repeat elements. Here we report sequencing and partial assembly of a BAC clone carrying an entire FSHD locus by a single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing technology which could produce long reads up to about 18 kb containing D4Z4 repeats. De novo assembly by Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process 1 (HGAP.1) yielded a contig of 41 kb containing all but a part of the most distal D4Z4 element. The validity of the sequence model was confirmed by an independent approach employing anchored multiple sequence alignment by Kalign using reads containing unique flanking sequences. Our data will provide a basis for further optimization of sequencing and assembly conditions of D4Z4. PMID:27002334

  10. Diagnostic approach for FSHD revisited: SMCHD1 mutations cause FSHD2 and act as modifiers of disease severity in FSHD1.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mirjam; Rost, Simone; El Hajj, Nady; Ferbert, Andreas; Deschauer, Marcus; Walter, Maggie C; Schoser, Benedikt; Tacik, Pawel; Kress, Wolfram; Müller, Clemens R

    2015-06-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant muscular disorder with a wide clinical variability. Contractions of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat on chromosome 4q35 are the molecular basis of the pathophysiology. Recently, in a subset of patients without D4Z4 repeat contractions, variants in the SMCHD1 gene have been identified that lead to hypomethylation of D4Z4 and thus DUX4 transcription, which causes FSHD type 2. In this study, we have screened 55 FSHD1-negative and 40 FSHD1-positive patients from unrelated families for potentially pathogenic variants in SMCHD1 by next-generation sequencing (NGS). We identified variants in SMCHD1 in 11 index patients, including missense, splice site and non-sense mutations. We developed a pyrosequencing assay to determine the methylation status of the D4Z4 repeat array and found significantly lower methylation levels for FSHD2 patients than for healthy controls and FSHD1 patients. Two out of eleven SMCHD1 mutation carriers had moderately contracted D4Z4 alleles thus these patients are suffering from FSHD1 and 2. Comparing the phenotype of patients, all FSHD2 patients were relatively mildly affected while patients with FSHD1+2 were much more severely affected than expected from their D4Z4 copy number. Our findings confirm the role of SMCHD1 mutations in FSHD2 and as a modifier of disease severity. With SMCHD1 variants found in 16.4% of phenotypic FSHD patients without D4Z4 repeat contractions, the incidence of FSHD2 is rather high and hence we suggest including sequencing of SMCHD1, haplotyping and methylation analysis in the workflow of molecular FSHD diagnostics. PMID:25370034

  11. New Insights into Genotype-phenotype Correlations in Chinese Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy: A Retrospective Analysis of 178 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Lin, Min-Ting; Murong, Shen-Xing; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a common autosomal dominant muscular disorder, is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 repeats on 4q35. The complicated genotype-phenotype correlation among different ethnic population remains a controversial subject. We aimed to refine this correlation in order to provide new information for genetic counseling. Methods: Here, a cohort of 136 Chinese families including 178 affected individuals and 137 unaffected members were investigated. Genetic analyses were performed using the p13E-11, 4qA and 4qB probes after pulsed field gel electrophoresis separation and southern blotting. A 10-grade FSHD clinical severity scale was adopted for clinical assessment. The genotype-phenotype correlation was established by linear regression analyses. Results: We observed a roughly inversed correlation between the short EcoRI fragment size and age-corrected clinical severity score in 154 symptomatic patients (P < 0.05). Compared to male patients, a significant higher proportion of females in both asymptomatic carriers and severe patients showed larger variation in the size of short EcoRI fragment. A high incidence (19/42, 45.2%) of asymptomatic (or minimally affected) carriers was found in familial members. Conclusions: Although the number of D4Z4 repeats is known as one of the critical influences on genotype-phenotype correlation, a majority of phenotypic spectrum was still incompatible with their heterozygous contraction of the D4Z4 repeat, especial in female cases. Our results suggest that there are multi-factors synergistically modulating the phenotypic expression. PMID:26112708

  12. A novel clinical tool to classify facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Giulia; Ruggiero, Lucia; Vercelli, Liliana; Sera, Francesco; Nikolic, Ana; Govi, Monica; Mele, Fabiano; Daolio, Jessica; Angelini, Corrado; Antonini, Giovanni; Berardinelli, Angela; Bucci, Elisabetta; Cao, Michelangelo; D'Amico, Maria Chiara; D'Angelo, Grazia; Di Muzio, Antonio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Maggi, Lorenzo; Moggio, Maurizio; Mongini, Tiziana; Morandi, Lucia; Pegoraro, Elena; Rodolico, Carmelo; Santoro, Lucio; Siciliano, Gabriele; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Villa, Luisa; Tupler, Rossella

    2016-06-01

    Based on the 7-year experience of the Italian Clinical Network for FSHD, we revised the FSHD clinical form to describe, in a harmonized manner, the phenotypic spectrum observed in FSHD. The new Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Form (CCEF) defines various clinical categories by the combination of different features. The inter-rater reproducibility of the CCEF was assessed between two examiners using kappa statistics by evaluating 56 subjects carrying the molecular marker used for FSHD diagnosis. The CCEF classifies: (1) subjects presenting facial and scapular girdle muscle weakness typical of FSHD (category A, subcategories A1-A3), (2) subjects with muscle weakness limited to scapular girdle or facial muscles (category B subcategories B1, B2), (3) asymptomatic/healthy subjects (category C, subcategories C1, C2), (4) subjects with myopathic phenotype presenting clinical features not consistent with FSHD canonical phenotype (D, subcategories D1, D2). The inter-rater reliability study showed an excellent concordance of the final four CCEF categories with a κ equal to 0.90; 95 % CI (0.71; 0.97). Absolute agreement was observed for categories C and D, an excellent agreement for categories A [κ = 0.88; 95 % CI (0.75; 1.00)], and a good agreement for categories B [κ = 0.79; 95 % CI (0.57; 1.00)]. The CCEF supports the harmonized phenotypic classification of patients and families. The categories outlined by the CCEF may assist diagnosis, genetic counseling and natural history studies. Furthermore, the CCEF categories could support selection of patients in randomized clinical trials. This precise categorization might also promote the search of genetic factor(s) contributing to the phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:27126453

  13. Experienced fatigue in facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, and HMSN-I

    PubMed Central

    Kalkman, J; Schillings, M; van der Werf, S P; Padberg, G; Zwarts, M; van Engelen, B G M; Bleijenberg, G

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of severe fatigue and its relation to functional impairment in daily life in patients with relatively common types of neuromuscular disorders. Methods: 598 patients with a neuromuscular disease were studied (139 with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, 322 with adult onset myotonic dystrophy, and 137 with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I). Fatigue severity was assessed with Checklist Individual Strength (CIS-fatigue). Functional impairments in daily life were measured with the short form 36 item health questionnaire (SF-36). Results: The three different neuromuscular patient groups were of similar age and sex. Severe experienced fatigue was reported by 61–74% of the patients. Severely fatigued patients had more problems with physical functioning, social functioning, mental health, bodily pain, and general health perception. There were some differences between the three disorders in the effects of fatigue. Conclusions: Severe fatigue is reported by the majority of patients with relatively common types of neuromuscular disorders. Because experienced fatigue severity is associated with the severity of various functional impairments in daily life, it is a clinically and socially relevant problem in this group of patients. PMID:16170086

  14. Correction of the FSHD myoblast differentiation defect by fusion with healthy myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Dib, Carla; Bou Saada, Yara; Dmitriev, Petr; Richon, Catherine; Dessen, Philippe; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Carnac, Gilles; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a neuromuscular disease with a prevalence that could reach 1 in 8,000 characterized by progressive asymmetric muscle weakness. Myoblasts isolated from FSHD muscles exhibit morphological differentiation defects and show a distinct transcription profile. These abnormalities may be linked to the muscle weakness in FSHD patients. We have tested whether fusion of FSHD myoblasts with primary myoblasts isolated from healthy individuals could correct the differentiation defects. Our results show that the number of hybrid myotubes with normal phenotype increased with the percentage of normal myoblasts initially cultured. We demonstrated that a minimum of 50% of normal nuclei is required for a phenotypic correction of the FSHD phenotype. Moreover, transcriptomic profiles of phenotypically corrected hybrid myotubes showed that the expression of deregulated genes in FSHD myotubes became almost normal. The number of deregulated pathways also decreased from 39 in FSHD myotubes to one in hybrid myotubes formed with 40% FSHD and 60% normal myoblasts. We thus propose that while phenotypical and functional correction of FSHD is feasible, it requires more than 50% of normal myoblasts, it creates limitations for cell therapy in the FSHD context. PMID:26218298

  15. Isolation and characterization of two overlapping cosmid clones from the 4q35 region, near the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Deidda, G.; Grisanti, P.; Vigneti, E.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) has been localized by linkage analysis to the 4q35 region. The most telomeric p13E-11 prove has been shown to detect 4q35 DNA rearrangements in both sporadic and familial cases of the disease. With the aim of constructing a detailed physical map of the 4q35 region and searching for the mutant gene, we used p13E-11 probe to isolate cosmid clones from a human genomic library in a pCos-EMBL 2 vector. Two positive clones were isolated, clones 3 and 5, which partially overlap and carry human genomic inserts of 42 and 45 kb, respectively. The cosmids share a common region containing the p13E-11 region and a stretch of KpnI units consisting of 3.2 kb tandemly repeated sequences (about 10). The restriction maps were constructed using the following enzymes: Bam HI, BgIII, Eco RI, EcoRV, KpnI and Sfi I. Clone 3 extends 4 kb upstream of C5 and stops within the Kpn repeats. Clone 5 extends 4 kb downstream from the Kpn repeats and it presents an additional EcoRI site. Clone 5 contains a stretch of Kpn sequences of nearly 32 kb, corresponding to 10 Kpn repeats; clone 3 contains a stretch of 29 kb corresponding to 9 Kpn repeats, as determined by PFGE analysis of partial digestion of the clones. Clone 5 seems to contain the entire Eco RI region prone to rearrangements in FSHD patients. From clone 5 several subclones were obtained, from the Kpn region and from the region spanning from the last Kpn repeat to the cloning site. No single copy sequences were detected. Subclones from the 3{prime} end region contain beta-satellite or Sau3A-like sequences. In situ hybridization with the whole C5 cosmid shows hybridization signals at the tip of chromosome 4 (4q35) and chromosome 10 (10q26), in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 1 (1q12) and in the p12 region of the acrocentric chromosomes (chr. 21, 22, 13, 14, 15).

  16. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1) is a dynamic RNA-associated and actin bundling protein

    PubMed Central

    Jessica Sun, Chia-Yun; van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Long, Steven W.; Straasheijm, Kirsten; Klooster, Rinse; Jones, Takako I.; Bellini, Michel; Levesque, Lyne; Brieher, William M.; van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Jones, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is a dynamic nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that, in skeletal muscle, shows an additional localization to the sarcomere. Maintaining appropriate levels of FRG1 protein is critical for the muscle and vascular development in the vertebrate, however its precise molecular function is unknown. This study investigates the molecular functions of human FRG1 along with mouse and Xenopus frg1 using molecular, biochemical and cell-biological approach to provide further insight into its roles in vertebrate development. The nuclear fraction of the endogenous FRG1 is localized in nucleoli, Cajal bodies, and actively transcribed chromatin; however, contrary to overexpressed FRG1, the endogenous FRG1 is not associated with nuclear speckles. We characterize the nuclear and nucleolar import of FRG1, the potential role for phosphorylation, and its interaction with the importin karyophernα2 (KPNA2). Consistent with a role in RNA biogenesis, human FRG1 is associated with mRNA in vivo and in vitro and interacts directly with TAP, the major mRNA export receptor, and is a dynamic nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling protein supporting a function for FRG1 in mRNA transport. Biochemically, we characterize FRG1 actin binding activity and show that the cytoplasmic pool of FRG1 is dependent on an intact actin cytoskeleton for its localization. These data provide the first biochemical activities - actin binding and RNA binding - for human FRG1 and the characterizations of the endogenous human FRG1, together indicating FRG1 is involved in multiple aspects of RNA biogenesis including mRNA transport and potentially cytoplasmic mRNA localization. PMID:21699900

  17. Identification of variants in the 4q35 gene FAT1 in patients with a facioscapulohumeral dystrophy-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Francesca; Dionnet, Eugenie; Gaillard, Marie-Cécile; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Castro, Christel; Vovan, Catherine; Bertaux, Karine; Bernard, Rafaelle; Attarian, Shahram; Goto, Kanako; Nishino, Ichizo; Hayashi, Yukiko; Magdinier, Frédérique; Krahn, Martin; Helmbacher, Françoise; Bartoli, Marc; Lévy, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeralmuscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to copy-number reduction (N < 10) of the 4q D4Z4 subtelomeric array, in association with DUX4-permissive haplotypes. This main form is indicated as FSHD1. FSHD-like phenotypes may also appear in the absence of D4Z4 copy-number reduction. Variants of the SMCHD1 gene have been reported to associate with D4Z4 hypomethylation in DUX4-compatible haplotypes, thus defining FSHD2. Recently, mice carrying a muscle-specific knock-out of the protocadherin gene Fat1 or its constitutive hypomorphic allele were shown to develop muscular and nonmuscular defects mimicking human FSHD. Here, we report FAT1 variants in a group of patients presenting with neuromuscular symptoms reminiscent of FSHD. The patients do not carry D4Z4 copy-number reduction, 4q hypomethylation, or SMCHD1 variants. However, abnormal splicing of the FAT1 transcript is predicted for all identified variants. To determine their pathogenicity, we elaborated a minigene approach coupled to an antisense oligonucleotide (AON) assay. In vitro, four out of five selected variants induced partial or complete alteration of splicing by creating new splice sites or modifying splicing regulators. AONs confirmed these effects. Altered transcripts may affect FAT1 protein interactions or stability. Altogether, our data suggest that defective FAT1 is associated with an FSHD-like phenotype. PMID:25615407

  18. Computer method for the analysis of evoked motor unit potentials. 2. Duchenne, limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral and myotonic muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, J P; Hansen, S

    1975-01-01

    Single motor unit potentials recorded from surface electrodes over the extensor digitorum brevis muscle and evoked by stimulation of the anterior tibial nerve at the ankle were obtained by a computer subtraction method. Their latencies, durations, amplitudes, and areas were measured in control subjects and patients with Duchenne, limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral, and myotonic muscular dystrophy. Lateral popliteal motor nerve conduction velocities were also recorded. In the muscular dystrophies there was a significant increase in both the latencies and durations of motor unit potentials, the latter in notable contrast with the findings of conventional needle electromyography. Fastest motor conduction velocities were significantly reduced in the limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral, and myotonic muscular dystrophy patients, while the shortest distal motor latencies were significantly prolonged in these patients and those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The results support the presence of a definitive neurogenic influence in the muscular dystrophies. PMID:1151411

  19. FSHD Myotubes with Different Phenotypes Exhibit Distinct Proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wauters, Armelle; Vanderplanck, Céline; Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Coppée, Frédérique; Wattiez, Ruddy; Belayew, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscle disorder linked to a contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array in the 4q35 subtelomeric region. This deletion induces epigenetic modifications that affect the expression of several genes located in the vicinity. In each D4Z4 element, we identified the double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene. DUX4 expresses a transcription factor that plays a major role in the development of FSHD through the initiation of a large gene dysregulation cascade that causes myogenic differentiation defects, atrophy and reduced response to oxidative stress. Because miRNAs variably affect mRNA expression, proteomic approaches are required to define the dysregulated pathways in FSHD. In this study, we optimized a differential isotope protein labeling (ICPL) method combined with shotgun proteomic analysis using a gel-free system (2DLC-MS/MS) to study FSHD myotubes. Primary CD56+ FSHD myoblasts were found to fuse into myotubes presenting various proportions of an atrophic or a disorganized phenotype. To better understand the FSHD myogenic defect, our improved proteomic procedure was used to compare predominantly atrophic or disorganized myotubes to the same matching healthy control. FSHD atrophic myotubes presented decreased structural and contractile muscle components. This phenotype suggests the occurrence of atrophy-associated proteolysis that likely results from the DUX4-mediated gene dysregulation cascade. The skeletal muscle myosin isoforms were decreased while non-muscle myosin complexes were more abundant. In FSHD disorganized myotubes, myosin isoforms were not reduced, and increased proteins were mostly involved in microtubule network organization and myofibrillar remodeling. A common feature of both FSHD myotube phenotypes was the disturbance of several caveolar proteins, such as PTRF and MURC. Taken together, our data suggest changes in trafficking and in the membrane microdomains of FSHD myotubes. Finally, the adjustment of a

  20. RNA interference inhibits DUX4-induced muscle toxicity in vivo: implications for a targeted FSHD therapy.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Liu, Jian; Domire, Jacqueline S; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Guckes, Susan M; Mendell, Jerry R; Flanigan, Kevin M; Harper, Scott Q

    2012-07-01

    No treatment exists for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), one of the most common inherited muscle diseases. Although FSHD can be debilitating, little effort has been made to develop targeted therapies. This lack of focus on targeted FSHD therapy perpetuated because the genes and pathways involved in the disorder were not understood. Now, more than 2 decades after efforts to decipher the root cause of FSHD began, this barrier to translation is finally lowering. Specifically, several recent studies support an FSHD pathogenesis model involving overexpression of the myopathic DUX4 gene. DUX4 inhibition has therefore emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for FSHD. In this study, we tested a preclinical RNA interference (RNAi)-based DUX4 gene silencing approach as a prospective treatment for FSHD. We found that adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-delivered therapeutic microRNAs corrected DUX4-associated myopathy in mouse muscle. These results provide proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of FSHD through DUX4 inhibition. PMID:22508491

  1. Evaluation of position effect variegation of the transcription of genes from the FSHD candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, S.T.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Altherr, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    The gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) lies in close proximity to the telomere of 4q. Deletion of several copies of a 3.2 kb tandem repeat have been associated with FSHD, although no genes have been identified within this repeat. We have shown that this repeat, as well as other repeats in the FSHD region, resemble constitutive heterochromatin both by sequence analysis and FISH cross-hybridization. We hypothesize that alterations in chromatin structure near the telomere of 4q due to deletion of these heterochromatic elements may lead to a position effect variegation of nearby genes. To test this hypothesis, we have isolated exons and candidate cDNAs from the FSHD region. A 2 kb polyadenylated cDNA was isolated from both fetal and infant brain cDNA libraries. Another cDNA hybridizes to a 7 kb skeletal muscle transcript on a Northern blot. Both of these cDNAs are chromosome 4-specific and map to the FSHD region. We have examined the expression pattern of these genes by RT-PCR, RNase protection and Northern analysis. Total RNA was isolated from normal and FSHD-affected lymphoblasts and from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids in which the normal and affected chromosomes 4 from FSHD patients were segregated. RT-PCR and RNase protection were then employed as quantitive assays to evaluate the potential for position effect variegation on RNA production in FSHD patients.

  2. Myoblasts from affected and non-affected FSHD muscles exhibit morphological differentiation defects

    PubMed Central

    Barro, Marietta; Carnac, Gilles; Flavier, Sébastien; Mercier, Jacques; Vassetzky, Yegor; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a muscular hereditary disease with a prevalence of 1 in 20,000 caused by a partial deletion of a subtelomeric repeat array on chromosome 4q. However, very little is known about the pathogenesis as well as the molecular and biochemical changes linked to the progressive muscle degeneration observed in these patients. Several studies have investigated possible pathophysiological pathways in FSHD myoblasts and mature muscle cells but some of these reports were apparently in contradiction. The discrepancy between these studies may be explained by differences between the sources of myoblasts. Therefore, we decided to thoroughly analyze affected and unaffected muscles from patients with FSHD in terms of vulnerability to oxidative stress, differentiation capacity and morphological abnormalities. We have established a panel of primary myoblast cell cultures from patients affected with FSHD and matched healthy individuals. Our results show that primary myoblasts are more susceptible to an induced oxidative stress than control myoblasts. Moreover, we demonstrate that both types of FSHD primary myoblasts differentiate into multi-nucleated myotubes, which present morphological abnormalities. Whereas control myoblasts fuse to form branched myotubes with aligned nuclei, FSHD myoblasts fuse to form either thin and branched myotubes with aligned nuclei or large myotubes with random nuclei distribution. In conclusion, we postulate that these abnormalities could be responsible for muscle weakness in patients with FSHD and provide an important marker for FSHD myoblasts. PMID:18505476

  3. Gene expression during normal and FSHD myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a dominant disease linked to contraction of an array of tandem 3.3-kb repeats (D4Z4) at 4q35. Within each repeat unit is a gene, DUX4, that can encode a protein containing two homeodomains. A DUX4 transcript derived from the last repeat unit in a contracted array is associated with pathogenesis but it is unclear how. Methods Using exon-based microarrays, the expression profiles of myogenic precursor cells were determined. Both undifferentiated myoblasts and myoblasts differentiated to myotubes derived from FSHD patients and controls were studied after immunocytochemical verification of the quality of the cultures. To further our understanding of FSHD and normal myogenesis, the expression profiles obtained were compared to those of 19 non-muscle cell types analyzed by identical methods. Results Many of the ~17,000 examined genes were differentially expressed (> 2-fold, p < 0.01) in control myoblasts or myotubes vs. non-muscle cells (2185 and 3006, respectively) or in FSHD vs. control myoblasts or myotubes (295 and 797, respectively). Surprisingly, despite the morphologically normal differentiation of FSHD myoblasts to myotubes, most of the disease-related dysregulation was seen as dampening of normal myogenesis-specific expression changes, including in genes for muscle structure, mitochondrial function, stress responses, and signal transduction. Other classes of genes, including those encoding extracellular matrix or pro-inflammatory proteins, were upregulated in FSHD myogenic cells independent of an inverse myogenesis association. Importantly, the disease-linked DUX4 RNA isoform was detected by RT-PCR in FSHD myoblast and myotube preparations only at extremely low levels. Unique insights into myogenesis-specific gene expression were also obtained. For example, all four Argonaute genes involved in RNA-silencing were significantly upregulated during normal (but not FSHD) myogenesis relative to non

  4. Endogenous DUX4 expression in FSHD myotubes is sufficient to cause cell death and disrupts RNA splicing and cell migration pathways.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Amanda M; Petek, Lisa M; Miller, Daniel G

    2015-10-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by chromatin relaxation that results in aberrant expression of the transcription factor Double Homeobox 4 (DUX4). DUX4 protein is present in a small subset of FSHD muscle cells, making its detection and analysis of its effects historically difficult. Using a DUX4-activated reporter, we demonstrate the burst expression pattern of endogenous DUX4, its method of signal amplification in the unique shared cytoplasm of the myotube, and FSHD cell death that depends on its activation. Transcriptome analysis of DUX4-expressing cells revealed that DUX4 activation disrupts RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, surveillance and transport pathways. Cell signaling, polarity and migration pathways were also disrupted. Thus, DUX4 expression is sufficient for myocyte death, and these findings suggest mechanistic links between DUX4 expression and cell migration, supporting recent descriptions of phenotypic similarities between FSHD and an FSHD-like condition caused by FAT1 mutations. PMID:26246499

  5. Inter-individual differences in CpG methylation at D4Z4 correlate with clinical variability in FSHD1 and FSHD2

    PubMed Central

    Lemmers, Richard J.L.F.; Goeman, Jelle J.; van der Vliet, Patrick J.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Merlijn P.; Balog, Judit; Vos-Versteeg, Marianne; Camano, Pilar; Ramos Arroyo, Maria Antonia; Jerico, Ivonne; Rogers, Mark T.; Miller, Daniel G.; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verschuuren, Jan J.G.M.; Lopez de Munain Arregui, Adolfo; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.; Padberg, George W.; Sacconi, Sabrina; Tawil, Rabi; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Bakker, Bert; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD: MIM#158900) is a common myopathy with marked but largely unexplained clinical inter- and intra-familial variability. It is caused by contractions of the D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4 to 1–10 units (FSHD1), or by mutations in the D4Z4-binding chromatin modifier SMCHD1 (FSHD2). Both situations lead to a partial opening of the D4Z4 chromatin structure and transcription of D4Z4-encoded polyadenylated DUX4 mRNA in muscle. We measured D4Z4 CpG methylation in control, FSHD1 and FSHD2 individuals and found a significant correlation with the D4Z4 repeat array size. After correction for repeat array size, we show that the variability in clinical severity in FSHD1 and FSHD2 individuals is dependent on individual differences in susceptibility to D4Z4 hypomethylation. In FSHD1, for individuals with D4Z4 repeat arrays of 1–6 units, the clinical severity mainly depends on the size of the D4Z4 repeat. However, in individuals with arrays of 7–10 units, the clinical severity also depends on other factors that regulate D4Z4 methylation because affected individuals, but not non-penetrant mutation carriers, have a greater reduction of D4Z4 CpG methylation than can be expected based on the size of the pathogenic D4Z4 repeat array. In FSHD2, this epigenetic susceptibility depends on the nature of the SMCHD1 mutation in combination with D4Z4 repeat array size with dominant negative mutations being more deleterious than haploinsufficiency mutations. Our study thus identifies an epigenetic basis for the striking variability in onset and disease progression that is considered a clinical hallmark of FSHD. PMID:25256356

  6. Inter-individual differences in CpG methylation at D4Z4 correlate with clinical variability in FSHD1 and FSHD2.

    PubMed

    Lemmers, Richard J L F; Goeman, Jelle J; van der Vliet, Patrick J; van Nieuwenhuizen, Merlijn P; Balog, Judit; Vos-Versteeg, Marianne; Camano, Pilar; Ramos Arroyo, Maria Antonia; Jerico, Ivonne; Rogers, Mark T; Miller, Daniel G; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Lopez de Munain Arregui, Adolfo; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Padberg, George W; Sacconi, Sabrina; Tawil, Rabi; Tapscott, Stephen J; Bakker, Bert; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2015-02-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD: MIM#158900) is a common myopathy with marked but largely unexplained clinical inter- and intra-familial variability. It is caused by contractions of the D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4 to 1-10 units (FSHD1), or by mutations in the D4Z4-binding chromatin modifier SMCHD1 (FSHD2). Both situations lead to a partial opening of the D4Z4 chromatin structure and transcription of D4Z4-encoded polyadenylated DUX4 mRNA in muscle. We measured D4Z4 CpG methylation in control, FSHD1 and FSHD2 individuals and found a significant correlation with the D4Z4 repeat array size. After correction for repeat array size, we show that the variability in clinical severity in FSHD1 and FSHD2 individuals is dependent on individual differences in susceptibility to D4Z4 hypomethylation. In FSHD1, for individuals with D4Z4 repeat arrays of 1-6 units, the clinical severity mainly depends on the size of the D4Z4 repeat. However, in individuals with arrays of 7-10 units, the clinical severity also depends on other factors that regulate D4Z4 methylation because affected individuals, but not non-penetrant mutation carriers, have a greater reduction of D4Z4 CpG methylation than can be expected based on the size of the pathogenic D4Z4 repeat array. In FSHD2, this epigenetic susceptibility depends on the nature of the SMCHD1 mutation in combination with D4Z4 repeat array size with dominant negative mutations being more deleterious than haploinsufficiency mutations. Our study thus identifies an epigenetic basis for the striking variability in onset and disease progression that is considered a clinical hallmark of FSHD. PMID:25256356

  7. Effects of vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc gluconate, and selenomethionine supplementation on muscle function and oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Passerieux, Emilie; Hayot, Maurice; Jaussent, Audrey; Carnac, Gilles; Gouzi, Fares; Pillard, Fabien; Picot, Marie-Christine; Böcker, Koen; Hugon, Gerald; Pincemail, Joel; Defraigne, Jean O; Verrips, Theo; Mercier, Jacques; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of specific skeletal muscles. As growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress may contribute to FSHD pathology, antioxidants that might modulate or delay oxidative insults could help in maintaining FSHD muscle function. Our primary objective was to test whether oral administration of vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc gluconate, and selenomethionine could improve the physical performance of patients with FSHD. Adult patients with FSHD (n=53) were enrolled at Montpellier University Hospital (France) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg vitamin C, 400mg vitamin E, 25mg zinc gluconate and 200 μg selenomethionine (n=26), or matching placebo (n=27) once a day for 17 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes in the two-minute walking test (2-MWT), maximal voluntary contraction, and endurance limit time of the dominant and nondominant quadriceps (MVCQD, MVCQND, TlimQD, and TlimQND, respectively) after 17 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes were changes in the antioxidant status and oxidative stress markers. Although 2-MWT, MVCQ, and TlimQ were all significantly improved in the supplemented group at the end of the treatment compared to baseline, only MVCQ and TlimQ variations were significantly different between groups (MVCQD: P=0.011; MVCQND: P=0.004; TlimQD: P=0.028; TlimQND: P=0.011). Similarly, the vitamin C (P<0.001), vitamin E as α-tocopherol (P<0.001), vitamin C/vitamin E ratio (P=0.017), vitamin E γ/α ratio (P=0.022) and lipid peroxides (P<0.001) variations were significantly different between groups. In conclusion, vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc, and selenium supplementation has no significant effect on the 2-MWT, but improves MVCQ and TlimQ of both quadriceps by enhancing the antioxidant defenses and reducing oxidative stress. This trial was registered at

  8. Inappropriate gene activation in FSHD: a repressor complex binds a chromosomal repeat deleted in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Gabellini, Davide; Green, Michael R; Tupler, Rossella

    2002-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a common myopathy, is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown molecular mechanism. Almost all FSHD patients carry deletions of an integral number of tandem 3.3 kilobase repeats, termed D4Z4, located on chromosome 4q35. Here, we find that in FSHD muscle, 4q35 genes located upstream of D4Z4 are inappropriately overexpressed. We show that an element within D4Z4 specifically binds a multiprotein complex consisting of YY1, a known transcriptional repressor, HMGB2, an architectural protein, and nucleolin. We demonstrate that this multiprotein complex binds D4Z4 in vitro and in vivo and mediates transcriptional repression of 4q35 genes. Based upon these results, we propose that deletion of D4Z4 leads to the inappropriate transcriptional derepression of 4q35 genes resulting in disease. PMID:12176321

  9. The FSHD Atrophic Myotube Phenotype Is Caused by DUX4 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vanderplanck, Céline; Ansseau, Eugénie; Charron, Sébastien; Stricwant, Nadia; Tassin, Alexandra; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wilton, Steve D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to deletions in 4q35 within the D4Z4 repeat array in which we identified the double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene. We found stable DUX4 mRNAs only derived from the most distal D4Z4 unit and unexpectedly extended to the flanking pLAM region that provided an intron and a polyadenylation signal. DUX4 encodes a transcription factor expressed in FSHD but not control primary myoblasts or muscle biopsies. The DUX4 protein initiates a large transcription deregulation cascade leading to muscle atrophy and oxidative stress, which are FSHD key features. Methodology/Principal Findings We now show that transfection of myoblasts with a DUX4 expression vector leads to atrophic myotube formation associated with the induction of E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1 and Atrogin1/MAFbx) typical of muscle atrophy. DUX4 induces expression of downstream targets deregulated in FSHD such as mu-crystallin and TP53. We developed specific siRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) targeting the DUX4 mRNA. Addition of these antisense agents to primary FSHD myoblast cultures suppressed DUX4 protein expression and affected expression of the above-mentioned markers. Conclusions/Significance These results constitute a proof of concept for the development of therapeutic approaches for FSHD targeting DUX4 expression. PMID:22053214

  10. Homolog of the polymorphic 4q35 FSHD locus (p13E-11; D4F104S1) maps to 10qter; exclusion as a second FSHD locus in a large Danish family

    SciTech Connect

    Frants, R.R.; Bakker, E.; Vossen, R.H.A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) has been mapped to 4q35 and shown to be associated with deletions that are detectable using probe p13E-11 (D4104S1). These deletions reside within highly polymorphic restriction fragments (20-300 kb) which can normally only be resolved completely using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Family studies showed that p13E-11 detects two non-allelic loci, only one of which originates from 4q35 origin. In 20 CEPH families, 8 individuals were identified showing a `small` EcoRI fragment detectable by conventional Southern blotting. Linkage analysis allowed assignment of these fragments to 10qter (D10S212 and D10S180) in all families tested. Since FSHD shows genetic heterogeneity, this second p13E-11 locus on 10qter became an interesting candidate as a second FSHD family did not provide evidence for linkage on chromosome 10qter.

  11. Post-and prenatal testing for FSHD: Diagnostic approach for sporadic and familial cases

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, E.; Wielen, M.J.R. van der; Losekoot, M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder. A major locus for FSHD was localized at the distal part of chromosome 4q. More recently, a disease associated DNA rearrangement was detected with the polymorphic probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1). In most FSHD patients, a shortened (< 28 kb instead of 50-300 kb) allele was detected. In sporadic patients a de novo deletion was found to be associated with the occurrence of FSHD. Diagnostically there were a number of problems to overcome. (1) About 5% of families show no linkage to chromosome 4q35. (2) Some 10% normal individuals show a shortened p13E11 allele, which is located at chromosome 10q. Our diagnostic strategy is as follows: If in sporadic patients a shortened p13E-11 allele is detected and neither parent shows this allele, then a de novo deletion has occurred and FSHD is proven. If no shortened allele is detected FSHD is less likely. In case one of the parents shows a shortened allele then clinical investigations and linkage studies are performed for both chromosome 4 and 10 markers. In familial cases both p13E-11 and polymorphic markers are tested. A shortened p13E-11 allele and/or chromosome 4 haplotype segregating with FSHD can be used for presymptomatic and prenatal diagnosis. Up to now, 45 sporadic cases and 21 families were referred for diagnosis. In 22 sporadic cases a shortened allele was detected, 13 were proven de novo. The first prenatal test was recently performed. The index patient was a de novo case with a shortened allele; the fetus had inherited this allele.

  12. Double SMCHD1 variants in FSHD2: the synergistic effect of two SMCHD1 variants on D4Z4 hypomethylation and disease penetrance in FSHD2.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Marlinde L; Lemmers, Richard J F L; Camaño, Pilar; van der Vliet, Patrick J; Voermans, Nicol; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Tapscott, Stephen J; van der Stoep, Nienke; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) predominantly affects the muscles in the face, trunk and upper extremities and is marked by large clinical variability in disease onset and progression. FSHD is associated with partial chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4 and the somatic expression of the D4Z4 encoded DUX4 gene. The most common form, FSHD1, is caused by a contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4 to a size of 1-10 units. FSHD2, the less common form of FSHD, is most often caused by heterozygous variants in the chromatin modifier SMCHD1, which is involved in the maintenance of D4Z4 methylation. We identified three families in which the proband carries two potentially damaging SMCHD1 variants. We investigated whether these variants were located in cis or in trans and determined their functional consequences by detailed clinical information and D4Z4 methylation studies. In the first family, both variants in trans were shown to act synergistically on D4Z4 hypomethylation and disease penetrance, in the second family both SMCHD1 function-affecting variants were located in cis while in the third family one of the two variants did not affect function. This study demonstrates that having two SMCHD1 missense variants that affect function is compatible with life in males and females, which is remarkable considering its role in X inactivation in mice. The study also highlights the variability in SMCHD1 variants underlying FSHD2 and the predictive value of D4Z4 methylation analysis in determining the functional consequences of SMCHD1 variants of unknown significance. PMID:25782668

  13. Different types of fatigue in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy and HMSN-I. Experienced fatigue and physiological fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Joke S; Zwarts, Machiel J; Schillings, Maartje L; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2008-09-01

    Although fatigue is a common symptom in neuromuscular disorders, little is known about different types of fatigue. Sixty-five FSHD, 79 adult-onset MD and 73 HMSN type I patients were studied. Experienced fatigue was assessed with the CIS-fatigue subscale. Physiological fatigue was measured during a 2-min sustained maximal voluntary contraction of the biceps brachii muscle using the twitch interpolation technique to assess central activation failure (CAF) and peripheral fatigue. Experienced fatigue, CAF and peripheral fatigue appeared to be predominantly separate types of fatigue. PMID:18690504

  14. Dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in persons with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rijken, N H M; van Engelen, B G M; Geurts, A C H; Weerdesteyn, V

    2015-09-01

    Patients with FSHD suffer from progressive skeletal muscle weakness, which is associated with an elevated fall risk. To obtain insight into fall mechanisms in this patient group, we aimed to assess dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in patients at different disease stages. Ten patients with at least some lower extremity weakness were included, of whom six were classified as moderately affected and four as mildly affected. Ten healthy controls were also included. Level walking at comfortable speed was assessed, as well as crossing a 10 cm high wooden obstacle. We assessed forward and lateral dynamic stability, as well as spatiotemporal and kinematics variables. During level walking, the moderately affected group demonstrated a lower walking speed, which was accompanied by longer step times and smaller step lengths, yet dynamic stability was unaffected. When crossing the obstacle, however, the moderately affected patients demonstrated reduced forward stability margins during the trailing step, which was accompanied by an increased toe clearance and greater trunk and hip flexion. This suggests that during level walking, the patients effectively utilized compensatory strategies for maintaining dynamic stability, but that the moderately affected group lacked the capacity to fully compensate for the greater stability demands imposed by obstacle crossing, rendering them unable to maintain optimal stability levels. The present results highlight the difficulties that FSHD patients experience in performing this common activity of daily living and may help explain their propensity to fall in the forward direction. PMID:26130572

  15. miR-411 is up-regulated in FSHD myoblasts and suppresses myogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant muscle disorder, which is linked to the contraction of the D4Z4 array at chromosome 4q35. Recent studies suggest that this shortening of the D4Z4 array leads to aberrant expression of double homeobox protein 4 (DUX4) and causes FSHD. In addition, misregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been reported in muscular dystrophies including FSHD. In this study, we identified a miRNA that is differentially expressed in FSHD myoblasts and investigated its function. Methods To identify misregulated miRNAs and their potential targets in FSHD myoblasts, we performed expression profiling of both miRNA and mRNA using TaqMan Human MicroRNA Arrays and Affymetrix Human Genome U133A plus 2.0 microarrays, respectively. In addition, we over-expressed miR-411 in C2C12 cells to determine the effect of miR-411 on myogenic markers. Results Using miRNA and mRNA expression profiling, we identified 8 miRNAs and 1,502 transcripts that were differentially expressed in FSHD myoblasts during cell proliferation. One of the 8 differentially expressed miRNAs, miR-411, was validated by quantitative RT-PCR in both primary (2.1 fold, p<0.01) and immortalized (2.7 fold, p<0.01) myoblasts. In situ hybridization showed cytoplasmic localization of miR-411 in FSHD myoblasts. By analyzing both miRNA and mRNA data using Partek Genomics Suite, we identified 4 mRNAs potentially regulated by miR-411 including YY1 associated factor 2 (YAF2). The down-regulation of YAF2 in immortalized myoblasts was validated by immunoblotting (−3.7 fold, p<0.01). C2C12 cells were transfected with miR-411 to determine whether miR-411 affects YAF2 expression in myoblasts. The results showed that over-expression of miR-411 reduced YAF2 mRNA expression. In addition, expression of myogenic markers including Myod, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain 1 (Myh1) were suppressed by miR-411. Conclusions The study demonstrated that miR-411 was differentially

  16. The genes encoding for D4Z4 binding proteins HMGB2, YY1, NCL, and MYOD1 are excluded as candidate genes for FSHD1B.

    PubMed

    Bastress, K L; Stajich, J M; Speer, M C; Gilbert, J R

    2005-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is a disease of skeletal muscle, with symptoms including both facial and shoulder girdle weakness and progression to involve the pelvic girdle and extremities in the majority of cases. For most cases of FSHD, the molecular basis of the disease can be identified as a partial deletion of the D4Z4 repeat array on the end of the long arm of chromosome 4. However, in up to 5% of FSHD families there is no linkage to 4q35. These cases are designated as FSHD1B. Proteins have been identified that bind to the D4Z4 repeats of chromosome 4q35. The genes encoding D4Z4 binding proteins YY1, HMGB2, NCL, and MYOD1 were investigated as candidate genes for FSHD1B. Coding sequences and promoter region were analyzed for HMBG2 and no sequence variations were detected. For YY1, all five exons were analyzed and a polymorphism was detected in both the unaffected and affected populations. In nucleolin (NCL), several SNPs were identified, including a SNP causing the non-synonymous change P515H; however, all polymorphisms either occurred in control samples or were previously reported. A novel polymorphism was also detected in MYOD1, but did not represent a disease-specific variation. These results suggest that HMBG2, YY1, NCL, and MYOD1 are unlikely to represent the genes responsible for FSHD in these families. PMID:15792872

  17. Culture Conditions Affect Expression of DUX4 in FSHD Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Khawaja, Hunain; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is believed to be caused by aberrant expression of double homeobox 4 (DUX4) due to epigenetic changes of the D4Z4 region at chromosome 4q35. Detecting DUX4 is challenging due to its stochastic expression pattern and low transcription level. In this study, we examined different cDNA synthesis strategies and the sensitivity for DUX4 detection. In addition, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone and knockout serum replacement (KOSR) on DUX4 expression in culture. Our data showed that DUX4 was consistently detected in cDNA samples synthesized using Superscript III. The sensitivity of DUX4 detection was higher in the samples synthesized using oligo(dT) primers compared to random hexamers. Adding dexamethasone to the culture media significantly suppressed DUX4 expression in immortalized (1.3 fold, p < 0.01) and primary (4.7 fold, p < 0.01) FSHD myoblasts, respectively. Culture medium with KOSR increased DUX4 expression and the response is concentration dependent. The findings suggest that detection strategies and culture conditions should be carefully considered when studying DUX4 in cultured cells. PMID:26007167

  18. Altered Tnnt3 characterizes selective weakness of fast fibers in mice overexpressing FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Sancisi, Valentina; Germinario, Elena; Esposito, Alessandra; Morini, Elisabetta; Peron, Samantha; Moggio, Maurizio; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Danieli-Betto, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a common hereditary myopathy, is characterized by atrophy and weakness of selective muscle groups. FSHD is considered an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance and unpredictable variability of clinical expression within families. Mice overexpressing FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1), a candidate gene for this disease, develop a progressive myopathy with features of the human disorder. Here, we show that in FRG1-overexpressing mice, fast muscles, which are the most affected by the dystrophic process, display anomalous fast skeletal troponin T (fTnT) isoform, resulting from the aberrant splicing of the Tnnt3 mRNA that precedes the appearance of dystrophic signs. We determine that muscles of FRG1 mice develop less strength due to impaired contractile properties of fast-twitch fibers associated with an anomalous MyHC-actin ratio and a reduced sensitivity to Ca2+. We demonstrate that the decrease of Ca2+ sensitivity of fast-twitch fibers depends on the anomalous troponin complex and can be rescued by the substitution with the wild-type proteins. Finally, we find that the presence of aberrant splicing isoforms of TNNT3 characterizes dystrophic muscles in FSHD patients. Collectively, our results suggest that anomalous TNNT3 profile correlates with the muscle impairment in both humans and mice. On the basis of these results, we propose that aberrant fTnT represents a biological marker of muscle phenotype severity and disease progression. PMID:24305066

  19. New multiplex PCR-based protocol allowing indirect diagnosis of FSHD on single cells: can PGD be offered despite high risk of recombination?

    PubMed Central

    Barat-Houari, Mouna; Nguyen, Karine; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Fernandez, Céline; Vovan, Catherine; Bareil, Corinne; Van Kien, Philippe Khau; Thorel, Delphine; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie; Vasseur, Francis; Attarian, Shahram; Pouget, Jean; Girardet, Anne; Lévy, Nicolas; Claustres, Mireille

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pathophysiology of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) involves the heterozygous contraction of the number of tandemly repeated D4Z4 units at chromosome 4q35.2. FSHD is associated with a range of 1–10 D4Z4 units instead of 11–150 in normal controls. Several factors complicate FSHD molecular diagnosis, especially the cis-segregation of D4Z4 contraction with a 4qA allele, whereas D4Z4 shortening is silent both on alleles 4qB and 10q. Discrimination of pathogenic 4q-D4Z4 alleles from highly homologous 10q-D4Z4 arrays requires the use of the conventional Southern blot, which is not suitable at the single-cell level. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a frequent request from FSHD families with several affected relatives. We aimed to develop a rapid and sensitive PCR-based multiplex approach on single cells to perform an indirect familial segregation study of pathogenic alleles. Among several available polymorphic markers at 4q35.2, the four most proximal (D4S2390, D4S1652, D4S2930 and D4S1523, <1.23 Mb) showing the highest heterozygote frequencies (67–91%) were selected. Five recombination events in the D4S2390-D4S1523 interval were observed among 144 meioses. In the D4S2390-D4Z4 interval, no recombination event occurred among 28 FSHD meioses. Instead, a particular haplotype segregated with both clinical and molecular status, allowing the characterization of an at-risk allele in each tested FSHD family (maximal LOD score 2.98 for θ=0.0). This indirect protocol can easily complement conventional techniques in prenatal diagnosis. Although our multiplex PCR-based approach technically fulfils guidelines for single-cell analysis, the relatively high recombination risk hampers its application to PGD. PMID:19935833

  20. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... make the muscle disease worse. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle strength. Other possible treatments include: Oral albuterol to increase muscle mass (but not strength) Speech therapy Surgery to fix a winged scapula Walking aids ...

  1. The FSHD-associated repeat, D4Z4, is a member of a dispersed family of homeobox-containing repeats, subsets of which are clustered on the short arms of the acrocentric chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, R.; Wright, T.J.; Clark, L.N.; Hewitt, J.E.

    1995-08-10

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is in autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder that maps to human chromosome 4q35. FSHD is tightly linked to a polymorphic 3.3-kb tandem repeat locus, D4Z4. D4Z4 is a complex repeat: it contains a novel homeobox sequence and two other repetitive sequence motifs. In most sporadic FSHD cases, a specific DNA rearrangement, deletion of copies of the repeat at D4Z4, is associated with development of the disease. However, no expressed sequences from D4Z4 have been identified. We have previously shown that there are other loci similar to D4Z4 within the genome. In this paper we describe the isolation of two YAC clones that map to chromosome 14 and that contain multiple copies of a D4Z4-like repeat. Isolation of cDNA clones that map to the acrocentric chromosomes and Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids show that there are similar loci on all of the acrocentric chromosomes. D4Z4 is a member of a complex repeat family, and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids shows an organization into distinct subfamilies. The implications of this work in relation to the molecular mechanism of FSHD pathogenesis is discussed. We propose the name 3.3-kb repeat for this family of repetitive sequence elements. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  2. RNA interference improves myopathic phenotypes in mice over-expressing FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1(-high) mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1(-high) mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  3. RNA Interference Improves Myopathic Phenotypes in Mice Over-expressing FSHD Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lindsay M; Garwick-Coppens, Sara E; Tupler, Rossella; Harper, Scott Q

    2011-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies, and other diseases of muscle, arise from recessive and dominant gene mutations. Gene replacement strategies may be beneficial for the former, while gene silencing approaches may provide treatment for the latter. In the last two decades, muscle-directed gene therapies were primarily focused on treating recessive disorders. This disparity at least partly arose because feasible mechanisms to silence dominant disease genes lagged behind gene replacement strategies. With the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) and its subsequent development as a promising new gene silencing tool, the landscape has changed. In this study, our objective was to demonstrate proof-of-principle for RNAi therapy of a dominant myopathy in vivo. We tested the potential of adeno-associated viral (AAV)-delivered therapeutic microRNAs, targeting the human Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1), to correct myopathic features in mice expressing toxic levels of human FRG1 (FRG1−high mice). We found that FRG1 gene silencing improved muscle mass, strength, and histopathological abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in FRG1−high mice, thereby demonstrating therapeutic promise for treatment of dominantly inherited myopathies using RNAi. This approach potentially applies to as many as 29 different gene mutations responsible for myopathies inherited as dominant disorders. PMID:21730972

  4. Molecular combing compared to Southern blot for measuring D4Z4 contractions in FSHD.

    PubMed

    Vasale, Jessica; Boyar, Fatih; Jocson, Michael; Sulcova, Vladimira; Chan, Patricia; Liaquat, Khalida; Hoffman, Carol; Meservey, Marc; Chang, Isabell; Tsao, David; Hensley, Kerri; Liu, Yan; Owen, Renius; Braastad, Corey; Sun, Weimin; Walrafen, Pierre; Komatsu, Jun; Wang, Jia-Chi; Bensimon, Aaron; Anguiano, Arturo; Jaremko, Malgorzata; Wang, Zhenyuan; Batish, Sat; Strom, Charles; Higgins, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    We compare molecular combing to Southern blot in the analysis of the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 locus (FSHD1) on chromosome 4q35-qter (chr 4q) in genomic DNA specimens sent to a clinical laboratory for FSHD testing. A de-identified set of 87 genomic DNA specimens determined by Southern blot as normal (n = 71), abnormal with D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array contractions (n = 7), indeterminate (n = 6), borderline (n = 2), or mosaic (n = 1) was independently re-analyzed by molecular combing in a blinded fashion. The molecular combing results were identical to the Southern blot results in 75 (86%) of cases. All contractions (n = 7) and mosaics (n = 1) detected by Southern blot were confirmed by molecular combing. Of the 71 samples with normal Southern blot results, 67 (94%) had concordant molecular combing results. The four discrepancies were either mosaic (n = 2), rearranged (n = 1), or borderline by molecular combing (n = 1). All indeterminate Southern blot results (n = 6) were resolved by molecular combing as either normal (n = 4), borderline (n = 1), or rearranged (n = 1). The two borderline Southern blot results showed a D4Z4 contraction on the chr 4qA allele and a normal result by molecular combing. Molecular combing overcomes a number of technical limitations of Southern blot by providing direct visualization of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat arrays on specific chr 4q and chr 10q alleles and more precise D4Z4 repeat sizing. This study suggests that molecular combing has superior analytical validity compared to Southern blot for determining D4Z4 contraction size, detecting mosaicism, and resolving borderline and indeterminate Southern blot results. Further studies are needed to establish the clinical validity and diagnostic accuracy of these findings in FSHD. PMID:26420234

  5. CRISPR/dCas9-mediated Transcriptional Inhibition Ameliorates the Epigenetic Dysregulation at D4Z4 and Represses DUX4-fl in FSH Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Charis L; Jones, Takako I; Jones, Peter L

    2016-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most prevalent myopathies, affecting males and females of all ages. Both forms of the disease are linked by epigenetic derepression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array at chromosome 4q35, leading to aberrant expression of D4Z4-encoded RNAs in skeletal muscle. Production of full-length DUX4 (DUX4-fl) mRNA from the derepressed D4Z4 array results in misexpression of DUX4-FL protein and its transcriptional targets, and apoptosis, ultimately leading to accumulated muscle pathology. Returning the chromatin at the FSHD locus to its nonpathogenic, epigenetically repressed state would simultaneously affect all D4Z4 RNAs, inhibiting downstream pathogenic pathways, and is thus an attractive therapeutic strategy. Advances in CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing make it possible to target epigenetic modifiers to an endogenous disease locus, although reports to date have focused on more typical genomic regions. Here, we demonstrate that a CRISPR/dCas9 transcriptional inhibitor can be specifically targeted to the highly repetitive FSHD macrosatellite array and alter the chromatin to repress expression of DUX4-fl in primary FSHD myocytes. These results implicate the promoter and exon 1 of DUX4 as potential therapeutic targets and demonstrate the utility of CRISPR technology for correction of the epigenetic dysregulation in FSHD. PMID:26527377

  6. DICER/AGO-dependent epigenetic silencing of D4Z4 repeats enhanced by exogenous siRNA suggests mechanisms and therapies for FSHD.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong-Won; Snider, Lauren; Yao, Zizhen; Tawil, Rabi; Van Der Maarel, Silvère M; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Filippova, Galina N; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by the aberrant expression of the DUX4 transcription factor in skeletal muscle. The DUX4 retrogene is encoded in the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array, and smaller array size or a mutation in the SMCHD1 gene results in inefficient epigenetic repression of DUX4 in skeletal muscle, causing FSHD1 and FSHD2, respectively. Previously we showed that the entire D4Z4 repeat is bi-directionally transcribed with the generation of small si- or miRNA-like fragments and suggested that these might suppress DUX4 expression through the endogenous RNAi pathway. Here we show that exogenous siRNA targeting the region upstream of the DUX4 transcription start site suppressed DUX4 mRNA expression and increased both H3K9 methylation and AGO2 recruitment. In contrast, similarly targeted MOE-gapmer antisense oligonucleotides that degrade RNA but do not engage the RNAi pathway did not repress DUX4 expression. In addition, knockdown of DICER or AGO2 using either siRNA or MOE-gapmer chemistries resulted in the induction of DUX4 expression in control muscle cells that normally do not express DUX4, indicating that the endogenous RNAi pathway is necessary to maintain repression of DUX4 in control muscle cells. Together these data demonstrate a role of the endogenous RNAi pathway in repeat-mediated epigenetic repression of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat, and show that enhancing the activity of this pathway by supplying exogenous siRNA oligonucleotides represents a potential therapeutic approach to silencing DUX4 in FSHD. PMID:26041815

  7. Facioscapulohumeral distrophy and physiotherapy: a literary review

    PubMed Central

    Corrado, Bruno; Ciardi, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this review was to critically evaluate the literature concerning the physiotherapy of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and to determine an effective protocol for physiotherapy treatments, which can be adapted to patient characteristics. [Methods] A bibliographic research was carried out of research papers held in the following databases: PUBMED, PEDRO, MEDLINE, EDS BASE INDEX. The inclusion criteria for acceptance of the studies to the review were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning a sample no smaller than 10 people and a medium- or long-term report of the results achieved. [Results] Just six of the works satisfied the inclusion criteria, and just three of them were useful for the review. However, these studies were difficult to compare. [Conclusion] At present, there are few studies concerning facioscapulohumeral dystrophy in the literature, and the few that are available rule out the utility of the techniques used. Therefore, more RCTs of new treatment strategies are needed. PMID:26311987

  8. Motor unit reorganization in progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Lipowska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze motor unit reorganization in different types of progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. The study population consisted of patients with genetically verified progressive muscular dystrophies: Duchenne (DMD) (n=54), Becker (BMD) (n=30), facio-scapulo-humeral (FSHD) (n=37), and Emery-Dreifuss (E-DD) (n=26). Patients with probable limb-girdle dystrophy (L-GD) (n=58) and congenital myopathies (n=35) were also included in the study. Quantitative EMG recordings were obtained from 469 muscles. Muscle activity at rest and during slight voluntary and maximal muscle contraction was analyzed. The motor unit activity potential (MUAP) duration, amplitude, area, size index (SI), polyphasicity, and the presence of "outliers" were evaluated. Diminished values of MUAP parameters and decreased maximal amplitude of maximal muscle contraction were recorded most frequently in DMD and mainly in the biceps brachii muscles. SI was the most frequently changed EMG parameter. "Outliers" with amplitude below the normal range were recorded more frequently then a decreased mean MUAP amplitude (what could indicate a very high sensitivity of this EMG parameter). Pathological interference pattern was recorded in 34.7% of biceps brachii and in 21.2% of rectus femoris muscles. In FSHD, decreased MUAP duration and SI and pathological interference pattern with low amplitude were recorded most frequently in the tibial anterior and deltoid muscles. The presence of potentials with reduced parameters is a result of decreasing motor unit area (reduced number and size of muscle fibers), while high amplitude potentials recorded in BMD and E-DD could indicate a slow and mild course of disease and muscle regeneration. PMID:26188938

  9. Aberrant splicing in transgenes containing introns, exons, and V5 epitopes: lessons from developing an FSHD mouse model expressing a D4Z4 repeat with flanking genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Domire, Jacqueline S; Wallace, Lindsay M; Eidahl, Jocelyn O; Guckes, Susan M; Giesige, Carlee R; Pyne, Nettie K; Belayew, Alexandra; Harper, Scott Q

    2015-01-01

    The DUX4 gene, encoded within D4Z4 repeats on human chromosome 4q35, has recently emerged as a key factor in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). This recognition prompted development of animal models expressing the DUX4 open reading frame (ORF) alone or embedded within D4Z4 repeats. In the first published model, we used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) and strong viral control elements (CMV promoter, SV40 poly A) to demonstrate that the DUX4 cDNA caused dose-dependent toxicity in mouse muscles. As a follow-up, we designed a second generation of DUX4-expressing AAV vectors to more faithfully genocopy the FSHD-permissive D4Z4 repeat region located at 4q35. This new vector (called AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM) contained the D4Z4/DUX4 promoter region, a V5 epitope-tagged DUX4 ORF, and the natural 3' untranslated region (pLAM) harboring two small introns, DUX4 exons 2 and 3, and the non-canonical poly A signal required for stabilizing DUX4 mRNA in FSHD. AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM failed to recapitulate the robust pathology of our first generation vectors following delivery to mouse muscle. We found that the DUX4.V5 junction sequence created an unexpected splice donor in the pre-mRNA that was preferentially utilized to remove the V5 coding sequence and DUX4 stop codon, yielding non-functional DUX4 protein with 55 additional residues on its carboxyl-terminus. Importantly, we further found that aberrant splicing could occur in any expression construct containing a functional splice acceptor and sequences resembling minimal splice donors. Our findings represent an interesting case study with respect to AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM, but more broadly serve as a note of caution for designing constructs containing V5 epitope tags and/or transgenes with downstream introns and exons. PMID:25742305

  10. Rippling muscle disease and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy-like phenotype in a patient carrying a heterozygous CAV3 T78M mutation and a D4Z4 partial deletion: Further evidence for “double trouble” overlapping syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Giulia; Scionti, Isabella; Alì, Greta; Volpi, Leda; Zampa, Virna; Fanin, Marina; Angelini, Corrado; Politano, Luisa; Tupler, Rossella; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    We report the first case of a heterozygous T78M mutation in the caveolin-3 gene (CAV3) associated with rippling muscle disease and proximal myopathy. The patient displayed also bilateral winged scapula with limited abduction of upper arms and marked asymmetric atrophy of leg muscles shown by magnetic resonance imaging. Immunohistochemistry on the patient’s muscle biopsy demonstrated a reduction of caveolin-3 staining, compatible with the diagnosis of caveolinopathy. Interestingly, consistent with the possible diagnosis of FSHD, the patient carried a 35 kb D4Z4 allele on chromosome 4q35. We discuss the hypothesis that the two genetic mutations may exert a synergistic effect in determining the phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:22245016

  11. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  12. Scalpel or Straitjacket: CRISPR/Cas9 Approaches for Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Charis L; Jones, Takako I; Jones, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Versatility of CRISPR/Cas9-based platforms makes them promising tools for the correction of diverse genetic/epigenetic disorders. Here we contrast the use of these genome editing tools in two myopathies with very different molecular origins: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a monogenetic disease, and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, an epigenetic disorder with unique therapeutic challenges. PMID:26917062

  13. A case of fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy misdiagnosed as Becker's muscular dystrophy for 20 years.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie Llaneza; Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat

    2012-03-01

    A 60-year-old man diagnosed clinically with Becker's muscular dystrophy 20 years ago by another physician presented with gradually progressive proximal muscle weakness since teenage years. Family history revealed a strong paternal familial inheritance pattern of similar distribution of weakness-face, forearm flexion, knee extension and foot dorsiflexion. Work-ups revealed B12 deficiency and allele 1 deletion in fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) DNA testing. FSHD is the third most common muscular dystrophy. Clinical diagnosis is made from the distinctive pattern of weakness, autosomal-dominant inheritance, and confirmed by genetic testing. This case strongly demonstrates the importance of a thorough and careful clinical evaluation even in a case with a long standing diagnosis. PMID:21795275

  14. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dev. Med. Child Neurol. Mar 1995;37(3):260-269. 4. Centers for ... DM1) . The International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC). Neurology. Mar 28 2000;54(6):1218-1221. 5. Harper ...

  15. Muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001190.htm Muscular dystrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited disorders that cause ...

  16. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  17. Gene search in the FSHD region on 4q35

    SciTech Connect

    Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Romberg, S.; Geel, M. van

    1994-09-01

    In the search for the FSHD gene on 4q35, four overlapping cosmids spanning a region of 95 kb including the deletion-prone repeated units were subcloned as well as subjected to cDNA selection and exon trap strategies. A total of 300 selected clones with an average length of 500 bp were mapped back to the cosmids. None of the clones appeared to be single copy. Sequence data of most clones and the related genomic regions were compared. cDNA clones with a high homolgy (>90%) and a low repetitive hybridization pattern were further analyzed by Zoo- and Northern blotting and by sequence analysis programs like GRAIL. Excellent and good exons could be identified and some clones showed evolutionary conservation. With the best cDNA, genomic and exon trap clones, several cDNA libraries were screened. The obtained cDNAs identified different genes, none of which originated from 4q35. 3{prime} RACE experiments were performed using primers derived of predicted exons especially in a 2.2 kb EcoRI fragment about 20 kb centromeric of the repeats. So far, only non-4q35 genes could be identified. Altogether, our results support other recent studies indicating that the FSHD gene is most likely not encoded by the 3.3 kb repeated units. Moreover, the region centromeric of these repeats appeared to contain abundant repetitive sequences and homologies to several other chromosomes, complicating the identification of the FSHD gene.

  18. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of facioscapulohumeral type.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, T; Toyokura, Y

    1976-01-01

    Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type affecting a mother and her son and daughter is reported. The relevant literature is reviewed and the relation between this conditon and Kugelberg-Welander (K-W) disease is discussed. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type is considered to be a different entity from the eponymous K-W disease. Each type of muscular dystrophy, e.g. limb-girdle, FSH, distal, ocular, or oculopharyngeal type, has its counterpart of nuclear origin. A classification of the chronic spinal muscular atrophies is suggested following the classification of muscular dystrophy. Images PMID:957378

  19. Emerging strategies for cell and gene therapy of the muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Lindsey A.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of over 40 disorders that are characterised by muscle weakness and wasting. The most common are Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy, which result from mutations within the gene encoding dystrophin; myotonic dystrophy type 1, which results from an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene; and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, which is associated with contractions in the subtelomeric region of human chromosome 1. Currently the only treatments involve clinical management of symptoms, although several promising experimental strategies are emerging. These include gene therapy using adeno-associated viral, lentiviral and adenoviral vectors and nonviral vectors, such as plasmid DNA. Exon-skipping and cell-based therapies have also shown promise in the effective treatment and regeneration of dystrophic muscle. The availability of numerous animal models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has enabled extensive testing of a wide range of therapeutic approaches for this type of disorder. Consequently, we focus here on the therapeutic developments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy as a model of the types of approaches being considered for various types of dystrophy. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic strategy, as well as prospects and recent successes in the context of future clinical applications. PMID:19555515

  20. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy KidsHealth > For Kids > The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy ... you know someone who has MD. What Is Muscular Dystrophy? Muscular dystrophy (say: MUS-kyoo-lur DIS-troh- ...

  1. Corneal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Klintworth, Gordon K

    2009-01-01

    The term corneal dystrophy embraces a heterogenous group of bilateral genetically determined non-inflammatory corneal diseases that are restricted to the cornea. The designation is imprecise but remains in vogue because of its clinical value. Clinically, the corneal dystrophies can be divided into three groups based on the sole or predominant anatomical location of the abnormalities. Some affect primarily the corneal epithelium and its basement membrane or Bowman layer and the superficial corneal stroma (anterior corneal dystrophies), the corneal stroma (stromal corneal dystrophies), or Descemet membrane and the corneal endothelium (posterior corneal dystrophies). Most corneal dystrophies have no systemic manifestations and present with variable shaped corneal opacities in a clear or cloudy cornea and they affect visual acuity to different degrees. Corneal dystrophies may have a simple autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive Mendelian mode of inheritance. Different corneal dystrophies are caused by mutations in the CHST6, KRT3, KRT12, PIP5K3, SLC4A11, TACSTD2, TGFBI, and UBIAD1 genes. Knowledge about the responsible genetic mutations responsible for these disorders has led to a better understanding of their basic defect and to molecular tests for their precise diagnosis. Genes for other corneal dystrophies have been mapped to specific chromosomal loci, but have not yet been identified. As clinical manifestations widely vary with the different entities, corneal dystrophies should be suspected when corneal transparency is lost or corneal opacities occur spontaneously, particularly in both corneas, and especially in the presence of a positive family history or in the offspring of consanguineous parents. Main differential diagnoses include various causes of monoclonal gammopathy, lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase deficiency, Fabry disease, cystinosis, tyrosine transaminase deficiency, systemic lysosomal storage diseases (mucopolysaccharidoses

  2. Myotonic Dystrophy Family Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy 1; Myotonic Dystrophy 2; Dystrophia Myotonica; Dystrophia Myotonica 1; Dystrophia Myotonica 2; Myotonia Dystrophica; Myotonic Dystrophy, Congenital; Myotonic Myopathy, Proximal; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Proximal Myotonic Myopathy; Steinert Disease; Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy; Steinert's Disease; Myotonia Atrophica

  3. Myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jozefowicz, R F; Griggs, R C

    1988-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, myotonia, and numerous nonmuscular manifestations including frontal balding, cataracts, gonadal dysfunction, cardiac conduction abnormalities, respiratory insufficiency, and hypersomnolence. Although the gene defect in myotonic dystrophy has been mapped to chromosome 19, the exact metabolic abnormalities responsible for this disorder are unknown. Skeletal muscle has been found to be relatively insulin-resistant in myotonic dystrophy, and a decrease in the anabolic action of insulin on skeletal muscle may be related to muscle wasting in this disorder. Laboratory studies, including electromyography, electrocardiography, and muscle biopsy, are helpful in evaluating patients for this disorder, but the clinical aspects and a careful family history remain the mainstays of diagnosis. A number of management strategies preserve function and prevent complications in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:3065594

  4. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be affected. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) affects boys and girls equally, weakening muscles in the shoulders and upper ... weakness and poor muscle tone. Occurring in both girls and boys, it can have different symptoms. It varies in ...

  5. Distal Myopathies: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz

    2016-08-01

    About 15% of myopathies present with distal weakness. Lack of sensory deficit, and preservation of sensory responses and deep tendon reflexes, favors a myopathic cause for distal weakness. Electromyogram confirms this diagnosis. Profuse spontaneous discharges are common in inflammatory, metabolic, and myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). If the clinical picture indicates a specific disease such as facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), genetic testing provides the quickest diagnosis. Otherwise, muscle biopsy can distinguish specific features. The common causes of myopathic distal weakness are FSHD, myotonic dystrophy, and inclusion body myositis. Other causes include MFM, distal muscular dystrophies, metabolic myopathies, and congenital myopathies. PMID:27445241

  6. Muscular dystrophy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - muscular dystrophy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on muscular dystrophy : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mdausa.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih. ...

  7. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Difference How to Get Involved Donate Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Share print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) What is myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD)? Myotonic ...

  8. Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica, DM) is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders in populations of European descent. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) was first described over a century ago. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG triplet repeat in the 3' non-coding region of DMPK, the gene encoding the DM protein kinase. More recently a second form of the disease, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) was recognized, which results from repeat expansion in a different gene. The DM2 expansion involves a CCTG repeat in the first intron of Zinc Finger 9 (ZNF9). Both disorders have autosomal dominant inheritance and multisystem features, including myotonic myopathy, cataract, and cardiac conduction disease. Studies suggest that the shared clinical features of DM1 and DM2 involve a novel genetic mechanism in which repetitive RNA exerts a toxic effect. The RNA toxicity stems from the expanded repeat in the transcripts from the mutant DM alleles. This chapter will review the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of DM, and discuss current management and future potential for developing targeted therapies. PMID:25037086

  9. Increased DUX4 expression during muscle differentiation correlates with decreased SMCHD1 protein levels at D4Z4.

    PubMed

    Balog, Judit; Thijssen, Peter E; Shadle, Sean; Straasheijm, Kirsten R; van der Vliet, Patrick J; Krom, Yvonne D; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L; de Jong, Annika; F Lemmers, Richard J L; Tawil, Rabi; Tapscott, Stephen J; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is caused by incomplete epigenetic repression of the transcription factor DUX4 in skeletal muscle. A copy of DUX4 is located within each unit of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array and its derepression in somatic cells is caused by either repeat array contraction (FSHD1) or by mutations in the chromatin repressor SMCHD1 (FSHD2). While DUX4 expression has thus far only been detected in FSHD muscle and muscle cell cultures, and increases with in vitro myogenic differentiation, the D4Z4 chromatin structure has only been studied in proliferating myoblasts or non-myogenic cells. We here show that SMCHD1 protein levels at D4Z4 decline during muscle cell differentiation and correlate with DUX4 derepression. In FSHD2, but not FSHD1, the loss of SMCHD1 repressor activity is partially compensated by increased Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated H3K27 trimethylation at D4Z4, a situation that can be mimicked by SMCHD1 knockdown in control myotubes. In contrast, moderate overexpression of SMCHD1 results in DUX4 silencing in FSHD1 and FSHD2 myotubes demonstrating that DUX4 derepression in FSHD is reversible. Together, we show that in FSHD1 and FSHD2 the decline in SMCHD1 protein levels during muscle cell differentiation renders skeletal muscle sensitive to DUX4. PMID:26575099

  10. Increased DUX4 expression during muscle differentiation correlates with decreased SMCHD1 protein levels at D4Z4

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Judit; Thijssen, Peter E.; Shadle, Sean; Straasheijm, Kirsten R.; van der Vliet, Patrick J.; Krom, Yvonne D.; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L.; de Jong, Annika; F Lemmers, Richard J. L.; Tawil, Rabi; Tapscott, Stephen J.; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is caused by incomplete epigenetic repression of the transcription factor DUX4 in skeletal muscle. A copy of DUX4 is located within each unit of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array and its derepression in somatic cells is caused by either repeat array contraction (FSHD1) or by mutations in the chromatin repressor SMCHD1 (FSHD2). While DUX4 expression has thus far only been detected in FSHD muscle and muscle cell cultures, and increases with in vitro myogenic differentiation, the D4Z4 chromatin structure has only been studied in proliferating myoblasts or non-myogenic cells. We here show that SMCHD1 protein levels at D4Z4 decline during muscle cell differentiation and correlate with DUX4 derepression. In FSHD2, but not FSHD1, the loss of SMCHD1 repressor activity is partially compensated by increased Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)–mediated H3K27 trimethylation at D4Z4, a situation that can be mimicked by SMCHD1 knockdown in control myotubes. In contrast, moderate overexpression of SMCHD1 results in DUX4 silencing in FSHD1 and FSHD2 myotubes demonstrating that DUX4 derepression in FSHD is reversible. Together, we show that in FSHD1 and FSHD2 the decline in SMCHD1 protein levels during muscle cell differentiation renders skeletal muscle sensitive to DUX4. PMID:26575099

  11. Serum Enzyme Profiles Differentiate Five Types of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuling; Zhang, Huili; Sun, Yiming; Li, Yaqin; Deng, Langhui; Wen, Xingxuan; Wang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background. Differentiation among types of muscular dystrophy (MD) has remained challenging. In this retrospective study, we sought to develop a methodology for differentiation of MD types using analysis of serum enzyme profiles. Methods. The serum levels of enzymes from 232 patients, including 120 with DMD, 36 with BMD, 36 with FSHD, 46 with LGMD, and 11 with EDMD, were evaluated. Results. The characteristic profiles of serum enzymes facilitated differentiation of these five types of MD. DMD was characterized by simultaneous elevation of ALT, AST, LDH, and ALP; BMD and LGMD were characterized by elevation of ALT, AST, and LDH; and FSHD and EDMD were characterized by a lack of abnormal serum enzyme levels. We further developed discriminant functions to distinguish BMD and LGMD. For LGMD, LGMD2B patients had significantly higher ALP levels than non-LGMD2B patients (98 ± 59 U/L versus 45 ± 9 U/L, resp., p < 0.05). Conclusions. Our approach enabled the determination of MD subtypes using serum enzyme profiles prior to genetic testing, which will increase the chance a mutation will be found in the first gene analyzed. PMID:26063958

  12. Depression in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1: clinical and neuronal correlates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of depression in Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Methods Thirty-one patients with DM1 and 47 subjects in a clinical contrast group, consisting of other neuromuscular disorders, including Spinal muscular atrophy, Limb girdle muscle atrophy and Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We aimed to establish whether different factors associated with DM1 correlated with ratings in the BDI. Results Signs of a clinical depression were prevalent in 32% of the patients with DM1, which was comparable with ratings in the clinical contrast group. The depressive condition was mild to moderate in both groups. In DM1, a longer duration of clinical symptoms was associated with lower scores on the BDI and higher educational levels were correlated with higher scores on depression. We also found a negative association with brain white matter lesions. Conclusions Findings indicate significantly more DM1 patients than normative collectives showing signs of a clinical depression. The depressive condition is however mild to moderate and data indicate that the need for intervention is at hand preferentially early during the disease process. PMID:20482818

  13. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  14. Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and wheelchairs may improve movement and self-care. Genetic counseling may be recommended. Daughters of a man with ... Genetic counseling may be advised if there is a family history of Becker muscular dystrophy.

  15. What Are the Types of Muscular Dystrophy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... means "present from birth." Congenital MD affects both boys and girls, who often require support to sit or stand ... lordosis (pronounced lawr-DOH-sis ) FSHD affects teen boys and girls typically but may occur as late as age ...

  16. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit with a health care ...

  17. Derivation of FSHD1 affected human embryonic stem cell line Genea049.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea049 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, carrying a deletion in 4q35 with only 5 D4Z4 repeats by PGD linkage analysis, indicative of FSHD1. Following ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders, karyotype was confirmed as 46, XX by CGH and STR analysis demonstrated a female Allele pattern. The hESC line had pluripotent cell morphology, 90% of cells expressed Nanog, 96% Oct4, 80% Tra1-60 and 99% SSEA4, gave a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 23.16, Novelty of 1.43 and demonstrated Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination. PMID:27346016

  18. Derivation of FSHD1 affected human embryonic stem cell line Genea050.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; Main, Heather; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea050 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, carrying a deletion in 4q35 with only 5 D4Z4 repeats by PGD linkage analysis, indicative of FSHD1. Following ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders, karyotype was confirmed as 46, XY and STR analysis demonstrated a male Allele pattern. The hESC line had pluripotent cell morphology, 92% of cells expressed Nanog, 97% Oct4, 79% Tra1-60 and 99% SSEA4, gave a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 25.45, Novelty of 1.45 demonstrated Alkaline Phosphatase activity and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination. PMID:27346025

  19. Derivation of FSHD1 affected human embryonic stem cell line Genea096.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Schaft, Julia; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea096 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, carrying a deletion in 4q35 with only 6 D4Z4 repeats by PGD linkage analysis, indicative of FSHD1. Following ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders, karyotype was confirmed as 46, XX by CGH and STR analysis demonstrated a female Allele pattern. The hESC line had pluripotent cell morphology, 64% of cells expressed Nanog, 93% Oct4, 58% Tra1-60 and 93% SSEA4 and a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 39.41, Novelty of 1.25. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination. PMID:27346027

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Eppie M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder, has an incidence of one in 5000 boys and presents in early childhood with proximal muscle weakness. Untreated boys become wheelchair bound by the age of 12 years and die of cardiorespiratory complications in their late teens to early 20s. The use of corticosteroids, non-invasive respiratory support, and active surveillance and management of associated complications have improved ambulation, function, quality of life and life expectancy. The clinical features, investigations and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reviewed, as well as the latest in some of the novel therapies. PMID:25752877

  1. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names for This Condition tardive tibial muscular dystrophy TMD Udd distal myopathy Udd-Markesbery muscular dystrophy Udd ... titin may cause more severe tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD). Neuromuscul Disord. 2008 Dec;18(12):922-8. ...

  2. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in muscular dystrophy with Thallium-201 emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Kawai, N.; Matsushima, H.; Okada, M.; Yamauchi, K.; Yokota, M.; Hayashi, H.; Sotobata, I.; Sakuma, S.

    1985-05-01

    The clinical usefulness of quantitative analysis of thallium-201 emission computed tomography (ECT) for evaluation of left ventricular myocardial fibrosis was assessed on 45 patients with Duchenne(D), facioscapulohumeral(FSH), limbgirdle(LG) and myotonic(M) dystrophy. Trans-,long- and short-axial images were interpreted quantitatively using circumferential profile analysis, and the fibrotic tissue size (%FIB) was estimated by integration of hypoperfused areas in 6 to 8 consecutive short-axial slices. Lung/mediastinum count ratios (L/M ratio) were also assessed. Distinct ECT defects were found in 42 patients (all cases of D, FSH and LG, and 2 of 5 MTs). ECT defects were observed specifically in the posterolateral wall (71%) and apex (58%) in D, and were scattered in all LV walls in FSHG, LG and MT. ECG and VCG underestimated the extent of myocardial fibrosis in 17 patients (40%). Percent FIBs coincided with fibrotic tissue sizes proven by autopsy. Body-surface ECG should be influenced by cardiac position and rotation in the thorax, which were often observed in these disease entities. These factors were also assessed with ECT. The authors conclude; ECT to be useful for non-invasive evaluation of myocardial fibrosis in patients with various types of muscular dystrophy.

  3. Engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived myogenic progenitors in a dominant model of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Darabi, Radbod; Baik, June; Clee, Mark; Kyba, Michael; Tupler, Rossella; Perlingeiro, Rita C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) consist of a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, recessive or dominant, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakening. To date, no effective treatment is available. Experimental strategies pursuing muscle regeneration through the transplantation of stem cell preparations have brought hope to patients affected by this disorder. Efficacy has been demonstrated in recessive MD models through contribution of wild-type nuclei to the muscle fiber heterokaryon, however to date, there has been no study investigating the efficacy of a cell therapy in a dominant model of MD. We have recently demonstrated that Pax3-induced embryonic stem (ES) cell- derived myogenic progenitors are able to engraft and improve muscle function in mdx mice, a recessive mouse model for Duchenne MD. To assess whether this therapeutic effect can be extended to a dominant type of muscle disorder, here we transplanted these cells into FRG1 transgenic mice, a dominant model that has been associated with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Our results show that Pax3-induced ES-derived myogenic progenitors are capable of significant engraftment after intramuscular or systemic transplantation into Frg1 mice. Analyses of contractile parameters revealed functional improvement in treated muscles of male mice, but not females, which are less severely affected. This study is the first to use Frg1 transgenic mice to assess muscle regeneration as well as to support the use of a cell-based therapy for autosomal dominant types of MD. PMID:19682990

  4. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, Cecilia; Guan, Tinglu; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Hays, Arthur P.; Worman, Howard J.; Gerace, Larry; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2009-11-13

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  5. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Bergoffen, J; Kant, J; Sladky, J; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E H; Fischbeck, K H

    1994-01-01

    The congenital form of myotonic dystrophy is reported to be almost exclusively, if not exclusively, maternally transmitted. We present a case of congenital myotonic dystrophy which was inherited from a mildly affected father. This family illustrates that the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy can occur without intrauterine or other maternal factors related to the disease. The possibility of paternal transmission of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy could be considered when counselling myotonic dystrophy patients and their families. Images PMID:7966187

  6. Progressive cone dystrophies.

    PubMed

    François, J; De Rouck, A; De Laey, J J

    1976-01-01

    Patients with progressive generalized cone dystrophy often present nystagmus (or strabism) and complain of photophobia, decrease in visual acuity or disturbances in colour perception. The most classic fundus abnormality is the bull's eye maculopathy or a pallor of the optic disc. Minimal macular changes are sometimes seen, which may progress to a bull's eye type of macular degeneration. The photopic ERG is always very affected, whereas at first the scotopic ERG seems normal. Progressive deterioration of the visual functions is accompanied by increasing fundus lesions and rod involvement, as suggested by the modifications of the dark adaptation curve and the scotopic ERG. However, the progression of typical generalized cone dysfunction is very slow. On the contrary, in some cases of so-called Stargardt's disease with peripheral participation, a very rapid progression has been observed. In such cases a normal ERG does not necessarily mean that the disease will remain localized to the macular area. No definite prognosis can be made on one single ERG. In 3 cases with sector pigmentary retinopathy the photopic ERG was more affected than the scotopic ERG. However, these cases are probably primary cone-rod dystrophies. Although there is no electrophysiological control, our clinical impression is that the evolution, if possible, is very slow. PMID:1066593

  7. Wasting Mechanisms in Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. PMID:23669245

  8. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  9. Fuchs’ corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Eghrari, Allen O; Gottsch, John D

    2010-01-01

    Fuchs’ corneal dystrophy (FCD) is a progressive, hereditary disease of the cornea first described a century ago by the Austrian ophthalmologist Ernst Fuchs. Patients often present in the fifth to sixth decade of life with blurry morning vision that increases in duration as the disease progresses. Primarily a condition of the posterior cornea, characteristic features include the formation of focal excrescences of Descemet membrane termed ‘guttae’, loss of endothelial cell density and end-stage disease manifested by corneal edema and the formation of epithelial bullae. Recent advances in our understanding of the genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, as well as the application of new imaging modalities and less invasive surgical procedures, present new opportunities for improved outcomes among patients with FCD. PMID:20625449

  10. What Are the Treatments for Muscular Dystrophy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for muscular dystrophy? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... available to stop or reverse any form of muscular dystrophy (MD). Instead, certain therapies and medications aim to ...

  11. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Manuela, Manuela; Cantinho, Guilhermina

    2011-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is rare in pediatrics. It is a complex regional pain syndrome, of unknown etiology, usually post-traumatic, characterized by dysfunctions of the musculoskeletal, vascular and skin systems: severe persistent pain of a limb, sensory and vascular alterations, associated disability and psychosocial dysfunction. The diagnosis is based in high clinical suspection. In children and adolescents there are aspects that are different from the adult ones. Excessive tests may result in worsening of the clinical symptoms. Bone scintigraphy can help. Pain treatment is difficult, not specific. Physical therapies and relaxation technics give some relief. Depression must be treated. This syndrome includes fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome type I. We present a clinical report of an adolescent girl, referred for pain, cold temperature, pallor and functional disability of an inferior limb, all signals disclosed by a minor trauma. She had been diagnosed depression the year before. The bone scintigraphy was a decisive test. The treatment with gabapentin, C vitamin, physiotherapy and pshycotherapy has been effective. PMID:22713207

  12. Nuclear envelope dystrophies show a transcriptional fingerprint suggesting disruption of Rb-MyoD pathways in muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bakay, Marina; Wang, Zuyi; Melcon, Gisela; Schiltz, Louis; Xuan, Jianhua; Zhao, Po; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Seo, Jinwook; Pegoraro, Elena; Angelini, Corrado; Shneiderman, Ben; Escolar, Diana; Chen, Yi-Wen; Winokur, Sara T; Pachman, Lauren M; Fan, Chenguang; Mandler, Raul; Nevo, Yoram; Gordon, Erynn; Zhu, Yitan; Dong, Yibin; Wang, Yue; Hoffman, Eric P

    2006-04-01

    Mutations of lamin A/C (LMNA) cause a wide range of human disorders, including progeria, lipodystrophy, neuropathies and autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). EDMD is also caused by X-linked recessive loss-of-function mutations of emerin, another component of the inner nuclear lamina that directly interacts with LMNA. One model for disease pathogenesis of LMNA and emerin mutations is cell-specific perturbations of the mRNA transcriptome in terminally differentiated cells. To test this model, we studied 125 human muscle biopsies from 13 diagnostic groups (125 U133A, 125 U133B microarrays), including EDMD patients with LMNA and emerin mutations. A Visual and Statistical Data Analyzer (VISDA) algorithm was used to statistically model cluster hierarchy, resulting in a tree of phenotypic classifications. Validations of the diagnostic tree included permutations of U133A and U133B arrays, and use of two probe set algorithms (MAS5.0 and MBEI). This showed that the two nuclear envelope defects (EDMD LMNA, EDMD emerin) were highly related disorders and were also related to fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). FSHD has recently been hypothesized to involve abnormal interactions of chromatin with the nuclear envelope. To identify disease-specific transcripts for EDMD, we applied a leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation approach using LMNA patient muscle as a test data set, with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validations in both LMNA and emerin patient muscle. A high proportion of top-ranked and validated transcripts were components of the same transcriptional regulatory pathway involving Rb1 and MyoD during muscle regeneration (CRI-1, CREBBP, Nap1L1, ECREBBP/p300), where each was specifically upregulated in EDMD. Using a muscle regeneration time series (27 time points) we develop a transcriptional model for downstream consequences of LMNA and emerin mutations. We propose that key interactions between the nuclear

  13. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  14. Modifying muscular dystrophy through TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle with replacement by scar or fibrosis resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through candidate gene approaches as well as genomewide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the TGFβ pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGFβ signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGFβ pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGFβ pathway and approaches to modulate TGFβ activity to ameliorate muscle disease. PMID:23551962

  15. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23669245

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a condition that chiefly affects muscles used ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic conditions characterized by ...

  18. Comparative study of thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography and electrocardiography in Duchenne and other types of muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Matsushima, H.; Suzuki, A.; Sotobata, I.; Indo, T.; Matsuoka, Y.

    1988-04-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using thallium-201 was compared with 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) in patients with Duchenne (29), facioscapulohumeral (7), limb-girdle (6) and myotonic (5) dystrophies, by dividing the left ventricular (LV) wall into 5 segments. SPECT showed thallium defects (37 patients, mostly in the posteroapical wall), malrotation (23), apical aneurysm (5) and dilatation (7). ECG showed abnormal QRS (36 patients), particularly as a posterolateral pattern (13). Both methods of assessment were normal in only 7 patients. The Duchenne type frequently showed both a thallium defect (particularly in the posteroapical wall) and an abnormal QRS (predominantly in the posterolateral wall); the 3 other types showed abnormalities over the 5 LV wall segments in both tests. The percent of agreement between the 2 tests was 64, 66, 70, 72 and 72 for the lateral, apical, anteroseptal, posterior and inferior walls, respectively. The 2 tests were discordant in 31% of the LV wall, with SPECT (+) but ECG (-) in 21% (mostly in the apicoinferior wall) and SPECT (-) but ECG (+) in 10% (mostly in the lateral wall). Some patients showed large SPECT hypoperfusion despite minimal electrocardiographic changes. ECG thus appeared to underestimate LV fibrosis and to reflect posteroapical rather than posterolateral dystrophy in its posterolateral QRS pattern. In this disease, extensive SPECT hypoperfusion was also shown, irrespective of clinical subtype and skeletal involvement.

  19. Zebrafish orthologs of human muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Leta S; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Vogel, Emily D; Beltre, Rosanna; Pusack, Timothy J; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Background Human muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders which cause decreased muscle strength and often result in premature death. There is no known cure for muscular dystrophy, nor have all causative genes been identified. Recent work in the small vertebrate zebrafish Danio rerio suggests that mutation or misregulation of zebrafish dystrophy orthologs can also cause muscular degeneration phenotypes in fish. To aid in the identification of new causative genes, this study identifies and maps zebrafish orthologs for all known human muscular dystrophy genes. Results Zebrafish sequence databases were queried for transcripts orthologous to human dystrophy-causing genes, identifying transcripts for 28 out of 29 genes of interest. In addition, the genomic locations of all 29 genes have been found, allowing rapid candidate gene discovery during genetic mapping of zebrafish dystrophy mutants. 19 genes show conservation of syntenic relationships with humans and at least two genes appear to be duplicated in zebrafish. Significant sequence coverage on one or more BAC clone(s) was also identified for 24 of the genes to provide better local sequence information and easy updating of genomic locations as the zebrafish genome assembly continues to evolve. Conclusion This resource supports zebrafish as a dystrophy model, suggesting maintenance of all known dystrophy-associated genes in the zebrafish genome. Coupled with the ability to conduct genetic screens and small molecule screens, zebrafish are thus an attractive model organism for isolating new dystrophy-causing genes/pathways and for use in high-throughput therapeutic discovery. PMID:17374169

  20. Hypothesis: neoplasms in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Martens, William; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.; Greene, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process due to an accumulation of genetic mutations in multiple genes in diverse pathways which ultimately lead to loss of control over cell growth. It is well known that inheritance of rare germline mutations in genes involved in tumorigenesis pathways confer high lifetime risk of neoplasia in affected individuals. Furthermore, a substantial number of multiple malformation syndromes include cancer susceptibility in their phenotype. Studies of the mechanisms underlying these inherited syndromes have added to the understanding of both normal development and the pathophysiology of carcinogenesis. Myotonic dystrophy (DM) represents a group of autosomal dominant, multisystemic diseases that share the clinical features of myotonia, muscle weakness, and early-onset cataracts. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) result from unstable nucleotide repeat expansions in their respective genes. There have been multiple reports of tumors in individuals with DM, most commonly benign calcifying cutaneous tumors known as pilomatricomas. We provide a summary of the tumors reported in DM and a hypothesis for a possible mechanism of tumorigenesis. We hope to stimulate further study into the potential role of DM genes in tumorigenesis, and help define DM pathogenesis, and facilitate developing novel treatment modalities. PMID:19642006

  1. Establishment of clonal myogenic cell lines from severely affected dystrophic muscles - CDK4 maintains the myogenic population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A hallmark of muscular dystrophies is the replacement of muscle by connective tissue. Muscle biopsies from patients severely affected with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) may contain few myogenic cells. Because the chromosomal contraction at 4q35 linked to FSHD is thought to cause a defect within myogenic cells, it is important to study this particular cell type, rather than the fibroblasts and adipocytes of the endomysial fibrosis, to understand the mechanism leading to myopathy. Results We present a protocol to establish clonal myogenic cell lines from even severely dystrophic muscle that has been replaced mostly by fat, using overexpression of CDK4 and the catalytic component of telomerase (human telomerase reverse transcriptase; hTERT), and a subsequent cloning step. hTERT is necessary to compensate for telomere loss during in vitro cultivation, while CDK4 prevents a telomere-independent growth arrest affecting CD56+ myogenic cells, but not their CD56- counterpart, in vitro. Conclusions These immortal cell lines are valuable tools to reproducibly study the effect of the FSHD mutation within myoblasts isolated from muscles that have been severely affected by the disease, without the confounding influence of variable amounts of contaminating connective-tissue cells. PMID:21798090

  2. Morpholino treatment improves muscle function and pathology of Pitx1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Lee, Yi-Chien; Yokota, Toshifumi; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2014-02-01

    Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1) was proposed to be part of the disease mechanisms of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). We generated a tet-repressible muscle-specific Pitx1 transgenic mouse model which develops phenotypes of muscular dystrophy after the PITX1 expression is induced. In this study, we attempted to block the translation of PITX1 protein using morpholinos. Three groups of the transgenic mice received intravenous injections of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) (100 mg/kg), octaguanidinium dendrimer-conjugated morpholino (vivo-morpholino) (10 mg/kg), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) after the PITX1 expression was induced. Immunoblotting data showed that PITX1 expression in the triceps and quadriceps was significantly reduced 70% and 63% by the vivo-morpholino treatment, respectively. Muscle pathology of the mice treated with the vivo-morpholino was improved by showing 44% fewer angular-shaped atrophic myofibers. Muscle function determined by grip strength was significantly improved by the vivo-morpholino treatment. The study showed that systemic delivery of the vivo-morpholino reduced the PITX1 expression and improved the muscle phenotypes. Aberrant expression of DUX4 from the last unit of the D4Z4 array has been proposed to be the cause of FSHD. The findings of this study suggest that the same principle may be applied to suppress the aberrantly expressed DUX4 in FSHD. PMID:24232919

  3. Morpholino Treatment Improves Muscle Function and Pathology of Pitx1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Lee, Yi-Chien; Yokota, Toshifumi; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1) was proposed to be part of the disease mechanisms of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). We generated a tet-repressible muscle-specific Pitx1 transgenic mouse model which develops phenotypes of muscular dystrophy after the PITX1 expression is induced. In this study, we attempted to block the translation of PITX1 protein using morpholinos. Three groups of the transgenic mice received intravenous injections of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) (100 mg/kg), octaguanidinium dendrimer-conjugated morpholino (vivo-morpholino) (10 mg/kg), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) after the PITX1 expression was induced. Immunoblotting data showed that PITX1 expression in the triceps and quadriceps was significantly reduced 70% and 63% by the vivo-morpholino treatment, respectively. Muscle pathology of the mice treated with the vivo-morpholino was improved by showing 44% fewer angular-shaped atrophic myofibers. Muscle function determined by grip strength was significantly improved by the vivo-morpholino treatment. The study showed that systemic delivery of the vivo-morpholino reduced the PITX1 expression and improved the muscle phenotypes. Aberrant expression of DUX4 from the last unit of the D4Z4 array has been proposed to be the cause of FSHD. The findings of this study suggest that the same principle may be applied to suppress the aberrantly expressed DUX4 in FSHD. PMID:24232919

  4. [Duodenal dystrophy: An interdisciplinary problem].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, L V; Khatkov, I E; Izrailov, R E; Bordin, D S; Dubtsova, E A; Nikolskaya, K A; Agafonov, M A; Andrianov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal dystrophy (DD) is the pathological change in the wall of the duodenum, which is caused by chronic inflammation in its ectopic pancreatic tissue. The most common complications of DD are acute or chronic pancreatitis and impaired duodenal patency, which along with severe pain are an indication for surgical treatment. Pancreaticoduodenal resection is recognized as the operation of choice. The paper describes a clinical case demonstrating the efficiency and safety of minimally invasive (laparoscopic) surgical technologies in this category of patients. Resectional interventions of this volume are also shown to be accompanied by the development of pancreatic insufficiency that necessitates continuous enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:27030187

  5. Arrhythmias in the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J

    2015-06-01

    In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occurs with variable prevalence, mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The noncardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms, affect the decision to implant a prophylactic device, and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  6. Segregation distortion in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Magee, A C; Hughes, A E

    1998-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant disease which, in the typical pedigree, shows a three generation anticipation cascade. This results in infertility and congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) with the disappearance of DM in that pedigree. The concept of segregation distortion, where there is preferential transmission of the larger allele at the DM locus, has been put forward to explain partially the maintenance of DM in the population. In a survey of DM in Northern Ireland, 59 pedigrees were ascertained. Sibships where the status of all the members had been identified were examined to determine the transmission of the DM expansion from affected parents to their offspring. Where the transmitting parent was male, 58.3% of the offspring were affected, and in the case of a female transmitting parent, 68.7% were affected. Studies on meiotic drive in DM have shown increased transmission of the larger allele at the DM locus in non-DM heterozygotes for CTGn. This study provides further evidence that the DM expansion tends to be transmitted preferentially. PMID:9863607

  7. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed. PMID:26136844

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... on PubMed Central Mansour AM, Uwaydat SH, Chan CC. Long-term follow-up in Bietti crystalline dystrophy. ... VD, Zhang J, Gesualdo C, Corte MD, Chan CC, Fielding Hejtmancik J, Simonelli F. An atypical form ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and walking. Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy also impairs brain development. People with this condition have a brain abnormality ... cobblestones). These changes in the structure of the brain lead to significantly delayed development of speech and motor skills and moderate to ...

  10. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    PubMed

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis. PMID:27011029

  11. Genetics Home Reference: vitelliform macular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... faces. Vitelliform macular dystrophy causes a fatty yellow pigment (lipofuscin) to build up in cells underlying the ... structures in these cells that contain light-sensing pigments. It is unclear why PRPH2 mutations affect only ...

  12. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Erriquez, Daniela; Perini, Giovanni; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies. PMID:24084719

  13. The Muscular Dystrophies: From Genes to Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Neil C; Bloch, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of many muscular disorders, including many of the more common muscular dystrophies, is now known. Clinically, the recent genetic advances have improved diagnostic capabilities, but they have not yet provided clues about treatment or management. Thanks to better management strategies and therapeutic interventions, however, many patients with a muscular dystrophy are more active and are living longer. Physical therapists, therefore, are more likely to see a patient with a muscular dystrophy, so understanding these muscle disorders and their management is essential. Physical therapy offers the most promise in caring for the majority of patients with these conditions, because it is unlikely that advances in gene therapy will significantly alter their clinical treatment in the near future. This perspective covers some of the basic molecular biological advances together with the clinical manifestations of the muscular dystrophies and the latest approaches to their management. PMID:16305275

  14. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  15. Flicker fusion thresholds in Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Massof, R W; Fleischman, J A; Fine, S L; Yoder, F

    1977-06-01

    Flicker fusion threshold intensities were measured as a function of flicker frequency for patients with Best macular dystrophy having normal or near-normal Snellen visual acuity. These data were found to differ from normal in ways that may be interpreted to be an abnormal elevation of the foveal cone threshold, a loss of cone temporal resolution, or both. The results led to the conclusion that Best macular dystrophy affects the neurosensory retina even when Snellen visual acuity is normal. PMID:869758

  16. Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Rainer; Banks, Glen B.; Hall, John K.; Muir, Lindsey A.; Ramos, Julian N.; Wicki, Jacqueline; Odom, Guy L.; Konieczny, Patryk; Seto, Jane; Chamberlain, Joel R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies (MDs) represent a diverse collection of inherited human disorders, which affect to varying degrees skeletal, cardiac, and sometimes smooth muscle (Emery, 20021). To date, more than 50 different genes have been implicated as causing one or more types of MD (Bansal et al., 20032). In many cases, invaluable insights into disease mechanisms, structure and function of gene products, and approaches for therapeutic interventions have benefited from the study of animal models of the different MDs (Arnett et al., 20093). The large number of genes that are associated with MD and the tremendous number of animal models that have been developed preclude a complete discussion of each in the context of this review. However, we summarize here a number of the more commonly used models together with a mixture of different types of gene and MD, which serves to give a general overview of the value of animal models of MD for research and therapeutic development. PMID:22137430

  17. Arrhythmias in the Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occur with variable prevalence mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. These patients are at risk for development for bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The non-cardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms (limited mobility and respiratory weakness masking cardiac manifestations), affect decision to implant prophylactic device (quantity vs. quality of life) and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  18. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Koroush; Kodali, Archana; Thapamagar, Suman B.; Walker, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG) and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP) studies. Results Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies. PMID:25656662

  19. Unusual scapular winging - A case report.

    PubMed

    Dori, Zohar; Sarig Bahat, Hilla

    2016-08-01

    Scapular mobility has a central role in maintaining normal upper limb function. Scapular winging is characterized by a failure in the dynamic stabilization of the scapula against the thoracic wall resulting in a condition in which the medial border of the scapula is prominent. The following case describes a patient who was referred to physiotherapy due to abnormal scapular protrusion. The main findings of the physical examination showed weakness of the scapular stabilizers more prominent on the right side than of the left. Additionally, the physical examination demonstrated weakness of the abdominal muscles, hip adductors, and ankle dorsi-flexors, as well as some facial muscles. The electromyography results were inconclusive. Further examination led to clinical suspicion of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy (FSHD) as a diagnosis, which was confirmed by genetic testing. Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy is characterized by symptoms related to motor function and in most cases becomes evident in patients in their 20s and 30s. The disease signs and symptoms are often identified in a clinical setting. Currently, there are no reports describing an effective treatment for the disease. However, physiotherapy, moderate physical exercise, counselling, and use of suitable aids and orthoses may help improve functionality and mobility. This case report aims to increase the awareness of musculoskeletal physiotherapists to this unique dystrophy, when encountering complex presentations with scapular winging. PMID:26759220

  20. Differential diagnosis of Schnyder corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jayne S; Khemichian, Arbi J

    2011-01-01

    Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) is a rare corneal dystrophy characterized by abnormally increased deposition of cholesterol and phospholipids in the cornea leading to progressive vision loss. SCD is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and has been mapped to the UBIAD1 gene on chromosome 1p36.3. Although 2/3 of SCD patients also have systemic hypercholesterolemia, the incidence of hypercholesterolemia is also increased in unaffected members of SCD pedigrees. Consequently, SCD is thought to result from a local metabolic defect in the cornea. The corneal findings in SCD are very predictable depending on the age of the individual, with initial central corneal haze and/or crystals, subsequent appearance of arcus lipoides in the third decade and formation of midperipheral haze in the late fourth decade. Because only 50% of affected patients have corneal crystals, the International Committee for Classification of Corneal Dystrophies recently changed the original name of this dystrophy from Schnyder crystalline corneal dystrophy to Schnyder corneal dystrophy. Diagnosis of affected individuals without crystalline deposits is often delayed and these individuals are frequently misdiagnosed. The differential diagnosis of the SCD patient includes other diseases with crystalline deposits such as cystinosis, tyrosinemia, Bietti crystalline dystrophy, hyperuricemia/gout, multiple myeloma, monoclonal gammopathy, infectious crystalline keratopathy, and Dieffenbachia keratitis. Depositions from drugs such as gold in chrysiasis, chlorpromazine, chloroquine, and clofazamine can also result in corneal deposits and are different from SCD. Diseases of systemic lipid metabolism that cause corneal opacification, such as lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency, fish eye disease and Tangier disease, should also be considered although these are autosomal recessive disorders. PMID:21540632

  1. Dominant lethal pathologies in male mice engineered to contain an X-linked DUX4 transgene

    PubMed Central

    Dandapat, Abhijit; Bosnakovski, Darko; Hartweck, Lynn M.; Arpke, Robert W.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Vang, Derek; Baik, June; Darabi, Radbod; Perlingeiro, RitaC.R.; Hamra, F. Kent; Gupta, Kalpna; Lowe, Dawn A.; Kyba, Michael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an enigmatic disease associated with epigenetic alterations in the subtelomeric heterochromatin of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat. Each repeat unit encodes DUX4, a gene that is normally silent in most tissues. Besides muscular loss, most patients suffer retinal vascular telangiectasias. To generate an animal model, we introduced a doxycycline-inducible transgene encoding DUX4and 3′genomic DNA into a euchromatic region of the mouse X chromosome. Without induction, DUX4 RNA was expressed at low levels in many tissues and animals displayed a variety of unexpected dominant leaky phenotypes, including male-specific lethality. Remarkably, rare live-born males expressed DUX4 RNA in the retina and presented a retinal vascular telangiectasia. By using doxycycline to induce DUX4 expression in satellite cells, we observed impaired myogenesis in vitro and in vivo. This mouse model, which shows pathologies due to FSHD-related D4Z4 sequences, is likely to be useful for testing anti-DUX4 therapies in FSHD. PMID:25176645

  2. [The heartache of muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Hoogerwaard, E M; Ginjaar, H B; Wilde, A A; Leschot, N J; de Voogt, W G; de Visser, M

    2000-11-11

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene, located on the short arm of the X chromosome. Three so called dystrophinopathy patients, a women aged 54 and two men aged 23 and 21 years, suffered from a severe dilated cardiomyopathy. Such a cardiomyopathy can develop in both carriers and patients. In addition, it is often more important for prognosis than muscle weakness. For these two reasons it is important to screen both groups for (early) cardiological abnormalities. If these are present, regular follow-up is necessary to start timely therapy. When cardiological investigations yield normal results, it is advised to screen carriers with a five-year interval. Dystrophinopathy patients should be checked every year, because the cardiomyopathy sometimes develops and deteriorates over a short period of time. Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and with a positive family history for dilated cardiomyopathy, muscle weakness or high serum creatine kinase activity should be screened for a mutation in the dystrophin gene. PMID:11103252

  3. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy. PMID:27228076

  4. Myoglobin in Primary Muscular Disease: I. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: and: II. Muscular Dystrophy of Distal Type

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Herrera, A. E.; Lehmann, H.; Tomlinson, B. E.; Walton, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    Skeletal myoglobin from two cases of muscular dystrophy, one of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and one of muscular dystrophy of distal type, have been examined and no differences from normal human myoglobin were found. The opportunity has been taken to discuss the nature of minor fractions of myoglobin-like material which are found when human skeletal myoglobin is isolated. Those which have been observed in the present study have been artefacts and it was possible to demonstrate that they were due to deamidation of certain glutamine and asparagine residues. Images PMID:4590363

  5. Median Nail Dystrophy Involving the Thumb Nail

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Rahulkrishna; Pilani, Abhishek; Nair, Pragya Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Median canaliform dystrophy of Heller is a rare entity characterized by a midline or a paramedian ridge or split and canal formation in nail plate of one or both the thumb nails. It is an acquired condition resulting from a temporary defect in the matrix that interferes with nail formation. Habitual picking of the nail base may be responsible for some cases. Histopathology classically shows parakeratosis, accumulation of melanin within and between the nail bed keratinocytes. Treatment of median nail dystrophy includes injectable triamcinalone acetonide, topical 0.1% tacrolimus, and tazarotene 0.05%, which is many a times challenging for a dermatologist. Psychiatric opinion should be taken when associated with the depressive, obsessive-compulsive, or impulse-control disorder. We report a case of 19-year-old male diagnosed as median nail dystrophy. PMID:26955129

  6. Other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Amato, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    The secondary α-dystroglycanopathies usually present in infancy as congenital muscular dystrophies but may manifest later in childhood or adult life (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I, LGMD2K, LGMD2M, LGMD2N, and LGMD2O). Patients with telethoninopathy (LGMD2B) may present with mainly proximal or distal lower extremity weakness, and notably the muscle biopsies may demonstrate rimmed vacuoles. LGMD2L is caused by newly described mutations in ANO5 and can sometimes present with distal weakness resembling Miyoshi myopathy. PMID:21496628

  7. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  8. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  9. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of skeletal muscle. Since the discovery of the first muscular dystrophy gene encoding dystrophin, a large number of genes have been identified that are involved in various muscle-wasting and neuromuscular disorders. Human genetic studies complemented by animal model systems have substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular pathomechanisms underlying muscle degeneration. Moreover, these studies have revealed distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms that link genetic mutations to diverse muscle wasting phenotypes. PMID:23671309

  10. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  11. Prevalence of congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Alessandra; Bianco, Flaviana; D'Amico, Adele; Moroni, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Bruno, Claudio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mora, Marina; Astrea, Guja; Magri, Francesca; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pini, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Minetti, Carlo; Mongini, Tiziana; Ricci, Enzo; Gorni, Ksenija; Battini, Roberta; Villanova, Marcello; Politano, Luisa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Muntoni, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Pane, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We provide a nationwide population study of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy. Methods: Cases were ascertained from the databases in all the tertiary referral centers for pediatric neuromuscular disorders and from all the genetic diagnostic centers in which diagnostic tests for these forms are performed. Results: The study includes 336 patients with a point prevalence of 0.563 per 100,000. Mutations were identified in 220 of the 336 (65.5%). The cohort was subdivided into diagnostic categories based on the most recent classifications on congenital muscular dystrophies. The most common forms were those with α-dystroglycan glycosylation deficiency (40.18%) followed by those with laminin α2 deficiency (24.11%) and collagen VI deficiency (20.24%). The forms of congenital muscular dystrophy related to mutations in SEPN1 and LMNA were less frequent (6.25% and 5.95%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study provides for the first time comprehensive epidemiologic information and point prevalence figures for each of the major diagnostic categories on a large cohort of congenital muscular dystrophies. The study also reflects the diagnostic progress in this field with an accurate classification of the cases according to the most recent gene discoveries. PMID:25653289

  12. Exon Snipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kemaladewi, Dwi U; Cohn, Ronald D

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a life-limiting neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin. We discuss very recent studies that used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to 'snip out' mutated exons in DMD, restoring the reading frame of the gene. We also present cautionary aspects of translating this exciting technology into clinical practice. PMID:26856237

  13. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD. PMID:25977513

  14. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  15. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  16. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-10-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malformations (Walker Warburg syndrome; muscle-eye-brain disease; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D) to a relatively milder congenital variant with no brain involvement (congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C), and to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2 variants with onset in childhood or adult life (LGMD2I, LGMD2L, and LGMD2N). ADG is a peripheral membrane protein that undergoes multiple and complex glycosylation steps to regulate its ability to effectively interact with extracellular matrix proteins, such as laminin, agrin, and perlecan. Although the precise composition of the glycans present on ADG are not known, it has been demonstrated that the forced overexpression of LARGE, or its paralog LARGE2, is capable of increasing the glycosylation of ADG in normal cells. In addition, its overexpression is capable of restoring dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding properties in primary cell cultures of patients affected by different genetically defined dystroglycanopathy variants. These observations suggest that there could be a role for therapeutic strategies to overcome the glycosylation defect in these conditions via the overexpression of LARGE. PMID:19019316

  17. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M

    2010-02-15

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I and congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C). Zebrafish are a useful animal model to reveal the mechanism of these diseases caused by mutations in FKRP gene. Downregulating FKRP expression in zebrafish by two different morpholinos resulted in embryos which had developmental defects similar to those observed in human muscular dystrophies associated with mutations in FKRP. The FKRP morphants showed phenotypes involving alterations in somitic structure and muscle fiber organization, as well as defects in developing eye morphology. Additionally, they were found to have a reduction in alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation and a shortened myofiber length. Moreover, co-injection of fish or human FKRP mRNA along with the morpholino restored normal development, alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity of alpha-dystroglycan in the morphants. Co-injection of the human FKRP mRNA containing causative mutations found in human patients of WWS, MDC1C and LGMD2I could not restore their phenotypes significantly. Interestingly, these morphant fish having human FKRP mutations showed a wide phenotypic range similar to that seen in humans. PMID:19955119

  18. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of α-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I and congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C). Zebrafish are a useful animal model to reveal the mechanism of these diseases caused by mutations in FKRP gene. Downregulating FKRP expression in zebrafish by two different morpholinos resulted in embryos which had developmental defects similar to those observed in human muscular dystrophies associated with mutations in FKRP. The FKRP morphants showed phenotypes involving alterations in somitic structure and muscle fiber organization, as well as defects in developing eye morphology. Additionally, they were found to have a reduction in α-dystroglycan glycosylation and a shortened myofiber length. Moreover, co-injection of fish or human FKRP mRNA along with the morpholino restored normal development, α-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity of α-dystroglycan in the morphants. Co-injection of the human FKRP mRNA containing causative mutations found in human patients of WWS, MDC1C and LGMD2I could not restore their phenotypes significantly. Interestingly, these morphant fish having human FKRP mutations showed a wide phenotypic range similar to that seen in humans. PMID:19955119

  19. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  20. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanitkar, Shubhangi A; Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower's sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  1. Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vedana, Gustavo; Villarreal, Guadalupe; Jun, Albert S

    2016-01-01

    Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is the most common corneal dystrophy and frequently results in vision loss. Hallmarks of the disease include loss of corneal endothelial cells and formation of excrescences of Descemet’s membrane. Later stages involve all layers of the cornea. Impairment of endothelial barrier and pump function and cell death from oxidative and unfolded protein stress contribute to disease progression. The genetic basis of FECD includes numerous genes and chromosomal loci, although alterations in the transcription factor 4 gene are associated with the majority of cases. Definitive treatment of FECD is corneal transplantation. In this paper, we highlight advances that have been made in understanding FECD’s clinical features, pathophysiology, and genetics. We also discuss recent advances in endothelial keratoplasty and potential future treatments. PMID:26937169

  2. Therapeutics Development in Myotonic Dystrophy Type I

    PubMed Central

    Foff, Erin Pennock; Mahadevan, Mani S.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1), the most common adult muscular dystrophy, is a multi-system, autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by an expanded CTG repeat that leads to nuclear retention of a mutant RNA and subsequent RNA toxicity. Significant insights into the molecular mechanisms of RNA toxicity have led to the surprising possibility that treating DM1 is a viable prospect. In this review, we briefly present the clinical picture in DM1, and describe how the research in understanding the pathogenesis of RNA toxicity in DM1 has led to targeted approaches to therapeutic development at various steps in the pathogenesis of the disease. We discuss the promise and current limitations of each with an emphasis on RNA-based therapeutics and small molecules. We conclude with a discussion of the unmet need for clinical tools and outcome measures that are essential prerequisites to proceed in evaluating these potential therapies in clinical trials. PMID:21607985

  3. Caveolae and caveolin-3 in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, F; Razani, B; Lisanti, M P

    2001-10-01

    Caveolae are vesicular invaginations of the plasma membrane, and function as 'message centers' for regulating signal transduction events. Caveolin-3, a muscle-specific caveolin-related protein, is the principal structural protein of caveolar membrane domains in skeletal muscle and in the heart. Several mutations within the coding sequence of the human caveolin-3 gene (located at 3p25) have been identified. Mutations that lead to a loss of approximately 95% of caveolin-3 protein expression are responsible for a novel autosomal dominant form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD-1C) in humans. By contrast, upregulation of the caveolin-3 protein is associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Thus, tight regulation of caveolin-3 appears essential for maintaining normal muscle health and homeostasis. PMID:11597517

  4. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N.; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower’s sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  5. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and its role in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy 1.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, Perla; Llagostera, Esther

    2008-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is an autosomal, dominant inherited, neuromuscular disorder. The DM1 mutation consists in the expansion of an unstable CTG-repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of a gene encoding DMPK (myotonic dystrophy protein kinase). Clinical expression of DM1 is variable, presenting a progressive muscular dystrophy that affects distal muscles more than proximal and is associated with the inability to relax muscles appropriately (myotonia), cataracts, cardiac arrhythmia, testicular atrophy and insulin resistance. DMPK is a Ser/Thr protein kinase homologous to the p21-activated kinases MRCK and ROCK/rho-kinase/ROK. The most abundant isoform of DMPK is an 80 kDa protein mainly expressed in smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscles. Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM1, as revealed by gene target studies. Here we review current understanding of the structural, functional and pathophysiological characteristics of DMPK. PMID:18583094

  6. Dog models for blinding inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Komáromy, András M

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  7. Dog Models for Blinding Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  8. Mutational spectrum of Korean patients with corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chae, H; Kim, M; Kim, Y; Kim, J; Kwon, A; Choi, H; Park, J; Jang, W; Lee, Y S; Park, S H; Kim, M S

    2016-06-01

    Corneal dystrophy typically refers to a group of rare hereditary disorders with a heterogeneous genetic background. A comprehensive molecular genetic analysis was performed to characterize the genetic spectrum of corneal dystrophies in Korean patients. Patients with various corneal dystrophies underwent thorough ophthalmic examination, histopathologic examination, and Sanger sequencing. A total of 120 probands were included, with a mean age of 50 years (SD = 18 years) and 70% were female. A total of 26 mutations in five genes (14 clearly pathogenic and 12 likely pathogenic) were identified in 49 probands (41%). Epithelial-stromal TGFBI dystrophies, macular corneal dystrophy and Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) showed 100% mutation detection rates, while endothelial corneal dystrophies showed lower detection rates of 3%. Twenty six non-duplicate mutations including eight novel mutations were identified and mutations associated with SCD were identified genetically for the first time in this population. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the genetic aberrations in Korean patients and also highlights the diagnostic value of molecular genetic analysis in corneal dystrophies. PMID:26748743

  9. Journey into muscular dystrophies caused by abnormal glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco

    2004-09-01

    An increasing number of genes encoding for putative or demonstrated glycosyltransferases are being associated with muscular dystrophies of variable severity, ranging from severe congenital onset and associated structural eye and brain changes, to relatively mild forms with onset into adulthood. Five of these genes (POMT1; POMGnT1; FXRP; Fukutin; LARGE) encode for proteins involved in the glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and, indeed, abnormal glycosylation of this molecule is a common finding in all the respective conditions (Walker Warburg syndrome; Muscle-Eye-Brain disease; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C and Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 21; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D). A 6th gene, GNE, responsible for the hereditary form of inclusion body myositis, encodes for a glycosyltransferase the substrate(s) of which is, however, still unclear. This article provides an overview of the clinical, biochemical and genetic features of this group of disorders. PMID:15605948

  10. Consensus statement on standard of care for congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching H; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D; Connolly, Anne M; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee. PMID:21078917

  11. First Identification of a Triple Corneal Dystrophy Association: Keratoconus, Epithelial Basement Membrane Corneal Dystrophy and Fuchs’ Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Traversi, Claudio; Raiskup, Frederik; Rizzo, Caterina Lo; Renieri, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the observation of a triple corneal dystrophy association consisting of keratoconus (KC), epithelial basement membrane corneal dystrophy (EBMCD) and Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Methods A 55-year-old male patient was referred to our cornea service for blurred vision and recurrent foreign body sensation. He reported bilateral recurrent corneal erosions with diurnal visual fluctuations. He underwent corneal biomicroscopy, Scheimpflug tomography, in vivo HRT confocal laser scanning microscopy and genetic testing for TGFBI and ZEB1 mutations using direct DNA sequencing. Results Biomicroscopic examination revealed the presence of subepithelial central and paracentral corneal opacities. The endothelium showed a bilateral flecked appearance, and the posterior corneal curvature suggested a possible concomitant ectatic disorder. Corneal tomography confirmed the presence of a stage II KC in both eyes. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed a concomitant bilateral EBMCD with hyperreflective deposits in basal epithelial cells, subbasal Bowman's layer microfolds and ridges with truncated subbasal nerves as pseudodendritic elements. Stromal analysis revealed honeycomb edematous areas, and the endothelium showed a strawberry surface configuration typical of FECD. The genetic analysis resulted negative for TGFBI mutations and positive for a heterozygous mutation in exon 7 of the gene ZEB1. Conclusion This is the first case reported in the literature in which KC, EBMCD and FECD are present in the same patient and associated with ZEB1 gene mutation. The triple association was previously established by means of morphological analysis of the cornea using corneal Scheimpflug tomography and in vivo HRT II confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:25408666

  12. [Treatment progress of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)].

    PubMed

    Smogorzewska, Elzbieta Monika; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. There exists a mouse model of the disease in which the usefulness of gene therapy was established. However, no progress towards human application was made due to the lack of a proper method for gene delivery. During the past several years, researchers acquired data which led them to believe that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating not only blood cells, but also liver, heart, skin, muscle, and other tissue. Although the term "stem cell plasticity" became very popular, other studies have suggested that bone marrow might contain different types of stem cells that can produce non-hematopoietic cells. For example, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in bone marrow give rise to osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle. Recently, researchers have been able to show that transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to muscle cells in a human patient who was diagnosed with two genetic diseases: severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The odds of this happening is estimated at one in seven million. The results of studying this patient's medical history were reported by collaborating researchers at Children's Hospital, Los Angeles and Children's Hospital, Boston in an article titled "Long-term persistence of donor nuclei in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patient receiving bone marrow transplantation" published in the September 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. This patient was transplanted 15 years ago at Children's Hospital Los Angeles with paternal HLA-haploidentical T cell-depleted bone marrow. He engrafted and became a hematopoietic chimera having T and NK lymphocytes of donor origin. Studies performed on the muscle biopsy from the patient 13 years after transplantation demonstrated that the muscle showed evidence of donor derived nuclei. In addition, analysis of his bone marrow

  13. Dynamic thoracoplasty for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kaddoura, I L; Obeid, M Y; Mroueh, S M; Nasser, A A

    2001-11-01

    The life-saving procedures to expand the chests of infants born with Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy provide a static solution incapable of responding to the growth demands of thriving patients. We describe an instrument that provided a dynamic solution for an infant, where an initial methyl methacrylate midsternotomy spacer placed at 4 months of age was followed at 11 months with recurrence of his difficulties. At 8 months after the second operation the patient was stable and thriving with no recurrence of symptoms. The instrument modifications, limitations, and possible complications are described. PMID:11722089

  14. Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kole, Ryszard; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused mostly by internal deletions in the gene for dystrophin, a protein essential for maintaining muscle cell membrane integrity. These deletions abrogate the reading frame and the lack of dystrophin results in progressive muscle deterioration. DMD patients experience progressive loss of ambulation, followed by a need for assisted ventilation, and eventual death in mid-twenties. By the method of exon skipping in dystrophin pre-mRNA the reading frame is restored and the internally deleted but functional dystrophin is produced. Two oligonucleotide drugs that induce desired exon skipping are currently in advanced clinical trials. PMID:25980936

  15. Noncoding RNAs: Emerging Players in Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The fascinating world of noncoding RNAs has recently come to light, thanks to the development of powerful sequencing technologies, revealing a variety of RNA molecules playing important regulatory functions in most, if not all, cellular processes. Many noncoding RNAs have been implicated in regulatory networks that are determinant for skeletal muscle differentiation and disease. In this review, we outline the noncoding RNAs involved in physiological mechanisms of myogenesis and those that appear dysregulated in muscle dystrophies, also discussing their potential use as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24729974

  16. [Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and related alpha-dystroglycanopathies].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Terumi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2008-10-01

    Alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) is a glycoprotein that binds to laminin in the basal lamina and helps provide mechanical support. A group of muscular dystrophies are caused by glycosylation defects of alpha-DG and are hence collectively called alpha-dystroglycanopathy (alpha-DGP). Alpha-DGP is clinically characterized by a combination of muscular dystrophies, structural brain anomalies, and ocular involvement. So far, 6 causative genes have been identified: LARGE, POMGNT1, POMT1, POMT2, FKRP, and FKTN. Initially, alpha-DGP was classified under congenital muscular dystrophies; however, the clinical phenotype is now expanded to include a markedly wide spectrum ranging from the most severe, lethal congenital muscular dystrophy with severe brain deformity to the mildest limb girdle muscular dystrophy with minimal muscle weakness. This is exemplified by Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), which is the most prevalent alpha-DGP in Japan, and is caused by mutations in FKTN. FCMD is clinically characterized by a triad of mental retardation, brain deformities, and congenital muscular dystrophy, and a majority of FCMD patients have a homozygous 3-kb retrotransposal insertion in the 3'non-coding region. Typically, they are able to sit but never attain independent ambulation in their lives. Recently, a patient from Turkey harboring homozygous 1-bp insertion reportedly showed a severe brain deformity with hydrocephalus and died 10 days after birth. In contrast, the mildest FKTN phenotype, LGMD2L, was identified in 6 cases from 4 families in Japan. These patients harbored compound heterozygous mutation with 3-kb retrotransposal insertion in the 3'non-coding region and a novel missense mutation in the coding region. Clinically, these patients presented with minimal muscle weakness and dilated cardiomyopathy and had normal intelligence. These data clearly indicate that FKTN mutations can cause a broad spectrum of muscular dystrophies. Therefore, clinicians should always

  17. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 or Steinert's disease.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 (DM1) is the most common worldwide autosomal dominant muscular dystrophy due to polynucleotide [CTG]( n ) triplet expansion located on the 3'UTR of chromosome 19q13.3. A toxic gain-of-function of abnormally stored RNA in the nuclei of affected cells is assumed to be responsible for several clinical features of the disease. It plays a basic role in deregulating RNA binding protein levels and in several mRNA splicing processes of several genes, thus leading to the multisystemic features typical of DM1. In DM1, the musculoskeletal apparatus, heart, brain, eye, endocrine, respiratory and gastroenteric systems are involved with variable levels of severity. DM1 onset can be congenital, juvenile, adult or late. DM1 can be diagnosed on the grounds of clinical presentation (distal muscular atrophy and weakness, grip and percussion myotonia, ptosis, hatchet face, slurred speech, rhinolalia), EMG myotonic pattern, EKG (such as AV-blocks) or routine blood test abnormalities (such as increased CK values or hypogamma-globulinemia) and history of cataract. Its confirmation can come by DNA analysis. At present, only symptomatic therapy is possible and is addressed at correcting hormonal and glycemic balance, removing cataract, preventing respiratory failure and, above all, major cardiac disturbances. Efficacious therapies targeted at the pathogenic mechanism of DM1 are not yet available, while studies that seek to block toxic RNA intranuclear storage with specific molecules are still ongoing. PMID:22411247

  18. Emerging Drugs for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy. Treatment is limited to glucocorticoids that have the benefit of prolonging ambulation by approximately 2 years and preventing scoliosis. Finding a more satisfactory treatment should focus on maintaining long-term efficacy with a minimal side effect profile. Areas covered Authors discuss different therapeutic strategies that have been used in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Expert opinion Multiple treatment approaches have emerged. Most attractive are molecular-based therapies that can express the missing dystrophin protein (exon skipping or mutation suppression) or a surrogate gene product (utrophin). Other approaches include increasing the strength of muscles (myostatin inhibitors), reducing muscle fibrosis, and decreasing oxidative stress. Additional targets include inhibiting NF-κB to reduce inflammation, or promoting skeletal muscle blood flow and muscle contractility using phosphodiesterase inhibitors or nitric oxide (NO) donors. The potential for each of these treatment strategies to enter clinical trials is a central theme of discussion. The review emphasizes that the goal of treatment should be to find a product at least as good as glucocorticoids with a lower side effect profile or with a significant glucocorticoid sparing effect. PMID:22632414

  19. Cardiac findings in congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Wang, Ching H; Wahbi, Karim; Rosenthal, David; Duboc, Denis; Melacini, Paola

    2010-09-01

    Cardiac involvement (CI) in congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) has been only rarely investigated so far. By means of a systematic literature search we reviewed the literature about CI in CMD and found that CI is apparently absent in Ullrich CMD or CMD with integrin deficiency and only mild in Bethlem CMD. CI in merosin deficiency includes dilated cardiomyopathy and systolic dysfunction. CI in dystroglycanopathies seems most prevalent among all CMDs and includes dilated cardiomyopathy, systolic dysfunction, and myocardial fibrosis in Fukuyama CMD. Among the nonspecified dystroglycanopathies, CI manifests as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP) or systolic dysfunction. With CMD type 1C, as well as with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I, up to half of the patients develop dilated cardiomyopathy. In rigid-spine syndrome, predominantly the right heart is affected secondary to thoracic deformity. In patients who carry LMNA mutations, CI may manifest as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Overall, CI in patients with CMD varies considerably between the different CMD types from absent or mild CI to severe cardiac disease, particularly in merosin deficiency, dystroglycanopathies, and laminopathies. Patients with CMD with CI require regular cardiologic surveillance so that severe, treatable cardiac disease is not overlooked. PMID:20679303

  20. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic. PMID:26427454

  1. Developments in gene therapy for muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD) presents significant challenges, including the large amount of muscle tissue in the body, the large size of many genes defective in different muscular dystrophies, and the possibility of a host immune response against the therapeutic gene. Overcoming these challenges requires the development and delivery of suitable gene transfer vectors. Encouraging progress has been made in modifying adenovirus (Ad) vectors to reduce immune response and increase capacity. Recently developed gutted Ad vectors can deliver full-length dystrophin cDNA expression vectors to muscle tissue. Using muscle-specific promoters to drive dystrophin expression, a strong immune response has not been observed in mdx mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can deliver small genes to muscle without provocation of a significant immune response, which should allow long-term expression of several MD genes. AAV vectors have also been used to deliver sarcoglycan genes to entire muscle groups. These advances and others reviewed here suggest that barriers to gene therapy for MD are surmountable. PMID:10679969

  2. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Konkay, Kaumudi; Kannan, Meena Angamuthu; Lingappa, Lokesh; Uppin, Megha S.; Challa, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC). Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E), enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with laminin α2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones) and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones. PMID:27570388

  3. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life. PMID:19820803

  4. Diagnostic Odyssey of Patients with Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Day, John W.; Luebbe, Elizabeth A.; Martens, William B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Tawil, Rabi; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    The onset and symptoms of the myotonic dystrophies are diverse, complicating their diagnoses and limiting a comprehensive approach to their clinical care. This report analyzes the diagnostic delay (time from onset of first symptom to diagnosis) in a large sample of myotonic dystrophy (DM) patients enrolled in the US National Registry [679 DM type 1 (DM1) and 135 DM type 2 (DM2) patients]. Age of onset averaged 34.0 ± 14.1 years in DM2 patients compared to 26.1 ± 13.2 years in DM1 (p<0.0001). The most common initial symptom in DM2 patients was leg weakness (32.6%) compared to grip myotonia in DM1 (38.3%). Pain was reported as the first symptom in 11.1% of DM2 and 3.0% of DM1 patients (p<0.0001). Reaching the correct diagnosis in DM2 took 14 years on average (double the time compared to DM1) and a significantly higher percentage of patients underwent extended workup including electromyography, muscle biopsies, and finally genetic testing. DM patients who were index cases experienced similar diagnostic delays to non-index cases of DM. Further evaluation of how to shorten these diagnostic delays and limit their impact on burdens of disease, family planning, and symptom management is needed. PMID:23807151

  5. Benign muscular dystrophy: risk calculation in families with consanguinity.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Müller, C R; Grimm, T

    1989-01-01

    This report concerns two families in which the index patients are sporadic cases of a benign form of muscular dystrophy. In both families the sisters of the patients have married a close relative. The respective risks for a child of these consanguineous marriages being affected with either X linked Becker muscular dystrophy or autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy is calculated using pedigree information, results of serum creatine kinase determinations, and also, in one family, results of DNA typing using RFLPs from the short arm of the X chromosome. PMID:2732990

  6. Bilateral cloudy cornea: is the usual suspect congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy or stromal dystrophy?

    PubMed

    Acar, Banu Torun; Bozkurt, Kansu Tahir; Duman, Erkan; Acar, Suphi

    2016-01-01

    We provide the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up period of a patient with cloudy cornea in both eyes from birth. A 4-year-old girl presented with blurring in both eyes. Penetrating keratoplasty (PK) was performed with the preliminary diagnosis of congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy in June 2012. According to the pathology report for extracted host tissue, the Descemet's membrane (DM) and endothelium were healthy and diagnosis was reported to be congenital hereditary stromal dystrophy. Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty was performed on the left eye. The DM was transparent at follow-up. Cornea transplantation is the only choice to provide visual rehabilitation in children with congenital cloudy cornea. However, it is known that the prognosis of traditional PK in the paediatric age group is not good. Therefore, when using alternative keratoplasty (deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty) options, pathological examination of the host tissue should be made. PMID:27107055

  7. The epigenetic regulator Smchd1 contains a functional GHKL-type ATPase domain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelan; Dobson, Renwick C J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Young, Samuel N; Pearce, F Grant; Blewitt, Marnie E; Murphy, James M

    2016-06-15

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (Smchd1) is an epigenetic regulator that plays critical roles in gene regulation during development. Mutations in SMCHD1 were recently implicated in the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), although the mechanistic basis remains of outstanding interest. We have previously shown that Smchd1 associates with chromatin via its homodimeric C-terminal hinge domain, yet little is known about the function of the putative GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, MutL)-type ATPase domain at its N-terminus. To formally assess the structure and function of Smchd1's ATPase domain, we have generated recombinant proteins encompassing the predicted ATPase domain and the adjacent region. Here, we show that the Smchd1 N-terminal region exists as a monomer and adopts a conformation resembling that of monomeric full-length heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) protein in solution, even though the two proteins share only ∼8% overall sequence identity. Despite being monomeric, the N-terminal region of Smchd1 exhibits ATPase activity, which can be antagonized by the reaction product, ADP, or the Hsp90 inhibitor, radicicol, at a nanomolar concentration. Interestingly, introduction of an analogous mutation to that identified in SMCHD1 of an FSHD patient compromised protein stability, suggesting a possible molecular basis for loss of protein function and pathogenesis. Together, these results reveal important structure-function characteristics of Smchd1 that may underpin its mechanistic action at the chromatin level. PMID:27059856

  8. High Frequency Hearing Loss and Hyperactivity in DUX4 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dandapat, Abhijit; Perrin, Benjamin J.; Cabelka, Christine; Razzoli, Maria; Ervasti, James M.; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Lowe, Dawn A.; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by mutations leading to ectopic expression of the transcription factor DUX4, and encompasses both muscle-related and non-muscle phenotypes. Mouse models bearing this gene represent valuable tools to investigate which pathologies are due to DUX4 expression, and how DUX4 leads to these pathologies. The iDUX4(2.7) mouse contains an X-linked doxycycline-inducible DUX4 gene that shows low level basal expression in the absence of doxycycline, leading to male lethality, generally in embryo, but always before 8 weeks of age. Here, we describe additional non-muscle phenotypes in this animal model. We find that iDUX4(2.7) female carriers are extremely hyperactive, spending large amounts of time ambulating and much less time resting. Rare 3-week old males, although hypophagic, runted and extremely fragile, are capable of high activity, but show periods of catatonic torpor in which animals appear dead and respiration is virtually absent. We also examine a non-muscle phenotype of interest to FSHD, high frequency hearing loss. We find that young iDUX4(2.7) females are significantly impaired in their ability to hear at frequencies above 8 kHz. These phenotypes make the iDUX4(2.7) mouse an attractive model in which to study non-muscle activities of DUX4. PMID:26978271

  9. Interaction of atypical cadherin Fat1 with SoHo adaptor proteins CAP/ponsin and ArgBP2.

    PubMed

    Braun, Gerald S; Kuszka, Andrzej; Dau, Cécile; Kriz, Wilhelm; Moeller, Marcus J

    2016-03-25

    Mammalian Fat1 is a giant atypical cadherin/tumor suppressor involved in the regulation of cellular orientation, migration, and growth. Fat1 is implicated in the development of the brain, eye, and kidney. Altered expression or mutations of FAT1 are also associated with cancer and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Yet, the mechanistic functions of this pathway remain incompletely understood. Here, we report the identification of Sorbin-homology (SoHo) proteins as novel interaction partners of Fat1 by virtue of a yeast-two-hybrid screen. SoHo proteins play diverse roles as adaptor proteins in cell signaling, cell adhesion and sarcomere architecture, including altered expression in cancer and FSHD. Specifically, we found SoHo proteins CAP/ponsin-1 and -2 (Sorbs1) and ArgBP2 (Sorbs2) to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of Fat1. We mapped the interaction to a prolin-rich classic type II PXXP motif within Fat1 and to the three Src-homology (SH3) domains within SoHo proteins using mutant expression in yeast, pulldown assays, and cell culture. Functionally, endogenous ponsin-2 expression of NRK-52E cells at cellular leading edges was lost upon knockdown of Fat1. In summary, our data point to an interaction of Fat1 with SoHo proteins that is able to recruit SoHo proteins to sites of Fat1 expression. PMID:26903299

  10. High Frequency Hearing Loss and Hyperactivity in DUX4 Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Dandapat, Abhijit; Perrin, Benjamin J; Cabelka, Christine; Razzoli, Maria; Ervasti, James M; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Lowe, Dawn A; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by mutations leading to ectopic expression of the transcription factor DUX4, and encompasses both muscle-related and non-muscle phenotypes. Mouse models bearing this gene represent valuable tools to investigate which pathologies are due to DUX4 expression, and how DUX4 leads to these pathologies. The iDUX4(2.7) mouse contains an X-linked doxycycline-inducible DUX4 gene that shows low level basal expression in the absence of doxycycline, leading to male lethality, generally in embryo, but always before 8 weeks of age. Here, we describe additional non-muscle phenotypes in this animal model. We find that iDUX4(2.7) female carriers are extremely hyperactive, spending large amounts of time ambulating and much less time resting. Rare 3-week old males, although hypophagic, runted and extremely fragile, are capable of high activity, but show periods of catatonic torpor in which animals appear dead and respiration is virtually absent. We also examine a non-muscle phenotype of interest to FSHD, high frequency hearing loss. We find that young iDUX4(2.7) females are significantly impaired in their ability to hear at frequencies above 8 kHz. These phenotypes make the iDUX4(2.7) mouse an attractive model in which to study non-muscle activities of DUX4. PMID:26978271

  11. Genetics Home Reference: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy , accounting for about 30 percent of cases. Dysferlinopathy, also ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of ...

  12. Cardiac function in muscular dystrophy associates with abdominal muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Kim, Gene; Watson, Sydeaka; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The muscular dystrophies target muscle groups differentially. In mouse models of muscular dystrophy, notably the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the diaphragm muscle shows marked fibrosis and at an earlier age than other muscle groups, more reflective of the histopathology seen in human muscular dystrophy. Methods Using a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, the Sgcg mouse, we compared muscle pathology across different muscle groups and heart. A cohort of nearly 200 Sgcg mice were studied using multiple measures of pathology including echocardiography, Evans blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content in multiple muscle groups. Spearman rank correlations were determined among echocardiographic and pathological parameters. Findings The abdominal muscles were found to have more fibrosis than other muscle groups, including the diaphragm muscle. The abdominal muscles also had more Evans blue dye uptake than other muscle groups. The amount of diaphragm fibrosis was found to correlate positively with fibrosis in the left ventricle, and abdominal muscle fibrosis correlated with impaired left ventricular function. Fibrosis in the abdominal muscles negatively correlated with fibrosis in the diaphragm and right ventricles. Together these data reflect the recruitment of abdominal muscles as respiratory muscles in muscular dystrophy, a finding consistent with data from human patients. PMID:26029630

  13. The genetics of Fuchs′ corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Iliff, Benjamin W; Riazuddin, S Amer; Gottsch, John D

    2013-01-01

    Fuchs′ corneal dystrophy (FCD) is a common late-onset genetic disorder of the corneal endothelium. It causes loss of endothelial cell density and excrescences in the Descemet membrane, eventually progressing to corneal edema, necessitating corneal transplantation. The genetic basis of FCD is complex and heterogeneous, demonstrating variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. To date, three causal genes, ZEB1, SLC4A11 and LOXHD1, have been identified, representing a small proportion of the total genetic load of FCD. An additional four loci have been localized, including a region on chromosome 18 that is potentially responsible for a large proportion of all FCD cases. The elucidation of the causal genes underlying these loci will begin to clarify the pathogenesis of FCD and pave the way for the emergence of nonsurgical treatments. PMID:23585771

  14. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a polyalanine myopathy.

    PubMed

    Brais, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the identification of the first PABPN1 gene (GCN)(n)/polyalanine mutations responsible for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). These mutations have been found in most cases of OPMD diagnosed in more than 35 countries. Sequence analyses have shown that such mutations have occurred numerous times in human history. Although PABPN1 was found early on to be a component of the classic filamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs), mRNA and other proteins also have been found to coaggregate in the INIs. It is still unclear if the INIs play a pathologic or a protective role. The generation of numerous cell and animal models of OPMD has led to greater insight into its complex molecular pathophysiology and identified the first candidate therapeutic molecules. This paper reviews basic and clinical research on OPMD, with special emphasis on recent developments in the understanding of its pathophysiology. PMID:19080757

  15. Neuromuscular function in limb girdle dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, A Y; McComas, A J

    1985-01-01

    The contractile properties of ankle dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscles in 20 patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy have been compared with those in matched controls. Twitch and voluntary torques were significantly smaller in the patient population and in nine patients it was impossible to record a twitch from tibialis anterior, a dorsiflexor muscle studied in detail. The disease process evidently ran a more rapid course in tibialis anterior than in plantarflexor muscles and this susceptibility was related to some aspect of the muscle other than its fibre type composition. Surviving fibres in dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscles did not reveal evidence of excitation-contraction uncoupling; they exhibited normal post-activation potentiation and fatigue properties. Some patients were initially incapable of exciting their motor units maximally during voluntary contractions. A finding of possible pathogenetic significance was that one patient, with prominent calves, developed exceptionally large voluntary torque in his plantarflexor muscles. PMID:4087001

  16. Congenital Muscular Dystrophies: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Enrico; D'Amico, Adele; Gualandi, Francesca; Petrini, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders with onset at birth or in infancy in which the muscle biopsy is compatible with a dystrophic myopathy. In the past 10 years, knowledge of neuromuscular disorders has dramatically increased, particularly with the exponential boost of disclosing the genetic background of CMDs. This review will highlight the clinical description of the most important forms of CMD, paying particular attention to the main keys for diagnostic approach. The diagnosis of CMDs requires the concurrence of expertise in multiple specialties (neurology, morphology, genetics, neuroradiology) available in a few centers worldwide that have achieved sufficient experience with the different CMD subtypes. Currently, molecular diagnosis is of paramount importance not only for phenotype-genotype correlations, genetic and prenatal counseling, and prognosis and aspects of management, but also concerning the imminent availability of clinical trials and treatments. PMID:22172424

  17. [MD-NET--muscular dystrophy network].

    PubMed

    Lochmüller, H; Straub, V

    2007-12-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) constitute a group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive weakness of skeletal and sometimes cardiac muscle. MD are rare disorders affecting approximately 26,000 to 40,000 people in Germany based on a pre valence of 1:2000 to 1:3000 (estimate of the Association Française contre les Myopathies, AFM) and a population of 80 million people residing in Germany. More than 30 forms of MD are recognized today caused by different genetic defects. Based on the symptoms of an individual patient the underlying genetic defect cannot be determined, since all MD have the following in common: Muscle fibers are destroyed and become replaced by fatty and fibrous tissue. Various forms of MD are caused by defects of proteins residing in the sarcolemma, the cell membrane of muscle fibers. Other forms are caused by defects of proteins that are associated to the nucleus, to the sarcomer or the cytoplasm. Moreover, there are numerous forms where the exact molecular defect is unknown to date. Even though the underlying defect is known for many MD, the pathogenic process that leads to the decay of musculature is poorly understood. At present, MD cannot be cured. MD are treated by physiotherapy, surgery and medication that may delay progression. Symptomatic therapy such as cardiac pace makers may be life-saving and improve quality of life in many patients. For optimizing research into the MD, a network, the muscular dystrophy network or MD-NET, was initiated and has been supported by the German ministry of education and research (BMBF) since 2003. PMID:18026885

  18. Porcine Models of Muscular Dystrophy1

    PubMed Central

    Selsby, Joshua T.; Ross, Jason W.; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease. PMID:25991703

  19. Employment profiles in neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Fowler, W M; Abresch, R T; Koch, T R; Brewer, M L; Bowden, R K; Wanlass, R L

    1997-01-01

    Consumer and rehabilitation provider factors that might limit employment opportunities for 154 individuals with six slowly progressive neuromuscular diseases (NMD) were investigated. The NMDs were spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), hereditary motor sensory neuropathy (HMSN), Becker's muscular dystrophy (BMD), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD), and limb-girdle syndrome (LGS). Forty percent were employed in the competitive labor market at the time of the study, 50% had been employed in the past, and 10% had never been employed. The major consumer barrier to employment was education. Other important factors were type of occupation, intellectual capacity, psychosocial adjustment, and the belief by most individuals that their physical disability was the only or major barrier to obtaining a job. Psychological characteristics were associated with level of unemployment. However, physical impairment and disability were not associated with level of unemployment. There also were differences among the types of NMDs. Compared with the SMA, HMSN, BMD, and FSHD groups, the MMD and LGS groups had significantly higher levels of unemployment, lower educational levels, and fewer employed professional, management, and technical workers. Nonphysical impairment factors such as a low percentage of college graduates, impaired intellectual function in some individuals, and poor psychological adjustment were correlated with higher unemployment levels in the MMD group. Unemployment in the LGS group was correlated with a failure to complete high school. Major provider barriers to employment were the low level of referrals to Department of Rehabilitation by physicians and the low percentage of acceptance into the State Department of Rehabilitation. The low rate of acceptance was primarily attributable to the low number of referrals compounded by a lack of counselor experience with individuals with NMD. Both consumer and provider barriers may

  20. Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 March 2013 (historical) Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication A readily available ... effects of a promising experimental treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to research partially funded by the ...

  1. NIH study shows increased risk for two types of myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with a form of muscular dystrophy called myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) may be at increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  2. [When do you implant a pacemaker in myotonic dystrophy?].

    PubMed

    Babuty, Dominique; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Laurent, Valérie; Clémenty, Nicolas; Pierre, Bertrand; Fauchier, Laurent; Raynaud, Martine; Pellieux, Sybille

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent adult form of hereditary muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation on the DMPK gene. Myotonic dystrophy leads to multiple systemic complications related to weakness, respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac conduction disturbances. Age of death is earlier in myotonic dystrophy patients than in general population with a high frequency of sudden death. Several mechanisms are involved in sudden death: atrio-ventricular block, severe ventricular arrhythmias or non-cardiac mechanism. The high degree of atrio-ventricular block is a well-recognized indication of pacemaker implantation but the prophylactic implantation of pacemaker should be considered to prevent sudden death in asymptomatic myotonic dystrophy patients. A careful clinical evaluation needs to be done for the identification of patients at high risk of sudden death. The resting ECG and SA ECG are non-invasive tools useful to select the patients who need an electrophysiologic study. In presence of prolonged HV interval more than or equal to 70 ms one can discuss the implantation of a prophylactic pacemaker. The choice of an implantable cardiac defibrillator is preferred in presence of spontaneous ventricular tachycardia or an alteration of the left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:21549556

  3. Skin features in myotonic dystrophy type 1: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Campanati, A; Giannoni, M; Buratti, L; Cagnetti, C; Giuliodori, K; Ganzetti, G; Silvestrini, M; Provinciali, L; Offidani, A

    2015-05-01

    Poor data regarding skin involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy, also named Dystrophia Myotonica type 1, have been reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of skin disorders in adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. Fifty-five patients and one hundred age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were referred to a trained dermatologist for a complete skin examination to check for potential cutaneous hallmarks of disease. No difference in prevalence of preneoplastic, neoplastic, and cutaneous lesions was detected between the two groups. Among morphofunctional, proliferative and inflammatory lesions, focal hyperhidrosis (p < 0.0001), follicular hyperkeratosis (p = 0.0003), early androgenic alopecia (p = 0.01), nail pitting (p = 0.003), pedunculus fibromas (p = 0. 01), twisted hair (p = 0.01), seborrheic dermatitis (p = 0.02), macules of hyperpigmentation (p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent in patients compared with controls. In patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 significant differences according to sex were found for: early androgenic alopecia, twisted hair and seborrheic dermatitis, whose prevalence was higher in males (p < 0.0001). Our preliminary results seem to rule out an increased prevalence of pre-neoplastic, and neoplastic skin lesions in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. On the other hand, an increased prevalence of morphofunctional, inflammatory, and proliferative diseases involving adnexal structures seems to characterize adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. PMID:25813338

  4. A novel proteotoxic stress associated mechanism for macular corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Szalai, Eszter; Smedowski, Adrian; Hegyi, Zoltán; Kivinen, Niko; Viiri, Johanna; Wowra, Bogumil; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Módis, László; Berta, András; Wylegala, Edward; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2015-08-01

    Macular corneal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive eye disease affecting primarily the corneal stroma. Abnormal accumulation of proteoglycan aggregates has been observed intra- and extracellularly in the stromal layer. In addition to the stromal keratocytes and corneal lamellae, deposits are also present in the basal epithelial cells, endothelial cells and Descemet's membrane. Misfolding of proteins has a tendency to gather into aggregating deposits. We studied interaction of molecular chaperones and proteasomal clearance in macular dystrophy human samples and in human corneal HCE-2 epithelial cells. Seven cases of macular corneal dystrophy and four normal corneal buttons collected during corneal transplantation were examined for their expression patterns of heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62. In response to proteasome inhibition the same proteins were analyzed by western blotting. Slit-lamp examination, in vivo confocal cornea microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for morphological analyses. Heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62 were upregulated in both the basal corneal epithelial cells and the stromal keratocytes in macular corneal dystrophy samples that coincided with an increased expression of the same molecules under proteasome inhibition in the HCE-2 cells in vitro. We propose a novel regulatory mechanism that connects the molecular chaperone and proteasomal clearance system in the pathogenesis of macular corneal dystrophy. PMID:25597745

  5. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  6. [Specific features of Becker Muscular Dystrophy patients and female carriers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Magot, A; Mercier, S; Péréon, Y

    2015-12-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was first described in 1955 and linked to the DMD gene in 1987. Compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), clinical onset of BMD usually occurs after the age of 12 and wheelchair is required after the age of 16. BMD is characterized by generalized weakness first affecting limb girdle muscles, hypertrophy of the calves and cardiomyopathy in males. Some patients have only mild symptoms such as cramps or elevated serum creatine kinases (SCK) throughout all their lives. SCK levels are usually elevated. Muscle biopsy (immunohistochemistry or immunoblotting) shows a dystrophic pattern with abnormal dystrophin staining. Diagnosis is confirmed by DMD gene sequencing. Deletions or duplications of one or several exons are identified in the majority of cases. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended for the care management of these patients with a particular attention to the cardiomyopathy, which is typically responsible for death but can be prevented by specific treatment. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathies linked to DMD gene are a phenotypic continuum of BMD. Some female carriers of DMD mutations exhibit clinical symptoms of variable severity, often milder and beginning later than in males. The cardiomyopathy is the most frequent feature that should be especially monitored in these patients. Genetic counselling should be systematically proposed. PMID:26773584

  7. Clinicopathologic findings in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Small, Kent W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To correlate the clinical and histopathologic features of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD). Methods Two eyes were obtained postmortem from a patient with BVMD. The patient’s clinical information was reviewed. Series sections of the globes were performed and sequentially stained with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff or Masson trichrome. A section of the left macula was submitted for electron microscopic processing. Histopathologic findings were reconstructed in a scaled two-dimensional map and compared with fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Results The macular lesion of the right eye was identified as a well-demarcated region with pigment, elevated submacular yellow material and subretinal fluid. This corresponded histopathologically to a well-circumscribed area of RPE hyperplasia, accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE, deposition of granular material in the photoreceptors, macrophages and drusen. The left eye displayed a 1 disc diameter chorioretinal scar with surrounding shallow fluid and submacular pigment. This corresponded to RPE changes and a fibrocellular proliferation in the choriocapillaris. Conclusion Histopathologic mapping revealed retinal edema, RPE abnormalities, drusen and a chorioretinal scar in BVMD that correlated with the fundus, FFA, FAF and OCT findings. PMID:21136072

  8. Autophagy in granular corneal dystrophy type 2.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process that is essential for cellular homeostasis and metabolic stress adaptation. Defective autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases including granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2). GCD2 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by substitution of histidine for arginine at codon 124 (R124H) in the transforming growth factor β-induced gene (TGFBI) on chromosome 5q31. Transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is degraded by autophagy, but mutant-TGFBIp accumulates in autophagosomes and/or lysosomes, despite significant activation of basal autophagy, in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy induces cell death of GCD2 corneal fibroblasts through active caspase-3. As there is currently no pharmacological treatment for GCD2, development of novel therapies is required. A potential strategy for preventing cytoplasmic accumulation of mutant-TGFBIp in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts is to enhance mutant-TGFBIp degradation. This could be achieved by activation of the autophagic pathway. Here, we will consider the role and the potential therapeutic benefits of autophagy in GCD2, with focus on TGFBIp degradation, in light of the recently established role of autophagy in protein degradation. PMID:26386150

  9. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA. PMID:26124831

  10. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    de Die-Smulders, C E; Smeets, H J; Loots, W; Anten, H B; Mirandolle, J F; Geraedts, J P; Höweler, C J

    1997-01-01

    We report a rare case of paternally transmitted congenital myotonic dystrophy (DM). The proband is a 23 year old, mentally retarded male who suffers severe muscular weakness. He presented with respiratory and feeding difficulties at birth. His two sibs suffer from childhood onset DM. Their late father had the adult type of DM, with onset around 30 years. Only six other cases of paternal transmission of congenital DM have been reported recently. We review the sex related effects on transmission of congenital DM. Decreased fertility of males with adult onset DM and contraction of the repeat upon male transmission contribute to the almost absent occurrence of paternal transmission of congenital DM. Also the fathers of the reported congenitally affected children showed, on average, shorter CTG repeat lengths and hence less severe clinical symptoms than the mothers of children with congenital DM. We conclude that paternal transmission of congenital DM is rare and preferentially occurs with onset of DM past 30 years in the father. Images PMID:9391889

  11. Molecular Bases of Corneal Endothelial Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Schmedt, Thore; Silva, Mariana Mazzini; Ziaei, Alireza; Jurkunas, Ula

    2011-01-01

    The phrase “corneal endothelial dystrophies” embraces a group of bilateral corneal conditions that are characterized by a non-inflammatory and progressive degradation of corneal endothelium. Corneal endothelial cells exhibit a high pump site density and, along with barrier function, are responsible for maintaining the cornea in its natural state of relative dehydration. Gradual loss of endothelial cells leads to an insufficient water outflow, resulting in corneal edema and loss of vision. Since the pathologic mechanisms remain largely unknown, the only current treatment option is surgical transplantation when vision is severely impaired. In the past decade, important steps have been taken to understand how endothelial degeneration progresses on the molecular level. Studies of affected multigenerational families and sporadic cases identified genes and chromosomal loci, and revealed either Mendelian or complex disorder inheritance patterns. Mutations have been detected in genes that carry important structural, metabolic, cytoprotective, and regulatory functions in corneal endothelium. In addition to genetic predisposition, environmental factors like oxidative stress were found to be involved in the pathogenesis of endotheliopathies. This review summarizes and crosslinks the recent progress on deciphering the molecular bases of corneal endothelial dystrophies. PMID:21855542

  12. Measuring quality of life in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abresch, Richard T.; Biesecker, Barbara; Conway, Kristin Caspers; Heatwole, Chad; Peay, Holly; Scal, Peter; Strober, Jonathan; Uzark, Karen; Wolff, Jodi; Margolis, Marjorie; Blackwell, Angela; Street, Natalie; Montesanti, Angela; Bolen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to develop a conceptual model of quality of life (QOL) in muscular dystrophies (MDs) and review existing QOL measures for use in the MD population. Methods: Our model for QOL among individuals with MD was developed based on a modified Delphi process, literature review, and input from patients and patient advocacy organizations. Scales that have been used to measure QOL among patients with MD were identified through a literature review and evaluated using the COSMIN (Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) checklist. Results: The Comprehensive Model of QOL in MD (CMQM) captures 3 broad domains of QOL (physical, psychological, and social), includes factors influencing self-reported QOL (disease-related factors, support/resources, and expectations/aspirations), and places these concepts within the context of the life course. The literature review identified 15 QOL scales (9 adult and 6 pediatric) that have been applied to patients with MD. Very few studies reported reliability data, and none included data on responsiveness of the measures to change in disease progression, a necessary psychometric property for measures included in treatment and intervention studies. No scales captured all QOL domains identified in the CMQM model. Conclusions: Additional scale development research is needed to enhance assessment of QOL for individuals with MD. Item banking and computerized adaptive assessment would be particularly beneficial by allowing the scale to be tailored to each individual, thereby minimizing respondent burden. PMID:25663223

  13. Congenital muscular dystrophy: from muscle to brain.

    PubMed

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Praticò, Andrea D; Ruggieri, Martino; Parano, Enrico; Rizzo, Renata; Corsello, Giovanni; Vitaliti, Giovanna; Pavone, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a wide group of muscular disorders that manifest with very early onset of muscular weakness, sometime associated to severe brain involvement.The histologic pattern of muscle anomalies is typical of dystrophic lesions but quite variable depending on the different stages and on the severity of the disorder.Recent classification of CMDs have been reported most of which based on the combination of clinical, biochemical, molecular and genetic findings, but genotype/phenotype correlation are in constant progression due to more diffuse utilization of the molecular analysis.In this article, the Authors report on CMDs belonging to the group of dystroglycanopathies and in particular on the most severe forms represented by the Fukuyama CMD, Muscle-Eye-Brain disease and Walker Walburg syndrome.Clinical diagnosis of infantile hypotonia is particularly difficult considering the different etiologic factors causing the lesions, the difficulty in localizing the involved CNS area (central vs. peripheral) and the limited role of the diagnostic procedures at this early age.The diagnostic evaluation is not easy mainly in differentiating the various types of CMDs, and represents a challenge for the neonatologists and pediatricians. Suggestions are reported on the way to reach a correct diagnosis with the appropriate use of the diagnostic means. PMID:27576556

  14. Gene Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Julian; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a relatively common inherited disorder caused by defective expression of the protein dystrophin. The most direct approach to treating this disease would be to restore dystrophin production in muscle. Recent progress has greatly increased the prospects for successful gene therapy of DMD, and here we summarize the most promising developments. Areas Covered Gene transfer using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising method to restore dystrophin production in muscles bodywide, and represents a treatment option applicable to all DMD patients. Using information gleaned from PubMed searches of the literature, attendance at scientific conferences and results from our own lab, we provide an overview of the potential for gene therapy of DMD using AAV vectors including a summary of promising developments and issues that need to be resolved prior to large-scale therapeutic implementation. Expert Opinion Of the many approaches being pursued to treat DMD and BMD, gene therapy based on AAV-mediated delivery of microdystrophin is the most direct and promising method to treat the cause of the disorder. The major challenges to this approach are ensuring that microdystrophin can be delivered safely and efficiently without eliciting an immune response. PMID:26594599

  15. Jagged 1 Rescues the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Natassia M; Elvers, Ingegerd; Alexander, Matthew S; Moreira, Yuri B; Eran, Alal; Gomes, Juliana P; Marshall, Jamie L; Karlsson, Elinor K; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana

    2015-11-19

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by mutations at the dystrophin gene, is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. There is no cure for DMD and current therapeutic approaches to restore dystrophin expression are only partially effective. The absence of dystrophin in muscle results in dysregulation of signaling pathways, which could be targets for disease therapy and drug discovery. Previously, we identified two exceptional Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs that are mildly affected, have functional muscle, and normal lifespan despite the complete absence of dystrophin. Now, our data on linkage, whole-genome sequencing, and transcriptome analyses of these dogs compared to severely affected GRMD and control animals reveals that increased expression of Jagged1 gene, a known regulator of the Notch signaling pathway, is a hallmark of the mild phenotype. Functional analyses demonstrate that Jagged1 overexpression ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype, suggesting that Jagged1 may represent a target for DMD therapy in a dystrophin-independent manner. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26582133

  16. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Moving the Field Forward

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies has evolved as a promising treatment for this progressive group of disorders. While corticosteroids and/or supportive treatments remain standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), loss of ambulation, respiratory failure and compromised cardiac function is the inevitable outcome. Recent developments in genetically mediated therapies have allowed for personalized treatments that strategically target individual muscular dystrophy subtypes based on disease pathomechanism and phenotype. In this review, we highlight therapeutic progress with emphasis on evolving pre-clinical data and our own experience in completed clinical trials, and others currently underway. We also discuss the lessons we have learned along the way and the strategies developed to overcome limitations and obstacles in this field. PMID:25439576

  17. Dark adaptation in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Baca, W; Fishman, G A; Alexander, K R; Glenn, A M

    1994-01-01

    Psychophysical dark adaptation studies were performed in six patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) using a Goldmann-Weekers dark adaptometer. Prebleach thresholds were determined before obtaining a postbleach full recovery curve. Unlike patients with Stargardt macular dystrophy, all patients with BVMD showed a normal time to reach their baseline dark adapted thresholds after bleaching of their rod visual pigment when tested in clinically normal appearing retina. Although a lipofuscin material accumulates within retinal pigment epithelial cells in patients with either Best or Stargardt dystrophy, functional findings pertaining to recovery of rod dark adaptation thresholds as well as electro-oculogram light peak to dark trough ratios are different in these two disorders. PMID:8060924

  18. Dark adaptation in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Baca, W; Fishman, G A; Alexander, K R; Glenn, A M

    1994-06-01

    Psychophysical dark adaptation studies were performed in six patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) using a Goldmann-Weekers dark adaptometer. Prebleach thresholds were determined before obtaining a postbleach full recovery curve. Unlike patients with Stargardt macular dystrophy, all patients with BVMD showed a normal time to reach their baseline dark adapted thresholds after bleaching of their rod visual pigment when tested in clinically normal appearing retina. Although a lipofuscin material accumulates within retinal pigment epithelial cells in patients with either Best or Stargardt dystrophy, functional findings pertaining to recovery of rod dark adaptation thresholds as well as electro-oculogram light peak to dark trough ratios are different in these two disorders. PMID:8060924

  19. Immobility reduces muscle fiber necrosis in dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Ikezawa, M; Nomura, K; Ito, K; Ozasa, S; Ueno, H; Yoshioka, K; Yano, S; Yamashita, T; Matuskura, M; Miike, T

    2006-08-01

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy is a progressive muscle disease, which is caused by the abnormality of dystrophin. Spina bifida is characterized by paralysis of the feet, with most of the upper extremities not being affected. We report here on the first case of Becker muscular dystrophy coinciding with spina bifida. The muscle biopsy specimens of the patient showed dystrophic changes in upper extremities, but clearly less in lower extremities. The results show that the restriction of excessive exercise is important for dystrophin deficiency disease. PMID:16516424

  20. Determinants of the incidence of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked disorder, is the most common muscular dystrophy with an incidence in boys of about 200 per million births. It presents in early childhood leading to death in early teens. Its relatively high incidence and severity have stimulated many studies from epidemiological to curative. Recent advances in molecular biology have opened up the possibility of carrier identification and potential reduction of the incidence of cases. This paper gives a population genetics model which can be used to predict the reduction in incidence. PMID:26697447

  1. Dupuytren's Contracture Cosegregation with Limb-Girdle Muscle Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lace, Baiba; Inashkina, Inna; Micule, Ieva; Vasiljeva, Inta; Naudina, Maruta Solvita; Jankevics, Eriks

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) is a heterogeneous group of muscular dystrophies that mostly affect the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscle groups. We report here a case of neuromuscular disease associated with Dupuytren's contracture, which has never been described before as cosegregating with an autosomal dominant type of inheritance. Dupuytren's contracture is a common disease, especially in Northern Europe. Comorbid conditions associated with Dupuytren's contracture are repetitive trauma to the hands, diabetes, and seizures, but it has never before been associated with neuromuscular disease. We hypothesize that patients may harbor mutations in genes with functions related to neuromuscular disease and Dupuytren's contracture development. PMID:24024053

  2. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Biagi, Sonia; Stasi, Cristina; Costa, Francesco; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Marchi, Santino

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting. A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry, electromyography, functional ultrasonography, scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported. The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, anti-dyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders. Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD. PMID:16609987

  3. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced. PMID:9060012

  4. Neuropsychological profile of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Anna Roshini; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting. DMD is a fatal X-linked recessive disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 3,500 male live births. This disease has long been associated with intellectual impairment. Research has shown that boys with DMD have variable intellectual performance, indicating the presence of specific cognitive deficits. The aim of the study was to use a battery of intelligence, learning, and memory tests to identify a neuropsychological profile in boys with DMD. A total of 22 boys diagnosed with DMD in the age range of 6 to 10 years old were evaluated using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition, Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Memory for Designs Test. The data were interpreted using means, standard deviations, percentages, and percentiles. Normative data were also used for further interpretation. The results showed that boys with DMD had a significantly lower IQ (88.5). Verbal IQ (86.59) was found to be lower than Performance IQ (92.64). There was evidence of impaired performance on the Processing Speed, Freedom From Distractibility, and Verbal Comprehension Indexes. Specific deficits in information processing, complex attention, immediate verbal memory span, verbal working memory, verbal comprehension, vocabulary, visuoconstruction ability, and verbal learning and encoding were observed. However, perceptional organization, general fund of information, abstract reasoning, visual discrimination and acuity, visual learning and memory, and verbal memory were adequate. The neuropsychological findings support the hypothesis that these children have specific cognitive deficits as opposed to a global intellectual deficit. PMID:24279481

  5. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Diagnosis to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Scotton, Chiara; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to the absence of dystrophin protein that causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The molecular diagnostic of DMD involves a deletions/duplications analysis performed by quantitative technique such as microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), Multiple Ligation Probe Assay MLPA. Since traditional methods for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants require high cost and are time consuming, especially for a large gene like dystrophin, the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become a useful tool available for clinical diagnosis. The dystrophin gene is large and finely regulated in terms of tissue expression, and RNA processing and editing includes a variety of fine tuned processes. At present, there are no effective treatments and the steroids are the only fully approved drugs used in DMD therapy able to slow disease progression. In the last years, an increasing variety of strategies have been studied as a possible therapeutic approach aimed to restore dystrophin production and to preserve muscle mass, ameliorating the DMD phenotype. RNA is the most studied target for the development of clinical strategies and Antisense Oligonucleotides (AONs) are the most used molecules for RNA modulation. The identification of delivery system to enhance the efficacy and to reduce the toxicity of AON is the main purpose in this area and nanomaterials are a very promising model as DNA/RNA molecules vectors. Dystrophinopathies therefore represent a pivotal field of investigation, which has opened novel avenues in molecular biology, medical genetics and novel therapeutic options. PMID:26457695

  6. The burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Landfeldt, Erik; Lindgren, Peter; Bell, Christopher F.; Schmitt, Claude; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the total cost of illness and economic burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: Patients with DMD from Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and United States were identified through Translational Research in Europe–Assessment & Treatment of Neuromuscular Diseases registries and invited to complete a questionnaire online together with a caregiver. Data on health care use, quality of life, work status, informal care, and household expenses were collected to estimate costs of DMD from the perspective of society and caregiver households. Results: A total of 770 patients (173 German, 122 Italian, 191 from the United Kingdom, and 284 from the United States) completed the questionnaire. Mean per-patient annual direct cost of illness was estimated at between $23,920 and $54,270 (2012 international dollars), 7 to 16 times higher than the mean per-capita health expenditure in these countries. Indirect and informal care costs were substantial, each constituting between 18% and 43% of total costs. The total societal burden was estimated at between $80,120 and $120,910 per patient and annum, and increased markedly with disease progression. The corresponding household burden was estimated at between $58,440 and $71,900. Conclusions: We show that DMD is associated with a substantial economic burden. Our results underscore the many different costs accompanying a rare condition such as DMD and the considerable economic burden carried by affected families. Our description of the previously unknown economic context of a rare disease serves as important intelligence input to health policy evaluations of intervention programs and novel therapies, financial support schemes for patients and their families, and the design of future cost studies. PMID:24991029

  7. Automated measurement of retinal blood vessel tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    Abnormalities in the vascular pattern of the retina are associated with retinal diseases and are also risk factors for systemic diseases, especially cardiovascular diseases. The three-dimensional retinal vascular pattern is mostly formed congenitally, but is then modified over life, in response to aging, vessel wall dystrophies and long term changes in blood flow and pressure. A characteristic of the vascular pattern that is appreciated by clinicians is vascular tortuosity, i.e. how curved or kinked a blood vessel, either vein or artery, appears along its course. We developed a new quantitative metric for vascular tortuosity, based on the vessel's angle of curvature, length of the curved vessel over its chord length (arc to chord ratio), number of curvature sign changes, and combined these into a unidimensional metric, Tortuosity Index (TI). In comparison to other published methods this method can estimate appropriate TI for vessels with constant curvature sign and vessels with equal arc to chord ratios, as well. We applied this method to a dataset of 15 digital fundus images of 8 patients with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and to the other publically available dataset of 60 fundus images of normal cases and patients with hypertensive retinopathy, of which the arterial and venous tortuosities have also been graded by masked experts (ophthalmologists). The method produced exactly the same rank-ordered list of vessel tortuosity (TI) values as obtained by averaging the tortuosity grading given by 3 ophthalmologists for FSHD dataset and a list of TI values with high ranking correlation with the ophthalmologist's grading for the other dataset. Our results show that TI has potential to detect and evaluate abnormal retinal vascular structure in early diagnosis and prognosis of retinopathies.

  8. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  9. Phonological Awareness Skills in Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Phoebe; Woodyatt, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Substantial research has detailed the reading deficits experienced by children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although phonological awareness (PA) is vital in reading development, little is known about PA in the DMD population. This pilot study describes the PA abilities of a group of five young children with DMD, comparing the results…

  10. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  11. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  12. Advances in genetic therapeutic strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guiraud, Simon; Chen, Huijia; Burns, David T.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This review highlights recent progress in genetically based therapies targeting the primary defect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What advances does it highlight? Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy, leading to the development of genetic therapies. These include manipulation of the expression of the gene or related genes, the splicing of the gene and its translation, and replacement of the gene using viral approaches. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X‐linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In the absence of the dystrophin protein, the link between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix is destroyed, and this severely compromises the strength, flexibility and stability of muscle fibres. The devastating consequence is progressive muscle wasting and premature death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. There is currently no cure, and despite exhaustive palliative care, patients are restricted to a wheelchair by the age of 12 years and usually succumb to cardiac or respiratory complications in their late 20s. This review provides an update on the current genetically based therapies and clinical trials that target or compensate for the primary defect of this disease. These include dystrophin gene‐replacement strategies, genetic modification techniques to restore dystrophin expression, and modulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin, as a surrogate to re‐establish muscle function. PMID:26140505

  13. Dasatinib as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Leanne; Piggott, Robert W.; Emmerson, Tracy; Winder, Steve J.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of a systemically acting and universal small molecule therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy would be an enormous advance for this condition. Based on evidence gained from studies on mouse genetic models, we have identified tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan as a key event in the aetiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Thus, preventing tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan presents itself as a potential therapeutic strategy. Using the dystrophic sapje zebrafish, we have investigated the use of tyrosine kinase and other inhibitors to treat the dystrophic symptoms in this model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dasatinib, a potent and specific Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to decrease the levels of β-dystroglycan phosphorylation on tyrosine and to increase the relative levels of non-phosphorylated β-dystroglycan in sapje zebrafish. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment resulted in the improved physical appearance of the sapje zebrafish musculature and increased swimming ability as measured by both duration and distance of swimming of dasatinib-treated fish compared with control animals. These data suggest great promise for pharmacological agents that prevent the phosphorylation of β-dystroglycan on tyrosine and subsequent steps in the degradation pathway as therapeutic targets for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:26604135

  14. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: CRISPR/Cas9 treatment.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Jerry R; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R

    2016-05-01

    A novel approach to gene correction by genome editing shows great promise as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). CRISPR/Cas9 delivered by adeno-associated virus to a mouse model for DMD demonstrated improvement in function and histology. PMID:26926391

  15. Neurotrophins, cytokines, oxidative parameters and funcionality in Progressive Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Comim, Clarissa M; Mathia, Gisiane B; Hoepers, Andreza; Tuon, Lisiane; Kapczinski, Flávio; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João; Rosa, Maria I

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the levels of brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cytokines and oxidative parameters in serum and tried to correlate them with the age and functionality of patients with Progressive Muscle Dystrophies (PMD). The patients were separated into six groups (case and controls pared by age and gender), as follows: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD); Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy (SMD); and Limb-girdle Muscular Dystrophy type-2A (LGMD2A). DMD patients (± 17.9 years old) had a decrease of functionality, an increase in the IL-1β and TNF-α levels and a decrease of IL-10 levels and superoxide dismutase activity in serum. SMD patients (± 25.8 years old) had a decrease of BDNF and IL-10 levels and superoxide dismutase activity and an increase of IL-1β levels in serum. LGMD2A patients (± 27.7 years old) had an decrease only in serum levels of IL-10. This research showed the first evidence of BDNF involvement in the SMD patients and a possible unbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, along with decreased superoxide dismutase activity in serum of DMD and SMD patients. PMID:25910175

  16. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  17. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  18. Occupational Potential in a Population with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schkade, Janette K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were tested to assess their potential for occupational activity. Tests measured possible sensory deficits, strength, endurance, and fatigue in response to sustained fine motor activity. Results indicate that, within limitations, persons with this diagnosis can engage in activity leading to skill…

  19. The Child with Muscular Dystrophy in School. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schock, Nancy C.

    Practical information on children with muscular dystrophy is intended to help parents and teachers facilitate their inclusion in mainstreamed classrooms. Major topics addressed include the following: transportation arrangements; providing full information to the teacher regarding the child's specific abilities and physical limitations;…

  20. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  1. The Assessment of Intelligence in Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mearig, Judith S.

    1979-01-01

    Challenges assumptions and research procedures leading to the position that below-average intellectual potential is an integral part of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A study of 58 boys (ages 5 to 18) from urban, suburban, and rural settings indicated IQ range of 59 to 131 and no evidence of significant verbal deficit (reported in earlier studies).…

  2. Psychiatric and Cognitive Phenotype of Childhood Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douniol, Marie; Jacquette, Aurelia; Cohen, David; Bodeau, Nicolas; Rachidi, Linda; Angeard, Nathalie; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Vallee, Louis; Eymard, Bruno; Plaza, Monique; Heron, Delphine; Guile, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the psychiatric and cognitive phenotype in young individuals with the childhood form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Method: Twenty-eight individuals (15 females, 13 males) with childhood DM1 (mean age 17y, SD 4.6, range 7-24y) were assessed using standardized instruments and cognitive testing of general intelligence,…

  3. Glycosylation defects: a new mechanism for muscular dystrophy?

    PubMed

    Grewal, Prabhjit K; Hewitt, Jane E

    2003-10-15

    Recently, post-translational modification of proteins has been defined as a new area of focus for muscular dystrophy research by the identification of a group of disease genes that encode known or putative glycosylation enzymes. Walker-Warburg Syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) are caused by mutations in two genes involved in O-mannosylation, POMT1 and POMGnT1, respectively. Fukuyama muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is due to mutations in fukutin, a putative phospholigand transferase. Congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C and limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I are allelic, both being due to mutations in the gene-encoding fukutin-related protein (FKRP). Finally, the causative gene in the myodystrophy (myd) mouse is a putative bifunctional glycosyltransferase (Large). WWS, MEB, FCMD and the myd mouse are also associated with neuronal migration abnormalities (often type II lissencephaly) and ocular or retinal defects. A deficiency in post-translational modification of alpha-dystroglycan is a common feature of all these muscular dystrophies and is thought to involve O-glycosylation pathways. This abnormally modified alpha-dystroglycan is deficient in binding to extracellular matrix ligands, including laminin and agrin. Selective deletion of dystroglycan in the central nervous system (CNS) produces brain abnormalities with striking similarities to WWS, MEB, FCMD and the myd mouse. Thus, impaired dystroglycan function is strongly implicated in these diseases. However, it is unlikely that these five glycosylation enzymes only have a role in glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and it is important that other protein targets are identified. PMID:12925572

  4. Mutations in IMPG1 Cause Vitelliform Macular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Gaël; Meunier, Isabelle; Avila-Fernández, Almudena; Banfi, Sandro; Le Meur, Guylène; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Corton, Marta; Simonelli, Francesca; Brabet, Philippe; Labesse, Gilles; Audo, Isabelle; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Zeitz, Christina; Sahel, José-Alain; Weber, Michel; Dollfus, Hélène; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Allorge, Delphine; De Baere, Elfride; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Kohl, Susanne; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Sénéchal, Audrey; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Ayuso García, Carmen; Hamel, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophies (VMD) are inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by yellow, round deposits visible upon fundus examination and encountered in individuals with juvenile Best macular dystrophy (BMD) or adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD). Although many BMD and some AVMD cases harbor mutations in BEST1 or PRPH2, the underlying genetic cause remains unknown for many affected individuals. In a large family with autosomal-dominant VMD, gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of a c.713T>G (p.Leu238Arg) IMPG1 mutation, which was subsequently found in two other families with autosomal-dominant VMD and the same phenotype. IMPG1 encodes the SPACR protein, a component of the rod and cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix domains. Structural modeling indicates that the p.Leu238Arg substitution destabilizes the conserved SEA1 domain of SPACR. Screening of 144 probands who had various forms of macular dystrophy revealed three other IMPG1 mutations. Two individuals from one family affected by autosomal-recessive VMD were homozygous for the splice-site mutation c.807+1G>T, and two from another family were compound heterozygous for the mutations c.461T>C (p.Leu154Pro) and c.1519C>T (p.Arg507∗). Most cases had a normal or moderately decreased electrooculogram Arden ratio. We conclude that IMPG1 mutations cause both autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms of VMD, thus indicating that impairment of the interphotoreceptor matrix might be a general cause of VMD. PMID:23993198

  5. Mechanisms of disease: congenital muscular dystrophies-glycosylation takes center stage.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul T

    2006-04-01

    Recent studies have defined a group of muscular dystrophies, now termed the dystroglycanopathies, as novel disorders of glycosylation. These conditions include Walker-Warburg syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease, Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy types 1C and 1D, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I. Although clinical findings can be highly variable, dystroglycanopathies are all characterized by cortical malformations and ocular defects at the more severe end of the clinical spectrum, in addition to muscular dystrophy. All of these disorders are defined by the underglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. Defective glycosylation of dystroglycan severs the link between this important cell adhesion molecule and the extracellular matrix, thereby contributing to cellular pathology. Recent experiments indicate that glycosylation might not only define forms of muscular dystrophy but also provide an avenue to the development of therapies for these disorders. PMID:16932553

  6. GCAP1 mutations associated with autosomal dominant cone dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the heterogeneity of autosomal dominant cone and cone-rod dystrophies (adCD, and adCORD, respectively). As one of the best characterized adCD genes, we focus on the GUCA1A gene encoding guanylate cyclase activating protein 1 (GCAP1), a protein carrying three high affinity Ca2+ binding motifs (EF hands). GCAP1 senses changes in cytoplasmic free [Ca2+] and communicates these changes to GC1, by either inhibiting it (at high free [Ca2+]), or stimulating it (at low free [Ca2+]). A number of missense mutations altering the structure and Ca2+ affinity of EF hands have been discovered. These mutations are associated with a gain of function, producing dominant cone and cone rod dystrophy phenotypes. In this article we review these mutations and describe the consequences of specific mutations on GCAP1 structure and GC stimulation. PMID:20238026

  7. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: description of a case with skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Vergara, Aránzazu; Isarría, María J; Prado Sánchez-Caminero, María; Guerra, Aurora

    2005-10-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy or algodystrophy is a poorly defined syndrome in which the patient develops pain disproportionate to the cause. It is included among the complex regional pain syndromes. The symptoms are triggered by some type of trauma, at times trivial, and consist of burning pain, edema, changes in skin color, alterations in vascularization, temperature changes, hyperhidrosis and skin disorders, which primarily consist of atrophic changes. Other less frequent cutaneous manifestations have been described in patients with this syndrome. These include papules, blisters, inflammatory lesions and reticulated hyperpigmentation. We discuss the case of a patient with reflex sympathetic dystrophy who presented with superficial ulcers on the affected limb, which mimicked dermatitis artefacta. PMID:16476289

  8. Does modafinil enhance activity of patients with myotonic dystrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, G.J.; van Dijk, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    We performed a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study in 13 patients with myotonic dystrophy to address the question whether modafinil, known to improve hypersomnolence in myotonic dystrophy, may improve levels of activity as well. We used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale as a measure of hypersomnolence and a structured interview of the patient and the partner or housemate as a measure of activity. We additionally used a restricted form of the RAND-36 to relate a possible improvement of activity to perceived general health. We confirmed earlier positive findings of modafinil regarding reduced somnolence (p = 0.015), but no significant effects were seen regarding activity levels (p = 0.2 for patients’ self-reports and 0.5 for partners’ reports). PMID:17285226

  9. Satellite Cells in Muscular Dystrophy - Lost in Polarity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Chevalier, Fabien P; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Recent findings employing the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have revealed that muscle satellite stem cells play a direct role in contributing to disease etiology and progression of DMD, the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. Lack of dystrophin expression in DMD has critical consequences in satellite cells including an inability to establish cell polarity, abrogation of asymmetric satellite stem-cell divisions, and failure to enter the myogenic program. Thus, muscle wasting in dystrophic mice is not only caused by myofiber fragility but is exacerbated by intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction leading to impaired regeneration. Despite intense research and clinical efforts, there is still no effective cure for DMD. In this review we highlight recent research advances in DMD and discuss the current state of treatment and, importantly, how we can incorporate satellite cell-targeted therapeutic strategies to correct satellite cell dysfunction in DMD. PMID:27161598

  10. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Donghoon

    2010-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are groups of inherited progressive diseases of the muscle caused by mutations of diverse genes related to normal muscle function. Although there is no current effective treatment for these devastating diseases, various molecular strategies have been developed to restore the expressions of the associated defective proteins. In preclinical animal models, both viral and nonviral vectors have been shown to deliver recombinant versions of defective genes. Antisense oligonucleotides have been shown to modify the splicing mechanism of mesenger ribonucleic acid to produce an internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin in an experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In addition, chemicals can induce readthrough of the premature stop codon in nonsense mutations of the dystrophin gene. On the basis of these preclinical data, several experimental clinical trials are underway that aim to demonstrate efficacy in treating these devastating diseases. PMID:20944811

  11. Bilateral choroidal excavation in best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Fasce, Francesco; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) has recently been described as one or more localized areas of choroidal excavation on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The authors describe a case of bilateral FCE in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD). SD-OCT revealed FCE in both eyes characterized by interruption of the internal segment-outer segment junction and the presence of subretinal hyporeflective space. This is the first report describing bilateral FCE in a distinct macular disorder and specifically with VMD. Future investigations are warranted to ascertain the involvement of other macular dystrophies with atrophic evolution and the impact of FCE on the clinical course. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:e8-e10.]. PMID:24512759

  12. [Optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence in Best macular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Chebil, A; Charfi, H; Largueche, L; El Matri, L

    2016-06-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is the second most frequent hereditary maculopathy, with bilateral involvement and juvenile onset. It is clinically characterized by bilateral deposits of lipofuscin-like autofluorescent material in the subretinal space, with a typical phenotypic manifestation taking the form of a vitelliform macular lesion evolving gradually into more advanced stages. The purpose of our study was to describe fundus autofluorescence patterns and OCT findings in three patients (6 eyes) with several stages of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become the first imaging technique to order when confronted with a hereditary maculopathy suggesting Best disease. Fundus autofluorescence combined with OCT allow for better diagnosis and management, which are necessary for any genetic analysis. PMID:27206620

  13. Identification of the gene responsible for Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Petrukhin, K; Koisti, M J; Bakall, B; Li, W; Xie, G; Marknell, T; Sandgren, O; Forsman, K; Holmgren, G; Andreasson, S; Vujic, M; Bergen, A A; McGarty-Dugan, V; Figueroa, D; Austin, C P; Metzker, M L; Caskey, C T; Wadelius, C

    1998-07-01

    Best macular dystrophy (BMD), also known as vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2; OMIM 153700), is an autosomal dominant form of macular degeneration characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipofuscin within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium cells. In pursuit of the disease gene, we limited the minimum genetic region by recombination breakpoint analysis and mapped to this region a novel retina-specific gene (VMD2). Genetic mapping data, identification of five independent disease-specific mutations and expression studies provide evidence that mutations within the candidate gene are a cause of BMD. The 3' UTR of the candidate gene contains a region of antisense complementarity to the 3' UTR of the ferritin heavy-chain gene (FTH1), indicating the possibility of antisense interaction between VMD2 and FTH1 transcripts. PMID:9662395

  14. Bestrophin gene mutations in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G M; Kakuk, L E; Griesinger, I B; Simpson, S A; Nowak, N J; Small, K W; Maumenee, I H; Rosenfeld, P J; Sieving, P A; Shows, T B; Ayyagari, R

    1999-05-15

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) is an autosomal dominant dystrophy with a juvenile age of onset. Mutations in the Bestrophin gene were shown in patients affected with VMD2. In a mutation study, we made three new and interesting observations. First, we identified possible mutation hotspots within the gene, suggesting that particular regions of the protein have greater functional significance than others. Second, we described a 2-bp deletion in a part of the gene where mutations have not previously been reported; this mutation causes a frameshift and subsequent premature termination of the protein. Finally, we have evidence that some mutations are associated with variable expression of the disease, suggesting the involvement of other factors or genes in the disease phenotype. PMID:10331951

  15. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  16. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  17. Cell transplantation and gene therapy in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J E; Partridge, T A

    1992-09-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD), which affects 1/3500 live male births, involves a progressive degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle, leading to early death. The protein dystrophin is lacking in DMD and present, but defective, in the allelic, less severe, Becker muscular dystrophy and is also missing in the mdx mouse. Experiments on the mdx mouse have suggested two possible therapies for these myopathies. Implantation of normal muscle precursor cells (mpc) into mdx skeletal muscle leads to the conversion of dystrophin-negative fibres to -positive, with consequent improvement in muscle histology. Direct injection of dystrophin cDNA into skeletal or cardiac muscle also gives rise to dystrophin-positive fibres. Although both appear promising, there are a number of questions to be answered and refinements to be made before either technique could be considered possible as treatments for myopathies in man. PMID:1365921

  18. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    PubMed

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy. PMID:26177134

  19. [Clinicopathological study of a case of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Moreno Martínez, J M; Martín Araguz, A; García de la Rocha, M L; Masjuán Vallejo, J; Barón Rubio, M; Ginel Feito, M D

    1991-01-01

    One case of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy is reported, in a 75 year old white male with manifest family history of palpebral ptosis. He displayed bilateral ptosis and dysphagia. Diagnosis was carried out after clinical, electrical and bioptic procedures. Data obtained have been discussed with previous reports in the literature. It was necessary to perform a cricopharyngeal myotomy to overcome the malnutrition secondary to his swallowing problem. PMID:1804038

  20. NAD+ Biosynthesis Ameliorates a Zebrafish Model of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Kelly, Meghan W.; Reynolds, Christine J.; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D.; Henry, Clarissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex– or integrin alpha7–deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin

  1. Best Macular Dystrophy in a Nigerian: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    S. Oluleye, Tunji

    2012-01-01

    Best macular dystrophy is reported to be rare in Africans. It is a hereditary disease that starts in childhood and progresses through some stages before visual symptoms occur. This case report presents a 43-year-old Nigerian with the disease and stresses the importance of regular eye exams of patients and relatives to detect changes such as choroidal neovascular membrane amenable to treatment. PMID:22740832

  2. Best macular dystrophy in a nigerian: a case report.

    PubMed

    S Oluleye, Tunji

    2012-05-01

    Best macular dystrophy is reported to be rare in Africans. It is a hereditary disease that starts in childhood and progresses through some stages before visual symptoms occur. This case report presents a 43-year-old Nigerian with the disease and stresses the importance of regular eye exams of patients and relatives to detect changes such as choroidal neovascular membrane amenable to treatment. PMID:22740832

  3. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Reynolds, Christine J; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D; Henry, Clarissa A

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin alpha

  4. Revised genetic classification of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Magri, F; Brajkovic, S; Govoni, A; Brusa, R; Comi, G P

    2014-10-10

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited progressive muscle disorders affecting predominantly the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. They present both with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive patterns of inheritance. Recent development, including results from Next Generation Sequencing technology, expanded the number of recognised forms. Therefore a revised genetic classification that takes into account the novel entities is needed, allowing clinicians and researchers to refer to a common nomenclature for diagnostic and research purposes. PMID:25323878

  5. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the hands: clinical and scintigraphic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, L.E.; Mackinnon, S.E.

    1984-08-01

    In an attempt to establish specific scintigraphic criteria for the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) as defined by a group of specialized hand surgeons, 145 consecutive patients, 23 of whom had clinical RSD, underwent three phase radionuclide bone scanning (TPBS). Specific patterns for positive radionuclide angiogram, blood pool, and delayed images were established. The delayed images were sensitive (96%), specific (97%), and had a valuable negative predictive value (99%). It was concluded that TPBS could provide an objective marker for RSD.

  6. Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Profile in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Rudaina; Smile, Sharon; Yoon, Grace; Dupuis, Annie; Mosleh, Maureen; Snider, Andrea; McAdam, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive neuromuscular condition that has a high rate of cognitive and learning disabilities as well as neurobehavioral disorders, some of which have been associated with disruption of dystrophin isoforms. Retrospective cohort of 59 boys investigated the cognitive and neurobehavioral profile of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Full-scale IQ of < 70 was seen in 27%; learning disability in 44%, intellectual disability in 19%; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 32%; autism spectrum disorders in 15%; and anxiety in 27%. Mutations affecting Dp260 isoform and 5'untranslated region of Dp140 were observed in 60% with learning disability, 50% intellectual disability, 77% with autism spectrum disorders, and 94% with anxiety. No statistically significant correlation was noted between comorbidities and dystrophin isoforms; however, there is a trend of cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms with declining full-scale IQ. Enhanced psychology testing to include both cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders is recommended for all individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:25660133

  7. Genetic Engineering of Dystroglycan in Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sciandra, Francesca; Bigotti, Maria Giulia; Giardina, Bruno; Bozzi, Manuela; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dystroglycan (DG) is the central component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), a multimeric protein complex that ensures a strong mechanical link between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Several muscular dystrophies arise from mutations hitting most of the components of the DGC. Mutations within the DG gene (DAG1) have been recently associated with two forms of muscular dystrophy, one displaying a milder and one a more severe phenotype. This review focuses specifically on the animal (murine and others) model systems that have been developed with the aim of directly engineering DAG1 in order to study the DG function in skeletal muscle as well as in other tissues. In the last years, conditional animal models overcoming the embryonic lethality of the DG knock-out in mouse have been generated and helped clarifying the crucial role of DG in skeletal muscle, while an increasing number of studies on knock-in mice are aimed at understanding the contribution of single amino acids to the stability of DG and to the possible development of muscular dystrophy. PMID:26380289

  8. The quality of life in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Gholamreza; Heidari, Morteza; Azizi Malamiri, Reza; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Mohammadi, Mahmoud; Shervin Badv, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Salehi, Soodeh; Shahrokhi, Amin; Qorbani, Mostafa; Fathi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate the quality of life in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 8-18 years, compared with that in matched healthy controls. A total of 85 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 8-18 years and 136 age, sex and living place matched healthy controls were included in this study. Patients and one of their parents separately completed the 27-item Persian version of KIDSCREEN questionnaire (child and adolescent version and parent version). From the children's perspective, the quality of life in patients was found to be lower in two subclasses: "physical activities and health" (p < 0.001) and "friends" (p = 0.005). Parental estimation of their sick child's quality of life was significantly lower than children's own assessment in two subclasses: "physical activities and health" (p < 0.001) and "general mood and feelings" (p < 0.001). Our results indicate that boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have quite a satisfactory quality of life. A happier and more hopeful life can be promoted through increasing social support and improving the parental knowledge regarding their child's more positive life perspective. PMID:27234309

  9. Differential isoform expression and selective muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Sanna; Penttilä, Sini; Somervuo, Panu; Keto, Joni; Auvinen, Petri; Vihola, Anna; Huovinen, Sami; Pelin, Katarina; Raheem, Olayinka; Salenius, Juha; Suominen, Tiina; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-10-01

    Despite the expression of the mutated gene in all muscles, selective muscles are involved in genetic muscular dystrophies. Different muscular dystrophies show characteristic patterns of fatty degenerative changes by muscle imaging, even to the extent that the patterns have been used for diagnostic purposes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining the selective involvement of muscles are not known. To test the hypothesis that different muscles may express variable amounts of different isoforms of muscle genes, we applied a custom-designed exon microarray containing probes for 57 muscle-specific genes to assay the transcriptional profiles in sets of human adult lower limb skeletal muscles. Quantitative real-time PCR and whole transcriptome sequencing were used to further analyze the results. Our results demonstrate significant variations in isoform and gene expression levels in anatomically different muscles. Comparison of the known patterns of selective involvement of certain muscles in two autosomal dominant titinopathies and one autosomal dominant myosinopathy, with the isoform and gene expression results, shows a correlation between the specific muscles involved and significant differences in the level of expression of the affected gene and exons in these same muscles compared with some other selected muscles. Our results suggest that differential expression levels of muscle genes and isoforms are one determinant in the selectivity of muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies. PMID:26269091

  10. Myotonic dystrophy: molecular windows on a complex etiology.

    PubMed Central

    Korade-Mirnics, Z; Babitzke, P; Hoffman, E

    1998-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of adult onset muscular dystrophy, with an incidence of approximately 1 in 8500 adults. DM is caused by an expanded number of trinucleotide repeats in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (DM protein kinase, DMPK). Although a large number of transgenic animals have been generated with different gene constructions and knock-outs, none of them faithfully recapitulates the multisystemic and often severe phenotype seen in human patients. The transgenic data suggest that myotonic dystrophy is not caused simply by a biochemical deficiency or abnormality in the DM kinase gene product. Emerging studies suggest that two novel pathogenetic mechanisms may play a role in the disease: the expanded repeats appear to cause haploinsufficiency of a neighboring homeobox gene and also abnormal DMPK RNA appears to have a detrimental effect on RNA homeostasis. The complex, multisystemic phenotype may reflect an underlying multifaceted molecular pathophysiology: the facial dysmorphology may be due to pattern defects caused by haploinsufficiency of the homeobox gene, while the muscle disease and endocrine abnormalities may be due to both altered RNA metabolism and deficiency of the cAMP DMPK protein. PMID:9490778

  11. Respiratory dysfunction in unsedated dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    DeVanna, Justin C; Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Dow, Jennifer L; Hawkins, Eleanor C

    2014-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a mild phenotype of GRMD and 11 age-matched carriers were compared. Arterial blood gas analysis was successfully performed in all dogs, spirometry in 21 of 22 (95%) dogs, and RIP in 18 of 20 (90%) dogs. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration were higher in GRMD dogs. Tidal breathing peak expiratory flows were markedly higher in GRMD dogs. Abnormal abdominal motion was present in 7 of 10 (70%) GRMD dogs. Each technique provided objective, quantifiable measures that will be useful for monitoring respiratory function in GRMD dogs during clinical trials while avoiding the influence of sedation on results. Increased expiratory flows and the pattern of abdominal breathing are novel findings, not reported in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and might be a consequence of hyperinflation. PMID:24295812

  12. Cardiac involvement in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Papavasiliou, Antigoni; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) are X-linked muscular diseases responsible for over 80% of all muscular dystrophies. Cardiac disease is a common manifestation, not necessarily related to the degree of skeletal myopathy; it may be the predominant manifestation with or without any other evidence of muscular disease. Death is usually due to ventricular dysfunction, heart block or malignant arrhythmias. Not only DMD/BMD patients, but also female carriers may present cardiac involvement. Clinically overt heart failure in dystrophinopathies may be delayed or absent, due to relative physical inactivity. The commonest electrocardiographic findings include conduction defects, arrhythmias (supraventricular or ventricular), hypertrophy and evidence of myocardial necrosis. Echocardiography can assess a marked variability of left ventricular dysfunction, independently of age of onset or mutation groups. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has documented a pattern of epicardial fibrosis in both dystrophinopathies’ patients and carriers that can be observed even if overt muscular disease is absent. Recently, new CMR techniques, such as postcontrast myocardial T1 mapping, have been used in Duchenne muscular dystrophy to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis. A combined approach using clinical assessment and CMR evaluation may motivate early cardioprotective treatment in both patients and asymptomatic carriers and delay the development of serious cardiac complications. PMID:26225202

  13. Degeneration of neuromuscular junction in age and dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Rüdiger; Khan, Muzamil Majid; Labeit, Siegfried; Deschenes, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Functional denervation is a hallmark of aging sarcopenia as well as of muscular dystrophy. It is thought to be a major factor reducing skeletal muscle mass, particularly in the case of sarcopenia. Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) serve as the interface between the nervous and skeletal muscular systems, and thus they may receive pathophysiological input of both pre- and post-synaptic origin. Consequently, NMJs are good indicators of motor health on a systemic level. Indeed, upon sarcopenia and dystrophy, NMJs morphologically deteriorate and exhibit altered characteristics of primary signaling molecules, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and agrin. Since a remarkable reversibility of these changes can be observed by exercise, there is significant interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic deterioration upon aging and dystrophy and how synapses are reset by the aforementioned treatments. Here, we review the literature that describes the phenomena observed at the NMJ in sarcopenic and dystrophic muscle as well as to how these alterations can be reversed and to what extent. In a second part, the current information about molecular machineries underlying these processes is reported. PMID:24904412

  14. Degeneration of Neuromuscular Junction in Age and Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Rüdiger; Khan, Muzamil Majid; Labeit, Siegfried; Deschenes, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Functional denervation is a hallmark of aging sarcopenia as well as of muscular dystrophy. It is thought to be a major factor reducing skeletal muscle mass, particularly in the case of sarcopenia. Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) serve as the interface between the nervous and skeletal muscular systems, and thus they may receive pathophysiological input of both pre- and post-synaptic origin. Consequently, NMJs are good indicators of motor health on a systemic level. Indeed, upon sarcopenia and dystrophy, NMJs morphologically deteriorate and exhibit altered characteristics of primary signaling molecules, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and agrin. Since a remarkable reversibility of these changes can be observed by exercise, there is significant interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic deterioration upon aging and dystrophy and how synapses are reset by the aforementioned treatments. Here, we review the literature that describes the phenomena observed at the NMJ in sarcopenic and dystrophic muscle as well as to how these alterations can be reversed and to what extent. In a second part, the current information about molecular machineries underlying these processes is reported. PMID:24904412

  15. RESPIRATORY DYSFUNCTION IN UNSEDATED DOGS WITH GOLDEN RETRIEVER MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    DeVanna, Justin C.; Kornegay, Joe N.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Bogan, Janet R.; Dow, Jennifer L.; Hawkins, Eleanor C.

    2013-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a mild phenotype of GRMD and 11 age-matched carriers were compared. Arterial blood gas analysis was successfully performed in all dogs, spirometry in 21 of 22 (95%) dogs, and RIP in 18 of 20 (90%) dogs. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration were higher in GRMD dogs. Tidal breathing peak expiratory flows were markedly higher in GRMD dogs. Abnormal abdominal motion was present in 7 of 10 (70%) GRMD dogs. Each technique provided objective, quantifiable measures that will be useful for monitoring respiratory function in GRMD dogs during clinical trials while avoiding the influence of sedation on results. Increased expiratory flows and the pattern of abdominal breathing are novel findings, not reported in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and might be a consequence of hyperinflation. PMID:24295812

  16. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J; Smits, Melinda M; Ng, Brandon H; Pospisil, Tyler C; Jones, Kayla S; Campbell, Kevin P; Wright, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  17. Myotonic dystrophy as a cause of colonic pseudoobstruction: not just another constipated child

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Andrea M; Johnston, Jennifer H; Gleason, Wallace A; Rhoads, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Muscular dystrophy has been traditionally associated with common gastrointestinal symptoms such as reflux, constipation, and dysphasia. In myotonic dystrophy, there are rare reports of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPOS). We herein present a case of CIPOS requiring colectomy and with good results. PMID:26185641

  18. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  19. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  20. Amelioration of Muscular Dystrophy by Transgenic Expression of Niemann-Pick C1

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Michelle S.; Adams, Marvin E.; Tesch, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and other types of muscular dystrophies are caused by the loss or alteration of different members of the dystrophin protein complex. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which dystrophin-associated protein abnormalities contribute to the onset of muscular dystrophy may identify new therapeutic approaches to these human disorders. By examining gene expression alterations in mouse skeletal muscle lacking α-dystrobrevin (Dtna−/−), we identified a highly significant reduction of the cholesterol trafficking protein, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). Mutations in NPC1 cause a progressive neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder. Transgenic expression of NPC1 in skeletal muscle ameliorates muscular dystrophy in the Dtna−/− mouse (which has a relatively mild dystrophic phenotype) and in the mdx mouse, a model for DMD. These results identify a new compensatory gene for muscular dystrophy and reveal a potential new therapeutic target for DMD. PMID:18946078

  1. Segmental myofiber necrosis in myotonic dystrophy - An immunoperoxidase study of immunoglobulins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Banerjee, D.; Hudson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because serum immunoglobulin G levels are low in patients with myotonic dystrophy, it was hypothesized that it might be catabolized within abnormal muscle fibers. Accordingly, immunohistochemical stains for immunoglobulins were performed on muscle sections derived at biopsy or autopsy from patients with myotonic dystrophy, other forms of muscular dystrophy, nondystrophic muscle disease, or normal muscle. Positive staining for immunoglobulins was found only in necrotic segments of myofibers (in 7 of 19 dystrophic and 6 of 27 nondystrophic subjects), and it is believed that the staining was due to nonspecific diffusion. However, staining reactions distinguished between incipient necrosis and artifactual contraction bands and allowed us to study segmental myofiber necrosis, comparing its frequency in the various muscle diseases. Segmental myofiber necrosis was present in 4 of 16 cases of myotonic dystrophy. The relevance of this finding to the clinical and morphologic features of myotonic dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6351629

  2. [Calpain-3 gene defect causing limb gird muscular dystrophy in a Hungarian family].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Rita; Walter, Maggie C; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hübner, Angela; Karcagi, Veronika; Pikó, Henriett; Timár, László; Komoly, Sámuel

    2005-01-20

    Limb gird muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary diseases with autosomal recessive trait, characterized by progressive atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limb muscles. The authors present clinical, histological, immunohistochemical and immunoblot results of two sisters suffering from so far unclassified autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Haplotype analysis for genes possibly involved in autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies was performed in the genetically informative family. All of the results pointed to a molecular genetic defect of the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. Direct sequencing of the CAPN3 gene revealed compound heterozygous state for two mutations previously described in association with limb girdle muscular dystrophy, proving pathogenicity. The authors would like to emphasize the importance of the above described combined strategy in diagnosing limb girdle muscular dystrophies. PMID:15884399

  3. New aspects on patients affected by dysferlin deficient muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Lars; Aboumousa, Ahmed; Eagle, Michelle; Hudson, Judith; Sarkozy, Anna; Vita, Gianluca; Charlton, Richard; Roberts, Mark; Straub, Volker; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene lead to limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy and distal anterior compartment myopathy. A cohort of 36 patients affected by dysferlinopathy is described, in the first UK study of clinical, genetic, pathological and biochemical data. The diagnosis was established by reduction of dysferlin in the muscle biopsy and subsequent mutational analysis of the dysferlin gene. Seventeen mutations were novel; the majority of mutations were small deletions/insertions, and no mutational hotspots were identified. Sixty-one per cent of patients (22 patients) initially presented with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, 31% (11 patients) with a Miyoshi phenotype, one patient with proximodistal mode of onset, one patient with muscle stiffness after exercise and one patient as a symptomatic carrier. A wider range of age of onset was noted than previously reported, with 25% of patients having first symptoms before the age of 13 years. Independent of the initial mode of presentation, in our cohort of patients the gastrocnemius muscle was the most severely affected muscle leading to an inability to stand on tiptoes, and lower limbs were affected more severely than upper limbs. As previous anecdotal evidence on patients affected by dysferlinopathy suggests good muscle prowess before onset of symptoms, we also investigated pre-symptomatic fitness levels of the patients. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were very active and sporty before the onset of symptoms which makes the clinical course of dysferlinopathy unusual within the different forms of muscular dystrophy and provides a challenge to understanding the underlying pathomechanisms in this disease. PMID:19528035

  4. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: an enigmatic improvement with spinal manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, James

    2000-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) or complex regional pain syndrome, is an extremely painful and disabling condition commonly seen following trauma. Its early recognition and treatment is most critical for a favorable prognosis. Although its diagnosis and treatments vary, neuroblockade is the treatment of choice. Very little has been reported in the literature in regards to manipulation as an early treatment modality to improve joint mobility and reduce pain and future disability. This case report reviews one case presentation of RSD where dramatic results followed cervical spine manipulation.

  5. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim; Hemati, Karim

    2015-05-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. PMID:26155505

  6. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. PMID:26155505

  7. Negative expansion of the myotonic dystrophy unstable sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Abeliovich, D; Lerer, I; Pashut-Lavon, I; Shmueli, E; Raas-Rothschild, A; Frydman, M

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the unstable fragment of the myotonic dystrophy (DM) gene in a pregnancy at 50% risk for DM. The affected father in this family had a 3.0-kb expansion of the DM unstable region. The fetus inherited the mutated gene, but with an expansion of 0.5 kb. This case represented a counseling problem in light of the absence of data concerning "negative expansion." Analysis of the DM gene in 17 families with 72 affected individuals revealed four more cases of negative expansions, all of them in paternal transmissions. The possible significance of this finding is discussed. Images Figure 2 PMID:8503449

  8. Bone scintigraphy in the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kozin, F.; Soin, J.S.; Ryan, L.M.; Carrera, G.F.; Wortmann, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients were studied for possible reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS). They were divided into five groups, based upon specific clinical criteria, and the radiographic and scintigraphic findings in each group were examined. Osteoporosis was the most common radiographic abnormality. Scintigraphic abnormalities were noted in 60% of RSDS patients but in only 7% of the others. These findings included increased blood flow and enhanced periarticular radionuclide activity in the affected extremity. The scan may reflect an active, potentially reversible disorder of local blood flow in RSDS. Furthermore, the scintigraphic patterns may be useful in the diagnosis and in predicting which patients are likely to respond to systemic steroid therapy.

  9. Complications of sodium hydroxide chemical matrixectomy: nail dystrophy, allodynia, hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bostancı, Seher; Koçyiğit, Pelin; Güngör, Hilayda Karakök; Parlak, Nehir

    2014-11-01

    Ingrown toenails are seen most commonly in young adults, and they can seriously affect daily life. Partial nail avulsion with chemical matrixectomy, generally by using either sodium hydroxide or phenol, is one of the most effective treatment methods. Known complications of phenol matrixectomy are unpredictable tissue damage, prolonged postoperative drainage, increased secondary infection rates, periostitis, and poor cosmetic results. To our knowledge, there have been no reports about the complications related to sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. Herein, we describe three patients who developed nail dystrophy, allodynia, and hyperalgesia after sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. PMID:25514278

  10. Familial amyloidosis with cranial neuropathy and corneal lattice dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, G; Galassi, G; Kamieniecka, Z; Schlaeger, J; Trojaborg, W

    1979-01-01

    Five siblings of a Danish family with slowly progressive involvement of the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves beginning at the age of 55-65 years were examined. All had asymptomatic corneal lattice dystrophy. Clinical and electrophysiological investigations also showed evidence of slight neurogenic involvement of the limbs. Conduction velocity along sensory nerves was normal but amplitude of sensory potentials was severely reduced suggesting an axonal affection which was confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The neuropathy was secondary to amyloidosis revealed by skin and sural nerve biopsies. Images PMID:228009

  11. Cell and gene therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J E

    1994-02-01

    Experiments in mice have supported the idea of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by implanting normal muscle precursor cells into dystrophin-deficient muscles. However, similar experiments on DMD patients have had little success. Gene therapy for DMD, by introducing dystrophin constructs via retroviral or adenoviral vectors, has been shown to be possible in the mouse, but the efficiency and safety aspects of this technique will have to be carefully examined before similar experiments can be attempted in man. Direct injection of dystrophin cDNA constructs into mdx muscles has given rise to very low levels of dystrophin and this may be a possibility for the treatment of heart muscle. PMID:7514447

  12. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most promising methods for restoration of dystrophin expression. This approach has been tested extensively targeting different exons in numerous models both in vitro and in vivo. During the past 10 years, there has been a considerable progress by using DMD animal models involving three types of antisense oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA). PMID:21686247

  13. [Dystrophy and necrosis following radiotherapy for maxillary cancer (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bertoin, P; Dutou, L; Lacroze, M; Bailly, C

    1979-01-01

    About 10% of patients developed severe sequelae following radiotherapy, which had been associated with surgical treatment, even though they were, or appeared to be cured. Complications affected the skin and soft tissues (causing skin retraction, loss of substance, and sometimes trismus) and bone (necrosis required surgical treatment, and when there was associated cutaneous dystrophy, resulted in exposure of the bone and severe functional and esthetic problems). A critical study of the radiotherapeutic techniques used suggests that the dose given should be reduced, the fields modified, and Cobalt used in preference to electrons in most cases. PMID:288159

  14. Corticosteroid Treatment Impact on Spinal Deformity in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Traina, Francesco; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease with loss of ambulation at around 9-10 years of age, followed, if untreated, by development of scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, and death in the second decade of life. This review highlights the natural history of the disease, in particular, with regard to the development of the spinal deformity and how this complication has been modified by surgical interventions and overall by corticosteroid treatment. The beneficial effect of corticosteroids may have also an impact on the clinical trial design of the new emerging causative therapies.

  15. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-11-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium.

  16. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes: First-reported cohort from northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Omar Abdulmonem; Jiang, Xinmei; Zhang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The relative frequencies of different subtypes of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies vary widely among different populations. We estimated the percentage of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes in Chinese people based on 68 patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy from the Myology Clinic, Neurology Department, First Hospital of Jilin University, China. A diagnosis of calpainopathy was made in 12 cases (17%), and dysferlin deficiency in 10 cases (15%). Two biopsies revealed α-sarcoglycan deficiency (3%), and two others revealed a lack of caveolin-3 (3%). A diagnosis of unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy was made in the remaining patients (62%). The appearances of calpain 3- and dysferlin-deficient biopsies were similar, though rimmed vacuoles were unique to dysferlinopathy, while inflammatory infiltrates were present in both these limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D biopsies. Macrophages were detected in seven dysferlinopathy biopsies. The results of this study suggest that the distribution of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes in the Han Chinese population is similar to that reported in the West. The less necrotic, regenerating and inflammatory appearance of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but with more lobulated fibers, supports the idea that calpainopathy is a less active, but more chronic disease than dysferlinopathy. Unusual features indicated an extended limb-girdle muscular dystrophy disease spectrum. The use of acid phosphatase stain should be considered in suspected dysferlinopathies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to define the relative proportions of the various forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in China, based on protein testing. PMID:25206500

  17. [Central Nervous Involvement in Patients with Fukuyama Congenital Muscular Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Keiko

    2016-02-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common muscular dystrophy in the Japanese population, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the fukutin (FKTN) gene. The main features of FCMD are a combination of infantile-onset hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, eye abnormalities and central nervous system involvement with mental retardation and seizures associated with cortical migration defects. The FKTN gene product is thought to be necessary for maintaining migrating neurons in an immature state during migration, and for supporting migration via α-dystroglycan in the central nervous system. Typical magnetic resonance imaging findings in FCMD patients are cobblestone lissencephaly and cerebellar cystic lesions. White matter abnormalities with hyperintensity on T(2)-weighted images are seen especially in younger patients and those with severe phenotypes. Most FCMD patients are mentally retarded and the level is moderate to severe, with IQs ranging from 30 to 50. In our recent study, 62% of patients developed seizures. Among them, 71% had only febrile seizures, 6% had afebrile seizures from the onset, and 22% developed afebrile seizures following febrile seizures. Most patients had seizures that were controllable with just 1 type of antiepileptic drug, but 18% had intractable seizures that must be treated with 3 medications. PMID:26873231

  18. A personal overview of causalgia and other reflex dystrophies.

    PubMed Central

    Shumacker, H B

    1985-01-01

    This is a personal assessment of true major causalgia and the other reflex dystrophies, related but distinctly separate entities. The clinical picture of causalgia differs only in minor respects from that described by Mitchell over 120 years ago. Its management has, however, been clarified, largely through the extensive experiences of World War II. It is readily recognized and can be treated effectively by sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy together with active exercise. The other reflex dystrophies are far less understood. They appear to have a similar pattern in their early phase and to respond well to a program of exercise and control of edema--a regimen which, because of pain and paresis, cannot be carried out without sympathetic blocks or occasionally sympathectomy. When not recognized early and treated properly, the sympatomatology usually changes dramatically and treatment differs. Often control of edema and active use of the affected part are all that is necessary. Sometimes, in addition to these measures, sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy is required. Guidelines found useful in management are outlined. Puzzling features are discussed. PMID:3977427

  19. Understanding the impact of genetic testing for inherited retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Combs, Ryan; McAllister, Marion; Payne, Katherine; Lowndes, Jo; Devery, Sophie; Webster, Andrew R; Downes, Susan M; Moore, Anthony T; Ramsden, Simon; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina

    2013-11-01

    The capability of genetic technologies is expanding rapidly in the field of inherited eye disease. New genetic testing approaches will deliver a step change in the ability to diagnose and extend the possibility of targeted treatments. However, evidence is lacking about the benefits of genetic testing to support service planning. Here, we report qualitative data about retinal dystrophy families' experiences of genetic testing in United Kingdom. The data were part of a wider study examining genetic eye service provision. Twenty interviewees from families in which a causative mutation had been identified by a genetic eye clinic were recruited to the study. Fourteen interviewees had chosen to have a genetic test and five had not; one was uncertain. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted allowing a thorough exploration of interviewees' views and experiences of the benefits of genetic counselling and testing. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Both affected and unaffected interviewees expressed mainly positive views about genetic testing, highlighting benefits such as diagnostic confirmation, risk information, and better preparation for the future. Negative consequences included the burden of knowledge, moral dilemmas around reproduction, and potential impact on insurance. The offer of genetic testing was often taken up, but was felt unnecessary in some cases. Interviewees in the study reported many benefits, suggesting genetic testing should be available to this patient group. The benefits and risks identified will inform future evaluation of models of service delivery. This research was part of a wider study exploring experiences of families with retinal dystrophy. PMID:23403902

  20. Nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, James G; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) that occurs in dystrophic muscle is the basis of numerous, complex and interacting features of the dystrophic pathology that affect not only muscle itself, but also influence the interaction of muscle with other tissues. Many mechanisms through which nNOS deficiency contributes to misregulation of muscle development, blood flow, fatigue, inflammation and fibrosis in dystrophic muscle have been identified, suggesting that normalization in NO production could greatly attenuate diverse aspects of the pathology of muscular dystrophy through multiple regulatory pathways. However, the relative importance of the loss of nNOS from the sarcolemma versus the importance of loss of total nNOS from dystrophic muscle remains unknown. Although most current evidence indicates that nNOS localization at the sarcolemma is not required to achieve NO-mediated reductions of pathology in muscular dystrophy, the question remains open concerning whether membrane localization would provide a more efficient rescue from features of the dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25194047

  1. Pathways Implicated in Tadalafil Amelioration of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    De Arcangelis, Valeria; Strimpakos, Georgios; Gabanella, Francesca; Corbi, Nicoletta; Luvisetto, Siro; Magrelli, Armando; Onori, Annalisa; Passananti, Claudio; Pisani, Cinzia; Rome, Sophie; Severini, Cinzia; Naro, Fabio; Mattei, Elisabetta; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Monaco, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic approaches for Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and BMD), the most common X-linked muscle degenerative disease, have been proposed. So far, the only one showing a clear beneficial effect is the use of corticosteroids. Recent evidence indicates an improvement of dystrophic cardiac and skeletal muscles in the presence of sustained cGMP levels secondary to a blocking of their degradation by phosphodiesterase five (PDE5). Due to these data, we performed a study to investigate the effect of the specific PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, on dystrophic skeletal muscle function. Chronic pharmacological treatment with tadalafil has been carried out in mdx mice. Behavioral and physiological tests, as well as histological and biochemical analyses, confirmed the efficacy of the therapy. We then performed a microarray-based genomic analysis to assess the pattern of gene expression in muscle samples obtained from the different cohorts of animals treated with tadalafil. This scrutiny allowed us to identify several classes of modulated genes. Our results show that PDE5 inhibition can ameliorate dystrophy by acting at different levels. Tadalafil can lead to (1) increased lipid metabolism; (2) a switch towards slow oxidative fibers driven by the up-regulation of PGC-1α; (3) an increased protein synthesis efficiency; (4) a better actin network organization at Z-disk. PMID:26097015

  2. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. ); Shokeir, M. )

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  3. A personal overview of causalgia and other reflex dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B

    1985-03-01

    This is a personal assessment of true major causalgia and the other reflex dystrophies, related but distinctly separate entities. The clinical picture of causalgia differs only in minor respects from that described by Mitchell over 120 years ago. Its management has, however, been clarified, largely through the extensive experiences of World War II. It is readily recognized and can be treated effectively by sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy together with active exercise. The other reflex dystrophies are far less understood. They appear to have a similar pattern in their early phase and to respond well to a program of exercise and control of edema--a regimen which, because of pain and paresis, cannot be carried out without sympathetic blocks or occasionally sympathectomy. When not recognized early and treated properly, the sympatomatology usually changes dramatically and treatment differs. Often control of edema and active use of the affected part are all that is necessary. Sometimes, in addition to these measures, sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy is required. Guidelines found useful in management are outlined. Puzzling features are discussed. PMID:3977427

  4. Congenital myotonic dystrophy: molecular diagnosis and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Hojo, K; Yamagata, H; Moji, H; Fujita, T; Miki, T; Fujimura, M; Kidoguchi, K

    1995-05-01

    Recently, an unstable DNA fragment specific to myotonic dystrophy (MyD) was discovered. In affected individuals, a DNA fragment is found that is larger than in normal siblings. Our objectives were to show whether the results of DNA analysis agree with the disease severity and prognosis in congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMyD) by DNA analysis. We investigated three pregnancies (two studied retrospectively) in three families. We genotyped the family members with the Southern blots and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In one case a prenatal diagnosis was carried out using chorionic villus sampling. This report also presents the three cases of affected mothers and CMyD babies with their growth courses. We clarify four main problems in CMyD, namely, respiratory distress, delayed motor development, feeding difficulty, and delayed mental development. The allele size in the range of 10 to 13 kb tended to be present as the adult form of MyD, and 14 to 15 kb as the CMyD. The three CMyD cases whose alleles size in the range of 14 to 15 kb showed various forms of disease and prognosis. We reached the following conclusions: the disease severity and prognosis in babies with CMyD did not correlate with the result of DNA analysis. The DNA analysis is a useful test for prenatal diagnosis. However, it is impossible to predict the disease severity and prognosis in babies with CMyD. PMID:7612095

  5. Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and Generalized Epilepsy Caused by GMPPB Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Alya R.; Couthouis, Julien; Sakamuri, Sarada; Siskind, Carly; Vogel, Hannes; Day, John W.; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha-dystroglycanopathies are genetically heterogeneous muscular dystrophies that result from hypoglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (α-DG). Alpha-dystroglycan is an essential link between the extracellular matrix and the muscle fiber sarcolemma, and proper glycosylation is critical for its ability to bind to ligands in the extracellular matrix. We sought to identify the genetic basis of alpha-dystroglycanopathy in a family wherein the affected individuals presented with congenital muscular dystrophy, brain abnormalities and generalized epilepsy. We performed whole exome sequencing and identified compound heterozygous GMPPB mutations in the affected children. GMPPB is an enzyme in the glycosylation pathway, and GMPPB mutation were recently linked to eight cases of alpha-dystroglycanopathy with a range of symptoms. We identified a novel mutation in GMPPB (p.I219T) as well as a previously published mutation (p.R287Q). Thus, our work further confirms a role for GMPPB defects in alpha-dystroglycanopathy, and suggests that glycosylation may play a role in the neuronal membrane channels or networks involved in the physiology of generalized epilepsy syndromes. PMID:24780531

  6. Dexmedetomidine and fentanyl combination for procedural sedation in a case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amarjit; Kapoor, Vinod

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, is the most common muscular dystrophy among children leading to death before the end of third decade. Anesthesia in such patients pose a great challenge due to various complications associated with it. The dreaded metabolic and clinical complications occur due to various inhalational anesthetics and succinylcholine in this subset of patients. We are reporting a child with diagnosed Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent excision of dentigerous cyst in oral cavity under procedural sedation with combination of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl and thus administration of general anesthesia was avoided. PMID:25885395

  7. A Rare Case Report of Neurodegenerative Disease: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Two Male Siblings.

    PubMed

    Suneja, B; Suneja, E S; Adlakha, V K; Chandna, P

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an recessive X-linked mediated, musculoskeletal disorder that affects only males. It is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy where there is failure to manufacture dystrophin. Clinically, it is characterized by progressive muscle wasting eventually leading to premature death. This case report describes the genetic, oral and systemic findings in two cases of DMD in male siblings. How to cite this article: Suneja B, Suneja ES, Adlakha VK, Chandna P. A Rare Case Report of Neurodegenerative Disease: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Two Male Siblings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):163-165. PMID:26379389

  8. A Rare Case Report of Neurodegenerative Disease: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Two Male Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Suneja, B; Suneja, ES; Chandna, P

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an recessive X-linked mediated, musculoskeletal disorder that affects only males. It is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy where there is failure to manufacture dystrophin. Clinically, it is characterized by progressive muscle wasting eventually leading to premature death. This case report describes the genetic, oral and systemic findings in two cases of DMD in male siblings. How to cite this article: Suneja B, Suneja ES, Adlakha VK, Chandna P. A Rare Case Report of Neurodegenerative Disease: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Two Male Siblings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):163-165. PMID:26379389

  9. The Intriguing Regulators of Muscle Mass in Sarcopenia and Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Kunihiro; Aoi, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of muscle have led to new interest in the pharmacological treatment of muscle wasting. Loss of muscle mass and increased intramuscular fibrosis occur in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. Several regulators (mammalian target of rapamycin, serum response factor, atrogin-1, myostatin, etc.) seem to modulate protein synthesis and degradation or transcription of muscle-specific genes during both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. This review provides an overview of the adaptive changes in several regulators of muscle mass in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25221510

  10. A review of 18p deletions.

    PubMed

    Hasi-Zogaj, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Heard, Patricia; Carter, Erika; Soileau, Bridgette; Hill, Annice; Rupert, David; Perry, Brian; Atkinson, Sidney; O'Donnell, Louise; Gelfond, Jon; Lancaster, Jack; Fox, Peter T; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-09-01

    Since 18p- was first described in 1963, much progress has been made in our understanding of this classic deletion condition. We have been able to establish a fairly complete picture of the phenotype when the deletion breakpoint occurs at the centromere, and we are working to establish the phenotypic effects when each gene on 18p is hemizygous. Our aim is to provide genotype-specific anticipatory guidance and recommendations to families with an 18p- diagnosis. In addition, establishing the molecular underpinnings of the condition will potentially suggest targets for molecular treatments. Thus, the next step is to establish the precise effects of specific gene deletions. As we look forward to deepening our understanding of 18p-, our focus will continue to be on the establishment of robust genotype-phenotype correlations and the penetrance of these phenotypes. We will continue to follow our 18p- cohort closely as they age to determine the presence or absence of some of these diagnoses, including spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and dystonia. We will also continue to refine the critical regions for other phenotypes as we enroll additional (hopefully informative) participants into the research study and as the mechanisms of the genes in these regions are elucidated. Mouse models will also be developed to further our understanding of the effects of hemizygosity as well as to serve as models for treatment development. PMID:26250845

  11. Is muscle spindle proprioceptive function spared in muscular dystrophies? A muscle tendon vibration study.

    PubMed

    Ribot-Ciscar, Edith; Tréfouret, Sylvie; Aimonetti, Jean-Marc; Attarian, Shahram; Pouget, Jean; Roll, Jean-Pierre

    2004-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are characterized by the degeneration of skeletal muscle fibers. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the intrafusal fibers of muscle spindles are also affected in MD. The functional integrity of muscle spindles was tested by analyzing their involvement in the perception of body segment movements and in the control of posture. Twenty MD patients (4 with dystrophinopathy, 5 with myotonic dystrophies, 5 with fascioscapulohumeral MD, and 6 with limb-girdle dystrophies) and 10 healthy subjects participated in the study. The MD patients perceived passive movements and experienced illusory movements similar to those perceived by healthy subjects in terms of their direction and velocity. Vibratory stimulation applied to the neck and ankle muscle tendons induced postural responses in MD patients with spatial and temporal characteristics similar to those produced by healthy subjects. These results suggest that the proprioceptive function of muscle spindles is spared in muscular dystrophies. PMID:15170619

  12. Stakeholder cooperation to overcome challenges in orphan medicine development: the example of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Volker; Balabanov, Pavel; Bushby, Kate; Ensini, Monica; Goemans, Nathalie; De Luca, Annamaria; Pereda, Alejandra; Hemmings, Robert; Campion, Giles; Kaye, Edward; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Niks, Erik; Veldhuizen, Olav; Furlong, Pat; Stoyanova-Beninska, Violeta; Wood, Matthew J; Johnson, Alex; Mercuri, Eugenio; Muntoni, Francesco; Sepodes, Bruno; Haas, Manuel; Vroom, Elizabeth; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2016-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a rare, progressive, muscle-wasting disease leading to severe disability and premature death. Treatment is currently symptomatic, but several experimental therapies are in development. Implemented care standards, validated outcome measures correlating with clinical benefit, and comprehensive information about the natural history of the disease are essential for regulatory approval of any treatment. However, for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other rare diseases, these requirements are not always in place when potential therapies enter the clinical trial phase. A cooperative effort of stakeholders in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-including representatives from patients' groups, academia, industry, and regulatory agencies-is aimed at addressing this shortfall by identifying strategies to overcome challenges, developing the tools needed, and collecting relevant data. An open and constructive dialogue among European stakeholders has positively affected development of treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy; this approach could serve as a paradigm for development of treatments for rare diseases in general. PMID:27302365

  13. [Reflex dystrophy following so-called whiplash injury of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Bühring, M

    1984-01-01

    In bad cases of whiplash injury of the cervical spine the post-accidental course is complicated by pain, vegetative dysfunctional syndromes and by psychic and psychiatric disorders over many years. There is no satisfactory concept to understand the pathophysiology of these processes. The paper deals with the possibility of a reflex dystrophy. Sympathetic reflex dystrophy syndromes are seen principally in patients with joint, tendon or vascular lesions. In case of whiplash injury, it would concern the cervical spine itself as well as visceral organs including the central nervous system. For the CNS the lymphostatic encephalopathy is a well defined entity. Above all, a reflex dystrophy develops on the basis of a special personality structure. In case of psychic and psychiatric complaints after whiplash injury patients with a so called Sudeck-personality should not be suspected to aggravate; in contrast, especially in these patients complications by reflex dystrophy are credible. Consequences for the assessment and for rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:6475217

  14. Imperatives for DUCHENNE MD: a Simplified Guide to Comprehensive Care for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kinnett, Kathi; Rodger, Sunil; Vroom, Elizabeth; Furlong, Pat; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Bushby, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, life-limiting muscle-wasting disease. Although no curative treatment is yet available, comprehensive multidisciplinary care has increased life expectancy significantly in recent decades. An international consensus care publication in 2010 outlined best-practice care, which includes corticosteroid treatment, respiratory, cardiac, orthopedic and rehabilitative interventions to address disease manifestations. While disease specialists are largely aware of these care standards, local physicians responsible for the day-to-day care of patients and families may be less familiar. To facilitate optimal care, a one-page document has been generated from published care recommendations, summarizing the key elements of comprehensive care for people living with DMD ("Imperatives for Duchenne muscular dystrophy). This document was developed through an international collaboration between Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD), United Parent Projects Muscular Dystrophy (UPPMD) and TREAT-NMD. PMID:26331093

  15. Imperatives for DUCHENNE MD: a Simplified Guide to Comprehensive Care for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kinnett, Kathi; Rodger, Sunil; Vroom, Elizabeth; Furlong, Pat; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Bushby, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, life-limiting muscle-wasting disease. Although no curative treatment is yet available, comprehensive multidisciplinary care has increased life expectancy significantly in recent decades. An international consensus care publication in 2010 outlined best-practice care, which includes corticosteroid treatment, respiratory, cardiac, orthopedic and rehabilitative interventions to address disease manifestations. While disease specialists are largely aware of these care standards, local physicians responsible for the day-to-day care of patients and families may be less familiar. To facilitate optimal care, a one-page document has been generated from published care recommendations, summarizing the key elements of comprehensive care for people living with DMD (“Imperatives for Duchenne muscular dystrophy). This document was developed through an international collaboration between Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD), United Parent Projects Muscular Dystrophy (UPPMD) and TREAT-NMD.  PMID:26331093

  16. Defective (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.E.; Norris, B.J.; Brooke, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation. (1-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

  17. Back pain in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: steroids are not always the culprit.

    PubMed

    Segal, Lee S; Odgers, Ryan; Carpentieri, David; Shrader, M Wade

    2016-01-01

    We report on a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy on prolonged corticosteroid treatment who presented with back pain and was subsequently found to have a monostotic fibrous dysplasia lesion of the spine. It is the intent of this case report to emphasize the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for other potential causes of back pain in Duchenne muscular dystrophy besides vertebral compression fractures. PMID:25714938

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophies: Characteristics of Users and Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Romitti, Paul A.; Conway, Kristin M.; Andrews, Jennifer; Liu, Ke; Meaney, F. John; Street, Natalie; Puzhankara, Soman; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Matthews, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complementary and alternative medicine is frequently used in the management of chronic pediatric diseases, but little is known about its use by those with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy. METHODS Complementary and alternative medicine use by male patients with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy and associations with characteristics of male patients and their caregivers were examined through interviews with 362 primary caregivers identified from the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network. RESULTS Overall, 272 of the 362 (75.1%) primary caregivers reported that they had used any complementary and alternative medicine for the oldest Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network male in their family. The most commonly reported therapies were from the mind-body medicine domain (61.0%) followed by those from the biologically based practice (39.2%), manipulative and body-based practice (29.3%), and whole medical system (6.9%) domains. Aquatherapy, prayer and/or blessing, special diet, and massage were the most frequently used therapies. Compared with nonusers, male patients who used any therapy were more likely to have an early onset of symptoms and use a wheel chair; their caregivers were more likely to be non-Hispanic white. Among domains, associations were observed with caregiver education and family income (mind-body medicines [excluding prayer and/or blessing only] and whole medical systems) and Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network site (biologically based practices and mind-body medicines [excluding prayer and/or blessing only]). CONCLUSIONS Complementary and alternative medicine use was common in the management of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies among Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network males. This widespread use suggests further study to evaluate the efficacy of integrating complementary and alternative medicine into treatment regimens for

  19. Decreased Insulin Receptors but Normal Glucose Metabolism in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pirro, Roberto; Lauro, Renato; Testa, Ivano; Ferretti, Ginofabrizio; de Martinis, Carlo; Dellantonio, Renzo

    1982-04-01

    Compared to matched controls, 17 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy showed decreased insulin binding to monocytes due to decreased receptor concentration. These patients showed no signs of altered glucose metabolism and retrospective analysis of the clinical records of a further 56 such patients revealed no modification in carbohydrate metabolism. These data suggest that reduced insulin receptor number does not produce overt modifications of glucose metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  20. Bethlem myopathy is not allelic to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Yamaoka, L.H.; Stajich, J.; Lewis, K.

    1995-08-28

    The Bethlem myopathy, an autosomal-dominant myopathy, shows a distribution of proximal muscle weakness similar to that observed in dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Yet the Bethlem myopathy differs from most limb-girdle dystrophies in two important regards. First, the Bethlem myopathy presents with joint contractures most commonly observed at the elbows, ankles, and neck. Secondly, disease onset in the Bethlem myopathy is in early childhood, while most dominant LGMDs present with adult onset. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz: an inversion disrupts the DMD and RPGR genes.

    PubMed

    Atencia-Fernandez, Sabela; Shiel, Robert E; Mooney, Carmel T; Nolan, Catherine M

    2015-04-01

    An X-linked muscular dystrophy, with deficiency of full-length dystrophin and expression of a low molecular weight dystrophin-related protein, has been described in Japanese Spitz dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation and develop a specific test to identify affected cases and carrier animals. Gene expression studies in skeletal muscle of an affected animal indicated aberrant expression of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (dystrophin) gene and an anomaly in intron 19 of the gene. Genome-walking experiments revealed an inversion that interrupts two genes on the X chromosome, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene and the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene. All clinically affected dogs and obligate carriers that were tested had the mutant chromosome, and it is concluded that the inversion is the causative mutation for X-linked muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz breed. A PCR assay that amplifies mutant and wild-type alleles was developed and proved capable of identifying affected and carrier individuals. Unexpectedly, a 7-year-old male animal, which had not previously come to clinical attention, was shown to possess the mutant allele and to have a relatively mild form of the disease. This observation indicates phenotypic heterogeneity in Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, a feature described previously in humans and Golden Retrievers. With the availability of a simple, fast and accurate test for Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, detection of carrier animals and selected breeding should help eliminate the mutation from the breed. PMID:25644216

  2. Pathophysiology of Corneal Dystrophies: From Cellular Genetic Alteration to Clinical Findings.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Marta; Macchi, Ilaria; Tiezzi, Alessandro; La Cava, Maurizio; Massaro-Giordano, Giacomina; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    Corneal dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of bilateral, inherited, rare diseases characterized by slowly progressive corneal opacities, that lead to visual impairment. Most of them have an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with variable expressivity, but new mutations have been described. Many corneal dystrophies have been genetically characterized and the specific gene mutations identified, such as for the epithelial-stromal TGFBI dystrophies. Current classification systems identified four main groups of corneal dystrophies based on clinical, histologic, and genetic information. Diagnosis is performed during a routine ophthalmic examination that shows typical cellular abnormalities of the corneal epithelium, stroma, or endothelium. Disease progression should be carefully monitored to decide the proper clinical management. The treatment of corneal dystrophies is variable, depending on symptoms, clinical course, severity, and type of dystrophy. Management aimed to reduce symptoms and to improve vision, includes different surgical approaches. Novel cellular and genetic therapeutic approaches are under evaluation. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 261-269, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26104822

  3. Effect of spinal surgery on lung function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, J. D.; Staples, A. J.; Brook, P. D.; Parsons, D. W.; Sutherland, A. D.; Martin, A. J.; Stern, L. M.; Foster, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The effect on subsequent respiratory function of spinal stabilisation for scoliosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy is unclear. In order to clarify this clinical problem, changes in the forced vital capacity of a group of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had undergone spinal surgery were measured and compared with a group of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had not had surgery. METHODS--In this retrospective study 17 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent spinal stabilisation at a mean age of 14.9 years (surgical group) were compared with 21 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had not had surgery (non-surgical group). The mean (SD) Cobb angle of the surgical group at 14.9 years was 57 (16.4) degrees, and of the non-surgical group at 15 years was 45 (29.9) degrees. Forced vital capacity expressed as percentage predicted (% FVC) was measured in total over a seven year period in the surgical group and over 6.5 years in the non-surgical group, and regression equations were calculated. Survival curves for both groups were also constructed. RESULTS--No difference was found between spinal stabilisation (surgical group) and the non-surgical group in the rate of deterioration of % FVC which was 3-5% per year. There was no difference in survival in either group. CONCLUSIONS--Spinal stabilisation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy does not alter the decline in pulmonary function, nor does it improve survival. PMID:8553273

  4. Merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy: Report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Incecik, Faruk; Herguner, Ozlem M.; Ceylaner, Serdar; Altunbasak, Sakir

    2015-01-01

    Context: Congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is caused by mutations in the laminin α-2 gene encoding laminin-a2. Aims: The purpose of this study is to determine clinical and genetic results in five Turkish patients with MDC1A. Setting and Designs: Five children with MDC1A were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Three (60%) were boys, and 2 (40%) were girls. Parental consanguinity was found in all the families. In all the patients, hypotonia, weakness, delayed motor milestones, markedly elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK) concentration, and brain white matter abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging were detected. Mutation analysis was performed in all the patients, and 3 different mutations were detected. However, a mutation in patient 1 and 2 has not been previously described in the literature. Conclusions: When a patient presents with severe congenital hypotonia, muscle weakness, high serum CPK levels, and white matter abnormalities, should be suspected as MDC1A. PMID:26962340

  5. Deletion patterns of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies in Greece.

    PubMed Central

    Florentin, L; Mavrou, A; Kekou, K; Metaxotou, C

    1995-01-01

    We present molecular data from 90 Greek boys with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy using cDNA analysis or multiplex PCR or both. Deletions were detected in 63.3% of patients and were mainly clustered in two areas of the gene, one in the 3' and one in the 5' end of the gene (exons 3-19 and 44-53). Almost 17% of deletion breakpoints lay in intron 44 while 29% of deletions have a breakpoint in intron 50. Thus the distribution of deletions in our DMD/BMD patients differs from that previously reported. Furthermore a 1:4.35 proximal:distal ratio was observed in familial cases and a 1:2.45 ratio in isolated ones. PMID:7897627

  6. Dental characteristics of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Symons, A L; Townsend, G C; Hughes, T E

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the dental characteristics of 23 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was carried out, based on dental records, oral examinations and dental models. Decreasing muscle function was associated with increased plaque and calculus accumulation, leading to gingival inflammation, but caries experience was low. Disturbances in tooth form, number and eruption of the second premolars were observed in 39% of patients. Anterior and posterior open bites were common, associated with lip incompetence, mouth breathing, macroglossia and tongue thrusting. Maxillary and mandibular arch breadths were significantly larger, on average, in the DMD group than in controls. Rather than a normal parabolic arch form, the dental arches in DMD patients tended to be hyperbolic, with the posterior teeth being displaced buccally, consistent with an imbalance between the lingual and facial musculature. PMID:12613312

  7. A case of paternally inherited congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, M; Yamada, H; Higuchi, I; Kaminishi, Y; Miki, T; Johnson, K; Osame, M

    1994-01-01

    We report two sisters with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) born to a normal mother and an affected father. The congenitally affected daughters had symptoms from birth. The age of onset of DM in the father was 39 years. Analysis of the CTG trinucleotide expansion in this family showed increase in the repeat length with increasing severity, with the smallest expansion in the grandfather and the largest expansion in the younger of the two CDM sisters. This family shows that exceptionally it is possible for CDM to be inherited paternally and refutes the hypothesis that CDM is exclusively of maternal origin. This contradicts several of the previous hypotheses concerning the mechanisms by which the CDM phenotype arises. Images PMID:8064819

  8. Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy: the most recognizable laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Madej-Pilarczyk, A; Kochański, A

    2016-01-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), a rare inherited disease, is characterized clinically by humero-peroneal muscle atrophy and weakness, multijoint contractures, spine rigidity and cardiac insufficiency with conduction defects. There are at least six types of EDMD known so far, of which five have been associated with mutations in genes encoding nuclear proteins. The majority of the EDMD cases described so far are of the emerinopathy (EDMD1) kind, with a recessive X-linked mode of inheritance, or else laminopathy (EDMD2), with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. In the work described here, the authors have sought to describe the history by which EDMD came to be distinguished as a separate entity, as well as the clinical and genetic characteristics of the disease, the pathophysiology of lamin-related muscular diseases and, finally, therapeutic issues, prevention and ethical aspects. PMID:27179216

  9. [Therapeutic trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: between hopes and disappointments].

    PubMed

    Bloetzer, Clemens; Fluss, Joël; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves

    2012-02-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked progressive muscle disease. Since the discovery of the dystrophin gene responsible for the condition, various therapeutic strategies have been elaborated. In this paper we introduce three of them, which are well into clinical trials. The first is based on the ability to read through premature stop codons, the second is based on the technique of exon skipping. Both strategies are examples of "personalized medicines", tailored for specific mutation types. The third approach is a pharmacological one, potentially useful for all Duchenne patients, regardless of their mutation type. These first clinical trials raise many questions for researchers as well as for patients and their families, some of which are discussed. PMID:22432241

  10. Gene for OTC: characterisation and linkage to Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K E; Briand, P; Ionasescu, V; Ionasescu, G; Williamson, R; Brown, C; Cavard, C; Cathelineau, L

    1985-01-01

    Cloned coding sequences for rat and human ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) were obtained by screening a rat and a human cDNA library respectively with a synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to 27 bases of the rat sequence. These clones, 1100 bp long for the rat clone and 1300 bp for the human, contain approximately 80% of the human OTC coding sequence. The OTC mRNA length determined by Northern blot analysis is 1700bp. The human OTC sequence was shown to be localised Xp11.4-Xp21 using somatic cell hybrids. There is a frequent RFLP revealed with the restriction enzyme MspI. OTC is located more closely to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation than previously reported markers such as RC8 and L1.28, and therefore should prove useful in carrier detection and haplotype analysis of families carrying the mutation causing the disease. Images PMID:3839070

  11. Acetoacetate Accelerates Muscle Regeneration and Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoting; Meng, Jiao; Li, Li; Han, Wanhong; Li, Changyin; Zhong, Ran; Miao, Xuexia; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Dahai

    2016-01-29

    Acetoacetate (AA) is a ketone body and acts as a fuel to supply energy for cellular activity of various tissues. Here, we uncovered a novel function of AA in promoting muscle cell proliferation. Notably, the functional role of AA in regulating muscle cell function is further evidenced by its capability to accelerate muscle regeneration in normal mice, and it ameliorates muscular dystrophy in mdx mice. Mechanistically, our data from multiparameter analyses consistently support the notion that AA plays a non-metabolic role in regulating muscle cell function. Finally, we show that AA exerts its function through activation of the MEK1-ERK1/2-cyclin D1 pathway, revealing a novel mechanism in which AA serves as a signaling metabolite in mediating muscle cell function. Our findings highlight the profound functions of a small metabolite as signaling molecule in mammalian cells. PMID:26645687

  12. Twenty-Nail Dystrophy and Darier's (Darier-White) Disease.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Chaudhuri, Anita; Verma, Prashant; Sharma, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old married man presented with progressive distortion of all the nails of the hands and toes for the past 30 years. Initially, his parents noticed yellowish discoloration and roughness of the thumb nail at the age of 5 years. Since then, the changes have been insidious to involve the other nails. Currently, the nails are lusterless, rough, ridged, and difficult to trim. In addition, the patient has had dark, dirty-looking raised eruptions over the skin, attended by generalized itching, corresponding to the onset of the nail lesions. His mother experienced similar disease. Examination of the nails was marked by alternating elevation and depression (ridging) and/or pitting, lack of luster, roughening, sandpaper texture, and splitting, along with muddy, grayish white discoloration. Dystrophy of the nails was prominent. The changes were bilateral and symmetrical, affecting all 10 fingers and 10 toes (Figure 1). PMID:26861433

  13. Genomic organization and transcriptional units at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, D.J.; Rundle, S.A.; Harley, H.G.; Crow, S.R.; Harper, P.S. ); McCurrach, M.; Sohn, R.; Thirion, J.P.; Buckler, A.J.; Housman, D.E.; Brook, J.D. ); Hamshere, M.G. )

    1993-12-01

    The genomic structure and apparently complete coding sequence of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene have been determined. The gene contains 15 exons distributed over about 13 kb of genomic DNA. It codes for a protein of 624 amino acids with an N-terminal domain highly homologous to cAMP-dependent serine-threonine protein kinases, an intermediate domain with a high [alpha]-helical content and weak similarity to various filamentous proteins, and a hydrophobic C-terminal segment. Located in close proximity is a second gene, coding for a transcript of about 3 kb, that is homologous to the gene DMR-N9 in the corresponding mouse locus, but has no homologies to other known genes or proteins. Strong expression of the latter gene in brain suggests that it may have a role in the development of mental symptoms in severe cases of the disease. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Duchenne muscular dystrophy drugs face tough path to approval.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, L; Sorbera, L; Graul, A I

    2016-03-01

    Highly anticipated as new disease-modifying treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), therapeutics by BioMarin Pharmaceutical (Kyndrisa™; drisapersen) and Sarepta Therapeutics (eteplirsen; AVI-4658) both recently received negative FDA reviews and are now facing battles for approval in the U.S. At present, BioMarin is committed to working with the FDA to forge a pathway to approval following the failure of its NDA, while Sarepta awaits the formal decision on its NDA, which is expected by late May 2016. Despite the critical nature of both reviews, analysts consider that there is still a narrow possibility of approval of both drugs. According to Consensus forecasts from Thomson Reuters Cortellis for Competitive Intelligence, Kyndrisa is forecast to achieve sales of USD 533.71 million in 2021. PMID:27186594

  15. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Patrizia; Kharraz, Yacine; Jardí, Mercè; Fukada, So-ichiro; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-06-01

    Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component. PMID:25981413

  16. A review of nutrition in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Z E; Truby, H

    2009-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X linked genetic disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness and reduced muscle tone. Affecting only boys, it limits life expectancy to approximately 20 years. A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library, employing the term 'Duchenne muscular dystrophy'. A total of 1491 articles in English were recovered. These papers were searched thematically under the headings: body composition (n = 10), energy expenditure (n = 10), nutrition (n = 6), corticosteroid therapy (n = 55) and gene therapy (n = 199). Key dietetic practice points were identified relevant to nutritional management. Papers supporting these key themes were assigned a level of evidence and grade of recommendation. There is limited high-quality evidence to guide the nutritional management of boys with DMD. Currently, the majority of evidence is based on expert opinion and clinical expertise. Delayed growth, short stature, muscle wasting and increased fat mass are characteristics of DMD and impact on nutritional status and energy requirements. The early introduction of steroids has altered the natural history of the disease, but can exacerbate weight gain in a population already susceptible to obesity. Prior to commencing steroids, anticipatory guidance for weight management should be provided. Malnutrition is a feature of end stage disease requiring a multidisciplinary approach, such as texture modification and supplemental feeding. Micronutrient requirements are yet to be determined but, as a result of corticosteroid treatment, vitamin D and calcium should be supplemented. Some evidence exists supporting supplementation with creatine monohydrate to improve muscle strength. More research is needed to provide a higher quality of evidence for dietitians working within this area. PMID:19743977

  17. Myotonic dystrophy type 1, daytime sleepiness and REM sleep dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves A; Laberge, Luc

    2012-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), or Steinert's disease, is the most common adult-onset form of muscular dystrophy. DM1 also constitutes the neuromuscular condition with the most significant sleep disorders including excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), central and obstructive sleep apneas, restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic leg movements in wake (PLMW) and periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS) as well as nocturnal and diurnal rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dysregulation. EDS is the most frequent non-muscular complaint in DM1, being present in about 70-80% of patients. Different phenotypes of sleep-related problems may mimic several sleep disorders, including idiopathic hypersomnia, narcolepsy without cataplexy, sleep apnea syndrome, and periodic leg movement disorder. Subjective and objective daytime sleepiness may be associated with the degree of muscular impairment. However, available evidence suggests that DM1-related EDS is primarily caused by a central dysfunction of sleep regulation rather than by sleep fragmentation, sleep-related respiratory events or periodic leg movements. EDS also tends to persist despite successful treatment of sleep-disordered breathing in DM1 patients. As EDS clearly impacts on physical and social functioning of DM1 patients, studies are needed to identify the best appropriate tools to identify hypersomnia, and clarify the indications for polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) in DM1. In addition, further structured trials of assisted nocturnal ventilation and randomized trials of central nervous system (CNS) stimulant drugs in large samples of DM1 patients are required to optimally treat patients affected by this progressive, incurable condition. PMID:22465566

  18. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  19. Muscle exercise in limb girdle muscular dystrophies: pitfall and advantages.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Gabriele; Simoncini, Costanza; Giannotti, Stefano; Zampa, Virna; Angelini, Corrado; Ricci, Giulia

    2015-05-01

    Different genetic mutations underlying distinct pathogenic mechanisms have been identified as cause of muscle fibers degeneration and strength loss in limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD). As a consequence, exercise tolerance is affected in patients with LGMD, either as a direct consequence of the loss of muscle fibers or secondary to the sedentary lifestyle due to the motor impairment. It has been debated for many years whether or not muscle exercise is beneficial or harmful for patients with myopathic disorders. In fact, muscular exercise would be considered in helping to hinder the loss of muscle tissue and strength. On the other hand, muscle structural defects in LGMD can result in instability of the sarcolemma, making it more likely to induce muscle damage as a consequence of intense muscle contraction, such as that performed during eccentric training. Several reports have suggested that supervised aerobic exercise training is safe and may be considered effective in improving oxidative capacity and muscle function in patients with LGMD, such as LGMD2I, LGMD2L, LGMD2A. More or less comfortable investigation methods applied to assess muscle function and structure can be useful to detect the beneficial effects of supervised training in LGMD. However, it is important to note that the available trials assessing muscle exercise in patients with LGMD have often involved a small number of patients, with a wide clinical heterogeneity and a different experimental design. Based on these considerations, resistance training can be considered part of the rehabilitation program for patients with a limb-girdle type of muscular dystrophy, but it should be strictly supervised to assess its effects and prevent possible development of muscle damage. PMID:26155063

  20. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. Methods: This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Results: Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. Conclusions: There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population.Implications for RehabilitationLittle guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy.Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration.We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of

  1. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  2. [Genetic Diagnosis and Molecular Therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of inherited muscle disease and is characterized by progressive muscle wasting, ultimately resulting in the death of patients in their twenties or thirties. DMD is characterized by a deficiency of the muscle dystrophin as a result of mutations in the dystrophin gene. Currently, no effective treatment for DMD is available. Promising molecular therapies which are mutation-specific have been developed. Transformation of an out-of-frame mRNA into an in-frame dystrophin message by inducing exon skipping is considered one of the approaches most likely to lead to success. We demonstrated that the intravenous administration of the antisense oligonucleotide against the splicing enhancer sequence results in exon skipping and production of the dystrophin protein in DMD case for the first time. After extensive studies, anti-sense oligonucleotides comprising different monomers have undergone clinical trials and provided favorable results, enabling improvements in ambulation of DMD patients. Induction of the read-through of nonsense mutations is expected to produce dystrophin in DMD patients with nonsense mutations, which are detected in 19% of DMD cases. The clinical effectiveness of gentamicin and PTC124 has been reported. We have demonstrated that arbekacin-mediated read-through can markedly ameliorate muscular dystrophy in vitro. We have already begun a clinical trial of nonsense mutation read-through therapy using arbekacin. Some of these drug candidates are planned to undergo submission for approval to regulatory agencies in the US and EU. We hope that these molecular therapies will contribute towards DMD treatment. PMID:26897856

  3. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  4. The Role of D4Z4-Encoded Proteins in the Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Isolated from Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    de la Kethulle de Ryhove, Laurence; Ansseau, Eugénie; Nachtegael, Charlotte; Pieters, Karlien; Vanderplanck, Céline; Geens, Mieke; Sermon, Karen; Wilton, Steve D; Coppée, Frédérique; Lagneaux, Laurence; Belayew, Alexandra

    2015-11-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is associated with an activation of the double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene, which we previously identified within the D4Z4 repeated elements in the 4q35 subtelomeric region. The pathological DUX4 mRNA is derived from the most distal D4Z4 unit and extends unexpectedly within the flanking pLAM region, which provides an intron and polyadenylation signal. The conditions that are required to develop FSHD are a permissive allele providing the polyadenylation signal and hypomethylation of the D4Z4 repeat array compared with the healthy muscle. The DUX4 protein is a 52-kDa transcription factor that initiates a large gene deregulation cascade leading to muscle atrophy, inflammation, differentiation defects, and oxidative stress, which are the key features of FSHD. DUX4 is a retrogene that is normally expressed in germline cells and is submitted to repeat-induced silencing in adult tissues. Since DUX4 mRNAs have been detected in human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, we investigated whether they could also be expressed in human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). We found that DUX4 mRNAs were induced during the differentiation of hMSCs into osteoblasts and that this process involved DUX4 and new longer protein forms (58 and 70 kDa). A DUX4 mRNA with a more distant 5' start site was characterized that presented a 60-codon reading frame extension and encoded the 58-kDa protein. Transfections of hMSCs with an antisense oligonucleotide targeting DUX4 mRNAs decreased both the 52- and 58-kDa protein levels and confirmed their identity. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments in hMSCs suggested these DUX4 proteins had opposite roles in osteogenic differentiation as evidenced by the alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. Differentiation was delayed by the 58-kDa DUX4 expression and it was increased by 52-kDa DUX4. These data indicate a role for DUX4 protein forms in the osteogenic differentiation of h

  5. Vascular-targeted therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscular dystrophy and an X-linked recessive, progressive muscle wasting disease caused by the absence of a functional dystrophin protein. Dystrophin has a structural role as a cytoskeletal stabilization protein and protects cells against contraction-induced damage. Dystrophin also serves a signaling role through mechanotransduction of forces and localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which produces nitric oxide (NO) to facilitate vasorelaxation. In DMD, the signaling defects produce inadequate tissue perfusion caused by functional ischemia due to a diminished ability to respond to shear stress induced endothelium-dependent dilation. Additionally, the structural defects seen in DMD render myocytes with an increased susceptibility to mechanical stress. The combination of both defects is necessary to generate myocyte damage, which induces successive rounds of myofiber degeneration and regeneration, loss of calcium homeostasis, chronic inflammatory response, fibrosis, and myonecrosis. In individuals with DMD, these processes inevitably cause loss of ambulation shortly after the first decade and an abbreviated life with death in the third or fourth decade due to cardio-respiratory anomalies. There is no known cure for DMD, and although the culpable gene has been identified for more than twenty years, research on treatments has produced few clinically relevant results. Several recent studies on novel DMD therapeutics are vascular targeted and focused on attenuating the inherent functional ischemia. One approach improves vasorelaxation capacity through pharmaceutical inhibition of either phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Another approach increases the density of the underlying vascular network by inducing angiogenesis, and this has been accomplished through either direct delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or by downregulating the VEGF decoy

  6. Dissociation of the dystroglycan complex in caveolin-3-deficient limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, R; Straub, V; Blank, M; Kutzick, C; Franke, N; Jacob, E N; Lenard, H G; Kröger, S; Voit, T

    2000-09-22

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders inherited in an autosomal recessive or dominant mode. Caveolin-3, the muscle-specific member of the caveolin gene family, is implicated in the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant limb girdle muscular dystrophy 1C. Here we report on a 4-year-old girl presenting with myalgia and muscle cramps due to a caveolin-3 deficiency in her dystrophic skeletal muscle as a result of a heterozygous 136G-->A substitution in the caveolin-3 gene. The novel sporadic missense mutation in the caveolin signature sequence of the caveolin-3 gene changes an alanine to a threonine (A46T) and prevents the localization of caveolin-3 to the plasma membrane in a dominant negative fashion. Caveolin-3 has been suggested to interact with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, which in striated muscle fibers links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and with neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Similar to dystrophin-deficient Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a secondary decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase and alpha-dystroglycan expression was detected in the caveolin-3-deficient patient. These results implicate an important function of the caveolin signature sequence and common mechanisms in the pathogenesis of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex-associated muscular dystrophies with caveolin-3-deficient limb girdle muscular dystrophy. PMID:11001938

  7. Benzalkonium Chloride Accelerates the Formation of the Amyloid Fibrils of Corneal Dystrophy-associated Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies. PMID:23861389

  8. Dystrophin analysis using a panel of anti-dystrophin antibodies in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, F; Mateddu, A; Cianchetti, C; Marrosu, M G; Clerk, A; Cau, M; Congiu, R; Cao, A; Melis, M A

    1993-01-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, was studied in 19 patients with Xp21 disorders and in 25 individuals with non-Xp21 muscular dystrophy. Antibodies raised to seven different regions spanning most of the protein were used for immunocytochemistry. In all patients specific dystrophin staining anomalies were detected and correlated with clinical severity and also gene deletion. In patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) the anomalies detected ranged from inter- and intra-fibre variation in labelling intensity with the same antibody or several antibodies to general reduction in staining and discontinuous staining. In vitro evidence of abnormal dystrophin breakdown was observed reanalysing the muscle of patients, with BMD and not that of non-Xp21 dystrophies, after it has been stored for several months. A number of patients with DMD showed some staining but this did not represent a diagnostic problem. Based on the data presented, it was concluded that immunocytochemistry is a powerful technique in the prognostic diagnosis of Xp21 muscular dystrophies. PMID:8429320

  9. Trends with corticosteroid use in males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy born 1982-2001.

    PubMed

    Fox, Deborah J; Kumar, Anil; West, Nancy A; DiRienzo, A Gregory; James, Katherine A; Oleszek, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    This study examines trends in corticosteroid use for males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy by birth year, race/ethnicity, and knowledge of Duchenne muscular dystrophy family history. Firstborn males (n = 521) selected from a population-based surveillance system of Duchenne muscular dystrophy were analyzed using Kaplan Meier and regression methods. Comparing males born 1982 to 1986 with males born 1997 to 2001, steroid use increased from 54% to 72% and mean age at steroid initiation decreased from 8.2 to 7.1 years. Hispanics and non-Hispanic Black males used steroids less frequently and delayed initiation compared to white males. Compared to males without a Duchenne muscular dystrophy family history, males with known family history were half as likely to use steroids. Duration of steroid use increased over time and age at initiation decreased. Racial/ethnic disparities exist for steroid use and should be addressed to improve outcome and quality of life for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:24682290

  10. Peripheral nerve blocks as the sole anesthetic technique in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seung Uk; Kim, Yee Suk; Kwon, Woo Jin; Lee, Sang Mook; Kim, Soo Hyang

    2016-04-01

    General anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are associated with high risks of complications, including rhabdomyolysis, malignant hyperthermia, hemodynamic instability, and postoperative mechanical ventilation. Here, we describe peripheral nerve blocks as a safe approach to anesthesia in a patient with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy who was scheduled to undergo surgery. A 22-year-old male patient was scheduled to undergo reduction and internal fixation of a left distal femur fracture. He had been diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy at 5 years of age, and had no locomotive capability except for that of the finger flexors and toe extensors. He had developed symptoms associated with dyspnea 5 years before and required intermittent ventilation. We blocked the femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and parasacral plexus under ultrasound on the left leg. The patient underwent a successful operation using peripheral nerve blocks with no complications. In conclusion general anesthesia and central neuraxial blockades in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy are unsafe approaches to anesthesia because of hemodynamic instability and respiratory depression. Peripheral nerve blocks are the best way to reduce the risks of critical complications, and are a safe and feasible approach to anesthesia in patients with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:26721827

  11. Developmental Defects in a Zebrafish Model for Muscular Dystrophies Associated with the Loss of Fukutin-Related Protein (FKRP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornhill, Paul; Bassett, David; Lochmuller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A number of muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of [alpha]-dystroglycan and many are now known to result from mutations in a number of genes encoding putative or known glycosyltransferases. These diseases include severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) such as Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy…

  12. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  13. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy: Lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    A milestone of molecular medicine is the identification of dystrophin gene mutation as the cause of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the last 2 decades, major advances in dystrophin biology and gene delivery technology have created an opportunity to treat DMD with gene therapy. Remarkable success has been achieved in treating dystrophic mice. Several gene therapy strategies, including plasmid transfer, exon skipping, and adeno-associated virus-mediated microdystrophin therapy, have entered clinical trials. However, therapeutic benefit has not been realized in DMD patients. Bridging the gap between mice and humans is no doubt the most pressing issue facing DMD gene therapy now. In contrast to mice, dystrophin-deficient dogs are genetically and phenotypically similar to human patients. Preliminary gene therapy studies in the canine model may offer critical insights that cannot be obtained from murine studies. It is clear that the canine DMD model may represent an important link between mice and humans. Unfortunately, our current knowledge of dystrophic dogs is limited, and the full picture of disease progression remains to be clearly defined. We also lack rigorous outcome measures (such as in situ force measurement) to monitor therapeutic efficacy in dystrophic dogs. Undoubtedly, maintaining a dystrophic dog colony is technically demanding, and the cost of dog studies cannot be underestimated. A carefully coordinated effort from the entire DMD community is needed to make the best use of the precious dog resource. Successful DMD gene therapy may depend on valid translational studies in dystrophin-deficient dogs. PMID:21691429

  14. In vitro mapping of Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Storbeck, C.J.; Sabourin, L.; Baird, S.

    1994-09-01

    The Myotonic Dystrophy Kinase (DMK) gene has been cloned and shared homology to serine/threonine protein kinases. Overexpression of this gene in stably transfected mouse myoblasts has been shown to inhibit fusion into myotubes while myoblasts stably transfected with an antisense construct show increased fusion potential. These experiments, along with data showing that the DM gene is highly expressed in muscle have highlighted the possibility of DMK being involved in myogenesis. The promoter region of the DM gene lacks a consensus TATA box and CAAT box, but harbours numerous transcription binding sites. Clones containing extended 5{prime} upstream sequences (UPS) of DMK only weakly drive the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) when transfected into C2C12 mouse myoblasts. However, four E-boxes are present in the first intron of the DM gene and transient assays show increased expression of the CAT gene when the first intron is present downstream of these 5{prime} UPS in an orientation dependent manner. Comparison between mouse and human sequence reveals that the regions in the first intron where the E-boxes are located are highly conserved. The mapping of the promoter and the importance of the first intron in the control of DMK expression will be presented.

  15. [Social Cognitive Impairment in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1].

    PubMed

    Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka

    2016-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1) is a heritable, multisystem disease that affects not only the muscles but also the brain. DM 1 is often accompanied by developmental behavioral disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. The autistic traits in DM 1 may be related to social cognitive dysfunction. The social cognitive function of patients with DM 1 was examined with respect to facial emotion recognition and theory of mind, which is the specific cognitive ability to understand the mental states of other people. With respect to facial emotion recognition, the sensitivities to disgust and anger were lower among patients with DM 1 than among healthy subjects, and this difference could not be attributed to visual impairment. To examine the theory of mind ability, the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" test and the faux pas recognition test were used. Patients with DM 1 were found to be impaired in both tests, but the results were not attributed to visual ability and lexical comprehension. The possible causes of social cognitive dysfunction in DM 1 are the l cerebral atrophy and white matter abnormalities in the temporal, frontal, and insular cortex. Dysfunctions in these areas may affect the emotional and theory of mind abilities in DM 1, which result in the behavioral and communication disorders. PMID:26873233

  16. Molecular bases of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V

    2003-09-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined disorders with a primary or predominant involvement of the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature. The clinical course is characterized by great variability, ranging from severe forms with rapid onset and progression to very mild forms allowing affected people to have fairly normal life spans and activity levels. Sixteen loci have been so far identified, six autosomal dominant and ten autosomal recessive. Linkage analyses indicate that there is further genetic heterogeneity both for dominant as well as for recessive LGMD. The dominant forms (LGMD1) are generally milder and relatively rare, representing less than 10% of all LGMD. The autosomal recessive forms (LGMD2) are much more common, having a cumulative prevalence of 1:15,000 with a number of geographical differences. The product of ten autosomal recessive LGMD genes has so far been identified. They are: calpain-3 (LGMD2A), dysferlin (LGMD2B), alpha-sarcoglycan (LGMD2D), beta-sarcoglycan (LGMD2E), gamma-sarcoglycan (LGMD2C), delta-sarcoglycan (LGMD2F), telethonin (LGMD2G), TRIM32 (LGMD2H), fukutin-related protein (LGMD2I) and titin (LGMD2J). There are, however, at least 25% of families who can be excluded from any known locus. The present review is devoted to outline the present advancements in the molecular bases of autosomal recessive LGMD. PMID:14959561

  17. Retinal dystrophies, genomic applications in diagnosis and prospects for therapy.

    PubMed

    Nash, Benjamin M; Wright, Dale C; Grigg, John R; Bennetts, Bruce; Jamieson, Robyn V

    2015-04-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RDs) are degenerative diseases of the retina which have marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Common presentations among these disorders include night or colour blindness, tunnel vision and subsequent progression to complete blindness. The known causative disease genes have a variety of developmental and functional roles with mutations in more than 120 genes shown to be responsible for the phenotypes. In addition, mutations within the same gene have been shown to cause different disease phenotypes, even amongst affected individuals within the same family highlighting further levels of complexity. The known disease genes encode proteins involved in retinal cellular structures, phototransduction, the visual cycle, and photoreceptor structure or gene regulation. This review aims to demonstrate the high degree of genetic complexity in both the causative disease genes and their associated phenotypes, highlighting the more common clinical manifestation of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The review also provides insight to recent advances in genomic molecular diagnosis and gene and cell-based therapies for the RDs. PMID:26835369

  18. Predictive factors for masticatory performance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    van Bruggen, H W; van de Engel-Hoek, L; Steenks, M H; Bronkhorst, E M; Creugers, N H J; de Groot, I J M; Kalaykova, S I

    2014-08-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) report masticatory and swallowing problems. Such problems may cause complications such as choking, and feeling of food sticking in the throat. We investigated whether masticatory performance in DMD is objectively impaired, and explored predictive factors for compromised mastication. Twenty-three patients and 23 controls filled out two questionnaires about mandibular function, and underwent a clinical examination of the masticatory system and measurements of anterior bite force and masticatory performance. In the patients, moreover, quantitative ultrasound of the tongue and motor function measurement was performed. The patients were categorized into ambulatory stage (early or late), early non-ambulatory stage, or late non-ambulatory stage. Masticatory performance, anterior bite force and occlusal contacts were all reduced in the patient group compared to the controls (all p < 0.001). Mastication abnormalities were present early in the disease process prior to a reduction of motor function measurement. The early non-ambulatory and late non-ambulatory stage groups showed less masticatory performance compared to the ambulatory stage group (p < 0.028 and p < 0.010, respectively). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that stage of the disease was the strongest independent risk factor for the masticatory performance (R(2) = 0.52). Anterior bite force, occlusal contacts and masticatory performance in DMD are severely reduced. PMID:24969130

  19. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies - international collaborations for translational research.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rachel; Straub, Volker

    2016-05-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a diverse group of genetic neuromuscular conditions that usually manifest in the proximal muscles of the hip and shoulder girdles. Since the identification of the first gene associated with the phenotype in 1994, an extensive body of research has identified the genetic defects responsible for over 30 LGMD subtypes, revealed an increasingly varied phenotypic spectrum, and exposed the need to move towards a systems-based understanding of the molecular pathways affected. New sequencing technologies, including whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing, are continuing to expand the range of genes and phenotypes associated with the LGMDs, and new computational approaches are helping clinicians to adapt to this new genomic medicine paradigm. However, 60 years on from the first description of LGMD, no curative therapies exist, and systematic exploration of the natural history is still lacking. To enable rapid translation of basic research to the clinic, well-phenotyped and genetically characterized patient cohorts are a necessity, and appropriate outcome measures and biomarkers must be developed through natural history studies. Here, we review the international collaborations that are addressing these translational research issues, and the lessons learned from large-scale LGMD sequencing programmes. PMID:27033376

  20. Orofacial dysfunction in children and adolescents with myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sjögreen, Lotta; Engvall, Monica; Ekström, Anne-Berit; Lohmander, Anette; Kiliaridis, Stavros; Tulinius, Már

    2007-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by an expansion of a CTG repeat sequence on chromosome 19q13. The aim of the present study was to describe the characteristics and prevalence of oral motor dysfunction in a cohort of children and adolescents with DM and to correlate different aspects of oral motor function with the type of DM and sex. Fifty-six individuals with DM (30 males, 26 females; median age 13y 2mo; range 2y 6mo-21y 5mo) were compared with healthy controls. They were divided into four subgroups: severe congenital DM (n=18); mild congenital DM (n=18); childhood DM (n=18); and classical DM (n=2). A speech-language pathologist assessed different variables of oral motor function, intelligibility, and lip force. The families used a questionnaire to report on eating difficulties and drooling. All individuals with DM had impaired facial expression. Intelligibility was moderately or severely reduced in 30 patients (60%), excluding six patients without speech. Most had a moderate or severe impairment of lip motility (76.0%), tongue motility (52.2%), and lip force (69.2%), causing deviant production of bilabial and dental consonants. The families reported problems with eating (51.9%) and drooling (37.0%). Oral motor dysfunction was most prominent in congenital DM, and males were more affected than females. PMID:17209971

  1. Acceptance of the different denominations for reflex sympathetic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Lario, B; Aretxabala-Alciba..., I; Alegre-Lopez, J; Alonso-Valdiviels..., J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To elucidate the real impact in the medical literature of the different denominations for reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD).
METHODS—A search was performed through the Medline database (WinSPIRS, SilverPlatter International, NS), from 1995 to 1999, including the following descriptors: RSD, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), CRPS type I, algodystrophy, Sudeck, shoulder-hand syndrome, transient osteoporosis, causalgia, and CRPS type II.
RESULTS—The descriptor RSD was detected in 576 references, algodystrophy in 54, transient osteoporosis in 42, CRPS type I in 24, Sudeck in 16, and shoulder-hand syndrome in 11. One hundred records were obtained for the descriptor causalgia and five for CRPS type II. The descriptor RSD was detected in the title of 262 references, algodystrophy in 29, transient osteoporosis in 29, CRPS type I in 15, Sudeck in 3, shoulder-hand syndrome in 5, causalgia in 17, and CRPS type II in 3 references.
CONCLUSIONS—The new CRPS terminology has not effectively replaced the old one. RSD and causalgia are the most used denominations.

 PMID:11114289

  2. Milder forms of muscular dystrophy associated with POMGNT2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Yukari; Dong, Mingrui; Ogawa, Megumu; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Kuru, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Kenji; Nagai, Shigehiro; Ozasa, Shiro; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic variants in patients with dystroglycanopathy (DGP) and assess the pathogenicity of these variants. Methods: A total of 20 patients with DGP were identified by immunohistochemistry or Western blot analysis. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed using patient samples. The pathogenicity of the variants identified was evaluated on the basis of the phenotypic recovery in a knockout (KO) haploid human cell line by transfection with mutated POMGNT2 cDNA and on the basis of the in vitro enzymatic activity of mutated proteins. Results: WES identified homozygous and compound heterozygous missense variants in POMGNT2 in 3 patients with the milder limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and intellectual disability without brain malformation. The 2 identified variants were located in the putative glycosyltransferase domain of POMGNT2, which affected its enzymatic activity. Mutated POMGNT2 cDNAs failed to rescue the phenotype of POMGNT2-KO cells. Conclusions: Novel variants in POMGNT2 are associated with milder forms of LGMD. The findings of this study expand the clinical and pathologic spectrum of DGP associated with POMGNT2 variants from the severest Walker-Warburg syndrome to the mildest LGMD phenotypes. The simple method to verify pathogenesis of variants may allow researchers to evaluate any variants present in all of the known causative genes and the variants in novel candidate genes to detect DGPs, particularly without using patients' specimens. PMID:27066570

  3. Motor unit remodelling in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Electrophysiological assessment.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martínez, A; López-Terradas, J M

    1992-01-01

    Conventional EMG, motor and sensory conduction velocities, averaging analysis of MUPs, SFEMG, and muscle fiber conduction velocity in situ were performed in 14 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DD) aged 5 to 11 years. MUPs parameters study showed a striking increment of long duration MUPs followed by satellites and increase of polyphasic potentials of variable duration. The main findings in SFEMG examination were increment in fiber density of the motor unit, large MISI and presence of complex potentials of long duration in all patients. Muscle fiber conduction velocity in situ was significantly slower than in controls, with significant decrease in minimum conduction and increased variability (large SD) in propagation velocity values. Low conduction velocity of muscle fibers, long duration of polyphasics and MUPs followed by satellites, and large MISI were significantly related. These findings support the hypotheses which have suggested that the motor unit remodelling in DD is mainly myogenic. The abnormalities in muscle fiber conduction velocity in situ reflect an increased diameter variation of muscle fibers consistent with splitting fibers, small groups of regenerating and necrotic fibers, and fiber diameter variation found in histological studies. Thus, increased variability in fiber diameter may be the cause of complex and long duration MUPs in DD. PMID:1526215

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging study in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ya; Dong, Yuru; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Shu; Mu, Xuetao; Wang, Hong; Xu, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle disorder associated with an intellectual deficit which is non-progressive. The aim of this study was to investigate brain microstructural changes in DMD and to explore the relationship between such changes and cognitive impairment. Methods All participants (12 DMD patients, 14 age-matched healthy boys), intelligence quotients (IQs) [both full (FIQ) and verbal (VIQ)] were evaluated using the Wechsler intelligence scale for children China revised (WISC-CR) edition, and brain gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) changes were mapped using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fractional anisotropy (FA). The differences between groups were analyzed using the t-test and the association of cognition with neuroimaging parameters was evaluated using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results Compared to the normal controls, the DMD group had lower FIQ (82.0±15.39 vs. 120.21±16.06) and significantly lower splenium of corpus callosum (CC) FA values (P<0.05). Splenium of CC FA was positively correlated with VIQ (r=0.588, P=0.044). Conclusions There were microstructural changes of splenium of CC in DMD patients, which was associated with cognitive impairment. PMID:27127762

  5. Dropped-head in recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Matteo; Pennisi, Elena Maria; Bruttini, Mirella; Bizzarri, Veronica; Bucci, Elisabetta; Morino, Stefania; Talerico, Caterina; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Renieri, Alessandra; Antonini, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented a dropped head, caused by severe neck extensor weakness that had started two years before. She had also developed a mild degree of dysphagia, rhinolalia, eyelid ptosis and proximal limb weakness during the last months. EMG revealed myopathic changes. Muscle MRI detected fatty infiltration in the posterior neck muscles and tongue. Muscle biopsy revealed fiber size variations, sporadic rimmed vacuoles, small scattered angulated fibers and a patchy myofibrillar network. Genetic analysis revealed homozygous (GCN)11 expansions in the PABPN1 gene that were consistent with recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). There are a few reports of the recessive form, which has a later disease onset with milder symptoms and higher clinical variability than the typical dominantly inherited form. This patient, who is the first Italian and the eighth worldwide reported case of recessive OPMD, is also the first case of OPMD with dropped-head syndrome, which thus expands the clinical phenotype of recessive OPMD. PMID:26494409

  6. Compound loss of muscleblind-like function in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuang-Yung; Li, Moyi; Manchanda, Mini; Batra, Ranjan; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Mohan, Apoorva; Warren, Sonisha A; Chamberlain, Christopher M; Finn, Dustin; Hong, Hannah; Ashraf, Hassan; Kasahara, Hideko; Ranum, Laura P W; Swanson, Maurice S

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a multi-systemic disease that impacts cardiac and skeletal muscle as well as the central nervous system (CNS). DM is unusual because it is an RNA-mediated disorder due to the expression of toxic microsatellite expansion RNAs that alter the activities of RNA processing factors, including the muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins. While these mutant RNAs inhibit MBNL1 splicing activity in heart and skeletal muscles, Mbnl1 knockout mice fail to recapitulate the full-range of DM symptoms in these tissues. Here, we generate mouse Mbnl compound knockouts to test the hypothesis that Mbnl2 functionally compensates for Mbnl1 loss. Although Mbnl1−/−; Mbnl2−/− double knockouts (DKOs) are embryonic lethal, Mbnl1−/−; Mbnl2+/− mice are viable but develop cardinal features of DM muscle disease including reduced lifespan, heart conduction block, severe myotonia and progressive skeletal muscle weakness. Mbnl2 protein levels are elevated in Mbnl1−/− knockouts where Mbnl2 targets Mbnl1-regulated exons. These findings support the hypothesis that compound loss of MBNL function is a critical event in DM pathogenesis and provide novel mouse models to investigate additional pathways disrupted in this RNA-mediated disease. PMID:24293317

  7. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Juliette; Lempereur, Mathieu; Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël; Brochard, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity. PMID:27622734

  8. Adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy: A fresh perspective.

    PubMed

    Chowers, Itay; Tiosano, Liran; Audo, Isabelle; Grunin, Michelle; Boon, Camiel J F

    2015-07-01

    Adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AFVD) was first described by Gass four decades ago. AFVD is characterized by subretinal vitelliform macular lesions and is usually diagnosed after the age of 40. The lesions gradually increase and then decrease in size over the years, leaving an area of atrophic outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium. This process is accompanied by a loss of visual acuity. Vitelliform lesions are hyperautofluorescent and initially have a dome-shaped appearance on optical coherence tomography. The electro-oculogram and full-field electroretinogram are typically normal, indicating localized retinal pathology. Phenocopies are also associated with other ocular disorders, such as vitreomacular traction, age-related macular degeneration, pseudodrusen, and central serous chorioretinopathy. A minority of AFVD patients have a mutation in the PRPH2, BEST1, IMPG1, or IMPG2 genes. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the HTRA1 gene has also been associated with this phenotype. Accordingly, the phenotype can arise from alterations in the photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and/or interphotoreceptor matrix depending on the underlying gene defect. Excess photoreceptor outer segment production and/or impaired outer segment uptake due to impaired phagocytosis are likely underlying mechanisms. At present, no cure is available for AFVD. Thus, the current challenges in the field include identifying the underlying cause in the majority of AFVD cases and the development of effective therapeutic approaches. PMID:25681578

  9. Therapeutic Approaches for Dominant Muscle Diseases: Highlight on Myotonic Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Klein, A F; Dastidar, S; Furling, D; Chuah, M K

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy (DM), one of the most common neuromuscular disorders in adults, comprises two genetically distinct forms triggered by unstable expanded repeats in non-coding regions. The most common DM1 is caused by expanded CTG repeats in the 3'UTR of the DMPK gene, whereas DM2 is due to large expanded CCTG repeats in the first intron of the CNBP gene. Both mutations induce a pathogenic RNA gain-of-function mechanism. Mutant RNAs containing CUG or CCUG expanded repeats, which are retained in the nuclei as aggregates alter activities of alternative splicing regulators such as MBNL proteins and CELF1. As a consequence, alternative splicing misregulations of several pre-mRNAs are associated with DM clinical symptoms. Currently, there is no available cure for this dominant neuromuscular disease. Nevertheless, promising therapeutic strategies have been developed in the last decade. Preclinical progress in DM research prompted the first DM1 clinical trial based on antisense oligonucleotides promoting a RNase-H-mediated degradation of the expanded CUG transcripts. The ongoing Phase 1/2a clinical trial will hopefully give further insights into the quest to find a bona fide cure for DM1. In this review, we will provide an overview of the different strategies that were developed to neutralize the RNA toxicity in DM1. Different approaches including antisense oligonucleotide technologies, gene therapies or small molecules have been tested and validated in cellular and animal models. Remaining challenges and additional avenues to explore will be discussed. PMID:26122101

  10. [Exon-skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the lack of dystrophin at the sarcolemma. Exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides is a novel method to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene, and rescue dystrophin expression. We recently reported that systemic delivery of Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting exon 6 and 8 of the canine DMD gene, efficiently recovered functional dystrophin at the sarcolamma of dystrophic dogs, and improved phenotypes of affected dogs without serious side effects (Ann Neurol. 65: 667-676, 2009). To optimize therapeutic antisense Morpholinos for more frequent mutations of the DMD gene, we designed antisense Morpholinos targeting exon 51 of the mouse DMD gene, and injected them separately or in combination into the muscles of mdx52 mice, in which exon 52 has been deleted by a gene targeting technique. We also tried systemic delivery of antisense Morpholino to skip exon 51 in mdx 52 mice and found the amelioration of the phenotypes (Mol Ther, 2010). Clinical trials of exon 51 skipping for DMD patients is now going in our country and application of antisense strategy to other hereditary neuromuscular diseases is largely expected. PMID:22277414

  11. Progress toward gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    1999-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is available. The lethal consequences of DMD are caused by absence of a structural protein, called dystrophin, from skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. The usefulness of gene replacement as therapy for this disease has been established in transgenic mouse models. Unfortunately, progress toward therapy for human patients has been limited by the characteristics of currently available viral vectors and by lack of a suitable technique for delivery of such vectors to a large mass of muscle cells. Successful gene therapy of DMD will require a vector that can carry most of the dystrophin coding sequence, that can be cheaply produce in large quantities, that can be delivered to a large mass of muscle cells, and that provides stable expression of dystrophin after delivery. We and others have worked to develop such a vector through modification of adenoviruses (Ad). Here we review the characteristics of conventional Ad vectors and new helper-dependent, or gutted, Ad vectors. Gutted Ad vectors contain cis-acting DNA sequences necessary for viral replication and packaging, but are deleted, or gutted, for all viral coding sequences. We found that gutted vectors efficiently delivered full-length dystrophin to the skeletal muscles of dystrophic (mdx) mice. Dystrophic muscles injected with these vectors expressed dystrophin for at least four months post-injection, which was the longest time point tested. These data suggest that gutted vectors will allow delivery and long-term expression of dystrophin. PMID:12194388

  12. Targeting nuclear RNA for in vivo correction of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Thurman M; Leger, Andrew J; Pandey, Sanjay K; MacLeod, A Robert; Nakamori, Masayuki; Cheng, Seng H; Wentworth, Bruce M; Bennett, C Frank; Thornton, Charles A

    2012-08-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) hold promise for gene-specific knockdown in diseases that involve RNA or protein gain-of-function effects. In the hereditary degenerative disease myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), transcripts from the mutant allele contain an expanded CUG repeat and are retained in the nucleus. The mutant RNA exerts a toxic gain-of-function effect, making it an appropriate target for therapeutic ASOs. However, despite improvements in ASO chemistry and design, systemic use of ASOs is limited because uptake in many tissues, including skeletal and cardiac muscle, is not sufficient to silence target messenger RNAs. Here we show that nuclear-retained transcripts containing expanded CUG (CUG(exp)) repeats are unusually sensitive to antisense silencing. In a transgenic mouse model of DM1, systemic administration of ASOs caused a rapid knockdown of CUG(exp) RNA in skeletal muscle, correcting the physiological, histopathologic and transcriptomic features of the disease. The effect was sustained for up to 1 year after treatment was discontinued. Systemically administered ASOs were also effective for muscle knockdown of Malat1, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that is retained in the nucleus. These results provide a general strategy to correct RNA gain-of-function effects and to modulate the expression of expanded repeats, lncRNAs and other transcripts with prolonged nuclear residence. PMID:22859208

  13. Functional muscle ischemia in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gail D.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) comprise a spectrum of devastating X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. DMD/BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle membrane and also targets other proteins to the sarcolemma. Among these is the muscle-specific isoform of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) which binds spectrin-like repeats within dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin. Dystrophin deficiency causes loss of sarcolemmal nNOSμ and reduces paracrine signaling of muscle-derived nitric oxide (NO) to the microvasculature, which renders the diseased muscle fibers susceptible to functional muscle ischemia during exercise. Repeated bouts of functional ischemia superimposed on muscle fibers already weakened by dystrophin deficiency result in use-dependent focal muscle injury. Genetic and pharmacologic strategies to boost nNOSμ-NO signaling in dystrophic muscle alleviate functional muscle ischemia and show promise as novel therapeutic interventions for the treatment of DMD/BMD. PMID:24391598

  14. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient's tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient's tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient's tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  15. [Myotonic dystrophy: magnetic resonance tomography and clinico-genetic correlations].

    PubMed

    Damian, M S; Koch, M C; Bachmann, G; Schilling, G; Fach, B; Stöppler, S; Trittmacher, S; Dorndorf, W

    1995-06-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder involving muscle, brain, heart, eyes and endocrine organs, among others. The molecular basis is an unstable trinucleotide repeat at the 3'-untranslated end of the myotonin protein kinase gene on chromosome 19 q 13.3, and the number of repeats correlates with the severity of muscle weakness. We performed a clinical, psychometric and MRI study on 43 patients with DM and correlated findings with the molecular analysis. Nineteen patients had mild distal muscle weakness, 17 moderate und 7 severe weakness. Thirteen had marked cognitive deficits with reduced speed of cognition, low IQ, and apathy. MRI showed pathological muscle signal in 35 cases with a characteristic mosaic involving distal muscle groups, often sparing the posterior tibial muscle. Cerebral MRI showed significant subcortical white matter lesions in 20 cases and brain atrophy in 15 cases. Clinical and MRI findings of CNS and muscle both correlated with CTG repeat length, but did not parallel each other. DM is a significant disease of the brain as well as muscle, and several aspects of the disease correlate with molecular findings, with a threshold effect for repeats exceeding 1000 trinucleotides. The individual predominance of specific organ involvement probably depends on variable somatic mosaicism of the molecular defect. PMID:7637829

  16. Mouse fukutin deletion impairs dystroglycan processing and recapitulates muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Beedle, Aaron M.; Turner, Amy J.; Saito, Yoshiaki; Lueck, John D.; Foltz, Steven J.; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Nienaber, Patricia M.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Dystroglycan is a transmembrane glycoprotein that links the extracellular basement membrane to cytoplasmic dystrophin. Disruption of the extensive carbohydrate structure normally present on α-dystroglycan causes an array of congenital and limb girdle muscular dystrophies known as dystroglycanopathies. The essential role of dystroglycan in development has hampered elucidation of the mechanisms underlying dystroglycanopathies. Here, we developed a dystroglycanopathy mouse model using inducible or muscle-specific promoters to conditionally disrupt fukutin (Fktn), a gene required for dystroglycan processing. In conditional Fktn-KO mice, we observed a near absence of functionally glycosylated dystroglycan within 18 days of gene deletion. Twenty-week-old KO mice showed clear dystrophic histopathology and a defect in glycosylation near the dystroglycan O-mannose phosphate, whether onset of Fktn excision driven by muscle-specific promoters occurred at E8 or E17. However, the earlier gene deletion resulted in more severe phenotypes, with a faster onset of damage and weakness, reduced weight and viability, and regenerating fibers of smaller size. The dependence of phenotype severity on the developmental timing of muscle Fktn deletion supports a role for dystroglycan in muscle development or differentiation. Moreover, given that this conditional Fktn-KO mouse allows the generation of tissue- and timing-specific defects in dystroglycan glycosylation, avoids embryonic lethality, and produces a phenotype resembling patient pathology, it is a promising new model for the study of secondary dystroglycanopathy. PMID:22922256

  17. Novel Mutations in Two Saudi Patients with Congenital Retinal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Safieh, Leen Abu; Al-Otaibi, Humoud M.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Kozak, Igor

    2016-01-01

    To report novel mutations in two Saudi children with clinical features of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and Alström syndrome. Case reports. Case 1 was a child with phenotypic features of LCA including oculodigital sign, bilateral enophthalmos, nystagmus, pale disc, and retinal changes. Direct sequencing of the coding sequence of GUCY2D revealed a missense mutation affecting highly conserved position (c. 743C > T; p.S248 L). Case 2 describes a girl with marked nystagmus, photophobia, and retinal changes in both eyes with short and stubby fingers tapering at the distal phalanges. The electroretinograms were nonrecordable in each eye. She had a hearing aid in the left ear, mid-facial hypoplasia, bilateral enophthalmos, and insulin dependent diabetes. Mutation screening of candidates genes revealed a pathogenic mutation in ALMS1 gene (c. 8441C > A, p.S2814*). Two novel mutations causing phenotypic LCA and Alström syndrome in Saudi patients from consanguineous families expand the genotypic spectrum of congenital retinal dystrophies PMID:26957854

  18. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient’s tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient’s tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient’s tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  19. The immune system in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Friend or foe

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, S Armando; Rosenberg, Amy S; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene, resulting in reduced or absent protein production, subsequently leading to the structural instability of the dystroglycan complex (DGC), muscle degeneration, and early death in males. Thus, current treatments have been targeting the genetic defect either by bypassing the mutation through exon skipping or replacing the defective gene through gene therapy and stem cell approaches. However, what has been an underappreciated mediator of muscle pathology and, ultimately, of muscle degeneration and fibrotic replacement, is the prominent inflammatory response. Of potentially critical importance, however, is the fact that the elements mediating the inflammatory response also play an essential role in tissue repair. In this opinion piece, we highlight the detrimental and supportive immune parameters that occur as a consequence of the genetic disorder and discuss how changes to immunity can potentially ameliorate the disease intensity and be employed in conjunction with efforts to correct the genetic disorder. PMID:26481612

  20. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  1. Myotonic dystrophy type 1: frequency of ophthalmologic findings.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Karin Suzete; Iwabe-Marchese, Cristina; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Nucci, Anamarli; Carvalho, Keila Monteiro de

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the frequency of ophthalmologic abnormalities in a cohort of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients and to correlate them with motor function. We reviewed the pathophysiology of cataract and low intraocular pressure (IOP). Method Patients were included after clinical and laboratory diagnosis and after signed informed consent. They were evaluated by Motor Function Measure scale, Portuguese version (MFM-P) and ophthalmic protocol. Results We evaluated 42 patients aged 17 to 64 years (mean 40.7 ± 12.5), 22 of which were men. IOP (n = 41) was reduced in all but one. We found cataract or positivity for surgery in 38 (90.48%) and ptosis in 23 (54.76%). These signs but not IOP were significantly correlated with severity of motor dysfunction. Abnormalities in ocular motility and stereopsis were observed. Conclusion Cataract and ptosis are frequent in DM1 and associated to motor dysfunction. Reduced IOP is also common, but appears not to be related with motor impairment. PMID:27050845

  2. A Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with Mitochondrial Structural Abnormalities Caused by Defective De Novo Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Ohkuma, Aya; Talim, Beril; Karahashi, Minako; Koumura, Tomoko; Aoyama, Chieko; Kurihara, Mana; Quinlivan, Ros; Sewry, Caroline; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Goto, Kanako; Koksal, Burcu; Kale, Gulsev; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Noguchi, Satoru; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Nonaka, Ikuya; Sher, Roger B.; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasuhito; Cox, Gregory A.; Topaloglu, Haluk; Nishino, Ichizo

    2011-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of inherited muscle diseases characterized clinically by muscle weakness and hypotonia in early infancy. A number of genes harboring causative mutations have been identified, but several cases of congenital muscular dystrophy remain molecularly unresolved. We examined 15 individuals with a congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by early-onset muscle wasting, mental retardation, and peculiar enlarged mitochondria that are prevalent toward the periphery of the fibers but are sparse in the center on muscle biopsy, and we have identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding choline kinase beta (CHKB). This is the first enzymatic step in a biosynthetic pathway for phosphatidylcholine, the most abundant phospholipid in eukaryotes. In muscle of three affected individuals with nonsense mutations, choline kinase activities were undetectable, and phosphatidylcholine levels were decreased. We identified the human disease caused by disruption of a phospholipid de novo biosynthetic pathway, demonstrating the pivotal role of phosphatidylcholine in muscle and brain. PMID:21665002

  3. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Nicholas P

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy in muscles from the dmd/mdx mouse, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Statins decrease CYBB/NOX2 expression and activity and stimulate autophagy in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we treated dmd/mdx mice with simvastatin and showed decreased CYBB/NOX2-mediated oxidative stress and enhanced autophagy induction. This was accompanied by reduced muscle damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and increased muscle force production. Our data suggest that increased autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which simvastatin improves skeletal muscle health and function in muscular dystrophy. PMID:26890413

  4. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jamie L; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian J; Baum, Linda G; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2013-09-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein-replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important potential therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein-replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  5. Mitochondrial DNA does not appear to influence the congenital onset type of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, J; Harley, H G; Dasmahapatra, J; Brown, G K; Potter, C G; Sykes, B

    1995-01-01

    Neither the maternal inheritance pattern nor the early onset of congenital myotonic dystrophy are fully explained. One possible mechanism is that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations might interact with the DM gene product, producing an earlier onset than would otherwise occur. We have used Southern hybridisation to show that high levels of major rearrangements of mtDNA are not present in muscle of five and in blood of 35 patients with congenital myotonic dystrophy. We used sequence analysis to show that no one particular mtDNA morph appears to cosegregate with congenital onset. A minor degree of depletion of mtDNA compared with nuclear DNA was present in the muscle of five patients with congenital DM, but we propose that this is not the primary cause of the muscle pathology but secondary to it. We have not found evidence that mtDNA is involved in congenital myotonic dystrophy. PMID:8544195

  6. Model organisms in the fight against muscular dystrophy: lessons from drosophila and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Plantié, Emilie; Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause muscle weakness, abnormal contractions and muscle wasting, often leading to premature death. More than 30 types of MD have been described so far; those most thoroughly studied are Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and congenital MDs. Structurally, physiologically and biochemically, MDs affect different types of muscles and cause individual symptoms such that genetic and molecular pathways underlying their pathogenesis thus remain poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of how MD-caused muscle defects arise and to find efficacious therapeutic treatments, different animal models have been generated and applied. Among these, simple non-mammalian Drosophila and zebrafish models have proved most useful. This review discusses how zebrafish and Drosophila MD have helped to identify genetic determinants of MDs and design innovative therapeutic strategies with a special focus on DMD, DM1 and congenital MDs. PMID:25859781

  7. Fracture in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Natural History and Vitamin D Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Perera, Nadia; Sampaio, Hugo; Woodhead, Helen; Farrar, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the natural history of fracture and vitamin D levels in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, who are vulnerable to osteoporosis and fractures. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 48 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients revealed that 43% of patients experienced ≥1 fracture. Fracture probabilities at ages 6, 9, 12, and 15 years were 4%, 9%, 31%, and 60% respectively, accelerating around the time of ambulation loss (mean age 11.8 ± 2.7 years). Chronic corticosteroid therapy was utilized in 69% of patients and was associated with all vertebral fractures. A history of vitamin D deficiency occurred in 84%, and 35% were currently deficient. Despite chronic vitamin D supplementation, 38% remained deficient. These results demonstrate that osteoporosis and fracture remain major concerns in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Bone health should be optimized well before loss of ambulation, however current levels of vitamin D supplementation may be inadequate given high levels of deficiency. PMID:27221372

  8. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian; Baum, Linda G.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  9. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-05-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which lead to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates.

  10. Modeling Myotonic Dystrophy 1 in C2C12 Myoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui; Dong, Wei; Shen, Xiaopeng; Peng, Xiaoping; Aceves, Angie G; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is a common form of muscular dystrophy. Although several animal models have been established for DM1, myoblast cell models are still important because they offer an efficient cellular alternative for studying cellular and molecular events. Though C2C12 myoblast cells have been widely used to study myogenesis, resistance to gene transfection, or viral transduction, hinders research in C2C12 cells. Here, we describe an optimized protocol that includes daily maintenance, transfection and transduction procedures to introduce genes into C2C12 myoblasts and the induction of myocyte differentiation. Collectively, these procedures enable best transfection/transduction efficiencies, as well as consistent differentiation outcomes. The protocol described in establishing DM1 myoblast cell models would benefit the study of myotonic dystrophy, as well as other muscular diseases. PMID:27501221

  11. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-05-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual /sup 31/P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which leads to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates.

  12. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Kay-Marie; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon B; Gao, Quan Q; Miller, Tamari; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression. PMID:27148972

  13. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Gao, Quan Q.; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H.; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression. PMID:27148972

  14. TGFBI and CHST6 gene analysis in Chinese stromal corneal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yin; Li, Tuo; Song, Xiu-Sheng; Li, Jia-Zhang; Wu, Qing-Song; Li, Hong-Yan

    2012-01-01

    AIM To investigate whether mutations in TGFBI gene or CHST6 gene correlated with stromal corneal dystrophies (CD) in 8 Chinese probands. METHODS Eight unrelated patients with stromal corneal dystrophies were recruited in this study; all affected members were assessed by completely ophthalmologic examinations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes, 17 exons of TGFBI gene and the exon of CHST6 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced directly and compared with the reference database. RESULTS Three heterozygous mutations in TGFBI gene were identified in six patients: c. 370C>T (p.Arg124Cys) was found in exon 4 of TGFBI gene in three members, c. 371G>A (p.Arg124His) was found in one patient; c. 1663C>T (p.Arg555Trp) was found in exon 12 in other two members. In addition, four polymorphisms with the nucleotide changes rs1442, rs1054124, rs4669, and rs35151677 were found in TGFBI gene. Mutations were not identified in the rest of 2 affected individuals in TGFBI gene or CHST6 gene. CONCLUSION Within these patients, R124C, R124H and R555W mutations were co-segregated with the disease phenotypes and were specific mutations for lattice corneal dystrophy type I (LCD I), Avellino corneal dystrophy (ACD, GCD II), granular corneal dystrophy type I (GCD I), respectively. Our study highlights the prevalence of codon 124 and codon 555 mutations in the TGFBI gene among the Chinese stromal corneal dystrophies patients. PMID:22773977

  15. Dysferlin-Deficient Muscular Dystrophy Identified Through Laboratory Testing for Elevated Aminotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Achdjian, Houry; Usta, Yousef; Nanda, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a 24-year-old combat veteran who underwent extensive work-up for elevated aminotransferases, including liver biopsy, with no underlying pathology identified. Subsequent investigations showed elevated creatinine kinase and aldolase. The patient was later diagnosed with biopsy-proven dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy. Persistent transaminase elevation despite negative liver work-up should prompt clinicians to consider extrahepatic sources of enzyme elevation. Promptly correlating aminotransferase elevation with musculoskeletal pathology may present an opportunity for clinicians to detect myopathies such as muscular dystrophy in their preclinical stages. PMID:26958568

  16. Two Cases of Endometrial Cancer in Twin Sisters with Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We describe two cases of endometrial cancer (EC) occurring in nulligravid twin sisters with myotonic dystrophy. Both tested negative for Lynch syndrome and both were treated with laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Although EC tends to run in families, the diagnosis in itself is not considered sufficient cause for screening or prophylactic measures in close relatives. However, the presence of additional risk factors, such as nulligravidity and myotonic dystrophy in the underlying cases, may call for extra vigilance in first-degree family members. PMID:27595026

  17. Bilateral Atypical Granular Corneal Dystrophy Associated with Unilateral Keratoconus in a Male Child

    PubMed Central

    Dangra, Kavita Lohiya; Das, Manoranjan; Periasamy, Sundersan; Prajna, N. Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with decreased vision. Slit lamp examination indicated multiple anterior corneal stromal opacities with clear intervening spaces accompanied with superficial subepithelial lines arranged in a quasi-whorl-like fashion bilateral with greater prominence in the right eye. Corneal steepening associated with thinning was noted only in the right eye. Genetic analysis confirmed a mutation suggestive of granular corneal dystrophy. Here, we describe a rare case of an atypical granular dystrophy associated with unilateral keratoconus in a male child. PMID:27555713

  18. Characteristics of corneal dystrophies: a review from clinical, histological and genetic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ze-Nan; Chen, Jie; Cui, Hong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Corneal dystrophy is a common type of hereditary corneal diseases. It includes many types, which have varied pathology, histology and clinical manifestations. Recently, the examination techniques of ophthalmology and gene sequencing advance greatly, which do benefit to our understanding of these diseases. However, many aspects remain still unknown. And due to the poor knowledge of these diseases, the results of the treatments are not satisfoctory. The purpose of this review was to summarize the clinical, histological and genetic characteristics of different types of corneal dystrophies. PMID:27366696

  19. Cardiac conduction abnormalities and Stokes-Adams attacks in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, C.; Gagnon, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is a well known cause of cardiomyopathy. While various cardiac conduction abnormalities have been described in patients with myotonic dystrophy, so far only sporadic cases of Stokes-Adams attacks have been reported. Of 27 patients with this disease various conduction disturbances were detected in 17 (63%), 5 of whom presented with Stokes-Adams attacks and were found to have intracardiac conduction defects. The prognosis in four of the five patients was greatly improved with permanent pacemaker implantation. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:657033

  20. Usefulness of sugammadex in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Shimauchi, Tsukasa; Yamaura, Ken; Sugibe, Sayaka; Hoka, Sumio

    2014-09-01

    A 54-year-old patient with Becker muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia. Muscle relaxation was induced by rocuronium (0.4 mg/kg body weight) under train-of-four (TOF) ratio monitoring. The TOF ratio was 0 at intubation, and 0.2 at the end of surgery. Residual muscle relaxant activity was successfully reversed by sugammadex (2 mg/kg body weight) without any hemodynamic adverse effects (TOF ratio 1.0 at extubation). The clinical and hemodynamic findings suggest that sugammadex can be safely used in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:25199695

  1. Median Canaliform Dystrophy of Heller occurring on thumb and great toe nails.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Vikas

    2016-04-01

    Median Canaliform Dystrophy of Heller is a rare but morphologically striking habit tic deformity of thumb nails characterized by midline longitudinal furrow with multiple transverse parallel lines. The proposed etiopathogenesis is repetitive trauma to the nail plate and cuticle, however some case reports have suggested familial occurrence and use of oral retinoids in its causation. Treatment is often prolonged and unsatisfactory, though some topical agents have been used successfully. We report a case of a young male patient presenting with Median Dystrophy of Heller affecting both Great thumb and toe nails simultaneously. PMID:27257330

  2. Effects of therapeutic exercise on masticatory function in patients with progressive muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Kawazoe, Y; Kobayashi, M; Tasaka, T; Tamamoto, M

    1982-01-01

    The slope of the curve relating integrated electromyographic activity of masseter muscle to biting force, the latency of the jaw-jerk reflex, and masticatory performance wee estimated in patients with Duchenne type of progressive muscular dystrophy before and during therapeutic exercise of the somatogenc system. The slope and latency were slightly decreased, and masticatory performance was increased during exercise. These results suggest that therapeutic exercise of the stomatognathic system is effective in improving masticatory function in patients with progressive muscular dystrophy. Images PMID:7077343

  3. Distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms in muscular dystrophy: insights into disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Beedle, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain isoforms are an important component defining fiber type specific properties in skeletal muscle, such as oxidative versus glycolytic metabolism, rate of contraction, and fatigability. While the molecular mechanisms that underlie specification of the different fiber types are becoming clearer, how this programming becomes disrupted in muscular dystrophy and the functional consequences of fiber type changes in disease are not fully resolved. Fiber type changes in disease, with specific focus on muscular dystrophies caused by defects in the dystrophin glycoprotein complex, are discussed. PMID:27430020

  4. Dermochondrocorneal dystrophy (Francois syndrome) in a Mexican patient and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto; Acosta-Nieto, Maria L; Normendez-Martinez, Monica I; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Nubia F; Paz-Gomez, Francisco; Valdes-Flores, Margarita; Kramis-Hollands, Mirelle

    2016-02-01

    Dermochondrocorneal Dystrophy (OMIM 221800) is a very rare disease first described by Francois in 1949. It is characterized by the appearance of skin nodules, osteochondral deformities, and corneal opacities during childhood. Only a few cases have been reported. There is uncertainty about the inheritance pattern and no gene or genes have been associated to this disease. We report a patient from Mexican mestizo origin with the classic manifestations of Dermochondrocorneal Dystrophy. We perform a multidisciplinary assessment in order to contribute to the knowledge of the clinical presentation of this uncommon condition. Among the few documented patients, this is the third patient of Mexican ancestry reported with this syndrome. PMID:26440764

  5. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium in chromosome 13-linked Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Othmane, K.B.; Speer, M.C.; Stauffer, J.

    1995-09-01

    Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy (DLMD) is an autosomal recessive Limb Girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2C) characterized by late age of onset, proximal muscle weakness leading to disability, high creatine kinase values, normal intelligence and normal dystrophin in muscle biopsy. We have shown previously that three DLMD families from Tunisia are linked to chromosome 13q12. To further localize the LGMD2C gene, we have investigated seven additional families (119 individuals). Both genotyping and two-point linkage analysis were performed as described elsewhere. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Technetium 99m-methylene diphosphonate bone scans in children with reflex neurovascular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Laxer, R.M.; Allen, R.C.; Malleson, P.N.; Morrison, R.T.; Petty, R.E.

    1985-03-01

    Eleven children with reflex neurovascular dystrophy were investigated by technetium-labeled methylene diphosphonate bone scanning. Eight of 12 scans demonstrated abnormal findings, four showing diffusely decreased uptake and four diffusely increased uptake of the radionuclide in the affected site. Three scans showed normal findings initially, as did one previously abnormal scan when repeated in the asymptomatic patient 6 months later. Diffusely abnormal findings can be helpful in the diagnosis of childhood reflex neurovascular dystrophy, but a normal scan does not exclude the diagnosis.

  7. TECPR2 Associated Neuroaxonal Dystrophy in Spanish Water Dogs.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Kerstin; Rohdin, Cecilia; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Seehusen, Frauke; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Grandon, Rodrigo; Drögemüller, Cord; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin

    2015-01-01

    Clinical, pathological and genetic examination revealed an as yet uncharacterized juvenile-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD) in Spanish water dogs. Affected dogs presented with various neurological deficits including gait abnormalities and behavioral deficits. Histopathology demonstrated spheroid formation accentuated in the grey matter of the cerebral hemispheres, the cerebellum, the brain stem and in the sensory pathways of the spinal cord. Iron accumulation was absent. Ultrastructurally spheroids contained predominantly closely packed vesicles with a double-layered membrane, which were characterized as autophagosomes using immunohistochemistry. The family history of the four affected dogs suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance. SNP genotyping showed a single genomic region of extended homozygosity of 4.5 Mb in the four cases on CFA 8. Linkage analysis revealed a maximal parametric LOD score of 2.5 at this region. By whole genome re-sequencing of one affected dog, a perfectly associated, single, non-synonymous coding variant in the canine tectonin beta-propeller repeat-containing protein 2 (TECPR2) gene affecting a highly conserved region was detected (c.4009C>T or p.R1337W). This canine NAD form displays etiologic parallels to an inherited TECPR2 associated type of human hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP). In contrast to the canine NAD, the spinal cord lesions in most types of human HSP involve the sensory and the motor pathways. Furthermore, the canine NAD form reveals similarities to cases of human NAD defined by widespread spheroid formation without iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Thus TECPR2 should also be considered as candidate gene for human NAD. Immunohistochemistry and the ultrastructural findings further support the assumption, that TECPR2 regulates autophagosome accumulation in the autophagic pathways. Consequently, this report provides the first genetic characterization of juvenile canine NAD, describes the histopathological features

  8. Idebenone reduces respiratory complications in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Craig M; Meier, Thomas; Voit, Thomas; Schara, Ulrike; Straathof, Chiara S M; D'Angelo, M Grazia; Bernert, Günther; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Finkel, Richard S; Goemans, Nathalie; Rummey, Christian; Leinonen, Mika; Spagnolo, Paolo; Buyse, Gunnar M

    2016-08-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), progressive loss of respiratory function leads to restrictive pulmonary disease and places patients at significant risk for severe respiratory complications. Of particular concern are ineffective cough, secretion retention and recurrent respiratory tract infections. In a Phase 3 randomized controlled study (DMD Long-term Idebenone Study, DELOS) in DMD patients 10-18 years of age and not taking concomitant glucocorticoid steroids, idebenone (900 mg/day) reduced significantly the loss of respiratory function over a 1-year study period. In a post-hoc analysis of DELOS we found that more patients in the placebo group compared to the idebenone group experienced bronchopulmonary adverse events (BAEs): placebo: 17 of 33 patients, 28 events; idebenone: 6 of 31 patients, 7 events. The hazard ratios (HR) calculated "by patient" (HR 0.33, p = 0.0187) and for "all BAEs" (HR 0.28, p = 0.0026) indicated a clear idebenone treatment effect. The overall duration of BAEs was 222 days (placebo) vs. 82 days (idebenone). In addition, there was also a difference in the use of systemic antibiotics utilized for the treatment of BAEs. In the placebo group, 13 patients (39.4%) reported 17 episodes of antibiotic use compared to 7 patients (22.6%) reporting 8 episodes of antibiotic use in the idebenone group. Furthermore, patients in the placebo group used systemic antibiotics for longer (105 days) compared to patients in the idebenone group (65 days). This post-hoc analysis of DELOS indicates that the protective effect of idebenone on respiratory function is associated with a reduced risk of bronchopulmonary complications and a reduced need for systemic antibiotics. PMID:27238057

  9. Quantifying the burden of caregiving in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Landfeldt, Erik; Lindgren, Peter; Bell, Christopher F; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Katharine

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rare pediatric neuromuscular disease associated with progressive muscle degeneration and extensive care needs. Our objective was to estimate the caregiver burden associated with DMD. We made cross-sectional assessments of caregiver health-related quality of life (HRQL) and burden using the EuroQol EQ-5D, a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the SF-12 Health Survey, and the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview (ZBI) administered online. Results were stratified by disease stage (early/late ambulatory/non-ambulatory) and caregivers' rating of patients' health and mental status. In total, caregivers to 770 patients participated. Mean EQ-5D utility ranged between 0.85 (95 % CI 0.82-0.88) and 0.77 (0.74-0.80) across ambulatory classes and 0.88 (0.85-0.90) and 0.57 (0.39-0.74) across caregivers' rating of patients' health and mental status. Mean VAS score was 0.74 (0.73-0.75), mean SF-12 Mental Health Component Summary score 44 (43-45), and mean ZBI score 29 (28-30). Anxiety and depression, recorded in up to 70 % of caregivers depending on patients' health and mental status, was significantly associated with annual household cost burden (>$5000 vs. <$1000, odds ratio 1.76, 95 % CI 1.18-2.63) and hours of leisure time devoted to informal care per week (25-50 vs. <25 h 2.01, 1.37-2.94; >50 vs. <25 h 3.35, 2.32-4.83) (p < 0.007). We show that caring for a person with DMD can be associated with a substantial burden and impaired HRQL. Our findings suggest that caregivers to patients with DMD should be screened for depression and emphasize the need for a holistic approach to family mental health in the context of chronic childhood disease. PMID:26964543

  10. TECPR2 Associated Neuroaxonal Dystrophy in Spanish Water Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Seehusen, Frauke; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Grandon, Rodrigo; Drögemüller, Cord; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin

    2015-01-01

    Clinical, pathological and genetic examination revealed an as yet uncharacterized juvenile-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD) in Spanish water dogs. Affected dogs presented with various neurological deficits including gait abnormalities and behavioral deficits. Histopathology demonstrated spheroid formation accentuated in the grey matter of the cerebral hemispheres, the cerebellum, the brain stem and in the sensory pathways of the spinal cord. Iron accumulation was absent. Ultrastructurally spheroids contained predominantly closely packed vesicles with a double-layered membrane, which were characterized as autophagosomes using immunohistochemistry. The family history of the four affected dogs suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance. SNP genotyping showed a single genomic region of extended homozygosity of 4.5 Mb in the four cases on CFA 8. Linkage analysis revealed a maximal parametric LOD score of 2.5 at this region. By whole genome re-sequencing of one affected dog, a perfectly associated, single, non-synonymous coding variant in the canine tectonin beta-propeller repeat-containing protein 2 (TECPR2) gene affecting a highly conserved region was detected (c.4009C>T or p.R1337W). This canine NAD form displays etiologic parallels to an inherited TECPR2 associated type of human hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP). In contrast to the canine NAD, the spinal cord lesions in most types of human HSP involve the sensory and the motor pathways. Furthermore, the canine NAD form reveals similarities to cases of human NAD defined by widespread spheroid formation without iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Thus TECPR2 should also be considered as candidate gene for human NAD. Immunohistochemistry and the ultrastructural findings further support the assumption, that TECPR2 regulates autophagosome accumulation in the autophagic pathways. Consequently, this report provides the first genetic characterization of juvenile canine NAD, describes the histopathological features

  11. A Model of Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Stanton, J. Brett; Yocom, John; Bakall, Benjamin; Schiavone, Marc T.; Wadelius, Claes; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The VMD2 gene, mutated in Best macular dystrophy (BMD) encodes bestrophin, a 68-kDa basolateral plasma membrane protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. BMD is characterized by a depressed light peak (LP) in the electro-oculogram. Bestrophin is thought to be the Cl channel that generates the LP. The goal was to generate an animal model of BMD and to determine the effects of bestrophin overexpression on the RPE-generated components of the ERG. METHODS Bestrophin or bestrophin mutants (W93C or R218C) were overexpressed in the RPE of rats by injection of replication-defective adenovirus. Immunofluorescence microscopy and ERG recordings were used to study subsequent effects. RESULTS Bestrophin was confined to the basolateral plasma membrane of the RPE. Neither wild-type (wt) nor mutant bestrophin affected the a- or b-waves of the ERG. Wt bestrophin, however, increased the c-wave and fast oscillation (FO), but not the LP. In contrast, both mutants had little or no effect on the c-wave and FO, but did reduce LP amplitude. LP amplitudes across a range of stimuli were not altered by wt bestrophin, though the luminance response function was desensitized. LP response functions were unaffected by bestrophin R218C but were significantly altered by bestrophin W93C. CONCLUSIONS A model of BMD was developed in the present study. Because overexpression of wt bestrophin shifted luminance response but did not alter the range of LP response amplitudes, the authors conclude that the rate-limiting step for generating LP amplitude occurs before activation of bestrophin or that bestrophin does not directly generate the LP conductance. PMID:15452084

  12. Multimodal analysis of the progression of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zerbib, Jennyfer; Georges, Anouk; Massamba, Nathalie; Forte, Raimondo; Querques, Lea; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Kaplan, Josseline; Souied, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the multimodal morphological features in the different stages of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD) in subjects harboring mutations in the BEST1 gene, and their changes during the progression of the disease. Methods In this retrospective observational study performed between January 2007 and December 2012, 21 patients (42 eyes) with Best VMD from eight families with the BEST1 mutation were included. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) were evaluated at study entry and at last visit. Results The mean age of patients was 26.3±17.4 years. Seven new missense mutations in BEST1 were identified. Mean follow-up was 41.1±18.5 months. Mean BCVA was 0.34±0.34 LogMAR at study entry and 0.32±0.33 LogMAR at last follow-up visit (p = 0.2). The overall lesion area on FAF increased from 6.62±4.9 mm2 to 7.34±6.1 mm2 (p = 0.05). At study entry, on SD-OCT, photoreceptor inner segment ellipsoid portion (ellipsoid zone, EZ) was normal in 15 eyes, disrupted in 14 eyes, and absent in 13 eyes. In two eyes, EZ changed from normal to disrupted during follow-up. Three eyes of three patients showing pseudohypopyon lesions at study entry progressed to vitelliruptive lesions at the last follow-up visit. Three eyes of three patients showing vitelliruptive lesion at study entry reverted to pseudohypopyon lesion with overall enlargement of the lesion size. Conclusions Multimodal analysis allowed documenting a continuous material accumulation and reabsorption in Best VMD progression. Blue FAF and SD-OCT could represent noninvasive imaging techniques to monitor Best VMD. PMID:24791142

  13. Outer Retinal Structure in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, David B.; Land, Megan E.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Godara, Pooja; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Stepien, Kimberly E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize outer retinal structure in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy (BVMD), using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Methods Four symptomatic members of a family with BVMD with known BEST1 gene mutation were recruited. Thickness of two outer retinal layers corresponding to photoreceptor inner and outer segments were measured using SD-OCT. Photoreceptor mosaic AOSLO images within and around visible lesions were obtained, and cone density was assessed in two subjects. Results Each subject was at a different stage of BVMD, with photoreceptor disruption evident by AOSLO at all stages. When comparing SD-OCT and AOSLO images from the same location, AOSLO images allowed for direct assessment of photoreceptor structure. A variable degree of retained photoreceptors was seen within all lesions. The photoreceptor mosaic immediately adjacent to visible lesions appeared contiguous and was of normal density. Fine hyperreflective structures were visualized by AOSLO, and their anatomical orientation and size are consistent with Henle fibers. Conclusions AOSLO findings indicate substantial photoreceptor structure persists within active lesions, accounting for good visual acuity in these patients. Despite previous reports of diffuse photoreceptor outer segment abnormalities in BVMD, our data reveal normal photoreceptor structure in areas adjacent to clinical lesions. Clinical Relevance This study demonstrates the utility of AOSLO for understanding the spectrum of cellular changes that occur in inherited degenerations such as BVMD. Photoreceptors are often significantly affected at various stages of inherited degenerations, and these changes may not be readily apparent with current clinical imaging instrumentation. PMID:23765342

  14. Extremely varied phenotypes in granular corneal dystrophy type 2 heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyung Eun; Choi, Seung-il; Chung, Woo Suk; Jung, Se Hwan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Kim, Tae-im

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the phenotypic variability of patients bearing the heterozygous R124H mutation in the TGFBI (transforming growth factor-beta-induced) gene that causes granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2). Methods We describe the phenotypic range of GCD2 heterozygotes for the common R124H mutation in TGFBI; seven with an extremely mild phenotype and six with an extremely severe phenotype. Detailed slit-lamp photographs of these patients were generated. All patients had no history of ocular surgery and were diagnosed as being heterozygous for GCD2 by DNA analysis from peripheral blood. Expression levels of transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) were compared among cultured corneal fibroblasts from ten normal donors. Results We report profound differences in the severity of the phenotype across our case series. Two patients with a mild phenotype were diagnosed as unaffected at presentation; however follow-up examinations revealed granular deposits. Importantly, we also observed familial clustering of phenotypic variance; five patients from two families with a mild phenotype showed a similarly mild phenotype within family members. Similarly, six patients from two families with severe phenotypes showed corneal deposits with similar patterns and severity within each distinct family, but distinct patterns between families. TGFBIp expressions from different donor derived cultured corneal fibroblasts were different between one another. Conclusions GCD2 heterozygotes have extremely varied phenotypes between individual patients. However phenotypes were broadly consistent within families, suggesting that the observed variable expressivity might be regulated by other genetic factors that could influence the abundance of TGFBIp or the function of the pathway. From a clinical perspective, our data also highlighted that genetic analysis and meticulous slit-lamp examination in both eyes at multiple time intervals is necessary. PMID:22815629

  15. Computer task performance by subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Silvia Regina Pinheiro; da Silva, Talita Dias; Favero, Francis Meire; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Fregni, Felipe; Ribeiro, Denise Cardoso; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira

    2016-01-01

    Aims Two specific objectives were established to quantify computer task performance among people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). First, we compared simple computational task performance between subjects with DMD and age-matched typically developing (TD) subjects. Second, we examined correlations between the ability of subjects with DMD to learn the computational task and their motor functionality, age, and initial task performance. Method The study included 84 individuals (42 with DMD, mean age of 18±5.5 years, and 42 age-matched controls). They executed a computer maze task; all participants performed the acquisition (20 attempts) and retention (five attempts) phases, repeating the same maze. A different maze was used to verify transfer performance (five attempts). The Motor Function Measure Scale was applied, and the results were compared with maze task performance. Results In the acquisition phase, a significant decrease was found in movement time (MT) between the first and last acquisition block, but only for the DMD group. For the DMD group, MT during transfer was shorter than during the first acquisition block, indicating improvement from the first acquisition block to transfer. In addition, the TD group showed shorter MT than the DMD group across the study. Conclusion DMD participants improved their performance after practicing a computational task; however, the difference in MT was present in all attempts among DMD and control subjects. Computational task improvement was positively influenced by the initial performance of individuals with DMD. In turn, the initial performance was influenced by their distal functionality but not their age or overall functionality. PMID:26766911

  16. Mothers' psychological adaptation to Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Peay, Holly L; Meiser, Bettina; Kinnett, Kathleen; Furlong, Pat; Porter, Kathryn; Tibben, Aad

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD) cause significant emotional and care-related burden on caregivers, but no studies have evaluated predictors of positive caregiver outcomes, including disorder-specific psychological adaptation. Using a community-engaged approach focused on supporting mothers in positive aspects of caregiving, this prospective study aims to assess (i) the association between child's baseline functional status and mothers' illness perceptions, resilience, and coping self-efficacy; and (ii) predictors of mothers' psychological adaptation to caring for a child with DBMD. Biological mothers with at least one living child with DBMD completed a baseline survey (n=205) with 1-year (n=147) and 2-year (n=144) follow-up surveys. Worse child's baseline function was associated not only with increased caregiver burden and reduced maternal resilience, but also with perception of positive disease impact on the family. At two follow-ups, increased psychological adaptation to DBMD was predicted by resilience (β=0.264, P=0.001) and perceived positive impact (β=0.310, P<0.001), controlling for mother's age (β=-0.305, P<0.001) and income (β=-0.088, P=0.245). Child's functional status and caregiver burden of DBMD did not predict DBMD-specific adaptation. Though clinicians caring for families with DBMD should anticipate increased caregiver burden as the disorder progresses, interventions focused on caregiver burden are not expected to influence mothers' psychosocial adaptation. Efforts to improve mothers' well-being should focus on fostering mothers' resilience and enhancing perceptions of positive disease impact (benefit finding). Results suggest that psychosocial interventions can highlight strengths and well-being rather than burden and deficit. PMID:26306645

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in myotonic dystrophy type 1 muscle.

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, Koji; Nakamori, Masayuki; Furuya, Hirokazu; Arahata, Hajime; Kanemoto, Soshi; Kimura, Takashi; Imaizumi, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masanori P; Sakoda, Saburo; Fujii, Naoki; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2007-11-01

    In myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), alternative splicing of ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) genes has been reported. These proteins are essential for maintaining intracellular Ca2+ in skeletal muscle. To clarify involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in DM1 muscles, we examined the activation of ER stress-related proteins by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and RT-PCR. In four of five DM1 muscle biopsies, except for a muscle biopsy from a patient with the shortest CTG expansion and no myotonia, increased expression of GRP78 and calnexin, and phosphorylation of PERK and eIF-2 alpha were revealed in fibers with sarcoplasmic masses and in highly atrophic fibers with pyknotic nuclear clumps. Caspase-3 and -7 were also expressed in these fibers. Increased expression of GRP78 in these DM1 muscles was confirmed by western blot analysis. GRP78 mRNA and spliced isoform of XBP1 mRNA were also increased in DM1 muscle biopsies. Furthermore, we demonstrated increased expression of GRP78 in highly atrophic fibers with pyknotic nuclear clumps in all three muscle biopsies from neurogenic muscular atrophies. However, five muscle biopsies from central core disease presumably with disturbed intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and a muscle biopsy from paramyotonia congenita with myotonia showed no activation of these proteins. Taken together, ER stress is involved in muscle wasting in DM1. However, it seems to be evoked not only by disrupted intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:17661063

  18. Patterns of late gadolinium enhancement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to assess whether cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers (DMDc) may index any cell milieu elements of LV dysfunction and whether this cardiac phenotype may be related to genotype. The null hypothesis was that myocardial fibrosis, assessed by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), might be similarly accounted for in DMDc and gender and age-matched controls. Methods Thirty DMDc patients had CMR and genotyping with 37 gender and age-matched controls. Systolic and diastolic LV function was assessed by 2D-echocardiography. Results Absolute and percent LGE were higher in muscular symptomatic (sym) than asymptomatic (asy) DMDc (1.77 ± 0.27 vs 0.76 ± 0.17 ml; F = 19.6, p < 0.0001 and 1.86 ± 0.26% vs 0.68 ± 0.17%, F = 22.1, p < 0.0001, respectively). There was no correlation between LGE and age. LGE was seen most frequently in segments 5 and 6; segment 5 was involved in all asy-DMDc. Subepicardial LGE predominated, compared to the mid-myocardial one (11 out of 14 DMDc). LGE was absent in the subendocardium. No correlations were seen between genotyping (type of mutation, gene region and protein domain), confined to the exon’s study, and cardiac phenotype. Conclusions A typical myocardial LGE-pattern location (LV segments 5 and 6) was a common finding in DMDc. LGE was more frequently subepicardial plus midmyocardial in sym-DMDc, with normal LV systolic and diastolic function. No genotype-phenothype correlation was found. PMID:25008475

  19. Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity in Patients with Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Luciano; Vagheggini, Alessandro; Cocchi, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Aging sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy (MD) are two conditions characterized by lower skeletal muscle quantity, lower muscle strength, and lower physical performance. Aging is associated with a peculiar alteration in body composition called “sarcopenic obesity” characterized by a decrease in lean body mass and increase in fat mass. To evaluate the presence of sarcopenia and obesity in a cohort of adult patients with MD, we have used the measurement techniques considered golden standard for sarcopenia that is for muscle mass dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), for muscle strength hand-held dynamometry (HHD), and for physical performance gait speed. The study involved 14 adult patients with different types of MD. We were able to demonstrate that all patients were sarcopenic obese. We showed, in fact, that all were sarcopenic based on appendicular lean, fat and bone free, mass index (ALMI). In addition, all resulted obese according to the percentage of body fat determined by DXA in contrast to their body mass index ranging from underweight to obese. Skeletal muscle mass determined by DXA was markedly reduced in all patients and correlated with residual muscle strength determined by HHD, and physical performances determined by gait speed and respiratory function. Finally, we showed that ALMI was the best linear explicator of muscle strength and physical function. Altogether, our study suggests the relevance of a proper evaluation of body composition in MD and we propose to use, both in research and practice, the measurement techniques that has already been demonstrated effective in aging sarcopenia. PMID:25339901

  20. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a late-onset polyalanine disease.

    PubMed

    Brais, B

    2003-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a muscle disease of late onset associated with progressive ptosis of the eyelids, dysphagia, and unique tubulofilamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs). OPMD is usually transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait (OMIM 164300). A rarer allelic autosomal recessive form has also been observed (OMIM 257950). Both forms are caused by short (GCG)8-13 expansions in the polyadenylate-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1) located on chromosome 14q11.1. The mutations cause the lengthening of an N-terminal polyalanine domain. Both slippage and unequal recombination have been proposed as the mutation mechanisms. The size of the mutation has not yet been conclusively shown to inversely correlate with the severity of the phenotype. Mutated PABPN1 proteins have been shown to be constituents of the INIs. The INIs also contain ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, HSP 40, HSP 70, SKIP, and abundant poly(A)-mRNA. The exact mechanism responsible for polyalanine toxicity in OPMD is unknown. Various intranuclear inclusion dependent and independent mechanisms have been proposed based on the major known function of PABPN1 in polyadenylation of mRNA and its shuttling from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. OPMD is one of the few triplet-repeat diseases for which the function of the mutated gene is known. Because of the increasing number of diseases caused by polyalanine expansions and the pathological overlap with CAG/polyglutamine diseases, what pathological insight is gained by the study of OPMD could lead to a better understanding of a much larger group of developmental and degenerative diseases. PMID:14526187

  1. Characterization of Pulmonary Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, OH; Finkel, RS; Rummey, C; Benton, MJ; Glanzman, AM; Flickinger, J; Lindström, B-M; Meier, T

    2015-01-01

    Decline in pulmonary function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) contributes to significant morbidity and reduced longevity. Spirometry is widely used and fairly easily performed technique to assess lung function, and in particular lung volume; however, the acceptability criteria from the American Thoracic Society (ATS) may be overly restrictive and inappropriate for patients with neuromuscular disease. We examined prospective spirometry data (Forced Vital Capacity [FVC] and peak expiratory flow [PEF]) from 60 DMD patients enrolled in a natural history cohort study (median age 10.3y, range 5–24y). Expiratory flow-volume curves were examined by a pulmonologist and the data were evaluated for acceptability using ATS criteria modified based on the capabilities of patients with neuromuscular disease. Data were then analyzed for change with age, ambulation status and glucocorticoid use. At least one acceptable study was obtained in 44 subjects (73%) and 81 of the 131 studies (62%) were acceptable. The FVC and PEF showed similar relative changes in absolute values with increasing age: an increase through 10y, relative stabilization from 10–18y, and then a decrease at older age. The percent predicted FVC and PEF showed a near linear decline of approximately 5 percentage points/year from ages 5 to 24y. Surprisingly, no difference was observed in FVC or PEF by ambulation or steroid treatment. Acceptable spirometry can be performed on DMD patients over a broad range of ages. Using modified ATS criteria, curated spirometry data, excluding technically unacceptable data, may provide a more reliable means of determining change in lung function over time. PMID:25755201

  2. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomographic Findings of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Öner, Ferit Hakan

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the OCT features of 24 eyes of 12 patients with Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) with the Heidelberg HRA2-OCT. Seventeen of 24 eyes were in intermediate stage of the disease and seven in advanced stage of the disease at the time of latest OCT examination performed in 2014. Outer retinal tubulations and retinal hyperreflective dots were present in 20 of 24 eyes. The remaining four eyes had advanced disease with very thin retina. Appearance of bright plaque on top of RPE-Bruch membrane was present in all eyes. Choroidal hyperreflective spots were noted in 19 of 24 eyes. The remaining five eyes had advanced disease stage with very thin choroid. Mean central macular thickness was 163.08 μm ± 62.52 for all eyes (170.35 μm ± 56.46 in eyes with intermediate disease and 145.42 μm ± 77.2 in eyes with advanced disease). Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was 95.37 μm ± 55.93 for the study eyes (116.47 ± 46.92 μm in eyes with intermediate disease and 44.14 μm ± 42.43 in eyes with advanced disease). Choroidal hyperreflective spots were noted in 21 of 24 eyes (87.5%). SD-OCT shows the disease progression in retinal and choroidal layers delicately in eyes with BCD and expands our knowledge about the ongoing disease process. PMID:25505979

  3. Phototherapeutic keratectomy for recurrent granular dystrophy in postpenetrating keratoplasty eyes

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Varsha M; Taneja, Mukesh; Murthy, Somasheila I; Bagga, Bhupesh; Vaddavalli, Pravin Krishna; Sangwan, Virender S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose is to assess the clinical and visual outcome after phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) procedure in eyes with prior penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) for granular corneal dystrophy (GCD) and the time of performance of repeat PTK for recurrence. Methods: PTK was performed for visually significant recurrence: A reduction in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) by >2 lines over BCVA before recurrence was considered as visually significant recurrence. Three eyes had amniotic membrane patch performed with PTK. The main outcome measures were a recurrence of GCD, clinical course, and visual outcome. Intervals between repeat PTK procedures were noted. Results: Six patients (n = 10 eyes; males: 4, mean age 39 ± 13.97 years) underwent PTK. The mean pachymetry before first PTK was 527.1 ± 34 microns. The mean duration between PKP and first PTK was 85.1 months (range: 37–108 months). Two and three PTK procedures were done for seven and five eyes, respectively. Mean duration between first and second and second and third PTK was 62.12 ± 34.41 and 42.8 ± 13.54 months respectively. The average cut depth was 43.66 ± 19.57, 75 ± 43.30 and 39 ± 19.79 microns after the first, second and third PTK procedures, respectively. All eyes had a corneal haze. Prefirst PTK mean BCVA was 20/200 and improved significantly after the first two PTK procedures to 20/40 and after the third PTK procedure to 20/32 (P < 0.001). Five eyes had hyperopia. One acute graft rejection was managed successfully at 5 months with medical therapy. Conclusion: Multiple PTK procedures can be performed safely with improved visual acuity in grafts without compromising graft survival. PMID:27050350

  4. Muscle wasting in myotonic dystrophies: a model of premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Aierdi, Alba Judith; Goicoechea, Maria; Aiastui, Ana; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; Garcia-Puga, Mikel; Matheu, Ander; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 or Steinert’s disease) and type 2 (DM2) are multisystem disorders of genetic origin. Progressive muscular weakness, atrophy and myotonia are the most prominent neuromuscular features of these diseases, while other clinical manifestations such as cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance and cataracts are also common. From a clinical perspective, most DM symptoms are interpreted as a result of an accelerated aging (cataracts, muscular weakness and atrophy, cognitive decline, metabolic dysfunction, etc.), including an increased risk of developing tumors. From this point of view, DM1 could be described as a progeroid syndrome since a notable age-dependent dysfunction of all systems occurs. The underlying molecular disorder in DM1 consists of the existence of a pathological (CTG) triplet expansion in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene, whereas (CCTG)n repeats in the first intron of the Cellular Nucleic acid Binding Protein/Zinc Finger Protein 9 (CNBP/ZNF9) gene cause DM2. The expansions are transcribed into (CUG)n and (CCUG)n-containing RNA, respectively, which form secondary structures and sequester RNA-binding proteins, such as the splicing factor muscleblind-like protein (MBNL), forming nuclear aggregates known as foci. Other splicing factors, such as CUGBP, are also disrupted, leading to a spliceopathy of a large number of downstream genes linked to the clinical features of these diseases. Skeletal muscle regeneration relies on muscle progenitor cells, known as satellite cells, which are activated after muscle damage, and which proliferate and differentiate to muscle cells, thus regenerating the damaged tissue. Satellite cell dysfunction seems to be a common feature of both age-dependent muscle degeneration (sarcopenia) and muscle wasting in DM and other muscle degenerative diseases. This review aims to describe the cellular, molecular and macrostructural processes involved in the

  5. Abnormal Splicing of NEDD4 in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Screen, Mark; Jonson, Per Harald; Raheem, Olayinka; Palmio, Johanna; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sirito, Mario; Krahe, Ralf; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a multisystemic disorder caused by a (CCTG)n repeat expansion in intron 1 of CNBP. Transcription of the repeats causes a toxic RNA gain of function involving their accumulation in ribonuclear foci. This leads to sequestration of splicing factors and alters pre-mRNA splicing in a range of downstream effector genes, which is thought to contribute to the diverse DM2 clinical features. Hyperlipidemia is frequent in DM2 patients, but the treatment is problematic because of an increased risk of statin-induced adverse reactions. Hypothesizing that shared pathways lead to the increased risk, we compared the skeletal muscle expression profiles of DM2 patients and controls with patients with hyperlipidemia on statin therapy. Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated-4 (NEDD4), an ubiquitin ligase, was one of the dysregulated genes identified in DM2 patients and patients with statin-treated hyperlipidemia. In DM2 muscle, NEDD4 mRNA was abnormally spliced, leading to aberrant NEDD4 proteins. NEDD4 was down-regulated in persons taking statins, and simvastatin treatment of C2C12 cells suppressed NEDD4 transcription. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), an established NEDD4 target, was increased and accumulated in highly atrophic DM2 muscle fibers. PTEN ubiquitination was reduced in DM2 myofibers, suggesting that the NEDD4-PTEN pathway is dysregulated in DM2 skeletal muscle. Thus, this pathway may contribute to the increased risk of statin-adverse reactions in patients with DM2. PMID:24907641

  6. Red-Green Color Vision Impairment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcelo Fernandes ; Oliveira, Andre Gustavo Fernandes ; Feitosa-Santana, Claudia ; Zatz, Mayana ; Ventura, Dora Fix 

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the color vision of 44 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) (mean age 14.8 years; SD 4.9) who were submitted to a battery of four different color tests: Cambridge Colour Test (CCT), Neitz Anomaloscope, Ishihara, and American Optical Hardy-Rand-Rittler (AO H-R-R). Patients were divided into two groups according to the region of deletion in the dystrophin gene: upstream of exon 30 (n=12) and downstream of exon 30 (n=32). The control group was composed of 70 age-matched healthy male subjects with no ophthalmological complaints. Of the patients with DMD, 47% (21/44) had a red-green color vision defect in the CCT, confirmed by the Neitz Anomaloscope with statistical agreement (P<.001). The Ishihara and the AO H-R-R had a lower capacity to detect color defects—5% and 7%, respectively, with no statistical similarity between the results of these two tests nor between CCT and Anomaloscope results (P>.05). Of the patients with deletion downstream of exon 30, 66% had a red-green color defect. No color defect was found in the patients with deletion upstream of exon 30. A negative correlation between the color thresholds and age was found for the controls and patients with DMD, suggesting a nonprogressive color defect. The percentage (66%) of patients with a red-green defect was significantly higher than the expected <10% for the normal male population (P<.001). In contrast, patients with DMD with deletion upstream of exon 30 had normal color vision. This color defect might be partially explained by a retina impairment related to dystrophin isoform Dp260. PMID:17503325

  7. Genetic Modifiers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Politano, Luisa; Melacini, Paola; Calore, Chiara; Polo, Angela; Vianello, Sara; Sorarù, Gianni; Semplicini, Claudio; Pantic, Boris; Taglia, Antonella; Picillo, Ester; Magri, Francesca; Gorni, Ksenija; Messina, Sonia; Vita, Gian Luca; Vita, Giuseppe; Comi, Giacomo P.; Ermani, Mario; Calvo, Vincenzo; Angelini, Corrado; Hoffman, Eric P.; Pegoraro, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major complication and leading cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DCM onset is variable, suggesting modifier effects of genetic or environmental factors. We aimed to determine if polymorphisms previously associated with age at loss of independent ambulation (LoA) in DMD (rs28357094 in the SPP1 promoter, rs10880 and the VTTT/IAAM haplotype in LTBP4) also modify DCM onset. Methods A multicentric cohort of 178 DMD patients was genotyped by TaqMan assays. We performed a time-to-event analysis of DCM onset, with age as time variable, and finding of left ventricular ejection fraction < 50% and/or end diastolic volume > 70 mL/m2 as event (confirmed by a previous normal exam < 12 months prior); DCM-free patients were censored at the age of last echocardiographic follow-up. Results Patients were followed up to an average age of 15.9 ± 6.7 years. Seventy-one/178 patients developed DCM, and median age at onset was 20.0 years. Glucocorticoid corticosteroid treatment (n = 88 untreated; n = 75 treated; n = 15 unknown) did not have a significant independent effect on DCM onset. Cardiological medications were not administered before DCM onset in this population. We observed trends towards a protective effect of the dominant G allele at SPP1 rs28357094 and recessive T allele at LTBP4 rs10880, which was statistically significant in steroid-treated patients for LTBP4 rs10880 (< 50% T/T patients developing DCM during follow-up [n = 13]; median DCM onset 17.6 years for C/C-C/T, log-rank p = 0.027). Conclusions We report a putative protective effect of DMD genetic modifiers on the development of cardiac complications, that might aid in risk stratification if confirmed in independent cohorts. PMID:26513582

  8. Modulation of myoblast fusion by caveolin-3 in dystrophic skeletal muscle cells: implications for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-1C.

    PubMed

    Volonte, Daniela; Peoples, Aaron J; Galbiati, Ferruccio

    2003-10-01

    Caveolae are vesicular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Caveolin-3 is the principal structural component of caveolae in skeletal muscle cells in vivo. We have recently generated caveolin-3 transgenic mice and demonstrated that overexpression of wild-type caveolin-3 in skeletal muscle fibers is sufficient to induce a Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy phenotype. In addition, we have shown that caveolin-3 null mice display mild muscle fiber degeneration and T-tubule system abnormalities. These data are consistent with the mild phenotype observed in Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-1C (LGMD-1C) in humans, characterized by a approximately 95% reduction of caveolin-3 expression. Thus, caveolin-3 transgenic and null mice represent valid mouse models to study Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and LGMD-1C, respectively, in humans. Here, we derived conditionally immortalized precursor skeletal muscle cells from caveolin-3 transgenic and null mice. We show that overexpression of caveolin-3 inhibits myoblast fusion to multinucleated myotubes and lack of caveolin-3 enhances the fusion process. M-cadherin and microtubules have been proposed to mediate the fusion of myoblasts to myotubes. Interestingly, we show that M-cadherin is downregulated in caveolin-3 transgenic cells and upregulated in caveolin-3 null cells. For the first time, variations of M-cadherin expression have been linked to a muscular dystrophy phenotype. In addition, we demonstrate that microtubules are disorganized in caveolin-3 null myotubes, indicating the importance of the cytoskeleton network in mediating the phenotype observed in these cells. Taken together, these results propose caveolin-3 as a key player in myoblast fusion and suggest that defects of the fusion process may represent additional molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of DMD and LGMD-1C in humans. PMID:14517320

  9. Uncovering the profile of mutations of transforming growth factor beta-induced gene in Chinese corneal dystrophy patients

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiao-Dan; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Chen, Peng; Li, Su-Xia; Wang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    AIM To uncover the mutations profile of transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI) gene in Chinese corneal dystrophy patients and further investigate the characteristics of genotype-phenotype correlations. METHODS Forty-two subjects (6 unrelated families including 15 patients and 8 unaffected members, and 19 sporadic patients) of Chinese origin were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic characterization. The corneal phenotypes of patients were documented by slit lamp photography. Mutation screening of the coding regions of TGFBI was performed by direct sequencing. RESULTS We detected four corneal dystrophy types. The most frequent phenotypes were granular corneal dystrophy (GCD) (including 3 families and 8 sporadic patients) and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) (including 2 families and 9 sporadic patients). The next phenotypes were corneal dystrophy of Bowman layer (CDB) (1 family and 1 sporadic patient) and epithelial basement membrane dystrophy (EBMD) (1 sporadic patient). Six distinct mutations responsible for TGFBI corneal dystrophies were identified in 30 individuals with corneal dystrophies. Those were, p.R124H mutation in 1 family and 2 sporadic patients with GCD, p.R555W mutation in 2 families and 3 sporadic patients with GCD, p.R124C mutation in 2 families and 7 sporadic patients with LCD, p.A620D mutation in 1 sporadic patient with LCD, p.H626R mutation in 1 sporadic patient with LCD, and p.R555Q in 1 family and 1 sporadic patient with CDB. No mutation was detected in the remaining 3 atypical GCD patients and 1 EBMD patient. CONCLUSION GCD and LCD are the most frequent phenotypes in Chinese population. R555W was the most common mutation for GCD; R124C was the most common mutation for LCD. Our findings extend the mutational spectrum of TFGBI, and this is the extensively delineated TGFBI mutation profile associated with the various corneal dystrophies in the Chinese population. PMID:26949635

  10. Pregnancy and delivery in Leyden-Möbius muscular dystrophy. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vavrinkova, Blanka; Binder, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Leyden-Möbius muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease of unknown aetiology; it is a congenital disorder of protein metabolism primarily affecting proximal muscle groups leading to progressive muscular dystrophy. It later spreads to the muscles of the pelvic floor and lower extremities. The estimated incidence is 1:200,000. This paper describe a case of pregnancy and delivery in woman with progressive Leyden-Moebius muscular dystrophy. Cesarean section was performed due to progression of the underlying disease. First postoperative day DIC occure and surgical revision of abdominal cavity was performed. Although the uterine suture was strong, diffuse bleeding was present. Blood was not coagulating. Supravaginal amputation of the uterus was performed including left-sided adnexectomy due to bleeding from the left ovarium. Due to the severity of the condition and assumed necessity of long-term controlled ventilation, the patient was transferred to the intensive medicine department. She was dismissed home after 91 days of hospitalisation. Gravidity in advanced muscular dystrophy is rare and associated with a high risk. Due to muscle weakness, diaphragm weakness, atrophy of individual muscle groups, spine deformities and often dislocation of thoracic organs, these patients cannot avoid the caesarean section to end their pregnancy, followed by prolonged intubation and controlled ventilation. During pregnancy, the growing uterus elevates the diaphragm and impairs breathing. Therefore, pregnancies in such patients will probably always have to be ended prematurely. PMID:26313391

  11. Neuromuscular disease. Diagnosis and discovery in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing is a new tool for neuromuscular clinicians, and recent findings show that it improves the diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. The technique has a dual role as a tool for diagnosis and discovery in genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular diseases. PMID:26670295

  12. Bietti's tapetoretinal degeneration with marginal corneal dystrophy (crystalline retinopathy): case report.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, R J; Acheson, R R; Dean-Hart, J C

    1987-01-01

    A patient with Bietti's tapetoretinal degeneration and marginal corneal dystrophy is reported on. Refractile deposits found in both the retina and cornea are the most striking feature of this condition. Apart from a slight reduction in left visual acuity there were no visual symptoms. The dark adapted electroretinogram was abnormal. No metabolic disturbance was detected. Images PMID:3493804

  13. Investigation of Poor Academic Achievement in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, V. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Fee, R.; Goldstein, E.; Stern, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder that presents with progressive muscular weakness. It is caused by a mutation in a gene that results in the absence of specific products that normally localize to muscle cells and the central nervous system (CNS). The majority of affected individuals have IQs within the…

  14. Congenital muscular dystrophy with glycosylation defects of alpha-dystroglycan in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Kim, Dae-Son; Ogawa, Megumu; Murakami, Terumi; Noguchi, Satoru; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nakazawa, Tomoyuki; Matsuo, Takiko; Futagami, Satoshi; Campbell, Kevin P; Nishino, Ichizo

    2005-05-01

    Glycosylation defects of alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) cause various muscular dystrophies. We performed clinical, pathological and genetic analyses of 62 Japanese patients with congenital muscular dystrophy, whose skeletal muscle showed deficiency of glycosylated form of alpha-DG. We found, the first Japanese patient with congenital muscular dystrophy 1C with a novel compound heterozygous mutation in the fukutin-related protein gene. Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy was genetically confirmed in 54 of 62 patients. Two patients with muscle-eye-brain disease and one Walker-Warburg syndrome were also genetically confirmed. Four patients had no mutation in any known genes associated with glycosylation of alpha-DG. Interestingly, the molecular mass of alpha-DG in the skeletal muscle was similar and was reduced to approximately 90 kDa among these patients, even though the causative gene and the clinico-pathological severity were different. This result suggests that other factors can modify clinical features of the patients with glycosylation defects of alpha-DG. PMID:15833426

  15. Mild and severe muscular dystrophy caused by a single gamma-sarcoglycan mutation.

    PubMed

    McNally, E M; Passos-Bueno, M R; Bönnemann, C G; Vainzof, M; de Sá Moreira, E; Lidov, H G; Othmane, K B; Denton, P H; Vance, J M; Zatz, M; Kunkel, L M

    1996-11-01

    Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy is genetically heterogeneous. One form of this disorder, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD 2C), is prevalent in northern Africa and has been shown to be associated with a single mutation in the gene encoding the dystrophin-associated protein gamma-sarcoglycan. The previous mutation analysis of gamma-sarcoglycan required the availability of muscle biopsies. To establish a mutation assay for genomic DNA, the intron-exon structure of the gamma-sarcoglycan gene was determined, and primers were designed to amplify each of the exons encoding gamma-sarcoglycan. We studied a group of Brazilian muscular dystrophy patients for mutations in the gamma-sarcoglycan gene. These patients were selected on the basis of autosomal inheritance and/or the presence of normal dystrophin and/or deficiency of alpha-sarcoglycan immunostaining. Four of 19 patients surveyed had a single, homozygous mutation in the gamma-sarcoglycan gene. The mutation identified in these patients, all of African-Brazilian descent, is identical to that seen in the North African population, suggesting that even patients of remote African descent may carry this mutation. The phenotype in these patients varied considerably. Of four families with an identical mutation, three have a severe Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy. However, one family has much milder symptoms, suggesting that other loci may be present that modify the severity of the clinical course resulting from gamma-sarcoglycan gene mutations. PMID:8900232

  16. DNA Damage, Somatic Aneuploidy, and Malignant Sarcoma Susceptibility in Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Uddin, Mohammed H.; Dysek, Sandra; Moser-Thier, Karin; Pirker, Christine; Höger, Harald; Ambros, Inge M.; Ambros, Peter F.; Berger, Walter; Bittner, Reginald E.

    2011-01-01

    Albeit genetically highly heterogeneous, muscular dystrophies (MDs) share a convergent pathology leading to muscle wasting accompanied by proliferation of fibrous and fatty tissue, suggesting a common MD–pathomechanism. Here we show that mutations in muscular dystrophy genes (Dmd, Dysf, Capn3, Large) lead to the spontaneous formation of skeletal muscle-derived malignant tumors in mice, presenting as mixed rhabdomyo-, fibro-, and liposarcomas. Primary MD–gene defects and strain background strongly influence sarcoma incidence, latency, localization, and gender prevalence. Combined loss of dystrophin and dysferlin, as well as dystrophin and calpain-3, leads to accelerated tumor formation. Irrespective of the primary gene defects, all MD sarcomas share non-random genomic alterations including frequent losses of tumor suppressors (Cdkn2a, Nf1), amplification of oncogenes (Met, Jun), recurrent duplications of whole chromosomes 8 and 15, and DNA damage. Remarkably, these sarcoma-specific genetic lesions are already regularly present in skeletal muscles in aged MD mice even prior to sarcoma development. Accordingly, we show also that skeletal muscle from human muscular dystrophy patients is affected by gross genomic instability, represented by DNA double-strand breaks and age-related accumulation of aneusomies. These novel aspects of molecular pathologies common to muscular dystrophies and tumor biology will potentially influence the strategies to combat these diseases. PMID:21533183

  17. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity.

    PubMed

    Saksens, Nicole T M; Krebs, Mark P; Schoenmaker-Koller, Frederieke E; Hicks, Wanda; Yu, Minzhong; Shi, Lanying; Rowe, Lucy; Collin, Gayle B; Charette, Jeremy R; Letteboer, Stef J; Neveling, Kornelia; van Moorsel, Tamara W; Abu-Ltaif, Sleiman; De Baere, Elfride; Walraedt, Sophie; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Cremers, Frans P M; Boon, Camiel J F; Roepman, Ronald; Leroy, Bart P; Peachey, Neal S; Hoyng, Carel B; Nishina, Patsy M; den Hollander, Anneke I

    2016-02-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the CTNNA1 gene (encoding α-catenin 1) in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy. In addition, we identified a Ctnna1 missense mutation in a chemically induced mouse mutant, tvrm5. Parallel clinical phenotypes were observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of individuals with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and in tvrm5 mice, including pigmentary abnormalities, focal thickening and elevated lesions, and decreased light-activated responses. Morphological studies in tvrm5 mice demonstrated increased cell shedding and the presence of large multinucleated RPE cells, suggesting defects in intercellular adhesion and cytokinesis. This study identifies CTNNA1 gene variants as a cause of macular dystrophy, indicates that CTNNA1 is involved in maintaining RPE integrity and suggests that other components that participate in intercellular adhesion may be implicated in macular disease. PMID:26691986

  18. Two cases of myotonic dystrophy manifesting various ophthalmic findings with genetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Ji; Yim, Hye Bin; Hwang, Hyung Bin

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of myotonic dystrophy in one family; both diagnosed from genetic analysis following ophthalmic indications, but before the manifestation of systemic symptoms. A 39-year-old female visited our clinic for routine examination. Mild ptosis, sluggish pupillary response, and bilateral snowflake cataracts were found. Fundus examination revealed an increased cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) in both eyes and a defect in the retinal nerve fiber layer in the right eye. Intraocular pressure was low, but within the normal range in both eyes. Because cataracts are characteristic of myotonic dystrophy, we suggested that her 14-year-old daughter, who did not have any systemic complaints, undergo ophthalmic examination. She also had mild ptosis and snowflake cataracts. Both patients underwent genetic evaluation and were diagnosed with myotonic dystrophy caused by unstable expansion of cytosine-thymine-guanine trinucleotide repeats in the dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase gene. Ophthalmologists can diagnose myotonic dystrophy based on clinical and genetic findings, before the manifestation of systemic abnormalities. PMID:27609169

  19. Myotonic dystrophy CTG expansion affects synaptic vesicle proteins, neurotransmission and mouse behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Sicot, Géraldine; Huguet, Aline; Luilier, Sabrina; Steidl, Esther; Saenger, Stefanie; Marciniak, Elodie; Obriot, Hélène; Chevarin, Caroline; Nicole, Annie; Revillod, Lucile; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Takashi; Matsuura, Tohru; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Swanson, Maurice S.; Trovero, Fabrice; Buisson, Bruno; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hamon, Michel; Humez, Sandrine; Bassez, Guillaume; Metzger, Friedrich; Buée, Luc; Munnich, Arnold; Sergeant, Nicolas; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is a complex multisystemic inherited disorder, which displays multiple debilitating neurological manifestations. Despite recent progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 in skeletal muscle and heart, the pathways affected in the central nervous system are largely unknown. To address this question, we studied the only transgenic mouse line expressing CTG trinucleotide repeats in the central nervous system. These mice recreate molecular features of RNA toxicity, such as RNA foci accumulation and missplicing. They exhibit relevant behavioural and cognitive phenotypes, deficits in short-term synaptic plasticity, as well as changes in neurochemical levels. In the search for disease intermediates affected by disease mutation, a global proteomics approach revealed RAB3A upregulation and synapsin I hyperphosphorylation in the central nervous system of transgenic mice, transfected cells and post-mortem brains of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. These protein defects were associated with electrophysiological and behavioural deficits in mice and altered spontaneous neurosecretion in cell culture. Taking advantage of a relevant transgenic mouse of a complex human disease, we found a novel connection between physiological phenotypes and synaptic protein dysregulation, indicative of synaptic dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy type 1 brain pathology. PMID:23404338

  20. Cathepsin S Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Muscular Dystrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tjondrokoesoemo, Andoria; Schips, Tobias G; Sargent, Michelle A; Vanhoutte, Davy; Kanisicak, Onur; Prasad, Vikram; Lin, Suh-Chin J; Maillet, Marjorie; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. Loss of dystrophin protein compromises the stability of the sarcolemma membrane surrounding each muscle cell fiber, leading to membrane ruptures and leakiness that induces myofiber necrosis, a subsequent inflammatory response, and progressive tissue fibrosis with loss of functional capacity. Cathepsin S (Ctss) is a cysteine protease that is actively secreted in areas of tissue injury and ongoing inflammation, where it participates in extracellular matrix remodeling and healing. Here we show significant induction of Ctss expression and proteolytic activity following acute muscle injury or in muscle from mdx mice, a model of DMD. To examine the functional ramifications associated with greater Ctss expression, the Ctss gene was deleted in the mdx genetic background, resulting in protection from muscular dystrophy pathogenesis that included reduced myofiber turnover and histopathology, reduced fibrosis, and improved running capacity. Mechanistically, deletion of the Ctss gene in the mdx background significantly increased myofiber sarcolemmal membrane stability with greater expression and membrane localization of utrophin, integrins, and β-dystroglycan, which anchor the membrane to the basal lamina and underlying cytoskeletal proteins. Consistent with these results, skeletal muscle-specific transgenic mice overexpressing Ctss showed increased myofiber necrosis, muscle histopathology, and a functional deficit reminiscent of muscular dystrophy. Hence, Ctss induction during muscular dystrophy is a pathologic event that partially underlies disease pathogenesis, and its inhibition might serve as a new therapeutic strategy in DMD. PMID:26966179