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Sample records for factor enhances basal

  1. Yeast GAL11 protein is a distinctive type transcription factor that enhances basal transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Hiraoka, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The yeast auxiliary transcription factor GAL11, a candidate for the coactivator, was partially purified from yeast cells, and its function was characterized in a cell-free transcription system. The partially purified GAL11 protein stimulated basal transcription from the CYC1 core promoter by a factor of 4-5 at the step of preinitiation complex formation. GAL11 protein also enhanced transcription activated by general regulatory factor 1, GAL4-AH, or GAL4-VP16 to the same extent as the basal transcription. Therefore, the apparent potentiation of the activators by GAL11 was attributable to the stimulation of basal transcription. The wild-type GAL11 protein (but not a mutant-type protein) produced in bacteria stimulated transcription as effectively as GAL11 from yeast. These results suggest that GAL11 functions as a positive cofactor of basal and activator-induced transcription in a cell-free transcription system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8378310

  2. Enhancing Basal Vocabulary Instruction in Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenfest, Ashleigh; Reed, Deborah K.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance the basal vocabulary instruction for kindergarten students at risk for reading difficulties, lessons provided in typical curricular materials can be supplemented with instructional elements derived from research. This article addresses how teachers can add 15 minutes of higher order instructional activities to daily reading lessons to…

  3. TEMPORAL VARIABILITY IN BASAL ISOPRENE EMISSION FACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variability in basal isoprene emission factor (micrograms C /g hr or nmol/ m2 sec, leaf temperature at 30 degrees C and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 1000 micromol/ m2 sec) was studied during the 1998 growing season at Duke Forest in the North Carolina Pie...

  4. Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation glide in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.

  5. Two distinct upstream regulatory domains containing multicopy cellular transcription factor binding sites provide basal repression and inducible enhancer characteristics to the immediate-early IES (US3) promoter from human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y J; Tseng, W P; Hayward, G S

    1996-08-01

    The US3 gene of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is expressed at immediate-early (IE) times in permissive HF cells, but not in nonpermissive rodent cells, and encodes several proteins that have been reported to have regulatory characteristics, although they are dispensable for growth in cell culture. Both spliced and unspliced forms of US3 IE transcripts are associated with the second of only two known large and complex upstream enhancer domains within the 229-kb HCMV genome, which we refer to as the IES cis-acting control region. Only the 260-bp proximal segment (from -313 to -55) of the 600-bp IES control domain, which contains multicopy NF-kappaB binding sites, proved to be necessary to transfer both high basal expression plus phorbol ester- and okadaic acid-inducible characteristics to heterologous promoters in transient assays in U-937 and K-562 cells. However, the IES control region contains a distinctive 280-bp distal domain, characterized by the presence of seven interspersed repeats of a 10-bp TGTCGCGACA palindromic consensus motif that encompasses a NruI site. This far upstream Nru repeat region (from -596 to -314) imparted up to 20-fold down-regulation effects onto strong basal heterologous promoters as well as onto the IES enhancer plus minimal promoter region in both U-937 and K-562 cells. Functional Nru repressor elements (NREs) could not be generated by multimerizing either the palindromic (P) Nru motifs alone or adjacent degenerate interrupted (I Nru motifs alone. However, multimerized forms of the combined P plus I elements reconstituted the full 20-fold cis-acting down-regulation phenotype of the intact NRE domain. The P and I forms of the Nru elements each bound independently and specifically to related cellular DNA-binding factors to form differently migrating A or B complexes, respectively, whereas the combined P plus I elements bound cooperatively to both the A and B complexes with high affinity. Interestingly, nuclear extracts from U-937, K-562

  6. Rho-associated protein kinase inhibition enhances airway epithelial Basal-cell proliferation and lentivirus transduction.

    PubMed

    Horani, Amjad; Nath, Aditya; Wasserman, Mollie G; Huang, Tao; Brody, Steven L

    2013-09-01

    The identification of factors that regulate airway epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation are essential for understanding the pathophysiology of airway diseases. Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCKs) are downstream effector proteins of RhoA GTPase that direct the functions of cell cytoskeletal proteins. ROCK inhibition with Y27632 has been shown to enhance the survival and cloning of human embryonic stem cells and pluripotent cells in other tissues. We hypothesized that Y27632 treatment exerts a similar effect on airway epithelial basal cells, which function as airway epithelial progenitor cells. Treatment with Y27632 enhanced basal-cell proliferation in cultured human tracheobronchial and mouse tracheal epithelial cells. ROCK inhibition accelerated the maturation of basal cells, characterized by a diminution of the cell size associated with cell compaction and the expression of E-cadherin at cell-cell junctions. Transient treatment of cultured basal cells with Y27632 did not affect subsequent ciliated or mucous cell differentiation under air-liquid interface conditions, and allowed for the initial use of lower numbers of human or mouse primary airway epithelial cells than otherwise possible. Moreover, the use of Y27632 during lentivirus-mediated transduction significantly improved posttransduction efficiency and the selection of a transduced cell population, as determined by reporter gene expression. These findings suggest an important role for ROCKs in the regulation of proliferation and maturation of epithelial basal cells, and demonstrate that the inhibition of ROCK pathways using Y27632 provides an adjunctive tool for the in vitro genetic manipulation of airway epithelial cells by lentivirus vectors. PMID:23713995

  7. Enhancement of the basal-level activity of HIV-1 long terminal repeat by HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J L; Sharma, P L; Crumpacker, C S

    2000-03-15

    Two HIV-1 proteins, Tat and NCp7 (NC), have zinc finger-like structures. NC is a virion protein and has been shown to accumulate in the nucleus 8 h postinfection. Since transcription factors with zinc fingers assist the transcriptional activity of both RNA polymerases II and III, we examined the effect of NC on HIV-1 LTR-directed gene expression. The HIV-1 NC binds to the HIV-1 LTR and results in a mobility shift in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Competition assays with cold probes revealed that the binding of NC and formation of a DNA-protein complex could be prevented by the addition of excess unlabeled LTR self-probe, but not the HIV-1 V3 envelope gene. The DNase I footprint analysis showed that NC binds to six regions within HIV-1 LTR, four of which are near the transcription start site. The NC alone enhances LTR basal-level activity in RNA runoff experiments. When the general transcription factors (GTFs) were added in the assay, NC enhances NF-kappaB, Sp1, and TFIIB-induced HIV-1 LTR-directed RNA transcription. RNA transcription directed by the adenovirus major late promoter, however, is not significantly affected by NC in the cell-free system. Transient transfection of human T lymphocytes with the plasmids containing HIV-1 nc or gag showed enhancement of LTR-CAT activity. Moreover, transfection of HIV-1 provirus containing mutations in NC zinc-finger domains dramatically decreases the enhancement activity in human T cells, in which HIV-1 LTR is stably integrated into the cellular genome. These observations show that NC binds to HIV-1 LTR and cooperatively enhances GTFs and NF-kappaB induced HIV-1 LTR basal-level activity. NC may play the role of a nucleation protein, which binds to LTR and enhances basal-level transcription by recruiting cellular transcription factors to the HIV-1 promoter in competition with cellular promoters. PMID:10704334

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Profile of genetic and environmental factors in oncogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.B.

    1984-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinomas (NBCCs) are a prototype of a genetic form of basal cell carcinoma. These basal cell cancers, rather than being caused by genetic factors alone, are most likely the product of genetic and environmental factors. The NBCC syndrome provides a model for studying tumors induced by ionizing radiation and for viewing carcinogenesis as a multistage process explainable by a minimum of two steps. The interaction of genetic and environmental factors in producing tumors to which an individual is predisposed can be studied in patients with the NBCC syndrome and childhood medulloblastoma that was treated by radiation therapy. Individuals with the NBCC syndrome represent a special subgroup with a hereditary predisposition to basal cell carcinoma in whom ionizing radiation may supply the subsequent mutation necessary for tumor development. The genetically altered epidermis underlying the palm and sole pits found in patients with the syndrome represents basal cell carcinoma in situ from which basal cell carcinomas develop, albeit infrequently. The restrained biologic behavior of most of these tumors contrasts with the usual destructive behavior of the NBCCs of the head and neck in the same patient.

  9. Low level of basal testosterone: a significant risk factor for poor oocyte yield after ovulation induction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zhang, Qingxue; Li, Yu; Wang, Wenjun; Yang, Dongzi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to further investigate the association of low androgen levels and poor ovarian response or negative pregnancy outcome in in vitro fertilisation treatment using a retrospective cohort study. Chinese women (n=1950) of relatively young age, with normal range of basal FSH and antral follicle count undergoing an in vitro fertilisation cycle were selected and testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were measured on Day 3 of the menstrual cycle before subsequent in vitro fertilisation treatment. The main outcome measures of the study were ovarian stimulation parameters and clinical pregnancy. Basal testosterone levels of poor responders and non-pregnant women were significantly lower than normal responders and pregnant women, respectively. Patients with low basal testosterone levels had significantly lower number of mature oocytes, cleavage-stage embryos, frozen embryos, lower fertilisation and pregnancy rates and required higher doses of gonadotrophins. Androgen levels had no correlation with early spontaneous abortion rates. Multivariable logistic analysis revealed that low basal testosterone (<0.88nmolL(-1)) was an independent risk factor for poor oocyte yield (odds ratio: 1.61; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-2.57; P=0.045). In conclusion, a low level of basal testosterone was a significant risk factor for poor oocyte yield after ovarian stimulation and might negatively influence pregnancy chances with in vitro fertilisation. Basal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were not predictive for poor ovarian response or negative pregnancy outcome in this population. PMID:25023952

  10. Prostatic inflammation enhances basal-to-luminal differentiation and accelerates initiation of prostate cancer with a basal cell origin

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Joon; Zhang, Li; Ittmann, Michael M.; Xin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been shown to promote the initiation and progression of diverse malignancies by inducing genetic and epigenetic alterations. In this study, we investigate an alternative mechanism through which inflammation promotes the initiation of prostate cancer. Adult murine prostate epithelia are composed predominantly of basal and luminal cells. Previous studies revealed that the two lineages are largely self-sustained when residing in their native microenvironment. To interrogate whether tissue inflammation alters the differentiation program of basal cells, we conducted lineage tracing of basal cells using a K14-CreER;mTmG model in concert with a murine model of prostatitis induced by infection from the uropathogenic bacteria CP9. We show that acute prostatitis causes tissue damage and creates a tissue microenvironment that induces the differentiation of basal cells into luminal cells, an alteration that rarely occurs under normal physiological conditions. Previously we showed that a mouse model with prostate basal cell-specific deletion of Phosphatase and tensin homolog (K14-CreER;Ptenfl/fl) develops prostate cancer with a long latency, because disease initiation in this model requires and is limited by the differentiation of transformation-resistant basal cells into transformation-competent luminal cells. Here, we show that CP9-induced prostatitis significantly accelerates the initiation of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in this model. Our results demonstrate that inflammation results in a tissue microenvironment that alters the normal prostate epithelial cell differentiation program and that through this cellular process inflammation accelerates the initiation of prostate cancer with a basal cell origin. PMID:24367088

  11. Enhanced target factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Akram; Abdollahi, Hamid; Maeder, Marcel

    2016-03-10

    Target testing or target factor analysis, TFA, is a well-established soft analysis method. TFA answers the question whether an independent target test vector measured at the same wavelengths as the collection of spectra in a data matrix can be excluded as the spectrum of one of the components in the system under investigation. Essentially, TFA cannot positively prove that a particular test spectrum is the true spectrum of one of the components, it can, only reject a spectrum. However, TFA will not reject, or in other words TFA will accept, many spectra which cannot be component spectra. Enhanced Target Factor Analysis, ETFA addresses the above problem. Compared with traditional TFA, ETFA results in a significantly narrower range of positive results, i.e. the chance of a false positive test result is dramatically reduced. ETFA is based on feasibility testing as described in Refs. [16-19]. The method has been tested and validated with computer generated and real data sets. PMID:26893084

  12. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    PubMed

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  13. Loss of Blm enhances basal cell carcinoma and rhabdomyosarcoma tumorigenesis in Ptch1+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Davari, Parastoo; Hebert, Jennifer L; Albertson, Donna G; Huey, Bing; Roy, Ritu; Mancianti, Maria L; Horvai, Andrew E; McDaniel, Lisa D; Schultz, Roger A; Epstein, Ervin H

    2010-06-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) have relative genomic stability and relatively benign clinical behavior but whether these two are related causally is unknown. To investigate the effects of introducing genomic instability into murine BCCs, we have compared ionizing radiation-induced tumorigenesis in Ptch1(+/-) mice versus that in Ptch1(+/-) mice carrying mutant Blm alleles. We found that BCCs in Ptch1(+/-) Blm(tm3Brd/tm3Brd) mice had a trend toward greater genomic instability as measured by array comprehensive genomic hybridization and that these mice developed significantly more microscopic BCCs than did Ptch1(+/-) Blm(+/tm3Brd) or Ptch1(+/-) Blm(+/+) mice. The mutant Blm alleles also markedly enhanced the formation of rhabdomyosarcomas (RMSs), another cancer to which Ptch1(+/)(-) mice and PTCH1(+/)(-) (basal cell nevus syndrome) patients are susceptible. Highly recurrent but different copy number changes were associated with the two tumor types and included losses of chromosomes 4 and 10 in all BCCs and gain of chromosome 10 in 80% of RMSs. Loss of chromosome 11 and 13, including the Trp53 and Ptch1 loci, respectively, occurred frequently in BCCs, suggesting tissue-specific selection for genes or pathways that collaborate with Ptch deficiency in tumorigenesis. Despite the quantitative differences, there was no dramatic qualititative difference in the BCC or RMS tumors associated with the mutant Blm genotype. PMID:19995795

  14. Antioxidants can inhibit basal autophagy and enhance neurodegeneration in models of polyglutamine disease

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Benjamin R.; Imarisio, Sara; Fleming, Angeleen; Rose, Claudia; Krishna, Gauri; Heard, Phoebe; Quick, Marie; Korolchuk, Viktor I.; Renna, Maurizio; Sarkar, Sovan; García-Arencibia, Moisés; O'Kane, Cahir J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases exhibit protein accumulation and increased oxidative stress. Therapeutic strategies include clearing aggregate-prone proteins by enhancing autophagy or decreasing oxidative stress with antioxidants. Many autophagy-inducing stimuli increase reactive oxygen species (ROS), raising concerns that the benefits of autophagy up-regulation may be counterbalanced by ROS toxicity. Here we show that not all autophagy inducers significantly increase ROS. However, many antioxidants inhibit both basal and induced autophagy. By blocking autophagy, antioxidant drugs can increase the levels of aggregate-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease. In fly and zebrafish models of Huntington's disease, antioxidants exacerbate the disease phenotype and abrogate the rescue seen with autophagy-inducing agents. Thus, the potential benefits in neurodegenerative diseases of some classes of antioxidants may be compromised by their autophagy-blocking properties. PMID:20566712

  15. Identifying enhanced cortico-basal ganglia loops associated with prolonged dance training.

    PubMed

    Li, Gujing; He, Hui; Huang, Mengting; Zhang, Xingxing; Lu, Jing; Lai, Yongxiu; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Studies have revealed that prolonged, specialized training combined with higher cognitive conditioning induces enhanced brain alternation. In particular, dancers with long-term dance experience exhibit superior motor control and integration with their sensorimotor networks. However, little is known about the functional connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activities in the sensorimotor network of dancers. Our study examined the functional connectivity density (FCD) of dancers with a mean period of over 10 years of dance training in contrast with a matched non-dancer group without formal dance training using resting-state fMRI scans. FCD was mapped and analyzed, and the functional connectivity (FC) analyses were then performed based on the difference of FCD. Compared to the non-dancers, the dancers exhibited significantly increased FCD in the precentral gyri, postcentral gyri and bilateral putamen. Furthermore, the results of the FC analysis revealed enhanced connections between the middle cingulate cortex and the bilateral putamen and between the precentral and the postcentral gyri. All findings indicated an enhanced functional integration in the cortico-basal ganglia loops that govern motor control and integration in dancers. These findings might reflect improved sensorimotor function for the dancers consequent to long-term dance training. PMID:26035693

  16. Identifying enhanced cortico-basal ganglia loops associated with prolonged dance training

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gujing; He, Hui; Huang, Mengting; Zhang, Xingxing; Lu, Jing; Lai, Yongxiu; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Studies have revealed that prolonged, specialized training combined with higher cognitive conditioning induces enhanced brain alternation. In particular, dancers with long-term dance experience exhibit superior motor control and integration with their sensorimotor networks. However, little is known about the functional connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activities in the sensorimotor network of dancers. Our study examined the functional connectivity density (FCD) of dancers with a mean period of over 10 years of dance training in contrast with a matched non-dancer group without formal dance training using resting-state fMRI scans. FCD was mapped and analyzed, and the functional connectivity (FC) analyses were then performed based on the difference of FCD. Compared to the non-dancers, the dancers exhibited significantly increased FCD in the precentral gyri, postcentral gyri and bilateral putamen. Furthermore, the results of the FC analysis revealed enhanced connections between the middle cingulate cortex and the bilateral putamen and between the precentral and the postcentral gyri. All findings indicated an enhanced functional integration in the cortico-basal ganglia loops that govern motor control and integration in dancers. These findings might reflect improved sensorimotor function for the dancers consequent to long-term dance training. PMID:26035693

  17. A NAC transcription factor and SNI1 cooperatively suppress basal pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Soo; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Kyung Eun; Jung, Mi Soon; Han, Hay Ju; Kim, Sun Ho; Kwon, Young Sang; Bahk, Sunghwa; An, Jonguk; Bae, Dong Won; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Chung, Woo Sik

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional repression of pathogen defense-related genes is essential for plant growth and development. Several proteins are known to be involved in the transcriptional regulation of plant defense responses. However, mechanisms by which expression of defense-related genes are regulated by repressor proteins are poorly characterized. Here, we describe the in planta function of CBNAC, a calmodulin-regulated NAC transcriptional repressor in Arabidopsis. A T-DNA insertional mutant (cbnac1) displayed enhanced resistance to a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 (PstDC3000), whereas resistance was reduced in transgenic CBNAC overexpression lines. The observed changes in disease resistance were correlated with alterations in pathogenesis-related protein 1 (PR1) gene expression. CBNAC bound directly to the PR1 promoter. SNI1 (suppressor of nonexpressor of PR genes1, inducible 1) was identified as a CBNAC-binding protein. Basal resistance to PstDC3000 and derepression of PR1 expression was greater in the cbnac1 sni1 double mutant than in either cbnac1 or sni1 mutants. SNI1 enhanced binding of CBNAC to its cognate PR1 promoter element. CBNAC and SNI1 are hypothesized to work as repressor proteins in the cooperative suppression of plant basal defense. PMID:22826500

  18. Overexpression of CRABPI in suprabasal keratinocytes enhances the proliferation of epidermal basal keratinocytes in mouse skin topically treated with all-trans retinoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.-H.; Vivero, Marina; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether ectopic expression of CRABPI, a cellular retinoic acid binding protein, influenced the actions of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in transgenic (TG) mice. We targeted CRABPI to the basal vs. suprabasal layers of mouse epidermis by using the keratin 14 (K14) and keratin 10 (K10) promoters, respectively. Greater CRABPI protein levels were detected in the epidermis of adult transgenic(+) mice than in transgenic(-) mice for both transgenes. In adult mouse skin CRABPI overexpression in the basal or suprabasal keratinocytes did not cause morphological abnormalities, but did result in decreased CRABPII mRNA levels. Ectopically overexpressed CRABPI in suprabasal keratinocytes, but not in basal keratinocytes, enhanced the thickening of the epidermis induced by topical ATRA treatments (10 {mu}M, 400 {mu}l for 4 days) by 1.59 {+-} 0.2-fold (p < 0.05). ATRA treatment (10 {mu}M) resulted in a 59.9 {+-} 9.8% increase (p < 0.05) in the BrdU labeling index in K10/FLAG-CRABPI TG(+) mice vs. TG(-) mice. Retinoid topical treatments reduced p27 and CYP26A1 mRNA levels in TG(+) and TG(-) mouse skin in K14 and K10/FLAG-CRABPI transgenic mice. As epidermal basal keratinocyte proliferation is stimulated by paracrine growth factors secreted by ATRA activated suprabasal keratinocytes, our results indicate that CRABPI overexpression in suprabasal keratinocytes enhances the physiological functions of ATRA.

  19. Cloning the promoter for transforming growth factor-beta type III receptor. Basal and conditional expression in fetal rat osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, C.; Chen, Y.; McCarthy, T. L.; Centrella, M.

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta binds to three high affinity cell surface molecules that directly or indirectly regulate its biological effects. The type III receptor (TRIII) is a proteoglycan that lacks significant intracellular signaling or enzymatic motifs but may facilitate transforming growth factor-beta binding to other receptors, stabilize multimeric receptor complexes, or segregate growth factor from activating receptors. Because various agents or events that regulate osteoblast function rapidly modulate TRIII expression, we cloned the 5' region of the rat TRIII gene to assess possible control elements. DNA fragments from this region directed high reporter gene expression in osteoblasts. Sequencing showed no consensus TATA or CCAAT boxes, whereas several nuclear factors binding sequences within the 3' region of the promoter co-mapped with multiple transcription initiation sites, DNase I footprints, gel mobility shift analysis, or loss of activity by deletion or mutation. An upstream enhancer was evident 5' proximal to nucleotide -979, and a silencer region occurred between nucleotides -2014 and -2194. Glucocorticoid sensitivity mapped between nucleotides -687 and -253, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 2 sensitivity co-mapped within the silencer region. Thus, the TRIII promoter contains cooperative basal elements and dispersed growth factor- and hormone-sensitive regulatory regions that can control TRIII expression by osteoblasts.

  20. Basal forebrain motivational salience signal enhances cortical processing and decision speed

    PubMed Central

    Raver, Sylvina M.; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) contains major projections to the cerebral cortex, and plays a well-documented role in arousal, attention, decision-making, and in modulating cortical activity. BF neuronal degeneration is an early event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementias, and occurs in normal cognitive aging. While the BF is best known for its population of cortically projecting cholinergic neurons, the region is anatomically and neurochemically diverse, and also contains prominent populations of non-cholinergic projection neurons. In recent years, increasing attention has been dedicated to these non-cholinergic BF neurons in order to better understand how non-cholinergic BF circuits control cortical processing and behavioral performance. In this review, we focus on a unique population of putative non-cholinergic BF neurons that encodes the motivational salience of stimuli with a robust ensemble bursting response. We review recent studies that describe the specific physiological and functional characteristics of these BF salience-encoding neurons in behaving animals. These studies support the unifying hypothesis whereby BF salience-encoding neurons act as a gain modulation mechanism of the decision-making process to enhance cortical processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli, and thereby facilitate faster and more precise behavioral responses. This function of BF salience-encoding neurons represents a critical component in determining which incoming stimuli warrant an animal’s attention, and is therefore a fundamental and early requirement of behavioral flexibility. PMID:26528157

  1. Enhancing biological control of basal stem rot disease (Ganoderma boninense) in oil palm plantations.

    PubMed

    Susanto, A; Sudharto, P S; Purba, R Y

    2005-01-01

    Basal Stem Rot (BSR) disease caused by Ganoderma boninense is the most destructive disease in oil palm, especially in Indonesia and Malaysia. The available control measures for BSR disease such as cultural practices and mechanical and chemical treatment have not proved satisfactory due to the fact that Ganoderma has various resting stages such as melanised mycelium, basidiospores and pseudosclerotia. Alternative control measures to overcome the Ganoderma problem are focused on the use of biological control agents and planting resistant material. Present studies conducted at Indonesian Oil Palm Research Institute (IOPRI) are focused on enhancing the use of biological control agents for Ganoderma. These activities include screening biological agents from the oil palm rhizosphere in order to evaluate their effectiveness as biological agents in glasshouse and field trials, testing their antagonistic activities in large scale experiments and eradicating potential disease inoculum with biological agents. Several promising biological agents have been isolated, mainly Trichoderma harzianum, T. viride, Gliocladium viride, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus sp. A glasshouse and field trial for Ganoderma control indicated that treatment with T. harzianum and G. viride was superior to Bacillus sp. A large scale trial showed that the disease incidence was lower in a field treated with biological agents than in untreated fields. In a short term programme, research activities at IOPRI are currently focusing on selecting fungi that can completely degrade plant material in order to eradicate inoculum. Digging holes around the palm bole and adding empty fruit bunches have been investigated as ways to stimulate biological agents. PMID:15750748

  2. Basal forebrain motivational salience signal enhances cortical processing and decision speed.

    PubMed

    Raver, Sylvina M; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) contains major projections to the cerebral cortex, and plays a well-documented role in arousal, attention, decision-making, and in modulating cortical activity. BF neuronal degeneration is an early event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementias, and occurs in normal cognitive aging. While the BF is best known for its population of cortically projecting cholinergic neurons, the region is anatomically and neurochemically diverse, and also contains prominent populations of non-cholinergic projection neurons. In recent years, increasing attention has been dedicated to these non-cholinergic BF neurons in order to better understand how non-cholinergic BF circuits control cortical processing and behavioral performance. In this review, we focus on a unique population of putative non-cholinergic BF neurons that encodes the motivational salience of stimuli with a robust ensemble bursting response. We review recent studies that describe the specific physiological and functional characteristics of these BF salience-encoding neurons in behaving animals. These studies support the unifying hypothesis whereby BF salience-encoding neurons act as a gain modulation mechanism of the decision-making process to enhance cortical processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli, and thereby facilitate faster and more precise behavioral responses. This function of BF salience-encoding neurons represents a critical component in determining which incoming stimuli warrant an animal's attention, and is therefore a fundamental and early requirement of behavioral flexibility. PMID:26528157

  3. Basal and apical regulation of VEGF-A and placenta growth factor in the RPE/choroid and primary RPE

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Leyla; Flach, Janina; Lassen, Jens; Treumer, Felix; Roider, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are strongly involved in pathological processes in the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) constitutively secrete VEGF-A, and the secretion of placental growth factor (PlGF) has also been described. RPE cells are strongly polarized cells with different secretome at the apical and basal side. In this study, we evaluated the basal and apical regulation of VEGF-A and PlGF secretion in RPE/choroid explants and primary RPE cells. Methods RPE/choroid tissue explants were prepared from porcine eyes and cultivated in modified Ussing chambers, separating apical (RPE) and basal (choroid) supernatant. Primary RPE cells were also prepared from porcine eyes and cultivated on Transwell plates. Explants and cells were treated with inhibitors for VEGFR-2 (SU1498), p38 (SB203580), and the transcription factors nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and SP-1 (mithramycin), respectively. VEGF-A and PlGF content was evaluated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, western blots were performed. Results In the RPE/choroid, VEGF-A can initially be found on the apical and basal sides with significantly more pronounced secretion on the basal side. VEGF-A secretion is differentially regulated on the apical and basal sides, with the inhibition of SP-1 and NF-κB showing strong effects apically and basally after 24 h and 48 h, the inhibition of p38 displaying its effect mainly on the basal side with some effect apically after 48 h, and the inhibition of VEGFR-2 reducing the secretion of VEGF only on the apical side at 24 h and 48 h. In the RPE cell culture, similar effects were found, with inhibition of NF-κB or SP-1 displaying a strong decrease in VEGF-A on both sides, and p38 inhibition displaying only an inhibitory effect on the basal side. In contrast, an apical effect of VEGFR-2 inhibition was not found. However, the

  4. Hypocretin/orexin antagonism enhances sleep-related adenosine and GABA neurotransmission in rat basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-DeRose, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Gulati, Srishti; Mathew, Thomas K; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    Hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons provide excitatory input to wake-promoting brain regions including the basal forebrain (BF). The dual HCRT receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases waking and increases sleep. We hypothesized that HCRT antagonists induce sleep, in part, through disfacilitation of BF neurons; consequently, ALM should have reduced efficacy in BF-lesioned (BFx) animals. To test this hypothesis, rats were given bilateral IgG-192-saporin injections, which predominantly targets cholinergic BF neurons. BFx and intact rats were then given oral ALM, the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem (ZOL) or vehicle (VEH) at lights-out. ALM was less effective than ZOL at inducing sleep in BFx rats compared to controls. BF adenosine (ADO), γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), and glutamate levels were then determined via microdialysis from intact, freely behaving rats following oral ALM, ZOL or VEH. ALM increased BF ADO and GABA levels during waking and mixed vigilance states, and preserved sleep-associated increases in GABA under low and high sleep pressure conditions. ALM infusion into the BF also enhanced cortical ADO release, demonstrating that HCRT input is critical for ADO signaling in the BF. In contrast, oral ZOL and BF-infused ZOL had no effect on ADO levels in either BF or cortex. ALM increased BF ADO (an endogenous sleep-promoting substance) and GABA (which is increased during normal sleep), and required an intact BF for maximal efficacy, whereas ZOL blocked sleep-associated BF GABA release, and required no functional contribution from the BF to induce sleep. ALM thus induces sleep by facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the normal transition to sleep. PMID:25431268

  5. Endothelin and endothelium-derived relaxing factor control of basal renovascular tone in hydronephrotic rat kidneys.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbins, E; Hoffend, J; Zou, A P; Dietrich, M S; Schlottmann, K; Cavarape, A; Steinhausen, M

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to investigate the control of renal vascular tone by endothelin (ET) and endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) under basal conditions, we infused intravenously anti-ET-1/3 antibodies (a-ET-1/3) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in split hydronephrotic rat kidneys. 2. A 25 min I.V. infusion of a-ET-1/3 (4.0 x 10(-13) mol kg-1 min-1) induced a time-dependent vasodilatation of arcuate (16.5%) and interlobular arteries (18.6%) as well as an increase of glomerular blood flow (GBF) by 32%. 3. Inhibition of EDRF synthesis by L-NAME produced a marked vasoconstriction of arcuate arteries (17.1%) and efferent (20.1%) arterioles and a decrease of GBF by 43%. 4. Co-infusion of a-ET-1/3 and L-NAME induced efferent vasoconstriction by 19.5%, whereas preglomerular vessel diameters remained unchanged. 5. The specificity of a-ET-1/3 effects was confirmed by simultaneous I.V. application of a-ET-1/3 and ET-1 (160 ng I.V.) which produced no significant vascular effects. Injection of ET-1 alone constricted arcuate arteries and decreased glomerular blood flow by 25%. 6. Experiments in normal rat kidneys with a-ET-1/3 I.V. revealed an increase of renal blood flow by 21%. 7. Our results demonstrate a physiological control of basal vascular tone in larger preglomerular arterioles by ET and EDRF. Efferent arteriolar tone is predominantly controlled by EDRF. PMID:8271216

  6. The SOX11 transcription factor is a critical regulator of basal-like breast cancer growth, invasion, and basal-like gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jonathan H.; Uray, Ivan P.; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Tsimelzon, Anna; Savage, Michelle; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Brown, Powel H.

    2016-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive breast cancers associated with poor survival. Defining the key drivers of BLBC growth will allow identification of molecules for targeted therapy. In this study, we performed a primary screen integrating multiple assays that compare transcription factor expression and activity in BLBC and non-BLBC at the RNA, DNA, and protein levels. This integrated screen identified 33 transcription factors that were elevated in BLBC in multiple assays comparing mRNA expression, DNA cis-element sequences, or protein DNA-binding activity. In a secondary screen to identify transcription factors critical for BLBC cell growth, 8 of the 33 candidate transcription factors (TFs) were found to be necessary for growth in at least two of three BLBC cell lines. Of these 8 transcription factors, SOX11 was the only transcription factor required for BLBC growth, but not for growth of non-BLBC cells. Our studies demonstrate that SOX11 is a critical regulator of multiple BLBC phenotypes, including growth, migration, invasion, and expression of signature BLBC genes. High SOX11 expression was also found to be an independent prognostic indicator of poor survival in women with breast cancer. These results identify SOX11 as a potential target for the treatment of BLBC, the most aggressive form of breast cancer. PMID:26894864

  7. High Basal Metabolic Rate Is a Risk Factor for Mortality: The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Metter, E. Jeffrey; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Cherubini, Antonio; Najjar, Samer S.; Ble, Alessandro; Senin, Umberto; Longo, Dan L.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite longstanding controversies from animal studies on the relationship between basal metabolic rate (BMR) and longevity, whether BMR is a risk factor for mortality has never been tested in humans. We evaluate the longitudinal changes in BMR and the relationship between BMR and mortality in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) participants. Methods BMR and medical information were collected at the study entry and approximately every 2 years in 1227 participants (972 men) over a 40-year follow-up. BMR, expressed as kcal/m2/h, was estimated from the basal O2 consumption and CO2 production measured by open-circuit method. Data on all-cause and specific-cause mortality were also obtained. Result BMR declined with age at a rate that accelerated at older ages. Independent of age, participants who died had a higher BMR compared to those who survived. BMR was a significant risk factor for mortality independent of secular trends in mortality and other well-recognized risk factors for mortality, such as age, body mass index, smoking, white blood cell count, and diabetes. BMR was nonlinearly associated with mortality. The lowest mortality rate was found in the BMR range 31.3–33.9 kcal/m2/h. Participants with BMR in the range 33.9–36.4 kcal/m2/h and above the threshold of 36.4 kcal/m2/h experienced 28% (hazard ratio: 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.61) and 53% (hazard ratio: 1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–1.96) higher mortality risk compared to participants with BMR 31.3–33.9 kcal/m2/h. Conclusion We confirm previous findings of an age-related decline of BMR. In our study, a blunted age-related decline in BMR was associated with higher mortality, suggesting that such condition reflects poor health status. PMID:18693224

  8. TFIIF, a basal eukaryotic transcription factor, is a substrate for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed Central

    Rawling, J M; Alvarez-Gonzalez, R

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the susceptibility of some of the basal eukaryotic transcription factors as covalent targets for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Human recombinant TATA-binding protein, transcription factor (TF)IIB and TFIIF (made up of the 30 and 74 kDa RNA polymerase II-associated proteins RAP30 and RAP74) were incubated with calf thymus poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and [32P]NAD+ at 37 degrees C. On lithium dodecyl sulphate/PAGE and autoradiography, two bands of radioactivity, coincident with RAP30 and RAP74, were observed. No radioactivity co-migrated with TATA-binding protein or TFIIB. The phenomenon was dependent on the presence of nicked DNA, which is essential for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. Covalent modification of TFIIF increased with time of incubation, with increasing TFIIF concentration and with increasing NAD+ concentration. High-resolution PAGE confirmed that the radioactive species associated with RAP30 and RAP74 were ADP-ribose polymers. From these observations, we conclude that both TFIIF subunits are highly specific substrates for covalent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. PMID:9164864

  9. Female Estrogen-Related Factors and Incidence of Basal Cell Carcinoma in a Nationwide US Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Ntowe, Estelle; Bowen, Emily M.; Doody, Michele M.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Lee, Terrence; Little, Mark P.; Linet, Martha S.; Freedman, D. Michal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose UV radiation exposure is the primary risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common human malignancy. Although the photosensitizing properties of estrogens have been recognized for decades, few studies have examined the relationship between reproductive factors or exogenous estrogen use and BCC. Methods Using data from the US Radiologic Technologists Study, a large, nationwide, prospective cohort, we assessed the relationship between reproductive factors, exogenous estrogen use, and first primary BCC while accounting for sun exposure, personal sun sensitivity, and lifestyle factors for geographically dispersed women exposed to a wide range of ambient UV radiation. Results Elevated risk of BCC was associated with late age at natural menopause (hazard ratio [HR] for ≥ 55 years v 50 to 54 years, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.17) and any use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT; HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.30; P for trend for duration = .001). BCC risk was most increased among women reporting natural menopause who used MHT for 10 or more years versus women who never used MHT (HR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.35 to 2.87). Risk of BCC was not associated with age at menarche, parity, age at first birth, infertility, use of diethylstilbestrol by participant's mother, age at hysterectomy, or use of oral contraceptives. Conclusion These analyses confirm a previous finding of increased risk of BCC associated with MHT. Novel findings of increased BCC risk associated with MHT in women experiencing natural menopause and for late age at natural menopause warrant further investigation. Users of MHT may constitute an additional high-risk group in need of more frequent skin cancer screening. PMID:26527779

  10. Factors Affecting the Disposition of Research-Based Innovations in the Development of a Basal Reading Program: A Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wile, J. M.

    A study investigated how the beliefs of literacy scholars affect the development of basal reading programs, the roles literacy scholars play in the development of new reading programs, and some of the critical factors that affect the disposition of innovative ideas. Two literacy scholars who had actively collaborated on the development of separate…

  11. Risk factors for basal cell carcinoma in the UK: case-control study in 806 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lear, J T; Tan, B B; Smith, A G; Bowers, W; Jones, P W; Heagerty, A H; Strange, R C; Fryer, A A

    1997-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the commonest malignant neoplasm in white people. We present a large UK case-control study in which conditional logistic regression analysis of age-matched and gender-matched data sets was used to compare, first, cases with controls (n = 403) and second, patients having multiple BCC with those having a single BCC (n = 278). Eye/hair colour, occupation, skin type, social class, tumour site at presentation and smoking history were assessed. Social class 1/2, skin type 1, red/blonde hair and blue/green eyes were all related to BCC risk, social class most strongly (odds ratio 2.36, P = 0.007). Truncal site at presentation was a risk factor for the development of multiple BCC (odds ratio 4.03, P = 0.002). These data support the view that genetically mediated differences in ultraviolet responsiveness are important in BCC, though the scale of their effect is small. They may be exploitable in primary and secondary prevention as well as giving insights into pathogenesis. In particular, the fact that patients presenting with a truncal tumour are at increased risk of further BCC suggests that intermittent exposure in genetically predisposed individuals may contribute to a cancer susceptibility syndrome. PMID:9290417

  12. Basal and postprandial change in serum fibroblast growth factor-21 concentration in type 1 diabetic mellitus and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Zibar, Karin; Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Ćuća, Jadranka Knežević; Smirčić-Duvnjak, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) appears to have an important role in glucose and lipid metabolism. FGF-21 secretion is mainly determined by nutritional status. The aim of this study was to measure basal and postprandial FGF-21 and postprandial change of FGF-21 concentration in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients and in healthy controls, and to investigate the differences between the groups. The cross-sectional study included 30 C-peptide negative T1DM patients, median age 37 years (20-59), disease duration 22 years (3-45), and nine healthy controls, median age 30 years (27-47). Basal and postprandial FGF-21 concentrations were measured by ELISA. The associations of FGF-21 with glucose, lipids, and insulin were analyzed. Individuals with T1DM showed significantly lower basal FGF-21 concentration (P=0.046) when compared with healthy controls (median value 28.2 vs 104 pg/mL) and had significantly different postprandial change (∆ 30'-0') of FGF-21 (P=0.006) in comparison with healthy controls (median value -1.1 vs -20.5 pg/mL). The glucose and lipid status did not correlate with FGF-21. In healthy controls, postprandial insulin level correlated with basal FGF-21 (ρ=0.7, P=0.036). Multiple regression analysis showed that they are independently associated after adjustment for confounding factors (β=1.824, P=0.04). We describe the pathological pattern of basal and postprandial change of FGF-21 secretion not associated with glucose, lipid levels, or insulin therapy in patients with T1DM. Since FGF-21 has numerous protective metabolic effects in the experimental model, the lower basal FGF-21 concentration in T1DM patients opens the question about the potential role of recombinant FGF-21 therapy. PMID:25194937

  13. Enhancement of the coercivity in Co-Ni layered double hydroxides by increasing basal spacing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuijuan; Tsuboi, Tomoya; Namba, Hiroaki; Einaga, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-09-14

    The magnetic properties of layered double hydroxides (LDH) containing transition metal ions can still develop, compared with layered metal hydroxide salts which exhibit structure-dependent magnetism. In this article, we report the preparation of a hybrid magnet composed of Co-Ni LDH and n-alkylsulfonate anions (Co-Ni-CnSO3 LDH). As Co-Ni LDH is anion-exchangeable, we can systematically control the interlayer spacing by intercalating n-alkylsulfonates with different carbon numbers. The magnetic properties were examined with temperature- and field-dependent magnetization measurements. As a result, we have revealed that the coercive field depends on the basal spacing. It is suggested that increasing the basal spacing varies the competition between the in-plane superexchange interactions and long-range out-of-plane dipolar interactions. Moreover, a jump in the coercive field at around 20 Å of the basal spacing is assumed to be the modification of the magnetic ordering in Co-Ni-CnSO3 LDH. PMID:27381282

  14. ΔNp63 promotes stem cell activity in mammary gland development and basal-like breast cancer by enhancing Fzd7 expression and Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Rumela; Wei, Yong; Hwang, Julie; Hang, Xiang; Blanco, Mario Andres; Choudhury, Abrar; Tiede, Benjamin; Romano, Rose-Anne; DeCoste, Christina; Mercatali, Laura; Ibrahim, Toni; Amadori, Dino; Kannan, Nagarajan; Eaves, Connie J; Sinha, Satrajit; Kang, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cancer is populated and maintained by tumor initiating cells (TICs) with stem-like properties similar to that of adult tissue stem cells. Despite recent advances, the molecular regulatory mechanisms that may be shared between normal and malignant stem cells remain poorly understood. Here we show that the ΔNp63 isoform of the Trp63 transcription factor promotes normal mammary stem cell (MaSC) activity by increasing the expression of the Wnt receptor Fzd7, thereby enhancing Wnt signaling. Importantly, Fzd7-dependent enhancement of Wnt signaling by ΔNp63 also governs tumor initiating activity of the basal subtype of breast cancer. These findings establish ΔNp63 as a key regulator of stem cells in both normal and malignant mammary tissues and provide direct evidence that breast cancer TICs and normal MaSCs share common regulatory mechanisms. PMID:25241036

  15. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Study of 4-ATP on Gold Nanoparticles for Basal Cell Carcinoma Fingerprint Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quynh, Luu Manh; Nam, Nguyen Hoang; Kong, K.; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Notingher, I.; Henini, M.; Luong, Nguyen Hoang

    2016-05-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman signals of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) attached to the surface of colloidal gold nanoparticles with size distribution of 2 to 5 nm were used as a labeling agent to detect basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin. The enhanced Raman band at 1075 cm-1 corresponding to the C-S stretching vibration in 4-ATP was observed during attachment to the surface of the gold nanoparticles. The frequency and intensity of this band did not change when the colloids were conjugated with BerEP4 antibody, which specifically binds to BCC. We show the feasibility of imaging BCC by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, scanning the 1075 cm-1 band to detect the distribution of 4-ATP-coated gold nanoparticles attached to skin tissue ex vivo.

  16. Vascular Risk Factors and Diseases Modulate Deficits of Reward-Based Reversal Learning in Acute Basal Ganglia Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wicking, Manon; Bellebaum, Christian; Hermann, Dirk M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Besides motor function, the basal ganglia have been implicated in feedback learning. In patients with chronic basal ganglia infarcts, deficits in reward-based reversal learning have previously been described. Methods We re-examined the acquisition and reversal of stimulus-stimulus-reward associations and acquired equivalence in eleven patients with acute basal ganglia stroke (8 men, 3 women; 57.8±13.3 years), whose performance was compared eleven healthy subjects of comparable age, sex distribution and education, who were recruited outside the hospital. Eleven hospitalized patients with a similar vascular risk profile as the stroke patients but without stroke history served as clinical control group. Results In a neuropsychological assessment 7±3 days post-stroke, verbal and spatial short-term and working memory and inhibition control did not differ between groups. Compared with healthy subjects, control patients with vascular risk factors exhibited significantly reduced performance in the reversal phase (F[2,30] = 3.47; p = 0.044; post-hoc comparison between risk factor controls and healthy controls: p = 0.030), but not the acquisition phase (F[2,30] = 1.01; p = 0.376) and the acquired equivalence (F[2,30] = 1.04; p = 0.367) tasks. In all tasks, the performance of vascular risk factor patients closely resembled that of basal ganglia stroke patients. Correlation studies revealed a significant association of the number of vascular risk factors with reversal learning (r = -0.33, p = 0.012), but not acquisition learning (r = -0.20, p = 0.121) or acquired equivalence (r = -0.22, p = 0.096). Conclusions The previously reported impairment of reward-based learning may be attributed to vascular risk factors and associated diseases, which are enriched in stroke patients. This study emphasizes the necessity of appropriate control subjects in cognition studies. PMID:27163585

  17. Basal insulin persistence, associated factors, and outcomes after treatment initiation among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the US.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nieves, Magaly; Kabul, Samaneh; Desai, Urvi; Ivanova, Jasmina I; Kirson, Noam Y; Cummings, Alice Kate; Birnbaum, Howard G; Duan, Ran; Cao, Dachuang; Hadjiyianni, Irene

    2016-04-01

    Objective To assess basal insulin persistence, associated factors, and economic outcomes for insulin-naïve people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the US. Research design and methods People aged ≥18 years diagnosed with T2DM initiating basal insulin between April 2006 and March 2012 (index date), no prior insulin use, and continuous insurance coverage for 6 months before (baseline) and 24 months after index date (follow-up period) were selected using de-identified administrative claims data in the US. Based on whether there were ≥30 day gaps in basal insulin use in the first year post-index, patients were classified as continuers (no gap), interrupters (≥1 prescription after gap), and discontinuers (no prescription after gap). Main outcome measures Factors associated with persistence - assessed using multinomial logistic regression model; annual healthcare resource use and costs during follow-up period - compared separately between continuers and interrupters, and continuers and discontinuers. Results Of the 19,110 people included in the sample (mean age: 59 years, ∼60% male), 20% continued to use basal insulin, 62% had ≥1 interruption, and 18% discontinued therapy in the year after initiation. Older age, multiple antihyperglycemic drug use, and injectable antihyperglycemic use during baseline were associated with significantly higher likelihoods of continuing basal insulin. Relative to interrupters and discontinuers, continuers had fewer emergency department visits, shorter hospital stays, and lower medical costs (continuers: $10,890, interrupters: $13,674, discontinuers: $13,021), but higher pharmacy costs (continuers: $7449, interrupters: $5239, discontinuers: $4857) in the first year post-index (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). Total healthcare costs were similar across the three cohorts. Findings for the second year post-index were similar. Conclusions The majority of people in this study interrupted or discontinued basal insulin

  18. Enhanced basal lubrication and the contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to future sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Sarah R.; Payne, Antony J.; Bartholomew, Ian D.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Edwards, Tamsin L.; Fettweis, Xavier; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Goelzer, Heiko; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Huybrechts, Philippe; Mair, Douglas W. F.; Nienow, Peter W.; Perego, Mauro; Price, Stephen F.; Smeets, C. J. P. Paul; Sole, Andrew J.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; Zwinger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We assess the effect of enhanced basal sliding on the flow and mass budget of the Greenland ice sheet, using a newly developed parameterization of the relation between meltwater runoff and ice flow. A wide range of observations suggest that water generated by melt at the surface of the ice sheet reaches its bed by both fracture and drainage through moulins. Once at the bed, this water is likely to affect lubrication, although current observations are insufficient to determine whether changes in subglacial hydraulics will limit the potential for the speedup of flow. An uncertainty analysis based on our best-fit parameterization admits both possibilities: continuously increasing or bounded lubrication. We apply the parameterization to four higher-order ice-sheet models in a series of experiments forced by changes in both lubrication and surface mass budget and determine the additional mass loss brought about by lubrication in comparison with experiments forced only by changes in surface mass balance. We use forcing from a regional climate model, itself forced by output from the European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM5) global climate model run under scenario A1B. Although changes in lubrication generate widespread effects on the flow and form of the ice sheet, they do not affect substantial net mass loss; increase in the ice sheet’s contribution to sea-level rise from basal lubrication is projected by all models to be no more than 5% of the contribution from surface mass budget forcing alone. PMID:23940337

  19. Enhanced basal lubrication and the contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to future sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Sarah R; Payne, Antony J; Bartholomew, Ian D; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Edwards, Tamsin L; Fettweis, Xavier; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Goelzer, Heiko; Hoffman, Matthew J; Huybrechts, Philippe; Mair, Douglas W F; Nienow, Peter W; Perego, Mauro; Price, Stephen F; Smeets, C J P Paul; Sole, Andrew J; van de Wal, Roderik S W; Zwinger, Thomas

    2013-08-27

    We assess the effect of enhanced basal sliding on the flow and mass budget of the Greenland ice sheet, using a newly developed parameterization of the relation between meltwater runoff and ice flow. A wide range of observations suggest that water generated by melt at the surface of the ice sheet reaches its bed by both fracture and drainage through moulins. Once at the bed, this water is likely to affect lubrication, although current observations are insufficient to determine whether changes in subglacial hydraulics will limit the potential for the speedup of flow. An uncertainty analysis based on our best-fit parameterization admits both possibilities: continuously increasing or bounded lubrication. We apply the parameterization to four higher-order ice-sheet models in a series of experiments forced by changes in both lubrication and surface mass budget and determine the additional mass loss brought about by lubrication in comparison with experiments forced only by changes in surface mass balance. We use forcing from a regional climate model, itself forced by output from the European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM5) global climate model run under scenario A1B. Although changes in lubrication generate widespread effects on the flow and form of the ice sheet, they do not affect substantial net mass loss; increase in the ice sheet's contribution to sea-level rise from basal lubrication is projected by all models to be no more than 5% of the contribution from surface mass budget forcing alone. PMID:23940337

  20. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  1. Functional roles for the TATA promoter and enhancers in basal and Tat-induced expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Berkhout, B; Jeang, K T

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed the contributory role of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promoter and enhancers in basal and Tat-induced transcription. We found that a minimal promoter competent for basal expression is contained within sequences spanning nucleotides -43 to +80. Basal expression from this HIV-1 promoter was boosted more by the additional presence of the NF-kappa B elements than by the Sp1 elements. The minimal long terminal repeat promoter (-43 to +80), while having an intact TAR sequence, was not Tat inducible. However, the simple addition of short synthetic enhancer motifs (AP1, Oct, Sp1, and NF-kappa B) conferred Tat responsiveness. This ability to respond to Tat was in part dependent on the presence of the HIV-1 promoter. Changing the HIV-1 TATA to other eucaryotic TATA or non-TATA initiators minimally affected basal expression but altered Tat inducibility. Our findings suggest a specific context of functional promoter and enhancer elements that is optimal for Tat trans activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. Our results do not allow conclusions about whether Tat acts at the level of initiation or at the level of elongation to be drawn. Images PMID:1727476

  2. Apical effect of diosmectite on damage to the intestinal barrier induced by basal tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Mahraoui, L; Heyman, M; Plique, O; Droy-Lefaix, M T; Desjeux, J F

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In many digestive diseases the intestinal barrier is weakened by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha). AIM: To investigate the protective effect of apical diosmectite on the intestinal dysfunction induced by the proinflammatory cytokine TNF alpha. METHODS: Filter grown monolayers of the intestinal cell line HT29-19A were incubated for 48 hours in basal medium containing 10 ng/ml TNF alpha and 5 U/ml interferon-gamma (IFN gamma). Next, 1, 10, or 100 mg/ml diosmectite was placed in the apical medium for one hour. Intestinal function was then assessed in Ussing chambers by measuring ionic conductance (G) and apicobasal fluxes of 14C-mannitol (Jman), and intact horseradish peroxidase. In control intestinal monolayers, diosmectite did not significantly modify G, Jman, or intact horseradish peroxidase. RESULTS: After incubation with TNF alpha and IFN gamma, intestinal function altered, as shown by the increases compared with control values for G (22.8 (3.7) v (9.6 (0.5) mS/cm2), Jman (33.8 (7.5) v 7.56 (0.67) micrograms/h x cm2), and intact horseradish peroxidase (1.95 (1.12) v 0.14 (0.04) micrograms/h x cm2). G and Jman were closely correlated, suggesting that the increase in permeability was paracellular. Treatment with diosmectite restored al the variables to control values. CONCLUSIONS: Basal TNF alpha disrupts the intestinal barrier through the tight junctions, and apical diosmectite counteracts this disruption. PMID:9135522

  3. Oligo-carrageenan kappa increases NADPH, ascorbate and glutathione syntheses and TRR/TRX activities enhancing photosynthesis, basal metabolism, and growth in Eucalyptus trees

    PubMed Central

    González, Alberto; Moenne, Fabiola; Gómez, Melissa; Sáez, Claudio A.; Contreras, Rodrigo A.; Moenne, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of OC kappa in redox status, photosynthesis, basal metabolism and growth in Eucalyptus globulus, trees were treated with water (control), with OC kappa at 1 mg mL−1, or treated with inhibitors of NAD(P)H, ascorbate (ASC), and glutathione (GSH) syntheses and thioredoxin reductase (TRR) activity, CHS-828, lycorine, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), and auranofin, respectively, and with OC kappa, and cultivated for 4 months. Treatment with OC kappa induced an increase in NADPH, ASC, and GSH syntheses, TRR and thioredoxin (TRX) activities, photosynthesis, growth and activities of basal metabolism enzymes such as rubisco, glutamine synthetase (GlnS), adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR), involved in C, N, and S assimilation, respectively, Krebs cycle and purine/pyrimidine synthesis enzymes. Treatment with inhibitors and OC kappa showed that increases in ASC, GSH, and TRR/TRX enhanced NADPH synthesis, increases in NADPH and TRR/TRX enhanced ASC and GSH syntheses, and only the increase in NADPH enhanced TRR/TRX activities. In addition, the increase in NADPH, ASC, GSH, and TRR/TRX enhanced photosynthesis and growth. Moreover, the increase in NADPH, ASC and TRR/TRX enhanced activities of rubisco, Krebs cycle, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis enzymes, the increase in GSH, NADPH, and TRR/TRX enhanced APR activity, and the increase in NADPH and TRR/TRX enhanced GlnS activity. Thus, OC kappa increases NADPH, ASC, and GSH syntheses leading to a more reducing redox status, the increase in NADPH, ASC, GSH syntheses, and TRR/TRX activities are cross-talking events leading to activation of photosynthesis, basal metabolism, and growth in Eucalyptus trees. PMID:25352851

  4. A host basal transcription factor is a key component for infection of rice by TALE-carrying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meng; Ke, Yinggen; Huang, Renyan; Ma, Ling; Yang, Zeyu; Chu, Zhaohui; Xiao, Jinghua; Li, Xianghua; Wang, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins found in a range of plant pathogenic bacteria, where they play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. However, it has been unclear how TALEs, after they have been injected into the host cells, activate transcription of host genes required for infection success. Here, we show that the basal transcription factor IIA gamma subunit TFIIAγ5 from rice is a key component for infection by the TALE-carrying bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent for bacterial blight. Direct interaction of several TALEs with TFIIAγ5 is required for activation of disease susceptibility genes. Conversely, reduced expression of the TFIIAγ5 host gene limits the induction of susceptibility genes and thus decreases bacterial blight symptoms. Suppression or mutation of TFIIAγ5 can also reduce bacterial streak, another devastating disease of rice caused by TALE-carrying X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. These results have important implications for formulating a widely applicable strategy with which to improve resistance of plants to TALE-carrying pathogens. PMID:27472897

  5. A host basal transcription factor is a key component for infection of rice by TALE-carrying bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Meng; Ke, Yinggen; Huang, Renyan; Ma, Ling; Yang, Zeyu; Chu, Zhaohui; Xiao, Jinghua; Li, Xianghua; Wang, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins found in a range of plant pathogenic bacteria, where they play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. However, it has been unclear how TALEs, after they have been injected into the host cells, activate transcription of host genes required for infection success. Here, we show that the basal transcription factor IIA gamma subunit TFIIAγ5 from rice is a key component for infection by the TALE-carrying bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent for bacterial blight. Direct interaction of several TALEs with TFIIAγ5 is required for activation of disease susceptibility genes. Conversely, reduced expression of the TFIIAγ5 host gene limits the induction of susceptibility genes and thus decreases bacterial blight symptoms. Suppression or mutation of TFIIAγ5 can also reduce bacterial streak, another devastating disease of rice caused by TALE-carrying X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. These results have important implications for formulating a widely applicable strategy with which to improve resistance of plants to TALE-carrying pathogens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19605.001 PMID:27472897

  6. Long-term Delivery of Nerve Growth Factor by Encapsulated Cell Biodelivery in the Göttingen Minipig Basal Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Kusk, Philip; Tornøe, Jens; Juliusson, Bengt; Torp, Malene; Bjarkam, Carsten R; Nielsen, Mette S; Handberg, Aase; Sørensen, Jens Christian H; Wahlberg, Lars U

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) prevents cholinergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and improves memory in AD animal models. In humans, the safe delivery of therapeutic doses of NGF is challenging. For clinical use, we have therefore developed an encapsulated cell (EC) biodelivery device, capable of local delivery of NGF. The clinical device, named NsG0202, houses an NGF-secreting cell line (NGC-0295), which is derived from a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line, stably genetically modified to secrete NGF. Bioactivity and correct processing of NGF was confirmed in vitro. NsG0202 devices were implanted in the basal forebrain of Göttingen minipigs and the function and retrievability were evaluated after 7 weeks, 6 and 12 months. All devices were implanted and retrieved without associated complications. They were physically intact and contained a high number of viable and NGF-producing NGC-0295 cells after explantation. Increased NGF levels were detected in tissue surrounding the devices. The implants were well tolerated as determined by histopathological brain tissue analysis, blood analysis, and general health status of the pigs. The NsG0202 device represents a promising approach for treating the cognitive decline in AD patients. PMID:20664524

  7. Different evolutionary patterns of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIF-α) isoforms in the basal branches of Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wei; Gan, Xiaoni; Xiao, Wuhan; Wang, Wen; He, Shunping

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a crucial regulator of cellular and systemic responses to low oxygen levels. Here we firstly cloned three HIF-α isoforms from the basal branches of Osteichthyes and used computational tools to characterise the molecular change underlying the functional divergence of HIF-α isoforms in different lineages. Only the HIF-1α and HIF-2α in African lungfish and amphibians were found under positive selection. HIF-1α and -2α were less functionally divergent in basal ray-finned fish than in teleosts, and showed conserved but different transcriptional activity towards specific target genes. PMID:24265980

  8. Type 2 Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Preserves Stemness and Prevents Differentiation of Prostate Stem Cells from the Basal Compartment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqing; Hamana, Tomoaki; Liu, Junchen; Wang, Cong; An, Lei; You, Pan; Chang, Julia Y F; Xu, Jianming; Jin, Chengliu; Zhang, Zhongying; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2015-07-17

    Prostate stem cells (P-SCs) are capable of giving rise to all three lineages of prostate epithelial cells, which include basal, luminal, and neuroendocrine cells. Two types of P-SCs have been identified in both human and mouse adult prostates based on prostasphere or organoid cultures, cell lineage tracing, renal capsule implantation, and expression of luminal- and basal-specific proteins. The sphere-forming P-SCs are from the basal cell compartment that express P63, and are therefore designated as basal P-SCs (P-bSCs). Luminal P-SCs (P-lSCs) express luminal cytokeratins and Nkx3.1. Herein, we report that the type 2 FGF receptor (FGFR2) signaling axis is crucial for preserving stemness and preventing differentiation of P-bSCs. FGFR2 signaling mediated by FGFR substrate 2α (FRS2α) is indispensable for formation and maintenance of prostaspheres derived from P63(+) P-bSCs. Ablation of Fgfr2 in P63(+) cells in vitro causes the disintegration of prostaspheres. Ablation of Fgfr2 in vivo reduces the number of P63-expressing basal cells and enriches luminal cells. This suggests a basal stem cell-to-luminal cell differentiation. In addition, ablation of Fgfr2 in P63(+) cells causes defective postnatal development of the prostate. Therefore, the data indicate that FGFR2 signaling is critical for preserving stemness and preventing differentiation of P-bSCs. PMID:26032417

  9. Nanoparticles with an Enhanced Power Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heng Quan; Miao, Lei; Zhang, Ming; Ohno, Kaoru; Zhou, Jian Hua; Gu, Hui; Shen, Yang; Lin, Hong

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured thermoelectric (TE) materials, for example Sb2Te3, PbTe, and SiGe-based semiconductors, have excellent thermoelectric transport properties and are promising candidates for next-generation TE commercial application. However, it is a challenge to synthesize the corresponding pure nanocrystals with controlled size by low-temperature wet-chemical reaction. Herein, we report an alternative versatile solution-based method for synthesis of plate-like Sb2Te3 nanoparticles in a flask using SbCl3 and Te powders as raw materials, EDTA-Na2 as complexing agent, and NaBH4 as reducing agent in the solvent (distilled water). To investigate their thermoelectric transport properties, the obtained powders were cold compacted into cuboid prisms then annealed under a protective N2 atmosphere. The results showed that both the electrical conductivity ( σ) and the power factor ( S 2 σ) can be enhanced by improving the purity of the products and by increasing the annealing temperature. The highest power factor was 2.04 μW cm-1 K-2 at 140°C and electrical conductivity remained in the range 5-10 × 103 S m-1. This work provides a simple and economic approach to preparation of large quantities of nanostructured Sb2Te3 with excellent TE performance, making it a fascinating candidate for commercialization of cooling devices.

  10. Alcohol Alters Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1-Induced Transforming Growth Factor-ß1 Synthesis in the Medial Basal Hypothalamus of the Prepubertal Female Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hiney, Jill K.; Srivastava, Vinod K.; Volz, Claire E.; Dees, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) are produced in hypothalamic astrocytes and facilitate luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion. IGF-1 stimulates release by acting directly on the LHRH nerve terminals and both peptides act indirectly through specific plastic changes on glial/tanycyte processes that further support LHRH secretion. Because the relationship between these growth factors in the hypothalamus is not known, we assessed the ability of IGF-1 to induce TGFβ1 synthesis and release and the actions of alcohol (ALC) on this mechanism prior to the onset of puberty. Methods Hypothalamic astrocytes were exposed to medium only, medium plus IGF-1 (200 ng/ml) or medium plus IGF-1 with 50 mM ALC. After 18 hours, media were collected and assayed for TGFß1. For the in vivo experiment, prepubertal female rats were administered either ALC (3g/kg) or water via gastric gavage at 0730 h and at 1130h. At 0900 h, saline or IGF-1 was administered into the third ventricle. Rats were killed at 1500 hrs and the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was collected for assessment of TGFß1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and Akt. Results IGF-1 induced TGFß1 release (p<0.01) from hypothalamic astrocytes in culture, an action blocked by ALC. In vivo, IGF-1 administration caused an increase in TGFβ1 protein compared to controls (p<0.05), an action blocked by ALC as well as a PI3K/Akt inhibitor. IGF-1 stimulation also increased both total (p<0.01) and phosphorylated (p<0.05) IGF-1R protein levels, and phosphorylated Akt levels (p<0.01), which were also blocked by ALC. Conclusions This study shows that ALC blocks IGF-1 actions to stimulate synthesis and release of hypothalamic TGFß1, total and phosphorylated IGF-1R and phosphorylated Akt levels further demonstrating the inhibitory actions of ALC on puberty-related events associated with hypothalamic LHRH release. PMID:25335926

  11. Ciliary neurotrophic factor improves diabetic parameters and hepatic steatosis and increases basal metabolic rate in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Sleeman, M. W.; Garcia, K.; Liu, R.; Murray, J. D.; Malinova, L.; Moncrieffe, M.; Yancopoulos, G. D.; Wiegand, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    Obesity plays a central role in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We therefore examined the effects of a modified form of ciliary neurotrophic factor [Axokine, which is hereafter referred to as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)Ax15], which uses a leptin-like mechanism to reduce body weight, in the db/db murine model of type 2 diabetes. In previous studies, weight loss produced by CNTF treatment could largely be attributed to its effects on food intake. In contrast, CNTFAx15 treatment of db/db mice caused significantly greater weight loss and marked improvements in diabetic parameters (e.g., levels of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, cholesterol, and nonesterified free fatty acids) than could be accounted for by reduced caloric intake alone. These beneficial effects, above and beyond those seen in animals controlled for either food restriction or body weight, correlated with the ability of CNTFAx15 to increase metabolic rate and energy expenditure and reduce hepatic steatosis while enhancing hepatic responsiveness to insulin. The hepatic effects were linked to rapid alterations in hepatic gene expression, most notably reduced expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of complex lipids that is also markedly suppressed by leptin in ob/ob mice. These observations further link the mechanisms of CNTF and leptin action, and they suggest important, beneficial effects for CNTF in diabetes that may be distinct from its ability to decrease food intake; instead, these effects may be more related to its influence on energy expenditure and hepatic gene expression. PMID:14610276

  12. Ciliary neurotrophic factor improves diabetic parameters and hepatic steatosis and increases basal metabolic rate in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, M W; Garcia, K; Liu, R; Murray, J D; Malinova, L; Moncrieffe, M; Yancopoulos, G D; Wiegand, S J

    2003-11-25

    Obesity plays a central role in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We therefore examined the effects of a modified form of ciliary neurotrophic factor [Axokine, which is hereafter referred to as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)Ax15], which uses a leptin-like mechanism to reduce body weight, in the db/db murine model of type 2 diabetes. In previous studies, weight loss produced by CNTF treatment could largely be attributed to its effects on food intake. In contrast, CNTFAx15 treatment of db/db mice caused significantly greater weight loss and marked improvements in diabetic parameters (e.g., levels of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, cholesterol, and nonesterified free fatty acids) than could be accounted for by reduced caloric intake alone. These beneficial effects, above and beyond those seen in animals controlled for either food restriction or body weight, correlated with the ability of CNTFAx15 to increase metabolic rate and energy expenditure and reduce hepatic steatosis while enhancing hepatic responsiveness to insulin. The hepatic effects were linked to rapid alterations in hepatic gene expression, most notably reduced expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of complex lipids that is also markedly suppressed by leptin in ob/ob mice. These observations further link the mechanisms of CNTF and leptin action, and they suggest important, beneficial effects for CNTF in diabetes that may be distinct from its ability to decrease food intake; instead, these effects may be more related to its influence on energy expenditure and hepatic gene expression. PMID:14610276

  13. Transcription factor p63 controls the reserve status but not the stemness of horizontal basal cells in the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schnittke, Nikolai; Herrick, Daniel B.; Lin, Brian; Peterson, Jesse; Coleman, Julie H.; Packard, Adam I.; Jang, Woochan; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue stem cells can serve two broad functions: to participate actively in the maintenance and regeneration of a tissue or to wait in reserve and participate only when activated from a dormant state. The adult olfactory epithelium, a site for ongoing, life-long, robust neurogenesis, contains both of these functional stem cell types. Globose basal cells (GBCs) act as the active stem cell population and can give rise to all the differentiated cells found in the normal tissue. Horizontal basal cells (HBCs) act as reserve stem cells and remain dormant unless activated by tissue injury. Here we show that HBC activation following injury by the olfactotoxic gas methyl bromide is coincident with the down-regulation of protein 63 (p63) but anticipates HBC proliferation. Gain- and loss-of-function studies show that this down-regulation of p63 is necessary and sufficient for HBC activation. Moreover, activated HBCs give rise to GBCs that persist for months and continue to act as bona fide stem cells by participating in tissue maintenance and regeneration over the long term. Our analysis provides mechanistic insight into the dynamics between tissue stem cell subtypes and demonstrates that p63 regulates the reserve state but not the stem cell status of HBCs. PMID:26305958

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis, anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, and risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer: cohort study based on nationwide prospectively recorded data from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Julia F; Asker Hagelberg, Charlotte; Askling, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of squamous cell and basal cell skin cancer in patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologic drugs, in patients starting tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor treatment, and in the general population. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Nationwide data from Sweden. Participants Cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis naive to biologics (n=46 409), cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting TNF inhibitor treatment as first biologic in 1998-2012 (n=12 558), and matched general population comparator cohort, identified through national quality of care and health registers. Main outcome measure Hazard ratio of first in situ or invasive squamous cell skin cancer (1998-2012) and first basal cell cancer (2004-12). Results For basal cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.22 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.41) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.14 (0.98 to 1.33; 236 v 1587 events) comparing TNF inhibitor treated patients with biologics-naive patients. For squamous cell cancer, the hazard ratio was 1.88 (1.74 to 2.03) comparing biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients with the general population and 1.30 (1.10 to 1.55; 191 v 847 events) comparing TNF inhibitors with biologics-naive patients; the latter translated to an annual number needed to harm in the order of 1600. Among people with a history of squamous cell or basal cell cancer, TNF inhibitors did not further increase risks. Conclusion A small to moderately increased risk of basal cell cancer was seen in biologics-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients, with no further effect of TNF inhibitors. For squamous cell cancer, the risk was nearly doubled in biologics-naive patients, with a further 30% increase in risk among patients treated with TNF inhibitors; this translates to one additional case for every 1600 years of treatment experience, assuming that this association reflected causality

  15. A region in the first exon/intron of rat carnitine palmitoyltransferase Ibeta is involved in enhancement of basal transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Li; Moore, Meredith L; McMillin, Jeanie B

    2002-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-Ibeta (CPT-Ibeta) catalyses the transfer of long-chain fatty acids to the enzymes of beta-oxidation of muscle and heart. Transcriptional control of this regulatory protein is relevant to disorders of fatty acid oxidation and the switch to glucose metabolism that occurs in cardiac pathology. The presence of a transcriptional enhancer sequence in the first untranslated exon and first intron of the CPT-Ibeta gene was identified using deletional and mutational analysis, and by ligation of an oleate responsive element (fatty acid response element) to a minimal promoter. The enhancer sequences are contained in the first 40 bases downstream of the transcription start site and increase CPT-Ibeta reporter gene expression independent of any 5' cis-acting elements. Deletion of the first 40 bases of the 3'-untranslated region does not affect the up-regulation of transcription by 10 microM phenylephrine. However, mutation and/or deletion of bases between +11 and +30 dramatically decreases reporter gene expression. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays reveal two DNA (+11 to +36)-protein complexes that appear cardiac specific. The exon/intron element enhances activation of the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter in a position- and orientation-dependent manner. Therefore we have identified a novel region in the first exon/intron of the CPT-Ibeta gene that acts as a non-classical transcriptional enhancer downstream of regulatory elements characterized previously in the 5'-flanking region of the minimal promoter. PMID:11879187

  16. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinomas: Infiltrating basal cell carcinomas can be more aggressive and locally destructive than other types of basal ... to treat them early and with slightly more aggressive techniques. Excision – The basal cell carcinoma is cut ...

  17. Factors affecting enhanced video quality preferences

    PubMed Central

    Satgunam, PremNandhini; Woods, Russell L; Bronstad, P Matthew; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    The development of video quality metrics requires methods for measuring perceived video quality. Most such metrics are designed and tested using databases of images degraded by compression and scored using opinion ratings. We studied video quality preferences for enhanced images of normally-sighted participants using the method of paired comparisons with a thorough statistical analysis. Participants (n=40) made pair-wise comparisons of high definition (HD) video clips enhanced at four different levels using a commercially available enhancement device. Perceptual scales were computed with binary logistic regression to estimate preferences for each level and to provide statistical inference of the differences among levels and the impact of other variables. While moderate preference for enhanced videos was found, two unexpected effects were also uncovered: (1) Participants could be broadly classified into two groups: those who preferred enhancement ("Sharp") and those who disliked enhancement ("Smooth"). (2) Enhancement preferences depended on video content, particularly for human faces to be enhanced less. The results suggest that algorithms to evaluate image quality (at least for enhancement) may need to be adjusted or applied differentially based on video content and viewer preferences. The possible impact of similar effects on image quality of compressed video needs to be evaluated. PMID:24107400

  18. The evolutionary origin of the Runx/CBFbeta transcription factors – Studies of the most basal metazoans

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Members of the Runx family of transcriptional regulators, which bind DNA as heterodimers with CBFβ, are known to play critical roles in embryonic development in many triploblastic animals such as mammals and insects. They are known to regulate basic developmental processes such as cell fate determination and cellular potency in multiple stem-cell types, including the sensory nerve cell progenitors of ganglia in mammals. Results In this study, we detect and characterize the hitherto unexplored Runx/CBFβ genes of cnidarians and sponges, two basal animal lineages that are well known for their extensive regenerative capacity. Comparative structural modeling indicates that the Runx-CBFβ-DNA complex from most cnidarians and sponges is highly similar to that found in humans, with changes in the residues involved in Runx-CBFβ dimerization in either of the proteins mirrored by compensatory changes in the binding partner. In situ hybridization studies reveal that Nematostella Runx and CBFβ are expressed predominantly in small isolated foci at the base of the ectoderm of the tentacles in adult animals, possibly representing neurons or their progenitors. Conclusion These results reveal that Runx and CBFβ likely functioned together to regulate transcription in the common ancestor of all metazoans, and the structure of the Runx-CBFβ-DNA complex has remained extremely conserved since the human-sponge divergence. The expression data suggest a hypothesis that these genes may have played a role in nerve cell differentiation or maintenance in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. PMID:18681949

  19. Manus Track Preservation Bias as a Key Factor for Assessing Trackmaker Identity and Quadrupedalism in Basal Ornithopods

    PubMed Central

    Castanera, Diego; Vila, Bernat; Razzolini, Novella L.; Falkingham, Peter L.; Canudo, José I.; Manning, Phillip L.; Galobart, Àngel

    2013-01-01

    Background The Las Cerradicas site (Tithonian–Berriasian), Teruel, Spain, preserves at least seventeen dinosaur trackways, some of them formerly attributed to quadrupedal ornithopods, sauropods and theropods. The exposure of new track evidence allows a more detailed interpretation of the controversial tridactyl trackways as well as the modes of locomotion and taxonomic affinities of the trackmakers. Methodology/Principal Findings Detailed stratigraphic analysis reveals four different levels where footprints have been preserved in different modes. Within the tridactyl trackways, manus tracks are mainly present in a specific horizon relative to surface tracks. The presence of manus tracks is interpreted as evidence of an ornithopod trackmaker. Cross-sections produced from photogrammetric digital models show different depths of the pes and manus, suggesting covariance in loading between the forelimbs and the hindlimbs. Conclusions/Significance Several features (digital pads, length/width ratio, claw marks) of some ornithopod pes tracks from Las Cerradicas are reminiscent of theropod pedal morphology. This morphological convergence, combined with the shallow nature of the manus tracks, which reduces preservation potential, opens a new window into the interpretation of these tridactyl tracks. Thus, trackmaker assignations during the Jurassic–Cretaceous interval of purported theropod trackways may potentially represent ornithopods. Moreover, the Las Cerradicas trackways are further evidence for quadrupedalism among some basal small- to medium-sized ornithopods from this time interval. PMID:23349817

  20. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as low-density lipoprotein and platelet-activating factor-stimulated human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Julie M; Croft, Kevin D; Puddey, Ian B; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2003-06-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemotactic agent for monocytes and other cells and is thought to be involved in atherosclerosis, recruiting monocytes to the subendothelial space or to the site of inflammation. Angiotensin II has been demonstrated, at least in animal models, to stimulate MCP-1 expression. We investigated the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists irbesartan and losartan on MCP-1 production by freshly isolated human monocytes. Irbesartan and losartan inhibited basal MCP-1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) stimulated MCP-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, with 200 microg/ml LDL protein giving a 2-fold increase in MCP-1. Irbesartan and losartan dose dependently blocked LDL-stimulated MCP-1. An angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist, S-(+)-1-([4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]methyl)-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD123319), had no significant effect on basal MCP-1 levels or LDL-stimulated MCP-1. After noting homology between the AT1 receptor and the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, we showed that irbesartan inhibited both [3H]PAF binding to human monocytes and carbamyl-PAF stimulation of MCP-1. However, irbesartan affinity for the PAF receptor was 700 times less than PAF, suggesting that there may be another mechanism for irbesartan inhibition of PAF-stimulated MCP-1. This is the first report showing that AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as LDL- and PAF-stimulated MCP-1 production in freshly isolated human monocytes. PMID:12626661

  1. Binding of basal transcription factor TFIIH to the acidic activation domains of VP16 and p53.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Pearson, A; Coulombe, B; Truant, R; Zhang, S; Regier, J L; Triezenberg, S J; Reinberg, D; Flores, O; Ingles, C J

    1994-01-01

    Acidic transcriptional activation domains function well in both yeast and mammalian cells, and some have been shown to bind the general transcription factors TFIID and TFIIB. We now show that two acidic transactivators, herpes simplex virus VP16 and human p53, directly interact with the multisubunit human general transcription factor TFIIH and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart, factor b. The VP16- and p53-binding domains in these factors lie in the p62 subunit of TFIIH and in the homologous subunit, TFB1, of factor b. Point mutations in VP16 that reduce its transactivation activity in both yeast and mammalian cells weaken its binding to both yeast and human TFIIH. This suggests that binding of activation domains to TFIIH is an important aspect of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:7935417

  2. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors act as auxiliary cofactors for hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 and enhance hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ktistaki, E; Talianidis, I

    1997-01-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors (COUP-TFs) strongly inhibit transcriptional activation mediated by nuclear hormone receptors, including hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4). COUP-TFs repress HNF-4-dependent gene expression by competition with HNF-4 for common binding sites found in several regulatory regions. Here we show that promoters, such as the HNF-1 promoter, which are recognized by HNF-4 but not by COUP-TFs are activated by COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII in conjunction with HNF-4 more than 100-fold above basal levels, as opposed to about 8-fold activation by HNF-4 alone. This enhancement was strictly dependent on an intact HNF-4 E domain. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that COUP-TFs enhance HNF-4 activity by a mechanism that involves their physical interaction with the amino acid 227 to 271 region of HNF-4. Our results indicate that in certain promoters, COUP-TFs act as auxiliary cofactors for HNF-4, orienting the HNF-4 activation domain in a more efficient configuration to achieve enhanced transcriptional activity. These findings provide new insights into the regulatory functions of COUP-TFs, suggesting their involvement in the initial activation and subsequent high-level expression of hepatic regulators, as well as in the positive and negative modulation of downstream target genes. PMID:9111350

  3. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors act as auxiliary cofactors for hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 and enhance hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ktistaki, E; Talianidis, I

    1997-05-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors (COUP-TFs) strongly inhibit transcriptional activation mediated by nuclear hormone receptors, including hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4). COUP-TFs repress HNF-4-dependent gene expression by competition with HNF-4 for common binding sites found in several regulatory regions. Here we show that promoters, such as the HNF-1 promoter, which are recognized by HNF-4 but not by COUP-TFs are activated by COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII in conjunction with HNF-4 more than 100-fold above basal levels, as opposed to about 8-fold activation by HNF-4 alone. This enhancement was strictly dependent on an intact HNF-4 E domain. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that COUP-TFs enhance HNF-4 activity by a mechanism that involves their physical interaction with the amino acid 227 to 271 region of HNF-4. Our results indicate that in certain promoters, COUP-TFs act as auxiliary cofactors for HNF-4, orienting the HNF-4 activation domain in a more efficient configuration to achieve enhanced transcriptional activity. These findings provide new insights into the regulatory functions of COUP-TFs, suggesting their involvement in the initial activation and subsequent high-level expression of hepatic regulators, as well as in the positive and negative modulation of downstream target genes. PMID:9111350

  4. Postproliferative transcription of the rat osteocalcin gene is reflected by vitamin D-responsive developmental modifications in protein-DNA interactions at basal and enhancer promoter elements.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, T A; Bortell, R; Shalhoub, V; Heinrichs, A; Stein, J L; Stein, G S; Lian, J B

    1993-01-01

    In the osteocalcin (OC) gene promoter, both independent positive and negative regulatory elements, as well as others with contiguous [TATA/glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GRE)] or overlapping [TATA/GRE, vitamin D-responsive enhancer elements (VDRE)/AP-1, and OC box/AP-1] domains, are sites for modifications in protein-DNA interactions. In the present studies, we have examined nuclear protein extracts from fetal rat calvarial cells that undergo a developmental sequence of bone cell differentiation. Our results demonstrate modifications in protein-DNA interactions that relate to the developmental stages of the osteoblast and support developmental regulation of OC gene transcription. Basal expression of the OC gene is associated with sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions at the OC box, VDRE, and TATA/GRE box. Distinct differences are observed in proliferating osteoblasts, where the OC gene is not transcribed compared to postproliferative, differentiated osteoblasts that transcribe the OC gene. Furthermore, the protein-DNA complexes that reflect hormonal control are also developmentally regulated, mediating both the transcriptionally active and repressed states of the OC gene. For example, in proliferating osteoblasts, a vitamin D receptor-antibody-sensitive complex is formed that is different from the DNA binding complex induced by vitamin D postproliferatively when the OC gene is transcribed. Mutational analysis of the steroid hormone binding domain and the overlapping AP-1 site at the VDRE supports mutually exclusive occupancy by Fos-Jun heterodimers and vitamin D receptor. Such protein-DNA interactions at the VDRE are consistent with repression of competency for vitamin D-mediated transcriptional enhancement in proliferating osteoblasts expressing high levels of Fos and Jun. Images PMID:8381969

  5. Reduced insulin-receptor mediated modulation of striatal dopamine release by basal insulin as a possible contributing factor to hyperdopaminergia in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Hahn, Margaret; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Gerretsen, Philip; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic neuropsychiatric disorder which affects 1% of the world population. Using the brain imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET) it has been demonstrated that persons with schizophrenia have greater dopamine transmission in the striatum compared to healthy controls. However, little progress has been made as to elucidating other biological mechanisms which may account for this hyperdopaminergic state in this disease. Studies in animals have demonstrated that insulin receptors are expressed on midbrain dopamine neurons, and that insulin from the periphery acts on these receptors to modify dopamine transmission in the striatum. This is pertinent given that several lines of evidence suggest that insulin receptor functioning may be abnormal in the brains of persons with schizophrenia. Post-mortem studies have shown that persons with schizophrenia have less than half the number of cortical insulin receptors compared to healthy persons. Moreover, these post-mortem findings are unlikely due to the effects of antipsychotic treatment; studies in cell lines and animals suggest antipsychotics enhance insulin receptor functioning. Further, hyperinsulinemia - even prior to antipsychotic use - seems to be related to less psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Collectively, these data suggest that midbrain insulin receptor functioning may be abnormal in persons with schizophrenia, resulting in reduced insulin-mediated regulation of dopamine transmission in the striatum. Such a deficit may account for the hyperdopaminergic state observed in these patients and would help guide the development of novel treatment strategies. We hypothesize that, (i) insulin receptor expression and/or function is reduced in midbrain dopamine neurons in persons with schizophrenia, (ii) basal insulin should reduce dopaminergic transmission in the striatum via these receptors, and (iii) this modulation of dopaminergic transmission by basal insulin

  6. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, A S; Graves, L M; Blancafort, P

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of EN1 triggered potent and selective cell death. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of EN1 in normal cells activated survival pathways and conferred resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Exogenous expression of EN1 cDNA reprogrammed the breast epithelial cells toward a long-lived, neural-like phenotype displaying dopaminergic markers. Gene expression microarrays demonstrated that the EN1 cDNA altered transcription of a high number of inflammatory molecules, notably chemokines and chemokine receptors, which could mediate prosurvival pathways. To block EN1 function, we engineered synthetic interference peptides (iPeps) comprising the EN1-specific sequences that mediate essential protein-protein interactions necessary for EN1 function and an N-terminal cell-penetrating peptide/nuclear localization sequence. These EN1-iPeps rapidly mediated a strong apoptotic response in tumor cells overexpressing EN1, with no toxicity to normal or non EN1-expressing cells. Delivery of EN1-iPeps into basal-like cancer cells significantly decreased the fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of chemotherapeutic drugs routinely used to treat breast cancer. Lastly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that EN1-iPeps captured targets involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the EN1-iPeps bound the glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) target, which

  7. Activated Acinus boosts basal autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Nilay; Tyra, Lauren K; Krämer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Acinus (Acn) is a nuclear protein that participates in the regulation of autophagy. Loss of Acn function prevents autophagy in starving cells. Conversely, Acn activation induces basal autophagy. This enhances the quality control functions of autophagy such as the removal of misfolded proteins, thereby reducing neurodegeneration and prolonging lifespan. Acn activity is enhanced by Akt1-mediated phosphorylation, which counteracts the cleavage of Acn by a caspase-3 homolog. PMID:27308482

  8. The basal level of intracellular calcium gates the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase - Akt signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fei; Soellner, Deborah; Nunez, Joseph; Wang, Hongbing

    2008-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates survival and neuroplasticity through the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway. Although previous studies suggested the roles of MAPK, PLC-γ-mediated intra-cellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) increase, and extra-cellular calcium influx in regulating Akt activation, the cellular mechanisms are largely unknown. We demonstrated that sub-nanomolar BDNF significantly induced Akt activation in developing cortical neurons. The TrkB-dependent Akt phosphorylation at S473 and T308 required only PI3K, but not PLC and MAPK activity. Blocking NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and chelating extra-cellular calcium by EGTA failed to block BDNF-induced Akt phosphorylation. In contrast, chelating [Ca2+]i by BAPTA-AM abolished Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, sub-nanomolar BDNF did not stimulate [Ca2+]i increase under our culture conditions. Together with that NMDA- and membrane depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i increase did not activate Akt, we conclude that the basal level of [Ca2+]i gates BDNF function. Furthermore, inhibiting calmodulin by W13 suppressed Akt phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 by okadaic acid and tautomycin rescued Akt phosphorylation in BAPTA- and W13-treated neurons. We further demonstrated that the phosphorylation of PDK1 did not correlate with Akt phosphorylation at T308. Our results suggested novel roles of basal [Ca2+]i, rather than activity-induced calcium elevation, in BDNF-Akt signaling. PMID:18485103

  9. Identification of a key regulatory element for the basal activity of the human insulin-like growth factor II gene promoter P3.

    PubMed Central

    Rietveld, L E; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1997-01-01

    Transcription of the human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene is under the control of four promoters (P1-P4) that are differentially active during growth and development. Promoter 3 (P3) is the most active promoter during fetal development as well as in most adult tissues. P3 is also the most active promoter in tumour tissues and cell lines expressing IGF-II. Transient transfections of HeLa and Hep3B cells with truncated promoter constructs revealed that the region between -289 and -183 relative to the transcription start site supports basal promoter activity in both cell lines. Footprint experiments showed that the region between positions -192 and -172 (P3-4) is the only element bound by nuclear proteins. P3-4 is bound by five proteins, of which three proteins (proteins 3, 4 and 5) bind specifically and are expressed at the same levels in HeLa and Hep3B cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and differential footprint experiments revealed the presence of two protein-binding regions within the P3-4 element. Proteins 4 and 5 bind box A (-193 to -188), whereas box B (-183 to -172) is bound by protein 3. From transcription experiments in vitro it can be concluded that Box A is essential for P3 activity. Box A is part of a region 11 dG residues long and is protected by proteins 4 and 5 that bind a contiguous set of six dG residues. DNA-binding of proteins 4 and 5 to box A requires the presence of Zn2+ ions. Thus structural and functional analysis reveals that the P3-4 element is a key regulatory element of P3 that contains two separate binding sites for proteins essential for the basal activity of IGF-II P3. PMID:9581544

  10. Increases in mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain during chronic sleep restriction in rats: possible role in initiating allostatic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, J K; Deurveilher, S; Currie, R W; Fawcett, J P; Semba, K

    2014-09-26

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) has various negative consequences on cognitive performance and health. Using a rat model of CSR that uses alternating cycles of 3h of sleep deprivation (using slowly rotating activity wheels) and 1h of sleep opportunity continuously for 4 days ('3/1' protocol), we previously observed not only homeostatic but also allostatic (adaptive) sleep responses to CSR. In particular, non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) electroencephalogram (EEG) delta power, an index of sleep intensity, increased initially and then declined gradually during CSR, with no rebound during a 2-day recovery period. To study underlying mechanisms of these allostatic responses, we examined the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is known to regulate NREMS EEG delta activity, during the same CSR protocol. Mature BDNF protein levels were measured in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain, two brain regions involved in sleep and EEG regulation, and the hippocampus, using Western blot analysis. Adult male Wistar rats were housed in motorized activity wheels, and underwent the 3/1 CSR protocol for 27 h, for 99 h, or for 99 h followed by 24h of recovery. Additional rats were housed in either locked wheels (locked wheel controls [LWCs]) or unlocked wheels that rats could rotate freely (wheel-running controls [WRCs]). BDNF levels did not differ between WRC and LWC groups. BDNF levels were increased, compared to the control levels, in all three brain regions after 27 h, and were increased less strongly after 99 h, of CSR. After 24h of recovery, BDNF levels were at the control levels. This time course of BDNF levels parallels the previously reported changes in NREMS delta power during the same CSR protocol. Changes in BDNF protein levels in the cortex and basal forebrain may be part of the molecular mechanisms underlying allostatic sleep responses to CSR. PMID:25010399

  11. Diagnosing the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Matsui, Toshihisa; Xie, Shaocheng; Lang, Stephen; Zhang, Minghua; Starr, David O'C; Li, Xiaowen; Simpson, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    Recent modeling studies have revealed that ice crystal number concentration is one of the dominant factors in the effect of clouds on radiation. Since the ice crystal enhancement factor and ice nuclei concentration determine the concentration, they are both important in quantifying the contribution of increased ice nuclei to global warming. In this study, long-term cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are compared with field observations to estimate the ice crystal enhancement factor in tropical and midlatitudinal clouds, respectively. It is found that the factor in tropical clouds is 10 3-104 times larger than that of mid-latitudinal ones, which makes physical sense because entrainment and detrainment in the Tropics are much stronger than in middle latitudes. The effect of entrainment/detrainment on the enhancement factor, especially in tropical clouds, suggests that cloud microphysical parameterizations should be coupled with subgrid turbulence parameterizations within CRMs to obtain a more accurate depiction of cloud-radiative forcing.

  12. A Study of Basal Cell Carcinoma in South Asians for Risk Factor and Clinicopathological Characterization: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Kaur, Sandeep; Yadav, Ashish; Singh, Navtej; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Although the incidence of skin cancers in India (part of South Asia) is low, the absolute number of cases may be significant due to large population. The existing literature on BCC in India is scant. So, this study was done focusing on its epidemiology, risk factors, and clinicopathological aspects. Methods. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted in Punjab, North India, from 2011 to 2013. History, examination and histopathological confirmation were done in all the patients visiting skin department with suspected lesions. Results. Out of 36 confirmed cases, 63.9% were females with mean ± SD age being 60.9 ± 14.2 years. Mean duration of disease was 4.7 years. Though there was statistically significant higher sun exposure in males compared to females (P value being 0.000), BCC was commoner in females, explainable by intermittent sun exposure (during household work in the open kitchens) in women. Majority of patients (88.9%) had a single lesion. Head and neck region was involved in 97.2% of cases, with nose being the commonest site (50%) with nodular/noduloulcerative morphology in 77.8% of cases. Pigmentation was evident in 22.2% of cases clinically. Nodular variety was the commonest histopathological variant (77.8%). Conclusions. This study highlights a paradoxically increasing trend of BCC with female preponderance, preferential involvement of nose, and higher percentage of pigmentation in Indians. PMID:25530883

  13. A Mouse Strain Where Basal Connective Tissue Growth Factor Gene Expression Can Be Switched from Low to High

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Heather E.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Hiller, Sylvia; Sulik, Kathleen K.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a signaling molecule that primarily functions in extracellular matrix maintenance and repair. Increased Ctgf expression is associated with fibrosis in chronic organ injury. Studying the role of CTGF in fibrotic disease in vivo, however, has been hampered by perinatal lethality of the Ctgf null mice as well as the limited scope of previous mouse models of Ctgf overproduction. Here, we devised a new approach and engineered a single mutant mouse strain where the endogenous Ctgf-3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) was replaced with a cassette containing two 3′UTR sequences arranged in tandem. The modified Ctgf allele uses a 3′UTR from the mouse FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (c-Fos) and produces an unstable mRNA, resulting in 60% of normal Ctgf expression (Lo allele). Upon Cre-expression, excision of the c-Fos-3′UTR creates a transcript utilizing the more stable bovine growth hormone (bGH) 3′UTR, resulting in increased Ctgf expression (Hi allele). Using the Ctgf Lo and Hi mutants, and crosses to a Ctgf knockout or Cre-expressing mice, we have generated a series of strains with a 30-fold range of Ctgf expression. Mice with the lowest Ctgf expression, 30% of normal, appear healthy, while a global nine-fold overexpression of Ctgf causes abnormalities, including developmental delay and craniofacial defects, and embryonic death at E10-12. Overexpression of Ctgf by tamoxifen-inducible Cre in the postnatal life, on the other hand, is compatible with life. The Ctgf Lo-Hi mutant mice should prove useful in further understanding the function of CTGF in fibrotic diseases. Additionally, this method can be used for the production of mouse lines with quantitative variations in other genes, particularly with genes that are broadly expressed, have distinct functions in different tissues, or where altered gene expression is not compatible with normal development. PMID:20877562

  14. Dependence of Proximal GC Boxes and Binding Transcription Factors in the Regulation of Basal and Valproic Acid-Induced Expression of t-PA

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Pia; Magnusson, Mia; Karlsson, Lena; Bergh, Niklas; Jern, Sverker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) release is a pivotal response to protect the circulation from occluding thrombosis. We have shown that the t-PA gene is epigenetically regulated and greatly induced by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA). We now investigated involvement of known t-PA promoter regulatory elements and evaluated dependence of potential interacting transcription factors/cofactors. Methods. A reporter vector with an insert, separately mutated at either the t-PA promoter CRE or GC box II or GC box III elements, was transfected into HT-1080 and HUVECs and challenged with VPA. HUVECs were targeted with siRNA against histone acetyl transferases (HAT) and selected transcription factors from the Sp/KLF family. Results. An intact VPA-response was observed with CRE mutated constructs, whereas mutation of GC boxes II and III reduced the magnitude of the induction by 54 and 79% in HT-1080 and 49 and 50% in HUVECs, respectively. An attenuated induction of t-PA mRNA was observed after Sp2, Sp4, and KLF5 depletion. KLF2 and p300 (HAT) were identified as positive regulators of basal t-PA expression and Sp4 and KLF9 as repressors. Conclusion. VPA-induced t-PA expression is dependent on the proximal GC boxes in the t-PA promoter and may involve interactions with Sp2, Sp4, and KLF5. PMID:26966581

  15. Human general transcription factor TFIIA: characterization of a cDNA encoding the small subunit and requirement for basal and activated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, J; Bernstein, R; Roeder, R G

    1995-01-01

    The human general transcription factor TFIIA is one of several factors involved in specific transcription by RNA polymerase II, possibly by regulating the activity of the TATA-binding subunit (TBP) of TFIID. TFIIA purified from HeLa extracts consists of 35-, 19-, and 12-kDa subunits. Here we describe the isolation of a cDNA clone (hTFIIA gamma) encoding the 12-kDa subunit. Using expression constructs derived from hTFIIA gamma and TFIIA alpha/beta (which encodes a 55-kDa precursor to the alpha and beta subunits of natural TFIIA), we have constructed a synthetic TFIIA with a polypeptide composition similar to that of natural TFIIA. The recombinant complex supports the formation of a DNA-TBP-TFIIA complex and mediates both basal and Gal4-VP16-activated transcription by RNA polymerase II in TFIIA-depleted nuclear extracts. In contrast, TFIIA has no effect on tRNA and 5S RNA transcription by RNA polymerase III in this system. We also present evidence that both the p55 and p12 recombinant subunits interact with TBP and that the basic region of TBP is critical for the TFIIA-dependent function of TBP in nuclear extracts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7724559

  16. Modulation of basal and corticotropin-releasing factor-stimulated proopiomelanocortin gene expression by vasopressin in rat anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Levin, N; Blum, M; Roberts, J L

    1989-12-01

    In several anterior pituitary hormone systems, factors that stimulate hormone release also stimulate hormone biosynthesis. In the corticotropes of the anterior pituitary, CRF stimulates ACTH release as well as cAMP accumulation and transcription of the POMC gene. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is a well documented coregulator of ACTH release and potentiates CRF-stimulated cAMP accumulation. The present studies were undertaken to determine if AVP also potentiates the early effects of CRF on POMC gene expression in rat anterior pituitary primary cultures. We have measured the levels of the POMC primary transcript, processing intermediate, and mature mRNA in nuclear RNA samples and POMC mRNA in cytoplasmic RNA samples as well as ACTH release after treatment with CRF and/or AVP. After a 30-min treatment with 0.5 nM CRF, POMC primary transcript levels were increased by 200-400%. Thirty-minute or 1-h treatments with AVP alone (10 or 100 nM) did not affect primary transcript levels, but increased the amount of the processing intermediate, while a 2-h incubation with 100 nM AVP significantly decreased POMC primary transcript levels. The effects of CRF on the POMC primary transcript and nuclear processing intermediate were not potentiated by cotreatment with AVP, although a potentiation of CRF-stimulated ACTH release was observed. POMC nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA levels were not affected by these 2-h or less treatments, while an 18-h incubation with 0.5 nM CRF alone or in combination with 100 nM AVP increased POMC cytoplasmic mRNA levels to about 140% of vehicle-treated control values. When a 1-h AVP treatment (100 nM) preceded presentation of CRF, we observed an attenuation of the stimulation of POMC primary transcript and processing intermediate levels by the 1-h CRF treatment. The effects of CRF on POMC primary transcript and processing intermediate levels in these experiments are consistent with a CRF-induced increase in POMC gene transcription. Our findings that AVP

  17. Enhancement of the Purcell factor in multiperiodic hyperboliclike metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebykin, A. V.; Babicheva, V. E.; Iorsh, I. V.; Orlov, A. A.; Belov, P. A.; Zhukovsky, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emission enhancement is theoretically investigated in multiperiodic metal-dielectric multilayers (multiperiodic hyperboliclike metamaterials or photonic hypercrystals) where the unit cell consists of two layers of different dielectrics alternating with identical metallic layers. It is shown that the Purcell factor in such multiperiodic structures exceeds the Purcell factor in ordinary periodic hyperbolic or plasmonic metamaterials by a factor of 4, which in general makes it possible to maximize interaction between emitting centers and nearby plasmonic structures. This enhancement is numerically characterized and shown to be related to the interplay between surface and volume plasmonic excitations in the multilayer metamaterial. We separately identify the influence of proximity between the emitter and the closest metal-dielectric boundary (including the quenching effect and the enhanced coupling of the dipole radiation and surface plasmon polaritons) and the effects related to the structural composition of the hypercrystal. The Purcell-factor modification brought about by placing a cavity layer into a multiperiodic structure was also characterized.

  18. Multiple pigmented basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shoji, T; Lee, J; Hong, S H; Oh, C H; Kim, W K; Bhawan, J

    1998-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common of all skin cancers and the most prevalent one among Caucasians. Rarely, these tumors are seen in other races. We report a 77-year-old Korean woman who presented with multiple darkly pigmented enlarging nodules on her scalp, face, trunk, and extremities. The patient had first noted a 6-mm pigmented lesion on her left eyebrow 10 years previously. Since then, other lesions had appeared in many locations on her body. She had been otherwise healthy and without a history of exposure to arsenic or radiation. There was no family history of skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum, or basal cell nevus syndrome. On physical examination, multiple darkly pigmented dome-shaped papules and nodules were present on her scalp, face, right forearm, lower abdomen, and inguinal areas. They ranged in size from 0.5 mm to 2 cm. The larger ones showed central ulceration. Multiple biopsy specimens from different sites showed pigmented basal cell carcinomas. Clinically, there was no evidence of nevus sebaceus, xeroderma pigmentosum, basal cell nevus syndrome, or immunodeficiency. Clinical workup including chest radiography, abdominal ultrasound, bone scan, and brain computerized axial tomography scan did not demonstrate primary or secondary tumors. The results of serologic and hematologic tests were also within normal limits. This is an unusual case report of multiple pigmented basal cell carcinomas in an Asian woman without any predisposing risk factors. PMID:9557792

  19. Effective Factors in Enhancing School Manager's Job Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Mirzamani, S. Mahmoud; Esfahani, Hamideh Darb

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examines the effective factors in enhancing school manager's job motivation from viewpoint of school mangers, teachers, education department managerial and staff experts in teaching, and also identifies and prioritizes each of these factors and indicators. Method For selecting a representative sample and increasing measurement precision, 587 people were selected using classified random sampling. The measurement tool was a 79-questionnaire made by the researcher. The questionnaire was collected using motivation theories and observing the findings of previous researches. Then, according to the three-stage Delphi technique, the questionnaire was sent to experts in education. The reliability of instruments was measured by calculating Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, and total reliability of the test was 0.99; the validity of the instrument was assessed by factor analysis (Construct Validity) and its load factor was 0.4 which was high. Results The results from factor analysis shows that the effective factors in enhancing manager's job motivation are as follows: self- actualization (51%) including 28 indices; social factor (7/9%) including 22 indices; self-esteem (3.2%) including 17 indices; job desirable features (2.2%) including 4 indices; physiologic (1.8%) including 4 indices; and job richness (1.6%) including 4 indices. Conclusions The results show that the six mentioned factors determine 68% of the total variance of manager's motivation. PMID:22952541

  20. Silibinin and its 2,3-dehydro-derivative inhibit basal cell carcinoma growth via suppression of mitogenic signaling and transcription factors activation.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Cynthia; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Chapla; Wempe, Michael F; Biedermann, David; Valentová, Kateřina; Kren, Vladimir; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer worldwide, and its current treatment options are insufficient and toxic. Surprisingly, unlike several other malignancies, chemopreventive efforts against BCC are almost lacking. Silibinin, a natural agent from milk thistle seeds, has shown strong efficacy against several cancers including ultraviolet radiation-induced skin (squamous) cancer; however, its potential activity against BCC is not yet examined. Herein, for the first time, we report the efficacy of silibinin and its oxidation product 2,3-dehydrosilibinin (DHS) against BCC both in vitro and in vivo using ASZ (p53 mutated) and BSZ (p53 deleted) cell lines derived from murine BCC tumors. Both silibinin and DHS significantly inhibited cell growth and clonogenicity while inducing apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with DHS showing higher activity at lower concentrations. Both agents also inhibited the mitogenic signaling by reducing EGFR, ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed the activation of transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1. More importantly, in an ectopic allograft model, oral administration of silibinin and DHS (200 mg/kg body weight) strongly inhibited the ASZ tumor growth by 44% and 71% (P < 0.05), respectively, and decreased the expression of proliferation biomarkers (PCNA and cyclin D1) as well as NF-κB p50 and c-Fos in the tumor tissues. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence for the efficacy and usefulness of silibinin and its derivative DHS against BCC, and suggest the need for additional studies with these agents in pre-clinical and clinical BCC chemoprevention and therapy models. PMID:25492239

  1. Nanoparticle Properties and Synthesis Effects on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Enhancement Factor: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has enabled researchers to map the specific chemical makeup of surfaces, solutions, and even cells. However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated. When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified. This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The extent of SERS enhancement is due to a variety of factors such as nanoparticle size, shape, material, and configuration. The choice of Raman reporters and protective coatings will also influence SERS enhancement. This review provides an introduction to how these factors influence signal enhancement and how to optimize them during synthesis of SERS nanoparticles. PMID:25884017

  2. Autoimmune basal ganglia disorders.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2012-11-01

    The basal ganglia are deep nuclei in the brain that include the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Pathological processes involving the basal ganglia often result in disorders of movement and behavior. A number of different autoimmune disorders predominantly involve the basal ganglia and can result in movement and psychiatric disorders. The classic basal ganglia autoimmune disorder is Sydenham chorea, a poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder. Resurgence in the interest in Sydenham chorea is the result of the descriptions of other poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders including tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder, broadly termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection. Encephalitic processes affecting the basal ganglia are also described including the syndromes basal ganglia encephalitis, encephalitis lethargica, and bilateral striatal necrosis. Last, systemic autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome can result in chorea or parkinsonism. Using paradigms learned from other autoantibody associated disorders, the authors discuss the autoantibody hypothesis and the role of systemic inflammation in autoimmune basal ganglia disorders. Identification of these entities is important as the clinician has an increasing therapeutic repertoire to modulate or suppress the aberrant immune system. PMID:22832771

  3. Elevated SP-1 transcription factor expression and activity drives basal and hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Karl; Onion, David; Kumari, Rajendra; Watson, Susan A; Knox, Alan J

    2012-11-16

    VEGF plays a central role in angiogenesis in cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors have increased microvascular density, localized hypoxia, and high VEGF expression levels; however, there is a lack of understanding of how oncogenic and tumor microenvironment changes such as hypoxia lead to greater VEGF expression in lung and other cancers. We show that NSCLC cells secreted higher levels of VEGF than normal airway epithelial cells. Actinomycin D inhibited all NSCLC VEGF secretion, and VEGF minimal promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were constitutively active until the last 85 base pairs before the transcription start site containing three SP-1 transcription factor-binding sites; mutation of these VEGF promoter SP-1-binding sites eliminated VEGF promoter activity. Furthermore, dominant negative SP-1, mithramycin A, and SP-1 shRNA decreased VEGF promoter activity, whereas overexpression of SP-1 increased VEGF promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated SP-1, p300, and PCA/F histone acetyltransferase binding and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the VEGF promoter in NSCLC cells. Cultured NSCLC cells expressed higher levels of SP-1 protein than normal airway epithelial cells, and double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry showed a strong correlation between SP-1 and VEGF in human NSCLC tumors. In addition, hypoxia-driven VEGF expression in NSCLC cells was SP-1-dependent, with hypoxia increasing SP-1 activity and binding to the VEGF promoter. These studies are the first to demonstrate that overexpression of SP-1 plays a central role in hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion. PMID:22992725

  4. Porous reduced graphene oxide membrane with enhanced gauge factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jen-Chieh; Weng, Cheng-Hsi; Tsai, Fu-Cheng; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a porous structure for a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) membrane effectively enhances its gauge factor. A porous graphene-based membrane was synthesized in a liquid phase by combining a GO sheet with copper hydroxide nanostrands (CHNs). A chemical reduction treatment using L-ascorbic acid was utilized to simultaneously improve the conductivity of GO and remove the CHNs from each GO sheet. The intrinsic gauge factors of the porous rGO membrane with varying applied tensile strains were obtained and found to increase monotonically with the increased porosity of the rGO membrane. For a membrane porosity of 15.78%, the maximum gauge factor is 46.1 under an applied strain of less than 1%. The main mechanism behind the enhanced gauge factor is attributed to the structure of the porous rGO membrane. The relationships between the initial electrical resistance, tunneling distance, and gauge factor of the rGO membrane were found by adjusting the membrane porosity and the results completely confirmed the physical phenomena.

  5. Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly occurring cancer in the world and overall incidence is still on the rise. While typically a slow-growing tumor for which metastases is rare, basal cell carcinoma can be locally destructive and disfiguring. Given the vast prevalence of this disease, there is a significant overall burden on patient well-being and quality of life. The current mainstay of basal cell carcinoma treatment involves surgical modalities, such as electrodessication and curettage, excision, cryosurgery, and Mohs micrographic surgery. Such methods are typically reserved for localized basal cell carcinoma and offer high five-year cure rates, but come with the risk of functional impairment, disfigurement, and scarring. Here, the authors review the evidence and indications for nonsurgical treatment modalities in cases where surgery is impractical, contraindicated, or simply not desired by the patient. PMID:27386043

  6. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in younger people who have had extensive sun exposure. You are more likely to get basal cell ... severe sunburns early in life Long-term daily sun exposure (such as the sun exposure received by people ...

  7. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and location of the cancer. Early treatment by a dermatologist may result in a cure rate of more than 95%, but regular examination ...

  8. MicroRNA-205 directly targets Krüppel-like factor 12 and is involved in invasion and apoptosis in basal-like breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guan, Bing; Li, Qing; Shen, Li; Rao, Qiu; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2016-08-01

    We investigated microRNAs (miRs) specific to its target gene and exerting distinct biological functions for basal-like breast carcinoma (BLBC). Total RNA was extracted and subjected to miR microarray and bioinformatics analysis. Based on the comprehensive analysis, expression of miRs including its target was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Further functional analyses were conducted including proliferation, invasion and apoptosis. miR-205 was identified as downregulated (less than 0.5-fold) in BLBC relatively to normal control (NC). Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggested miR-205 may directly targeted Krüppel-like factor 12 (KLF12; degree=4). Luciferase assay revealed miR-205 directly targeted KLF12 through binding its 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR; p=0.0016). qRT-PCR and western blot analysis showed miR-205 expression was low in cells (p=0.007) and tumor tissues (n=6; p=0.0074), and KLF12 RNA/protein was observed at high levels in cells (p=0.0026; p=0.0079) and tumor tissues (n=9; p=0.0083); knock-up of miR-205 increased its expression (p=0.0021) but reduced KLF12 RNA/protein levels (p=0.0038; p=0.009) in cells. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfecting its mimics in cells, was involved in invasion (p=0.00175) and apoptosis (p=0.006). In conclusion, our results supported that miR-205 was a miR specific to BLBC which functioned as tumor suppressor gene through directly targeting and negatively regulating proto-oncogene KLF12. miR-205 dysregulation was involved in invasion and apoptosis. miR-205 and KLF12 provided a potential diagnosis biomarker and therapeutic approach for BLBC. PMID:27278159

  9. Wavelet Speech Enhancement Based on Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Syu-Siang; Chern, Alan; Tsao, Yu; Hung, Jeih-weih; Lu, Xugang; Lai, Ying-Hui; Su, Borching

    2016-08-01

    For most of the state-of-the-art speech enhancement techniques, a spectrogram is usually preferred than the respective time-domain raw data since it reveals more compact presentation together with conspicuous temporal information over a long time span. However, the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) that creates the spectrogram in general distorts the original signal and thereby limits the capability of the associated speech enhancement techniques. In this study, we propose a novel speech enhancement method that adopts the algorithms of discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) in order to conquer the aforementioned limitation. In brief, the DWPT is first applied to split a time-domain speech signal into a series of subband signals without introducing any distortion. Then we exploit NMF to highlight the speech component for each subband. Finally, the enhanced subband signals are joined together via the inverse DWPT to reconstruct a noise-reduced signal in time domain. We evaluate the proposed DWPT-NMF based speech enhancement method on the MHINT task. Experimental results show that this new method behaves very well in prompting speech quality and intelligibility and it outperforms the convnenitional STFT-NMF based method.

  10. Epidemiology of basal-like breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Millikan, Robert C.; Newman, Beth; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Moorman, Patricia G.; Conway, Kathleen; Smith, Lisa V.; Labbok, Miriam H.; Geradts, Joseph; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Jackson, Susan; Nyante, Sarah; Livasy, Chad; Carey, Lisa; Earp, H. Shelton; Perou, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    Risk factors for the newly identified “intrinsic” breast cancer subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive/estrogen receptor-negative) were determined in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based, case–control study of African-American and white women. Immunohistochemical markers were used to subtype 1,424 cases of invasive and in situ breast cancer, and case subtypes were compared to 2,022 controls. Luminal A, the most common subtype, exhibited risk factors typically reported for breast cancer in previous studies, including inverse associations for increased parity and younger age at first full-term pregnancy. Basal-like cases exhibited several associations that were opposite to those observed for luminal A, including increased risk for parity and younger age at first term full-term pregnancy. Longer duration breastfeeding, increasing number of children breastfed, and increasing number of months breastfeeding per child were each associated with reduced risk of basal-like breast cancer, but not luminal A. Women with multiple live births who did not breastfeed and women who used medications to suppress lactation were at increased risk of basal-like, but not luminal A, breast cancer. Elevated waist-hip ratio was associated with increased risk of luminal A in postmenopausal women, and increased risk of basal-like breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal women. The prevalence of basal-like breast cancer was highest among premenopausal African-American women, who also showed the highest prevalence of basal-like risk factors. Among younger African-American women, we estimate that up to 68% of basal-like breast cancer could be prevented by promoting breastfeeding and reducing abdominal adiposity. PMID:17578664

  11. Sludge pretreatment chemistry evaluation: Enhanced sludge washing separation factors

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, N.G.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the work conducted in Fiscal Year 1994 by the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Treatment Science Task. The main purpose of this task, is to provide the technical basis and scientific understanding to support TWRS baseline decisions and actions, such as the development of an enhanced sludge washing process to reduce the volume of waste that will require high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. One objective within the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask was to establish wash factors for various SST (single-shell tank) sludges. First, analytical data were compiled from existing tank waste characterization reports. These data were summarized on tank-specific worksheets that provided a uniform format for reviewing and comparing data, as well as the means to verify whether the data set for each tank was complete. Worksheets were completed for 27 SST wastes. The analytical water wash data provided tank-specific information about the fraction of each component that dissolves with water, i.e., an estimate of tank-specific wash factors for evaluating tank-by-tank processing. These wash data were then used collectively to evaluate some of the wash factors that are assumed for the overall SST waste inventory; specifically, wash factors for elements that would be found primarily in sludges. The final step in this study was to incorporate the characterization and wash factor data into a spreadsheet that provides insight into the effect of enhanced sludge washing on individual tank sludges as well as for groups of sludges that may be representative of different waste types. Spreadsheet results include the estimated mass and percentage of each element that would be removed with washing and leaching. Furthermore, estimated compositions are given of the final wash and leach streams and residual solids, in terms of both concentration and dry weight percent.

  12. Reappraisal of the Electric Dipole Moment Enhancement Factor for Thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Nataraj, H. S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    2011-05-20

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) enhancement factor of atomic Tl is of considerable interest as it has been used in determining the most accurate limit on the electron EDM to date. However, its value varies from -179 to -1041 in different approximations. In view of the large uncertainties associated with many of these calculations, we perform an accurate calculation employing the relativistic coupled-cluster theory and obtain -466, which in combination with the most accurate measurement of Tl EDM [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 071805 (2002)] yields a new limit for the electron EDM: |d{sub e}|<2.0x10{sup -27}e cm.

  13. Correction: Towards improved precision in the quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors: a renewed approach.

    PubMed

    Sivanesan, Arumugam; Adamkiewicz, Witold; Kalaivani, Govindasamy; Kamińska, Agnieszka; Waluk, Jacek; Hołyst, Robert; Izake, Emad L

    2015-01-21

    Correction for 'Towards improved precision in the quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors: a renewed approach' by Arumugam Sivanesan et al., Analyst, 2015, DOI:10.1039/c4an01778a PMID:25453040

  14. Amino Acid Supplementation Increases Lean Body Mass, Basal Muscle Protein Synthesis, and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Expression in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Edgar L.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Gilkison, Charles; Sanford, Arthur P.; Casperson, Shanon L.; Jiang, Jie; Chinkes, David L.; Urban, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Inadequate dietary protein intake has been implicated in sarcopenia. Objective and Design: The objectives of this study were to determine whether: 1) chronic essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation improves postabsorptive muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR), lean body mass (LBM), and one-repetition maximum muscle strength, and androgen receptor and IGF-I muscle protein expression; and 2) the acute anabolic response to EAA ingestion is preserved after a 3-month supplementation period. Using a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design, older women (68 ± 2 yr) were assigned to receive either placebo (n = 7), or 15 g EAA/d [supplemented treatment group (SUP)] (n = 7) for 3 months. Metabolic outcomes were assessed in association with stable isotope studies conducted at 0 and 3 months. Setting: The study was performed at The University of Texas Medical Branch General Clinical Research Center. Results: Ingestion of 7.5 g EAA acutely stimulated FSR in both groups at 0 months (P < 0.05). Basal FSR at 3 months was increased in SUP only. The magnitude of the acute response to EAA was unaltered after 3 months in SUP. LBM increased in SUP only (P < 0.05). One-repetition maximum strength remained unchanged in both groups. Basal IGF-I protein expression increased in SUP after 3 months (P = 0.05), with no changes in androgen receptor or total and phosphorylated Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, S6 kinase, and 4E-binding protein. Conclusions: EAA improved LBM and basal muscle protein synthesis in older individuals. The acute anabolic response to EAA supplementation is maintained over time and can improve LBM, possibly offsetting the debilitating effects of sarcopenia. PMID:19208731

  15. National plan to enhance aviation safety through human factors improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foushee, Clay

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this section of the plan is to establish a development and implementation strategy plan for improving safety and efficiency in the Air Traffic Control (ATC) system. These improvements will be achieved through the proper applications of human factors considerations to the present and future systems. The program will have four basic goals: (1) prepare for the future system through proper hiring and training; (2) develop a controller work station team concept (managing human errors); (3) understand and address the human factors implications of negative system results; and (4) define the proper division of responsibilities and interactions between the human and the machine in ATC systems. This plan addresses six program elements which together address the overall purpose. The six program elements are: (1) determine principles of human-centered automation that will enhance aviation safety and the efficiency of the air traffic controller; (2) provide new and/or enhanced methods and techniques to measure, assess, and improve human performance in the ATC environment; (3) determine system needs and methods for information transfer between and within controller teams and between controller teams and the cockpit; (4) determine how new controller work station technology can optimally be applied and integrated to enhance safety and efficiency; (5) assess training needs and develop improved techniques and strategies for selection, training, and evaluation of controllers; and (6) develop standards, methods, and procedures for the certification and validation of human engineering in the design, testing, and implementation of any hardware or software system element which affects information flow to or from the human.

  16. Life beyond the Basal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, Jeanne; Carbone, Carole

    1987-01-01

    Reading is a tool for learning. The goal for the teaching of reading must be to produce lovers of reading. A holistic approach should replace exclusive dependence on basal readers. Effective methods are the following: (1) language experience approach; (2) word banks; (3) pattern books; (4) sustained silent reading; and (5) directed…

  17. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christian D.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B.; Gatza, Michael L.; Morrison, Meghan M.; Moore, Preston D.; Whitwell, Corbin A.; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E.; Silva, Grace O.; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A.; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J.; Perou, Charles M.; Weaver, Alissa M.; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A.; Chang, Jenny C.; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  18. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  19. Cellular transcription factors enhance herpes simplex virus type 1 oriS-dependent DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huynh, A T; Schaffer, P A

    1998-05-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) origin of DNA replication, oriS, contains three binding sites for the viral origin binding protein (OBP) flanked by transcriptional regulatory elements of the immediate-early genes encoding ICP4 and ICP22/47. To assess the role of flanking sequences in oriS function, plasmids containing oriS and either wild-type or mutant flanking sequences were tested in transient DNA replication assays. Although the ICP4 and ICP22/47 regulatory regions were shown to enhance oriS function, most individual elements in these regions, including the VP16-responsive TAATGARAT elements, were found to be dispensable for oriS function. In contrast, two oriS core-adjacent regulatory (Oscar) elements, OscarL and OscarR, at the base of the oriS palindrome were shown to enhance oriS function significantly and additively. Specifically, mutational disruption of either element reduced oriS-dependent DNA replication by 60 to 70%, and disruption of both elements reduced replication by 90%. The properties of protein-DNA complexes formed in gel mobility shift assays using uninfected and HSV-1-infected Vero cell nuclear extracts demonstrated that both OscarL and OscarR are binding sites for cellular proteins. Whereas OscarR does not correspond to the consensus binding site of any known transcription factor, OscarL contains a consensus binding site for the transcription factor Sp1. Gel mobility shift and supershift experiments using antibodies directed against members of the Sp1 family of transcription factors demonstrated the presence of Sp1 and Sp3, but not Sp2 or Sp4, in the protein-DNA complexes formed at OscarL. The abilities of OscarL and OscarR to bind their respective cellular proteins correlated directly with the efficiency of oriS-dependent DNA replication. Cooperative interactions between the Oscar-binding factors and proteins binding to adjacent OBP binding sites were not observed. Notably, Oscar element mutations that impaired oriS-dependent DNA

  20. Great enhancements in the thermoelectric power factor of BiSbTe nanostructured films with well-ordered interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiu-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Hua; Kuo, Yung-Kang

    2013-08-01

    An innovative concept of twin-enhanced thermoelectricity was proposed to fundamentally resolve the high electrical resistance while not degrading the phonon scattering of the thermoelectric nanoassemblies. Under this frame, a variety of highly oriented and twinned bismuth antimony telluride (BixSb2-xTe3) nanocrystals were successfully fabricated by a large-area pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) technique on insulated silicon substrates at various deposition temperatures. The significant presence of the nonbasal- and basal-plane twins across the hexagonal BiSbTe nanocrystals, which were experimentally and systematically observed for the first time, evidently contributes to the unusually high electrical conductivity of ~2700 S cm(-1) and the power factor of ~25 μW cm(-1) K(-2) as well as the relatively low thermal conductivity of ~1.1 W m(-1) K(-1) found in these nanostructured films. PMID:23803956

  1. Perceptual factors that influence use of computer enhanced visual displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, David; Boehm-Davis, Debbie

    1993-01-01

    This document is the final report for the NASA/Langley contract entitled 'Perceptual Factors that Influence Use of Computer Enhanced Visual Displays.' The document consists of two parts. The first part contains a discussion of the problem to which the grant was addressed, a brief discussion of work performed under the grant, and several issues suggested for follow-on work. The second part, presented as Appendix I, contains the annual report produced by Dr. Ann Fulop, the Postdoctoral Research Associate who worked on-site in this project. The main focus of this project was to investigate perceptual factors that might affect a pilot's ability to use computer generated information that is projected into the same visual space that contains information about real world objects. For example, computer generated visual information can identify the type of an attacking aircraft, or its likely trajectory. Such computer generated information must not be so bright that it adversely affects a pilot's ability to perceive other potential threats in the same volume of space. Or, perceptual attributes of computer generated and real display components should not contradict each other in ways that lead to problems of accommodation and, thus, distance judgments. The purpose of the research carried out under this contract was to begin to explore the perceptual factors that contribute to effective use of these displays.

  2. Enhanced Pharmacokinetics of Factor VIIa as a Monomeric Fc Fusion.

    PubMed

    Salas, Joe; Liu, Tongyao; Lu, Qi; Kulman, John D; Ashworth, Tamera; Kistanova, Elena; Moore, Nancy; Pierce, Glenn F; Jiang, Haiyan; Peters, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Recombinant Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is utilized for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in hemophilia patients with neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) against Factor VIII or Factor IX, but a short half-life in the circulation (~2.5hrs) limits its use in a prophylactic setting. Recombinant FVIIa variants with improved pharmacokinetic properties may enable improved treatment and prevention of bleeding episodes in the inhibitor population. In this study we describe recombinant FVIIaFc (rFVIIaFc), a recombinant Fc-fusion protein generated to utilize the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling pathway that protects immunoglobulin G from catabolism. On the basis of activity, rFVIIaFc exhibited a 5.5-fold extension in terminal half-life in hemophilia A mice compared to rFVIIa. The potency of rFVIIaFc was comparable to that of rFVIIa in thrombin generation assay and ROTEM. In agreement with these data, rFVIIaFc and rFVIIa showed similar acute efficacy at comparable molar doses in the tail clip bleeding model in hemophilia A mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate enhanced pharmacokinetics and similar hemostatic properties for rFVIIaFc compared to rFVIIa. PMID:25721936

  3. Identification of a large bent DNA domain and binding sites for serum response factor adjacent to the NFI repeat cluster and enhancer region in the major IE94 promoter from simian cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y N; Jeang, K T; Chiou, C J; Chan, Y J; Pizzorno, M; Hayward, G S

    1993-01-01

    The major immediate-early (MIE) transactivator proteins of cytomegaloviruses (CMV) play a pivotal role in the initiation of virus-host cell interactions. Therefore, cis- and trans-acting factors influencing the expression of these proteins through their upstream promoter-enhancer regions are important determinants of the outcome of virus infection. S1 nuclease analysis and in vitro transcription assays with the MIE (or IE94) transcription unit of simian CMV (SCMV) (Colburn) revealed a single prominent mRNA start site associated with a canonical TATATAA motif. This initiator region lies adjacent to a 2,400-bp 5'-upstream noncoding sequence that encompasses a newly identified 1,000-bp (A+T)-rich segment containing intrinsically bent DNA (domain C), together with the previously described proximal cyclic AMP response element locus (domain A) and a tandemly repeated nuclear factor I binding site cluster (domain B). Deleted MIE reporter gene constructions containing domain A sequences only yield up to 4-fold stronger basal expression in Vero cells than the intact simian virus 40 promoter-enhancer region, and sequences from position -405 to -69 (ENH-A1) added to a minimal heterologous promoter produced a 50-fold increase of basal expression in an enhancer assay. In contrast, neither the nuclear factor I cluster nor the bent DNA region possessed basal enhancer properties and neither significantly modulated the basal activity of the ENH-A1 segment. A second segment of domain A from position -580 to -450 was also found to possess basal enhancer activity in various cell types. This ENH-A2 region contains three copies of a repeated element that includes the 10-bp palindromic sequence CCATATATGG, which resembles the core motif of serum response elements and proved to bind specifically to the cellular nuclear protein serum response transcription factor. Reporter gene constructions containing four tandem copies of these elements displayed up to 13-fold increased basal enhancer

  4. Identification of a negative response element in the human inducible nitric-oxide synthase (hiNOS) promoter: The role of NF-κB-repressing factor (NRF) in basal repression of the hiNOS gene

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xuesheng; Guo, Zhong; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab; Hauser, Hansjorg; Ganster, Ray; Shao, Lifang; Geller, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Although nuclear factor (NF)-κB plays a central role in mediating cytokine-stimulated human inducible nitric-oxide synthase (hiNOS) gene transcription, very little is known about the factors involved in silencing of the hiNOS promoter. NF-κB-repressing factor (NRF) interacts with a specific negative regulatory element (NRE) to mediate transcriptional repression of certain NF-κB responsive genes. By sequence comparison with the IFN-β and IL-8 promoters, we identified an NRE in the hiNOS promoter located at −6.7 kb upstream. In A549 and HeLa human cells, constitutive NRF mRNA expression is detected by RT-PCR. Gel shift assay showed constitutive NRF binding to the hiNOS NRE. Mutation of the −6.7-kb NRE site in the hiNOS promoter resulted in loss of NRF binding and increased basal but not cytokine-stimulated hiNOS transcription in promoter transfection experiments. Interestingly, overexpression of NRF suppressed both basal and cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activity that depended on an intact cis-acting NRE motif. By using stably transformed HeLa cells with the tetracycline on/off expression system, reduction of cellular NRF by expressing antisense NRF increased basal iNOS promoter activity and resulted in constitutive iNOS mRNA expression. These data demonstrate that the transacting NRF protein is involved in constitutive silencing of the hiNOS gene by binding to a cis-acting NRE upstream in the hiNOS promoter. PMID:12381793

  5. Harmonic demodulation and minimum enhancement factors in field-enhanced near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Scarpettini, A F; Bragas, A V

    2015-01-01

    Field-enhanced scanning optical microscopy relies on the design and fabrication of plasmonic probes which had to provide optical and chemical contrast at the nanoscale. In order to do so, the scattering containing the near-field information recorded in a field-enhanced scanning optical microscopy experiment, has to surpass the background light, always present due to multiple interferences between the macroscopic probe and sample. In this work, we show that when the probe-sample distance is modulated with very low amplitude, the higher the harmonic demodulation is, the better the ratio between the near-field signal and the interferometric background results. The choice of working at a given n harmonic is dictated by the experiment when the signal at the n + 1 harmonic goes below the experimental noise. We demonstrate that the optical contrast comes from the nth derivative of the near-field scattering, amplified by the interferometric background. By modelling the far and near field we calculate the probe-sample approach curves, which fit very well the experimental ones. After taking a great amount of experimental data for different probes and samples, we conclude with a table of the minimum enhancement factors needed to have optical contrast with field-enhanced scanning optical microscopy. PMID:25231792

  6. Genetic Factors for Enhancement of Nicotine Levels in Cultivated Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingwu; Lewis, Ramsey S.; Shi, Junli; Song, Zhongbang; Gao, Yulong; Li, Wenzheng; Chen, Hongxia; Qu, Rongda

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine has practical applications relating to smoking cessation devices and alternative nicotine products. Genetic manipulation for increasing nicotine content in cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) may be of value for industrial purposes, including the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of nicotine extraction. Biotechnological approaches have been evaluated in connection with this objective, but field-based results are few. Here, we report characterization of two genes encoding basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs), NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b from tobacco. Overexpression of NtMYC2a increased leaf nicotine levels in T1 transgenic lines approximately 2.3-fold in greenhouse-grown plants of tobacco cultivar ‘NC 95′. Subsequent field testing of T2 and T3 generations of transgenic NtMYC2a overexpression lines showed nicotine concentrations were 76% and 58% higher than control lines, respectively. These results demonstrated that the increased nicotine trait was stably inherited to the T2 and T3 generations, indicating the important role that NtMYC2a plays in regulating nicotine accumulation in N. tabacum and the great potential of NtMYC2a overexpression in tobacco plants for industrial nicotine production. Collected data in this study also indicated a negative feedback inhibition of nicotine biosynthesis. Further enhancement of nicotine accumulation in tobacco leaf may require modification of the processes of nicotine transport and deposition. PMID:26626731

  7. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this disorder is a type of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma , that develops around the time of puberty. Other ... if: You or any family members have nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, especially if you are planning to have ...

  8. Enhancement factor statistics of surface enhanced Raman scattering in multiscale heterostructures of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Suitable metal nanostructures may induce surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors (EFs) large-enough to reach single-molecule sensitivity. However, the gap hot-spot EF probability density function (PDF) has the character of a long-tail distribution, which dramatically mines the reproducibility of SERS experiments. Herein, we carry out electrodynamic calculations based on a 3D finite element method of two plasmonic nanostructures, combined with Monte Carlo simulations of the EF statistics under different external conditions. We compare the PDF produced by a homodimer of nanoparticles with that provided by a self-similar trimer. We show that the PDF is sensitive to the spatial distribution of near-field enhancement specifically supported by the nanostructure geometry. Breaking the symmetry of the plasmonic system is responsible for inducing particular modulations of the PDF tail resembling a multiple Poisson distribution. We also study the influence that molecular diffusion towards the hottest hot-spot, or selective hot-spot targeting, might have on the EF PDF. Our results quantitatively assess the possibility of designing the response of a SERS substrate so as to contain the intrinsic EF PDF variance and significantly improving, in principle, the reproducibility of SERS experiments.

  9. Enhancement factor statistics of surface enhanced Raman scattering in multiscale heterostructures of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Suitable metal nanostructures may induce surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors (EFs) large-enough to reach single-molecule sensitivity. However, the gap hot-spot EF probability density function (PDF) has the character of a long-tail distribution, which dramatically mines the reproducibility of SERS experiments. Herein, we carry out electrodynamic calculations based on a 3D finite element method of two plasmonic nanostructures, combined with Monte Carlo simulations of the EF statistics under different external conditions. We compare the PDF produced by a homodimer of nanoparticles with that provided by a self-similar trimer. We show that the PDF is sensitive to the spatial distribution of near-field enhancement specifically supported by the nanostructure geometry. Breaking the symmetry of the plasmonic system is responsible for inducing particular modulations of the PDF tail resembling a multiple Poisson distribution. We also study the influence that molecular diffusion towards the hottest hot-spot, or selective hot-spot targeting, might have on the EF PDF. Our results quantitatively assess the possibility of designing the response of a SERS substrate so as to contain the intrinsic EF PDF variance and significantly improving, in principle, the reproducibility of SERS experiments. PMID:27497573

  10. Loss of Function of FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 in Tomato Enhances Basal Aphid Resistance in a Salicylate-Dependent Manner1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Carlos A.; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio M.; Jia, Lingling; Navarre, Duroy A.; Chen, Zhaorigetu; Howe, Gregg A.; Meng, Qing-Wei; Smith, Jonathon E.; Goggin, Fiona L.

    2012-01-01

    We report here that disruption of function of the ω-3 FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 (FAD7) enhances plant defenses against aphids. The suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2) mutation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which eliminates the function of FAD7, reduces the settling behavior, survival, and fecundity of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Likewise, the antisense suppression of LeFAD7 expression in wild-type tomato plants reduces aphid infestations. Aphid resistance in the spr2 mutant is associated with enhanced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and mRNA encoding the pathogenesis-related protein P4. Introduction of the Naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase transgene, which suppresses SA accumulation, restores wild-type levels of aphid susceptibility to spr2. Resistance in spr2 is also lost when we utilize virus-induced gene silencing to suppress the expression of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1), a positive regulator of many SA-dependent defenses. These results indicate that FAD7 suppresses defenses against aphids that are mediated through SA and NPR1. Although loss of function of FAD7 also inhibits the synthesis of jasmonate (JA), the effects of this desaturase on aphid resistance are not dependent on JA; other mutants impaired in JA synthesis (acx1) or perception (jai1-1) show wild-type levels of aphid susceptibility, and spr2 retains aphid resistance when treated with methyl jasmonate. Thus, FAD7 may influence JA-dependent defenses against chewing insects and SA-dependent defenses against aphids through independent effects on JA synthesis and SA signaling. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants Atfad7-2 and Atfad7-1fad8 also show enhanced resistance to the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) compared with wild-type controls, indicating that FAD7 influences plant-aphid interactions in at least two plant families. PMID:22291202

  11. Regulatory Implications of Non-Trivial Splicing: Isoform 3 of Rab1A Shows Enhanced Basal Activity and Is Not Controlled by Accessory Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schöppner, Patricia; Csaba, Gergely; Braun, Tatjana; Daake, Marina; Richter, Bettina; Lange, Oliver F; Zacharias, Martin; Zimmer, Ralf; Haslbeck, Martin

    2016-04-24

    Alternative splicing often affects structured and highly conserved regions of proteins, generating so called non-trivial splicing variants of unknown structure and cellular function. The human small G-protein Rab1A is involved in the regulation of the vesicle transfer from the ER to Golgi. A conserved non-trivial splice variant lacks nearly 40% of the sequence of the native Rab1A, including most of the regulatory interaction sites. We show that this variant of Rab1A represents a stable and folded protein, which is still able to bind nucleotides and co-localizes with membranes. Nevertheless, it should be mentioned that compared to other wild-typeRabGTPases, the measured nucleotide binding affinities are dramatically reduced in the variant studied. Furthermore, the Rab1A variant forms hetero-dimers with wild-type Rab1A and its presence in the cell enhances the efficiency of alkaline phosphatase secretion. However, this variant shows no specificity for GXP nucleotides, a constantly enhanced GTP hydrolysis activity and is no longer controlled by GEF or GAP proteins, indicating a new regulatory mechanism for the Rab1A cycle via alternative non-trivial splicing. PMID:26953259

  12. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Effects on Oligodendrocyte Progenitors of the Basal Forebrain Are Mediated Through TrkB and the MAP Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Van’t Veer, Ashlee; Du, Yangzhou; Fischer, Tanya Z.; Boetig, Deborah R.; Wood, Melissa R.; Dreyfus, Cheryl F.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that BDNF increases the differentiation of basal forebrain (BF) oligodendrocytes (OLGs) in culture through the mediation of trkB and the MAPK pathway (Du et al. [2006a,b] Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 31:366–375; J. Neurosci. Res. 84:1692–1702). In the present work, effects of BDNF on BF OLG progenitor cells (OPCs) were examined. BDNF increased DNA synthesis of OPCs, as assessed by thymidine and bro-modeoxyuridine incorporation. Effects of BDNF on DNA synthesis were mediated through the trkB receptor and not the p75 receptor, as shown by inhibitors that block neurotrophin binding to the receptors and by the phosphorylation of trkB. TrkB can activate the mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3-K), and phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathways. BDNF elicited the phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt, a kinase downstream of PI3K, but not PLC-γ in OPCs. Through the use of specific inhibitors to the MAPK and PI3-K pathways, it was found that the MAPK pathway was responsible for the effect of BDNF on DNA synthesis. These data indicate that BDNF affects OPC proliferation and development through the mediation of trkB and the MAPK pathway. PMID:18752299

  13. Enhancing selectivity of infrared emitters through quality-factor matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, Enas; Zhou, Zhiguang; Bermel, Peter

    2015-09-01

    It has recently been proposed that designing selective emitters with photonic crystals (PhCs) or plasmonic metamaterials can suppress low-energy photon emission, while enhancing higher-energy photon emission. Here, we will consider multiple approaches to designing and fabricating nanophotonic structures concentrating infrared thermal radiation at energies above a critical threshold. These are based on quality factor matching, in which one creates resonant cavities that couple light out at the same rate that the underlying materials emit it. When this quality-factor matching is done properly, emissivities can approach those of a blackbody, but only within a selected range of thermal photon energies. One potential application is for improving the conversion of heat to electricity via a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system, by using thermal radiation to illuminate a photovoltaic (PV) diode. In this study, realistic simulations of system efficiencies are performed using finite-difference time domain (FDTD) and rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) to capture both thermal radiation and PV diode absorption. We first consider a previously studied 2D molybdenum photonic crystal with a commercially-available silicon PV diode, which can yield TPV efficiencies up to 26.2%. Second, a 1D-periodic samarium-doped glass emitter with a gallium antimonide (GaSb) PV diode is presented, which can yield efficiencies up to 38.5%. Finally, a 2D tungsten photonic crystal with a 1D integrated, chirped filter and the GaSb PV diode can yield efficiencies up to 38.2%; however, the fabrication procedure is expected to be more challenging. The advantages and disadvantages of each strategy will be discussed.

  14. Neonatal fibroblast growth factor treatment enhances cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Sarah M; Turner, Cortney A; Flagel, Shelly B; Simpson, Danielle N; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda

    2012-11-01

    Growth factors are critical in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity, and recent studies point to their involvement in addiction. We previously reported increased levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) in high novelty/drug-seeking rats (bred high responders, bHR) compared to low novelty/drug-seeking rats(bred low responders, bLRs). The present study asked whether an early life manipulation of the FGF system(a single FGF2 injection on postnatal day 2) can impact cocaine sensitization and associated neurobiological markers in adult bHR/bLR animals. Neonatal FGF2- and vehicle-treated bHR/bLR rats were sensitized to cocaine(7 daily injections, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.) in adulthood. Neonatal FGF2 markedly increased bLRs' typically low psychomotor sensitization to cocaine (day 7 locomotor response to cocaine), but had little effect on bHRs' cocaine sensitization. Gene expression studies examined dopaminergic molecules as well as FGF2 and the FGFR1 receptor in cocaine naïve animals, to investigate possible neurobiological alterations induced by neonatal FGF2 exposure that may influence behavioral response to cocaine. bLRs showed decreased tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), decreased D1 and increased D2 receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as decreased FGF2 in the VTA, substantia nigra, accumbens core, and caudate putamen compared to bHRs. Neonatal FGF2 selectively increased D1 receptor and FGF2 mRNA in the accumbens core of bLRs, which may contribute to their heightened cocaine sensitization. Our results suggest increased FGF2 in the mesodopaminergic circuit (as in baseline bHRs and neonatal FGF2-exposed bLRs vs. baseline bLRs) enhances an individual's susceptibility to cocaine sensitization and may increase vulnerability to drug seeking and addiction. PMID:22819969

  15. Neonatal Fibroblast Growth Factor Treatment Enhances Cocaine Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, Sarah M.; Turner, Cortney A.; Flagel, Shelly B.; Simpson, Danielle N.; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda

    2012-01-01

    Growth factors are critical in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity, and recent studies point to their involvement in addiction. We previously reported increased levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) in high novelty/drug-seeking rats (bred High Responders, bHR) compared to low novelty/drug-seeking rats (bred Low Responders, bLRs). The present study asked whether an early life manipulation of the FGF system (a single FGF2 injection on postnatal day 2) can impact cocaine sensitization and associated neurobiological markers in adult bHR/bLR animals. Neonatal FGF2- and vehicle-treated bHR/bLR rats were sensitized to cocaine (7 daily injections, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.) in adulthood. Neonatal FGF2 markedly increased bLRs’ typically low psychomotor sensitization to cocaine (day 7 locomotor response to cocaine), but had little effect on bHRs’ cocaine sensitization. Gene expression studies examined dopaminergic molecules as well as FGF2 and the FGFR1 receptor in cocaine naïve animals, to investigate possible neurobiological alterations induced by neonatal FGF2 exposure that may influence behavioral response to cocaine. bLRs showed decreased tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), decreased D1 and increased D2 receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as decreased FGF2 in the VTA, substantia nigra, accumbens core, and caudate putamen compared to bHRs. Neonatal FGF2 selectively increased D1 receptor and FGF2 mRNA in the accumbens core of bLRs, which may contribute to their heightened cocaine sensitization. Our results suggest increased FGF2 in the mesodopaminergic circuit (as in baseline bHRs and neonatal FGF2-exposed bLRs vs. baseline bLRs) enhances an individual’s susceptibility to cocaine sensitization and may increase vulnerability to drug seeking and addiction. PMID:22819969

  16. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Scarmeas, N; Chin, S S; Marder, K

    2001-10-01

    In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms. PMID:14602941

  17. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates lipid oxidation, reduces protein oxidation, and enhances insulin sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M A; Schmitz, O; Mengel, A; Keller, A; Christiansen, J S; Zapf, J; Froesch, E R

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on fuel oxidation and insulin sensitivity, eight healthy subjects were treated with saline and recombinant human (IGF-I (10 micrograms/kg.h) during 5 d in a crossover, randomized fashion, while receiving an isocaloric diet (30 kcal/kg.d) throughout the study period. On the third and fourth treatment days, respectively, an L-arginine stimulation test and an intravenous glucose tolerance test were performed. A euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry and a glucose tracer infusion were performed on the fifth treatment day. IGF-I treatment led to reduced fasting and stimulated (glucose and/or L-arginine) insulin and growth hormone secretion. Basal and stimulated glucagon secretion remained unchanged. Intravenous glucose tolerance was unaltered despite reduced insulin secretion. Resting energy expenditure and lipid oxidation were both elevated, while protein oxidation was reduced, and glucose turnover rates were unaltered on the fifth treatment day with IGF-I as compared to the control period. Enhanced lipolysis was reflected by elevated circulating free fatty acids. Moreover, insulin-stimulated oxidative and nonoxidative glucose disposal (i.e., insulin sensitivity) were enhanced during IGF-I treatment. Thus, IGF-I treatment leads to marked changes in lipid and protein oxidation, whereas, at the dose used, carbohydrate metabolism remains unaltered in the face of reduced insulin levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Images PMID:8227340

  18. Fast Modulation of Visual Perception by Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Estandian, Daniel; Xu, Min; Kwan, Alex C.; Lee, Seung-Hee; Harrison, Thomas C.; Feng, Guoping; Dan, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain provides the primary source of cholinergic input to the cortex, and it plays a crucial role in promoting wakefulness and arousal. However, whether rapid changes in basal forebrain neuron spiking in awake animals can dynamically influence sensory perception is unclear. Here we show that basal forebrain cholinergic neurons rapidly regulate cortical activity and visual perception in awake, behaving mice. Optogenetic activation of the cholinergic neurons or their V1 axon terminals improved performance of a visual discrimination task on a trial-by-trial basis. In V1, basal forebrain activation enhanced visual responses and desynchronized neuronal spiking, which could partly account for the behavioral improvement. Conversely, optogenetic basal forebrain inactivation decreased behavioral performance, synchronized cortical activity and impaired visual responses, indicating the importance of cholinergic activity in normal visual processing. These results underscore the causal role of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in fast, bidirectional modulation of cortical processing and sensory perception. PMID:24162654

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Regulates Genes Involved in Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor Signaling and Lipid Metabolism during Adipogenesis through Functionally Distinct Enhancer Classes*

    PubMed Central

    Oger, Frédérik; Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Gheeraert, Céline; Avner, Stéphane; Durand, Emmanuelle; Froguel, Philippe; Salbert, Gilles; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is a transcription factor whose expression is induced during adipogenesis and that is required for the acquisition and control of mature adipocyte functions. Indeed, PPARγ induces the expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis and storage through enhancers activated during adipocyte differentiation. Here, we show that PPARγ also binds to enhancers already active in preadipocytes as evidenced by an active chromatin state including lower DNA methylation levels despite higher CpG content. These constitutive enhancers are linked to genes involved in the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway that are transcriptionally induced during adipogenesis but to a lower extent than lipid metabolism genes, because of stronger basal expression levels in preadipocytes. This is consistent with the sequential involvement of hormonal sensitivity and lipid handling during adipocyte maturation and correlates with the chromatin structure dynamics at constitutive and activated enhancers. Interestingly, constitutive enhancers are evolutionary conserved and can be activated in other tissues, in contrast to enhancers controlling lipid handling genes whose activation is more restricted to adipocytes. Thus, PPARγ utilizes both broadly active and cell type-specific enhancers to modulate the dynamic range of activation of genes involved in the adipogenic process. PMID:24288131

  20. Critical assessment of enhancement factor measurements in surface-enhanced Raman scattering on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daniel C; de Souza, Michele L; Souza, Klester S; dos Santos, Diego P; Andrade, Gustavo F S; Temperini, Marcia L A

    2015-09-01

    The SERS enhancement factor (SERS-EF) is one of the most important parameters that characterizes the ability of a given substrate to enhance the Raman signal for SERS applications. The comparison of SERS intensities and SERS-EF values across different substrates is a common practice to unravel the performance of a given substrate. In this study, it is shown that such a comparison may lack significance if we compare substrates of very distinct nature and optical properties. It is specifically shown that the SERS-EF values for static substrates (e.g. immobilized metallic nanostructures) cannot be compared to those of dynamic ones (e.g. colloidal metal nanoparticle solutions), and that the optical properties for the latter show strong dependence on the metal-molecule interaction dynamics. The most representative experimental results concerning the dynamic substrates have been supported by generalized Mie theory simulations, which are tools used to describe the substrate complexity and the microscopic information not usually taken into account. PMID:25669424

  1. Sarcolipin Is a Key Determinant of the Basal Metabolic Rate, and Its Overexpression Enhances Energy Expenditure and Resistance against Diet-induced Obesity*

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Santosh K.; Bal, Naresh C.; Sopariwala, Danesh H.; Pant, Meghna; Rowland, Leslie A.; Shaikh, Sana A.; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-01-01

    Sarcolipin (SLN) is a novel regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) in muscle. SLN binding to SERCA uncouples Ca2+ transport from ATP hydrolysis. By this mechanism, SLN promotes the futile cycling of SERCA, contributing to muscle heat production. We recently showed that SLN plays an important role in cold- and diet-induced thermogenesis. However, the detailed mechanism of how SLN regulates muscle metabolism remains unclear. In this study, we used both SLN knockout (Sln−/−) and skeletal muscle-specific SLN overexpression (SlnOE) mice to explore energy metabolism by pair feeding (fixed calories) and high-fat diet feeding (ad libitum). Our results show that, upon pair feeding, SlnOE mice lost weight compared with the WT, but Sln−/− mice gained weight. Interestingly, when fed with a high-fat diet, SlnOE mice consumed more calories but gained less weight and maintained a normal metabolic profile in comparison with WT and Sln−/− mice. We found that oxygen consumption and fatty acid oxidation were increased markedly in SlnOE mice. There was also an increase in both mitochondrial number and size in SlnOE muscle, together with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) and PPAR γ coactivator 1 α (PGC1α), key transcriptional activators of mitochondrial biogenesis and enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism. These results, taken together, establish an important role for SLN in muscle metabolism and energy expenditure. On the basis of these data we propose that SLN is a novel target for enhancing whole-body energy expenditure. PMID:25713078

  2. Paramecium tetraurelia basal body structure.

    PubMed

    Tassin, Anne-Marie; Lemullois, Michel; Aubusson-Fleury, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is a free-living unicellular organism, easy to cultivate, featuring ca. 4000 motile cilia emanating from longitudinal rows of basal bodies anchored in the plasma membrane. The basal body circumferential polarity is marked by the asymmetrical organization of its associated appendages. The complex basal body plus its associated rootlets forms the kinetid. Kinetids are precisely oriented within a row in correlation with the cell polarity. Basal bodies also display a proximo-distal polarity with microtubule triplets at their proximal ends, surrounding a permanent cartwheel, and microtubule doublets at the transition zone located between the basal body and the cilium. Basal bodies remain anchored at the cell surface during the whole cell cycle. On the opposite to metazoan, there is no centriolar stage and new basal bodies develop anteriorly and at right angle from the base of the docked ones. Ciliogenesis follows a specific temporal pattern during the cell cycle and both unciliated and ciliated docked basal bodies can be observed in the same cell. The transition zone is particularly well organized with three distinct plates and a maturation of its structure is observed during the growth of the cilium. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses have been performed in different organisms including Paramecium to understand the ciliogenesis process. The data have incremented a multi-organism database, dedicated to proteins involved in the biogenesis, composition and function of centrosomes, basal bodies or cilia. Thanks to its thousands of basal bodies and the well-known choreography of their duplication during the cell cycle, Paramecium has allowed pioneer studies focusing on the structural and functional processes underlying basal body duplication. Proteins involved in basal body anchoring are sequentially recruited to assemble the transition zone thus indicating that the anchoring process parallels the structural differentiation of the transition zone. This feature

  3. Human basal body basics.

    PubMed

    Vertii, Anastassiia; Hung, Hui-Fang; Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In human cells, the basal body (BB) core comprises a ninefold microtubule-triplet cylindrical structure. Distal and subdistal appendages are located at the distal end of BB, where they play indispensable roles in cilium formation and function. Most cells that arrest in the G0 stage of the cell cycle initiate BB docking at the plasma membrane followed by BB-mediated growth of a solitary primary cilium, a structure required for sensing the extracellular environment and cell signaling. In addition to the primary cilium, motile cilia are present in specialized cells, such as sperm and airway epithelium. Mutations that affect BB function result in cilia dysfunction. This can generate syndromic disorders, collectively called ciliopathies, for which there are no effective treatments. In this review, we focus on the features and functions of BBs and centrosomes in Homo sapiens. PMID:26981235

  4. A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Romu, Thobias; Dahlqvist-Leinhard, Olof; Borga, Magnus; Leandersson, Per; Nystrom, Fredrik H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern. Objectives To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans. Methods Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers. Results Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group. Conclusions Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including

  5. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Enhances Endogenous Cardiomyocyte Regeneration after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Masato; Nagai, Toshio; Takahashi, Toshinao; Liu, Mei Lan; Kondou, Naomichi; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Sashida, Goro; Iwama, Atsushi; Komuro, Issei; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac stem cells or precursor cells regenerate cardiomyocytes; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. We generated CreLacZ mice in which more than 99.9% of the cardiomyocytes in the left ventricular field were positive for 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactoside (X-gal) staining immediately after tamoxifen injection. Three months after myocardial infarction (MI), the MI mice had more X-gal-negative (newly generated) cells than the control mice (3.04 ± 0.38/mm2, MI; 0.47 ± 0.16/mm2, sham; p < 0.05). The cardiac side population (CSP) cell fraction contained label-retaining cells, which differentiated into X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes after MI. We injected a leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-expression construct at the time of MI and identified a significant functional improvement in the LIF-treated group. At 1 month after MI, in the MI border and scar area, the LIF-injected mice had 31.41 ± 5.83 X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes/mm2, whereas the control mice had 12.34 ± 2.56 X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes/mm2 (p < 0.05). Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyurinide (EdU) administration after MI, the percentages of EdU-positive CSP cells in the LIF-treated and control mice were 29.4 ± 2.7% and 10.6 ± 3.7%, respectively, which suggests that LIF influenced CSP proliferation. Moreover, LIF activated the Janus kinase (JAK)signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK)extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–AKT pathways in CSPs in vivo and in vitro. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-bone marrow-chimeric CreLacZ mouse results indicated that LIF did not stimulate cardiogenesis via circulating bone marrow-derived cells during the 4 weeks following MI. Thus, LIF stimulates, in part, stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte regeneration by activating cardiac stem or precursor cells. This approach may represent a novel therapeutic

  6. Transcriptional regulation of the human cystathionine beta-synthase -1b basal promoter: synergistic transactivation by transcription factors NF-Y and Sp1/Sp3.

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Y; Konrad, M A; Matherly, L H; Taub, J W

    2001-01-01

    Cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) catalyses the condensation of serine and homocysteine to form cystathionine, an intermediate step in the synthesis of cysteine. Human CBS encodes five distinct 5' non-coding exons, the most frequent termed CBS -1a and CBS -1b, each transcribed from its own unique GC-rich TATA-less promoter. The minimal transcriptional region (-3792 to -3667) of the CBS -1b promoter was defined by 5'- and 3'-deletions, and transient transfections of reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells, characterized by CBS transcription exclusively from the -1b promoter. Included in this 125 bp region are 3 GC-boxes (termed GC-a, GC-b and GC-c), an inverted CAAT-box and an E-box. By gel-shift and supershift assays, binding of specificity protein (Sp)1 and Sp3 to the GC-box elements, upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF-1) to the E-box, and both nuclear factor (NF)-Y and an NF-1-like factor to the CAAT box could be demonstrated. By transient trans fections and reporter gene assays in HepG2 and Drosophila SL2 cells, a functional interplay was indicated between NF-Y binding to the CAAT-box, or between USF-1 binding to the E-box, and Sp1/Sp3 binding to the GC-box elements. In SL2 cells, NF-Y and Sp1/Sp3 were synergistic. Furthermore, both Sp1 and the long Sp3 isoform transactivated the CBS -1b minimal promoter; however, the short Sp3 isoforms were potent repressors. These results may explain the cell- or tissue-specific regulation of CBS transcription, and clarify the bases for alterations in CBS gene expression in human disease and Down's syndrome. PMID:11415440

  7. Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Expression in the Rat Brain Both in Basal Condition and following Learning Predominantly Derives from the Maternal Allele

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaojing; Kohtz, Amy; Pollonini, Gabriella; Riccio, Andrea; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor 2 (Igf2) is known as a maternally imprinted gene involved in growth and development. Recently, Igf2 was found to also be regulated and required in the adult rat hippocampus for long-term memory formation, raising the question of its allelic regulation in adult brain regions following experience and in cognitive processes. We show that, in adult rats, Igf2 is abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in cognitive functions, like hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, compared to the peripheral tissues. In contrast to its maternal imprinting in peripheral tissues, Igf2 is mainly expressed from the maternal allele in these brain regions. The training-dependent increase in Igf2 expression derives proportionally from both parental alleles, and, hence, is mostly maternal. Thus, Igf2 parental expression in the adult rat brain does not follow the imprinting rules found in peripheral tissues, suggesting differential expression regulation and functions of imprinted genes in the brain. PMID:26495851

  8. Factors Affecting Quality Enhancement Procedures for E-Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Magdalena; Mellar, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on an empirical study exploring the way in which campus-based higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK apply their internal quality assurance and enhancement (QA/QE) procedures to their e-learning courses. The purpose of this paper is to identify those characteristics of e-learning courses which affected the…

  9. Basal and therapy-driven hypoxia-inducible factor-1α confers resistance to endocrine therapy in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daqiang; Li, Jianwei; Mo, Miao; Wang, Yujie; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Zhenzhou; Cheng, Jingyi; Liu, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    Resistance is an obstacle to endocrine therapy for breast cancer. We measured levels of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in 52 primary breast cancer patients before and after receiving neoadjuvant endocrine therapy with letrozole for at least 3 months. Pre-treatment levels of HIF-1α were associated with negative clinical outcome. Furthermore, levels of HIF-1α were increased in post-treatment residual tumors compared with those in pre-treatment biopsy samples. In animal studies, xenografts stably expressing HIF-1α were resistant to endocrine therapy with fulvestrant compared with the effects in control xenografts. Additionally, HIF-1α transcription was inhibited by zoledronic acid, a conventional drug for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, and was accompanied by a marked inhibition of the RAS/MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. HIF-1α is a determinant of resistance to endocrine therapy and should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for overcoming endocrine resistance in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. In addition, zoledronic acid may overcome endocrine resistance in ER-positive human breast cancer by targeting HIF-1α transcription through inhibition of the RAS/MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. Clinical studies on the administration of zoledronic acid as a second line treatment in patients who failed endocrine therapy should be considered to improve therapeutic outcomes in breast cancer patients. PMID:25929338

  10. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  11. Basal Cell Carcinoma. Part 1: Basal Cell Carcinoma Has Come of Age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Min; Marsch, Amanda F; Petronic-Rosic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Almost 2 centuries after its recognition, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) remains the most common cancer worldwide, with a 30% overall lifetime risk in the United States and an incidence that continues to increase annually. The increasing incidence of BCC is multifactorial and likely correlates to multiple risk factors, including exposure to both ionizing and UV radiation. Despite its relatively indolent growth, what was once referred to as a rodent ulcer or basal cell epithelioma is now identified as a full-fledged malignancy. The authors describe the societal burden of this disease and characterize its malignant potential, emphasizing associated clinical and histopathologic prognostic features. PMID:26380507

  12. Ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring of greige cotton: regression analysis of process factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process factors of enzyme concentration, time, power and frequency were investigated for ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring of greige cotton. A fractional factorial experimental design and subsequent regression analysis of the process factors were employed to determine the significance of each factor a...

  13. Scale-model charge-transfer technique for measuring enhancement factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kositsky, J.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Determination of aircraft electric field enhancement factors is crucial when using airborne field mill (ABFM) systems to accurately measure electric fields aloft. SRI used the scale model charge transfer technique to determine enhancement factors of several canonical shapes and a scale model Learjet 36A. The measured values for the canonical shapes agreed with known analytic solutions within about 6 percent. The laboratory determined enhancement factors for the aircraft were compared with those derived from in-flight data gathered by a Learjet 36A outfitted with eight field mills. The values agreed to within experimental error (approx. 15 percent).

  14. Master transcription factors and mediator establish super-enhancers at key cell identity genes.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Warren A; Orlando, David A; Hnisz, Denes; Abraham, Brian J; Lin, Charles Y; Kagey, Michael H; Rahl, Peter B; Lee, Tong Ihn; Young, Richard A

    2013-04-11

    Master transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog bind enhancer elements and recruit Mediator to activate much of the gene expression program of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We report here that the ESC master transcription factors form unusual enhancer domains at most genes that control the pluripotent state. These domains, which we call super-enhancers, consist of clusters of enhancers that are densely occupied by the master regulators and Mediator. Super-enhancers differ from typical enhancers in size, transcription factor density and content, ability to activate transcription, and sensitivity to perturbation. Reduced levels of Oct4 or Mediator cause preferential loss of expression of super-enhancer-associated genes relative to other genes, suggesting how changes in gene expression programs might be accomplished during development. In other more differentiated cells, super-enhancers containing cell-type-specific master transcription factors are also found at genes that define cell identity. Super-enhancers thus play key roles in the control of mammalian cell identity. PMID:23582322

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering enhancement factor distribution for nanoparticles of arbitrary shapes using surface integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Huang, Shao; Wu, Bae-Ian; Foong, Shaohui

    2013-01-01

    Poggio-Miller-Chang-Harrington-Wu-Tsai (PMCHWT) surface integral equation method is applied for the first time to accurately estimate the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor distribution for arbitrary nanoparticles and nano-aggregates. It is the first time in literature that the distributions of SERS enhancement factors of nanoparticles of a large variety are reported. It is shown that not every SERS substrate exhibits a long-tail distribution as a dimer consisting of two spheres in close proximity. Generic methods are proposed to evaluate the performance of nanoparticles on SERS substrates. A cumulative distribution is proposed to examine the contributions of hot and warm spots around the nanoparticles. It is used to identify the importance of warm spots on a SERS substrate. A parameter q is proposed to describe the likelihood of a randomly positioned molecule that can be activated. This study provides guidance and insights for the optimization of SERS substrate fabrication techniques.

  16. [Basal and spinous cell epitheliomas].

    PubMed

    Shaw, M; Sanguinetti, O; de Kaminsky, A R; Kaminsky, C A

    1975-01-01

    A study on 502 epithelial cutaneous cancers was carried out by the authors. The study included 377 basal cell carcinomas (57,5% in males and 42,4% in females) and 125 squamous cell carcinomas (78,4% in males and 21,6% in females). The basal cell carcinomas in both sexs had an earlier onset than the squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:1241706

  17. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:23568985

  18. Ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring of greige cotton: regression analysis of process factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultrasound-enhanced bioscouring process factors for greige cotton fabric are examined using custom experimental design utilizing statistical principles. An equation is presented which predicts bioscouring performance based upon percent reflectance values obtained from UV-Vis measurements of rutheniu...

  19. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo. PMID:20075049

  20. Identification of factor-binding sites in the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer and in vivo effects of enhancer mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Mason, W S; Burch, J B

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B viruses (hepadnaviruses) can cause chronic, productive infections of hepatocytes. Analyses of the enhancers and promoters of these viruses in cell lines have suggested a requirement of these elements for liver-enriched transcription factors. In this study, a minimum of seven factor-binding sites on the duck hepatitis B virus enhancer were detected by DNase I footprinting using duck liver nuclear extracts. Among the sites that were tentatively identified were one C/EBP-, one HNF1-, and two HNF3-binding sites. Mutations of the HNF1- and HNF3-like sites, which eliminated factor binding, as assessed by both DNase I footprinting and competitive gel shift assays, were evaluated for their effects on enhancer activity. Using a construct in which human growth hormone was expressed from the viral enhancer and core gene promoter, we found that all of the mutations, either alone or in combination, reduced expression two- to fourfold in LMH chicken hepatoma cells. The mutations in the HNF1 site and one of the HNF3 sites, when inserted into the intact viral genome, also suppressed virus RNA synthesis in primary hepatocyte cultures. Virus carrying the latter HNF3 mutation was also examined for its ability to infect and replicate in ducks. No significant inhibition of virus replication was observed in a short-term assay; however, virus with the HNF3 mutation was apparently unable to grow in the pancreas, a second site of duck hepatitis B virus replication in the duck. Images PMID:8139013

  1. Towards improved precision in the quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors: a renewed approach.

    PubMed

    Sivanesan, Arumugam; Adamkiewicz, Witold; Kalaivani, Govindasamy; Kamińska, Agnieszka; Waluk, Jacek; Hołyst, Robert; Izake, Emad L

    2015-01-21

    This paper demonstrates a renewed procedure for the quantification of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors with improved precision. The principle of this method relies on deducting the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) contribution from surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) to end up with the surface enhancement (SERS) effect alone. We employed 1,8,15,22-tetraaminophthalocyanato-cobalt(II) (4α-Co(II)TAPc), a resonance Raman- and electrochemically redox-active chromophore, as a probe molecule for RRS and SERRS experiments. The number of 4α-Co(II)TAPc molecules contributing to RRS and SERRS phenomena on plasmon inactive glassy carbon (GC) and plasmon active GC/Au surfaces, respectively, has been precisely estimated by cyclic voltammetry experiments. Furthermore, the SERS substrate enhancement factor (SSEF) quantified by our approach is compared with the traditionally employed methods. We also demonstrate that the present approach of SSEF quantification can be applied for any kind of different SERS substrates by choosing an appropriate laser line and probe molecule. PMID:25374971

  2. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  3. Cardiovascular effects of basal insulins

    PubMed Central

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Giannini, Stefano; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Basal insulin is an important component of treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One of the principal aims of treatment in patients with diabetes is the prevention of diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease. There is some evidence, although controversial, that attainment of good glycemic control reduces long-term cardiovascular risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential cardiovascular safety of the different available preparations of basal insulin. Current basal insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], or isophane) and basal insulin analogs (glargine, detemir, and the more recent degludec) differ essentially by various measures of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in the bloodstream, presence and persistence of peak action, and within-subject variability in the glucose-lowering response. The currently available data show that basal insulin analogs have a lower risk of hypoglycemia than NPH human insulin, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, then excluding additional harmful effects on the cardiovascular system mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. Given that no biological rationale for a possible difference in cardiovascular effect of basal insulins has been proposed so far, available meta-analyses of publicly disclosed randomized controlled trials do not show any signal of increased risk of major cardiovascular events between the different basal insulin analogs. However, the number of available cardiovascular events in these trials is very small, preventing any clear-cut conclusion. The results of an ongoing clinical trial comparing glargine and degludec with regard to cardiovascular safety will provide definitive evidence. PMID:26203281

  4. IL-2 enhancing factor(s) in B cell supernatants from patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tomura, K; Kang, H; Mitamura, K; Takei, M; Karasaki, M; Koyasu, S; Sawada, S

    1989-11-01

    Culture supernatants of B cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the active stage enhanced interleukin 2 (IL-2) dependent proliferation of CTLL A/J cells. This activity, designated B cell-derived growth-enhancing factor-2 (BGEF-2), was recovered by gel filtration of a molecular weight between 15,000 and 20,000. BGEF-2 itself did not show IL-2 activity nor IL-1 activity, and BGEF-2 activity was not detected in the following cytokines: Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 5 (IL-5) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). Furthermore, BGEF-2 was distinguishable from B cell-derived growth-enhancing factor described in a previous paper [Kang et al. (1987) J. Immunol., 139, 1154-1160]. BGEF-2 was produced by B cells from patients with RA or SLE only when the patients were in the active stage. BGEF-2 enhanced IL-2-dependent growth of peripheral blood T cells from patients with active RA, but did not enhance the growth of T cells from healthy volunteers. These results suggest that BGEF-2 is a B cell-derived lymphokine which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of RA and SLE. PMID:2623661

  5. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  6. Gauge factor enhancement driven by heterogeneity in thick-film resistors

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, C.; Ryser, P.; Strassler, S.

    2001-07-01

    We present a simple picture of the gauge factor (GF) enhancement in highly heterogeneous materials such as thick-film resistors. We show that when the conducting phase is stiffer than the insulating one, the local strains within the latter are enhanced with respect to the averaged macroscopic strain. Within a simple model of electron tunneling processes, we show that the enhanced local strain leads to values of GF higher than those expected for a homogeneous system. Moreover, we provide formulas relating the enhancement of GF to the elastic and microstructural characteristics of thick-film resistors. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Factors Enhancing the Teaching of Information Literacy to Adirondack Community College Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joyce

    This study examines the status of information literacy skills among the faculty of Adirondack Community College (ACC) in New York, and describes factors that enhance these skills. Three primary questions posed by the study are: (1) what information literacy skills do faculty have now?; (2) what factors strengthen the teaching of information…

  8. Analysis of Factors Enhancing Pitfall in Research and Teaching of the Nigerian University System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Tafida; Umar, Kasim; Paul, Chima

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses factors enhancing pitfall in research and teaching in the Nigerian university system. Using data generated from secondary sources, it was found that so many factors are responsible for the constant decay in teaching and research in the Nigerian universities. The paper however found from literature that the high rate of pitfalls…

  9. Determination and applications of enhancement factors for positron and ortho-positronium annihilations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitroy, J.

    2005-12-01

    Electron-positron annihilation rates calculated directly from the electron and positron densities are known to underestimate the true annihilation rate. A correction factor, known as the enhancement factor, allows for the local increase of the electron density around the positron caused by the attractive electron-positron interaction. Enhancement factors are given for positrons annihilating with the 1s electron in H, He+ , He, Li2+ , and Li+ . The enhancement factor for a free positron annihilating with He+ and He is found to be close to that of ortho-positronium (i.e., Ps in its triplet state) annihilating with these atoms. The enhancement factor for Ps-He scattering is used in conjunction with the known annihilation rate for pickoff annihilation to derive a scattering length of 1.47a0 for Ps-He scattering. Further, enhancement factors for e+ -Ne and e+ -Ar annihilation are used in conjunction with the pickoff annihilation rate to estimate scattering lengths of 1.46a0 for Ps-Ne scattering and 1.75a0 for Ps-Ar scattering.

  10. Determination and applications of enhancement factors for positron and ortho-positronium annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.

    2005-12-15

    Electron-positron annihilation rates calculated directly from the electron and positron densities are known to underestimate the true annihilation rate. A correction factor, known as the enhancement factor, allows for the local increase of the electron density around the positron caused by the attractive electron-positron interaction. Enhancement factors are given for positrons annihilating with the 1s electron in H, He{sup +}, He, Li{sup 2+}, and Li{sup +}. The enhancement factor for a free positron annihilating with He{sup +} and He is found to be close to that of ortho-positronium (i.e., Ps in its triplet state) annihilating with these atoms. The enhancement factor for Ps-He scattering is used in conjunction with the known annihilation rate for pickoff annihilation to derive a scattering length of 1.47a{sub 0} for Ps-He scattering. Further, enhancement factors for e{sup +}-Ne and e{sup +}-Ar annihilation are used in conjunction with the pickoff annihilation rate to estimate scattering lengths of 1.46a{sub 0} for Ps-Ne scattering and 1.75a{sub 0} for Ps-Ar scattering.

  11. Basal cell carcinoma – diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika; Strzelecka-Węklar, Daria; Dańczak-Pazdrowska, Aleksandra; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer in the Caucasian population. The cancer arises in sun exposed areas of the skin. The incidence of morbidity is high and it is still growing. The metastatic rate is low, but the enlarging tumor may cause severe tissue disfigurement and a poor cosmetic outcome. The diagnosis is usually clinical but there are many subtypes of this carcinoma and correct diagnosis is the clue to appropriate treatment of the lesion. The main problem in basal cell carcinoma management is the high recurrence rate. PMID:24592119

  12. Spectral dependence of the linewidth enhancement factor in quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zubov, F. I.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Maximov, M. V.; Zhukov, A. E.; Livshits, D. A.; Payusov, A. S.; Nadtochiy, A. M.; Savelyev, A. V.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Gordeev, N. Yu.

    2013-12-15

    The spectral analysis of amplified spontaneous emission is used to determine the linewidth enhancement factor (α-factor) in lasers based on InAs/InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) in a wide spectral range near the ground-state optical transition energy. The effect of the pump current and number of QDs on the spectral dependences of the α-factor is examined. The temperature dependence of the spectra of the α-factor is experimentally determined for the first time for lasers with InAs/InGaAs QDs. An explanation is suggested for the observed anomalous decrease in the α-factor with increasing temperature.

  13. Predictive factors of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the response to transarterial chemoembolization in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kil Hyo; Kwon, Soon Ha; Lee, Yong Sub; Jang, Jae Young; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Sang Gyune; Cha, Sang-Woo; Kim, Young Seok; Cho, Young Deok; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Boo Sung; Kim, Yong Jae

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The predictive role of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) before performing transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has not been determined. We assessed the possible predictive factors of CEUS for the response to TACE. Methods Seventeen patients with 18 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) underwent TACE. All of the tumors were studied with CEUS before TACE using a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent (SonoVue®, Bracco, Milan, Italy). The tumor response to TACE was classified with a score between 1 and 4 according to the remaining enhancing-tumor percentage based on modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST): 1, enhancing tumor <25%; 2, 25%≤enhancing tumor<50%; 3, 50%≤enhancing tumor<75%; and 4, enhancing tumor≥75%). A score of 1 was defined as a "good response" to TACE. The predictive factors for the response to TACE were evaluated during CEUS based on the maximum tumor diameter, initial arterial enhancing time, arterial enhancing duration, intensity of arterial enhancement, presence of a hypoenhanced pattern, and the feeding artery to the tumor. Results The median tumor size was 3.1 cm. The distribution of tumor response scores after TACE in all tumors was as follows: 1, n=11; 2, n=4; 3, n=2; and 4, n=1. Fifteen tumors showed feeding arteries. The presence of a feeding artery and the tumor size (≤5 cm) were the predictive factors for a good response (P=0.043 and P=0.047, respectively). Conclusions The presence of a feeding artery and a tumor size of less than 5 cm were the predictive factors for a good response of HCC to TACE on CEUS. PMID:26157753

  14. Pioneer factors govern super-enhancer dynamics in stem cell plasticity and lineage choice.

    PubMed

    Adam, Rene C; Yang, Hanseul; Rockowitz, Shira; Larsen, Samantha B; Nikolova, Maria; Oristian, Daniel S; Polak, Lisa; Kadaja, Meelis; Asare, Amma; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-05-21

    Adult stem cells occur in niches that balance self-renewal with lineage selection and progression during tissue homeostasis. Following injury, culture or transplantation, stem cells outside their niche often display fate flexibility. Here we show that super-enhancers underlie the identity, lineage commitment and plasticity of adult stem cells in vivo. Using hair follicle as a model, we map the global chromatin domains of hair follicle stem cells and their committed progenitors in their native microenvironments. We show that super-enhancers and their dense clusters ('epicentres') of transcription factor binding sites undergo remodelling upon lineage progression. New fate is acquired by decommissioning old and establishing new super-enhancers and/or epicentres, an auto-regulatory process that abates one master regulator subset while enhancing another. We further show that when outside their niche, either in vitro or in wound-repair, hair follicle stem cells dynamically remodel super-enhancers in response to changes in their microenvironment. Intriguingly, some key super-enhancers shift epicentres, enabling their genes to remain active and maintain a transitional state in an ever-changing transcriptional landscape. Finally, we identify SOX9 as a crucial chromatin rheostat of hair follicle stem cell super-enhancers, and provide functional evidence that super-enhancers are dynamic, dense transcription-factor-binding platforms which are acutely sensitive to pioneer master regulators whose levels define not only spatial and temporal features of lineage-status but also stemness, plasticity in transitional states and differentiation. PMID:25799994

  15. Teachers Reflect Standards in Basals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Dozens of teachers and literacy specialists from across the country hunkered down in Baltimore at round tables, with laptops, pens, and paper, intent on rewriting the collections that wield tremendous influence over the way millions of U.S. children learn literacy skills: the big-name basal readers. Hailing from 18 school districts in 11 states,…

  16. The Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b Is an Essential Cofactor for the Activation of Transcription by Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Masanori; Huang, Yehong; Tyagi, Mudit; Kao, Hung-Ying; Fujinaga, Koh

    2014-01-01

    The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), composed of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 and cyclin T1, stimulates the elongation of transcription by hyperphosphorylating the C-terminal region of RNA polymerase II. Aberrant activation of P-TEFb results in manifestations of cardiac hypertrophy in mice, suggesting that P-TEFb is an essential factor for cardiac myocyte function and development. Here, we present evidence that P-TEFb selectively activates transcription mediated by the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors, key regulatory factors for myocyte development. Knockdown of endogenous cyclin T1 in murine C2C12 cells abolishes MEF2-dependent reporter gene expression as well as transcription of endogenous MEF2 target genes, whereas overexpression of P-TEFb enhances MEF2-dependent transcription. P-TEFb interacts with MEF2 both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of MEF2-dependent transcription induced by serum starvation is mediated by a rapid dissociation of P-TEFb from its inhibitory subunit, HEXIM1, and a subsequent recruitment of P-TEFb to MEF2 binding sites in the promoter region of MEF2 target genes. These results indicate that recruitment of P-TEFb is a critical step for stimulation of MEF2-dependent transcription, therefore providing a fundamentally important regulatory mechanism underlying the transcriptional program in muscle cells. PMID:18662700

  17. Demonstration of the enhanced Purcell factor in all-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnok, Alexander; Glybovski, Stanislav; Petrov, Mihail; Makarov, Sergey; Savelev, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Simovski, Constantin; Kivshar, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    The Purcell effect is usually described as a modification of the spontaneous decay rate in the presence of a resonator. In plasmonics, this effect is commonly associated with a large local-field enhancement in "hot spots" due to the excitation of surface plasmons. However, high-index dielectric nanostructures, which become the basis of all-dielectric nanophotonics, cannot provide high values of the local-field enhancement due to larger radiation losses. Here, we demonstrate how to achieve a strong Purcell effect in all-dielectric nanostructures, and show theoretically that the Purcell factor can be increased by two orders of magnitude in a finite chain of silicon nanoparticles. Using the eigenmode analysis for an infinite chain, we demonstrate that the high Purcell factor regime is associated with a Van Hove singularity. We perform a proof-of-concept experiment for microwave frequencies and observe the 65-fold enhancement of the Purcell factor in a chain of 10 dielectric particles.

  18. The ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient in the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Benyi; Lu, Yigang

    2008-10-01

    Based on several hypotheses about the process of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, the onflow around the solute granule is figured out by the Navier-Stocks equation. In combination with the Higbie’s solute infiltration model, the link between the mass-transfer coefficient and the velocity of flow is found. The mass-transfer coefficient with the ultrasonical effect is compared with that without the ultrasonical effect, and then a new parameter named the ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient is brought forward, which describes the mathematical model of the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction process enhanced by ultrasonic. The model gives out the relationships among the ultrasonical power, the ultrasonical frequency, the radius of solute granule and the ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient. The results calculated by this model fit well with the experimental data, including the extraction of Coix Lacryma-jobi Seed Oil (CLSO) and Coix Lacryma-jobi Seed Ester (CLSE) from coix seeds and the extraction of Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) from the alga by means of the ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (USFE) and the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE) respectively. This proves the rationality of the ultrasonic-enhanced factor model. The model provides a theoretical basis for the application of ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical fluid extraction technique.

  19. Enhancement of antigen-induced leukocyte histamine release by a mononuclear cell--derived factor.

    PubMed

    Bamzai, A K; Kretschmer, R R

    1978-09-01

    Supernatant fluids of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated mononuclear cells from ragweed-sensitive patients significantly enhanced the release of histamine from antigen-triggered leukocytes of ragweed-sensitive as well as control individuals. Supernatants of mononuclear cells from control individuals did not reveal this enhancing effect, nor was it found with the use of supernatants of unstimulated mononuclear cells of ragweed-sensitive patients or culture media with PHA alone. Supernatant fluids of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated mononuclear cells of patients sensitive to trees and grass also revealed this enhancing effect. The factor(s) responsible for the enhancement of antigen-induced histamine is heat labile and has a molecular weight of less than 10,000 daltons. The mechanism and site of action of the enhancing factor could involve initiating and/or modulating steps of the leukocyte histamine release reaction. This factor, presumably a lymphokine or a monokine, may constitute a regulating link between cell-mediated immunity and histamine-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in allergic patients. PMID:79584

  20. Full and Constrained Moment Tensor Inversions of Basal Icequakes Beneath Gornergletscher, Switzerland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, F.; Dreger, D. S.; Clinton, J. F.; Deichmann, N.

    2009-12-01

    A solid understanding of glacier flow dynamics is fundamental to accurate predictions of changes in the cryosphere in response to a changing climate. For Alpine glaciers, such as Gornergletscher in southern Switzerland, basal hydrological processes are a controlling factor in the ice dynamics. The drastically varying basal water pressures can either enhance or inhibit glacier sliding. In the case of Gornergletscher, basal water pressure variations are mainly due to the diurnal melt-cycle as well as yearly drainage events of a nearby ice-marginal lake. The latter phenomenon is an example for glacier outburst floods, which can potentially occur in all glaciated areas throughout the world and pose the most significant hazard related to glaciers. In order to attain a better understanding of Gornergletscher’s flow dynamics in response to the lake drainages the ETH Zurich deployed campaign seismic networks covering four lake drainage sequences. The instruments were placed directly on glacier ice near the lake and detected seismic signals of well over 100,000 icequakes. Although the vast majority of these seismic events occurs at the glacier surface, a small subset was confidently located near the glacier bed. The temporal occurrence of these basal icequakes correlates strongly with variations in subglacial water pressure, which in turn controls basal sliding. Here we present the results of full and constrained moment tensor inversions of seismograms of an icequake cluster at Gornergletscher’s bed. As the glacier bed near the icequake hypocenters is strongly inclined we calculate Green’s Functions for a 3D medium. In order to estimate the effect of errors in Green’s Functions on the determined source mechanisms we perform a set of sensitivity studies. We use Green’s Functions for velocity models of different complexity, ranging from a homogeneous halfspace to a model that includes the three-dimensional basal topography and a basal intermediate layer. The results

  1. On the nature of the linewidth enhancement factor in p-doped quantum dash based lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Siddharth Chimot, Nicolas; Lelarge, François; Ramdane, Abderrahim

    2014-12-15

    P-doped quantum dash based lasers have shown superior dynamic performance as compared to their un-doped counterparts. This improvement in performance is strongly observed in line-width enhancement factor. These devices show a dramatic reduction in the α{sub H} parameter, resulting in very low chirp. This letter discusses the nature line-width enhancement factor of p-doped quantum dash lasers as opposed to un-doped counterparts. Owing to the p-doping a low and bias-stable alpha parameter is demonstrated.

  2. Development of Near-Field-Enhanced High-Fill-Factor MEMS Radiator with Shared Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Oh, S.; Ueno, A.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For precise thermal control in satellites under varying internal heat dissipation and thermal boundary condition, we propose a high-fill factor MEMS radiator enhanced by the near-field effect. We have successfully fabricated a prototype with parylene shared springs and achieved a fill factor of as high as 89%. It is found that at the ON state, the diaphragm temperature is increased from 58.0 °C to 106.4 °C, showing 144% enhancement in the radiation heat flux.

  3. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2

    PubMed Central

    MIYAHARA, Daichi; OISHI, Isao; MAKINO, Ryuichi; KURUMISAWA, Nozomi; NAKAYA, Ryuma; ONO, Tamao; KAGAMI, Hiroshi; TAGAMI, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2. PMID:26727404

  4. Five factor model personality factors moderated the effects of an intervention to enhance chronic disease management self-efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Peter; Chapman, Benjamin; Duberstein, Paul; Jerant, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Peer led interventions can enhance patient self-efficacy for managing chronic illnesses, but little is known regarding the moderators or duration of their effects. We hypothesized Homing in on Health (HIOH), a variant of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, would be most effective in patients high in neuroticism and low in extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and/or conscientiousness. Design Analysis of data from subjects (N = 415) enrolled in an ongoing randomized controlled trial Methods Regression analyses were conducted to explore whether Five Factor Model (FFM) personality factors moderated the effects of HIOH, delivered in subjects’ homes or via telephone, on disease management self-efficacy. Data were collected at 6 time points over the course of 1 year. Results Compared with control and telephone HIOH, home HIOH significantly increased self-efficacy, an effect peaking at 6 weeks and fully attenuating by 1 year. Moderation analyses revealed the benefit was confined to patients higher in neuroticism and/or lower in conscientiousness, agreeableness, and extraversion. Conclusions A peer led intervention to enhance disease management self-efficacy had only short-term effects, and FFM personality factors moderated those effects. Measuring personality factors in chronically ill individuals may facilitate targeting of self-management interventions to those most likely to respond. PMID:18808733

  5. The Use of Growth Factors and Other Humoral Agents to Accelerate and Enhance Burn Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Yiu-Hei; Sutton, Thomas L.; Pierpont, Yvonne N.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Certain cytokines, especially those known as growth factors, have been demonstrated to mediate or modulate burn wound healing. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that there are therapeutic advantages to the wound healing process when these agents are utilized. Positive effects have been reported for 4 types of wounds seen in the burn patient: partial-thickness wounds, full-thickness wounds, interstices of meshed skin grafts, and skin graft donor sites. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, Ovid, and Web of Science databases to identify pertinent articles regarding growth factors and other cytokines in burns and wound healing. Results: The current knowledge about cytokine growth factors and their potential therapeutic applications in burn wound healing are discussed and reviewed. Conclusions: Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factors, epidermal growth factors, transforming growth factor alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin-like growth factor I, nerve growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution have all been suggested to enhance the rate and quality of healing in 1 or more of these wounds encountered in burn care. PMID:22084646

  6. Pioneer factors govern super-enhancer dynamics in stem cell plasticity and lineage choice

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rene C.; Yang, Hanseul; Rockowitz, Shira; Larsen, Samantha B.; Nikolova, Maria; Oristian, Daniel S.; Polak, Lisa; Kadaja, Meelis; Asare, Amma; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) reside in niches which balance self-renewal with lineage selection and progression during tissue homeostasis. Following injury, culture or transplantation, SCs outside their niche often display fate flexibility1-4. Here we show that super-enhancers5 underlie the identity, lineage commitment and plasticity of adult SCs in vivo. Using hair follicle (HF) as model, we map the global chromatin domains of HFSCs and their committed progenitors in their native microenvironments. We show that super-enhancers and their dense clusters (‘epicenters’) of transcription factor (TF) binding sites change upon lineage progression. New fate is acquired by decommissioning old and establishing new super-enhancers and/or epicenters, an auto-regulatory process that abates one master regulator subset while enhancing another. We further show that when outside their niche, either in vitro or in wound-repair, HFSCs dynamically remodel super-enhancers in response to changes in their microenvironment. Intriguingly, some key super-enhancers shift epicenters, enabling them to remain active and maintain a transitional state in an ever-changing transcriptional landscape. Finally, we identify SOX9 as a crucial chromatin rheostat of HFSC super-enhancers, and provide functional evidence that super-enhancers are dynamic, dense TF-binding platforms which are acutely sensitive to pioneer master regulators whose levels define not only spatial and temporal features of lineage-status, but also stemness, plasticity in transitional states and differentiation. PMID:25799994

  7. Basal body structure in Trichonympha.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Paul; Gönczy, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Trichonympha is a symbiotic flagellate of many species of termites and of the wood-feeding cockroach. Remarkably, this unicellular organism harbors up to over ten thousand flagella on its surface, which serve to propel it through the viscous environment of the host hindgut. In the 1960s, analysis of resin-embedded Trichonympha samples by electron microscopy revealed that the basal bodies that give rise to these flagella are exceptionally long, with a proximal, cartwheel-bearing, region some 50 times longer than that of regular centrioles. In recent years, this salient feature has prompted the analysis of the 3D architecture of Trichonympha basal bodies in the native state using cryo-electron tomography. The resulting ~40 Å resolution map of the basal body proximal region revealed a number of novel features that may be conserved in centrioles of other systems. These include proximal-distal polarity of the pinhead structure that links the cartwheel to centriolar microtubules, as well as of the linker between the A and the C microtubules. Moreover, this work demonstrated that the cartwheel is made of stacked ring-like structures that likely each comprise 18 molecules of SAS-6 proteins. PMID:26937279

  8. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    Background The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. Results We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Conclusions Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function - such as binding-site clustering - makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  9. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function--such as binding-site clustering--makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  10. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain. PMID:27345430

  11. Transcription factor p63 bookmarks and regulates dynamic enhancers during epidermal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N; Oti, Martin; Niehues, Hanna; van Heeringen, Simon J; Schalkwijk, Joost; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Zhou, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 plays a pivotal role in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in the epidermis. However, how p63 regulates epidermal genes during differentiation is not yet clear. Using epigenome profiling of differentiating human primary epidermal keratinocytes, we characterized a catalog of dynamically regulated genes and p63-bound regulatory elements that are relevant for epithelial development and related diseases. p63-bound regulatory elements occur as single or clustered enhancers, and remarkably, only a subset is active as defined by the co-presence of the active enhancer mark histone modification H3K27ac in epidermal keratinocytes. We show that the dynamics of gene expression correlates with the activity of p63-bound enhancers rather than with p63 binding itself. The activity of p63-bound enhancers is likely determined by other transcription factors that cooperate with p63. Our data show that inactive p63-bound enhancers in epidermal keratinocytes may be active during the development of other epithelial-related structures such as limbs and suggest that p63 bookmarks genomic loci during the commitment of the epithelial lineage and regulates genes through temporal- and spatial-specific active enhancers. PMID:26034101

  12. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain.

  13. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain. PMID:27345430

  14. Transcription factor p63 bookmarks and regulates dynamic enhancers during epidermal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N; Oti, Martin; Niehues, Hanna; van Heeringen, Simon J; Schalkwijk, Joost; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Zhou, Huiqing

    2015-07-01

    The transcription factor p63 plays a pivotal role in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in the epidermis. However, how p63 regulates epidermal genes during differentiation is not yet clear. Using epigenome profiling of differentiating human primary epidermal keratinocytes, we characterized a catalog of dynamically regulated genes and p63-bound regulatory elements that are relevant for epithelial development and related diseases. p63-bound regulatory elements occur as single or clustered enhancers, and remarkably, only a subset is active as defined by the co-presence of the active enhancer mark histone modification H3K27ac in epidermal keratinocytes. We show that the dynamics of gene expression correlates with the activity of p63-bound enhancers rather than with p63 binding itself. The activity of p63-bound enhancers is likely determined by other transcription factors that cooperate with p63. Our data show that inactive p63-bound enhancers in epidermal keratinocytes may be active during the development of other epithelial-related structures such as limbs and suggest that p63 bookmarks genomic loci during the commitment of the epithelial lineage and regulates genes through temporal- and spatial-specific active enhancers. PMID:26034101

  15. Factors Related to Career Enhancement Among Tenured and Non-tenured Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, James D., Jr.; Anderson, Douglas

    Using a questionnaire designed to elicit information on factors relating to career enhancement, 438 faculty members of departments of psychology in the southeastern United States were questioned concerning: major area of expertise; rank; tenure status; teaching load; opportunities for summer teaching; general tenure requirements; relationship of…

  16. Evaluation of a Resilience Intervention to Enhance Coping Strategies and Protective Factors and Decrease Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhardt, Mary; Dolbier, Christyn

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In this pilot study, the authors examined the effectiveness of a 4-week resilience intervention to enhance resilience, coping strategies, and protective factors, as well as decrease symptomatology during a period of increased academic stress. Participants and Methods: College students were randomly assigned to experimental (n = 30) and…

  17. Purcell factor based understanding of enhancements in surface plasmon-coupled emission with DNA architectures.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, S; Badiya, Pradeep Kumar; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2016-01-14

    We demonstrate the successful application of DNA thin films as dynamic bio-spacers in a surface plasmon-coupled emission platform. Site-directed DNA modification using silver and carbon nanomaterials resulted in an amplified Purcell factor (PF) and >130-fold fluorescence enhancements. We present unique architectures of DNA as a plasmonic spacer in metal-dielectric-metal substrates. PMID:26651026

  18. Emotional Enhancement Effect of Memory: Removing the Influence of Cognitive Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Tobias; Glascher, Jan; Moritz, Steffen; Buchel, Christian

    2008-01-01

    According to the modulation hypothesis, arousal is the crucial factor in the emotional enhancement of memory (EEM). However, the multifactor theory of the EEM recently proposed that cognitive characteristics of emotional stimuli, e.g., relatedness and distinctiveness, also play an important role. The current study aimed to investigate the…

  19. Origin of bimodal fluorescence enhancement factors of Chlorobaculum tepidum reaction centers on silver island films.

    PubMed

    Maćkowski, Sebastian; Czechowski, Nikodem; Ashraf, Khuram U; Szalkowski, Marcin; Lokstein, Heiko; Cogdell, Richard J; Kowalska, Dorota

    2016-08-01

    We focus on the spectral dependence of plasmon-induced enhancement of fluorescence of Chlorobaculum tepidum reaction centers. When deposited on silver island film, they exhibit up to a 60-fold increase in fluorescence. The dependence of enhancement factors on the excitation wavelength is not correlated with the absorption spectrum of the plasmonic structure. In particular, the presence of one (or multiple) trimers of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein reveals itself in bimodal distribution of enhancement factors for the excitation at 589 nm, the wavelength corresponding to bacteriochlorophyll absorption of FMO and the core of the RC. We conclude that the structure of multichromophoric complexes can substantially affect the impact of plasmonic excitations, which is important in the context of assembling functional biohybrid systems. PMID:27406896

  20. Discourse Types in Canadian Basal Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sharon

    This study examined the authorship and discourse types of Canadian basal anthologies to determine whether the lingering centrality of the basal anthology in Canadian programs controls students and teachers by controlling language and reading. Each selection within five Canadian basal series (Gage Expressways II, Ginn Journeys, Holt Impressions,…

  1. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  2. Platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta enhance tissue repair activities by unique mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pierce, G F; Mustoe, T A; Lingelbach, J; Masakowski, V R; Griffin, G L; Senior, R M; Deuel, T F

    1989-07-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) markedly potentiate tissue repair in vivo. In the present experiments, both in vitro and in vivo responses to PDGF and TGF-beta were tested to identify mechanisms whereby these growth factors might each enhance the wound-healing response. Recombinant human PDGF B-chain homodimers (PDGF-BB) and TGF-beta 1 had identical dose-response curves in chemotactic assays with monocytes and fibroblasts as the natural proteins from platelets. Single applications of PDGF-BB (2 micrograms, 80 pmol) and TGF-beta 1 (20 micrograms, 600 pmol) were next applied to linear incisions in rats and each enhanced the strength required to disrupt the wounds at 5 d up to 212% of paired control wounds. Histological analysis of treated wounds demonstrated an in vivo chemotactic response of macrophages and fibroblasts to both PDGF-BB and to TGF-beta 1 but the response to TGF-beta 1 was significantly less than that observed with PDGF-BB. Marked increases of procollagen type I were observed by immunohistochemical staining in fibroblasts in treated wounds during the first week. The augmented breaking strength of TGF-beta 1 was not observed 2 and 3 wk after wounding. However, the positive influence of PDGF-BB on wound breaking strength persisted through the 7 wk of testing. Furthermore, PDGF-BB-treated wounds had persistently increased numbers of fibroblasts and granulation tissue through day 21, whereas the enhanced cellular influx in TGF-beta 1-treated wounds was not detectable beyond day 7. Wound macrophages and fibroblasts from PDGF-BB-treated wounds contained sharply increased levels of immunohistochemically detectable intracellular TGF-beta. Furthermore, PDGF-BB in vitro induced a marked, time-dependent stimulation of TGF-beta mRNA levels in cultured normal rat kidney fibroblasts. The results suggest that TGF-beta transiently attracts fibroblasts into the wound and may stimulate collagen synthesis directly. In

  3. Oscillations and the basal ganglia: Motor control and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, John-Stuart; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Oscillations form a ubiquitous feature of the central nervous system. Evidence is accruing from cortical and sub-cortical recordings that these rhythms may be functionally important, although the precise details of their roles remain unclear. The basal ganglia share this predilection for rhythmic activity which, as we see in Parkinson’s disease, becomes further enhanced in the dopamine depleted state. While certain cortical rhythms appear to penetrate the basal ganglia, others are transformed or blocked. Here, we discuss the functional association of oscillations in the basal ganglia and their relationship with cortical activity. We further explore the neural underpinnings of such oscillatory activity, including the important balance to be struck between facilitating information transmission and limiting information coding capacity. Finally, we introduce the notion that synchronised oscillatory activity can be broadly categorised as immutability promoting rhythms that reinforce incumbent processes, and mutability promoting rhythms that favour novel processing. PMID:23711535

  4. Soluble expression and stability enhancement of transcription factors using 30Kc19 cell-penetrating protein.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jina; Park, Hee Ho; Park, Ju Hyun; Lee, Hong Jai; Rhee, Won Jong; Park, Tai Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Transcription factors have been studied as an important drug candidate. Ever since the successful generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), there has been tremendous interest in reprogramming transcription factors. Because of the safety risks involved in a virus-based approach, many researchers have been trying to deliver transcription factors using nonintegrating materials. Thus, delivery of transcription factors produced as recombinant proteins in E. coli was proposed as an alternative method. However, the low level of soluble expression and instability of such recombinant proteins are potential barriers. We engineered a Bombyx mori 30Kc19 protein as a fusion partner for transcription factors to overcome those problems. We have previously reported that 30Kc19 protein can be produced as a soluble form in E. coli and has a cell-penetrating property and a protein-stabilizing effect. Transcription factors fused with 30Kc19 (Oct4-30Kc19, Sox2-30Kc19, c-Myc-30Kc19, L-Myc-30Kc19, and Klf4-30Kc19) were produced as recombinant proteins. Interestingly, Oct4 and L-Myc were expressed as a soluble form by conjugating with 30Kc19 protein, whereas Oct4 alone and L-Myc alone aggregated. The 30Kc19 protein also enhanced the stability of transcription factors both in vitro and in cells. In addition, 30Kc19-conjugated transcription factors showed rapid delivery into cells and transcriptional activity significantly increased. Overall, 30Kc19 protein conjugation simultaneously enhanced soluble expression, stability, and transcriptional activity of transcription factors. We propose that the conjugation with 30Kc19 protein is a novel approach to solve the technical bottleneck of gene regulation using transcription factors. PMID:26668030

  5. Insulin Degludec, The New Generation Basal Insulin or Just another Basal Insulin?

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Sami N; Reynolds, L Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The advances in recombinant DNA technology have led to an improvement in the properties of currently available long-acting insulin analogs. Insulin degludec, a new generation ultra-long-acting basal insulin, currently in phase 3 clinical trials, has a promising future in clinical use. When compared to its rival basal insulin analogs, a longer duration of action and lower incidence of hypoglycemic events in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients has been demonstrated.1,2 Its unique mechanism of action is based on multihexamer formation after subcutaneous injection. This reportedly allows for less pharmacodynamic variability and within-subject variability than currently available insulin analogs, and a duration of action that is over 24 hours.3 The lack of proof of carcinogenicity with insulin degludec is yet another factor that would be taken into consideration when choosing the optimal basal insulin for a diabetic individual.4 A formulation of insulin degludec with insulin aspart, Insulin degludec 70%/aspart 30%, may permit improved flexibly of dosing without compromising glycemic control or safety.5. PMID:22879797

  6. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors Enhance the Permeability of the Mouse Blood-brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shize; Xia, Rui; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Lei; Gao, Fabao

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) impedes entry of many drugs into the brain, limiting clinical efficacy. A safe and efficient method for reversibly increasing BBB permeability would greatly facilitate central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery and expand the range of possible therapeutics to include water soluble compounds, proteins, nucleotides, and other large molecules. We examined the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on BBB permeability in Kunming (KM) mice. Human VEGF165 was administered to treatment groups at two concentrations (1.6 or 3.0 µg/mouse), while controls received equal-volume saline. Changes in BBB permeability were measured by parenchymal accumulation of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA as assessed by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Mice were then injected with Evans blue, sacrificed 0.5 h later, and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, fixed, and sectioned for histological study. Both VEGF groups exhibited a significantly greater signal intensity from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia than controls (P<0.001). Evans blue fluorescence intensity was higher in the parenchyma and lower in the cerebrovasculature of VEGF-treated animals compared to controls. No significant brain edema was observed by diffusion weighted MRI (DWI) or histological staining. Exogenous application of VEGF can increase the permeability of the BBB without causing brain edema. Pretreatment with VEGF may be a feasible method to facilitate drug delivery into the CNS. PMID:24551038

  7. Quantitative investigation of physical factors contributing to gold nanoparticle-mediated proton dose enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongmin; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Manohar, Nivedh; Kerr, Matthew; Krishnan, Sunil; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-03-21

    Some investigators have shown tumor cell killing enhancement in vitro and tumor regression in mice associated with the loading of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) before proton treatments. Several Monte Carlo (MC) investigations have also demonstrated GNP-mediated proton dose enhancement. However, further studies need to be done to quantify the individual physical factors that contribute to the dose enhancement or cell-kill enhancement (or radiosensitization). Thus, the current study investigated the contributions of particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), Auger and secondary electrons, and activation products towards the total dose enhancement. Specifically, GNP-mediated dose enhancement was measured using strips of radiochromic film that were inserted into vials of cylindrical GNPs, i.e. gold nanorods (GNRs), dispersed in a saline solution (0.3 mg of GNRs/g or 0.03% of GNRs by weight), as well as vials containing water only, before proton irradiation. MC simulations were also performed with the tool for particle simulation code using the film measurement setup. Additionally, a high-purity germanium detector system was used to measure the photon spectrum originating from activation products created from the interaction of protons and spherical GNPs present in a saline solution (20 mg of GNPs/g or 2% of GNPs by weight). The dose enhancement due to PIXE/PIGE recorded on the films in the GNR-loaded saline solution was less than the experimental uncertainty of the film dosimetry (<2%). MC simulations showed highly localized dose enhancement (up to a factor 17) in the immediate vicinity (<100 nm) of GNRs, compared with hypothetical water nanorods (WNRs), mostly due to GNR-originated Auger/secondary electrons; however, the average dose enhancement over the entire GNR-loaded vial was found to be minimal (0.1%). The dose enhancement due to the activation products from GNPs was minimal (<0.1%) as well. In conclusion, under the currently

  8. Quantitative investigation of physical factors contributing to gold nanoparticle-mediated proton dose enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Manohar, Nivedh; Kerr, Matthew; Krishnan, Sunil; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Some investigators have shown tumor cell killing enhancement in vitro and tumor regression in mice associated with the loading of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) before proton treatments. Several Monte Carlo (MC) investigations have also demonstrated GNP-mediated proton dose enhancement. However, further studies need to be done to quantify the individual physical factors that contribute to the dose enhancement or cell-kill enhancement (or radiosensitization). Thus, the current study investigated the contributions of particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), Auger and secondary electrons, and activation products towards the total dose enhancement. Specifically, GNP-mediated dose enhancement was measured using strips of radiochromic film that were inserted into vials of cylindrical GNPs, i.e. gold nanorods (GNRs), dispersed in a saline solution (0.3 mg of GNRs/g or 0.03% of GNRs by weight), as well as vials containing water only, before proton irradiation. MC simulations were also performed with the tool for particle simulation code using the film measurement setup. Additionally, a high-purity germanium detector system was used to measure the photon spectrum originating from activation products created from the interaction of protons and spherical GNPs present in a saline solution (20 mg of GNPs/g or 2% of GNPs by weight). The dose enhancement due to PIXE/PIGE recorded on the films in the GNR-loaded saline solution was less than the experimental uncertainty of the film dosimetry (<2%). MC simulations showed highly localized dose enhancement (up to a factor 17) in the immediate vicinity (<100 nm) of GNRs, compared with hypothetical water nanorods (WNRs), mostly due to GNR-originated Auger/secondary electrons; however, the average dose enhancement over the entire GNR-loaded vial was found to be minimal (0.1%). The dose enhancement due to the activation products from GNPs was minimal (<0.1%) as well. In conclusion, under the

  9. Single-Phase, Turbulent Heat-Transfer Friction-Factor Data Base Flow Enhanced Tb

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Heat-exchanger designers need to know what type of performance improvement can be obtained before they will consider enhanced tubes. In particular, they need access to the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factor values of enhanced tube types that are commercially available. To compile these data from the numerous publications and reports in the open literature is a formidable task that can discourage the designer from using them. A computer program that contains a comprehensive data base withmore » a search feature would be a handy tool for the designer to obtain an estimate of the performance improvement that can be obtained with a particular enhanced tube geometry. In addition, it would be a valuable tool for researchers who are developing and/or validating new prediction methods. This computer program can be used to obtain friction-factor and/or heat-transfer data for a broad range of internally enhanced tube geometries with forced-convective turbulent flow. The program has search features; that is the user can select data for tubes with a particular enhancement geometry range or data obtained from a particular source or publication. The friction factor data base contains nearly 5,000 points and the heat-transfer data base contains more than 4,700 points. About 360 different tube geometries are included from the 36 different sources. Data for tubes with similar geometries and the same and/or different types can be easily extracted with the sort feature of this data base and compared. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  10. Controlling the electric field enhancement factor of photonic nanojets by using the magneto-optical effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleque, Abdul; Li, Ziyuan; Hattori, Haroldo T.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied photonic nanojets. These nanojets are created when an incident plane wave is focused into a narrow and high intensity emerging optical beam leaving a micro-object (e.g. microcylinder). These narrow beams may find applications in particle imaging and detection, optical sensors, enhanced Raman scattering, and particle manipulation. They also allow the projection of a particle to the far-field where it can be easily visualized. In this paper, it is shown that the electric field enhancement factor can be dynamically controlled by the application of an external intense magnetic flux density.

  11. Impact of Contextual Factors and Substance Characteristics on Perspectives toward Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Sebastian; Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Éric; Sauer, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing cognitive performance with substances–especially prescription drugs–is a fiercely debated topic among scholars and in the media. The empirical basis for these discussions is limited, given that the actual nature of factors that influence the acceptability of and willingness to use cognitive enhancement substances remains unclear. In an online factorial survey, contextual and substance-specific characteristics of substances that improve academic performance were varied experimentally and presented to respondents. Students in four German universities rated their willingness to use and moral acceptance of different substances for cognitive enhancement. We found that the overall willingness to use performance enhancing substances is low. Most respondents considered the use of these substances as morally unacceptable. Situational influences such as peer pressure, policies concerning substance use, relative performance level of peers, but also characteristics of the substance, such as perceptions of substance safety, shape the willingness and acceptability of using a substance to enhance academic performance. Among the findings is evidence of a contagion effect meaning that the willingness was higher when the respondents have more CE drug users in their social network. We also found deterrence effects from strong side effects of using the substance, as well as from policy regulations and sanctions. Regulations might activate social norms against usage and sanctions can be seen as costly to users. Moreover, enhancement substances seem to be most tempting to low performers to catch up with others compared to high performers. By identifying contextual factors and substance characteristics influencing the willingness and acceptability of cognitive enhancers, policy approaches could consider these insights to better manage the use of such substances. PMID:23940757

  12. Impact of contextual factors and substance characteristics on perspectives toward cognitive enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Sebastian; Forlini, Cynthia; Racine, Eric; Sauer, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing cognitive performance with substances--especially prescription drugs--is a fiercely debated topic among scholars and in the media. The empirical basis for these discussions is limited, given that the actual nature of factors that influence the acceptability of and willingness to use cognitive enhancement substances remains unclear. In an online factorial survey, contextual and substance-specific characteristics of substances that improve academic performance were varied experimentally and presented to respondents. Students in four German universities rated their willingness to use and moral acceptance of different substances for cognitive enhancement. We found that the overall willingness to use performance enhancing substances is low. Most respondents considered the use of these substances as morally unacceptable. Situational influences such as peer pressure, policies concerning substance use, relative performance level of peers, but also characteristics of the substance, such as perceptions of substance safety, shape the willingness and acceptability of using a substance to enhance academic performance. Among the findings is evidence of a contagion effect meaning that the willingness was higher when the respondents have more CE drug users in their social network. We also found deterrence effects from strong side effects of using the substance, as well as from policy regulations and sanctions. Regulations might activate social norms against usage and sanctions can be seen as costly to users. Moreover, enhancement substances seem to be most tempting to low performers to catch up with others compared to high performers. By identifying contextual factors and substance characteristics influencing the willingness and acceptability of cognitive enhancers, policy approaches could consider these insights to better manage the use of such substances. PMID:23940757

  13. "Basal Cell Blanche": A Diagnostic Maneuver to Increase Early Detection of Basal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Quach, Olivia Leigh; Barry, Megan; Roberts Cruse, Allison; Wilson, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas represent one of the most common skin cancers and often present initially in the primary care setting. Subtle basal cell carcinomas may be difficult to detect, and early detection of these carcinomas remains important in limiting patient morbidity. In this article, we present a simple diagnostic maneuver, "basal cell blanche," to increase early detection of basal cell carcinomas. PMID:27170799

  14. HSP90 inhibitors enhance differentiation and MITF (microphthalmia transcription factor) activity in osteoclast progenitors.

    PubMed

    van der Kraan, A Gabrielle J; Chai, Ryan C C; Singh, Preetinder P; Lang, Benjamin J; Xu, Jiake; Gillespie, Matthew T; Price, John T; Quinn, Julian M W

    2013-04-15

    The HSP90 (heat-shock protein 90) inhibitor 17-AAG (17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin) increases osteoclast formation both in vitro and in vivo, an action that can enhance cancer invasion and growth in the bone microenvironment. The cellular mechanisms through which 17-AAG exerts this action are not understood. Thus we sought to clarify the actions of 17-AAG on osteoclasts and determine whether other HSP90 inhibitors had similar properties. We determined that 17-AAG and the structurally unrelated HSP90 inhibitors CCT018159 and NVP-AUY922 dose-dependently increased RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) ligand]-stimulated osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow and pre-osteoclastic RAW264.7 cell cultures. Moreover, 17-AAG also enhanced RANKL- and TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-elicited osteoclastogenesis, but did not affect RANKL-induced osteoclast survival, suggesting that only differentiation mechanisms are targeted. 17-AAG affected the later stages of progenitor maturation (after 3 days of incubation), whereas the osteoclast formation enhancer TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) acted prior to this, suggesting different mechanisms of action. In studies of RANKL-elicited intracellular signalling, 17-AAG treatment did not increase c-Fos or NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) c1 protein levels nor did 17-AAG increase activity in luciferase-based NF-κB- and NFAT-response assays. In contrast, 17-AAG treatment (and RANKL treatment) increased both MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) protein levels and MITF-dependent vATPase-d2 (V-type proton ATPase subunit d2) gene promoter activity. These results indicate that HSP90 inhibitors enhance osteoclast differentiation in an NFATc1-independent manner that involves elevated MITF levels and activity. PMID:23379601

  15. A novel enhancing effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on glucose oxidation in uteri from pregnant rats. Participation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes.

    PubMed

    González, E; Gimeno, A L; Gimeno, M A

    1990-05-01

    The effects of platelet activating factor (PAF) on glucose oxidation in uterine strips isolated from rats in the 4 th and 5 th day of pregnancy, were explored. PAF, at a concentration of 10(-10) and 10(-8) M, augmented significantly the generation of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in uteri from pregnant rats in the 4 th day of pregnancy. When the tissue was obtained from 5 days pregnant rats, the addition of PAF at 10(-8) increased significantly more than PAF at 10(-10) M the metabolism of glucose. On the other hand, PAF at 10(-8) M failed to alter the uterine basal production of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in animals at estrus. BN52021, a specific PAF antagonist employed at 10(-5) M, blocked completely the action of PAF in the pregnant rat uterus. PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2 alpha enhanced significantly the formation of 14CO2 from labelled glucose in uteri from 5 days pregnant rats. Indomethacin, a well known inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, did not alter the basal glucose metabolism in uteri from 5 days pregnant rats, but antagonized completely the stimulating action of PAF on 14CO2 production from labelled glucose an effect that was partially reverted by the addition of PGE1, PGE2 or PGF2 alpha (10(-7) M). Furthermore, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDHGA), a specific inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase at 10(-5) M, as well as FPL-55712, an antagonist of leukotrienes (LTs), at the same concentration, blocked the action of PAF on the metabolism of glucose. The action of NDHGA was partially counteracted by the addition of LTC4 at 10(-7) M.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2399270

  16. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-04-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  17. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-01-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  18. The basal bodies of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dutcher, Susan K; O'Toole, Eileen T

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is a biflagellated cell that can swim or glide. C. reinhardtii cells are amenable to genetic, biochemical, proteomic, and microscopic analysis of its basal bodies. The basal bodies contain triplet microtubules and a well-ordered transition zone. Both the mother and daughter basal bodies assemble flagella. Many of the proteins found in other basal body-containing organisms are present in the Chlamydomonas genome, and mutants in these genes affect the assembly of basal bodies. Electron microscopic analysis shows that basal body duplication is site-specific and this may be important for the proper duplication and spatial organization of these organelles. Chlamydomonas is an excellent model for the study of basal bodies as well as the transition zone. PMID:27252853

  19. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month). The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human) brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF) to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication) group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF). Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine. PMID:21936901

  20. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  1. Nuclear transcription factors: a new approach to enhancing cellular responses to ALA-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Moore, Brian; Mack, Judith; Gasbarre, Christopher; Keevey, Samantha; Ortel, Bernhard; Sinha, Alok; Khachemoune, Amor

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolevulinic acid (ALA) relies upon the uptake of ALA into cancer cells, where it is converted into a porphyrin intermediate, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) that is highly photosensitizing. For large or resistant tumors, however, ALA/PDT is often not completely effective due to inadequate PpIX levels. Therefore, new approaches to enhance the intracellular production of PpIX are sought. Here, we describe a general approach to improve intracellular PpIX accumulation via manipulations that increase the expression of an enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO), that is rate-determining for PpIX production. We show that nuclear hormones that promote terminal differentiation, e.g. vitamin D or androgens, can also increase the accumulation of PpIX and the amount of killing of the target cells upon exposure to light. These hormones bind to intracellular hormone receptors that translocate to the nucleus, where they act as transcription factors to increase the expression of target genes. We have found that several other transcription factors associated with terminal differentiation, including members of the CCAAT enhancer binding (C/EBP) family, and a homeobox protein named Hoxb13, are also capable of enhancing PpIX accumulation. These latter transcription factors appear to interact directly with the CPO gene promoter, resulting in enhanced CPO transcriptional activity. Our data in several different cell systems, including epithelial cells of the skin and prostate cancer cells, indicate that enhancement of CPO expression and PpIX accumulation represents a viable new approach toward improving the efficacy of ALA/PDT.

  2. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture. PMID:17961129

  3. Linearity enhancement of scale factor in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Lishuang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A method to reduce the residual stress of support arms in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer is proposed in order to enhance the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer. First, the behavior of residual stress in support arms is analyzed in detail, and the simulation of shape curvature caused by residual stress in aluminum-made support arms is completed using finite element analysis. Then, by comparing two different materials of support arms (aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms), a modified fabrication is introduced in order to reduce the unexpected residual stress in support arms. Finally, based on contrast experiments, the linearity of the scale factor of accelerometers with aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms is measured using the force feedback test system, respectively. Results show that the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer with silicon-made support arms is 0.85%, which is reduced about an order of magnitude compared to that of the accelerometer with aluminum-made support arms with the linearity of scale factor of 7.48%; linearity enhancement of the scale factor is validated. This allows accuracy improvement of the optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer in the application of inertial navigation and positioning. PMID:27505396

  4. Quality-Factor Enhancement of Nanoelectromechanical Systems by Capacitive Driving Beyond Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barois, T.; Perisanu, S.; Poncharal, P.; Vincent, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Ayari, A.

    2016-07-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems are considered as ultrasensitive devices for mass and force detection. Capacitive actuation is widely used in these devices but is known to degrade the quality factor of the resonator due to dc electrostatic damping. We report the enhancement of the quality factor of SiC vibrating nanowires detected nano-optomechanically and electrically by applying an ac capacitive driving at a frequency above both the resonance frequency and the electrical cutoff frequency. Self-oscillations are demonstrated for optimal conditions. We develop an analytical model of the phenomenon and show that it can lead to an improvement of the force sensitivity.

  5. Estimating electric field enhancement factors on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model: A method evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterbrook, Calvin C.; Rudolph, Terence; Easterbrook, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A method for obtaining field enhancement factors at specific points on an aircraft utilizing a small scale model was evaluated by measuring several canonical shapes. Comparison of the form factors obtained by analytical means with measurements indicate that the experimental method has serious flaws. Errors of 200 to 300 percent were found between analytical values and measured values. As a result of the study, the analytical method is not recommended for calibration of field meters located on aircraft, and should not be relied upon in any application where the local spatial derivatives of the electric field on the model are large over the dimensions of the sensing probe.

  6. Super defect inside photonic crystal ring resonator to enhance Q factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasulu, Tupakula; Kolli, Venkateswara Rao; Tarimala, Badrinarayana; Hegde, Gopalkrishna; Sangineni, Mohan; Talabattula, Srinivas

    2016-03-01

    A design is proposed to enhance the quality factor of a photonic crystal ring resonator. A super defect is employed inside the ring resonator, which consists of variation of hole dimensions inside the ring resonator in such a way that the radiation field components of the resonant nanocavity are forced to get cancelled in order to reduce radiation loss. After this forced cancellation, the improved Q factor is calculated as 18,000. This photonic crystal ring resonator can be used for sensing applications like force sensing, pressure sensing, biochemical sensing, and communication applications like demultiplexing.

  7. Radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zargari, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of tinea capitis using radiotherapy was introduced at the beginning of the twentieth century. A variety of cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are seen years after this treatment. Objective: We sought to determine the clinical characteristics of BCCs among irradiated patients. Methods: The clinical records of all patients with BCC in a clinic in north of Iran were reviewed. Results: Of the 58 cases of BCC, 29 had positive history for radiotherapy in their childhood. Multiple BCCs were seen in 79.3% and 10.3% of patients with history and without history of radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusions: X-ray radiation is still a major etiologic factor in developing BCC in northern Iran. Patients with positive history for radiotherapy have higher rate of recurrence. PMID:26114066

  8. Binding of a liver-specific factor to the human albumin gene promoter and enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Frain, M.; Hardon, E.; Ciliberto, G. ); Sala-Trepat, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    A segment of 1,022 base pairs (bp) of the 5{prime}-flanking region of the human albumin gene, fused to a reporter gene, directs hepatoma-specific transcription. Three functionally distinct regions have been defined by deletion analysis: a negative element located between bp {minus}673 and {minus}486, an enhancer essential for efficient albumin transcription located between bp {minus}486 and {minus}221, and a promoter spanning a region highly conserved throughout evolution. Protein-binding studies have demonstrated that a liver {ital trans}-acting factor which interacts with the enhancer region is the well-characterized transcription factor LF-B1, which binds to promoters of several liver-specific genes. A synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide containing the LF-B1-binding site is sufficient to act as a tissue-specific transcriptional enhancer when placed in front of the albumin promoter. The fact that the same binding site functions in both an enhancer and a promoter suggests that these two elements influence the initiation of transcription through similar mechanisms.

  9. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  10. College Experiences and Student Inputs: Factors That Promote the Development of Skills and Attributes that Enhance Learning among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemosit, Caroline Chepkurui

    2012-01-01

    The study involved an exploration of factors that promoted the development of skills and attributes that enhanced learning among college students. The factors explored in this study were, active learning, student-teacher interaction, time on tasks, institutional expectations, student inputs, and skills and attributes that enhance learning. This…

  11. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Qiangsong; Zheng Liduan; Li Bo; Wang Danming; Huang Chuanshu; Matuschak, George M.; Li Dechun . E-mail: dli2@slu.edu

    2006-11-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF) has angiogenic properties in an in vivo matrigel plug model and HIMF upregulates expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse lungs and cultured lung epithelial cells. However, whether HIMF exerts angiogenic effects through modulating endothelial cell function remains unknown. In this study, mouse aortic rings cultured with recombinant HIMF protein resulted in enhanced vascular sprouting and increased endothelial cell spreading as confirmed by Dil-Ac-LDL uptake, von Willebrand factor and CD31 staining. In cultured mouse endothelial cell line SVEC 4-10, HIMF dose-dependently enhanced cell proliferation, in vitro migration and tubulogenesis, which was not attenuated by SU1498, a VEGFR2/Flk-1 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Moreover, HIMF stimulation resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, p38 and ERK1/2 kinases in SVEC 4-10 cells. Treatment of mouse aortic rings and SVEC 4-10 cells with LY294002, but not SB203580, PD098059 or U0126, abolished HIMF-induced vascular sprouting and angiogenic responses. In addition, transfection of a dominant-negative mutant of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K), {delta}p85, blocked HIMF-induced phosphorylation of Akt, endothelial activation and tubulogenesis. These results indicate that HIMF enhances angiogenesis by promoting proliferation and migration of endothelial cells via activation of the PI-3K/Akt pathways.

  12. Numerical and experimental studies of the elastic enhancement factor of 2D open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirko, Leszek; Białous, Małgorzata; Yunko, Vitalii; Bauch, Szymon; Ławniczak, Michał

    We present the results of numerical and experimental studies of the elastic enhancement factor W for microwave rough and rectangular cavities simulating two-dimensional chaotic and partially chaotic quantum billiards in the presence of moderate absorption strength. We show that for the frequency range ν = 15 . 0 - 18 . 5 GHz, in which the coupling between antennas and the system is strong enough, the values of W for the microwave rough cavity lie below the predictions of random matrix theory and on average they are above the theoretical results of V. Sokolov and O. Zhirov, Phys. Rev. E, 91, 052917 (2015). We also show that the enhancement factor W of a microwave rectangular cavity coupled to the external channels via microwave antennas, simulating a partially chaotic quantum billiard, calculated by applying the Potter-Rosenzweig model with κ = 2 . 8 +/- 0 . 5 is close to the experimental one. Our numerical and experimental results suggest that the enhancement factor can be used as a measure of internal chaos which can be especially useful for systems with significant openness or absorption. This work was partially supported by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education Grants N N202 130239 and UMO-2013/09/D/ST2/03727.

  13. Sonic hedgehog signaling in Basal cell nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Athar, Mohammad; Li, Changzhao; Kim, Arianna L; Spiegelman, Vladimir S; Bickers, David R

    2014-09-15

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is considered to be a major signal transduction pathway during embryonic development, but it usually shuts down after birth. Aberrant Sonic hedgehog (Shh) activation during adulthood leads to neoplastic growth. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is driven by this pathway. Here, we summarize information related to the pathogenesis of this neoplasm, discuss pathways that crosstalk with Shh signaling, and the importance of the primary cilium in this neoplastic process. The identification of the basic/translational components of Shh signaling has led to the discovery of potential mechanism-driven druggable targets and subsequent clinical trials have confirmed their remarkable efficacy in treating BCCs, particularly in patients with nevoid BCC syndrome (NBCCS), an autosomal dominant disorder in which patients inherit a germline mutation in the tumor-suppressor gene Patched (Ptch). Patients with NBCCS develop dozens to hundreds of BCCs due to derepression of the downstream G-protein-coupled receptor Smoothened (SMO). Ptch mutations permit transposition of SMO to the primary cilium followed by enhanced expression of transcription factors Glis that drive cell proliferation and tumor growth. Clinical trials with the SMO inhibitor, vismodegib, showed remarkable efficacy in patients with NBCCS, which finally led to its FDA approval in 2012. PMID:25172843

  14. Dopamine-glutamate interactions in the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W J

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to formulate a working hypothesis of basal-ganglia functions, arguments are considered suggesting that the basal ganglia are involved in a process of response selection i.e. in the facilitation of "wanted" and in the suppression of "unwanted" behaviour. The meso-accumbal dopamine-system is considered to mediate natural and drug-induced reward and sensitization. The meso-striatal dopamine-system seems to fulfill similar functions: It may mediate reinforcement which strengthens a given behaviour when elicited subsequently, but which is not experienced as reward or hedonia. Glutamate as the transmitter of the corticofugal projections to the basal ganglia nuclei and of the subthalamic neurons is critically involved in basal ganglia functions and dysfunctions; for example Parkinson's disease can be considered to be a secondary hyperglutamatergic disease. Additionally, glutamate is an essential factor in the plasticity response of the basal-ganglia. However, opposite to previous suggestions, the NMDA-receptor blocker MK-801 does not prevent psychostimulant- nor morphine-induced day to day increase (sensitization) of locomotion. Also the day to day increase of haloperidol-induced catalepsy was not prevented by MK-801. PMID:9871434

  15. SPOCK1 Is a Novel Transforming Growth Factor-β-Induced Myoepithelial Marker That Enhances Invasion and Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Ching; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lu, Yueh-Tong; Lien, Huang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    In addition to contraction, myoepithelia have diverse paracrine effects, including a tumor suppression effect. However, certain myoepithelial markers have been shown to contribute to tumor progression. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is involved in the transdifferentiation of fibroblasts to contractile myofibroblasts. We investigated whether TGF-β can upregulate potential myoepithelial markers, which may have functional and clinicopathological significance in breast cancer. We found that TGF-β induced SPOCK1 expression in MCF10A, MCF12A, and M10 breast cells and demonstrated SPOCK1 as a novel myoepithelial marker that was immunolocalized within or beneath myoepithelia lining ductolobular units. A functional study showed that overexpression of SPOCK1 enhanced invasiveness in mammary immortalized and cancer cells. To further determine the biological significance of SPOCK1 in breast cancer, we investigated the expression of SPOCK1 in 478 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases through immunohistochemistry and correlated the expression with clinicopathological characteristics. SPOCK1 expression was significantly correlated with high pathological tumor size (P = 0.012), high histological grade (P = 0.013), the triple-negative phenotype (P = 0.022), and the basal-like phenotype (P = 0.026) and was correlated with a significantly poorer overall survival on univariate analysis (P = 0.001, log-rank test). Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that SPOCK1 expression maintained an independent poor prognostic factor of overall survival. Analysis of SPOCK1 expression on various non-IDC carcinoma subtypes showed an enrichment of SPOCK1 expression in metaplastic carcinoma, which is pathogenetically closely related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In conclusion, we identified SPOCK1 as a novel TGF-β-induced myoepithelial marker and further demonstrated that SPOCK1 enhanced invasion in breast cancer cells and correlated with poor prognosis in breast

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor C enhances cervical cancer cell invasiveness via upregulation of galectin-3 protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junxiu; Cheng, Yang; He, Mian; Yao, Shuzhong

    2014-06-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) promotes cervical cancer metastasis, while the detailed mechanism remains obscure. Recent evidence shows that galectin-3 (Gal-3), a glycan binding protein, interacts with the VEGF receptors and reinforces their signal transduction. In this study, we investigated the role of Gal-3 in VEGF-C-induced cervical cancer cell invasion. On cervical carcinoma cell line SiHa cells, silencing of Gal-3 expression with specific siRNA largely impaired VEGF-C-enhanced cell invasion. Treatment with VEGF-C for 12-48 h enhanced Gal-3 protein expression, which was inhibited by the addition of NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). Moreover, the silencing of NF-κB subunit p65 expression with specific siRNA attenuated VEGF-C-enhanced Gal-3 expression, suggesting that NF-κB is the key intermediate. Under VEGF-C stimulation, an enhanced interaction between VEGF receptor-3 (VEGF-R3) and Gal-3 was found, which may possibly lead to VEGF-R3 activation since exogenous Gal-3 induced VEGF-R3 phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In conclusion, our findings implied that VEGF-C enhanced cervical cancer invasiveness via upregulation of Gal-3 protein through NF-κB pathway, which may shed light on potential therapeutic strategies for cervical cancer therapy. PMID:24650367

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhances IL-15-induced natural killer cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Suk Hyung; Shin, Nara; Jeong, Mira; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Mi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ran; Chung, Jin Woong; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo

    2009-09-04

    The differentiation of natural killer (NK) cells is regulated by various factors including soluble growth factors and transcription factors. Here, we have demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) is a positive regulator of NK cell differentiation. TNF-{alpha} augmented the IL-15-induced expression of NK1.1 and CD122 in mature NK cells, and TNF-{alpha} alone also induced NK cell maturation as well as IL-15. TNF-{alpha} also increased IFN-{gamma} production in NK cells in the presence of IL-15. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of several transcription factors, including T-bet and GATA-3, was increased by the addition of TNF-{alpha} and IL-15. In addition, TNF-{alpha} increased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in NK cells and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B impeded TNF-{alpha}-enhanced NK cell maturation. Overall, these data suggest that TNF-{alpha} significantly increased IL-15-driven NK cell differentiation by increasing the expression of transcription factors that play crucial roles in NK cell maturation and inducing the NF-{kappa}B activity.

  18. Interferon-γ enhances phorbol myristate acetate-induced cell attachment and tumor necrosis factor production via the NF-κB pathway in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yuichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2013-06-01

    During inflammation, activated macrophages express adhesion molecules and produce cytokines that interact with other hematopoietic and stromal cells. THP-1 non-adherent human monocytic cells differentiate into plastic-adherent macrophages via αVβ3 integrin, by ERK activation in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This has proven to be a valuable model for investigating functional monocyte/macrophage diversity. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a Th1-cytokine that is crucial in macrophage activation. In this study, we investigated the effects of IFN-γ on adhesion and the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells. IFN-γ is incapable of inducing cell attachment and TNF production; however, it cumulatively upregulated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. IFN-γ increased αV integrin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and among these PMA-induced cell surface adhesion molecules, the blocking antibody for αV integrin suppressed adhesion and TNF production. Furthermore, IFN-γ enhanced PMA-induced NF-κB phosphorylation and not ERK phosphorylation. Accordingly, the NF-κB pathway inhibitor (BAY 11-7082) inhibited the enhancing effect of IFN-γ on adhesion and TNF production. By contrast, the MEK inhibitor (U0126) almost completely eliminated PMA-induced basal adhesion and TNF production. In conclusion, IFN-γ regulates macrophage activation by mediating the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:23589028

  19. Secreted Endothelial Cell Factors Immobilized on Collagen Scaffolds Enhance the Recipient Endothelial Cell Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Callanan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Strategies to design novel vascular scaffolds are a continuing aim in tissue engineering and often such designs encompass the use of recombinant factors to enhance the performance of the scaffold. The established use of cell secretion utilized in feeder systems and conditioned media offer a source of paracrine factors, which has potential to be used in tissue-engineered (TE) scaffolds. Here we utilize this principle from endothelial cells (ECs), to create a novel TE scaffold by harnessing secreted factors and immobilizing these to collagen scaffolds. This research revealed increased cellular attachment and positive angiogenic gene upregulation responses in recipient ECs grown on these conditioned scaffolds. Also, the conditioning method did not affect the mechanical structural integrity of the scaffolds. These results may advocate the potential use of this system to improve vascular scaffolds' in vivo performance. In addition, this process may be a future method utilized to improve other tissue engineering scaffold therapies. PMID:27057474

  20. Bias-dependent enhancement of the Fano factor in atomic-scale Au junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Loah; Zolotavin, Pavlo; Chen, Ruoyu; Natelson, Douglas

    We report measurements of current noise in STM-style Au break junctions at 77K, focusing on the dependence of the Fano factor on applied bias. In room temperature investigations of similar systems, measured noise at low bias (<150 mV) was observed to agree well with Landauer-Büttiker theory for shot noise at a fixed electronic temperature. At higher biases, however, measured noise exhibited a superlinear dependence on scaled bias above the low bias expectations. In the present experiment at cryogenic temperatures, we also observe this nonlinear increase of noise. We will discuss this behavior in terms of an enhancement of the Fano factor above the predicted model for minimum open transmission channels, and how the data constrain possible explanations of this excess noise. Furthermore, we will examine channel mixing in transport through the junction from measured Fano factor and conductance.

  1. Exchange enhancement of the electron g factor in strained InGaAs/InP heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Maremyanin, K. V. Kalinin, K. P.; Spirin, K. E.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Baidus, N. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2015-02-15

    The exchange enhancement of the electron g factor in strained InGaAs/InP heterostructures with a two-dimensional electron gas is studied. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the resistance in the minima of the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in perpendicular magnetic fields up to 12 T in the vicinity of the odd filling factors of the Landau levels yields the values of the effective electron Lande factor g* from −8.6 to −10.1. The experimental values are compared with the results of theoretical calculations of the g factor of quasiparticles. The calculations are performed using an eight-band k · p Hamiltonian and take into account exchange interaction in the two-dimensional electron gas. It is shown that, under the conditions of a large overlap between the spin-split Landau levels, the maximum value of the quasiparticle g factor can be attained in the vicinity of even filling factors. This is caused by the nonparabolicity of the electron dispersion relation.

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  3. Pre-B Cell Colony Enhancing Factor (PBEF), a Cytokine with Multiple Physiological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongjie; Lei, Han; Zhang, Zhonge

    2013-01-01

    Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF) is regarded as a proinflammatory cytokine. Named for its first discovered function as a pre-B cell colony enhancing factor, it has since been found to have many other functions relating to cell metabolism, inflammation, and immune modulation. It has also been found to have intracellular and extracellular forms, with the two overlapping in function. Most of the intracellular functions of PBEF are due to its role as a nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). It has been found in human endothelial cells, where it is able to induce angiogenesis through upregulation of VEGF and VEGFR and secretion of MCP-1. In human umbilical endothelial cells, PBEF increases levels of the protease MMP 2/9. PBEF has also been found in a variety of immune cells other than B cells and has been shown to inhibit apoptosis of macrophages. Extracellular PBEF has been shown to increase inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-16, and TGF-β1, and the chemokine receptor CCR3. PBEF also increases the production of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β in CD14+ monocyctes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, enhances the effectiveness of T cells, and is vital to the development of both B and T lymphocytes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent advances in PBEF research. PMID:23787158

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor expression and enhances angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Shih-Ya; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are a type of primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is commonly upregulated during neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism involved in BDNF-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Here, we knocked down BDNF expression in chondrosarcoma cells and assessed their capacity to control VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We found knockdown of BDNF decreased VEGF expression and abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mouse models. In addition, in the xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, the knockdown of BDNF significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. BDNF increased VEGF expression and angiogenesis through the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we analyzed samples from chondrosarcoma patients by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of BDNF and VEGF protein in 56 chondrosarcoma patients was significantly higher than in normal cartilage. In addition, the high level of BDNF expression correlated strongly with VEGF expression and tumor stage. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF increases VEGF expression and enhances angiogenesis through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α. Therefore, BDNF may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy for human chondrosarcoma. PMID:25150213

  5. Functional Neuroanatomy of the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lanciego, José L.; Luquin, Natasha; Obeso, José A.

    2012-01-01

    The “basal ganglia” refers to a group of subcortical nuclei responsible primarily for motor control, as well as other roles such as motor learning, executive functions and behaviors, and emotions. Proposed more than two decades ago, the classical basal ganglia model shows how information flows through the basal ganglia back to the cortex through two pathways with opposing effects for the proper execution of movement. Although much of the model has remained, the model has been modified and amplified with the emergence of new data. Furthermore, parallel circuits subserve the other functions of the basal ganglia engaging associative and limbic territories. Disruption of the basal ganglia network forms the basis for several movement disorders. This article provides a comprehensive account of basal ganglia functional anatomy and chemistry and the major pathophysiological changes underlying disorders of movement. We try to answer three key questions related to the basal ganglia, as follows: What are the basal ganglia? What are they made of? How do they work? Some insight on the canonical basal ganglia model is provided, together with a selection of paradoxes and some views over the horizon in the field. PMID:23071379

  6. Striatal plasticity and basal ganglia circuit function.

    PubMed

    Kreitzer, Anatol C; Malenka, Robert C

    2008-11-26

    The dorsal striatum, which consists of the caudate and putamen, is the gateway to the basal ganglia. It receives convergent excitatory afferents from cortex and thalamus and forms the origin of the direct and indirect pathways, which are distinct basal ganglia circuits involved in motor control. It is also a major site of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Striatal plasticity alters the transfer of information throughout basal ganglia circuits and may represent a key neural substrate for adaptive motor control and procedural memory. Here, we review current understanding of synaptic plasticity in the striatum and its role in the physiology and pathophysiology of basal ganglia function. PMID:19038213

  7. Overlapping CRE and E Box Motifs in the Enhancer Sequences of the Bovine Leukemia Virus 5′ Long Terminal Repeat Are Critical for Basal and Acetylation-Dependent Transcriptional Activity of the Viral Promoter: Implications for Viral Latency

    PubMed Central

    Calomme, Claire; Dekoninck, Ann; Nizet, Séverine; Adam, Emmanuelle; Nguyên, Thi Liên-Anh; Van Den Broeke, Anne; Willems, Luc; Kettmann, Richard; Burny, Arsène; Lint, Carine Van

    2004-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is characterized by viral latency in a large proportion of cells containing an integrated provirus. In this study, we postulated that mechanisms directing the recruitment of deacetylases to the BLV 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR) could explain the transcriptional repression of viral expression in vivo. Accordingly, we showed that BLV promoter activity was induced by several deacetylase inhibitors (such as trichostatin A [TSA]) in the context of episomal LTR constructs and in the context of an integrated BLV provirus. Moreover, treatment of BLV-infected cells with TSA increased H4 acetylation at the viral promoter, showing a close correlation between the level of histone acetylation and transcriptional activation of the BLV LTR. Among the known cis-regulatory DNA elements located in the 5′ LTR, three E box motifs overlapping cyclic AMP responsive elements (CREs) in U3 were shown to be involved in transcriptional repression of BLV basal gene expression. Importantly, the combined mutations of these three E box motifs markedly reduced the inducibility of the BLV promoter by TSA. E boxes are susceptible to recognition by transcriptional repressors such as Max-Mad-mSin3 complexes that repress transcription by recruiting deacetylases. However, our in vitro binding studies failed to reveal the presence of Mad-Max proteins in the BLV LTR E box-specific complexes. Remarkably, TSA increased the occupancy of the CREs by CREB/ATF. Therefore, we postulated that the E box-specific complexes exerted their negative cooperative effect on BLV transcription by steric hindrance with the activators CREB/ATF and/or their transcriptional coactivators possessing acetyltransferase activities. Our results thus suggest that the overlapping CRE and E box elements in the BLV LTR were selected during evolution as a novel strategy for BLV to allow better silencing of viral transcription and to escape from the host immune response. PMID:15564493

  8. Basal ganglia morphology links the metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Onyewuenyi, Ikechukwu C.; Muldoon, Matthew F.; Christie, Israel C.; Erickson, Kirk I.; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk factors that are often comorbid with depressive symptoms. Individual components of the MetS also covary with the morphology of basal ganglia regions that are altered by depression. However, it remains unknown whether the covariation between the MetS and depressive symptomatology can be accounted for in part by morphological changes in the basal ganglia. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that increased depressive symptoms among individuals with the MetS might be statistically mediated by reduced grey matter volume in basal ganglia regions. The presence of the MetS was determined in 147 middle-aged adults using the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. Basal ganglia volumes were determined on an a priori basis by automated segmentation of high-resolution magnetic resonance images. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire. Even after controlling for demographic and other confounding factors, having the MetS and meeting more MetS criteria covaried with reduced globus pallidus volume. Meeting more MetS criteria and reduced pallidal volume were also related to depressive symptoms. Moreover, the MetS-depression association was statistically mediated by pallidal volume. In summary, reduced globus pallidus volume is a neural correlate of the MetS that may partly account for its association with depressive symptoms. PMID:24096008

  9. Cloning and sequence analysis of candidate human natural killer-enhancing factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shau, H.; Butterfield, L.H.; Chiu, R.; Kim, A.

    1994-12-31

    A cytosol factor from human red blood cells enhances natural killer (NK) activity. This factor, termed NK-enhancing factor (NKEF), is a protein of 44000 M{sub r} consisting of two subunits of equal size linked by disulfide bonds. NKEF is expressed in the NK-sensitive erythroleukemic cell line K562. Using an antibody specific for NKEF as a probe for immunoblot screening, we isolated several clones from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library of K562. Additional subcloning and sequencing revealed that the candidate NKEF cDNAs fell into one of two categories of closely related but non-identical genes, referred to as NKEF A and B. They are 88% identical in amino acid sequence and 71% identical in nucleotide sequence. Southern blot analysis suggests that there are two to three NKEF family members in the genome. Analysis of predicted amino acid sequences indicates that both NKEF A and B are cytosol proteins with several phosphorylation sites each, but that they have no glycosylation sites. They are significantly homologous to several other proteins from a wide variety of organisms ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, especially with regard to several well-conserved motifs within the amino acid sequences. The biological functions of these proteins in other species are mostly unknown, but some of them were reported to be induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, as well as for immunoregulation of NK activity, NKEF may be important for cells in coping with oxidative insults. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Growth factor enhanced retroviral gene transfer to the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    King, L A; Mitrophanous, K A; Clark, L A; Kim, V N; Rohll, J B; Kingsman, A J; Colello, R J

    2000-07-01

    The use of viral vectors for gene delivery into mammalian cells provides a new approach in the treatment of many human diseases. The first viral vector approved for human clinical trials was murine leukemia virus (MLV), which remains the most commonly used vector in clinical trials to date. However, the application of MLV vectors is limited since MLV requires cells to be actively dividing in order for transduction and therefore gene delivery to occur. This limitation precludes the use of MLV for delivering genes to the adult CNS, where very little cell division is occurring. However, we speculated that this inherent limitation of ML V may be overcome by utilizing the known mitogenic effect of growth factors on cells of the CNS. Specifically, an in vivo application of growth factor to the adult brain, if able to induce cell division, could enhance MLV-based gene transfer to the adult brain. We now show that an exogenous application of basic fibroblast growth factor induces cell division in vivo. Under these conditions, where cells of the adult brain are stimulated to divide, MLV-based gene transfer is significantly enhanced. This novel approach precludes any vector modifications and provides a simple and effective way of delivering genes to cells of the adult brain utilizing MLV-based retroviral vectors. PMID:10918476

  11. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  12. Feature enhancement of reverberant speech by distribution matching and non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keronen, Sami; Kallasjoki, Heikki; Palomäki, Kalle J.; Brown, Guy J.; Gemmeke, Jort F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a novel two-stage dereverberation feature enhancement method for noise-robust automatic speech recognition. In the first stage, an estimate of the dereverberated speech is generated by matching the distribution of the observed reverberant speech to that of clean speech, in a decorrelated transformation domain that has a long temporal context in order to address the effects of reverberation. The second stage uses this dereverberated signal as an initial estimate within a non-negative matrix factorization framework, which jointly estimates a sparse representation of the clean speech signal and an estimate of the convolutional distortion. The proposed feature enhancement method, when used in conjunction with automatic speech recognizer back-end processing, is shown to improve the recognition performance compared to three other state-of-the-art techniques.

  13. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Sun, Wenhao; Ceder, Gerbrand; Armiento, Rickard; Lazic, Predrag

    2014-02-24

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this work, we report orbital interaction as a powerful tool to finetune the band structure and the transport properties of charge carriers in bulk crystalline semiconductors. The proposed mechanism of orbital interaction on band structure is demonstrated for IV-VI thermoelectric semiconductors. For IV-VI materials, we find that the convergence of multiple carrier pockets not only displays a strong correlation with the s-p and spin-orbit coupling but also coincides with the enhancement of power factor. Our results suggest a useful path to engineer the band structure and an enticing solid-solution design principle to enhance thermoelectric performance.

  14. Optimization of the particle density to maximize the SERS enhancement factor of periodic plasmonic nanostructure array.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhua; Zheng, Mengjie; Xiang, Quan; Hu, Hailong; Duan, Huigao

    2016-09-01

    Low-cost surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate with the largest possible enhancement factor is highly desirable for SERS-based sensing applications. In this work, we systematically investigated how the density of plasmonic nanostructures affects the intensity of SERS signal. By directly depositing of metallic layer on electron-beam-lithography defined dielectric nanoposts, plasmonic structures array with different densities were reliably fabricated for SERS measurements. Two main experimental phenomena were obtained: (1) the SERS intensity did not increase monotonically when increasing the density of plasmonic structures, and (2) these ultra-dense plasmonic structures resulted in the maximal SERS intensity. These results could be well explained based on finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations and provide robust experimental evidences to guide the design of the best possible SERS substrate. PMID:27607665

  15. Inverted polymer solar cells with enhanced fill factor by inserting the potassium stearate interfacial modification layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangsheng; Jiu, Tonggang; Li, Bairu; Kuang, Chaoyang; Chen, Qiushan; Ma, Sushuang; Shu, Jie; Fang, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    A thin potassium stearate (KSt) film combined with an optimized ZnO film was introduced to improve the fill factor (FF) of highly efficient inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements were used to show that the introduction of KSt did not change the morphology of interlayer. On the contrary, it is beneficial for the spread of the active layer on the interlayer. The origin of enhanced FF was systematically studied by the ideal current-voltage model for a single heterojunction solar cell and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. On the basis of the data analysis, the reduced charge recombination loss was responsible for this improved FF. At last, when KSt was replaced by sodium stearate (NaSt), the similar experiment phenomenon was observed. This indicates that inserting a metallic stearate modified layer is a promising strategy to enhance inverted PSCs performance.

  16. Semantic Webbing, Semantic-Pictorial Webbing and Standard Basal Teaching Techniques: A Comparison of Three Strategies To Enhance Learning and Memory of a Reading Comprehension Task in the Fourth Grade Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri

    A study analyzed the relative effectiveness of three teaching strategies for enhancing vocabulary and reading comprehension. Sixty-eight students in three fourth-grade classrooms in a suburban southwestern public school were presented with a vocabulary lesson on weather from the reading text according to one of the following strategies: (1) basal…

  17. sine oculis in basal Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Bebenek, Ilona G; Gates, Ruth D; Morris, Joshua; Hartenstein, Volker; Jacobs, David K

    2004-07-01

    We report the recovery of homologs of Six1/2/sine oculis (so), a homeodomain-containing member of the Six-gene family, from a diverse set of basal Metazoa, including representatives of the poriferan classes Demospongia, Calcarea and Hexactinellida, the cnidarian classes Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa and Anthozoa, as well as a ctenophore. so sequences were also recovered from a platyhelminth, an echiurid and two bivalve molluscs, members of the super-phyletic group Lophotrochozoa. In the case of the platyhelminth, multiple distinct so sequences were recovered, as well as a member of the related group Six4/5/D-Six4. Extended sequences of the so gene were recovered from the demosponge, Haliclona sp., and the scyphozoan Aurelia aurita via PCR, and 3' RACE. The affinities of all recovered sequences were assessed using a parsimony analysis based on both nucleic and amino acid sequence and using successive character weighting. Our results indicate that so is highly conserved across the animal kingdom. Preliminary expression data for Aurelia reveal that transcripts of the so homolog are present in the manubrium as well as in the rhopalia, which contain the statocyst and eyes, in the free-swimming ephyra and juvenile stages of these jellyfish. PMID:15221378

  18. Enzyme Activities of Starch and Sucrose Pathways and Growth of Apical and Basal Maize Kernels 1

    PubMed Central

    Ou-Lee, Tsai-Mei; Setter, Tim Lloyd

    1985-01-01

    Apical kernels of maize (Zea mays L.) ears have smaller size and lower growth rates than basal kernels. To improve our understanding of this difference, the developmental patterns of starch-synthesis-pathway enzyme activities and accumulation of sugars and starch was determined in apical- and basal-kernel endosperm of greenhouse-grown maize (cultivar Cornell 175) plants. Plants were synchronously pollinated, kernels were sampled from apical and basal ear positions throughout kernel development, and enzyme activities were measured in crude preparations. Several factors were correlated with the higher dry matter accumulation rate and larger mature kernel size of basal-kernel endosperm. During the period of cell expansion (7 to 19 days after pollination), the activity of insoluble (acid) invertase and sucose concentration in endosperm of basal kernels exceeded that in apical kernels. Soluble (alkaline) invertase was also high during this stage but was the same in endosperm of basal and apical kernels, while glucose concentration was higher in apical-kernel endosperm. During the period of maximal starch synthesis, the activities of sucrose synthase, ADP-Glc-pyrophosphorylase, and insoluble (granule-bound) ADP-Glc-starch synthase were higher in endosperm of basal than apical kernels. Soluble ADP-Glc-starch synthase, which was maximal during the early stage before starch accumulated, was the same in endosperm from apical and basal kernels. It appeared that differences in metabolic potential between apical and basal kernels were established at an early stage in kernel development. PMID:16664503

  19. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell-suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Dietmar M W; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Roovers, Rob C; Coffer, Paul J; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2013-02-21

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, mast cell-derived AREG fully restored optimal Treg cell function. These findings reveal EGFR as a component in the regulation of local immune responses and establish a link between mast cells and Treg cells. Targeting of this immune regulatory mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic successes of EGFR-targeting treatments in cancer patients. PMID:23333074

  20. Transgenic songbirds with suppressed or enhanced activity of CREB transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kentaro; Matsui, Sumiko; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-06-16

    Songbirds postnatally develop their skill to utter and to perceive a vocal signal for communication. How genetic and environmental influences act in concert to regulate the development of such skill is not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotype of transgenic songbirds with altered intrinsic activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. By viral vector-mediated modification of genomic DNA, we established germ line-transmitted lines of zebra finches, which exhibited enhanced or suppressed activity of CREB. Although intrinsically acquired vocalizations or their hearing ability were not affected, the transgenic birds showed reduced vocal learning quality of their own songs and impaired audio-memory formation against conspecific songs. These results thus demonstrate that appropriate activity of CREB is necessary for the postnatal acquisition of learned behavior in songbirds, and the CREB transgenic birds offer a unique opportunity to separately manipulate both genetic and environmental factors that impinge on the postnatal song learning. PMID:26048905

  1. Malaysian adolescent students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience

    PubMed Central

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam

    2015-01-01

    The adolescence period of life comes along with changes and challenges in terms of physical and cognitive development. In this hectic period, many adolescents may suffer more from various risk factors such as low socioeconomic status, substance abuse, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicate that such disadvantaged backgrounds of Malaysian adolescent students lead to failure or underachievement in their academic performance. This narrative review scrutinises how some of these students are able to demonstrate academic resilience, which is satisfactory performance in cognitive or academic tasks in spite of their disadvantaged backgrounds. The review stresses the need for developing a caregiving relationship model for at-risk adolescent students in Malaysia. Such a model would allow educators to meet the students' needs for enhancing thinking skills, counteracting risk factors and demonstrating academic resilience. PMID:25663734

  2. The basal ganglia communicate with the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Andreea C; Dum, Richard P; Strick, Peter L

    2010-05-01

    The basal ganglia and cerebellum are major subcortical structures that influence not only movement, but putatively also cognition and affect. Both structures receive input from and send output to the cerebral cortex. Thus, the basal ganglia and cerebellum form multisynaptic loops with the cerebral cortex. Basal ganglia and cerebellar loops have been assumed to be anatomically separate and to perform distinct functional operations. We investigated whether there is any direct route for basal ganglia output to influence cerebellar function that is independent of the cerebral cortex. We injected rabies virus (RV) into selected regions of the cerebellar cortex in cebus monkeys and used retrograde transneuronal transport of the virus to determine the origin of multisynaptic inputs to the injection sites. We found that the subthalamic nucleus of the basal ganglia has a substantial disynaptic projection to the cerebellar cortex. This pathway provides a means for both normal and abnormal signals from the basal ganglia to influence cerebellar function. We previously showed that the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum has a disynaptic projection to an input stage of basal ganglia processing, the striatum. Taken together these results provide the anatomical substrate for substantial two-way communication between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Thus, the two subcortical structures may be linked together to form an integrated functional network. PMID:20404184

  3. Readiness in the Basal Reader: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Pamela

    A study examined two 1989 basal reading series' (published by McGraw Hill and Holt) readiness/priming sequences in order to ascertain the theoretical bases of each and then compared the findings with those of an earlier study. All pages of the readiness/priming sequence student texts and workbooks of both basal reading series were analyzed using…

  4. Modern basal insulin analogs: An incomplete story.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-11-01

    The currently available basal insulin does not completely mimic the endogenous insulin secretion. This has continued to promote the search for ideal basal insulin. The newer basal insulin have primarily focused on increasing the duration of action, reducing variability, and reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia, particularly nocturnal. However, the changing criteria of hypoglycemia within a short span of a few years along with the surprising introduction of major cardiac events as another outcome measure has not only clouded the assessment of basal insulin but has also polarized opinion worldwide about the utility of the newer basal insulin. A critical review of both the pre and post FDA analysis of all the basal insulin in this article attempts to clear some of the confusion surrounding the issues of hypoglycemia and glycemic control. This article also discusses all the trials and meta-analysis done on all the current basal insulin available along with their head-to-head comparison with particular attention to glycemic control and hypoglycemic events including severe and nocturnal hypoglycemia. This in-depth analysis hopes to provide a clear interpretation of the various analyses available in literature at this point of time thereby acting as an excellent guide to the readers in choosing the most appropriate basal insulin for their patient. PMID:25364672

  5. Modern basal insulin analogs: An incomplete story

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The currently available basal insulin does not completely mimic the endogenous insulin secretion. This has continued to promote the search for ideal basal insulin. The newer basal insulin have primarily focused on increasing the duration of action, reducing variability, and reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia, particularly nocturnal. However, the changing criteria of hypoglycemia within a short span of a few years along with the surprising introduction of major cardiac events as another outcome measure has not only clouded the assessment of basal insulin but has also polarized opinion worldwide about the utility of the newer basal insulin. A critical review of both the pre and post FDA analysis of all the basal insulin in this article attempts to clear some of the confusion surrounding the issues of hypoglycemia and glycemic control. This article also discusses all the trials and meta-analysis done on all the current basal insulin available along with their head-to-head comparison with particular attention to glycemic control and hypoglycemic events including severe and nocturnal hypoglycemia. This in-depth analysis hopes to provide a clear interpretation of the various analyses available in literature at this point of time thereby acting as an excellent guide to the readers in choosing the most appropriate basal insulin for their patient. PMID:25364672

  6. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  7. Mussel-inspired immobilization of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for enhanced endothelialization of vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Kim, Seok Joo; Kang, Jae Kyeong; Park, Jong-Chul; Jang, Wonhee; Shin, Heungsoo

    2012-07-01

    Most polymeric vascular prosthetic materials have low patency rate for replacement of small diameter vessels (<5 mm), mainly due to failure to generate healthy endothelium. In this study, we present polydopamine-mediated immobilization of growth factors on the surface of polymeric materials as a versatile tool to modify surface characteristics of vascular grafts potentially for accelerated endothelialization. Polydopamine was deposited on the surface of biocompatible poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) elastomer, on which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was subsequently immobilized by simple dipping. Surface characteristics and composition were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Immobilization of VEGF on the polydopamine-deposited PLCL films was effective (19.8 ± 0.4 and 197.4 ± 19.7 ng/cm(2) for DPv20 and DPv200 films, respectively), and biotin-mediated labeling of immobilized VEGF revealed that the fluorescence intensity increased as a function of the concentration of VEGF solution. The effect of VEGF on adhesion of HUVECs was marginal, which may have been masked by polydopamine layer that also enhanced cell adhesion. However, VEGF-immobilized substrate significantly enhanced proliferation of HUVECs for over 7 days of in vitro culture and also improved their migration. In addition, immobilized VEGF supported robust cell to cell interactions with strong expression of CD 31 marker. The same process was effective for immobilization of basic fibroblast growth factor, demonstrating the robustness of polydopamine layer for secondary ligation of growth factors as a simple and novel surface modification strategy for vascular graft materials. PMID:22617001

  8. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy. PMID:26971503

  9. A Combination of Radiosurgery and Soluble Tissue Factor Enhances Vascular Targeting for Experimental Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Radiosurgery for glioblastoma is limited to the development of resistance, allowing tumor cells to survive and initiate tumor recurrence. Based on our previous work that coadministration of tissue factor and lipopolysaccharide following radiosurgery selectively induced thrombosis in cerebral arteriovenous malformations, achieving thrombosis of 69% of the capillaries and 39% of medium sized vessels, we hypothesized that a rapid and selective shutdown of the capillaries in glioblastoma vasculature would decrease the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, reducing tumor growth, preventing intracranial hypertension, and improving life expectancy. Glioblastoma was formed by implantation of GL261 cells into C57Bl/6 mouse brain. Mice were intravenously injected tissue factor, lipopolysaccharide, a combination of both, or placebo 24 hours after radiosurgery. Control mice received both agents after sham irradiation. Coadministration of tissue factor and lipopolysaccharide led to the formation of thrombi in up to 87 ± 8% of the capillaries and 46 ± 4% of medium sized vessels within glioblastoma. The survival rate of mice in this group was 80% versus no survivor in placebo controls 30 days after irradiation. Animal body weight increased with time in this group (r = 0.88, P = 0.0001). Thus, radiosurgery enhanced treatment with tissue factor, and lipopolysaccharide selectively induces thrombosis in glioblastoma vasculature, improving life expectancy. PMID:24307995

  10. The Glucose Transporter (GLUT4) Enhancer Factor Is Required for Normal Wing Positioning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Umar; Huang, Zhiyu; Terman, Jonathan R.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the transcription factors and target genes that pattern the developing adult remain unknown. In the present study, we find that an ortholog of the poorly understood transcription factor, glucose transporter (GLUT4) enhancer factor (Glut4EF, GEF) [also known as the Huntington's disease gene regulatory region-binding protein (HDBP) 1], plays a critical role in specifying normal wing positioning in adult Drosophila. Glut4EF proteins are zinc-finger transcription factors named for their ability to regulate expression of GLUT4 but nothing is known of Glut4EF's in vivo physiological functions. Here, we identify a family of Glut4EF proteins that are well conserved from Drosophila to humans and find that mutations in Drosophila Glut4EF underlie the wing-positioning defects seen in stretch mutants. In addition, our results indicate that previously uncharacterized mutations in Glut4EF are present in at least 11 publicly available fly lines and on the widely used TM3 balancer chromosome. These results indicate that previous observations utilizing these common stocks may be complicated by the presence of Glut4EF mutations. For example, our results indicate that Glut4EF mutations are also present on the same chromosome as two gain-of-function mutations of the homeobox transcription factor Antennapedia (Antp) and underlie defects previously attributed to Antp. In fact, our results support a role for Glut4EF in the modulation of morphogenetic processes mediated by Antp, further highlighting the importance of Glut4EF transcription factors in patterning and morphogenesis. PMID:18245850