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Sample records for factor h-related protein

  1. Complement factor H related proteins (CFHRs).

    PubMed

    Skerka, Christine; Chen, Qian; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T

    2013-12-15

    Factor H related proteins comprise a group of five plasma proteins: CFHR1, CFHR2, CFHR3, CFHR4 and CFHR5, and each member of this group binds to the central complement component C3b. Mutations, genetic deletions, duplications or rearrangements in the individual CFHR genes are associated with a number of diseases including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), C3 glomerulopathies (C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN), dense deposit disease (DDD) and CFHR5 nephropathy), IgA nephropathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although complement regulatory functions were attributed to most of the members of the CFHR protein family, the precise role of each CFHR protein in complement activation and the exact contribution to disease pathology is still unclear. Recent publications show that CFHR proteins form homo- as well as heterodimers. Genetic abnormalities within the CFHR gene locus can result in hybrid proteins with affected dimerization or recognition domains which cause defective functions. Here we summarize the recent data about CFHR genes and proteins in order to better understand the role of CFHR proteins in complement activation and in complement associated diseases. PMID:23830046

  2. Complement Factor H-Related 5-Hybrid Proteins Anchor Properdin and Activate Complement at Self-Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Manzke, Melanie; Hartmann, Andrea; Büttner, Maike; Amann, Kerstin; Pauly, Diana; Wiesener, Michael; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F

    2016-05-01

    C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) is a severe kidney disease for which no specific therapy exists. The causes of C3G are heterogeneous, and defective complement regulation is often linked to C3G pathogenesis. Copy number variations in the complement factor H-related (CFHR) gene cluster on chromosome 1q32 and CFHR5 mutant proteins associate with this disease. Here, we identified CFHR5 as a pattern recognition protein that binds to damaged human endothelial cell surfaces and to properdin, the human complement activator. We found the two N-terminal short consensus repeat domains of CFHR5 contact properdin and mediate dimer formation. These properdin-binding segments are duplicated in two mutant CFHR5 proteins, CFHR2-CFHR5Hyb from German patients with C3G and CFHR5Dup from Cypriot patients with C3G. Each of these mutated proteins assembled into large multimeric complexes and, compared to CFHR5, bound damaged human cell surfaces and properdin with greater intensity and exacerbated local complement activation. This enhanced surface binding and properdin recruitment was further evidenced in the mesangia of a transplanted and explanted kidney from a German patient with a CFHR2-CFHR5Hyb protein. Enhanced properdin staining correlated with local complement activation with C3b and C5b-9 deposition on the mesangial cell surface in vitro This gain of function in complement activation for two disease-associated CFHR5 mutants describes a new disease mechanism of C3G, which is relevant for defining appropriate treatment options for this disorder. PMID:26432903

  3. New Insights into Disease-Specific Absence of Complement Factor H Related Protein C in Mouse Models of Spontaneous Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Banda, Nirmal K.

    2014-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) protein is an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement (AP) both in the fluid phase and on the surface of host cells. Mouse and human complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins also belong to the fH family of plasma glycoproteins. The main goal of the current study was to compare the presence of mRNA for two mCFHR proteins in spontaneously developing autoimmune diseases in mice such as dense deposit disease (DDD), diabetes mellitus (DM), basal laminar deposits (BLD), collagen antibody-induced arthrits (CAIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report for the first time that the CFHR-C mRNA was universally absent in the liver from three strains of lupus-prone mice and in a diabetic-prone mouse strain. The mRNA levels (pg/ng) for CFH and CFHR-B in MRL-lpr/lpr, at 9 wks and 23 wks were 707.2 ± 44.4, 54.5 ± 5.75 and 729 ± 252.9, 74.04 ± 22.76 respectively. The mRNA levels for CFH and CFHR-B in NZB/NZW mice, at 9 wks and 54 wks were 579.9 ± 23.8, 58.8 ± 1.41 and 890.3 ± 135.2, 63.30 ± 9.2 respectively. CFHR-C protein was absent in the circulation of MRL-lpr/lpr and NZB/NZW mice before and after the development of lupus. Similarly, mRNA and protein for CFHR-C was universally absent in liver and other organs and in the circulation of NOD mice before and after the development of DM. In contrast, the mRNAs for CFH, CFHR-B and CFHR-C were universally present in the liver from mice with and without DDD, BLD and CAIA. The levels of mRNA for CFHR-B in mice with and without BLD were ~4 times higher than the mice with lupus. The complete absence of mRNA for CFHR-C in lupus and diabetic-prone strains indicates that polymorphic variation within the mouse CFHR family exists and raises the possibility that such variation contributes to lupus and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:25033230

  4. New insights into disease-specific absence of complement factor H related protein C in mouse models of spontaneous autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Gaurav; Ferreira, Viviana P; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Banda, Nirmal K

    2014-11-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) protein is an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement (AP) both in the fluid phase and on the surface of host cells. Mouse and human complement factor H-related (CFHR) proteins also belong to the fH family of plasma glycoproteins. The main goal of the current study was to compare the presence of mRNA for two mCFHR proteins in spontaneously developing autoimmune diseases in mice such as dense deposit disease (DDD), diabetes mellitus (DM), basal laminar deposits (BLD), collagen antibody-induced arthrits (CAIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report for the first time that the CFHR-C mRNA was universally absent in the liver from three strains of lupus-prone mice and in a diabetic-prone mouse strain. The mRNA levels (pg/ng) for CFH and CFHR-B in MRL-lpr/lpr, at 9 wks and 23 wks were 707.2±44.4, 54.5±5.75 and 729±252.9, 74.04±22.76, respectively. The mRNA levels for CFH and CFHR-B in NZB/NZW mice, at 9 wks and 54 wks were 579.9±23.8, 58.8±1.41 and 890.3±135.2, 63.30±9.2, respectively. CFHR-C protein was absent in the circulation of MRL-lpr/lpr and NZB/NZW mice before and after the development of lupus. Similarly, mRNA and protein for CFHR-C was universally absent in liver and other organs and in the circulation of NOD mice before and after the development of DM. In contrast, the mRNAs for CFH, CFHR-B and CFHR-C were universally present in the liver from mice with and without DDD, BLD and CAIA. The levels of mRNA for CFHR-B in mice with and without BLD were ∼4 times higher than the mice with lupus. The complete absence of mRNA for CFHR-C in lupus and diabetic-prone strains indicates that polymorphic variation within the mouse CFHR family exists and raises the possibility that such variation contributes to lupus and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:25033230

  5. Complement Factor H-Related Protein 3 Serum Levels Are Low Compared to Factor H and Mainly Determined by Gene Copy Number Variation in CFHR3

    PubMed Central

    Pouw, Richard B.; Brouwer, Mieke C.; Geissler, Judy; van Herpen, Laurens V.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Wuillemin, Walter A.; Wouters, Diana; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2016-01-01

    The major human complement regulator in blood, complement factor H (FH), has several closely related proteins, called FH-related (FHR) proteins. As all FHRs lack relevant complement regulatory activity, their physiological role is not well understood. FHR protein 3 (FHR-3) has been suggested to compete with FH for binding to Neisseria meningitidis, thereby affecting complement-mediated clearance. Clearly, the in vivo outcome of such competition greatly depends on the FH and FHR-3 concentrations. While FH levels have been established, accurate FHR-3 levels were never unequivocally reported to date. Moreover, CFHR3 gene copy numbers commonly vary, which may impact the FHR-3 concentration. Hence, we generated five anti-FHR-3 mAbs to specifically measure FHR-3 in human healthy donors of which we determined the gene copy number variation at the CFH/CFHR locus. Finally, we examined the acute-phase response characteristics of FHR-3 in a small sepsis cohort. We determined FHR-3 levels to have a mean of 19 nM and that under normal conditions the copy number of CFHR3 correlates to a very large extent with the FHR-3 serum levels. On average, FHR-3 was 132-fold lower compared to the FH concentration in the same serum samples and FHR-3 did not behave as a major acute phase response protein. PMID:27007437

  6. Complement Factor H-Related Protein 3 Serum Levels Are Low Compared to Factor H and Mainly Determined by Gene Copy Number Variation in CFHR3.

    PubMed

    Pouw, Richard B; Brouwer, Mieke C; Geissler, Judy; van Herpen, Laurens V; Zeerleder, Sacha S; Wuillemin, Walter A; Wouters, Diana; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-01-01

    The major human complement regulator in blood, complement factor H (FH), has several closely related proteins, called FH-related (FHR) proteins. As all FHRs lack relevant complement regulatory activity, their physiological role is not well understood. FHR protein 3 (FHR-3) has been suggested to compete with FH for binding to Neisseria meningitidis, thereby affecting complement-mediated clearance. Clearly, the in vivo outcome of such competition greatly depends on the FH and FHR-3 concentrations. While FH levels have been established, accurate FHR-3 levels were never unequivocally reported to date. Moreover, CFHR3 gene copy numbers commonly vary, which may impact the FHR-3 concentration. Hence, we generated five anti-FHR-3 mAbs to specifically measure FHR-3 in human healthy donors of which we determined the gene copy number variation at the CFH/CFHR locus. Finally, we examined the acute-phase response characteristics of FHR-3 in a small sepsis cohort. We determined FHR-3 levels to have a mean of 19 nM and that under normal conditions the copy number of CFHR3 correlates to a very large extent with the FHR-3 serum levels. On average, FHR-3 was 132-fold lower compared to the FH concentration in the same serum samples and FHR-3 did not behave as a major acute phase response protein. PMID:27007437

  7. Variants in Complement Factor H and Complement Factor H-Related Protein Genes, CFHR3 and CFHR1, Affect Complement Activation in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Zhai, Ya-Ling; Wang, Feng-Mei; Hou, Ping; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Xu, Da-Min; Shi, Su-Fang; Liu, Li-Jun; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Novak, Jan; Gharavi, Ali G; Zhang, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Complement activation is common in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and associated with disease severity. Our recent genome-wide association study of IgAN identified susceptibility loci on 1q32 containing the complement regulatory protein-encoding genes CFH and CFHR1-5, with rs6677604 in CFH as the top single-nucleotide polymorphism and CFHR3-1 deletion (CFHR3-1∆) as the top signal for copy number variation. In this study, to explore the clinical effects of variation in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 on IgAN susceptibility and progression, we enrolled two populations. Group 1 included 1178 subjects with IgAN and available genome-wide association study data. Group 2 included 365 subjects with IgAN and available clinical follow-up data. In group 1, rs6677604 was associated with mesangial C3 deposition by genotype-phenotype correlation analysis. In group 2, we detected a linkage between the rs6677604-A allele and CFHR3-1∆ and found that the rs6677604-A allele was associated with higher serum levels of CFH and lower levels of the complement activation split product C3a. Furthermore, CFH levels were positively associated with circulating C3 levels and negatively associated with mesangial C3 deposition. Moreover, serum levels of the pathogenic galactose-deficient glycoform of IgA1 were also associated with the degree of mesangial C3 deposition in patients with IgAN. Our findings suggest that genetic variants in CFH, CFHR3, and CFHR1 affect complement activation and thereby, predispose patients to develop IgAN. PMID:25205734

  8. Polymorphism of the human factor H-related gene (FHR-1) and of factor H in a West African individual

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, C.G.; Skerka, C.; Zipfel, P.F.

    1995-03-01

    The human factor H-related 1 (FHR-1) protein is structurally and immunogenically related to the regulatory complement protein factor H (FH). Polymorphism of the FHR-1 gene is indicated by the nucleotide differences as described by the five cDNA clones isolated so far. In order to further analyze this polymorphism we identified PCR-primers which allow the simultaneous amplification of FHR-1 and FH alleles in a single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By DNA sequence analysis, two novel FHR-1 variants and one as yet unrecognized FH allele could be characterized in an individual from Benin, West Africa. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  9. The major autoantibody epitope on factor H in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is structurally different from its homologous site in factor H-related protein 1, supporting a novel model for induction of autoimmunity in this disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Reuter, Stefanie; Trojnár, Eszter; Kolodziejczyk, Robert; Seeberger, Harald; Hyvärinen, Satu; Uzonyi, Barbara; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Prohászka, Zoltán; Goldman, Adrian; Józsi, Mihály; Jokiranta, T Sakari

    2015-04-10

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is characterized by complement attack against host cells due to mutations in complement proteins or autoantibodies against complement factor H (CFH). It is unknown why nearly all patients with autoimmune aHUS lack CFHR1 (CFH-related protein-1). These patients have autoantibodies against CFH domains 19 and 20 (CFH19-20), which are nearly identical to CFHR1 domains 4 and 5 (CFHR14-5). Here, binding site mapping of autoantibodies from 17 patients using mutant CFH19-20 constructs revealed an autoantibody epitope cluster within a loop on domain 20, next to the two buried residues that are different in CFH19-20 and CFHR14-5. The crystal structure of CFHR14-5 revealed a difference in conformation of the autoantigenic loop in the C-terminal domains of CFH and CFHR1, explaining the variation in binding of autoantibodies from some aHUS patients to CFH19-20 and CFHR14-5. The autoantigenic loop on CFH seems to be generally flexible, as its conformation in previously published structures of CFH19-20 bound to the microbial protein OspE and a sialic acid glycan is somewhat altered. Cumulatively, our data suggest that association of CFHR1 deficiency with autoimmune aHUS could be due to the structural difference between CFHR1 and the autoantigenic CFH epitope, suggesting a novel explanation for CFHR1 deficiency in the pathogenesis of autoimmune aHUS. PMID:25659429

  10. ATYPICAL HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME AND GENETIC ABERRATIONS IN THE COMPLEMENT FACTOR H RELATED 5 GENE

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Dineke; Vernon, Katherine A.; Volokhina, Elena B.; Pickering, Matthew C.; van de Kar, Nicole C.A.J.; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.

    2012-01-01

    Atypical HUS (aHUS) is a severe renal disorder that is associated with mutations in the genes encoding proteins of the complement alternative pathway. Previously, we identified pathogenic variations in genes encoding complement regulators (CFH, CFI, and MCP) in our aHUS cohort. In this study, we screened for mutations in the alternative pathway regulator CFHR5 in 65 aHUS patients by means of PCR on genomic DNA and sequence analysis. Potential pathogenicity of genetic alterations was determined by published data on CFHR5 variants, evolutionary conservation, and in silico mutation prediction programs. Detection of serum CFHR5 was performed by western blot analysis and ELISA. A potentially pathogenic sequence variation was found in CFHR5 in three patients (4.6%). All variations were located in SCRs that might be involved in binding to C3b, heparin, or CRP. The identified CFHR5 mutations require functional studies to determine their relevance to aHUS, but they might be candidates for an altered genetic profile predisposing to the disease. PMID:22622361

  11. Association of Genetic Variants in Complement Factor H and Factor H-Related Genes with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Wu, Hui; Khosravi, Melanie; Cui, Huijuan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Williams, Adrienne H.; Comeau, Mary E.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Marion, Miranda C.; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Jacob, Chaim O.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Moser, Kathy L.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Petri, Michelle A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Vilá, Luis M.; Reveille, John D.; James, Judith A.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Freedman, Barry I.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Merrill, Joan T.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Stevens, Anne M.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Park, Ji Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Boackle, Susan A.; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Cantor, Rita M.; Yu, Chack-Yung; Shen, Nan; Tsao, Betty P.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH) and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5) within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA), which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, Pmeta = 6.6×10−8, OR = 1.18) and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, Pmeta = 2.9×10−7, OR = 1.17) rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS). Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ∼146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ), a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (Pmeta = 3.2×10−7, OR = 1.47) conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (Pmeta = 3.5×10−4, OR = 1.14). These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of complement

  12. Association of genetic variants in complement factor H and factor H-related genes with systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Wu, Hui; Khosravi, Melanie; Cui, Huijuan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Langefeld, Carl D; Williams, Adrienne H; Comeau, Mary E; Ziegler, Julie T; Marion, Miranda C; Adler, Adam; Glenn, Stuart B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Harley, John B; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Jacob, Chaim O; Vyse, Timothy J; Niewold, Timothy B; Gaffney, Patrick M; Moser, Kathy L; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcon, Graciela S; Petri, Michelle A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Vilá, Luis M; Reveille, John D; James, Judith A; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Freedman, Barry I; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Merrill, Joan T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Scofield, R Hal; Stevens, Anne M; Guthridge, Joel M; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Park, Ji Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Boackle, Susan A; Grossman, Jennifer M; Hahn, Bevra H; Goodship, Timothy H J; Cantor, Rita M; Yu, Chack-Yung; Shen, Nan; Tsao, Betty P

    2011-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex polygenic autoimmune disease, is associated with increased complement activation. Variants of genes encoding complement regulator factor H (CFH) and five CFH-related proteins (CFHR1-CFHR5) within the chromosome 1q32 locus linked to SLE, have been associated with multiple human diseases and may contribute to dysregulated complement activation predisposing to SLE. We assessed 60 SNPs covering the CFH-CFHRs region for association with SLE in 15,864 case-control subjects derived from four ethnic groups. Significant allelic associations with SLE were detected in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA), which could be attributed to an intronic CFH SNP (rs6677604, in intron 11, P(meta) = 6.6×10(-8), OR = 1.18) and an intergenic SNP between CFHR1 and CFHR4 (rs16840639, P(meta) = 2.9×10(-7), OR = 1.17) rather than to previously identified disease-associated CFH exonic SNPs, including I62V, Y402H, A474A, and D936E. In addition, allelic association of rs6677604 with SLE was subsequently confirmed in Asians (AS). Haplotype analysis revealed that the underlying causal variant, tagged by rs6677604 and rs16840639, was localized to a ~146 kb block extending from intron 9 of CFH to downstream of CFHR1. Within this block, the deletion of CFHR3 and CFHR1 (CFHR3-1Δ), a likely causal variant measured using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, was tagged by rs6677604 in EA and AS and rs16840639 in AA, respectively. Deduced from genotypic associations of tag SNPs in EA, AA, and AS, homozygous deletion of CFHR3-1Δ (P(meta) = 3.2×10(-7), OR = 1.47) conferred a higher risk of SLE than heterozygous deletion (P(meta) = 3.5×10(-4), OR = 1.14). These results suggested that the CFHR3-1Δ deletion within the SLE-associated block, but not the previously described exonic SNPs of CFH, might contribute to the development of SLE in EA, AA, and AS, providing new insights into the role of

  13. A De Novo Deletion in the Regulators of Complement Activation Cluster Producing a Hybrid Complement Factor H/Complement Factor H-Related 3 Gene in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rachel C; Araujo, Geisilaine S R; Wong, Edwin K S; Anderson, Holly E; Awan, Atif; Dorman, Anthony M; Waldron, Mary; Wilson, Valerie; Brocklebank, Vicky; Strain, Lisa; Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L; Marchbank, Kevin J; Goodship, Timothy H J; Kavanagh, David

    2016-06-01

    The regulators of complement activation cluster at chromosome 1q32 contains the complement factor H (CFH) and five complement factor H-related (CFHR) genes. This area of the genome arose from several large genomic duplications, and these low-copy repeats can cause genome instability in this region. Genomic disorders affecting these genes have been described in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, arising commonly through nonallelic homologous recombination. We describe a novel CFH/CFHR3 hybrid gene secondary to a de novo 6.3-kb deletion that arose through microhomology-mediated end joining rather than nonallelic homologous recombination. We confirmed a transcript from this hybrid gene and showed a secreted protein product that lacks the recognition domain of factor H and exhibits impaired cell surface complement regulation. The fact that the formation of this hybrid gene arose as a de novo event suggests that this cluster is a dynamic area of the genome in which additional genomic disorders may arise. PMID:26490391

  14. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  15. DIETARY PROTEIN AND LACTOSE INCREASE TRANSLATION INITIATION FACTOR ACTIVATION AND TISSUE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN NEONATAL PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in muscle and liver of pigs parenterally infused with amino acids and insulin. To examine the effects of enteral protein and carbohydrate on protein synthesis, pigs (n = 42, 1.7 kg body wt) were fed isocaloric milk die...

  16. A Recommendation for Naming Transcription Factor Proteins in the Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription factors are central for the exquisite temporal and spatial expression patterns of many genes. These proteins are characterized by their ability to be tethered to particular regulatory sequences in the genes that they control. While many other proteins participate in the regulation of g...

  17. Controlling for Gene Expression Changes in Transcription Factor Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Lee, Zachary T.; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D.; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L.; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein–protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions. PMID:24722732

  18. Effect of dietary protein restriction on liver transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Marten, N W; Sladek, F M; Straus, D S

    1996-01-01

    The transcription of several genes that are preferentially expressed in the liver, including the serum albumin, transthyretin and carbamyl phosphate synthetase-I genes, is specifically decreased in animals consuming inadequate amounts of dietary protein. The high level of transcription of these genes in the liver is directed in part by a number of liver-enriched transcription factors, including hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1, -3, and -4, and proteins of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family. In the present study, we investigated the possibility that the co-ordinate decrease in transcription of the nutritionally sensitive genes in protein-deprived rats results from altered activity of one or more of the liver-enriched transcription factors. For HNF-4, Western blots indicated no change in the level of nuclear HNF-4 protein in liver of protein-deprived animals, whereas we observed a 40% reduction in the DNA binding activity of HNF-4 as measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Furthermore, the binding affinity of HNF-4 for DNA was unaltered by dietary protein deprivation, while the number of HNF-4 molecules able to bind to DNA (Bmax) was reduced, as determined by Scatchard analysis. This indicates that in the protein-restricted rats a portion of the pool of HNF-4 protein is inactivated or otherwise prevented from binding to DNA. The overall DNA binding activity of C/EBP alpha and beta was increased in protein-restricted animals. This change occurred in the absence of a change in the amount of the full-length forms of these two proteins, quantified by Western blotting. Interestingly, dietary protein restriction specifically increased the level of a truncated form of C/EBP beta (liver-enriched transcriptional inhibitory protein, LIP), which is a protein dominant negative inhibitor of C/EBP function. Analysis of HNF-3 DNA-binding activity by EMSA revealed that HNF-3 alpha and beta DNA binding was increased and that HNF-3 gamma DNA

  19. Cloning, expression and purification of the factor H binding protein and its interaction with factor H

    PubMed Central

    Yarian, Fatemeh; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Seyed, Negar; Kazemi, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of meningitis and sepsis worldwide. The factor H binding protein (fHBP) is a key virulence factor of Neisseria meningitidis that is able to selectively bind to human factor H, the key regulator of the alternative complement pathway, which it has important implications for meningococcal pathogenesis and vaccine design. The aims of present research were cloning, expression, purification of fHbp and confirmation of the interaction between serum factor H (fH) and produced factor H binding protein. Materials and Methods: A 820 base pairs fhbp gene fragment was amplified by PCR and cloned into expression vector pET28a (+) in Bam HI and SalI restriction enzymes sites. Recombinant DNA was expressed in BL21 (DE3) cell. fHBP protein was purified by Ni-NTA agarose resin. Coupling of recombinant protein into CNBr activated Sepharose 4B resin was carried out for application in serum fH protein purification. (fH-fHBP) interaction was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and far-western blotting. Results and Conclusions: SDS-PAGE results showed a 35 kDa protein band. 150 kDa fH protein was purified by designed Sepharose 4B resin. Far-western blotting confirmed (fH-fHBP) interaction and proper folding of factor H binding protein. PMID:27092222

  20. A Dominant Factor for Structural Classification of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei; Fudo, Satoshi; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2015-08-24

    With the increasing number of solved protein crystal structures, much information on protein shape and atom geometry has become available. It is of great interest to know the structural diversity for a single kind of protein. Our preliminary study suggested that multiple crystal structures of a single kind of protein can be classified into several groups from the viewpoint of structural similarity. In order to broadly examine this finding, cluster analysis was applied to the crystal structures of hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (Mb), human serum albumin (HSA), hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR), downloaded from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). As a result of classification by cluster analysis, 146 crystal structures of Hb were separated into five groups. The crystal structures of Mb (n = 284), HEWL (n = 336), HSA (n = 63), and HIV-1 PR (n = 488) were separated into six, five, three, and six groups, respectively. It was found that a major factor causing these structural separations is the space group of crystals and that crystallizing agents have an influence on the crystal structures. Amino acid mutation is a minor factor for the separation because no obvious point mutation making a specific cluster group was observed for the five kinds of proteins. In the classification of Hb and Mb, the species of protein source such as humans, rabbits, and mice is another significant factor. When the difference in amino sequence is large among species, the species of protein source is the primary factor causing cluster separation in the classification of crystal structures. PMID:26230289

  1. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aalt D. J.; Morabito, Giuseppa; Fiers, Martijn; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and network evolution. PMID

  2. The effects of whey protein on cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone

    2013-04-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The health consequences of obesity are more dangerous when associated with the metabolic syndrome and its components. Studies show that whey protein and its bioactive components can promote greater benefits compared to other protein sources such as egg and casein. The aim of this paper is to review the effects of whey protein on cardiometabolic risk factors. Using PubMed as the database, a review was conducted to identify current scientific literature on whey protein and the components of the metabolic syndrome published between 1970 and 2012. Consumption of whey protein seems to play an anti-obesity and muscle-protective role during dieting by increasing thermogenesis and maintaining lean mass. In addition, whey protein has been shown to improve glucose levels and insulin response, promote a reduction in blood pressure and arterial stiffness, and improve lipid profile. The collective view of current scientific literature indicates that the consumption of whey protein may have beneficial effects on some symptoms of the metabolic syndrome as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:23167434

  3. Cellular Actions of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, R. J.; Katz, L. E. L.; Grimberg, Adda; Cohen, P.; Weinzimer, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), and the IGFBP proteases are involved in the regulation of somatic growth and cellular proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. IGFs are potent mitogenic agents whose actions are determined by the availability of free IGFs to interact with the IGF receptors. IGFBPs comprise a family of proteins that bind IGFs with high affinity and specificity and thereby regulate IGF-dependent actions. IGFBPs have recently emerged as IGF-independent regulators of cell growth. Various IGFBP association proteins as well as cleavage of IGFBPs by specific proteases modulate levels of free IGFs and IGFBPs. The ubiquity and complexity of the IGF axis promise exciting discoveries and applications for the future. PMID:10226802

  4. Pharmacological manipulation of transcription factor protein-protein interactions: opportunities and obstacles.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Frank; Overman, Jeroen; François, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Much research on transcription factor biology and their genetic pathways has been undertaken over the last 30 years, especially in the field of developmental biology and cancer. Yet, very little is known about the molecular modalities of highly dynamic interactions between transcription factors, genomic DNA, and protein partners. Methodological breakthroughs such as RNA-seq (RNA-sequencing), ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing), RIME (rapid immunoprecipitation mass spectrometry of endogenous proteins), and single-molecule imaging will dramatically accelerate the discovery rate of their molecular mode of action in the next few years. From a pharmacological viewpoint, conventional methods used to target transcription factor activity with molecules mimicking endogenous ligands fail to achieve high specificity and are limited by a lack of identification of new molecular targets. Protein-protein interactions are likely to represent one of the next major classes of therapeutic targets. Transcription factors, known to act mostly via protein-protein interaction, may well be at the forefront of this type of drug development. One hurdle in this field remains the difficulty to collate structural data into meaningful information for rational drug design. Another hurdle is the lack of chemical libraries meeting the structural requirements of protein-protein interaction disruption. As more attempts at modulating transcription factor activity are undertaken, valuable knowledge will be accumulated on the modality of action required to modulate transcription and how these findings can be applied to developing transcription factor drugs. Key discoveries will spawn into new therapeutic approaches not only as anticancer targets but also for other indications, such as those with an inflammatory component including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and chronic liver and kidney diseases. PMID:25848531

  5. Regulation of the protein stability of EMT transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, VM; Viñas-Castells, R; García de Herreros, A

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) consists of a rapid change of cell phenotype, characterized by the loss of epithelial characteristics and the acquisition of a more invasive phenotype. Transcription factors regulating EMT (Snail, Twist and Zeb) are extremely labile proteins, rapidly degraded by the proteasome system. In this review we analyze the current mechanisms controlling degradation of EMT transcription factors, focusing on the role of new E3 ubiquitin-ligases involved in EMT. We also summarize the regulation of the stability of these EMT transcription factors, specially observed in different stress conditions, such as hypoxia, chemotherapeutic drugs, oxidative stress or γ-irradiation. PMID:25482633

  6. Delivery of neurotrophic factors and therapeutic proteins for retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Chris; Emerich, Dwaine

    2005-11-01

    Neurotrophic factors have the ability to protect and initiate growth of neurons. In the central nervous system, neurotrophic factors are neuroprotective in a wide range of disease states. Similarly, disease pathologies of the neurosensory retina respond favourably in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, glaucoma and others. With advances in drug delivery and cell therapy, an almost universal increase in efficacy is being realised. Now, repeated injections of neurotrophic factors are being replaced by controlled delivery of cell-mediated factor secretion, reducing the number of potential acute side effects. Tissue engineering strategies in conjunction with gene-modulated protein therapy or gene transfer are creating a unique treatment niche and are quickly gaining acclaim in the clinic. This review surveys the founding and current work on neurotrophic factors such as CNTF, BDNF, GDNF, LEDGF, PEDF and others. Ongoing clinical trials and successful preclinical studies are summarised as well. PMID:16255648

  7. Protein interactions of the transcription factor Hoxa1

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hox proteins are transcription factors involved in crucial processes during animal development. Their mode of action remains scantily documented. While other families of transcription factors, like Smad or Stat, are known cell signaling transducers, such a function has never been squarely addressed for Hox proteins. Results To investigate the mode of action of mammalian Hoxa1, we characterized its interactome by a systematic yeast two-hybrid screening against ~12,200 ORF-derived polypeptides. Fifty nine interactors were identified of which 45 could be confirmed by affinity co-purification in animal cell lines. Many Hoxa1 interactors are proteins involved in cell-signaling transduction, cell adhesion and vesicular trafficking. Forty-one interactions were detectable in live cells by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation which revealed distinctive intracellular patterns for these interactions consistent with the selective recruitment of Hoxa1 by subgroups of partner proteins at vesicular, cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Conclusions The characterization of the Hoxa1 interactome presented here suggests unexplored roles for Hox proteins in cell-to-cell communication and cell physiology. PMID:23088713

  8. Studies of the human factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein. III. Qualitative defects in von Willebrand's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gralnick, H R; Coller, B S; Sultan, Y

    1975-01-01

    The Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein was characterized in two unrelated patients with von Willebrand's disease in whom procoagulant and Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor antigen levels were normal. In both patients evidence of an abnormal protein was observed on crossed antigen-antibody electrophoresis. In one patient the Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein eluted from Sepharose 4B in a position and distribution identical to normal with normal levels of procoagulant activity and antigen. However, the partially purified Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein had markedly reduced von Willebrand factor activity in a ristocetin assay. In the second patient the peak of Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein, antigen, and procoagulant activity eluted from a Sepharose 4B column with an estimated molecular weight of approximately half that of normal. This protein had no von Willebrand factor activity. In both patients the reduced Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor protein subunit was indistinguishable from normal on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These studies indicate that in some patients with von Willebrand's disease there is a qualitative defect of the Factor VII/von Willebrand factor protein; the total amount of protein, antigen, and procoagulant activity are normal while the von Willebrand factor activity is deficient. Images PMID:1080491

  9. Interactions of signaling proteins, growth factors and other proteins with heparan sulfate: mechanisms and mysteries.

    PubMed

    Billings, Paul C; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans (HSPGs) that, collectively, play crucial roles in many physiologic processes including cell differentiation, organ morphogenesis and cancer. A key function of HS is to bind and interact with signaling proteins, growth factors, plasma proteins, immune-modulators and other factors. In doing so, the HS chains and HSPGs are able to regulate protein distribution, bio-availability and action on target cells and can also serve as cell surface co-receptors, facilitating ligand-receptor interactions. These proteins contain an HS/heparin-binding domain (HBD) that mediates their association and contacts with HS. HBDs are highly diverse in sequence and predicted structure, contain clusters of basic amino acids (Lys and Arg) and possess an overall net positive charge, most often within a consensus Cardin-Weintraub (CW) motif. Interestingly, other domains and residues are now known to influence protein-HS interactions, as well as interactions with other glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate. In this review, we provide a description and analysis of HBDs in proteins including amphiregulin, fibroblast growth factor family members, heparanase, sclerostin and hedgehog protein family members. We discuss HBD structural and functional features and important roles carried out by other protein domains, and also provide novel conformational insights into the diversity of CW motifs present in Sonic, Indian and Desert hedgehogs. Finally, we review progress in understanding the pathogenesis of a rare pediatric skeletal disorder, Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME), characterized by HS deficiency and cartilage tumor formation. Advances in understanding protein-HS interactions will have broad implications for basic biology and translational medicine as well as for the development of HS-based therapeutics. PMID:26076122

  10. Interplay between trigger factor and other protein biogenesis factors on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Thomas; Holtkamp, Wolf; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Nascent proteins emerging from translating ribosomes in bacteria are screened by a number of ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors, among them the chaperone trigger factor (TF), the signal recognition particle (SRP) that targets ribosomes synthesizing membrane proteins to the membrane and the modifying enzymes, peptide deformylase (PDF) and methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). Here, we examine the interplay between these factors both kinetically and at equilibrium. TF rapidly scans the ribosomes until it is stabilized on ribosomes presenting TF-specific nascent chains. SRP binding to those complexes is strongly impaired. Thus, TF in effect prevents SRP binding to the majority of ribosomes, except those presenting SRP-specific signal sequences, explaining how the small amount of SRP in the cell can be effective in membrane targeting. PDF and MAP do not interfere with TF or SRP binding to translating ribosomes, indicating that nascent-chain processing can take place before or in parallel with TF or SRP binding.

  11. Targeted genes and interacting proteins of hypoxia inducible factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shen, Shao-Ming; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) functions as a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis in almost all nucleated mammalian cells. The fundamental process adapted to cellular oxygen alteration largely depends on the refined regulation on its alpha subunit, HIF-1α. Recent studies have unraveled expanding and critical roles of HIF-1α, involving in a multitude of developmental, physiological, and pathophysiological processes. This review will focus on the current knowledge of HIF-1α-targeting genes and its interacting proteins, as well as the concomitant functional relationships between them. PMID:22773957

  12. Minimalistic predictor of protein binding energy: contribution of solvation factor to protein binding.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Mo; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Murphy, Sean; Lucarelli, Dennis; Lofranco, Leo L; Feldman, Andrew; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-02-17

    It has long been known that solvation plays an important role in protein-protein interactions. Here, we use a minimalistic solvation-based model for predicting protein binding energy to estimate quantitatively the contribution of the solvation factor in protein binding. The factor is described by a simple linear combination of buried surface areas according to amino-acid types. Even without structural optimization, our minimalistic model demonstrates a predictive power comparable to more complex methods, making the proposed approach the basis for high throughput applications. Application of the model to a proteomic database shows that receptor-substrate complexes involved in signaling have lower affinities than enzyme-inhibitor and antibody-antigen complexes, and they differ by chemical compositions on interfaces. Also, we found that protein complexes with components that come from the same genes generally have lower affinities than complexes formed by proteins from different genes, but in this case the difference originates from different interface areas. The model was implemented in the software PYTHON, and the source code can be found on the Shakhnovich group webpage: http://faculty.chemistry.harvard.edu/shakhnovich/software. PMID:25692584

  13. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed

    Tanford, C

    1997-06-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  14. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  15. Autotransporter passenger proteins: virulence factors with common structural themes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kaoru; Tajima, Nami; Yoon, Young-Ho; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2010-05-01

    Autotransporter proteins are virulence factors associated with a wide variety of diseases caused by pathogenic gram-negative bacteria, and they play a variety of roles in pathogenesis including disabling host defences and mediating colonization. Pertactin, a key component of the whooping cough vaccine, is an autotransporter protein. A large sub-family of the autotransporters carries a trypsin-like protease domain, but these enzymes have different substrates and functions. The unique export process which defines the autotransporter family involves the polypeptide chain C-terminus forming a barrel structure in the bacterial outer membrane, but the role of this barrel in secreting of the N-terminal 'passenger' domain remains very unclear. There are now four published crystal structures of passenger proteins or fragments of them. We have compared these models to catalogue common features and to help predict the structures and functions of other autotransporter proteins such as SepA, which is involved in the pathogenicity of Shigella. PMID:20217035

  16. Effective protein-protein interaction from structure factor data of a lysozyme solution

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, M. C.; Caccamo, C.; Costa, D.; Ruberto, R.; Wanderlingh, U.; Cavero, M.; Pellicane, G.

    2013-08-07

    We report the determination of an effective protein-protein central potential for a lysozyme solution, obtained from the direct inversion of the total structure factor of the system, as extracted from small angle neutron scattering. The inversion scheme rests on a hypernetted-chain relationship between the effective potential and the structural functions, and is preliminarily tested for the case of a Lennard-Jones interaction. The characteristics of our potential are discussed in comparison with current models of effective interactions in complex fluids. The phase behavior predictions are also investigated.

  17. Cell ``vision'': complementary factor of protein corona in nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Saeedi-Eslami, Seyyed N.; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Hassanlou, Maryam; Kalhor, Hamid R.; Burtea, Carmen; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Laurent, Sophie; Sheibani, Sara; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are increasingly being considered for use as biosensors, imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles. Their versatility in design and applications make them an attractive proposition for new biological and biomedical approaches. Despite the remarkable speed of development in nanoscience, relatively little is known about the interaction of nanoscale objects with living systems. In a biological fluid, proteins associate with nanoparticles, and the amount and the presentation of the proteins on their surface could lead to a different in vivo response than an uncoated particle. Here, in addition to protein adsorption, we are going to introduce concept of cell ``vision'', which would be recognized as another crucial factor that should be considered for the safe design of any type of nanoparticles that will be used in specific biomedical applications. The impact of exactly the same nanoparticles on various cells is significantly different and could not be assumed for other cells; the possible mechanisms that justify this cellular response relate to the numerous detoxification strategies that any particular cell can utilize in response to nanoparticles. The uptake and defence mechanism could be considerably different according to the cell type. Thus, what the cell ``sees'', when it is faced with nanoparticles, is most likely dependent on the cell type.Engineered nanoparticles are increasingly being considered for use as biosensors, imaging agents and drug delivery vehicles. Their versatility in design and applications make them an attractive proposition for new biological and biomedical approaches. Despite the remarkable speed of development in nanoscience, relatively little is known about the interaction of nanoscale objects with living systems. In a biological fluid, proteins associate with nanoparticles, and the amount and the presentation of the proteins on their surface could lead to a different in vivo response than an uncoated particle. Here

  18. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Sarah N; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R; Darling, April; Dickey, Chad A

    2015-05-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer's disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  19. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Sarah N.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R.; Darling, April

    2015-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  20. Lengths of Orthologous Prokaryotic Proteins Are Affected by Evolutionary Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Dien Bard, Jennifer; Cohen, Irit

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the same functional family (for example, kinases) may have significantly different lengths. It is an open question whether such variation in length is random or it appears as a response to some unknown evolutionary driving factors. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate existence of factors affecting prokaryotic gene lengths. We believe that the ranking of genomes according to lengths of their genes, followed by the calculation of coefficients of association between genome rank and genome property, is a reasonable approach in revealing such evolutionary driving factors. As we demonstrated earlier, our chosen approach, Bubble-sort, combines stability, accuracy, and computational efficiency as compared to other ranking methods. Application of Bubble Sort to the set of 1390 prokaryotic genomes confirmed that genes of Archaeal species are generally shorter than Bacterial ones. We observed that gene lengths are affected by various factors: within each domain, different phyla have preferences for short or long genes; thermophiles tend to have shorter genes than the soil-dwellers; halophiles tend to have longer genes. We also found that species with overrepresentation of cytosines and guanines in the third position of the codon (GC3 content) tend to have longer genes than species with low GC3 content. PMID:26114113

  1. Werner syndrome protein positively regulates XRCC4-like factor transcription

    PubMed Central

    LIU, DONGYUN; DENG, XIAOLI; YUAN, CHONGZHEN; CHEN, LIN; CONG, YUSHENG; XU, XINGZHI

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF) is involved in non-homologous end joining-mediated repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mutations in the WRN gene results in the development of Werner syndrome (WS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature ageing and genome instability. In the present study, it was identified that XLF protein levels were lower in WRN-deficient fibroblasts, compared with normal fibroblasts. Depletion of WRN in HeLa cells led to a decrease of XLF mRNA and its promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that WRN was associated with the XLF promoter. Depletion of XLF in normal human fibroblasts increased the percentage of β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining-positive cells, indicating acceleration in cellular senescence. Taken together, the results suggest that XLF is a transcriptional target of WRN and may be involved in the regulation of cellular senescence. PMID:24626809

  2. RNA-Binding Proteins: Splicing Factors and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Alger M.; Cygan, Kamil J.; Brown, Brian A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by interactions of the Core Spliceosome and an array of accessory RNA binding proteins with cis-sequence elements. Splicing is a major regulatory component in higher eukaryotes. Disruptions in splicing are a major contributor to human disease. One in three hereditary disease alleles are believed to cause aberrant splicing. Hereditary disease alleles can alter splicing by disrupting a splicing element, creating a toxic RNA, or affecting splicing factors. One of the challenges of medical genetics is identifying causal variants from the thousands of possibilities discovered in a clinical sequencing experiment. Here we review the basic biochemistry of splicing, the mechanisms of splicing mutations, the methods for identifying splicing mutants, and the potential of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25985083

  3. Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B bivalent factor H binding protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Brendish, Nathan James; Read, Robert Charles

    2015-04-01

    With the successful development of meningococcal vaccines against other serogroups, disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B now accounts for a disproportionate frequency compared with other serogroups, particularly in the US and Europe. Infants and adolescents bear the highest incidence of disease, which typically manifests as meningitis and septicemia. This vaccine profile article examines a bivalent factor H binding protein (fHbp; also known as LP2086) vaccine that has now been approved by the US FDA for use in 10- to 25-year olds. The manufacturer has shelved plans for further investigation of its use in infants because of high rates of fever in Phase I and II trials in that age group. PMID:25703792

  4. The latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein (LTBP) family.

    PubMed Central

    Oklü, R; Hesketh, R

    2000-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) cytokines are a multi-functional family that exert a wide variety of effects on both normal and transformed mammalian cells. The secretion and activation of TGFbetas is regulated by their association with latency-associated proteins and latent TGFbeta binding proteins (LTBPs). Over the past few years, three members of the LTBP family have been identified, in addition to the protoype LTBP1 first sequenced in 1990. Three of the LTBP family are expressed in a variety of isoforms as a consequence of alternative splicing. This review summarizes the differences between the isoforms in terms of the effects on domain structure and hence possible function. The close identity between LTBPs and members of the fibrillin family, mutations in which have been linked directly to Marfan's syndrome, suggests that anomalous expression of LTBPs may be associated with disease. Recent data indicating that differential expression of LTBP1 isoforms occurs during the development of coronary heart disease is considered, together with evidence that modulation of LTBP function, and hence of TGFbeta activity, is associated with a variety of cancers. PMID:11104663

  5. STEROIDOGENIC FACTOR-1 IS A SPHINGOLIPID BINDING PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Aarti N.; Dammer, Eric; Kelly, Samuel; Wang, Elaine; Merrill, Alfred H.; Sewer, Marion B.

    2007-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor (SF1, NR5A1, Ad4BP) is an orphan nuclear receptor that is essential for steroid hormone-biosynthesis and endocrine development. Studies have found that the ability of this receptor to increase target gene expression can be regulated by post-translational modification, subnuclear localization, and protein-protein interactions. Recent crystallographic studies and our mass spectrometric analyses of the endogenous receptor have demonstrated an integral role for ligand-binding in the control of SF1 transactivation activity. Herein, we discuss our findings that sphingosine is an endogenous ligand for SF1. These studies and the structural findings of others have demonstrated that the receptor can bind both sphingolipids and phospholipids. Thus, it is likely that multiple bioactive lipids are ligands for SF1 and that these lipids will differentially act to control SF1 activity in a context-dependent manner. Finally, these findings highlight a central role for bioactive lipids as mediators of trophic-hormone stimulated steroid hormone biosynthesis. PMID:17196738

  6. Evolutionary Dynamics of Floral Homeotic Transcription Factor Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Madelaine; Thompson, Beth; Brabazon, Holly; Del Gizzi, Robert; Zhang, Thompson; Whipple, Clinton

    2016-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have widely acknowledged roles in the regulation of development, but few studies have addressed the timing and mechanism of shifting PPIs over evolutionary history. The B-class MADS-box transcription factors, PISTILLATA (PI) and APETALA3 (AP3) are key regulators of floral development. PI-like (PI(L)) and AP3-like (AP3(L)) proteins from a number of plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and the grass Zea mays (maize), bind DNA as obligate heterodimers. However, a PI(L) protein from the grass relative Joinvillea can bind DNA as a homodimer. To ascertain whether Joinvillea PI(L) homodimerization is an anomaly or indicative of broader trends, we characterized PI(L) dimerization across the Poales and uncovered unexpected evolutionary lability. Both obligate B-class heterodimerization and PI(L) homodimerization have evolved multiple times in the order, by distinct molecular mechanisms. For example, obligate B-class heterodimerization in maize evolved very recently from PI(L) homodimerization. A single amino acid change, fixed during domestication, is sufficient to toggle one maize PI(L) protein between homodimerization and obligate heterodimerization. We detected a signature of positive selection acting on residues preferentially clustered in predicted sites of contact between MADS-box monomers and dimers, and in motifs that mediate MADS PPI specificity in Arabidopsis. Changing one positively selected residue can alter PI(L) dimerization activity. Furthermore, ectopic expression of a Joinvillea PI(L) homodimer in Arabidopsis can homeotically transform sepals into petals. Our results provide a window into the evolutionary remodeling of PPIs, and show that novel interactions have the potential to alter plant form in a context-dependent manner. PMID:26908583

  7. The Neuroprotective Functions of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Vincze, Csilla; Pál, Gabriella; Lovas, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) proteins are multifunctional cytokines whose neural functions are increasingly recognized. The machinery of TGF-β signaling, including the serine kinase type transmembrane receptors, is present in the central nervous system. However, the 3 mammalian TGF-β subtypes have distinct distributions in the brain suggesting different neural functions. Evidence of their involvement in the development and plasticity of the nervous system as well as their functions in peripheral organs suggested that they also exhibit neuroprotective functions. Indeed, TGF-β expression is induced following a variety of types of brain tissue injury. The neuroprotective function of TGF-βs is most established following brain ischemia. Damage in experimental animal models of global and focal ischemia was shown to be attenuated by TGF-βs. In addition, support for their neuroprotective actions following trauma, sclerosis multiplex, neurodegenerative diseases, infections, and brain tumors is also accumulating. The review will also describe the potential mechanisms of neuroprotection exerted by TGF-βs including anti-inflammatory, -apoptotic, -excitotoxic actions as well as the promotion of scar formation, angiogenesis, and neuroregeneration. The participation of these mechanisms in the neuroprotective effects of TGF-βs during different brain lesions will also be discussed. PMID:22942700

  8. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3: insulin-like growth factor-1 binding protein-3, insulin-like growth factor-1 carrier protein.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 [insulin-like growth factor-1 binding protein-3, SomatoKine] is a recombinant complex of insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) and binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which is the major circulating somatomedin (insulin-like growth factor) binding protein; binding protein-3 regulates the delivery of somatomedin-1 to target tissues. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 has potential as replacement therapy for somatomedin-1 which may become depleted in indications such as major surgery, organ damage/failure and traumatic injury, resulting in catabolism. It also has potential for the treatment of osteoporosis; diseases associated with protein wasting including chronic renal failure, cachexia and severe trauma; and to attenuate cardiac dysfunction in a variety of disease states, including after severe burn trauma. Combined therapy with somatomedin-1 and somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 would prolong the duration of action of somatomedin-1 and would reduce or eliminate some of the undesirable effects associated with somatomedin-1 monotherapy. Somatomedin-1 is usually linked to binding protein-3 in the normal state of the body, and particular proteases clip them apart in response to stresses and release somatomedin-1 as needed. Therefore, somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 is a self-dosing system and SomatoKine would augment the natural supply of these linked compounds. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 was developed by Celtrix using its proprietary recombinant protein production technology. Subsequently, Celtrix was acquired by Insmed Pharmaceuticals on June 1 2000. Insmed and Avecia, UK, have signed an agreement for the manufacturing of SomatoKine and its components, IGF-1 and binding protein-3. CGMP clinical production of SomatoKine and its components will be done in Avecia's Advanced Biologics Centre, Billingham, UK, which manufactures recombinant-based medicines and vaccines with a capacity of up to 1000 litres. In 2003, manufacturing of SomatoKine is

  9. Hepatitis B virus X protein activates transcription factor NF-kappa B without a requirement for protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Lucito, R; Schneider, R J

    1992-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus X protein stimulates transcription from a variety of promoter elements, including those activated by transcription factor NF-kappa B. A diverse group of extra- and intracellular agents, including growth factors and the human immunodeficiency virus tat protein, have been shown to require a functional protein kinase C (PKC) system to achieve activation of NF-kappa B. In this study we have investigated the molecular mechanism by which X protein activates NF-kappa B. We demonstrate that in hepatocytes, X protein induces a maximal activation of NF-kappa B corresponding to the sequestered pool of factor, which is also activated by phorbol esters. To determine whether X protein requires activation of PKC to stimulate transcription by NF-kappa B, we attempted to prevent transactivation by X protein in the presence of the PKC inhibitors calphostin C and H7. We show that PKC inhibitors do not block X protein activation of NF-kappa B, whereas they largely impair activation by phorbol esters. In addition, activation of PKC is correlated with its translocation from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. The subcellular distribution of PKC was investigated by introducing X protein from a replication-defective adenovirus vector, followed by immunochemical detection of PKC in cell fractions. These data also indicate that X protein stimulates transcription by NF-kappa B without the activation and translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1309924

  10. Impact of antinutritional factors in food proteins on the digestibility of protein and the bioavailability of amino acids and on protein quality.

    PubMed

    Sarwar Gilani, G; Wu Xiao, Chao; Cockell, Kevin A

    2012-08-01

    Dietary antinutritional factors have been reported to adversely affect the digestibility of protein, bioavailability of amino acids and protein quality of foods. Published data on these negative effects of major dietary antinutritional factors are summarized in this manuscript. Digestibility and the quality of mixed diets in developing countries are considerably lower than of those in developed regions. For example, the digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94 %). Poor digestibility of protein in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, is due to the presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fibre, and/or high concentrations of antinutritional factors present endogenously or formed during processing. Examples of naturally occurring antinutritional factors include glucosinolates in mustard and canola protein products, trypsin inhibitors and haemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, gossypol in cottonseed protein products, and uricogenic nucleobases in yeast protein products. Heat/alkaline treatments of protein products may yield Maillard reaction compounds, oxidized forms of sulphur amino acids, D-amino acids and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural nephrotoxic amino acid derivative). Among common food and feed protein products, soyabeans are the most concentrated source of trypsin inhibitors. The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soyabeans, kidney beans or other grain legumes have been reported to cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibility (up to 50 %) and protein quality (up to 100 %) in rats and/or pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in sorghum and other cereals, fababean and other grain legumes can cause

  11. Antigenicity of Recombinant Maltose Binding Protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Fusion Proteins with and without Factor Xa Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Bannantine, John P.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such proteins are hypothesized to be expressed in vivo, are recognized by the host immune system, and may be of potential use in the diagnosis of JD. In this study, 50 recombinant maltose binding protein (MBP)-M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins were evaluated using serum samples from sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 29 (58%) were found to be antigenic. Among 50 fusion proteins, 10 were evaluated in MBP fusion and factor Xa-cleaved forms. A total of 31 proteins (62%) were found to be antigenic in either MBP fusion or factor Xa-cleaved forms. Antigenicity after cleavage and removal of the MBP tag was marginally enhanced. PMID:24132604

  12. Transcription factors, chromatin proteins and the diversification of Hemiptera.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Newton M; Grazziotin, Ana Laura; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L; Venancio, Thiago M

    2016-02-01

    Availability of complete genomes provides a means to explore the evolution of enormous developmental, morphological, and behavioral diversity among insects. Hemipterans in particular show great diversity of both morphology and life history within a single order. To better understand the role of transcription regulators in the diversification of hemipterans, using sequence profile searches and hidden Markov models we computationally analyzed transcription factors (TFs) and chromatin proteins (CPs) in the recently available Rhodnius prolixus genome along with 13 other insect and 4 non-insect arthropod genomes. We generated a comprehensive collection of TFs and CPs across arthropods including 303 distinct types of domains in TFs and 139 in CPs. This, along with the availability of two hemipteran genomes, R. prolixus and Acyrthosiphon pisum, helped us identify possible determinants for their dramatic morphological and behavioral divergence. We identified five domain families (i.e. Pipsqueak, SAZ/MADF, THAP, FLYWCH and BED finger) as having undergone differential patterns of lineage-specific expansion in hemipterans or within hemipterans relative to other insects. These expansions appear to be at least in part driven by transposons, with the DNA-binding domains of transposases having provided the raw material for emergence of new TFs. Our analysis suggests that while R. prolixus probably retains a state closer to the ancestral hemipteran, A. pisum represents a highly derived state, with the emergence of asexual reproduction potentially favoring genome duplication and transposon expansion. Both hemipterans are predicted to possess active DNA methylation systems. However, in the course of their divergence, aphids seem to have expanded the ancestral hemipteran DNA methylation along with a distinctive linkage to the histone methylation system, as suggested by expansion of SET domain methylases, including those fused to methylated CpG recognition domains. Thus

  13. Frequency Factors in a Landscape Model of Filamentous Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buell, Alexander K.; Jamie R. Blundell; Dobson, Christopher M.; Welland, Mark E.; Terentjev, Eugene M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2010-06-01

    Using quantitative measurements of protein aggregation rates, we develop a kinetic picture of protein conversion from a soluble to a fibrillar state which shows that a single free energy barrier to aggregation controls the addition of protein molecules into amyloid fibrils, while the characteristic sublinear concentration dependence emerges as a natural consequence of finite diffusion times. These findings suggest that this reaction does not follow a simple chemical mechanism, but rather operates in a way analogous to the landscape models of protein folding defined by stochastic dynamics on a characteristic energy surface.

  14. Screening Bicyclic Peptide Libraries for Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors: Discovery of a Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Curran A.; Liu, Yusen; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions represent a new class of exciting but challenging drug targets, because their large, flat binding sites lack well defined pockets for small molecules to bind. We report here a methodology for chemical synthesis and screening of large combinatorial libraries of bicyclic peptides displayed on rigid small-molecule scaffolds. With planar trimesic acid as the scaffold, the resulting bicyclic peptides are effective for binding to protein surfaces such as the interfaces of protein-protein interactions. Screening of a bicyclic peptide library against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) identified a potent antagonist that inhibits the TNFα-TNFα receptor interaction and protects cells from TNFα-induced cell death. Bicyclic peptides of this type may provide a general solution for inhibition of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23865589

  15. Screening for Host Factors Directly Interacting with RSV Protein: Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Avrahami, Dorit; Bajorek, Monika; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-throughput microfluidics platform to identify novel host cell binding partners of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) matrix (M) protein. The device consists of thousands of reaction chambers controlled by micro-mechanical valves. The microfluidic device is mated to a microarray-printed custom-made gene library. These genes are then transcribed and translated on-chip, resulting in a protein array ready for binding to RSV M protein.Even small viral proteome, such as that of RSV, presents a challenge due to the fact that viral proteins are usually multifunctional and thus their interaction with the host is complex. Protein microarrays technology allows the interrogation of protein-protein interactions, which could possibly overcome obstacles by using conventional high throughput methods. Using microfluidics platform we have identified new host interactors of M involved in various cellular pathways. A number of microfluidics based assays have already provided novel insights into the virus-host interactome, and the results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of viral protein interactions with the host. PMID:27464694

  16. Effects of antinutritional factors on protein digestibility and amino acid availability in foods.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Cockell, Kevin A; Sepehr, Estatira

    2005-01-01

    Digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala, and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94%). The presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fiber, and high concentrations of antinutritional factors in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, are responsible for poor digestibility of protein. The effects of the presence of some of the important antinutritional factors on protein and amino digestibilities of food and feed products are reviewed in this chapter. Food and feed products may contain a number of antinutritional factors that may adversely affect protein digestibility and amino acid availability. Antinutritional factors may occur naturally, such as glucosinolates in mustard and rapeseed protein products, trypsin inhibitors and hemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, phytates in cereals and oilseeds, and gossypol in cottonseed protein products. Antinutritional factors may also be formed during heat/alkaline processing of protein products, yielding Maillard compounds, oxidized forms of sulfur amino acids, D-amino acids, and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural amino acid derivative). The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soybeans, kidney beans, or other grain legumes can cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 50%) in rats and pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in cereals, such as sorghum, and grain legumes, such as fababean (Vicia faba L.), can result in significantly reduced protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 23%) in rats, poultry, and pigs. Studies involving phytase supplementation of production rations for swine or poultry have provided indirect evidence that normally encountered levels of phytates in cereals and legumes

  17. Biological Variations of Lupus Anticoagulant, Antithrombin, Protein C, Protein S, and von Willebrand Factor Assays.

    PubMed

    Shou, Weiling; Chen, Qian; Wu, Wei; Cui, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The results of lupus anticoagulant (LA), antithrombin (AT), protein C (PC), and protein S (PS) testing, and the values of von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) are important in diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of thrombosis and hemostasis diseases. Till now, no published study has focused on the biological variations in LA testing, and only a few studies have examined the biological variations of AT, PC, PS, and VWF:Ag. With the latest fully automated instruments and improved reagents, the analytical, within-subject, and between-subject biological variations were estimated for these five coagulant parameters in a cohort of 25 apparently healthy subjects. Blood specimens were collected at 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5. The analytical biological variation (CV(A)) values of all the parameters were less than 3%. The within-subject biological variation (CV(W)) and between-subject biological variation (CV(G)) values of the LA normalized ratio were 4.64 and 6.83%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the intraday and interday biological variations of LA tests, or in AT, PC, PS, and VWF:Ag values. Additionally, the utility of the conventional population-based reference intervals of the five coagulation parameters was evaluated by the index of individuality, and data on CV(W) and CV(A) were used to calculate the reference change value to identify the significance of changes in serial results from the same individual. PMID:26516946

  18. Mitochondrial Inhibitory Factor Protein 1 Functions as an Endogenous Inhibitor for Coupling Factor 6.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Misato; Osanai, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Magota, Koji; Tomita, Hirofumi; Okumura, Ken

    2016-07-01

    Coupling factor 6 (CF6) forces a counter-clockwise rotation of plasma membrane F1 Fo complex unlike a proton-mediated clockwise rotation in the mitochondria, resulting in ATP hydrolysis, proton import, and apoptosis. Inhibitory peptide 1 (IF1) inhibits a unidirectional counter-clockwise rotation of F1 Fo complex without affecting ATP synthesis by a clockwise rotation. We tested the hypothesis that IF1 may antagonize the biological action of CF6 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. We generated mature and immature IF1 expression vectors and those labeled with GFP at the C-terminus. In the immature IF1-GFP overexpressing cells, the mitochondrial network of IF1-GFP was newly found at the plasma membrane after peripheral translocation, whereas in mature IF1-GFP transfected cells, a less punctuate rather homogenous pattern was found in the cytoplasm. IF1 protein was detected in the exosome fraction of culture media, and it was enhanced by mature or immature IF1 transfection. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis was enhanced by CF6, whereas immature or mature IF1 transfection suppressed ATP hydrolysis in response to CF6. Intracellular pH was decreased by CF6 but was unchanged after immature IF1 transfection. CF6-induced increase in apoptotic cells was blocked by immature or mature IF1, being accompanied by protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation. IF1 antagonizes the pro-apoptotic action of CF6 by relief of intracellular acidification and resultant phosphorylation of PKB. Given the widespread biological actions of CF6, the physiological and pathological functions of IF1 may be expected to be complex. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1680-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659871

  19. Patagonfibrase modifies protein expression of tissue factor and protein disulfide isomerase in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María Elisa; Santoro, Marcelo Larami

    2016-09-01

    Patagonfibrase is a hemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from the venom of the South American rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and is an important contributor to local lesions inflicted by this species. The tissue factor (TF)-factor VIIa complex, besides triggering the coagulation cascade, has been demonstrated to be involved in inflammatory events. Our aim was to determine whether patagonfibrase affects the expression of TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme that controls TF biological activity, at the site of patagonfibrase injection, and thus if they may play a role in hemostatic and inflammatory events induced by snake venoms. Patagonfibrase (60 μg/kg) was administered s.c. to rats, and after 3 h blood was collected to evaluate hemostasis parameters, and skin fragments close to the site of injection were taken to assess TF and PDI expression. Patagonfibrase did not alter blood cell counts, plasma fibrinogen levels, or levels of TF activity in plasma. However, by semiquantitative Western blotting, patagonfibrase increased TF expression by 2-fold, and decreased PDI expression by 3-fold in skin samples. In agreement, by immunohistochemical analyses, prominent TF expression was observed in the subcutaneous tissue. Thus, patagonfibrase affects the local expression of TF and PDI without inducing any systemic hemostatic disturbance, although that they may be involved in the local inflammatory events induced by hemorrhagic metalloproteinases. Once antivenom therapy is not totally effective to treat the local injury induced by snake venoms, modulation of the activity and expression of TF and/or PDI might become a strategy for treating snake envenomation. PMID:27390042

  20. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  1. Soluble expression and stability enhancement of transcription factors using 30Kc19 cell-penetrating protein.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jina; Park, Hee Ho; Park, Ju Hyun; Lee, Hong Jai; Rhee, Won Jong; Park, Tai Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Transcription factors have been studied as an important drug candidate. Ever since the successful generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), there has been tremendous interest in reprogramming transcription factors. Because of the safety risks involved in a virus-based approach, many researchers have been trying to deliver transcription factors using nonintegrating materials. Thus, delivery of transcription factors produced as recombinant proteins in E. coli was proposed as an alternative method. However, the low level of soluble expression and instability of such recombinant proteins are potential barriers. We engineered a Bombyx mori 30Kc19 protein as a fusion partner for transcription factors to overcome those problems. We have previously reported that 30Kc19 protein can be produced as a soluble form in E. coli and has a cell-penetrating property and a protein-stabilizing effect. Transcription factors fused with 30Kc19 (Oct4-30Kc19, Sox2-30Kc19, c-Myc-30Kc19, L-Myc-30Kc19, and Klf4-30Kc19) were produced as recombinant proteins. Interestingly, Oct4 and L-Myc were expressed as a soluble form by conjugating with 30Kc19 protein, whereas Oct4 alone and L-Myc alone aggregated. The 30Kc19 protein also enhanced the stability of transcription factors both in vitro and in cells. In addition, 30Kc19-conjugated transcription factors showed rapid delivery into cells and transcriptional activity significantly increased. Overall, 30Kc19 protein conjugation simultaneously enhanced soluble expression, stability, and transcriptional activity of transcription factors. We propose that the conjugation with 30Kc19 protein is a novel approach to solve the technical bottleneck of gene regulation using transcription factors. PMID:26668030

  2. Detection and properties of A-factor-binding protein from Streptomyces griseus

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, K.; Horinouchi, S.; Yoshida, M.; Chiba, N.; Mori, K.; Nogawa, N.; Morikawa, N.; Beppu, T. )

    1989-08-01

    The optically active form of tritium-labeled A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone), a pleiotropic autoregulator responsible for streptomycin production, streptomycin resistance, and sporulation in Streptomyces griseus, was chemically synthesized. By using the radioactive A-factor, a binding protein for A-factor was detected in the cytoplasmic fraction of this organism. The binding protein had an apparent molecular weight of approximately 26,000, as determined by gel filtration. Scatchard analysis suggested that A-factor bound the protein in the molar ratio of 1:1 with a binding constant, Kd, of 0.7 nM. The number of the binding protein was roughly estimated to be 37 per genome. The inducing material virginiae butanolide C (VB-C), which has a structure very similar to that of A-factor and is essential for virginiamycin production in Streptomyces virginiae, did not inhibit binding. In addition, no protein capable of specifically binding {sup 3}H-labeled VB-C was found in S. griseus. Together with the observation that VB-C had almost no biological activity on the restoration of streptomycin production or sporulation in an A-factor-deficient mutant of S. griseus, these results indicated that the binding protein had a strict ligand specificity. Examination for an A-factor-binding protein in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces lividans showed the absence of any specifically binding protein.

  3. Biochemical characterization of the Drosophila dpp protein, a member of the transforming growth factor beta family of growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Panganiban, G E; Rashka, K E; Neitzel, M D; Hoffmann, F M

    1990-01-01

    The decapentaplegic (dpp) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is required for pattern formation in the embryo and for viability of the epithelial cells in the imaginal disks. The dpp protein product predicted from the DNA sequence is similar to members of a family of growth factors that includes transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). We have produced polyclonal antibodies to a recombinant dpp protein made in bacteria and used a metallothionein promoter to express a dpp cDNA in Drosophila S2 cells. Similar to other proteins in the TGF-beta family, the dpp protein produced by the Drosophila cells was proteolytically cleaved, and both portions of the protein were secreted from the cells. The amino-terminal 47-kilodalton (kDa) peptide was found in the medium and in the proteins adhering to the plastic petri dish. The carboxy-terminal peptide, the region with sequence similarity to the active ligand portion of TGF-beta, was found extracellularly as a 30-kDa homodimer. Most of the 30-kDa homodimer was in the S2 cell protein adsorbed onto the surface of the plastic dish. The dpp protein could be released into solution by increased salt concentration and nonionic detergent. Under these conditions, the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal portions of dpp were not associated in a stable complex. Images PMID:1692958

  4. Organelle RNA recognition motif-containing (ORRM) proteins are plastid and mitochondrial editing factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaowen; Bentolila, Stephane; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing occurs at specific sites in plastid and plant mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing protein family and RNA-editing factor Interacting Protein (RIP, also known as MORF) family have been characterized as essential components of the RNA editing apparatus. Recent studies reveal that several organelle-targeted RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing proteins are involved in either plastid or mitochondrial RNA editing. ORRM1 (Organelle RRM protein 1) is essential for plastid editing, whereas ORRM2, ORRM3 and ORRM4 are involved in mitochondrial RNA editing. The RRM domain of ORRM1, ORRM3 and ORRM4 is required for editing activity, whereas the auxiliary RIP and Glycine-Rich (GR) domains mediate the ORRM proteins' interactions with other editing factors. The identification of the ORRM proteins as RNA editing factors further expands our knowledge of the composition of the editosome. PMID:27082488

  5. Organelle RNA recognition motif-containing (ORRM) proteins are plastid and mitochondrial editing factors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaowen; Bentolila, Stephane; Hanson, Maureen R

    2016-05-01

    Post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing occurs at specific sites in plastid and plant mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing protein family and RNA-editing factor Interacting Protein (RIP, also known as MORF) family have been characterized as essential components of the RNA editing apparatus. Recent studies reveal that several organelle-targeted RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing proteins are involved in either plastid or mitochondrial RNA editing. ORRM1 (Organelle RRM protein 1) is essential for plastid editing, whereas ORRM2, ORRM3 and ORRM4 are involved in mitochondrial RNA editing. The RRM domain of ORRM1, ORRM3 and ORRM4 is required for editing activity, whereas the auxiliary RIP and Glycine-Rich (GR) domains mediate the ORRM proteins' interactions with other editing factors. The identification of the ORRM proteins as RNA editing factors further expands our knowledge of the composition of the editosome. PMID:27082488

  6. Perspectives into factors limiting in vivo digestion of legume proteins: antinutritional compounds or storage proteins?

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, M; Grant, G; Cappelloni, M; Pusztai, A

    2000-03-01

    The in vivo protein digestibility of raw and cooked common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and faba bean (Vicia faba L.) and of protein fractions extracted from them was determined with growing rats. Overnight-fasted rats were intubated with a protein suspension or fed the same amount of protein added to a basal diet. The rats were killed 1 h later, the contents of stomach and small intestine were washed out, and their protein contents were measured. The in vivo digestibility of proteins of raw common bean flour was 72.4% and not significantly improved after cooking. In contrast, the digestibility of faba bean proteins was decreased from 86.5 to 60.6% by the thermal treatment. Globulins from either species had similar digestibilities (approximately 70%). Proteins in the soluble fraction of cooked beans were more digestible than those in the insoluble fraction, which contained the bulk of the proteins. Hemagglutination assay and trypsin inhibitor determination indicated that after the thermal treatment only very low, nonharmful, levels of both lectin and inhibitor remained. Faba bean contained more polyphenols than common bean samples, with most of the polyphenols being bound to globulins. However, protein-bound polyphenols were markedly decreased after cooking. SDS-PAGE characterization of the gastrointestinal digesta of globulins and amino acid analysis of undigested proteins of whole cooked common bean and faba bean suggested that it is mainly the structural properties of the storage proteins and not their binding of polyphenols, which determines the extent of protein aggregation on autoclaving and may therefore be responsible for their low digestibility. PMID:10725143

  7. Response of protein C and protein C inhibitor to warfarin therapy in patient with combined deficiency of Factors V and VIII.

    PubMed

    Bern, M M; Suzuki, K; Mann, K; Tracy, P; Hoyer, L; Jensen, W; Gallivan, M; Arkin, C; Davis, G

    1984-12-15

    The role of Protein C in combined factor V/VIII deficiency was examined by reducing the Protein C concentration using warfarin therapy in a patient with the combined deficiency. The factor VIII deficiency was like Hemophilia-A, with deficiency of VIII:C and VIII:C(Ag), but normal VIIIR:Ag and VIIIR:cof. The factor V deficiency was due to loss of the V antigen. During warfarin therapy the Protein C level was reduced, but concentrations of factors V and VIII did not change. Protein C Inhibitor was normal throughout. Thus combined factor V/VIII deficiency is not related to Protein C levels. PMID:6098970

  8. Coagulation factors X, Xa, and protein S as potent mitogens of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gasic, G P; Arenas, C P; Gasic, T B; Gasic, G J

    1992-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the rat carotid artery leave the quiescent state and proliferate after balloon catheter injury. The precise signals responsible for this SMC mitogenesis need to be elucidated. Although platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a potent SMC mitogen, is released from activated platelets, damaged endothelium, and macrophages, it cannot be solely responsible for this proliferation. In search of other SMC growth factors, we have examined several proteins of the coagulation cascade. At nanomolar concentrations, factors X, Xa, and protein S promote cultured rat aortic SMC mitosis. In contrast, factor IX is only weakly mitogenic, whereas factor VII and protein C fail to stimulate SMC division. Protein S, the most mitogenic of these coagulation cascade factors, stimulates DNA synthesis in cultured SMCs with a time course similar to that of PDGF-AA and without the delay observed for transforming growth factor beta. Antistasin and tick anticoagulant peptide, two specific factor Xa inhibitors, inhibit SMC mitogenesis due to Xa and protein S. Coagulation factors that possess mitogenic activity may contribute to intimal SMC proliferation after vascular injury as a result of angioplasty or vascular compromise during atherogenesis. Images PMID:1532256

  9. [Influence of dietary factors on microbial protein synthesis in the rumen].

    PubMed

    Vérité, R; Durand, M; Jouany, J P

    1986-01-01

    The effect of dietary factors (usually controlled in practice) on microbial protein synthesis is reviewed using in vivo experiments. Attention is drawn on the necessity to clearly distinguish variations in microbial growth efficiency from those of intestinal flow of microbial protein and to consider simultaneously variations in feed protein degradation. In practice, the relationship between microbial protein synthesis and energy intake depends mainly on diet composition and the nature of the forage. Microbial protein flow to the intestine, relative to energy intake, is lower with high concentrate diets (when given in restricted amounts), with silages and with antibiotic supplements. This flow is increased by some forage processing (such as dehydration and alkali treatments), by natural or induced defaunation, and occasionally by increased feeding frequency (when intake is restricted) and buffer and vitamin supplements. However, with some factors such as feeding frequency and antibiotics supplementation, these variations are partly counterbalanced by reverse effects on feed protein degradation. PMID:3517986

  10. Functional and Structural Properties of a Novel Protein and Virulence Factor (Protein sHIP) in Streptococcus pyogenes *

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewska, Magdalena; Happonen, Lotta; Kahn, Fredrik; Varjosalo, Markku; Malmström, Lars; Rosenberger, George; Karlsson, Christofer; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Streicher, Werner; Malmström, Johan; Wikström, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a significant bacterial pathogen in the human population. The importance of virulence factors for the survival and colonization of S. pyogenes is well established, and many of these factors are exposed to the extracellular environment, enabling bacterial interactions with the host. In the present study, we quantitatively analyzed and compared S. pyogenes proteins in the growth medium of a strain that is virulent to mice with a non-virulent strain. Particularly, one of these proteins was present at significantly higher levels in stationary growth medium from the virulent strain. We determined the three-dimensional structure of the protein that showed a unique tetrameric organization composed of four helix-loop-helix motifs. Affinity pull-down mass spectrometry analysis in human plasma demonstrated that the protein interacts with histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), and the name sHIP (streptococcal histidine-rich glycoprotein-interacting protein) is therefore proposed. HRG has antibacterial activity, and when challenged by HRG, sHIP was found to rescue S. pyogenes bacteria. This and the finding that patients with invasive S. pyogenes infection respond with antibody production against sHIP suggest a role for the protein in S. pyogenes pathogenesis. PMID:24825900

  11. Heat-induced Accumulation of Chloroplast Protein Synthesis Elongation Factor, EF-TU, in Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, has been implicated in heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.). Chloroplast EF-Tu is highly conserved, and it is possible that this protein may be of importance to heat tolerance in other species including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In this ...

  12. Networks of Host Factors that Interact with NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Thulasi Raman, Sathya N.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Pigs are an important host of influenza A viruses due to their ability to generate reassortant viruses with pandemic potential. NS1 protein of influenza A viruses is a key virulence factor and a major antagonist of innate immune responses. It is also involved in enhancing viral mRNA translation and regulation of virus replication. Being a protein with pleiotropic functions, NS1 has a variety of cellular interaction partners. Hence, studies on swine influenza viruses (SIV) and identification of swine influenza NS1-interacting host proteins is of great interest. Here, we constructed a recombinant SIV carrying a Strep-tag in the NS1 protein and infected primary swine respiratory epithelial cells (SRECs) with this virus. The Strep-tag sequence in the NS1 protein enabled us to purify intact, the NS1 protein and its interacting protein complex specifically. We identified cellular proteins present in the purified complex by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and generated a dataset of these proteins. 445 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS and among them 192 proteins were selected by setting up a threshold based on MS parameters. The selected proteins were analyzed by bioinformatics and were categorized as belonging to different functional groups including translation, RNA processing, cytoskeleton, innate immunity, and apoptosis. Protein interaction networks were derived using these data and the NS1 interactions with some of the specific host factors were verified by immunoprecipitation. The novel proteins and the networks revealed in our study will be the potential candidates for targeted study of the molecular interaction of NS1 with host proteins, which will provide insights into the identification of new therapeutic targets to control influenza infection and disease pathogenesis. PMID:27199973

  13. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry.

    PubMed

    Gerold, Gisa; Meissner, Felix; Bruening, Janina; Welsch, Kathrin; Perin, Paula M; Baumert, Thomas F; Vondran, Florian W; Kaderali, Lars; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Khan, Abdul G; Mann, Matthias; Rice, Charles M; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1), which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion. PMID:26212323

  14. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  15. Rhizobium nod factor signaling. Evidence for a g protein-mediated transduction mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pingret, JL; Journet, EP; Barker, DG

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobium nodulation (Nod) factors are lipochitooligosaccharide signals that elicit key symbiotic developmental responses in the host legume root. In this study, we have investigated Nod factor signal transduction in the Medicago root epidermis by using a pharmacological approach in conjunction with transgenic plants expressing the Nod factor-responsive reporter construct pMtENOD12-GUS. Evidence for the participation of heterotrimeric G proteins in Nod factor signaling has come from three complementary observations: (1) the amphiphilic peptides mastoparan and Mas7, known G protein agonists, are able to mimic Nod factor-induced epidermal MtENOD12 expression; (2) growth of plants in nodulation-inhibiting conditions (10 mM NH4NO3) leads to a dramatic reduction in both Nod factor- and mastoparan-elicited gene expression; and (3) bacterial pertussis toxin, a well-characterized G protein antagonist, blocks the activities of both the Nod factor and mastoparan. In addition, we have found that antagonists that interfere with phospholipase C activity (neomycin and U73122) and Ca2+ influx/release (EGTA, La3+, and ruthenium red) block Nod factor/mastoparan activity. Taken together, these results are consistent with a Nod factor signal transduction mechanism involving G protein mediation coupled to the activation of both phosphoinositide and Ca2+ second messenger pathways. PMID:9596628

  16. Serine/arginine-rich splicing factors belong to a class of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Chad; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.

    2006-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) splicing factors play an important role in constitutive and alternative splicing as well as during several steps of RNA metabolism. Despite the wealth of functional information about SR proteins accumulated to-date, structural knowledge about the members of this family is very limited. To gain a better insight into structure-function relationships of SR proteins, we performed extensive sequence analysis of SR protein family members and combined it with ordered/disordered structure predictions. We found that SR proteins have properties characteristic of intrinsically disordered (ID) proteins. The amino acid composition and sequence complexity of SR proteins were very similar to those of the disordered protein regions. More detailed analysis showed that the SR proteins, and their RS domains in particular, are enriched in the disorder-promoting residues and are depleted in the order-promoting residues as compared to the entire human proteome. Moreover, disorder predictions indicated that RS domains of SR proteins were completely unstructured. Two different classification methods, the charge-hydropathy measure and the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the disorder scores, were in agreement with each other, and they both strongly predicted members of the SR protein family to be disordered. This study emphasizes the importance of the disordered structure for several functions of SR proteins, such as for spliceosome assembly and for interaction with multiple partners. In addition, it demonstrates the usefulness of order/disorder predictions for inferring protein structure from sequence. PMID:16407336

  17. Nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors for some cereal products in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, S; Sasaki, H; Aoyagi, Y; Sugahara, T

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate a practical method of determining more accurately conversion factors for calculating the protein contents of foods from the total nitrogen content, 19 cereal products found in Japan were analyzed for total nitrogen, amino acid nitrogen, and amide nitrogen, and then the nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors were calculated. The average conversion factors were 5.75 for rice, 5.81 for wheat, and 5.95 for others. These values, corresponding to the proportion of the amino acid residue to amino acid nitrogen recovered from 20 amino acids, were lower than the currently applied factors to these foods, except for wheat flour and amaranth. The use of this factor for estimating the protein content results in a considerable difference from the estimate based on amino acid residue concentrations, due to the wide variations in amino acid composition and to the presence of a significant level of nonprotein nitrogen. The distribution of the protein nitrogen recovered from the amino acids to total nitrogen averaged 93%. Adjusted conversion factors corresponding to the proportion of the amino acid residue to total nitrogen averaged 5.26 for rice, 5.47 for wheat, and 5.54 for other cereal products. Protein contents estimated using these factors are in good agreement with the contents defined as amino acid residues. PMID:18387100

  18. Biochemical characterization of a factor X activator protein purified from Walterinnesia aegyptia venom.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sami U; Al-Saleh, Saad S

    2015-10-01

    Factor X of blood coagulation cascade can be activated by both intrinsic and extrinsic activating complex, trypsin and some kind of snake venom. A factor X activator protein is reported in Elapidae snake venom. The aim of this study was to evaluate biochemical properties of factor X activator protein because of its prospective application in biochemical research and therapeutics. Crude venom was fractionated on a HPLC system Gold 126/1667 using a combination of Protein PAK 125 and Protein PAK 60 Columns. Molecular weight was determined using SDS-PAGE. Walterinnesia aegyptia venom was fractionated into several protein peaks, but procoagulant and factor X activation activity coexisted into peak no.6. It appeared as single band on native PAGE and molecular weight was 60,000 ± 3. Purified up to 37-fold over crude venom. It shortened recalcification time, effect was dose-dependent and strictly Ca(2++)-dependent. Factor X activator seems to be able to activate factor X specifically because it showed no activation activity on human prothrombin, plasminogen, or protein C. It did not hydrolyze factor Xa substrate S-2222, thrombin substrate S-2238, plasmin substrate S-2251 or S-2302 and kalikrein substrate S-2266. It did not hydrolyze synthetic ester benzoyl arginine ethyl ester. Procoagulant activity was completely inhibited by irreversible serine protease inhibitors phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride and N-p-tosylphenylalanine chloromethyl ketone. This study illustrates that factor X activator from W. aegyptia is though different in many aspects from factor X activators of Viperidae and Crotalidae venoms, but shows several properties identical to factor X activators from Elapidae venoms. PMID:26407136

  19. Topographic patterns of vascular disease: HOX proteins as determining factors?

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Richard P; Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Steadily increasing evidence supports the idea that genetic diversities in the vascular bed are, in addition to hemodynamic influences, a major contributing factor in determining region-specific cardiovascular disease susceptibility. Members of the phylogenetically highly conserved Hox gene family of developmental regulators have to be viewed as prime candidates for determining these regional genetic differences in the vasculature. During embryonic patterning, the regionally distinct and precisely choreographed expression patterns of HOX transcription factors are essential for the correct specification of positional identities. Apparently, these topographic patterns are to some degree retained in certain adult tissues, including the circulatory system. While an understanding of the functional significance of these localized Hox activities in adult blood vessels is only beginning to emerge, an argument can be made for a role of Hox genes in the maintenance of vessel wall homeostasis and functional integrity on the one hand, and in regulating the development and progression of regionally restricted vascular pathologies, on the other. Initial functional studies in animal models, as well as data from clinical studies provide some level of support for this view. The data suggest that putative genetic regulatory networks of Hox-dependent cardiovascular disease processes include genes of diverse functional categories (extracellular matrix remodeling, transmembrane signaling, cell cycle control, inflammatory response, transcriptional control, etc.), as potential targets in both vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, as well as cell populations residing in the adventitia. PMID:26322165

  20. Protein-energy malnutrition: a risk factor for various ailments.

    PubMed

    Batool, Rizwana; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Saeed, Farhan; Naz, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    The wheel of industrialization that spun throughout the last century resulted in urbanization coupled with modifications in lifestyles and dietary habits. However, the communities living in developing economies are facing many problems related to their diet and health. Amongst, the prevalence of nutritional problems especially protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and micronutrients deficiencies are the rising issues. Moreover, the immunity or susceptibility to infect-parasitic diseases is also directly linked with the nutritional status of the host. Likewise, disease-related malnutrition that includes an inflammatory component is commonly observed in clinical practice thus affecting the quality of life. The PEM is treatable but early detection is a key for its appropriate management. However, controlling the menace of PEM requires an aggressive partnership between the physician and the dietitian. This review mainly attempts to describe the pathophysiology, prevalence and consequences of PEM and aims to highlight the importance of this clinical syndrome and the recent growth in our understanding of the processes behind its development. Some management strategies/remedies to overcome PEM are also the limelight of the article. In the nutshell, early recognition, prompt management, and robust follow up are critical for best outcomes in preventing and treating PEM. PMID:24915388

  1. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D.; Lahvic, Jamie L.; Ranheim, Erik A.; Zon, Leonard I.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis. PMID:26905203

  2. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D; Lahvic, Jamie L; Ranheim, Erik A; Zon, Leonard I; Bresnick, Emery H

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5(-/-) AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis. PMID:26905203

  3. Amblyomma americanum tick saliva insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 binds insulin but not insulin-like growth factors.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Ž M; Porter, L M; Kim, T K; Bakshi, M; Mulenga, A

    2015-10-01

    Silencing Amblyomma americanum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (AamIGFBP-rP1) mRNA prevented ticks from feeding to repletion. In this study, we used recombinant (r)AamIGFBP-rP1 in a series of assays to obtain further insight into the role(s) of this protein in tick feeding regulation. Our results suggest that AamIGFBP-1 is an antigenic protein that is apparently exclusively expressed in salivary glands. We found that both males and females secrete AamIGFBP-rP1 into the host during feeding and confirmed that female ticks secrete this protein from within 24-48 h after attachment. Our data suggest that native AamIGFBP-rP1 is a functional insulin binding protein in that both yeast- and insect cell-expressed rAamIGFBP-rP1 bound insulin, but not insulin-like growth factors. When subjected to anti-blood clotting and platelet aggregation assays, rAamIGFBP-rP1 did not have any effect. Unlike human IGFBP-rP1, which is controlled by trypsinization, rAamIGFBP-rP1 is resistant to digestion, suggesting that the tick protein may not be under mammalian host control at the tick feeding site. The majority of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted 48 h after the tick has attached. Thus, the demonstrated antigenicity and secretion into the host within 24-48 h of the tick starting to feed makes AamIGFBP-rP1 an attractive target for antitick vaccine development. PMID:26108887

  4. Renal protein synthesis in diabetes mellitus: effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I

    SciTech Connect

    Barac-Nieto, M.; Lui, S.M.; Spitzer, A. )

    1991-06-01

    Is increased synthesis of proteins responsible for the hypertrophy of kidney cells in diabetes mellitus Does the lack of insulin, and/or the effect of insulin-like growth factor I (IGFI) on renal tubule protein synthesis play a role in diabetic renal hypertrophy To answer these questions, we determined the rates of 3H-valine incorporation into tubule proteins and the valine-tRNA specific activity, in the presence or absence of insulin and/or IGFI, in proximal tubule suspension isolated from kidneys of streptozotocin diabetic and control rats. The rate of protein synthesis increased, while the stimulatory effects of insulin and IGFI on tubule protein synthesis were reduced, early (96 hours) after induction of experimental diabetes. Thus, hypertrophy of the kidneys in experimental diabetes mellitus is associated with increases in protein synthesis, rather than with decreases in protein degradation. Factor(s) other than the lack of insulin, or the effects of IGFI, must be responsible for the high rate of protein synthesis present in the hypertrophying tubules of diabetic rats.

  5. Multimodular biosensors reveal a novel platform for activation of G proteins by growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Krishna K.; Aznar, Nicolas; Laederich, Melanie B.; Ma, Gary S.; Kunkel, Maya T.; Newton, Alexandra C.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Environmental cues are transmitted to the interior of the cell via a complex network of signaling hubs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two such major signaling hubs in eukaryotes. Conventionally, canonical signal transduction via trimeric G proteins is thought to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors. Here we used molecular engineering to develop modular fluorescent biosensors that exploit the remarkable specificity of bimolecular recognition, i.e., of both G proteins and RTKs, and reveal the workings of a novel platform for activation of G proteins by RTKs in single living cells. Comprised of the unique modular makeup of guanidine exchange factor Gα-interacting vesicle-associated protein (GIV)/girdin, a guanidine exchange factor that links G proteins to a variety of RTKs, these biosensors provide direct evidence that RTK–GIV–Gαi ternary complexes are formed in living cells and that Gαi is transactivated within minutes after growth factor stimulation at the plasma membrane. Thus, GIV-derived biosensors provide a versatile strategy for visualizing, monitoring, and manipulating the dynamic association of Gαi with RTKs for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins in cells and illuminate a fundamental signaling event regulated by GIV during diverse cellular processes and pathophysiologic states. PMID:25713130

  6. High mobility group protein 2 functionally interacts with the POU domains of octamer transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Zwilling, S; König, H; Wirth, T

    1995-01-01

    The octamer transcription factors Oct1 and Oct2 are involved in the transcriptional regulation of both lymphoid-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes. Their activity depends critically on their interaction with distinct cellular cofactors. Therefore, we have isolated cDNAs encoding proteins that physically interact with Oct2. Here we describe the analysis of one such clone, representing the murine homologue of high mobility group (HMG) protein 2. We have mapped the interaction domains for both proteins and have shown that HMG2 and Oct2 interact via their HMG domains and POU homeodomains, respectively. This interaction is not restricted to Oct2, as other members of the octamer transcription factor family like Oct1 and Oct6 also interact with HMG2. The interaction with HMG2 results in a marked increase in the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of the Oct proteins. Interestingly, the HMG2 protein is not present in the protein-DNA complex detected by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The Oct and HMG2 proteins also interact in vivo. A chimeric protein, in which the strong transactivation domain of VP16 was fused directly to the HMG domains of HMG2, stimulated the activity of an octamer-dependent reporter construct upon cotransfection. Furthermore, the expression of antisense RNA for HMG2 specifically reduces octamer-dependent transcription. These results suggest that one of the functions of HMG2 is to support the octamer transcription factors in their role as transcriptional activators. Images PMID:7720710

  7. Divest yourself of a preconceived idea: transcription factor ATF6 is not a soluble protein!

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazutoshi

    2010-05-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional induction program that is coupled with intracellular signaling from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the nucleus, is activated to cope with ER stress and to maintain the homeostasis of the ER. In 1996, we isolated a basic leucine zipper protein, which had been previously named activating transcription factor (ATF)6, as a candidate transcription factor responsible for the mammalian UPR. Subsequent analysis, however, was confounding. The problem was eventually tracked down to an unusual property of ATF6: rather than being a soluble nuclear protein, as expected for an active transcription factor, ATF6 was instead synthesized as a transmembrane protein embedded in the ER, which was activated by ER stress-induced proteolysis. ATF6 was thus unique: an ER stress sensor/transducer that is involved in all steps of the UPR, from the sensing step in the ER to the transcriptional activation step in the nucleus. PMID:20219975

  8. Divest Yourself of a Preconceived Idea: Transcription Factor ATF6 Is Not a Soluble Protein!

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional induction program that is coupled with intracellular signaling from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the nucleus, is activated to cope with ER stress and to maintain the homeostasis of the ER. In 1996, we isolated a basic leucine zipper protein, which had been previously named activating transcription factor (ATF)6, as a candidate transcription factor responsible for the mammalian UPR. Subsequent analysis, however, was confounding. The problem was eventually tracked down to an unusual property of ATF6: rather than being a soluble nuclear protein, as expected for an active transcription factor, ATF6 was instead synthesized as a transmembrane protein embedded in the ER, which was activated by ER stress-induced proteolysis. ATF6 was thus unique: an ER stress sensor/transducer that is involved in all steps of the UPR, from the sensing step in the ER to the transcriptional activation step in the nucleus. PMID:20219975

  9. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  10. Polysomes of Trypanosoma brucei: Association with Initiation Factors and RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Cornelia; Terrao, Monica; Inchaustegui Gil, Diana; Clayton, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We report here the results of experiments designed to identify RNA-binding proteins that might be associated with Trypanosoma brucei polysomes. After some preliminary mass spectrometry of polysomal fractions, we investigated the distributions of selected tagged proteins using sucrose gradients and immunofluorescence. As expected, the polysomal fractions contained nearly all annotated ribosomal proteins, the translation-associated protein folding complex, and many translation factors, but also many other abundant proteins. Results suggested that cap-binding proteins EIF4E3 and EIF4E4 were associated with both free and membrane-bound polysomes. The EIF4E binding partners EIF4G4 and EIF4G3 were present but the other EIF4E and EIF4G paralogues were not detected. The dominant EIF4E in the polysomal fraction is EIF4E4 and very few polysomal mRNAs are associated with EIF4G. Thirteen potential mRNA-binding proteins were detected in the polysomes, including the known polysome-associated protein RBP42. The locations of two of the other proteins were tested after epitope tagging: RBP29 was in the nucleus and ZC3H29 was in the cytoplasm. Quantitative analyses showed that specific association of an RNA-binding protein with the polysome fraction in sucrose gradients will not be detected if the protein is in more than 25-fold molar excess over its target binding sites. PMID:26287607

  11. Sperm and Spermatids Contain Different Proteins and Bind Distinct Egg Factors

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Miyamoto, Kei; Simeone, Angela; Feret, Renata; Deery, Michael J.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Spermatozoa are more efficient at supporting normal embryonic development than spermatids, their immature, immediate precursors. This suggests that the sperm acquires the ability to support embryonic development during spermiogenesis (spermatid to sperm maturation). Here, using Xenopus laevis as a model organism, we performed 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially expressed proteins between sperm and spermatids in order to identify factors that could be responsible for the efficiency of the sperm to support embryonic development. Furthermore, benefiting from the availability of egg extracts in Xenopus, we also tested whether the chromatin of sperm could attract different egg factors compared to the chromatin of spermatids. Our analysis identified: (1) several proteins which were present exclusively in sperm; but not in spermatid nuclei and (2) numerous egg proteins binding to the sperm (but not to the spermatid chromatin) after incubation in egg extracts. Amongst these factors we identified many chromatin-associated proteins and transcriptional repressors. Presence of transcriptional repressors binding specifically to sperm chromatin could suggest its preparation for the early embryonic cell cycles, during which no transcription is observed and suggests that sperm chromatin has a unique protein composition, which facilitates the recruitment of egg chromatin remodelling factors. It is therefore likely that the acquisition of these sperm-specific factors during spermiogenesis makes the sperm chromatin suitable to interact with the maternal factors and, as a consequence, to support efficient embryonic development. PMID:25244019

  12. Clostridium pasteurianum W5 synthesizes two NifH-related polypeptides under nitrogen-fixing conditions.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Murat; Chen, Jiann-Shin

    2005-07-01

    Previous studies identified five nifH-like genes (nifH2 through nifH6) in Clostridium pasteurianum (strain W5), where the nifH1 gene encodes the nitrogenase iron protein. Transcripts of these nifH genes, with the exception of nifH3, were detected in molybdenum-sufficient nitrogen-fixing cells. However, the size of the transcripts, the level of transcription and the presence of polypeptides encoded by the nifH-like genes were not reported. The nifH2 and nifH6 genes were extremely similar, as they seemed to differ by only two bases in a span of 2481 bp, one in the coding region and another in the upstream region. Re-examination of the DNA sequences revealed that the coding region of nifH2 and nifH6 was identical, whereas the difference in the upstream region was confirmed. Results from the authors' ongoing study of the nif genes of single-colony isolates of C. pasteurianum suggest that the nifH6 designation should be eliminated. Here the size of mRNA from nifH2 and the detection of the NifH2 polypeptide in nitrogen-fixing cells of C. pasteurianum are reported. Northern blot analysis of periodically collected nitrogen-fixing cells showed that the nifH1 and nifH2 mRNAs were present throughout growth. Addition of ammonium acetate repressed the transcription of both these genes similarly. Using an antiserum raised against NifH of Azotobacter vinelandii, two NifH-related bands were detected by Western blot analysis after electrophoretic separation of proteins in extracts of nitrogen-fixing C. pasteurianum cells. After separation of proteins by preparative SDS-PAGE, the NifH polypeptides were characterized by MALDI-TOF-MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) and by ES-MS/MS (electrospray tandem mass spectrometry) analyses. The results confirmed the presence of NifH2, in addition to NifH1, in nitrogen-fixing C. pasteurianum cells. PMID:16000725

  13. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  14. The molecular biology and nomenclature of the activating transcription factor/cAMP responsive element binding family of transcription factors: activating transcription factor proteins and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hai, T; Hartman, M G

    2001-07-25

    The mammalian ATF/CREB family of transcription factors represents a large group of basic region-leucine zipper (bZip) proteins which was originally defined in the late 1980s by their ability to bind to the consensus ATF/CRE site 'TGACGTCA'. Over the past decade, cDNA clones encoding identical or homologous proteins have been isolated by different laboratories and given different names. These proteins can be grouped into subgroups according to their amino acid similarity. In this review, we will briefly describe the classification of these proteins with a historical perspective of their nomenclature. We will then review three members of the ATF/CREB family of proteins: ATF3, ATF4 and ATF6. We will address four issues for each protein: (a) homologous proteins and alternative names, (b) dimer formation with other bZip proteins, (c) transcriptional activity, and (d) potential physiological functions. Although the name Activating Transcription Factor (ATF) implies that they are transcriptional activators, some of these proteins are transcriptional repressors. ATF3 homodimer is a transcriptional repressor and ATF4 has been reported to be either an activator or a repressor. We will review the reports on the transcriptional activities of ATF4, and propose potential explanations for the discrepancy. Although the physiological functions of these proteins are not well understood, some clues can be gained from studies with different approaches. When the data are available, we will address the following questions. (a) How is the expression (at the mRNA level or protein level) regulated? (b) How are the transcriptional activities regulated? (c) What are the interacting proteins (other than bZip partners)? (d) What are the consequences of ectopically expressing the gene (gain-of-function) or deleting the gene (loss-of-function)? Although answers to these questions are far from being complete, together they provide clues to the functions of these ATF proteins. Despite the

  15. Thyroid transcription factor-1, hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β and surfactant protein A and B in the developing chick lung

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, XIN; YUTZEY, KATHERINE E.; WHITSETT, JEFFREY A.

    1998-01-01

    Expression of surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B and the transcription factors TTF-1 and HNF-3β was identified by immunohistochemistry in the developing chicken. SP-B, a small hydrophobic peptide critical for lung function and surfactant homeostasis in mammals, was detected in the epithelial cells of parabronchi in embryonic chicken lung from the 15th day of incubation, prior to the onset of the breathing movements and was expressed at high levels in the posthatching chicken lung. SP-A, an abundant surfactant protein involved in innate defence of the mammalian lung, was detected in the chick embryo in subsets of epithelial cells in the mesobronchus, starting from d 15 and was detected in the posthatching chicken lung. The transcription factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β (HNF-3β) and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), both regulators epithelial cell differentiation and gene expression in mammalian species, were detected at the onset of lung bud formation (d 4 of incubation) and throughout lung development. Abundant nuclear expression was detected in nuclei of respiratory epithelial cells of developing bronchial tubules for both transcription factors. In contrast to the surfactant proteins, expression of both TTF-1 and HNF-3β decreased markedly in posthatching chicken lung. The expression of SP-A and SP-B in chick lung demonstrates the conservation of surfactant proteins in vertebrates. The temporospatial pattern of TTF-1 and HNF-3β overlaps with that of SP-A and SP-B, supporting their potential roles in chick lung development and demonstrating the conservation of regulatory mechanisms contributing to gene expression in respiratory epithelial cells in vertebrates. PMID:9877295

  16. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding. PMID:25351253

  17. Bioinformatic identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins likely to target host cell mitochondria: virulence factors?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background M. tuberculosis infection either induces or inhibits host cell death, depending on the bacterial strain and the cell microenvironment. There is evidence suggesting a role for mitochondria in these processes. On the other hand, it has been shown that several bacterial proteins are able to target mitochondria, playing a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis and modulation of cell death. However, mycobacteria–derived proteins able to target host cell mitochondria are less studied. Results A bioinformaic analysis based on available genomic sequences of the common laboratory virulent reference strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, the avirulent strain H37Ra, the clinical isolate CDC1551, and M. bovis BCG Pasteur strain 1173P2, as well as of suitable bioinformatic tools (MitoProt II, PSORT II, and SignalP) for the in silico search for proteins likely to be secreted by mycobacteria that could target host cell mitochondria, showed that at least 19 M. tuberculosis proteins could possibly target host cell mitochondria. We experimentally tested this bioinformatic prediction on four M. tuberculosis recombinant proteins chosen from this list of 19 proteins (p27, PE_PGRS1, PE_PGRS33, and MT_1866). Confocal microscopy analyses showed that p27, and PE_PGRS33 proteins colocalize with mitochondria. Conclusions Based on the bioinformatic analysis of whole M. tuberculosis genome sequences, we propose that at least 19 out of 4,246 M. tuberculosis predicted proteins would be able to target host cell mitochondria and, in turn, control mitochondrial physiology. Interestingly, such a list of 19 proteins includes five members of a mycobacteria specific family of proteins (PE/PE_PGRS) thought to be virulence factors, and p27, a well known virulence factor. P27, and PE_PGRS33 proteins experimentally showed to target mitochondria in J774 cells. Our results suggest a link between mitochondrial targeting of M. tuberculosis proteins and virulence. PMID:23259719

  18. Mapping transcription factor interactome networks using HaloTag protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Junshi; Galli, Mary; Kim, Alice Y; Nito, Kazumasa; Aleman, Fernando; Chang, Katherine N; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Quan, Rosa; Nguyen, Hien; Song, Liang; Alvarez, José M; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Chen, Huaming; Ramachandran, Niroshan; Altmann, Stefan; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Hill, David E; Schroeder, Julian I; Chory, Joanne; LaBaer, Joshua; Vidal, Marc; Braun, Pascal; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-07-19

    Protein microarrays enable investigation of diverse biochemical properties for thousands of proteins in a single experiment, an unparalleled capacity. Using a high-density system called HaloTag nucleic acid programmable protein array (HaloTag-NAPPA), we created high-density protein arrays comprising 12,000 Arabidopsis ORFs. We used these arrays to query protein-protein interactions for a set of 38 transcription factors and transcriptional regulators (TFs) that function in diverse plant hormone regulatory pathways. The resulting transcription factor interactome network, TF-NAPPA, contains thousands of novel interactions. Validation in a benchmarked in vitro pull-down assay revealed that a random subset of TF-NAPPA validated at the same rate of 64% as a positive reference set of literature-curated interactions. Moreover, using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay, we confirmed in planta several interactions of biological interest and determined the interaction localizations for seven pairs. The application of HaloTag-NAPPA technology to plant hormone signaling pathways allowed the identification of many novel transcription factor-protein interactions and led to the development of a proteome-wide plant hormone TF interactome network. PMID:27357687

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Nuclear Factors Binding to an Intronic Enhancer in the Myelin Proteolipid Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Dobretsova, Anna; Johnson, Jennifer W.; Jones, Richard C.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Wight, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The myelin proteolipid protein gene (Plp1) encodes the most abundant protein found in CNS myelin, accounting for nearly one-half of the total protein. Its expression in oligodendrocytes is developmentally regulated – peaking during the active myelination period of CNS development. Previously we have identified a novel enhancer (designated ASE) in intron 1 DNA that appears to be important in mediating the surge of Plp1 gene activity during the active myelination period. Evidence suggests that the ASE participates in the formation of a specialized multi-protein/DNA complex called an enhanceosome. The current study describes an optimized, five-step, DNA affinity chromatography purification procedure to purify nuclear proteins from mouse brain that bind to the 85-bp ASE sequence, specifically. EMSA analysis demonstrated that specific DNA binding activity was retained throughout the purification procedure, resulting in concomitant enrichment of nucleoprotein complexes. Identification of the purported regulatory factors was achieved through mass spectrometry analysis and included over twenty sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. Supplementary Western blot analyses to determine which of these sequence-specific factors are present in oligodendrocytes, and their developmental and regional expression in whole brain, suggest that Purα and Purβ rank highest among the candidate factors as constituents of the multi-protein complex formed on the ASE. PMID:18266931

  20. A fragment of anthrax lethal factor delivers proteins to the cytosol without requiring protective antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Nicholas; Zhang, Dong; Touzjian, Neal; Essex, Max; Lieberman, Judy; Lu, Yichen

    2003-01-01

    Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is a 735-aa polypeptide that facilitates the exit of anthrax lethal factor (LF) from the endosome to the cytosol where the toxin acts. We recently found, however, that a fusion protein of the detoxified N-terminal domain of lethal factor (LFn) with a foreign peptide could induce CD8 T cell immune responses in the absence of PA. Because CD8 T cells recognize peptides derived from proteins degraded in the cytosol, this result suggests that lethal factor may be capable of entering the cytosol independently of PA. To investigate this further, the intracellular trafficking of an LFn-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion protein (LFn-GFP) in the presence or absence of PA was examined by using confocal microscopy. LFn-GFP is able to enter the cytosol without PA. Moreover, it efficiently colocalizes with the proteosome 20s subunit, which degrades proteins into peptides for presentation to CD8 T cells by the MHC class I pathway. We further demonstrate that in the presence of an immune adjuvant LFn fusion protein without PA is able to effectively elicit anti-HIV cytotoxic T lymphocyte in inbred mice. These results indicate that LFn may be used without PA in a protein vaccine as a carrier to deliver antigens into the cytosol for efficient induction of T lymphocyte responses. Furthermore, these results enable us to propose a modified molecular mechanism of anthrax lethal toxin. PMID:12740437

  1. Characterization of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins from sheep thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, L K; Liu, F R; Burrow, G N; Eggo, M C

    1989-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are bound by specific, high affinity binding proteins. Distinct classes of IGF-binding proteins have been described in human serum, amniotic fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, and conditioned medium from cultured cells. Sheep thyroid cells produce IGF-binding proteins under hormonal regulation. Cells grown without or with standard medium supplements (transferrin, glycyl-histidyl-lysine, hydrocortisone, somatostatin, insulin, and TSH) released binding proteins with apparent mol wt of 23, 29, and 32 kDa on Western ligand blot (nonreduced). Binding proteins from these cells appeared as 21, 26, 34, 36, and 41 kDa bands when cross-linked to [125I]IGF-I under reducing conditions. The addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) or phorbol esters, thyroid cell mitogens stimulated the production of larger binding proteins with mol wt of 40-44 and 48-52 by ligand blot and cross-linking methods, respectively. Deglycosylation of conditioned medium cross-linked to [125I]IGF-I with endoglycosidase-F did not alter the size of the smaller binding proteins, but reduced EGF-stimulated binding proteins to 36-40 kDa. Similarly, tunicamycin treatment, which inhibits glycosylation, reduced only the size of this larger binding protein species. Polyclonal antisera directed against the human amniotic fluid binding protein (BP-28) immunoprecipitated the 32 kDa sheep thyroid binding protein seen on ligand blot and the cross-linked binding protein at 36-38 kDa. Antibody against the major human serum binding protein (BP-53) recognized only the larger EGF-stimulated binding proteins. In contrast to sheep thyroid cells, rat FRTL5 thyroid cells produced no detectable IGF-binding proteins. We conclude that the predominant binding proteins produced by sheep thyroid cells under standard culture conditions are non-glycosylated and immunoreact with antiserum directed against BP-28. EGF and phorbol esters stimulate production of larger glycosylated binding proteins

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediation of tumor targeting human recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Shao, Xin; Zeng, Liang; Wang, Fa; Huang, Di-Nan; Hou, Gan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to use genetic engineering in order to establish an efficient tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α fusion protein with low toxicity, which may be used to target tumors. Four types of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated tumor targeting human recombinant TNF-α (rhTNF-α) fusion protein vectors were constructed. These were subsequently introduced into Escherichia coli. rhTNF-α fusion protein with a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tag was purified using GST resin affinity chromatography, and GST-tags were digested using factor Xa. The cytotoxic effects of the fusion protein on L929 cells were determined using MTT assays. At a concentration of 1 pM, the GST-tagged fusion protein exerted no cytotoxic effects on the cells, compared with the negative control cells (P=0.975>0.05). However, at a concentration of 1000 pM, the deblocking fusion protein exerted greater cytotoxic effects on L929 cells, compared with positive control cells (P<0.05). Treatment with the fusion protein also induced cell apoptosis in the nasopharyngeal cancer cell line, CNE-2Z, which secretes high levels of MMP-1. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that MMP-mediated rhTNF-α fusion protein induces CNE-2Z cells apoptosis. rhTNF-α exhibits high efficacy and tumor cell targeting capability, with low toxicity effects on healthy cells. PMID:25891416

  3. Identification of human complement factor H as a chemotactic protein for monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nabil, K; Rihn, B; Jaurand, M C; Vignaud, J M; Ripoche, J; Martinet, Y; Martinet, N

    1997-01-01

    We used chromatographic separation to purify to homogeneity a monomeric monocyte chemotactic protein of 150 kDa contained in mesothelioma pleural effusions. It was identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and immunoblotting as complement factor H, an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Specific antibodies against factor H inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity of the purified protein, which was most active at 10 nM. Factor H is a restrictive factor of alternative complement pathway activation. The new chemotactic function assigned to factor H in recruiting monocytes to the mesothelioma site might contribute to malignant cell phagocytosis via the iC3b/complement receptor type 3 pathway. These functions link the humoral and cellular immune systems. PMID:9291108

  4. In Silico Analysis of Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Protein 8-Like-1 (TIPE1) Protein.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei; Zhang, Hong; Su, Zhaoliang; Wang, Shengjun; Xu, Huaxi

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8)-like protein 1 (TIPE1) was a member of TNFAIP8 family. Previous studies have shown that TIPE1 could induce apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we attempted to predict its potential structure. Bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 was performed to predict its potential structure using the bioinfomatic web services or softwares. The results showed that the amino acid sequences of TIPE1 were well conserved in mammals. No signal peptide and no transmembrane domain existed in human TIPE1. The aliphatic index of TIPE1 was 100.75 and the theoretical pI was 9.57. TIPE1 was a kind of stable protein and its grand average of hydropathicity was -0.108. Various post-translational modifications were also speculated to exist in TIPE1. In addition, the results of Swiss-Model Server and Swiss-Pdb Viewer program revealed that the predicted three-dimensional structure of TIPE1 protein was stable and it may accord with the rule of stereochemistry. TIPE1 was predicted to interact with FBXW5, caspase8 and so on. In conclusion, TIPE1 may be a stable protein with no signal peptide and no transmembrane domain. The bioinformatic analysis of TIPE1 will provide the basis for the further study on the function of TIPE1. PMID:26207809

  5. Arabidopsis Sigma Factor Binding Proteins Are Activators of the WRKY33 Transcription Factor in Plant Defense[W

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-01-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif–containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:21990940

  6. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  7. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  8. Stimulation of protein phosphatase activity by insulin and growth factors in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; McNall, S.J.; Krebs, E.G.; Fischer, E.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Incubation of Swiss mouse 3T3-D1 cells with physiological concentrations of insulin resulted in a rapid and transient activation of protein phosphatase activity as measure by using ({sup 32}P)phosphorylase {alpha} as substrate. Activation reached a maximum level (140% of control value) within 5 min of addition and returned to control levels within 20 min. The effect of insulin was dose-dependent with half-maximal activation occurring at {approx}5 nM insulin. This activity could be completely inhibited by addition of the heat-stable protein inhibitor 2, which suggests the presence of an activated type-1 phosphatase. Similar effects on phosphatase activity were seen when epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor were tested. These results suggest that some of the intracellular effects caused by insulin and growth factors are mediated through the activation of a protein phosphatase.

  9. The factor H binding protein of Neisseria meningitidis interacts with xenosiderophores in vitro.

    PubMed

    Veggi, Daniele; Gentile, Maria A; Cantini, Francesca; Lo Surdo, Paola; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Seib, Kate L; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Banci, Lucia; Savino, Silvana; Scarselli, Maria

    2012-11-20

    The factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a key virulence factor of Neisseria meningitidis that confers to the bacterium the ability to resist killing by human serum. The determination of its three-dimensional structure revealed that the carboxyl terminus of the protein folds into an eight-stranded β barrel. The structural similarity of this part of the protein to lipocalins provided the rationale for exploring the ability of fHbp to bind siderophores. We found that fHbp was able to bind in vitro siderophores belonging to the cathecolate family and mapped the interaction site by nuclear magnetic resonance. Our results indicated that the enterobactin binding site was distinct from the site involved in binding to human factor H and stimulates new hypotheses about possible multiple activities of fHbp. PMID:23121397

  10. Probing the solution structure of Factor H using hydroxyl radical protein footprinting and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Baud, Anna; Gonnet, Florence; Salard, Isabelle; Le Mignon, Maxime; Giuliani, Alexandre; Mercère, Pascal; Sclavi, Bianca; Daniel, Régis

    2016-06-15

    The control protein Factor H (FH) is a crucial regulator of the innate immune complement system, where it is active on host cell membranes and in the fluid phase. Mutations impairing the binding capacity of FH lead to severe autoimmune diseases. Here, we studied the solution structure of full-length FH, in its free state and bound to the C3b complement protein. To do so, we used two powerful techniques, hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) and chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), to probe the structural rearrangements and to identify protein interfaces. The footprint of C3b on the FH surface matches existing crystal structures of C3b complexed with the N- and C-terminal fragments of FH. In addition, we revealed the position of the central portion of FH in the protein complex. Moreover, cross-linking studies confirmed the involvement of the C-terminus in the dimerization of FH. PMID:27099340

  11. Biopolymer nanoparticles from heat-treated electrostatic protein-polysaccharide complexes: factors affecting particle characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Owen Griffith; McClements, David Julian

    2010-03-01

    Biopolymer nanoparticles can be formed by heating globular protein-ionic polysaccharide electrostatic complexes above the thermal denaturation temperature of the protein. This study examined how the size and concentration of biopolymer particles formed by heating beta-lactoglobulin-pectin complexes could be manipulated by controlling preparation conditions: pH, ionic strength, protein concentration, holding time, and holding temperature. Biopolymer particle size and concentration increased with increasing holding time (0 to 30 min), decreasing holding temperature (90 to 70 degrees C), increasing protein concentration (0 to 2 wt/wt%), increasing pH (4.5 to 5), and increasing salt concentration (0 to 50 mol/kg). The influence of these factors on biopolymer particle size was attributed to their impact on protein-polysaccharide interactions, and on the kinetics of nucleation and particle growth. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate the rational design of biopolymer particles with specific physicochemical and functional attributes. PMID:20492252

  12. Characterization of PXK as a Protein Involved in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Trafficking ▿

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Takako; Gao, Jing; Cantley, Lewis C.; Hirata, Masato

    2010-01-01

    The phox homology (PX) domain is a phosphoinositide-binding module that typically binds phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Out of 47 mammalian proteins containing PX domains, more than 30 are denoted sorting nexins and several of these have been implicated in internalization of cell surface proteins to the endosome, where phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate is concentrated. Here we investigated a multimodular protein termed PXK, composed of a PX domain, a protein kinase-like domain, and a WASP homology 2 domain. We show that the PX domain of PXK localizes this protein to the endosomal membrane via binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. PXK expression in COS7 cells accelerated the ligand-induced internalization and degradation of epidermal growth factor receptors by a mechanism requiring phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding but not involving the WASP homology 2 domain. Conversely, depletion of PXK using RNA interference decreased the rate of epidermal growth factor receptor internalization and degradation. Ubiquitination of epidermal growth factor receptor by the ligand stimulation was enhanced in PXK-expressing cells. These results indicate that PXK plays a critical role in epidermal growth factor receptor trafficking through modulating ligand-induced ubiquitination of the receptor. PMID:20086096

  13. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhaohua; Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse; Lin, Ren-Jang; Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  14. Elongation factor Ts of Chlamydia trachomatis: structure of the gene and properties of the protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Tao, J; Zhou, M; Meng, Q; Zhang, L; Shen, L; Klein, R; Miller, D L

    1997-08-01

    A putative structural gene cluster containing four open reading frames (ORFs) located downstream of the omp1 gene of Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) was cloned and sequenced. A GenBank survey indicated that the identified cluster is similar to the rpsB-tsf-pyrH(smbA)-frr region of Escherichia coli. The second ORF was 846 bp encoding a 282-amino-acid polypeptide with a calculated M(r) 30,824. Alignment of this deduced protein sequence and E. coli elongation factor Ts (EF-Ts, product of tsf) demonstrated 34% identity and an additional 14% similarity. The putative chlamydial tsf gene was expressed in E. coli as a nonfusion protein and as a 6x His-tagged fusion protein. By SDS-PAGE analysis, the molecular weights of the nonfusion recombinant protein and a protein of chlamydial elementary bodies (EBs), which was recognized by monoclonal antibodies derived from the nonfusion recombinant protein, are 34 kDa. The purified recombinant 6x His-tagged fusion protein increased the rate of GDP exchange with both Chlamydia and E. coli elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). These data show that the second gene of the identified cluster is tsf. Unlike EF-Ts from any other species, its activity was comparable to that of E. coli EF-Ts in exchange reaction with E. coli EF-Tu. PMID:9244380

  15. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Pieper, Rembert; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Townsend, Katherine; Yu, Chenggang; Yu, Xueping; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cell's cytosol. However, the secretion systems' proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin

  16. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  17. Structures and Functions of Qβ Replicase: Translation Factors beyond Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    Qβ replicase is a unique RNA polymerase complex, comprising Qβ virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (the catalytic β-subunit) and three host-derived factors: translational elongation factor (EF) -Tu, EF-Ts and ribosomal protein S1. For almost fifty years, since the isolation of Qβ replicase, there have been several unsolved, important questions about the mechanism of RNA polymerization by Qβ replicase. Especially, the detailed functions of the host factors, EF-Tu, EF-Ts, and S1, in Qβ replicase, which are all essential in the Escherichia coli (E. coli) host for protein synthesis, had remained enigmatic, due to the absence of structural information about Qβ replicase. In the last five years, the crystal structures of the core Qβ replicase, consisting of the β-subunit, EF-Tu and Ts, and those of the core Qβ replicase representing RNA polymerization, have been reported. Recently, the structure of Qβ replicase comprising the β-subunit, EF-Tu, EF-Ts and the N-terminal half of S1, which is capable of initiating Qβ RNA replication, has also been reported. In this review, based on the structures of Qβ replicase, we describe our current understanding of the alternative functions of the host translational elongation factors and ribosomal protein S1 in Qβ replicase as replication factors, beyond their established functions in protein synthesis. PMID:25184952

  18. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  19. A protein's conformational stability is an immunologically dominant factor: evidence that free-energy barriers for protein unfolding limit the immunogenicity of foreign proteins.

    PubMed

    Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Nagatomo, Satoko; Oda, Kenji; So, Takanori; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi

    2010-10-01

    Foreign protein Ags are incorporated into APCs and then degraded by endosomal proteases. The peptides are then mounted on MHC II molecules on the surfaces of APCs. The T cell-triggering response and, therefore, the immune response, were suggested to be governed by the degree of conformational stability of the foreign protein Ags. However, there is little evidence that a protein's conformational stability is an immunologically dominant factor. In this study, we show that a protein has a threshold of conformational stability to prevent the immunogenicity of foreign proteins. Inverse and linear correlations were found between the amount of IgG production against lysozymes and the free-energy change for the unfolding of lysozymes, based on the correlation between the free-energy changes of the protein unfolding and the amount of IgG production against lysozymes with different stabilities in mice using hen egg white lysozyme derivatives and mutant mouse lysozymes, in which the sequence between 107 and 116 is replaced with that of hen egg white lysozyme, which can produce autoantibodies in mice. Interestingly, the thresholds of free-energy changes for both lysozymes to prevent their immunogenicity were almost identical (21-23 kcal/mol). To confirm the results, we also showed that the cross-linking of Phl p 7, in which intact Phl p 7 has stability greater than ∼20 kcal/mol under physiological conditions, induced minimal IgG production in mice, whereas intact Phl p 7 was antigenic. From the above results, we suggest that protein conformational stability was an immunologically dominant factor. PMID:20817878

  20. Local dynamics of proteins and DNA evaluated from crystallographic B factors

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Bohdan; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Brevern, Alexandre G. de; Černý, Jiří

    2014-09-01

    Distributions of scaled B factors from 704 protein–DNA complexes reflect primarily the neighbourhood of amino-acid and nucleotide residues: their flexibility grows from the protein core to protein–protein and protein–DNA interfaces, to solvent-exposed residues. Some of the findings clearly observed at higher resolution structures can no longer be observed for structures at low resolution indicating problems in refinement protocols. The dynamics of protein and nucleic acid structures is as important as their average static picture. The local molecular dynamics concealed in diffraction images is expressed as so-called B factors. To find out how the crystal-derived B factors represent the dynamic behaviour of atoms and residues of proteins and DNA in their complexes, the distributions of scaled B factors from a carefully curated data set of over 700 protein–DNA crystal structures were analyzed [Schneider et al. (2014 ▶), Nucleic Acids Res.42, 3381–3394]. Amino acids and nucleotides were categorized based on their molecular neighbourhood as solvent-accessible, solvent-inaccessible (i.e. forming the protein core) or lying at protein–protein or protein–DNA interfaces; the backbone and side-chain atoms were analyzed separately. The B factors of two types of crystal-ordered water molecules were also analyzed. The analysis confirmed several expected features of protein and DNA dynamics, but also revealed surprising facts. Solvent-accessible amino acids have B factors that are larger than those of residues at the biomolecular interfaces, and core-forming amino acids are the most restricted in their movement. A unique feature of the latter group is that their side-chain and backbone atoms are restricted in their movement to the same extent; in all other amino-acid groups the side chains are more floppy than the backbone. The low values of the B factors of water molecules bridging proteins with DNA and the very large fluctuations of DNA phosphates are

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  2. Multiplex immunoassays for quantification of cytokines, growth factors, and other proteins in stem cell communication.

    PubMed

    Valekova, Ivona; Skalnikova, Helena Kupcova; Jarkovska, Karla; Motlik, Jan; Kovarova, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Immunoassays represent valuable and broadly used techniques for detection and quantification of proteins. Thanks to their high sensitivity, such techniques are powerful for analyzing growth factors, trophic factors, angiogenic factors, hormones, cytokines, chemokines, soluble receptors, and other proteins which play key roles in intercellular communication and operate as potent regulators of stem cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, or cell death. Multiplex immunological assays, in contrast to ELISA, offer simultaneous quantification of tens of proteins across multiple samples, and have been developed to save time, costs, and sample volumes. Among them, planar antibody microarrays and xMAP(®) bead-based assays have become particularly popular for characterization of proteins secreted by stem cells, as they are relatively easy, highly accurate, multiplex to a high degree and a broad spectrum of analytes can be measured. Here, we describe protocols for multiplex quantification of secreted proteins using Quantibody(®) microarrays (RayBiotech) and xMAP(®) assays (Luminex and its partners). PMID:25063502

  3. Mutant forms of growth factor-binding protein-2 reverse BCR-ABL-induced transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Gishizky, M L; Cortez, D; Pendergast, A M

    1995-01-01

    Growth factor-binding protein 2 (Grb2) is an adaptor protein that links tyrosine kinases to Ras. BCR-ABL is a tyrosine kinase oncoprotein that is implicated in the pathogenesis of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1)-positive leukemias. Grb2 forms a complex with BCR-ABL and the nucleotide exchange factor Sos that leads to the activation of the Ras protooncogene. In this report we demonstrate that Grb2 mutant proteins lacking amino- or carboxyl-terminal src homology SH3 domains suppress BCR-ABL-induced Ras activation and reverse the oncogenic phenotype. The Grb2 SH3-deletion mutant proteins bind to BCR-ABL and do not impair tyrosine kinase activity. Expression of the Grb2 SH3-deletion mutant proteins in BCR-ABL-transformed Rat-1 fibroblasts and in the human Ph1-positive leukemic cell line K562 inhibits their ability to grow as foci in soft agar and form tumors in nude mice. Furthermore, expression of the Grb2 SH3-deletion mutants in K562 cells induced their differentiation. Because Ras plays an important role in signaling by receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, the use of interfering mutant Grb2 proteins may be applied to block the proliferation of other cancers that depend in part on activated tyrosine kinases for growth. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479904

  4. Mapping transcription factor interactome networks using HaloTag protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yazaki, Junshi; Galli, Mary; Kim, Alice Y.; Nito, Kazumasa; Aleman, Fernando; Chang, Katherine N.; Quan, Rosa; Nguyen, Hien; Song, Liang; Alvarez, José M.; Huang, Shao-shan Carol; Chen, Huaming; Ramachandran, Niroshan; Altmann, Stefan; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A.; Schroeder, Julian I.; Chory, Joanne; LaBaer, Joshua; Vidal, Marc; Braun, Pascal; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarrays enable investigation of diverse biochemical properties for thousands of proteins in a single experiment, an unparalleled capacity. Using a high-density system called HaloTag nucleic acid programmable protein array (HaloTag-NAPPA), we created high-density protein arrays comprising 12,000 Arabidopsis ORFs. We used these arrays to query protein–protein interactions for a set of 38 transcription factors and transcriptional regulators (TFs) that function in diverse plant hormone regulatory pathways. The resulting transcription factor interactome network, TF-NAPPA, contains thousands of novel interactions. Validation in a benchmarked in vitro pull-down assay revealed that a random subset of TF-NAPPA validated at the same rate of 64% as a positive reference set of literature-curated interactions. Moreover, using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay, we confirmed in planta several interactions of biological interest and determined the interaction localizations for seven pairs. The application of HaloTag-NAPPA technology to plant hormone signaling pathways allowed the identification of many novel transcription factor–protein interactions and led to the development of a proteome-wide plant hormone TF interactome network. PMID:27357687

  5. The Fimbrial Protein is a Virulence Factor and Potential Vaccine Antigen of Avibacterium paragallinarum.

    PubMed

    Liu, C-C; Ou, S-C; Tan, D-H; Hsieh, M-K; Shien, J-H; Chang, P-C

    2016-09-01

    Fimbriae are recognized as virulence factors and potential vaccine antigens of several pathogenic bacteria, but the function of the fimbriae from Avibacterium paragallinarum is not well known. In this study, a gene encoding the fimbrial protein FlfA was identified in A. paragallinarum . Sequencing analysis of the putative promoter region of flfA suggests that flfA expression in A. paragallinarum might be controlled by phase variation. The flfA gene from A. paragallinarum was expressed as a recombinant protein (r-FlfA) in Escherichia coli . Immunization with r-FlfA conferred chickens protection against challenge infection with A. paragallinarum . Virulence assays showed that the flfA-deficient mutants of A. paragallinarum were less virulent than their parental wild-type strains. These results indicated that the fimbrial protein FlfA is a virulence factor and potential vaccine antigen from A. paragallinarum . PMID:27610725

  6. Two cell surface proteins bind the sponge Microciona prolifera aggregation factor.

    PubMed

    Varner, J A; Burger, M M; Kaufman, J F

    1988-06-15

    Two extracellular matrix cell surface proteins which bind the proteoglycan-like aggregation factor from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera (MAF) and which may function as physiological receptors for MAF were identified and characterized for the first time. By probing nitrocellulose blots of nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate gels containing whole sponge cell protein with iodinated MAF, a 210- and a 68-kDa protein, which have native molecular masses of approximately 200-400 and 70 kDa, were identified. MAF binding to blots is species-specific. It is also sensitive to reduction and is completely abolished by pretreatment of live cells with proteases, as was cellular aggregation, indicating that the 210- and 68-kDa proteins may be located on the cell surface. The additional observations that the 68 kDa is an endoglycosidase F-sensitive glycoprotein and that antisera against whole sponge cells or membranes can immunoprecipitate the 210 kDa when prebound to intact cells are consistent with a cell surface location. Both proteins can be isolated from sponge cell membranes and from the sponge skeleton (insoluble extracellular matrix), but the 210-kDa MAF-binding protein can also be found in the soluble extracellular matrix (buffer washes of cells and skeleton) as well. A third MAF-binding protein of molecular mass 95 kDa was also found in the sponge extracellular matrix but rarely on cells. Both of the cell-associated 210- and 68-kDa proteins are nonintegral membrane proteins, based on Triton X-114 phase separation, flotation of liposomes containing sponge membrane lysates, and their extraction from membranes by buffer washes. Both proteins bind MAF affinity resins, indicating that they each exhibit a moderate affinity for MAF under native conditions. They can also be separated from each other and from the bulk of the protein in an octylpolyoxyethylene extract of membranes by fast protein liquid chromatography Mono Q anion exchange chromatography, as assessed by native

  7. Implication of tubby proteins as transcription factors by structure-based functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Boggon, T J; Shan, W S; Santagata, S; Myers, S C; Shapiro, L

    1999-12-10

    Tubby-like proteins (TULPs) are found in a broad range of multicellular organisms. In mammals, genetic mutation of tubby or other TULPs can result in one or more of three disease phenotypes: obesity (from which the name "tubby" is derived), retinal degeneration, and hearing loss. These disease phenotypes indicate a vital role for tubby proteins; however, no biochemical function has yet been ascribed to any member of this protein family. A structure-directed approach was employed to investigate the biological function of these proteins. The crystal structure of the core domain from mouse tubby was determined at a resolution of 1.9 angstroms. From primarily structural clues, experiments were devised, the results of which suggest that TULPs are a unique family of bipartite transcription factors. PMID:10591637

  8. Chromatin assembly factor I and Hir proteins contribute to building functional kinetochores in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Judith A.; Franco, Alexa A.; Osley, Mary Ann; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    Budding yeast centromeres are comprised of ∼125-bp DNA sequences that direct formation of the kinetochore, a specialized chromatin structure that mediates spindle attachment to chromosomes. We report here a novel role for the histone deposition complex chromatin assembly factor I (CAF-I) in building centromeric chromatin. The contribution of CAF-I to kinetochore function overlaps that of the Hir proteins, which have also been implicated in nucleosome formation and heterochromatic gene silencing. cacΔ hirΔ double mutant cells lacking both CAF-I and Hir proteins are delayed in anaphase entry in a spindle assembly checkpoint-dependent manner. Further, cacΔ and hirΔ deletions together cause increased rates of chromosome missegregation, genetic synergies with mutations in kinetochore protein genes, and alterations in centromeric chromatin structure. Finally, CAF-I subunits and Hir1 are enriched at centromeres, indicating that these proteins make a direct contribution to centromeric chromatin structures. PMID:11782447

  9. Structural Basis for Protein anti-Aggregation Activity of the Trigger Factor Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Saio, Tomohide; Guan, Xiao; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones prevent aggregation and misfolding of proteins but scarcity of structural data has impeded an understanding of the recognition and anti-aggregation mechanisms. Here we report the solution structure, dynamics and energetics of three Trigger Factor (TF) chaperone molecules in complex with alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) captured in the unfolded state. Our data show that TF uses multiple sites to bind to several regions of the PhoA substrate protein primarily through hydrophobic contacts. NMR relaxation experiments show that TF interacts with PhoA in a highly dynamic fashion but as the number and length of the PhoA regions engaged by TF increases, a more stable complex gradually emerges. Multivalent binding keeps the substrate protein in an extended, unfolded conformation. The results show how molecular chaperones recognize unfolded polypeptides and how by acting as unfoldases and holdases prevent the aggregation and premature (mis)folding of unfolded proteins. PMID:24812405

  10. Profiling lethal factor interacting proteins from human stomach using T7 phage display screening

    PubMed Central

    CARDONA-CORREA, ALBIN; RIOS-VELAZQUEZ, CARLOS

    2016-01-01

    The anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc dependent metalloproteinase that cleaves the majority of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases and a member of NOD-like receptor proteins, inducing cell apoptosis. Despite efforts to fully understand the Bacillus anthracis toxin components, the gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies demonstrated gastric ulceration, and a substantial bacterial growth rate in Peyer's patches. However, the complete molecular pathways of the disease that results in tissue damage by LF proteolytic activity remains unclear. In the present study, to identify the profile of the proteins potentially involved in GI anthrax, protein-protein interactions were investigated using human stomach T7 phage display (T7PD) cDNA libraries. T7PD is a high throughput technique that allows the expression of cloned DNA sequences as peptides on the phage surface, enabling the selection and identification of protein ligands. A wild type and mutant LF (E687A) were used to differentiate interaction sites. A total of 124 clones were identified from 194 interacting-phages, at both the DNA and protein level, by in silico analysis. Databases revealed that the selected candidates were proteins from different families including lipase, peptidase-A1 and cation transport families, among others. Furthermore, individual T7PD candidates were tested against LF in order to detect their specificity to the target molecule, resulting in 10 LF-interacting peptides. With a minimum concentration of LF for interaction at 1 μg/ml, the T7PD isolated pepsin A3 pre-protein (PAP) demonstrated affinity to both types of LF. In addition, PAP was isolated in various lengths for the same protein, exhibiting common regions following PRALINE alignment. These findings will help elucidate and improve the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of GI anthrax, and aid in the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:27035230

  11. Reduction of Factor VIII Inhibitor Titers During Immune Tolerance Induction With Recombinant Factor VIII-Fc Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Groomes, Charles L; Gianferante, David M; Crouch, Gary D; Parekh, Dina S; Scott, David W; Lieuw, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The development of inhibitors toward factor VIII (FVIII) is a common and serious complication of hemophilia A (HA) therapy. Patients with hemophilia who develop inhibitors often undergo time- and resource-intensive immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. We report a 15-month-old male with severe HA and a high-titer inhibitor that occurred while receiving prophylactic treatment with recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), in whom significant inhibitor titer reduction was achieved with thrice weekly infusions of a new, prolonged half-life rFVIII-Fc fusion protein product (trade name Eloctate). Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of Eloctate in ITI protocols. PMID:26739399

  12. Recombinant Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterisation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Nephroblastoma-Overexpressed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Wilhelm; Kupper, Michael; Hoffmann, Kurt; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    The CCN family of proteins, especially its prominent member, the Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) has been identified as a possible biomarker for the diagnosis of fibrotic diseases. As a downstream mediator of TGF-β1 signalling, it is involved in tissue scarring, stimulates interstitial deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, and promotes proliferation of several cell types. Another member of this family, the Nephroblastoma-Overexpressed protein (NOV/CCN3), has growth-inhibiting properties. First reports further suggest that these two CCN family members act opposite to each other in regulating extracellular matrix protein expression and reciprocally influence their own expression when over-expressed. We have established stable HEK and Flp-In-293 clones as productive sources for recombinant human CCN2/CTGF. In addition, we generated an adenoviral vector for recombinant expression of rat NOV and established protocols to purify large quantities of these CCN proteins. The identity of purified human CCN2/CTGF and rat CCN3/NOV was proven by In-gel digest followed by ESI-TOF/MS mass spectrometry. The biological activity of purified proteins was demonstrated using a Smad3-sensitive reporter gene and BrdU proliferation assay in permanent cell line EA•hy 926 cells. We further demonstrate for the first time that both recombinant CCN proteins are N-glycosylated. PMID:21209863

  13. Alpha subunit of eukaryotic translational initiation factor-2 is a heat-shock protein.

    PubMed

    Colbert, R A; Hucul, J A; Scorsone, K A; Young, D A

    1987-12-15

    The use of ultra high resolution giant two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has expanded the number of recognizable heat-shock proteins to 68 inductions in rat thymic lymphocytes, many of which are among the less abundant cellular proteins (Maytin, E. V., Colbert, R. A., and Young, D. A. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 2384-2392). Previous studies also show that cells receiving a prior heat shock recover more rapidly from the inhibition of protein synthesis induced by a second heat shock. In this report we use a monoclonal antibody to identify the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF-2 alpha) as a heat-shock protein. Its relative rate of synthesis increases approximately 40% in the 2nd h and 5-fold in the 4th h of a continuous heat shock and is stimulated more dramatically, 15-fold, in the 3rd h of recovery from a 1-h heat shock. These results suggest that the induction of eIF-2 alpha in the heat-shock response may be important for restoring the cell's ability to initiate protein synthesis. In addition to identifying a function for one of the heat-shock proteins, our findings draw attention to the likelihood that other low-abundance heat-shock proteins may play critical roles in the heat-shock response. PMID:3500171

  14. Characterization of Differential Protein Tethering at the Plasma Membrane in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan D.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Physical tethering of membrane proteins to the cortical actin cytoskeleton provides functional organization to the plasma membrane and contributes to diverse cellular processes including cell signaling, vesicular trafficking, endocytosis, and migration. For these processes to occur, membrane protein tethering must be dynamically regulated in response to environmental cues. In this study, we describe a novel biochemical scheme for isolating the complement of plasma membrane proteins that are physically tethered to the actin cytoskeleton. We utilized this method in combination with tandem liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) to demonstrate that cytoskeletal tethering of membrane proteins is acutely regulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in normal human kidney (HK2) cells. Our results indicate that several proteins known to be involved in EGF signaling, as well as other proteins not traditionally associated with this pathway, are tethered to the cytoskeleton in dynamic fashion. Further analysis of one hit from our proteomic survey, the receptor phosphotyrosine phosphatase PTPRS, revealed a correlation between cytoskeletal tethering and endosomal trafficking in response to EGF. This finding parallels previous indications that PTPRS is involved in the desensitization of EGFR and provides a potential mechanism to coordinate localization of these two membrane proteins in the same compartment upon EGFR activation. PMID:22559174

  15. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulates protein kinase D through the activation of phospholipase Cgamma and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Van Lint, J; Ni, Y; Valius, M; Merlevede, W; Vandenheede, J R

    1998-03-20

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates protein kinase D (PKD) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We have used a series of PDGF receptor mutants that display a selective impairment of the binding of SH2-containing proteins (GTPase-activating protein, SHP-2, phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma), or phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)) to show that Tyr-1021, the PLCgamma-binding site, is essential for PKD stimulation by PDGF in A431 cells. We next investigated whether any one of these four binding sites could mediate PKD activation in the absence of the other three sites. F5, a receptor mutant that lacks all four binding sites for GTPase-activating protein, PLCgamma, PI3K, and SHP-2, fails to activate PKD. A panel of single add-back mutants was used to investigate if any one of these four sites could restore signaling to PKD. Of the four sites, only the PLCgamma+ single add-back receptor restored PDGF-mediated activation of PKD, and only this add-back receptor produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a PDGF-dependent manner. 1,2-Dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol, a membrane-permeant DAG analog, was found to be sufficient for activation of PKD. Taken together, these data indicate that PLCgamma activation is not only necessary, but also sufficient to mediate PDGF-induced PKD activation. Although the presence of a pleckstrin homology domain makes PKD a potential PI3K target, PKD was not stimulated by selective PI3K activation, and wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K, did not inhibit PDGF signaling to PKD. The activation of PKD by DAG or by the wild-type and PLCgamma+ add-back PDGF receptors was inhibited by GF109203X, suggesting a role for protein kinase C in the stimulation of PKD by PDGF. PDGF induced a time-dependent phosphorylation of PKD that closely correlated with activation. The PDGF-induced activation and phosphorylation of PKD were reversed by in vitro incubation of PKD with protein phosphatase 1 or 2A, indicating that PDGF signaling to PKD involves the Ser

  16. Different Protein Kinase C Isoforms Determine Growth Factor Specificity in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Kevin C.; Soh, Jae-Won; Yoshida, Keiko; Eves, Eva M.; Weinstein, I. Bernard; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2000-01-01

    Although mitogenic and differentiating factors often activate a number of common signaling pathways, the mechanisms leading to their distinct cellular outcomes have not been elucidated. In a previous report, we demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (ERK) activation by the neurogenic agents fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and nerve growth factor is dependent on protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), whereas MAP kinase activation in response to the mitogen epidermal growth factor (EGF) is independent of PKCδ in rat hippocampal (H19-7) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. We now show that EGF activates MAP kinase through a PKCζ-dependent pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and PDK1 in H19-7 cells. PKCζ, like PKCδ, acts upstream of MEK, and PKCζ can potentiate Raf-1 activation by EGF. Inhibition of PKCζ also blocks EGF-induced DNA synthesis as monitored by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in H19-7 cells. Finally, in embryonic rat brain hippocampal cell cultures, inhibitors of PKCζ or PKCδ suppress MAP kinase activation by EGF or FGF, respectively, indicating that these factors activate distinct signaling pathways in primary as well as immortalized neural cells. Taken together, these results implicate different PKC isoforms as determinants of growth factor signaling specificity within the same cell. Furthermore, these data provide a mechanism whereby different growth factors can differentially activate a common signaling intermediate and thereby generate biological diversity. PMID:10891480

  17. TATA-binding protein and associated factors in polymerase II and polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, R E; Sharp, P A

    1993-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase I (pol I), pol II, and pol III requires the TATA-binding protein (TBP). This protein functions in association with distinct TBP-associated factors (TAFs) which may specify the nature of the polymerase selected for initiation at a promoter site. In the pol III transcription system, the TBP-TAF complex is a component of the TFIIIB factor. This factor has been resolved into a TBP-TAF complex and another component, both of which are required for reconstitution of transcription by pol III. Neither the TBP-TAF complexes B-TFIID and D-TFIID, which were previously characterized as active for pol II transcription, nor TBP alone can complement pol III transcription reactions that are dependent upon the TBP-TAF subcomponent of TFIIIB. Surprisingly, the TBP-TAF subcomponent of TFIIIB is active in reconstitution of pol II transcription. Images PMID:8247010

  18. Fibroblast growth factor 3, a protein with a dual subcellular fate, is interacting with human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, Marianne; Reimers, Kerstin; Wirz, Werner; Gressner, Axel M.; Mueller, Robert; Kiefer, Paul . E-mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-12-16

    The secreted isoform of fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3) induces a mitogenic cell response, while the nuclear form inhibits cell proliferation. Recently, we identified a nucleolar FGF3-binding protein which is implicated in processing of pre-rRNA as a possible target of nuclear FGF3 signalling. Here, we report a second candidate protein identified by a yeast two-hybrid screen for nuclear FGF3 action, ribosomal protein S2, rpS2. Recombinant rpS2 binds to in vitro translated FGF3 and to nuclear FGF3 extracted from transfected COS-1 cells. Characterization of the FGF3 binding domain of rpS2 showed that both the Arg-Gly-rich N-terminal region and a short carboxyl-terminal sequence of rpS2 are necessary for FGF3 binding. Mapping the S2 binding domains of FGF3 revealed that these domains are important for both NoBP and rpS2 interaction. Transient co-expression of rpS2 and nuclear FGF3 resulted in a reduced nucleolar localization of the FGF. These findings suggest that the nuclear form of FGF3 inhibits cell proliferation by interfering with ribosomal biogenesis.

  19. Osteoblast-specific factor 2: cloning of a putative bone adhesion protein with homology with the insect protein fasciclin I.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, S; Kikuno, R; Tezuka, K; Amann, E

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA library prepared from the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 was screened for the presence of specifically expressed genes by employing a combined subtraction hybridization/differential screening approach. A cDNA was identified and sequenced which encodes a protein designated osteoblast-specific factor 2 (OSF-2) comprising 811 amino acids. OSF-2 has a typical signal sequence, followed by a cysteine-rich domain, a fourfold repeated domain and a C-terminal domain. The protein lacks a typical transmembrane region. The fourfold repeated domain of OSF-2 shows homology with the insect protein fasciclin I. RNA analyses revealed that OSF-2 is expressed in bone and to a lesser extent in lung, but not in other tissues. Mouse OSF-2 cDNA was subsequently used as a probe to clone the human counterpart. Mouse and human OSF-2 show a high amino acid sequence conservation except for the signal sequence and two regions in the C-terminal domain in which 'in-frame' insertions or deletions are observed, implying alternative splicing events. On the basis of the amino acid sequence homology with fasciclin I, we suggest that OSF-2 functions as a homophilic adhesion molecule in bone formation. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8363580

  20. Complement factor H–related hybrid protein deregulates complement in dense deposit disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Wiesener, Michael; Eberhardt, Hannes U.; Hartmann, Andrea; Uzonyi, Barbara; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Kerstin; Buettner, Maike; Goodship, Tim; Hugo, Christian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    The renal disorder C3 glomerulopathy with dense deposit disease (C3G-DDD) pattern results from complement dysfunction and primarily affects children and young adults. There is no effective treatment, and patients often progress to end-stage renal failure. A small fraction of C3G-DDD cases linked to factor H or C3 gene mutations as well as autoantibodies have been reported. Here, we examined an index family with 2 patients with C3G-DDD and identified a chromosomal deletion in the complement factor H–related (CFHR) gene cluster. This deletion resulted in expression of a hybrid CFHR2-CFHR5 plasma protein. The recombinant hybrid protein stabilized the C3 convertase and reduced factor H–mediated convertase decay. One patient was refractory to plasma replacement and exchange therapy, as evidenced by the hybrid protein quickly returning to pretreatment plasma levels. Subsequently, complement inhibitors were tested on serum from the patient for their ability to block activity of CFHR2-CFHR5. Soluble CR1 restored defective C3 convertase regulation; however, neither eculizumab nor tagged compstatin had any effect. Our findings provide insight into the importance of CFHR proteins for C3 convertase regulation and identify a genetic variation in the CFHR gene cluster that promotes C3G-DDD. Monitoring copy number and sequence variations in the CFHR gene cluster in C3G-DDD and kidney patients with C3G-DDD variations will help guide treatment strategies. PMID:24334459

  1. Yeast GAL11 protein is a distinctive type transcription factor that enhances basal transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Hiraoka, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The yeast auxiliary transcription factor GAL11, a candidate for the coactivator, was partially purified from yeast cells, and its function was characterized in a cell-free transcription system. The partially purified GAL11 protein stimulated basal transcription from the CYC1 core promoter by a factor of 4-5 at the step of preinitiation complex formation. GAL11 protein also enhanced transcription activated by general regulatory factor 1, GAL4-AH, or GAL4-VP16 to the same extent as the basal transcription. Therefore, the apparent potentiation of the activators by GAL11 was attributable to the stimulation of basal transcription. The wild-type GAL11 protein (but not a mutant-type protein) produced in bacteria stimulated transcription as effectively as GAL11 from yeast. These results suggest that GAL11 functions as a positive cofactor of basal and activator-induced transcription in a cell-free transcription system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8378310

  2. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-08-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  3. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  4. Factors influencing subcellular localization of the human papillomavirus L2 minor structural protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kieback, Elisa; Mueller, Martin . E-mail: Martin.Mueller@dkfz.de

    2006-02-05

    Two structural proteins form the capsids of papillomaviruses. The major structural protein L1 is the structural determinant of the capsids and is present in 360 copies arranged in 72 pentamers. The minor structural protein L2 is estimated to be present in twelve copies per capsid. Possible roles for L2 in interaction with cell surface receptors and in virion uptake have been suggested. As previously reported, L2 localizes in subnuclear domains identified as nuclear domain 10 (ND10). As it was demonstrated that L2 is able to recruit viral and cellular proteins to ND10, a possible role for L2 as a mediator in viral assembly has been proposed. In this study, we determined factors influencing the localization of L2 at ND10. Under conditions of moderate L2 expression level and in the absence of heterologous viral components, we observed that, in contrast to previous reports, L2 is mainly distributed homogeneously throughout the nucleus. L2, however, is recruited to ND10 at a higher expression level or in the presence of viral components derived from vaccinia virus or from Semliki Forest virus. We observed that translocation of L2 to ND10 is not a concentration-dependent accumulation but rather seems to be triggered by yet unidentified cellular factors. In contrast to HPV 11 and 16 L2, the HPV 18 L2 protein seems to require L1 for efficient nuclear accumulation.

  5. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein Loads as a Separate Factor onto DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Suzanne; Volker, Marcel; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Nigg, Alex L.; Moné, Martijn J.; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main DNA repair pathway in mammals for removal of UV-induced lesions. NER involves the concerted action of more than 25 polypeptides in a coordinated fashion. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) has been suggested to function as a central organizer and damage verifier in NER. How XPA reaches DNA lesions and how the protein is distributed in time and space in living cells are unknown. Here we studied XPA in vivo by using a cell line stably expressing physiological levels of functional XPA fused to green fluorescent protein and by applying quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The majority of XPA moves rapidly through the nucleoplasm with a diffusion rate different from those of other NER factors tested, arguing against a preassembled XPA-containing NER complex. DNA damage induced a transient (∼5-min) immobilization of maximally 30% of XPA. Immobilization depends on XPC, indicating that XPA is not the initial lesion recognition protein in vivo. Moreover, loading of replication protein A on NER lesions was not dependent on XPA. Thus, XPA participates in NER by incorporation of free diffusing molecules in XPC-dependent NER-DNA complexes. This study supports a model for a rapid consecutive assembly of free NER factors, and a relatively slow simultaneous disassembly, after repair. PMID:12897146

  6. Neural regeneration protein is a novel chemoattractive and neuronal survival-promoting factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gorba, Thorsten; Bradoo, Privahini; Antonic, Ana; Marvin, Keith; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E.; Reymann, Klaus G.; Gluckman, Peter D.; Sieg, Frank . E-mail: fsieg@neurenpharma.com

    2006-10-01

    Neurogenesis and neuronal migration are the prerequisites for the development of the central nervous system. We have identified a novel rodent gene encoding for a neural regeneration protein (NRP) with an activity spectrum similar to the chemokine stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1, but with much greater potency. The Nrp gene is encoded as a forward frameshift to the hypothetical alkylated DNA repair protein AlkB. The predicted protein sequence of NRP contains domains with homology to survival-promoting peptide (SPP) and the trefoil protein TFF-1. The Nrp gene is first expressed in neural stem cells and expression continues in glial lineages. Recombinant NRP and NRP-derived peptides possess biological activities including induction of neural migration and proliferation, promotion of neuronal survival, enhancement of neurite outgrowth and promotion of neuronal differentiation from neural stem cells. NRP exerts its effect on neuronal survival by phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 and Akt kinases, whereas NRP stimulation of neural migration depends solely on p44/42 MAP kinase activity. Taken together, the expression profile of Nrp, the existence in its predicted protein structure of domains with similarities to known neuroprotective and migration-inducing factors and the high potency of NRP-derived synthetic peptides acting in femtomolar concentrations suggest it to be a novel gene of relevance in cellular and developmental neurobiology.

  7. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  8. Profiling lethal factor interacting proteins from human stomach using T7 phage display screening.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Correa, Albin; Rios-Velazquez, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    The anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc dependent metalloproteinase that cleaves the majority of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases and a member of NOD-like receptor proteins, inducing cell apoptosis. Despite efforts to fully understand the Bacillus anthracis toxin components, the gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies demonstrated gastric ulceration, and a substantial bacterial growth rate in Peyer's patches. However, the complete molecular pathways of the disease that results in tissue damage by LF proteolytic activity remains unclear. In the present study, to identify the profile of the proteins potentially involved in GI anthrax, protein‑protein interactions were investigated using human stomach T7 phage display (T7PD) cDNA libraries. T7PD is a high throughput technique that allows the expression of cloned DNA sequences as peptides on the phage surface, enabling the selection and identification of protein ligands. A wild type and mutant LF (E687A) were used to differentiate interaction sites. A total of 124 clones were identified from 194 interacting‑phages, at both the DNA and protein level, by in silico analysis. Databases revealed that the selected candidates were proteins from different families including lipase, peptidase‑A1 and cation transport families, among others. Furthermore, individual T7PD candidates were tested against LF in order to detect their specificity to the target molecule, resulting in 10 LF‑interacting peptides. With a minimum concentration of LF for interaction at 1 µg/ml, the T7PD isolated pepsin A3 pre‑protein (PAP) demonstrated affinity to both types of LF. In addition, PAP was isolated in various lengths for the same protein, exhibiting common regions following PRALINE alignment. These findings will help elucidate and improve the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of GI anthrax, and aid in the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID

  9. Binding affinity prediction for protein-ligand complexes based on β contacts and B factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Li, Jinyan

    2013-11-25

    Accurate determination of protein-ligand binding affinity is a fundamental problem in biochemistry useful for many applications including drug design and protein-ligand docking. A number of scoring functions have been proposed for the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity. However, accurate prediction is still a challenging problem because poor performance is often seen in the evaluation under the leave-one-cluster-out cross-validation (LCOCV). We introduce a new scoring function named B2BScore to improve the prediction performance. B2BScore integrates two physicochemical properties for protein-ligand binding affinity prediction. One is the property of β contacts. A β contact between two atoms requires no other atoms to interrupt the atomic contact and assumes that the two atoms should have enough direct contact area. The other is the property of B factor to capture the atomic mobility in the dynamic protein-ligand binding process. Tested on the PDBBind2009 data set, B2BScore shows superior prediction performance to existing methods on independent test data as well as under the LCOCV evaluation framework. In particular, B2BScore achieves a significant LCOCV improvement across 26 protein clusters-a big increase of the averaged Pearson's correlation coefficients from 0.418 to 0.518 and a significant decrease of standard deviation of the coefficients from 0.352 to 0.196. We also identified several important and intuitive contact descriptors of protein-ligand binding through the random forest learning in B2BScore. Some of these descriptors are closely related to contacts between carbon atoms without covalent-bond oxygen/nitrogen, preferred contacts of metal ions, interfacial backbone atoms from proteins, or π rings. Some others are negative descriptors relating to those contacts with nitrogen atoms without covalent-bond hydrogens or nonpreferred contacts of metal ions. These descriptors can be directly used to guide protein-ligand docking. PMID:24191692

  10. Enhanced Production of Insulin-like Growth Factor I Protein in Escherichia coli by Optimization of Five Key Factors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbari, Javad; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Vahidi, Hossein; Moghimi, Hamidreza; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Namvaran, Mohammad Mehdi; Jafari, Sevda

    2015-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) is a kind of growth factor with clinical significance in medicine. Up to now, E. coli expression system has been widely used as a host to produce rhIGF-1 with high yields. Batch cultures as non-continuous fermentations were carried out to overproduce rhIGF-I in E. coli. The major objective of this study is over- production of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I) through a developed process by recruiting effective factors in order to achieve the most recombinant protein. In this study we investigated the effect of culture medium, induction temperature and amount of inducer on cell growth and IGF-1 production. Taguchi design of experiments (DOE) method was used as the statistical method. Analysis of experimental data showed that maximum production of rhIGF-I was occurred in 32y culture medium at 32 °C and 0.05 Mm IPTG. Under this condition, 0.694 g/L of rhIGF-I was produced as the inclusion bodies. Following optimization of these three factors, we have also optimized the amount of glucose and induction time in 5 liter top bench bioreactor. Full factorial design of experiment method was used for these two factors as the statistical method. 10 g/L and OD600=5 were selected as the optimum point of Glucose amount and induction time, respectively. Finally, we reached to a concentration of 1.26 g/L rhIGF-1 at optimum condition. PMID:26330880

  11. Enhanced Production of Insulin-like Growth Factor I Protein in Escherichia coli by Optimization of Five Key Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbari, Javad; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Vahidi, Hossein; Moghimi, Hamidreza; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Namvaran, Mohammad Mehdi; Jafari, Sevda

    2015-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) is a kind of growth factor with clinical significance in medicine. Up to now, E. coli expression system has been widely used as a host to produce rhIGF-1 with high yields. Batch cultures as non-continuous fermentations were carried out to overproduce rhIGF-I in E. coli. The major objective of this study is over- production of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I) through a developed process by recruiting effective factors in order to achieve the most recombinant protein. In this study we investigated the effect of culture medium, induction temperature and amount of inducer on cell growth and IGF-1 production. Taguchi design of experiments (DOE) method was used as the statistical method. Analysis of experimental data showed that maximum production of rhIGF-I was occurred in 32y culture medium at 32 °C and 0.05 Mm IPTG. Under this condition, 0.694 g/L of rhIGF-I was produced as the inclusion bodies. Following optimization of these three factors, we have also optimized the amount of glucose and induction time in 5 liter top bench bioreactor. Full factorial design of experiment method was used for these two factors as the statistical method. 10 g/L and OD600=5 were selected as the optimum point of Glucose amount and induction time, respectively. Finally, we reached to a concentration of 1.26 g/L rhIGF-1 at optimum condition. PMID:26330880

  12. Structural Insights into mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhubing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yanyan; Li, Chuanchuan; Wang, Xin; He, Feng; Sun, Lina; Jiao, Shi; Shi, Weiyang; Zhou, Zhaocai

    2015-10-30

    In response to viral infection, cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors sense viral RNA and promote oligomerization of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), which then recruits tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family proteins, including TRAF6, to activate an antiviral response. Currently, the interaction between MAVS and TRAF6 is only partially understood, and atomic details are lacking. Here, we demonstrated that MAVS directly interacts with TRAF6 through its potential TRAF6-binding motif 2 (T6BM2; amino acids 455-460). Further, we solved the crystal structure of MAVS T6BM2 in complex with the TRAF6 TRAF_C domain at 2.95 Å resolution. T6BM2 of MAVS binds to the canonical adaptor-binding groove of the TRAF_C domain. Structure-directed mutational analyses in vitro and in cells revealed that MAVS binding to TRAF6 via T6BM2 instead of T6BM1 is essential but not sufficient for an optimal antiviral response. Particularly, a MAVS mutant Y460E retained its TRAF6-binding ability as predicted but showed significantly impaired signaling activity, highlighting the functional importance of this tyrosine. Moreover, these observations were further confirmed in MAVS(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Collectively, our work provides a structural basis for understanding the MAVS-TRAF6 antiviral response. PMID:26385923

  13. Neisseria meningitidis factor H-binding protein fHbp: a key virulence factor and vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Seib, Kate L; Scarselli, Maria; Comanducci, Maurizio; Toneatto, Daniela; Masignani, Vega

    2015-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of meningitis and sepsis worldwide. The first broad-spectrum multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B meningococcus (MenB), 4CMenB (Bexsero(®)), was approved by the EMA in 2013, for prevention of MenB disease in all age groups, and by the US FDA in January 2015 for use in adolescents. A second protein-based MenB vaccine has also been approved in the USA for adolescents (rLP2086, Trumenba(®)). Both vaccines contain the lipoprotein factor H-binding protein (fHbp). Preclinical studies demonstrated that fHbp elicits a robust bactericidal antibody response that correlates with the amount of fHbp expressed on the bacterial surface. fHbp is able to selectively bind human factor H, the key regulator of the alternative complement pathway, and this has important implications both for meningococcal pathogenesis and for vaccine design. Here, we review the functional and structural properties of fHbp, the strategies that led to the design of the two fHbp-based vaccines and the data generated during clinical studies. PMID:25704037

  14. Elongation factor-1A1 is a novel substrate of the protein phosphatase 1-TIMAP complex.

    PubMed

    Boratkó, Anita; Péter, Margit; Thalwieser, Zsófia; Kovács, Előd; Csortos, Csilla

    2015-12-01

    TIMAP (TGF-β inhibited membrane associated protein) is a protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulatory subunit highly abundant in endothelial cells and it is involved in the maintenance of pulmonary endothelial barrier function. It localizes mainly in the plasma membrane, but it is also present in the nuclei and cytoplasm. Direct interaction of TIMAP with the eukaryotic elongation factor 1 A1 (eEF1A1) is shown by pull-down, LC-MS/MS, Far-Western and immunoprecipitations. In connection with the so called moonlighting functions of the elongation factor, eEF1A is thought to establish protein-protein interactions through a transcription-dependent nuclear export motif, TD-NEM, and to aid nuclear export of TD-NEM containing proteins. We found that a TD-NEM-like motif of TIMAP has a critical role in its specific binding to eEF1A1. However, eEF1A1 is not or not exclusively responsible for the nuclear export of TIMAP. On the contrary, TIMAP seems to regulate membrane localization of eEF1A1 as the elongation factor co-localized with TIMAP in the plasma membrane fraction of control endothelial cells, but it has disappeared from the membrane in TIMAP depleted cells. It is demonstrated that membrane localization of eEF1A1 depends on the phosphorylation state of its Thr residue(s); and ROCK phosphorylated eEF1A1 is a novel substrate for TIMAP-PP1 underlining the complex regulatory role of TIMAP in the endothelium. The elongation factor seems to be involved in the regulation of endothelial cell attachment and spreading as silencing of eEF1A1 positively affected these processes which were monitored by transendothelial resistance measurements. PMID:26497934

  15. Identification of a specific protein factor defective in group A xeroderma pigmentosum cells.

    PubMed

    Sugano, T; Uchida, T; Yamaizumi, M

    1991-10-01

    A protein factor which corrects the defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells belonging to complementation group A (XP-A cells) was detected in a cell extract prepared from calf thymus. The activity of this factor was measured as the amount of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) reappearing in UV-irradiated XP-A cells after microinjection of the extract. The native molecular mass of this factor was estimated to be 80 kDa by gel-filtration and 25 kDa by glycerol gradient centrifugation. The activity was, however, recovered at a position corresponding to 43 kDa after renaturation on an SDS-PAGE gel. The isoelectric point was determined to be approximately 7.5 by measuring the activity after renaturation on an IEF gel. These values were obtained with a partially purified sample. A spot corresponding to these values was detected on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with a highly purified sample recovered from an SDS-PAGE gel. The purified protein stimulated UDS specifically in the XP-A cells and endowed the cells with a normal level of UV-resistance. The XP-A cells injected with the factor also showed a normal level of UDS after treatment with either 4HAQO or psoralen plus UV-A. This factor (XP-A complementing factor; XP-ACF) may be involved in the repair of DNA damage induced by various agents. PMID:1778992

  16. Investigating a novel protein using mass spectrometry: the example of tumor differentiation factor (TDF).

    PubMed

    Woods, Alisa G; Sokolowska, Izabela; Deinhardt, Katrin; Darie, Costel C

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of central nervous system (CNS) molecules can include the identification of new molecules and their receptor systems. Discovery of novel proteins and elucidation of receptor targets can be accomplished using mass spectrometry (MS). We describe a case study of such a molecule, which our lab has studied using MS in combination with other protein identification techniques, such as immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting. This molecule is known as tumor differentiation factor (TDF), a recently-found protein secreted by the pituitary into the blood. TDF mRNA has been detected in brain; not heart, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, or pancreas. Currently TDF has an unclear function, and prior to our studies, its localization was only minimally understood, with no understanding of receptor targets. We investigated the distribution of TDF in the rat brain using IHC and immunofluorescence (IF). TDF protein was detected in pituitary and most other brain regions, in specific neurons but not astrocytes. We found TDF immunoreactivity in cultured neuroblastoma, not astrocytoma. These data suggest that TDF is localized to neurons, not to astrocytes. Our group also conducted studies to identify the TDF receptor (TDF-R). Using LC-MS/MS and Western blotting, we identified the members of the Heat Shock 70-kDa family of proteins (HSP70) as potential TDF-R candidates in both MCF7 and BT-549 human breast cancer cells (HBCC) and PC3, DU145, and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells (HPCC), but not in HeLa cells, NG108 neuroblastoma, or HDF-a and BLK CL.4 cell fibroblasts or fibroblast-like cells. These studies have combined directed protein identification techniques with mass spectrometry to increase our understanding of a novel protein that may have distinct actions as a hormone in the body and as a growth factor in the brain. PMID:24952200

  17. Competitive-Protein Adsorption in Contact Activation of Blood Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Rui; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) is moderated by the protein composition of the fluid phase in which FXII is dissolved. Solution yield of FXIIa arising from FXII contact with hydrophilic activating particles (fully-water-wettable glass) suspended in a protein cocktail is shown to be significantly greater than that obtained under corresponding activation conditions in buffer solutions containing only FXII. By contrast, solution yield of FXIIa arising from FXII contact with hydrophobic particles (silanized glass) suspended in protein cocktail is sharply lower than obtained in buffer. This confirms that contact activation is not specific to anionic hydrophilic surfaces as proposed by the accepted biochemistry of surface activation. Rather, contact activation in the presence of proteins unrelated to the plasma coagulation cascade leads to an apparent specificity for hydrophilic surfaces that is actually due to a relative diminution of activation at hydrophobic surfaces and an enhancement at hydrophilic surfaces. Furthermore, the rate of FXIIa accumulation in whole-plasma and buffer solution is found to decrease with time in the continuous presence of activating surfaces, leading to a steady-state FXIIa yield dependent on the initial FXII solution concentration for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic procoagulant particles suspended in either plasma, protein cocktail, or buffer. These results strongly suggest that activation competes with an autoinhibition reaction in which FXIIa itself inhibits FXII→FXIIa. Experimental results are modeled using a reaction scheme invoking FXII activation and autoinhibition linked to protein adsorption to procoagulant surfaces, where FXII activation is presumed to proceed by either autoactivation ( FXII→surfaceFXIIa) and autohydrolysis ( FXII→FXIIa2FXIIa) in buffer solution or autoactivation and reciprocal activation (kallikrein mediated hydrolysis) in plasma. FXII adsorption competition with other

  18. Oxidative Damage and Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Protein Expression in Normal Skin and Keloid Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon Jin; Kwon, Sun Bum; Kim, Chul Han; Cho, Hyun Deuk; Nam, Hae Seon; Lee, Sang Han; Lee, Mi Woo; Nam, Doo Hyun; Choi, Chang Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the induction of apoptosis under pathological conditions. Recently, a significant increase in ROS production and disrupted apoptosis mechanisms in keloids have been reported. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) represents one of the most important cellular defense mechanisms against oxidative stress and is implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. Recently, it has been reported that Nrf2 upregulates Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein. Objective To compare Nrf2 protein expression in normal skin tissues to keloid tissues. Methods ROS generation in keloid tissues was evaluated with OxyBlot analysis. Western blotting and/or immunohistochemical staining approaches were used to study expression of Nrf2 or Bcl-2 in keloid and normal skin tissues. Cellular fractionation was performed to examine subcellular distribution of Nrf2. Transfection of fibroblasts with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was conducted to understand the relationship between Nrf2 expression and apoptosis induction. Results Protein oxidation, a marker of oxidative stress, is increased in keloid tissues. Western blot analysis clearly showed that Nrf2 and Bcl-2 are downregulated in keloid tissues. Immunohistochemical staining of Nrf2 confirmed the results of the western blot analysis. Transfection of fibroblasts with the Nrf2-specific siRNA results in increased apoptosis and decreased cell viability. Conclusion Collectively, our data indicate that Nrf2 expression is downregulated in keloid tissues, and that Nrf2 is involved in the development of apoptosis in Nrf2 siRNA-transfected fibroblasts. We propose that a defective antioxidant system and apoptotic dysregulation may participate in keloid pathogenesis. PMID:26512164

  19. Binding proteins from fish sera and intrinsic factor compared in vitamin B12 radioassay.

    PubMed

    Ithakissios, D S; Kubiatowicz, D O; Windorski, D C; Wicks, J H

    1977-11-01

    We compare serum proteins from rainbow trout, chinook salmon, coho salmon, and oyster toadfish with intrinsic factor as binding proteins in a simplified radioassay for B12. Regression analysis of B12 values, determined in 21 serum samples, shows good correlation (r greater than .975) between results for the fish sera and intrinsic factor. The accuracy of the five assays, as evaluated by analytical recovery of B12 added to pooled human serum, ranges from 90 to 110%. Intra-assay precision ranges from 2.6% for coho salmon serum to 5.5% for intrinsic factor, Ionic strength and variations in pH influence binding of [57Co]vit B12 to the fish sera. Maximum binding occurs from pH 6 to 10 at an ionic strength of 0.1 for all sera. The sera are stable for longer than two years when stored at -20 degrees C. Important advantages of fish sera are their high binding capacity (typical assay dilutions range from 1500-fold for trout serum to more than 50 000-fold for chinook salmon); high affinity for B12 (K greater than 10(12) liter/mol); their relative constant binding characteristics as compared to commercial intrinsic factor preparations; and the finding that the accuracy of radioassays with use of fish sera is not significantly affected by the amount of B12 or human serum proteins present. PMID:912869

  20. HSV Usurps Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 3 Subunit M for Viral Protein Translation: Novel Prevention Target

    PubMed Central

    Cheshenko, Natalia; Trepanier, Janie B.; Segarra, Theodore J.; Fuller, A. Oveta; Herold, Betsy C.

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of genital herpes is a global health priority. B5, a recently identified ubiquitous human protein, was proposed as a candidate HSV entry receptor. The current studies explored its role in HSV infection. Viral plaque formation was reduced by ∼90% in human cells transfected with small interfering RNA targeting B5 or nectin-1, an established entry receptor. However, the mechanisms were distinct. Silencing of nectin-1 prevented intracellular delivery of viral capsids, nuclear transport of a viral tegument protein, and release of calcium stores required for entry. In contrast, B5 silencing had no effect on these markers of entry, but inhibited viral protein translation. Specifically, viral immediate early genes, ICP0 and ICP4, were transcribed, polyadenylated and transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, but the viral transcripts did not associate with ribosomes or polysomes in B5-silenced cells. In contrast, immediate early gene viral transcripts were detected in polysome fractions isolated from control cells. These findings are consistent with sequencing studies demonstrating that B5 is eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit m (eIF3m). Although B5 silencing altered the polysome profile of cells, silencing had little effect on cellular RNA or protein expression and was not cytotoxic, suggesting that this subunit is not essential for host cellular protein synthesis. Together these results demonstrate that B5 plays a major role in the initiation of HSV protein translation and could provide a novel target for strategies to prevent primary and recurrent herpetic disease. PMID:20676407

  1. Activation of G Proteins by Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Relies on GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Rob J.; Thomas, Geraint M. H.

    2016-01-01

    G proteins are an important family of signalling molecules controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity in what is commonly called an ‘activation/inactivation cycle’. The molecular mechanism by which guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyse the activation of monomeric G proteins is well-established, however the complete reversibility of this mechanism is often overlooked. Here, we use a theoretical approach to prove that GEFs are unable to positively control G protein systems at steady-state in the absence of GTPase activity. Instead, positive regulation of G proteins must be seen as a product of the competition between guanine nucleotide exchange and GTPase activity—emphasising a central role for GTPase activity beyond merely signal termination. We conclude that a more accurate description of the regulation of G proteins via these processes is as a ‘balance/imbalance’ mechanism. This result has implications for the understanding of intracellular signalling processes, and for experimental strategies that rely on modulating G protein systems. PMID:26986850

  2. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  3. Mitochondrial Bol1 and Bol3 function as assembly factors for specific iron-sulfur proteins

    PubMed Central

    Uzarska, Marta A; Nasta, Veronica; Weiler, Benjamin D; Spantgar, Farah; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Saviello, Maria Rosaria; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Banci, Lucia; Lill, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins is a key process of cells, and defects cause many rare diseases. In the first phase of this pathway, ten Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly components synthesize and insert [2Fe-2S] clusters. The second phase is dedicated to the assembly of [4Fe-4S] proteins, yet this part is poorly understood. Here, we characterize the BOLA family proteins Bol1 and Bol3 as specific mitochondrial ISC assembly factors that facilitate [4Fe-4S] cluster insertion into a subset of mitochondrial proteins such as lipoate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase. Bol1-Bol3 perform largely overlapping functions, yet cannot replace the ISC protein Nfu1 that also participates in this phase of Fe/S protein biogenesis. Bol1 and Bol3 form dimeric complexes with both monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 and Nfu1. Complex formation differentially influences the stability of the Grx5-Bol-shared Fe/S clusters. Our findings provide the biochemical basis for explaining the pathological phenotypes of patients with mutations in BOLA3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16673.001 PMID:27532772

  4. Modification of the protein corona-nanoparticle complex by physiological factors.

    PubMed

    Braun, Nicholas J; DeBrosse, Madeleine C; Hussain, Saber M; Comfort, Kristen K

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona-NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications. PMID:27127026

  5. Identification and Validation of Genetic Variants that Influence Transcription Factor and Cell Signaling Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hause, Ronald J.; Stark, Amy L.; Antao, Nirav N.; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Chung, Sophie H.; Brown, Christopher D.; Wong, Shan S.; Gill, Daniel F.; Myers, Jamie L.; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-01-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression. PMID:25087611

  6. Purification and Properties of Myxococcus xanthus C-Factor, an Intercellular Signaling Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung K.; Kaiser, Dale

    1990-05-01

    C-factor, a Myxococcus xanthus protein that restores the developmental defects of a class of nonautonomous mutants resulting from mutation of the csgA gene, has been purified approximately 1000-fold from starved wild-type cells. The monomeric form of C-factor is a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 17 kDa that can be solubilized by detergent from membrane components. Characterization by gel filtration and denaturing gel electrophoresis suggests that biologically active C-factor is a dimer composed of two 17-kDa monomers. Antibodies against a form of the M. xanthus csgA gene product overexpressed in Escherichia coli react with purified C-factor.

  7. Lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity via protein disulfide isomerase-dependent tissue factor decryption.

    PubMed

    Lysov, Zakhar; Swystun, Laura L; Kuruvilla, Sara; Arnold, Andrew; Liaw, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy have an elevated risk for thrombosis. However, the mechanisms by which chemotherapy agents increase the risk for thrombosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) by which lung cancer chemotherapy agents cisplatin, carboplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel elicit increased tissue factor activity on endothelial cells, A549 cells, and monocytes. Tissue factor activity, tissue factor antigen, and phosphatidylserine exposure were measured on chemotherapy-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), A549 cells, and monocytes. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and cell surface free thiol levels were measured on HUVEC and A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. Treatment of HUVECs, A549 cells, and monocytes with lung cancer chemotherapy significantly increased cell surface tissue factor activity. However, elevated tissue factor antigen levels were observed only on cisplatin-treated and gemcitabine-treated monocytes. Cell surface levels of phosphatidylserine were increased on HUVEC and monocytes treated with cisplatin/gemcitabine combination therapy. Chemotherapy also resulted in increased cell surface levels of PDI and reduced cell surface free thiol levels. Glutathione treatment and PDI inhibition, but not phosphatidylserine inhibition, attenuated tissue factor activity. Furthermore, increased tissue factor activity was reversed by reducing cysteines with dithiothreitol. These studies are the first to demonstrate that lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity on endothelial cells and A549 cells by tissue factor decryption through a disulfide bond formation in a PDI-dependent mechanism. PMID:24911456

  8. Metallothionein gene expression is regulated by serum factors and activators of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Imbra, R J; Karin, M

    1987-01-01

    The exact physiological role of metallothionein (MT) is not clear. It has been suggested that these low-molecular-weight, highly inducible, heavy-metal-binding proteins serve in the regulation of intracellular Zn metabolism. Among the Zn-requiring systems are several enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. Therefore, during periods of active DNA synthesis there is likely to be an increased demand for Zn, which could be met by elevated MT synthesis. For that reason, we examined whether stimulation of cellular proliferation leads to increased expression of MT. We report here that treatment of cultured mammalian cells with serum growth factors and activators of protein kinase C, all of which are known to have growth stimulatory activity, led to induction of MT mRNA. One of the required steps in the signal transduction pathways triggered by these agents, ending in MT induction, appears to be the activation of protein kinase C. Images PMID:3600629

  9. E protein transcription factors are required for the development of CD4(+) lineage T cells.

    PubMed

    Jones-Mason, Mary Elizabeth; Zhao, Xudong; Kappes, Dietmar; Lasorella, Anna; Iavarone, Antonio; Zhuang, Yuan

    2012-03-23

    The double-positive (DP) to single-positive (SP) transition during T cell development is initiated by downregulation of the E protein transcription factors HEB and E2A. Here, we have demonstrated that in addition to regulating the onset of this transition, HEB and E2A also play a separate role in CD4(+) lineage choice. Deletion of HEB and E2A in DP thymocytes specifically blocked the development of CD4(+) lineage T cells. Furthermore, deletion of the E protein inhibitors Id2 and Id3 allowed CD4(+) T cell development but blocked CD8(+) lineage development. Analysis of the CD4(+) lineage transcriptional regulators ThPOK and Gata3 placed HEB and E2A upstream of CD4(+) lineage specification. These studies identify an important role for E proteins in the activation of CD4(+) lineage differentiation as thymocytes undergo the DP to SP transition. PMID:22425249

  10. PCF11 encodes a third protein component of yeast cleavage and polyadenylation factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Amrani, N; Minet, M; Wyers, F; Dufour, M E; Aggerbeck, L P; Lacroute, F

    1997-01-01

    Cleavage and polyadenylation factor I (CF I) is one of four factors required in vitro for yeast pre-mRNA 3'-end processing. Two protein components of this factor, encoded by genes RNA14 and RNA15, have already been identified. We describe here another gene, PCF11 (for protein 1 of CF I), that genetically interacts with RNA14 and RNA15 and which presumably codes for a third protein component of CF I. This gene was isolated in a two-hybrid screening designed to identify proteins interacting with Rna14 and Rna15. PCF11 is an essential gene encoding for a protein of 626 amino acids having an apparent molecular mass of 70 kDa. Thermosensitive mutations in PCF11 are synergistically lethal with thermosensitive alleles of RNA14 and RNA15. The Pcf11-2 thermosensitive strain shows a shortening of the poly(A) tails and a strong decrease in the steady-state level of actin transcripts after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature as do the thermosensitive alleles of RNA14 and RNA15. Extracts from the pcf11-1 and pcf11-2 thermosensitive strains and the wild-type strain, when Pcf11 is neutralized by specific antibodies, are deficient in cleavage and polyadenylation. Moreover, fractions obtained by anion-exchange chromatography of extracts from the wild-type strain contain both Pcf11 and Rna15 in the same fractions, as shown by immunoblotting with a Pcf11-specific antibody. PMID:9032237

  11. Complement factor H in its alternative identity as adrenomedullin-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Sim, Robert B; Ferluga, Janez; Al-Rashidi, Hanan; Abbow, Hussein; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Kishore, Uday

    2015-11-01

    Complement factor H has been extensively studied since its discovery 50 years ago, and its role in the complement system is quite well established. It has another role, however, as a binding protein for the regulatory peptide adrenomedullin. Part of this role appears to be protection of adrenomedullin from proteolytic degradation. The binding interaction is unusual and merits further investigation. Adrenomedullin has potential therapeutic uses in diseases affecting the vasculature, and factor H has been administered with adrenomedullin in some animal models of disease. PMID:26597206

  12. The Oct1 transcription factor and epithelial malignancies: Old protein learns new tricks.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Arreguín, Karina; Tantin, Dean

    2016-06-01

    The metazoan-specific POU domain transcription factor family comprises activities underpinning developmental processes such as embryonic pluripotency and neuronal specification. Some POU family proteins efficiently bind an 8-bp DNA element known as the octamer motif. These proteins are known as Oct transcription factors. Oct1/POU2F1 is the only widely expressed POU factor. Unlike other POU factors it controls no specific developmental or organ system. Oct1 was originally described to operate at target genes associated with proliferation and immune modulation, but more recent results additionally identify targets associated with oxidative and cytotoxic stress resistance, metabolic regulation, stem cell function and other unexpected processes. Oct1 is pro-oncogenic in multiple contexts, and several recent reports provide broad evidence that Oct1 has prognostic and therapeutic value in multiple epithelial tumor settings. This review focuses on established and emerging roles of Oct1 in epithelial tumors, with an emphasis on mechanisms of transcription regulation by Oct1 that may underpin these findings. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin. PMID:26877236

  13. Static structure factor and collective diffusion of globular proteins in concentrated aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, Bernard M.; Lomakin, Aleksey; Ogun, Olutayo O.; Benedek, George B.

    1996-01-01

    We report our measurement of the time average and the temporal autocorrelation function of the intensity of light scattered by the highly monomeric globular protein, bovine γII-crystallin, in aqueous solution as a function of wave number q, protein volume fraction φ, and temperature T. The time average intensity data is used to obtain the q→0 limit of the static structure factor S(φ,T), as a function of φ and T. We show that S(φ,T) may be well characterized by modeling the proteins as interacting through the Baxter adhesive hard sphere pair interaction potential. The temporal autocorrelation function data is used to determine the collective diffusion coefficient D˜(φ,T) of the proteins as a function of φ and T. We then obtain the experimental hydrodynamic factor H˜(φ,T)≡S(φ,T)[D˜(φ,T)/D0(T)], where D0(T) is the diffusion coefficient of the individual proteins in the φ→0 limit. We find that H˜ exhibits a different φ-dependence at low (φ≤0.016) and high (φ≳0.02) protein volume fractions. In the low φ domain our data for H˜ are consistent with the theoretical result for the collective diffusion in the q→0, t→0 limit. However, for φ≳0.02 we find a deviation from single exponential decay in the autocorrelation functions, and an unexpected, large change in the slope of the H˜ vs φ relation. This crossover at such low φ suggests the existence of a heretofore unappreciated length scale in the dynamics of colloid solutions. Clearly, further theoretical insights are required to understand the origin of this crossover behavior.

  14. Emerging role of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Akiel, Maaged; Rajasekaran, Devaraja; Gredler, Rachel; Siddiq, Ayesha; Srivastava, Jyoti; Robertson, Chadia; Jariwala, Nidhi Himanshu; Fisher, Paul B; Sarkar, Devanand

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a vicious and highly vascular cancer with a dismal prognosis. It is a life-threatening illness worldwide that ranks fifth in terms of cancer prevalence and third in cancer deaths. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage by which time conventional therapies are no longer effective. Targeted molecular therapies, such as the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib, provide a modest increase in survival for advanced HCC patients and display significant toxicity. Thus, there is an immense need to identify novel regulators of HCC that might be targeted effectively. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis is commonly abnormal in HCC. Upon activation, the IGF axis controls metabolism, tissue homeostasis, and survival. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) is a secreted protein of a family of low-affinity IGF-binding proteins termed "IGFBP-related proteins" that have been identified as a potential tumor suppressor in HCC. IGFBP7 has been implicated in regulating cellular proliferation, senescence, and angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a comprehensive discussion of the role of IGFBP7 in HCC and the potential use of IGFBP7 as a novel biomarker for drug resistance and as an effective therapeutic strategy. PMID:27508172

  15. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-03-18

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  16. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  17. Transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 by Akt3

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Quanri; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Min, Hye-Young; Smith, John Kendal; Hwang, Su Jung; Whang, Young Mi; Kim, Woo-Young; Kim, Yeul Hong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-dependent and -independent antitumor activities of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have been proposed in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. However, the mechanism underlying regulation of IGFBP-3 expression in NSCLC cells is not well understood. In this study, we show that activation of Akt, especially Akt3, plays a major role in the mRNA expression and protein stability of IGFBP-3 and thus antitumor activities of IGFBP-3 in NSCLC cells. When Akt was activated by genomic or pharmacologic approaches, IGFBP-3 transcription and protein stability were decreased. Conversely, suppression of Akt increased IGFBP-3 mRNA levels and protein stability in NSCLC cell lines. Characterization of the effects of constitutively active form of each Akt subtype (HA-Akt-DD) on IGFBP-3 expression in NSCLC cells and a xenograft model indicated that Akt3 plays a major role in the Akt-mediated regulation of IGFBP-3 expression and thus suppression of Akt effectively enhances the antitumor activities of IGFBP-3 in NSCLC cells with Akt3 overactivation. Collectively, these data suggest a novel function of Akt3 as a negative regulator of IGFBP-3, indicating the possible benefit of a combined inhibition of IGFBP-3 and Akt3 for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. PMID:24942865

  18. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  19. A role for the perlecan protein core in the activation of the keratinocyte growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, G; Eichstetter, I; Iozzo, R V

    2001-01-01

    Perlecan, a widespread heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycan, is directly involved in the storing of angiogenic growth factors, mostly members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) gene family. We have previously shown that antisense targeting of the perlecan gene causes a reduced growth and responsiveness to FGF7 [also known as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] in human cancer cells, and that the perlecan protein core interacts specifically with FGF7. In the present paper, we have investigated human colon carcinoma cells in which the perlecan gene was disrupted by targeted homologous recombination. After screening over 1000 clones, we obtained two clones heterozygous for the null mutation with no detectable perlecan, indicating that the other allele was non-functioning. The perlecan-deficient cells grew more slowly, did not respond to FGF7 with or without the addition of heparin, and were less tumorigenic than control cells. Paradoxically, the perlecan-deficient cells displayed increased FGF7 surface binding. However, the perlecan protein core was required for functional activation of the KGF receptor and downstream signalling. Because heparin could not substitute for perlecan, the HS chains are not critical for FGF7-mediated signalling in this cell system. These results provide the first genetic evidence that the perlecan protein core is a molecular entity implicated in FGF7 binding and activation of its receptor. PMID:11563979

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  1. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens.

    PubMed

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  2. A 29-kilodalton Golgi soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (Vti1-rp2) implicated in protein trafficking in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Wong, S H; Tang, B L; Subramaniam, V N; Zhang, T; Hong, W

    1998-08-21

    Expressed sequence tags coding for a potential SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) were revealed during data base searches. The deduced amino acid sequence of the complete coding region predicts a 217-residue protein with a COOH-terminal hydrophobic membrane anchor. Affinity-purified antibodies raised against the cytoplasmic region of this protein specifically detect a 29-kilodalton integral membrane protein enriched in the Golgi membrane. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that this protein is mainly associated with the Golgi apparatus. When detergent extracts of the Golgi membrane are incubated with immobilized glutathione S-transferase alpha soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (GST-alpha-SNAP), this protein was specifically retained. This protein has been independently identified and termed Vti1-rp2, and it is homologous to Vti1p, a yeast Golgi SNARE. We further show that Vti1-rp2 can be qualitatively coimmunoprecipitated with Golgi syntaxin 5 and syntaxin 6, suggesting that Vti1-rp2 exists in at least two distinct Golgi SNARE complexes. In cells microinjected with antibodies against Vti1-rp2, transport of the envelope protein (G-protein) of vesicular stomatitis virus from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane was specifically arrested at the Golgi apparatus, providing further evidence for functional importance of Vti1-rp2 in protein trafficking in the secretory pathway. PMID:9705316

  3. Protein kinase A modulates transforming growth factor-β signaling through a direct interaction with Smad4 protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huibin; Li, Gangyong; Wu, Jing-Jiang; Wang, Lidong; Uhler, Michael; Simeone, Diane M

    2013-03-22

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling normally functions to regulate embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. It is increasingly recognized that TGFβ signaling is regulated by cross-talk with other signaling pathways. We previously reported that TGFβ activates protein kinase A (PKA) independent of cAMP through an interaction of an activated Smad3-Smad4 complex and the regulatory subunit of the PKA holoenzyme (PKA-R). Here we define the interaction domains of Smad4 and PKA-R and the functional consequences of this interaction. Using a series of Smad4 and PKA-R truncation mutants, we identified amino acids 290-300 of the Smad4 linker region as critical for the specific interaction of Smad4 and PKA-R. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the B cAMP binding domain of PKA-R was sufficient for interaction with Smad4. Targeting of B domain regions conserved among all PKA-R isoforms and exposed on the molecular surface demonstrated that amino acids 281-285 and 320-329 were required for complex formation with Smad4. Interactions of these specific regions of Smad4 and PKA-R were necessary for TGFβ-mediated increases in PKA activity, CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) phosphorylation, induction of p21, and growth inhibition. Moreover, this Smad4-PKA interaction was required for TGFβ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition, invasion of pancreatic tumor cells, and regulation of tumor growth in vivo. PMID:23362281

  4. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Tajnik, Mojca; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Balestra, Dario; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  5. Cleavage of spike protein of SARS coronavirus by protease factor Xa is associated with viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Lanying; Kao, Richard Y.; Zhou, Yusen; He, Yuxian; Zhao, Guangyu; Wong, Charlotte; Jiang, Shibo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Jian . E-mail: bzheng@hkucc.hku.hk

    2007-07-20

    The spike (S) protein of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been known to recognize and bind to host receptors, whose conformational changes then facilitate fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membrane, leading to viral entry into target cells. However, other functions of SARS-CoV S protein such as proteolytic cleavage and its implications to viral infection are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the infection of SARS-CoV and a pseudovirus bearing the S protein of SARS-CoV was inhibited by a protease inhibitor Ben-HCl. Also, the protease Factor Xa, a target of Ben-HCl abundantly expressed in infected cells, was able to cleave the recombinant and pseudoviral S protein into S1 and S2 subunits, and the cleavage was inhibited by Ben-HCl. Furthermore, this cleavage correlated with the infectivity of the pseudovirus. Taken together, our study suggests a plausible mechanism by which SARS-CoV cleaves its S protein to facilitate viral infection.

  6. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  7. Folding Factors and Partners for the Intrinsically Disordered Protein Micro-Exon Gene 14 (MEG-14)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Jose Luiz S.; Orcia, Debora; Araujo, Ana Paula U.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Wallace, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    The micro-exon genes (MEG) of Schistosoma mansoni, a parasite responsible for the second most widely spread tropical disease, code for small secreted proteins with sequences unique to the Schistosoma genera. Bioinformatics analyses suggest the soluble domain of the MEG-14 protein will be largely disordered, and using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, its secondary structure was shown to be essentially completely unfolded in aqueous solution. It does, however, show a strong propensity to fold into more ordered structures under a wide range of conditions. Partial folding was produced by increasing temperature (in a reversible process), contrary to the behavior of most soluble proteins. Furthermore, significant folding was observed in the presence of negatively charged lipids and detergents, but not in zwitterionic or neutral lipids or detergents. Absorption onto a surface followed by dehydration stimulated it to fold into a helical structure, as it did when the aqueous solution was replaced by nonaqueous solvents. Hydration of the dehydrated folded protein was accompanied by complete unfolding. These results support the identification of MEG-14 as a classic intrinsically disordered protein, and open the possibility of its interaction/folding with different partners and factors being related to multifunctional roles and states within the host. PMID:23746524

  8. Cloning a cDNA encoding an alternatively spliced protein of BRCA2-associated factor 35.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chiang; McCarty, Ida M; Balazs, Louisa; Li, Yi; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2002-07-01

    Inheritance of mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, predisposes humans to breast and ovarian cancers. Inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene are also known to cause susceptibility to prostate cancer. BRCA2 protein exists in a large multi-protein complex from which a novel structural DNA binding protein BRCA2-associated factor 35 (BRAF35) has been isolated. We have cloned a novel cDNA encoding an alternatively spliced protein of BRAF35, designated as BRAF25. BRAF25 transcript is present in various human cells. We have precisely mapped the BRAF25 cDNA sequence to the genomic chromosome 19 sequence. Analysis of the predicted sequence of BRAF25 identified a protein of 215 amino acids. BRAF25 contains a truncated high mobility group domain, a kinesin-like coiled-coil domain and multiple Src homology 2 (SH2) motifs. Western blot analysis using antibodies specific for BRAF25 revealed the presence of BRAF25 in human prostate cancer cells. PMID:12083779

  9. Adaptation of Extremophilic Proteins with Temperature and Pressure: Evidence from Initiation Factor 6.

    PubMed

    Calligari, Paolo A; Calandrini, Vania; Ollivier, Jacques; Artero, Jean-Baptiste; Härtlein, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Kneller, Gerald R

    2015-06-25

    In this work, we study dynamical properties of an extremophilic protein, Initiation Factor 6 (IF6), produced by the archeabacterium Methanocaldococcus jannascii, which thrives close to deep-sea hydrothermal vents where temperatures reach 80 °C and the pressure is up to 750 bar. Molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements give new insights into the dynamical properties of this protein with respect to its eukaryotic and mesophilic homologue. Results obtained by MD are supported by QENS data and are interpreted within the framework of a fractional Brownian dynamics model for the characterization of protein relaxation dynamics. IF6 from M. jannaschii at high temperature and pressure shares similar flexibility with its eukaryotic homologue from S. cerevisieae under ambient conditions. This work shows for the first time, to our knowledge, that the very common pattern of corresponding states for thermophilic protein adaptation can be extended to thermo-barophilic proteins. A detailed analysis of dynamic properties and of local structural fluctuations reveals a complex pattern for "corresponding" structural flexibilities. In particular, in the case of IF6, the latter seems to be strongly related to the entropic contribution given by an additional, C-terminal, 20 amino-acid tail which is evolutionary conserved in all mesophilic IF6s. PMID:25996652

  10. The transcription factor ATF2 promotes melanoma metastasis by suppressing protein fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eric; Feng, Yongmei; Claps, Giuseppina; Fukuda, Michiko N.; Perlina, Ally; Donn, Dylan; Jilaveanu, Lucia; Kluger, Harriet; Freeze, Hudson H.; Ronai, Ze’ev A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most lethal skin cancers worldwide, primarily because of its propensity to metastasize. Thus, the elucidation of mechanisms that govern metastatic propensity is urgently needed. We found that protein kinase Cε (PKCε)–mediated activation of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) controls the migratory and invasive behaviors of melanoma cells. PKCε-dependent phosphorylation of ATF2 promoted its transcriptional repression of the gene encoding fucokinase (FUK), which mediates the fucose salvage pathway and thus global cellular protein fucosylation. In primary melanocytes and cell lines representing early-stage melanoma, the abundance of PKCε-phosphorylated ATF2 was low, thereby enabling the expression of FUK and cellular protein fucosylation, which promoted cellular adhesion and reduced motility. In contrast, increased expression of the gene encoding PKCε and abundance of phosphorylated, transcriptionally active ATF2 were observed in advanced-stage melanomas and correlated with decreased FUK expression, decreased cellular protein fucosylation, attenuated cell adhesion, and increased cell motility. Restoring fucosylation in mice either by dietary fucose supplementation or by genetic manipulation of murine Fuk expression attenuated primary melanoma growth, increased the number of intratumoral natural killer cells, and decreased distal metastasis in murine isograft models. Tumor microarray analysis of human melanoma specimens confirmed reduced fucosylation in metastatic tumors and a better prognosis for primary melanomas that had high abundance of fucosylation. Thus, inhibiting PKCε or ATF2 or increasing protein fucosylation in tumor cells may improve clinical outcome in melanoma patients. PMID:26645581

  11. Phosphorylation of protein synthesis initiation factor 2 (elF-2) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    Initiation Factor 2 (elF-2) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is comprised of 3 subunits. The control of protein synthesis in mammalian cells have been shown to involve the phosphorylation of the small (alpha) subunit by a specific protein kinase. Phosphorylation results in an inhibition of protein synthesis. In order to determine whether or not an analogous system is operative in yeast, the phosphorylation state of the alpha subunit of elF-2 in Saccharomyces was determined during various growth and nongrowth conditions. Cells were radiolabelled with /sup 32/P and /sup 35/S, and the whole cell lysates were analyzed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis. These experiments revealed that the smallest subunit (alpha, M/sub r/ = 31,000) is a phosphoprotein in vivo under a variety of growth and nongrowth conditions. This is in direct contrast to the pattern exhibited in mammalian cells. The fact that the small subunit of elF-2 in yeast is phosphorylated under a variety of physiological conditions indicates that such a covalent modification is important for some aspects of elF-2 function. In order to investigate this problem further, a protein kinase that specifically labels the alpha subunit of elF-2 in vitro was isolated. The kinase is not autophosphorylating, utilizes ATP as a phosphate donor, phosphorylates an exogenous protein, casein, modifies serine residues in elF-2, is cyclic nucleotide-independent, and is strongly inhibited by heparin.

  12. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  13. A Novel Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Is Responsive to Raf and Mediates Growth Factor Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Janulis, Mark; Trakul, Nicholas; Greene, Geoffrey; Schaefer, Erik M.; Lee, J. D.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2001-01-01

    The proto-oncogene Raf is a major regulator of growth and differentiation. Previous studies from a number of laboratories indicate that Raf activates a signaling pathway that is independent of the classic MEK1,2-ERK1,2 cascade. However, no other signaling cascade downstream of Raf has been identified. We describe a new member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family, p97, an ERK5-related kinase that is activated and Raf associated when cells are stimulated by Raf. Furthermore, p97 is selectively responsive to different growth factors, providing a mechanism for specificity in cellular signaling. Thus, p97 is activated by the neurogenic factor fibroblast growth factor (FGF) but not the mitogenic factor epidermal growth factor (EGF) in neuronal cells. Conversely, the related kinase ERK5 is activated by EGF but not FGF. p97 phosphorylates transcription factors such as Elk-1 and Ets-2 but not MEF2C at transactivating sites, whereas ERK5 phosphorylates MEF2C but not Elk-1 or Ets-2. Finally, p97 is expressed in a number of cell types including primary neural and NIH 3T3 cells. Taken together, these results identify a new signaling pathway that is distinct from the classic Raf-MEK1,2-ERK1,2 kinase cascade and can be selectively stimulated by growth factors that produce discrete biological outcomes. PMID:11238956

  14. Dissecting the Critical Factors for Thermodynamic Stability of Modular Proteins Using Molecular Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Chul; Han, Jieun; Heu, Woosung; Park, Keunwan; Kim, Hyun Jung; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Kim, Dongsup; Kim, Hak-Sung; Lee, Keun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Repeat proteins have recently attracted much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural and biophysical features. In particular, repeat proteins show high stability against temperature and chaotic agents. Despite many studies, structural features for the stability of repeat proteins remain poorly understood. Here we present an interesting result from in silico analyses pursuing the factors which affect the stability of repeat proteins. Previously developed repebody structure based on variable lymphocytes receptors (VLRs) which consists of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules was used as initial structure for the present study. We constructed extra six repebody structures with varying numbers of repeat modules and those structures were used for molecular dynamics simulations. For the structures, the intramolecular interactions including backbone H-bonds, van der Waals energy, and hydrophobicity were investigated and then the radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, ratio of secondary structure, and hydration free energy were also calculated to find out the relationship between the number of LRR modules and stability of the protein. Our results show that the intramolecular interactions lead to more compact structure and smaller surface area of the repebodies, which are critical for the stability of repeat proteins. The other features were also well compatible with the experimental results. Based on our observations, the repebody-5 was proposed as the best structure from the all repebodies in structure optimization process. The present study successfully demonstrated that our computer-based molecular modeling approach can significantly contribute to the experiment-based protein engineering challenge. PMID:24849801

  15. Protein Composition of Infectious Spores Reveals Novel Sexual Development and Germination Factors in Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingwei; Hebert, Alexander S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hull, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Spores are an essential cell type required for long-term survival across diverse organisms in the tree of life and are a hallmark of fungal reproduction, persistence, and dispersal. Among human fungal pathogens, spores are presumed infectious particles, but relatively little is known about this robust cell type. Here we used the meningitis-causing fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to determine the roles of spore-resident proteins in spore biology. Using highly sensitive nanoscale liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, we compared the proteomes of spores and vegetative cells (yeast) and identified eighteen proteins specifically enriched in spores. The genes encoding these proteins were deleted, and the resulting strains were evaluated for discernable phenotypes. We hypothesized that spore-enriched proteins would be preferentially involved in spore-specific processes such as dormancy, stress resistance, and germination. Surprisingly, however, the majority of the mutants harbored defects in sexual development, the process by which spores are formed. One mutant in the cohort was defective in the spore-specific process of germination, showing a delay specifically in the initiation of vegetative growth. Thus, by using this in-depth proteomics approach as a screening tool for cell type-specific proteins and combining it with molecular genetics, we successfully identified the first germination factor in C. neoformans. We also identified numerous proteins with previously unknown functions in both sexual development and spore composition. Our findings provide the first insights into the basic protein components of infectious spores and reveal unexpected molecular connections between infectious particle production and spore composition in a pathogenic eukaryote. PMID:26313153

  16. Crosstalk between Src and major vault protein in epidermal growth factor-dependent cell signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euikyung; Lee, Seunghwan; Mian, Md Firoz; Yun, Sang Uk; Song, Minseok; Yi, Kye-Sook; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2006-02-01

    Vaults are highly conserved, ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles with an unidentified function. For the three protein species (TEP1, VPARP, and MVP) and a small RNA that comprises vault, expression of the unique 100-kDa major vault protein (MVP) is sufficient to form the basic vault structure. To identify and characterize proteins that interact with the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Src and potentially regulate Src activity, we used a pull-down assay using GST-Src-SH2 fusion proteins. We found MVP as a Src-SH2 binding protein in human stomach tissue. Interaction of Src and MVP was also observed in 253J stomach cancer cells. A subcellular localization study using immunofluorescence microscopy shows that epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation triggers MVP translocation from the nucleus to the cytosol and perinuclear region where it colocalizes with Src. We found that the interaction between Src and MVP is critically dependent on Src activity and protein (MVP) tyrosyl phosphorylation, which are induced by EGF stimulation. Our results also indicate MVP to be a novel substrate of Src and phosphorylated in an EGF-dependent manner. Interestingly, purified MVP inhibited the in vitro tyrosine kinase activity of Src in a concentration-dependent manner. MVP overexpression downregulates EGF-dependent ERK activation in Src overexpressing cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MVP interacting with a protein tyrosine kinase involved in a distinct cell signalling pathway. It appears that MVP is a novel regulator of Src-mediated signalling cascades. PMID:16441665

  17. Role of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in the catabolic response to injury and infection.

    PubMed

    Lang, Charles H; Frost, Robert A

    2002-05-01

    The erosion of lean body mass resulting from protracted critical illness remains a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Previous studies have documented the well known impairment in nitrogen balance results from both an increase in muscle protein degradation as well as a decreased rate of both myofibrillar and sacroplasmic protein synthesis. This protein imbalance may be caused by an increased presence or activity of various catabolic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6 or glucocorticoids, or may be mediated via a decreased concentration or responsiveness to various anabolic hormones, such as growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I. This review focuses on recent developments pertaining to the importance of alterations in the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I axis as a mechanism for the observed defects in muscle protein balance. PMID:11953652

  18. Comparative protein profiling identifies elongation factor-1beta and tryparedoxin peroxidase as factors associated with metastasis in Leishmania guyanensis.

    PubMed

    Walker, John; Acestor, Nathalie; Gongora, Rafael; Quadroni, Manfredo; Segura, Iris; Fasel, Nicolas; Saravia, Nancy G

    2006-02-01

    Parasites of the Leishmania Viannia subgenus are major causative agents of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL), a disease characterised by parasite dissemination (metastasis) from the original cutaneous lesion to form debilitating secondary lesions in the nasopharyngeal mucosa. We employed a protein profiling approach to identify potential metastasis factors in laboratory clones of L. (V.) guyanensis with stable phenotypes ranging from highly metastatic (M+) through infrequently metastatic (M+/M-) to non-metastatic (M-). Comparison of the soluble proteomes of promastigotes by two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed two abundant protein spots specifically associated with M+ and M+/M- clones (Met2 and Met3) and two others exclusively expressed in M- parasites (Met1 and Met4). The association between clinical disease phenotype and differential expression of Met1-Met4 was less clear in L. Viannia strains from mucosal (M+) or cutaneous (M-) lesions of patients. Identification of Met1-Met4 by biological mass spectrometry (LC-ES-MS/MS) and bioinformatics revealed that M+ and M- clones express distinct acidic and neutral isoforms of both elongation factor-1 subunit beta (EF-1beta) and cytosolic tryparedoxin peroxidase (TXNPx). This interchange of isoforms may relate to the mechanisms by which the activities of EF-1beta and TXNPx are modulated, and/or differential post-translational modification of the gene product(s). The multiple metabolic functions of EF-1 and TXNPx support the plausibility of their participation in parasite survival and persistence and thereby, metastatic disease. Both polypeptides are active in resistance to chemical and oxidant stress, providing a basis for further elucidation of the importance of antioxidant defence in the pathogenesis underlying MCL. PMID:16325936

  19. Does binding of complement factor H to the meningococcal vaccine antigen, factor H binding protein, decrease protective serum antibody responses?

    PubMed

    Granoff, Dan M; Ram, Sanjay; Beernink, Peter T

    2013-08-01

    Factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a principal antigen in a multicomponent meningococcal vaccine recently licensed in Europe for prevention of serogroup B diseases. The protein recruits the complement downregulator, factor H (fH), to the bacterial surface, which enables the organism to resist complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Binding is specific for human fH. In preclinical studies, mice and rabbits immunized with fHbp vaccines developed serum bactericidal antibody responses, which in humans predict protection against developing meningococcal disease. These studies, however, were in animals whose fH did not bind to the vaccine antigen. Here we review the immunogenicity of fHbp vaccines in human fH transgenic mice. The data suggest that animals with high serum human fH concentrations have impaired protective antibody responses. Further, mutant fHbp vaccines with single amino acid substitutions that decrease fH binding are superior immunogens, possibly by unmasking epitopes in the fH binding site that are important for eliciting serum bactericidal antibody responses. Humans immunized with fHbp vaccines develop serum bactericidal antibody, but achieving broad coverage in infants required incorporation of additional antigens, including outer membrane vesicles, which increased rates of fever and local reactions at the injection site. The experimental results in transgenic mice predict that fHbp immunogenicity can be improved in humans by using mutant fHbp vaccines with decreased fH binding. These results have important public health implications for developing improved fHbp vaccines for control of serogroup B meningococcal disease and for development of vaccines against other microbes that bind host molecules. PMID:23740919

  20. Characterization and regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, A; Feliers, D; Pinzani, M; Woodruff, K; Abboud, S

    1998-02-01

    Cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the cell type primarily involved in the progression of liver fibrosis, secrete insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein (IGFBP) activity. IGF-I exerts a mitogenic effect on HSCs, thus potentially contributing to the fibrogenic process in an autocrine fashion. However, IGF-I action is modulated by the presence of specific IGFBPs that may inhibit and/or enhance its biologic effects. Therefore, we examined IGFBP-1 through IGFBP-6 mRNA and protein expression in HSCs isolated from human liver and activated in culture. Regulation of IGFBPs in response to IGF-I and other polypeptide growth factors involved in the hepatic fibrogenic process was also assessed. RNase protection assays and ligand blot analysis demonstrated that HSCs express IGFBP-2 through IGFBP-6 mRNAs and release detectable levels of IGFBP-2 through IGFBP-5. Because IGF-I, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) stimulate HSC proliferation and/or matrix production, we tested their effect on IGFBPs released by HSCs. IGF-I induced IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 proteins in a time-dependent manner without an increase in the corresponding mRNAs. IGFBP-4 protein levels decreased in response to IGF-I. TGF-beta stimulated IGFBP-3 mRNA and protein but decreased IGFBP-5 mRNA and protein. In contrast, PDGF-BB failed to regulate IGFBPs compared with controls. Recombinant human IGFBP-3 (rhIGFBP-3) was then tested for its effect on IGF-I-induced mitogenesis in HSCs. rhIGFBP-3 inhibited IGF-I-stimulated DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with a peak effect observed at 25 nM IGFBP-3. Because TGF-beta is highly expressed in cirrhotic liver tissue, we determined whether IGFBP-3 mRNA expression is increased in liver biopsies obtained from patients with an active fibroproliferative response due to viral-induced chronic active hepatitis. In the majority of these samples, IGFBP-3 mRNA was increased compared with normal

  1. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q.; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  2. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ansseau, Eugénie; Eidahl, Jocelyn O; Lancelot, Céline; Tassin, Alexandra; Matteotti, Christel; Yip, Cassandre; Liu, Jian; Leroy, Baptiste; Hubeau, Céline; Gerbaux, Cécile; Cloet, Samuel; Wauters, Armelle; Zorbo, Sabrina; Meyer, Pierre; Pirson, Isabelle; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Wattiez, Ruddy; Harper, Scott Q; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppée, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX) genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain) and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain). Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay) as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs). Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs were

  3. Chemical synthesis and X-ray structure of a heterochiral {D-protein antagonist plus vascular endothelial growth factor} protein complex by racemic crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ault-Riché, Dana; Kenney, John; Lowitz, Joshua; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2012-10-23

    Total chemical synthesis was used to prepare the mirror image (D-protein) form of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Phage display against D-VEGF-A was used to screen designed libraries based on a unique small protein scaffold in order to identify a high affinity ligand. Chemically synthesized D- and L- forms of the protein ligand showed reciprocal chiral specificity in surface plasmon resonance binding experiments: The L-protein ligand bound only to D-VEGF-A, whereas the D-protein ligand bound only to L-VEGF-A. The D-protein ligand, but not the L-protein ligand, inhibited the binding of natural VEGF{sub 165} to the VEGFR1 receptor. Racemic protein crystallography was used to determine the high resolution X-ray structure of the heterochiral complex consisting of {l_brace}D-protein antagonist + L-protein form of VEGF-A{r_brace}. Crystallization of a racemic mixture of these synthetic proteins in appropriate stoichiometry gave a racemic protein complex of more than 73 kDa containing six synthetic protein molecules. The structure of the complex was determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. Detailed analysis of the interaction between the D-protein antagonist and the VEGF-A protein molecule showed that the binding interface comprised a contact surface area of approximately 800 {angstrom}{sup 2} in accord with our design objectives, and that the D-protein antagonist binds to the same region of VEGF-A that interacts with VEGFR1-domain 2.

  4. Chemical synthesis and X-ray structure of a heterochiral {D-protein antagonist plus vascular endothelial growth factor} protein complex by racemic crystallography.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Uppalapati, Maruti; Ault-Riché, Dana; Kenney, John; Lowitz, Joshua; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Kent, Stephen B H

    2012-09-11

    Total chemical synthesis was used to prepare the mirror image (D-protein) form of the angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Phage display against D-VEGF-A was used to screen designed libraries based on a unique small protein scaffold in order to identify a high affinity ligand. Chemically synthesized D- and L- forms of the protein ligand showed reciprocal chiral specificity in surface plasmon resonance binding experiments: The L-protein ligand bound only to D-VEGF-A, whereas the D-protein ligand bound only to L-VEGF-A. The D-protein ligand, but not the L-protein ligand, inhibited the binding of natural VEGF(165) to the VEGFR1 receptor. Racemic protein crystallography was used to determine the high resolution X-ray structure of the heterochiral complex consisting of {D-protein antagonist + L-protein form of VEGF-A}. Crystallization of a racemic mixture of these synthetic proteins in appropriate stoichiometry gave a racemic protein complex of more than 73 kDa containing six synthetic protein molecules. The structure of the complex was determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. Detailed analysis of the interaction between the D-protein antagonist and the VEGF-A protein molecule showed that the binding interface comprised a contact surface area of approximately 800 Å(2) in accord with our design objectives, and that the D-protein antagonist binds to the same region of VEGF-A that interacts with VEGFR1-domain 2. PMID:22927390

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates expression of surfactant protein in alveolar type II cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Ahmad, Aftab; Kewley, Emily; Mason, Robert J

    2011-11-01

    Alveolar type II (ATII) cells cultured at an air-liquid (A/L) interface maintain differentiation, but they lose these properties when they are submerged. Others showed that an oxygen tension gradient develops in the culture medium as ATII cells consume oxygen. Therefore, we wondered whether hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling could explain differences in the phenotypes of ATII cells cultured under A/L interface or submerged conditions. ATII cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured on inserts coated with a mixture of rat-tail collagen and Matrigel, in medium including 5% rat serum and 10 ng/ml keratinocyte growth factor, with their apical surfaces either exposed to air or submerged. The A/L interface condition maintained the expression of surfactant proteins, whereas that expression was down-regulated under the submerged condition, and the effect was rapid and reversible. Under submerged conditions, there was an increase in HIF1α and HIF2α in nuclear extracts, mRNA levels of HIF inducible genes, vascular endothelial growth factor, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), and the protein level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme-1. The expression of surfactant proteins was suppressed and GLUT1 mRNA levels were induced when cells were cultured with 1 mM dimethyloxalyl glycine. The expression of surfactant proteins was restored under submerged conditions with supplemented 60% oxygen. HIF signaling and oxygen tension at the surface of cells appears to be important in regulating the phenotype of rat ATII cells. PMID:21454802

  6. TAL effectors: highly adaptable phytobacterial virulence factors and readily engineered DNA targeting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Erin L.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are transcription factors injected into plant cells by pathogenic bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas. They function as virulence factors by activating host genes important for disease, or as avirulence factors by turning on genes that provide resistance. DNA binding specificity is encoded by polymorphic repeats in each protein that correspond one-to-one with different nucleotides. This code has facilitated target identification and opened new avenues for engineering disease resistance. It has also enabled TAL effector customization for targeted gene control, genome editing, and other applications. This article reviews the structural basis for TAL effector-DNA specificity, the impact of the TAL effector-DNA code on plant pathology and engineered resistance, and recent accomplishments and future challenges in TAL effector-based DNA targeting. PMID:23707478

  7. Structural and Functional Analysis of VQ Motif-Containing Proteins in Arabidopsis as Interacting Proteins of WRKY Transcription Factors1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Chi, Ying-Jun; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Jian-Ye; Wang, Fei; Fan, Baofang; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2012-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are encoded by a large gene superfamily with a broad range of roles in plants. Recently, several groups have reported that proteins containing a short VQ (FxxxVQxLTG) motif interact with WRKY proteins. We have recently discovered that two VQ proteins from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN1 and SIGMA FACTOR-INTERACTING PROTEIN2, act as coactivators of WRKY33 in plant defense by specifically recognizing the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulating the DNA-binding activity of WRKY33. In this study, we have analyzed the entire family of 34 structurally divergent VQ proteins from Arabidopsis. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assays showed that Arabidopsis VQ proteins interacted specifically with the C-terminal WRKY domains of group I and the sole WRKY domains of group IIc WRKY proteins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified structural features of these two closely related groups of WRKY domains that are critical for interaction with VQ proteins. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of a majority of Arabidopsis VQ genes was responsive to pathogen infection and salicylic acid treatment. Functional analysis using both knockout mutants and overexpression lines revealed strong phenotypes in growth, development, and susceptibility to pathogen infection. Altered phenotypes were substantially enhanced through cooverexpression of genes encoding interacting VQ and WRKY proteins. These findings indicate that VQ proteins play an important role in plant growth, development, and response to environmental conditions, most likely by acting as cofactors of group I and IIc WRKY transcription factors. PMID:22535423

  8. Purification of scatter factor, a fibroblast-derived basic protein that modulates epithelial interactions and movement.

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, E; Gray, J; Stoker, M; Perryman, M; Furlong, R

    1989-01-01

    Scatter factor is a fibroblast-derived protein that causes separation of contiguous epithelial cells and increased local mobility of unanchored cells. Highly purified scatter factor has been obtained by a combination of ion-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography from serum-free medium conditioned by a ras-transformed clone (D4) of mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Under nonreducing conditions scatter factor has a pI of approximately 9.5 and migrates in SDS/polyacrylamide gels as a single band at approximately 62 kDa from which epithelial scatter activity can be recovered. Treatment with reducing agents destroys biological activity and is associated with the appearance of two major bands at approximately 57 and approximately 30 kDa. Whether both the 57-kDa and 30-kDa polypeptides are required for biological activity remains to be established. All the activities observed in crude medium conditioned by cells producing scatter factor are retained by highly purified preparations of scatter factor. These include (i) increased local movement, modulation of morphology, and inhibition of junction formation by single epithelial cells and (ii) disruption of epithelial interactions and cell scattering from preformed epithelial sheets. These changes occur with picomolar concentrations of purified scatter factor and without an effect on cell growth. Images PMID:2527367

  9. Dual-stage growth factor release within 3D protein-engineered hydrogel niches promotes adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Goodwin, Midori; Teasley, Eric S.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered biomimetic microenvironments from hydrogels are an emerging strategy to achieve lineage-specific differentiation in vitro. In addition to recapitulating critical matrix cues found in the native three-dimensional (3D) niche, the hydrogel can also be designed to deliver soluble factors that are present within the native inductive microenvironment. We demonstrate a versatile materials approach for the dual-stage delivery of multiple soluble factors within a 3D hydrogel to induce adipogenesis. We use a Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH) embedded with alginate microgels to deliver two pro-adipogenic soluble factors, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) with two distinct delivery profiles. We show that dual-stage delivery of FGF-1 and BMP-4 to human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs) significantly increases lipid accumulation compared with the simultaneous delivery of both growth factors together. Furthermore, dual-stage growth factor delivery within a 3D hydrogel resulted in substantially more lipid accumulation compared to identical delivery profiles in 2D cultures. Gene expression analysis shows upregulation of key adipogenic markers indicative of brown-like adipocytes. These data suggest that dual-stage release of FGF-1 and BMP-4 within 3D microenvironments can promote the in vitro development of mature adipocytes. PMID:25309741

  10. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses) replication. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV) were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated. Conclusions/Significance The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with

  11. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. PMID:27503803

  12. Embryonic Neural Inducing Factor Churchill is not a DNA-Binding Zinc Finger Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian M.; Buck-Koehntop, Bethany A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A.; Dyson, H. Jane; Wright, Peter E.

    2007-01-01

    Churchill is a zinc-containing protein that is involved in neural induction during embryogenesis. At the time of its discovery, it was thought on the basis of sequence alignment to contain two zinc fingers of the C4 type. Further, binding of an N-terminal GST-Churchill fusion protein to a particular DNA sequence was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation selection assay, suggesting that Churchill may function as a transcriptional regulator by sequence-specific DNA binding. We show by NMR solution structure determination that, far from containing canonical C4 zinc fingers, the protein contains three bound zinc ions in novel coordination sites, including an unusual binuclear zinc cluster. The secondary structure of Churchill is also unusual, consisting of a highly solvent exposed single-layer β-sheet. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and backbone relaxation measurements reveals that Churchill is unusually dynamic on a number of time scales, with the exception of regions surrounding the zinc coordinating sites, which serve to stabilize the otherwise unstructured N-terminus and the single-layer β-sheet. No binding of Churchill to the previously-identified DNA sequence could be detected, and extensive searches using DNA sequence selection techniques could find no other DNA sequence that was bound by Churchill. Since the N-terminal amino acids of Churchill form part of the zinc-binding motif, the addition of a fusion protein at the N-terminus causes loss of zinc and unfolding of Churchill. This observation most likely explains the published DNA-binding results, which would arise due to non-specific interaction of the unfolded protein in the immunoprecipitation selection assay. Since Churchill does not appear to bind DNA, we suggest that it may function in embryogenesis as a protein-interaction factor. PMID:17610897

  13. Isolation and characterization of a gene encoding an ethylene responsive factor protein from Ceratoides arborescens.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Wang, Xuemin; Wang, Kang; Wang, Zan; Gao, Hongwen

    2012-02-01

    Ethylene responsive factor (ERF) proteins play important roles in plant growth and development and regulate biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this study, a full length mRNA encoding a novel ERF-type transcription factor namely Ceratoides arborescens ERF protein (CeERF) was isolated from C. arborescens. The deduced amino acid of CeERF had a conserved APETALA2/ERF (AP2/ERF) domain which specifically binds to cis-acting elements GCC box. Under normal conditions, the expression level of CeERF was highest in leaves and lowest in roots. CeERF expression was induced by 20% PEG in a time-dependent pattern and peaked at 8 h. CeERF also acts in salt- and hormones-induced stresses. Transient expression analysis in onion epidermal cells indicated that CeERF protein localized to nucleus. Overexpression of CeERF in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in higher tolerance to abiotic stresses than in control plants. These results suggested that CeERF might play a role in abiotic stress signal transduction and that overexpression of CeERF might serve as a feasible approach to enhance resistance in forage, even crop. PMID:21603850

  14. The Trigger Factor Chaperone Encapsulates and Stabilizes Partial Folds of Substrate Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Kushagra; Vreede, Jocelyne; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander J.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    How chaperones interact with protein chains to assist in their folding is a central open question in biology. Obtaining atomistic insight is challenging in particular, given the transient nature of the chaperone-substrate complexes and the large system sizes. Recent single-molecule experiments have shown that the chaperone Trigger Factor (TF) not only binds unfolded protein chains, but can also guide protein chains to their native state by interacting with partially folded structures. Here, we used all-atom MD simulations to provide atomistic insights into how Trigger Factor achieves this chaperone function. Our results indicate a crucial role for the tips of the finger-like appendages of TF in the early interactions with both unfolded chains and partially folded structures. Unfolded chains are kinetically trapped when bound to TF, which suppresses the formation of transient, non-native end-to-end contacts. Mechanical flexibility allows TF to hold partially folded structures with two tips (in a pinching configuration), and to stabilize them by wrapping around its appendages. This encapsulation mechanism is distinct from that of chaperones such as GroEL, and allows folded structures of diverse size and composition to be protected from aggregation and misfolding interactions. The results suggest that an ATP cycle is not required to enable both encapsulation and liberation. PMID:26512985

  15. ADP ribosylation factor like 2 (Arl2) protein influences microtubule dynamics in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beghin, Anne . E-mail: anne.beghin@recherche.univ-lyon1.fr; Honore, Stephane; Messana, Celine; Matera, Eva-Laure; Aim, Jennifer; Burlinchon, Sandrine; Braguer, Diane; Dumontet, Charles

    2007-02-01

    ADP ribosylation factor like 2 (Arl2) protein is involved in the folding of tubulin peptides. Variants of the human adenocarcinoma line MCF7 cells with increased or reduced content of Arl2 protein were produced and characterized. Western blot analysis performed after separation of the different fractions of tubulins showed that the content in polymerizable soluble heterodimers was significantly increased in cells with the highest Arl2 expression level (MA+) and reduced in cells with the lowest Arl2 expression level (MA-) in comparison to control cells (MP). Microtubule dynamic instability, measured after microinjection of rhodamine-labelled tubulin in living cells, was significantly enhanced in MA+ cells and reduced in MA- cells. These alterations involved modifications of the microtubule growth and shortening rates, duration of attenuation phases, percentage of time spent in each phase (growth, shortening and attenuation) and catastrophe frequency. We also observed modifications in the expression level of the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2Ac, which has been shown to form a complex with Arl2. Finally, cell cycle progression was modified in these cells, particularly in regard to duration of telophase. In summary, alterations in Arl2 protein content were found to be associated with modifications in tubulin pools, microtubule dynamics as well as cell cycle progression.

  16. Pentapeptide-repeat proteins that act as topoisomerase poison resistance factors have a common dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Zhang, Yong; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The protein AlbG is a self-resistance factor against albicidin, a nonribosomally encoded hybrid polyketide-peptide with antibiotic and phytotoxic properties produced by Xanthomonas albilineans. Primary-sequence analysis indicates that AlbG is a member of the pentapeptide-repeat family of proteins (PRP). The structure of AlbG from X. albilineans was determined at 2.0 Å resolution by SAD phasing using data collected from a single trimethyllead acetate derivative on a home source. AlbG folds into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix composed of approximately eight semi-regular coils. The regularity of the β-­helix is blemished by a large loop/deviation in the β-helix between coils 4 and 5. The C-terminus of the β-helix is capped by a dimerization module, yielding a dimer with a 110 Å semi-collinear β-helical axis. This method of dimer formation appears to be common to all PRP proteins that confer resistance to topoisomerase poisons and contrasts with most PRP proteins, which are typically monomeric. PMID:21393830

  17. Pathogenic Leptospira Species Acquire Factor H and Vitronectin via the Surface Protein LcpA

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ludmila Bezerra; Miragaia, Lidia dos Santos; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Abe, Cecilia Mari; Schmidt, Mariana Costa Braga; Moro, Ana Maria; Monaris, Denize; Conde, Jonas Nascimento; Józsi, Mihály; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patrícia Antônia Estima

    2014-01-01

    Upon infection, pathogenic Leptospira species bind several complement regulators in order to overcome host innate immunity. We previously characterized a 20-kDa leptospiral surface protein which interacts with C4b binding protein (C4BP): leptospiral complement regulator-acquiring protein A (LcpA). Here we show that LcpA also interacts with human factor H (FH), which remains functionally active once bound to the protein. Antibodies directed against short consensus repeat 20 (SCR20) inhibited binding of FH to LcpA by approximately 90%, thus confirming that this particular domain is involved in the interaction. We have also shown for the first time that leptospires bind human vitronectin and that the interaction is mediated by LcpA. Coincubation with heparin blocked LcpA-vitronectin interaction in a dose-dependent manner, strongly suggesting that binding may occur through the heparin binding domains of vitronectin. LcpA also bound to the terminal pathway component C9 and inhibited Zn2+-induced polymerization and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. Competitive binding assays indicated that LcpA interacts with C4BP, FH, and vitronectin through distinct sites. Taken together, our findings indicate that LcpA may play a role in leptospiral immune evasion. PMID:25534939

  18. Effect of protein kinase P on phosphorylations catalyzed by the epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghany, M; Kole, H K; Racker, E

    1987-01-01

    Protein kinase P (PK-P) activated by histones or certain other basic compounds has been purified previously from yeast [Yanagita, Y., Abdel-Ghany, M., Raden, D., Nelson, N. & Racker, E. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 925-929]. It is shown here that PK-P is present in solubilized membranes of A-431 carcinoma cells where it changes the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase activity. Polylysine, a weak PK-P activator, inhibited the autophosphorylation of the EGF receptor both in the absence and presence of EGF. Increased PK-P activity induced by histone 1, a potent activator, gave rise to increased autophosphorylation of the EGF receptor as well as phosphorylation at tyrosine residues of numerous other endogenous membrane components. The stimulation by histone was particularly striking in the presence of EGF. A similar stimulation was achieved with polylysine and EGF on addition of yeast PK-P. However, addition of yeast PK-P in the presence of histone 1 markedly inhibited the EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of endogenous membrane proteins. We conclude from these results that the effect of PK-P on the EGF receptor takes place in three phases: at low levels PK-P inhibits the autophosphorylation, at intermediate levels it stimulates the autophosphorylation as well as the EGF-dependent phosphorylation of numerous other membrane proteins, and at high levels it inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins. Images PMID:3501120

  19. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions—The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Cornelia M.; Jansch, Mirko; Müller, Rainer H.

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern), typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface). The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics. PMID:24300396

  20. C4 protein of Beet severe curly top virus is a pathomorphogenetic factor in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungan; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Buckley, Kenneth J; Park, Jong-Bum; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Kim, Dong-Giun; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R

    2010-12-01

    The Curtovirus C4 protein is required for symptom development during infection of Arabidopsis. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing C4 from either Beet curly top virus or Beet severe curly top virus produced phenotypes that were similar to symptoms seen during infection with wild-type viruses. The pseudosymptoms caused by C4 protein alone were novel to transgenic Arabidopsis and included bumpy trichomes, severe enations, disorientation of vascular bundles and stomata, swelling, callus-like structure formation, and twisted siliques. C4 induced abnormal cell division and altered cell fate in a variety of tissues depending on the C4 expression level. C4 protein expression increased the expression levels of cell-cycle-related genes CYCs, CDKs and PCNA, and suppressed ICK1 and the retinoblastoma-related gene RBR1, resulting in activation of host cell division. These results suggest that the Curtovirus C4 proteins are involved actively in host cell-cycle regulation to recruit host factors for virus replication and symptom development. PMID:20960205

  1. Regulation of WRKY46 Transcription Factor Function by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Arsheed H; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Sinha, Alok K; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are central signaling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defense as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defense. PMID:26870073

  2. Regulation of WRKY46 Transcription Factor Function by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Arsheed H.; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Sinha, Alok K.; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are central signaling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defense as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defense. PMID:26870073

  3. Prolonged activity of factor IX as a monomeric Fc fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Peters, Robert T; Low, Susan C; Kamphaus, George D; Dumont, Jennifer A; Amari, John V; Lu, Qi; Zarbis-Papastoitsis, Greg; Reidy, Thomas J; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Nichols, Timothy C; Bitonti, Alan J

    2010-03-11

    Treatment of hemophilia B requires frequent infusions of factor IX (FIX) to prophylax against bleeding episodes. Hemophilia B management would benefit from a FIX protein with an extended half-life. A recombinant fusion protein (rFIXFc) containing a single FIX molecule attached to the Fc region of immunoglobulin G was administered intravenously and found to have an extended half-life, compared with recombinant FIX (rFIX) in normal mice, rats, monkeys, and FIX-deficient mice and dogs. Recombinant FIXFc protein concentration was determined in all species, and rFIXFc activity was measured in FIX-deficient animals. The half-life of rFIXFc was approximately 3- to 4-fold longer than that of rFIX in all species. In contrast, in mice in which the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) was deleted, the half-life of rFIXFc was similar to rFIX, confirming the increased circulatory time was due to protection of the rFIXFc via the Fc/FcRn interaction. Whole blood clotting time in FIX-deficient mice was corrected through 144 hours for rFIXFc, compared with 72 hours for rFIX; similar results were observed in FIX-deficient dogs. Taken together, these studies show the enhanced pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the rFIXFc fusion protein and provide the basis for evaluating rFIXFc in patients with hemophilia B. PMID:20056791

  4. Host proteins interacting with the Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase: Multiple transcriptional regulators and chromatin binding factors

    PubMed Central

    Studamire, Barbara; Goff, Stephen P

    2008-01-01

    Background A critical step for retroviral replication is the stable integration of the provirus into the genome of its host. The viral integrase protein is key in this essential step of the retroviral life cycle. Although the basic mechanism of integration by mammalian retroviruses has been well characterized, the factors determining how viral integration events are targeted to particular regions of the genome or to regions of a particular DNA structure remain poorly defined. Significant questions remain regarding the influence of host proteins on the selection of target sites, on the repair of integration intermediates, and on the efficiency of integration. Results We describe the results of a yeast two-hybrid screen using Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase as bait to screen murine cDNA libraries for host proteins that interact with the integrase. We identified 27 proteins that interacted with different integrase fusion proteins. The identified proteins include chromatin remodeling, DNA repair and transcription factors (13 proteins); translational regulation factors, helicases, splicing factors and other RNA binding proteins (10 proteins); and transporters or miscellaneous factors (4 proteins). We confirmed the interaction of these proteins with integrase by testing them in the context of other yeast strains with GAL4-DNA binding domain-integrase fusions, and by in vitro binding assays between recombinant proteins. Subsequent analyses revealed that a number of the proteins identified as Mo-MLV integrase interactors also interact with HIV-1 integrase both in yeast and in vitro. Conclusion We identify several proteins interacting directly with both MoMLV and HIV-1 integrases that may be common to the integration reaction pathways of both viruses. Many of the proteins identified in the screen are logical interaction partners for integrase, and the validity of a number of the interactions are supported by other studies. In addition, we observe that some of the

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Induced Protein 3 Interacting Protein 1 Gene Polymorphisms and Pustular Psoriasis in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jian-Wen; Wang, Yong; Alateng, Chulu; Li, Hong-Bin; Bai, Yun-Hua; Lyu, Xin-Xiang; Wu, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated inflammatory dermatosis. Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is the severe and rare type of psoriasis. The association between tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced protein 3 interacting protein 1 (TNIP1) gene and psoriasis was confirmed in people with multiple ethnicities. This study was to investigate the association between TNIP1 gene polymorphisms and pustular psoriasis in Chinese Han population. Methods: Seventy-three patients with GPP, 67 patients with palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP), and 476 healthy controls were collected from Chinese Han population. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the TNIP1 gene, namely rs3805435, rs3792798, rs3792797, rs869976, rs17728338, and rs999011 were genotyped by using polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction. Statistical analyses were performed using the PLINK 1.07 package. Allele frequencies and genotyping frequencies for six SNPs were compared by using Chi-square test, odd ratio (OR) (including 95% confidence interval) were calculated. The haplotype analysis was conducted by Haploview software. Results: The frequencies of alleles of five SNPs were significantly different between the GPP group and the control group (P ≤ 7.22 × 10−3), especially in the GPP patients without psoriasis vulgaris (PsV). In the haplotype analysis, the most significantly different haplotype was H4: ACGAAC, with 13.1% frequency in the GPP group but only 3.4% in the control group (OR = 4.16, P = 4.459 × 10−7). However, no significant difference in the allele frequencies was found between the PPP group and control group for each of the six SNPs (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Polymorphisms in TNIP1 are associated with GPP in Chinese Han population. However, no association with PPP was found. These findings suggest that TNIP1 might be a susceptibility gene for GPP. PMID:27364786

  6. Intrauterine growth restriction inhibits expression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase, a regulator of protein translation.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Robert A; Yost, Christian C; Zinkhan, Erin K; Fu, Qi; Callaway, Christopher W; Fung, Camille M

    2016-08-01

    Nutrient deprivation suppresses protein synthesis by blocking peptide elongation. Transcriptional upregulation and activation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) blocks peptide elongation by phosphorylating eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Previous studies examining placentas from intrauterine growth restricted (IUGR) newborn infants show decreased eEF2K expression and activity despite chronic nutrient deprivation. However, the effect of IUGR on hepatic eEF2K expression in the fetus is unknown. We, therefore, examined the transcriptional regulation of hepatic eEF2K gene expression in a Sprague-Dawley rat model of IUGR. We found decreased hepatic eEF2K mRNA and protein levels in IUGR offspring at birth compared with control, consistent with previous placental observations. Furthermore, the CpG island within the eEF2K promoter demonstrated increased methylation at a critical USF 1/2 transcription factor binding site. In vitro methylation of this binding site caused near complete loss of eEF2K promoter activity, designating this promoter as methylation sensitive. The eEF2K promotor in IUGR offspring also lost the protective histone covalent modifications associated with unmethylated CGIs. In addition, the +1 nucleosome was displaced 3' and RNA polymerase loading was reduced at the IUGR eEF2K promoter. Our findings provide evidence to explain why IUGR-induced chronic nutrient deprivation does not result in the upregulation of eEF2K gene transcription. PMID:27317589

  7. Expanding functions of GIT Arf GTPase-activating proteins, PIX Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GIT-PIX complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Li, Xiaobo; Premont, Richard T

    2016-05-15

    The GIT proteins, GIT1 and GIT2, are GTPase-activating proteins (inactivators) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) small GTP-binding proteins, and function to limit the activity of Arf proteins. The PIX proteins, α-PIX and β-PIX (also known as ARHGEF6 and ARHGEF7, respectively), are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (activators) for the Rho family small GTP-binding protein family members Rac1 and Cdc42. Through their multi-domain structures, GIT and PIX proteins can also function as signaling scaffolds by binding to numerous protein partners. Importantly, the constitutive association of GIT and PIX proteins into oligomeric GIT-PIX complexes allows these two proteins to function together as subunits of a larger structure that coordinates two distinct small GTP-binding protein pathways and serves as multivalent scaffold for the partners of both constituent subunits. Studies have revealed the involvement of GIT and PIX proteins, and of the GIT-PIX complex, in numerous fundamental cellular processes through a wide variety of mechanisms, pathways and signaling partners. In this Commentary, we discuss recent findings in key physiological systems that exemplify current understanding of the function of this important regulatory complex. Further, we draw attention to gaps in crucial information that remain to be filled to allow a better understanding of the many roles of the GIT-PIX complex in health and disease. PMID:27182061

  8. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus.

    PubMed

    Kotova, E S; Akopov, S B; Didych, D A; Petrova, N V; Iarovaia, O V; Razin, S V; Nikolaev, L G

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently - in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  9. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Kotova, E. S.; Akopov, S. B.; Didych, D. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Iarovaia, O. V.; Razin, S. V.; Nikolaev, L. G.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently – in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  10. Using protein-binding microarrays to study transcription factor specificity: homologs, isoforms and complexes

    PubMed Central

    Andrilenas, Kellen K.; Penvose, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Protein–DNA binding is central to specificity in gene regulation, and methods for characterizing transcription factor (TF)–DNA binding remain crucial to studies of regulatory specificity. High-throughput (HT) technologies have revolutionized our ability to characterize protein–DNA binding by significantly increasing the number of binding measurements that can be performed. Protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) are a robust and powerful HT platform for studying DNA-binding specificity of TFs. Analysis of PBM-determined DNA-binding profiles has provided new insight into the scope and mechanisms of TF binding diversity. In this review, we focus specifically on the PBM technique and discuss its application to the study of TF specificity, in particular, the binding diversity of TF homologs and multi-protein complexes. PMID:25431149

  11. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A.; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A.; Roth, Frederick P.; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E.; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.

    2014-01-01

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases. PMID:24722188

  12. Orthogonal matrix factorization enables integrative analysis of multiple RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stražar, Martin; Žitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž; Ule, Jernej; Curk, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression, including splicing, transport, polyadenylation and RNA stability. To model protein–RNA interactions by considering all available sources of information, it is necessary to integrate the rapidly growing RBP experimental data with the latest genome annotation, gene function, RNA sequence and structure. Such integration is possible by matrix factorization, where current approaches have an undesired tendency to identify only a small number of the strongest patterns with overlapping features. Because protein–RNA interactions are orchestrated by multiple factors, methods that identify discriminative patterns of varying strengths are needed. Results: We have developed an integrative orthogonality-regularized nonnegative matrix factorization (iONMF) to integrate multiple data sources and discover non-overlapping, class-specific RNA binding patterns of varying strengths. The orthogonality constraint halves the effective size of the factor model and outperforms other NMF models in predicting RBP interaction sites on RNA. We have integrated the largest data compendium to date, which includes 31 CLIP experiments on 19 RBPs involved in splicing (such as hnRNPs, U2AF2, ELAVL1, TDP-43 and FUS) and processing of 3’UTR (Ago, IGF2BP). We show that the integration of multiple data sources improves the predictive accuracy of retrieval of RNA binding sites. In our study the key predictive factors of protein–RNA interactions were the position of RNA structure and sequence motifs, RBP co-binding and gene region type. We report on a number of protein-specific patterns, many of which are consistent with experimentally determined properties of RBPs. Availability and implementation: The iONMF implementation and example datasets are available at https://github.com/mstrazar/ionmf. Contact: tomaz.curk@fri.uni-lj.si Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available

  13. Factors contributing to decreased protein stability when aspartic acid residues are in {beta}-sheet regions.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Cai, X.; Raffen, R.; Gu, M.; Stevens, F. J.; Schiffer, M.

    2002-07-01

    Asp residues are significantly under represented in {beta}-sheet regions of proteins, especially in the middle of {beta}-strands, as found by a number of studies using statistical, modeling, or experimental methods. To further understand the reasons for this under representation of Asp, we prepared and analyzed mutants of a {beta}-domain. Two Gln residues of the immunoglobulin light-chain variable domain (V{sub L}) of protein Len were replaced with Asp, and then the effects of these changes on protein stability and protein structure were studied. The replacement of Q38D, located at the end of a {beta}-strand, and that of Q89D, located in the middle of a {beta}-strand, reduced the stability of the parent immunoglobulin VL domain by 2.0 kcal/mol and 5.3 kcal/mol, respectively. Because the Q89D mutant of the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain was too unstable to be expressed as a soluble protein, we prepared the Q89D mutant in a triple mutant background, V{sub L}-Len M4L/Y27dD/T94H, which was 4.2 kcal/mol more stable than the wild-type V{sub L}-Len domain. The structures of mutants V{sub L}-Len Q38D and V{sub L}-Len Q89D/M4L/Y27dD/T94H were determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.6 A resolution. We found no major perturbances in the structures of these QD mutant proteins relative to structures of the parent proteins. The observed stability changes have to be accounted for by cumulative effects of the following several factors: (1) by changes in main-chain dihedral angles and in side-chain rotomers, (2) by close contacts between some atoms, and, most significantly, (3) by the unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the Asp side chain and the carbonyls of the main chain. We show that the Asn side chain, which is of similar size but neutral, is less destabilizing. The detrimental effect of Asp within a {beta}-sheet of an immunoglobulin-type domain can have very serious consequences. A somatic mutation of a {beta}-strand residue to Asp could prevent the expression of the

  14. Identification of bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) as a novel profibrotic factor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Cuesta, Cristina; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Subileau, Mariela; López-Hernández, Francisco J; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Upregulated synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts is a common phenomenon in the development of fibrosis. Although the role of TGF-β in fibrosis development has been extensively studied, the involvement of other members of this superfamily of cytokines, the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in organ fibrosis has given contradictory results. BMP9 is the main ligand for activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1) TGF-β1 type I receptor and its effect on fibrosis development is unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of BMP9 in ECM protein synthesis in fibroblasts, as well as the involved receptors and signaling pathways. In cultured mice fibroblasts, BMP9 induces an increase in collagen, fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor expression, associated with Smad1/5/8, Smad2/3 and Erk1/2 activation. ALK5 inhibition with SB431542 or ALK1/2/3/6 with dorsomorphin-1, inhibition of Smad3 activation with SIS3, and inhibition of the MAPK/Erk1/2 with U0126, demonstrates the involvement of these pathways in BMP9-induced ECM synthesis in MEFs. Whereas BMP9 induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation through ALK1, it also induces Smad2/3 phosphorylation through ALK5 but only in the presence of ALK1. Summarizing, this is the first study that accurately identifies BMP9 as a profibrotic factor in fibroblasts that promotes ECM protein expression through ALK1 and ALK5 receptors. PMID:27208502

  15. Overexpression of Eukaryotic Translation Elongation Factor 3 Impairs Gcn2 Protein Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Visweswaraiah, Jyothsna; Lee, Su Jung; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Sattlegger, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, phosphorylation of translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) by the kinase Gcn2 (general control nonderepressible 2) is a key response to amino acid starvation. Sensing starvation requires that Gcn2 directly contacts its effector protein Gcn1, and both must contact the ribosome. We have proposed that Gcn2 is activated by uncharged tRNA bound to the ribosomal decoding (A) site, in a manner facilitated by ribosome-bound Gcn1. Protein synthesis requires cyclical association of eukaryotic elongation factors (eEFs) with the ribosome. Gcn1 and Gcn2 are large proteins, raising the question of whether translation and monitoring amino acid availability can occur on the same ribosome. Part of the ribosome-binding domain in Gcn1 has homology to one of the ribosome-binding domains in eEF3, suggesting that these proteins utilize overlapping binding sites on the ribosome and consequently cannot function simultaneously on the same ribosome. Supporting this idea, we found that eEF3 overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae diminished growth on amino acid starvation medium (Gcn− phenotype) and decreased eIF2α phosphorylation, and that the growth defect associated with constitutively active Gcn2 was diminished by eEF3 overexpression. Overexpression of the eEF3 HEAT domain, or C terminus, was sufficient to confer a Gcn− phenotype, and both fragments have ribosome affinity. eEF3 overexpression did not significantly affect Gcn1-ribosome association, but it exacerbated the Gcn− phenotype of Gcn1-M7A that has reduced ribosome affinity. Together, this suggests that eEF3 blocks Gcn1 regulatory function on the ribosome. We propose that the Gcn1-Gcn2 complex only functions on ribosomes with A-site-bound uncharged tRNA, because eEF3 does not occupy these stalled complexes. PMID:22888004

  16. Overexpression of eukaryotic translation elongation factor 3 impairs Gcn2 protein activation.

    PubMed

    Visweswaraiah, Jyothsna; Lee, Su Jung; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Sattlegger, Evelyn

    2012-11-01

    In eukaryotes, phosphorylation of translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) by the kinase Gcn2 (general control nonderepressible 2) is a key response to amino acid starvation. Sensing starvation requires that Gcn2 directly contacts its effector protein Gcn1, and both must contact the ribosome. We have proposed that Gcn2 is activated by uncharged tRNA bound to the ribosomal decoding (A) site, in a manner facilitated by ribosome-bound Gcn1. Protein synthesis requires cyclical association of eukaryotic elongation factors (eEFs) with the ribosome. Gcn1 and Gcn2 are large proteins, raising the question of whether translation and monitoring amino acid availability can occur on the same ribosome. Part of the ribosome-binding domain in Gcn1 has homology to one of the ribosome-binding domains in eEF3, suggesting that these proteins utilize overlapping binding sites on the ribosome and consequently cannot function simultaneously on the same ribosome. Supporting this idea, we found that eEF3 overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae diminished growth on amino acid starvation medium (Gcn(-) phenotype) and decreased eIF2α phosphorylation, and that the growth defect associated with constitutively active Gcn2 was diminished by eEF3 overexpression. Overexpression of the eEF3 HEAT domain, or C terminus, was sufficient to confer a Gcn(-) phenotype, and both fragments have ribosome affinity. eEF3 overexpression did not significantly affect Gcn1-ribosome association, but it exacerbated the Gcn(-) phenotype of Gcn1-M7A that has reduced ribosome affinity. Together, this suggests that eEF3 blocks Gcn1 regulatory function on the ribosome. We propose that the Gcn1-Gcn2 complex only functions on ribosomes with A-site-bound uncharged tRNA, because eEF3 does not occupy these stalled complexes. PMID:22888004

  17. Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor: Multiple Anticoagulant Activities for a Single Protein.

    PubMed

    Mast, Alan E

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is an anticoagulant protein that inhibits early phases of the procoagulant response. Alternatively spliced isoforms of TFPI are differentially expressed by endothelial cells and human platelets and plasma. The TFPIβ isoform localizes to the endothelium surface where it is a potent inhibitor of TF-factor VIIa complexes that initiate blood coagulation. The TFPIα isoform is present in platelets. TFPIα contains a stretch of 9 amino acids nearly identical to those found in the B-domain of factor V that are well conserved in mammals. These amino acids provide exosite binding to activated factor V, which allows for TFPIα to inhibit prothrombinase during the initiation phase of blood coagulation. Endogenous inhibition at this point in the coagulation cascade was only recently recognized and has provided a biochemical rationale to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying several clinical disorders. These include the east Texas bleeding disorder that is caused by production of an altered form of factor V with high affinity for TFPI and a paradoxical procoagulant effect of heparins. In addition, these findings have led to ideas for pharmacological targeting of TFPI that may reduce bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:26603155

  18. [Factors to be considered in the production and introduction of high-quality protein foods].

    PubMed

    Chávez, J F

    1980-03-01

    A wide variety of factors can influence the development, production and introduction of high-quality protein foods in a given country. Such factors can be grouped in three main areas: I. Factors depending upon the country itself. II. Factors related with the identity of the food and III. Factors inherent to the consumer. The role of the food industry and of the government are discussed in area I, and such aspects as improvement of staples, availability of raw materials, health programs and energy crisis are briefly commented. Area II covers product identity in relation to used ingredients. Nutritional quality and requirements as well as the danger of increasing the price of the product after being in the market are briefly discussed. The consumer's attitude, preferences and personal reactions towards the presentation of the food are covered in area III. Also marketing approach, promotion, labels and possible influence of the name are discussed. The launching of "incaparina" in Venezuela in 1964 and the reasons for its failure are commented from the different points of view covered in the above sections. PMID:7447587

  19. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 protein is overexpressed in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koole, Koos; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Swartz, Justin E; Peeters, Ton; van Diest, Paul J; Koole, Ron; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase family. It has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in multiple types of cancer. We have investigated FGFR3 protein expression and FGFR3 gene copy-numbers in a single well-documented cohort of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Tissue microarray sets containing 452 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues were immunohistochemically stained with an anti-FGFR3 antibody and hybridized with a FGFR3 fluorescence in situ hybridization probe. FGFR3 protein expression was correlated with clinicopathological and survival data, which were retrieved from electronic medical records. FGFR3 mRNA data of 522 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) protein was overexpressed in 48% (89/185) of oral and 59% (124/211) of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Overexpression of FGFR3 protein was not related to overall survival or disease-free survival in oral (HR[hazard ratio]: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.64-1.39; P = 0.77, HR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.65-1.36; P = 0.75) and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 0.81-1.80; P = 0.36, HR: 0.42; 95% CI: 0.79-1.77; P = 0.42). FGFR3 mRNA was upregulated in 3% (18/522) of HNSCC from the TCGA. The FGFR3 gene was gained in 0.6% (1/179) of oral squamous cell carcinoma but no amplification was found in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, FGFR3 protein is frequently overexpressed in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, it may serve as a potential therapeutic target for FGFR3-directed therapies in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26711175

  20. A Nuclear Factor of High Mobility Group Box Protein in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Lei, Tao; Liu, Jing; Li, Muzi; Nan, Huizhu; Liu, Qun

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear factor that usually binds DNA and modulates gene expression in multicellular organisms. Three HMGB1 orthologs were predicted in the genome of Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen, termed TgHMGB1a, b and c. Phylogenetic and bioinformatic analyses indicated that these proteins all contain a single HMG box and which shared in three genotypes. We cloned TgHMGB1a, a 33.9 kDa protein that can stimulates macrophages to release TNF-α, and, we demonstrated that the TgHMGB1a binds distorted DNA structures such as cruciform DNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Immunofluorescence assay indicated TgHMGB1a concentrated in the nucleus of intracellular tachyzoites but translocated into the cytoplasm while the parasites release to extracellular. There were no significant phenotypic changes when the TgHMGB1a B box was deleted, while transgenic parasites that overexpressed TgHMGB1a showed slower intracellular growth and caused delayed death in mouse, further quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that the expression levels of many important genes, including virulence factors, increased when TgHMGB1a was overexpressed, but no significant changes were observed in TgHMGB1a B box-deficient parasites. Our findings demonstrated that TgHMGB1a is indeed a nuclear protein that maintains HMG box architectural functions and is a potential proinflammatory factor during the T.gondii infection. Further studies that clarify the functions of TgHMGB1s will increase our knowledge of transcriptional regulation and parasite virulence, and might provide new insight into host–parasite interactions for T. gondii infection. PMID:25369210

  1. Nonfunctional variant 3 factor H binding proteins as meningococcal vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Jongerius, Ilse; Malik, Talat; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Staunton, David; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L; Pickering, Matthew C; Lea, Susan M; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-03-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen and leading cause of meningitis and septicemia. Factor H binding protein (fHbp), a virulence factor which protects N. meningitidis from innate immunity by binding the human complement regulator factor H (fH) with high affinity, is also a key antigen in vaccines being developed to prevent meningococcal disease. fHbp can be divided into three variant groups (V1, V2, and V3) that elicit limited immunological cross-reactivity. The interaction of fH with fHbp could impair the immunogenicity of this antigen by hindering access to the antigenic epitopes in fHbp, providing the rationale for the development of nonfunctional fHbps as vaccine candidates. Here, we characterized the two nonfunctional V3 fHbps, fHbp(T286A) and fHbp(E313A), which each contains a single amino acid substitution that leads to a marked reduction in affinity for fH without affecting the folding of the proteins. The immunogenicity of the nonfunctional fHbps was assessed in transgenic mice expressing a single chimeric fH containing domains of human fH involved in binding to fHbp. No differences in anti-V3 fHbp antibody titers were elicited by the wild-type V3 fHbp, V3 fHbp(T286A), and V3 fHbp(E313A), demonstrating that the nonfunctional fHbps retain their immunogenicity. Furthermore, the nonfunctional V3 fHbps elicit serum bactericidal activity that is equivalent to or higher than that observed with the wild-type protein. Our findings provide the basis for the rational design of next-generation vaccines containing nonfunctional V3 fHbps. PMID:24379280

  2. Nonfunctional Variant 3 Factor H Binding Proteins as Meningococcal Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Jongerius, Ilse; Malik, Talat; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Staunton, David; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.; Pickering, Matthew C.; Lea, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen and leading cause of meningitis and septicemia. Factor H binding protein (fHbp), a virulence factor which protects N. meningitidis from innate immunity by binding the human complement regulator factor H (fH) with high affinity, is also a key antigen in vaccines being developed to prevent meningococcal disease. fHbp can be divided into three variant groups (V1, V2, and V3) that elicit limited immunological cross-reactivity. The interaction of fH with fHbp could impair the immunogenicity of this antigen by hindering access to the antigenic epitopes in fHbp, providing the rationale for the development of nonfunctional fHbps as vaccine candidates. Here, we characterized the two nonfunctional V3 fHbps, fHbpT286A and fHbpE313A, which each contains a single amino acid substitution that leads to a marked reduction in affinity for fH without affecting the folding of the proteins. The immunogenicity of the nonfunctional fHbps was assessed in transgenic mice expressing a single chimeric fH containing domains of human fH involved in binding to fHbp. No differences in anti-V3 fHbp antibody titers were elicited by the wild-type V3 fHbp, V3 fHbpT286A, and V3 fHbpE313A, demonstrating that the nonfunctional fHbps retain their immunogenicity. Furthermore, the nonfunctional V3 fHbps elicit serum bactericidal activity that is equivalent to or higher than that observed with the wild-type protein. Our findings provide the basis for the rational design of next-generation vaccines containing nonfunctional V3 fHbps. PMID:24379280

  3. The transcription factor cyclic AMP–responsive element–binding protein H regulates triglyceride metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Giannikopoulos, Petros; Duncan, Stephen A.; Wang, Jian; Johansen, Christopher T.; Brown, Jonathan D.; Plutzky, Jorge; Hegele, Robert A.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Lee, Ann-Hwee

    2012-01-01

    Here we report that the transcription factor CREB-H is required for the maintenance of normal plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. CREB-H deficient mice displayed hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) secondary to inefficient TG clearance catalyzed by lipoprotein lipase (Lpl), partly due to defective expression of the Lpl coactivators, Apoc2, Apoa4, and Apoa5 and concurrent augmentation of the Lpl inhibitor, Apoc3. Multiple nonsynonymous mutations in CREB3L3 that produced hypomorphic or nonfunctional CREB-H protein were identified in patients with extreme HTG, implicating a critical role for CREB-H in human TG metabolism. PMID:21666694

  4. Therapeutic effects of cell-permeant peptides that activate G proteins downstream of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Gary S.; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K.; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Sato, Emi; Dunkel, Ying; Gallo, Richard L.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two major signaling hubs. Signal transduction via trimeric G proteins has long been believed to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This paradigm has recently been challenged by several studies on a multimodular signal transducer, Gα-Interacting Vesicle associated protein (GIV/Girdin). We recently demonstrated that GIV’s C terminus (CT) serves as a platform for dynamic association of ligand-activated RTKs with Gαi, and for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins. However, exogenous manipulation of this platform has remained beyond reach. Here we developed cell-permeable GIV-CT peptides by fusing a TAT-peptide transduction domain (TAT-PTD) to the minimal modular elements of GIV that are necessary and sufficient for activation of Gi downstream of RTKs, and used them to engineer signaling networks and alter cell behavior. In the presence of an intact GEF motif, TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced diverse processes in which GIV’s GEF function has previously been implicated, e.g., 2D cell migration after scratch-wounding, invasion of cancer cells, and finally, myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Furthermore, topical application of TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced the complex, multireceptor-driven process of wound repair in mice in a GEF-dependent manner. Thus, TAT-GIV peptides provide a novel and versatile tool to manipulate Gαi activation downstream of growth factors in a diverse array of pathophysiologic conditions. PMID:25926659

  5. Translation factors and ribosomal proteins control tumor onset and progression: how?

    PubMed

    Loreni, F; Mancino, M; Biffo, S

    2014-04-24

    Gene expression is shaped by translational control. The modalities and the extent by which translation factors modify gene expression have revealed therapeutic scenarios. For instance, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E activity is controlled by the signaling cascade of growth factors, and drives tumorigenesis by favoring the translation of specific mRNAs. Highly specific drugs target the activity of eIF4E. Indeed, the antitumor action of mTOR complex 1 (mTORc1) blockers like rapamycin relies on their capability to inhibit eIF4E assembly into functional eIF4F complexes. eIF4E biology, from its inception to recent pharmacological targeting, is proof-of-principle that translational control is druggable. The case for eIF4E is not isolated. The translational machinery is involved in the biology of cancer through many other mechanisms. First, untranslated sequences on mRNAs as well as noncoding RNAs regulate the translational efficiency of mRNAs that are central for tumor progression. Second, other initiation factors like eIF6 show a tumorigenic potential by acting downstream of oncogenic pathways. Third, genetic alterations in components of the translational apparatus underlie an entire class of inherited syndromes known as 'ribosomopathies' that are associated with increased cancer risk. Taken together, data suggest that in spite of their evolutionary conservation and ubiquitous nature, variations in the activity and levels of ribosomal proteins and translation factors generate highly specific effects. Beside, as the structures and biochemical activities of several noncoding RNAs and initiation factors are known, these factors may be amenable to rational pharmacological targeting. The future is to design highly specific drugs targeting the translational apparatus. PMID:23644661

  6. Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens with Increased Thermal Stability and Decreased Binding of Human Factor H.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Raffaella; Konar, Monica; Beernink, Peter T

    2016-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes cases of bacterial meningitis and sepsis. Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a component of two licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccines. FHbp recruits the complement regulator factor H (FH) to the bacterial surface, which inhibits the complement alternative pathway and promotes immune evasion. Binding of human FH impairs the protective antibody responses to FHbp, and mutation of FHbp to decrease binding of FH can increase the protective responses. In a previous study, we identified two amino acid substitutions in FHbp variant group 2 that increased its thermal stability by 21°C and stabilized epitopes recognized by protective monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Our hypothesis was that combining substitutions to increase stability and decrease FH binding would increase protective antibody responses in the presence of human FH. In the present study, we generated four new FHbp single mutants that decreased FH binding and retained binding of anti-FHbp MAbs and immunogenicity in wild-type mice. From these mutants, we selected two, K219N and G220S, to combine with the stabilized double-mutant FHbp antigen. The two triple mutants decreased FH binding >200-fold, increased the thermal stability of the N-terminal domain by 21°C, and bound better to an anti-FHbp MAb than the wild-type FHbp. In human-FH-transgenic mice, the FHbp triple mutants elicited 8- to 15-fold-higher protective antibody responses than the wild-type FHbp antigen. Collectively, the data suggest that mutations to eliminate binding of human FH and to promote conformational stability act synergistically to optimize FHbp immunogenicity. PMID:27021245

  7. Defining a protective epitope on factor H binding protein, a key meningococcal virulence factor and vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Faleri, Agnese; Lo Surdo, Paola; Veggi, Daniele; Maruggi, Giulietta; Grassi, Eva; Cartocci, Elena; Bertoldi, Isabella; Genovese, Alessia; Santini, Laura; Romagnoli, Giacomo; Borgogni, Erica; Brier, Sébastien; Lo Passo, Carla; Domina, Maria; Castellino, Flora; Felici, Franco; van der Veen, Stijn; Johnson, Steven; Lea, Susan M; Tang, Christoph M; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Savino, Silvana; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Bottomley, Matthew J; Masignani, Vega

    2013-02-26

    Mapping of epitopes recognized by functional monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is essential for understanding the nature of immune responses and designing improved vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics. In recent years, identification of B-cell epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies has facilitated the design of peptide-based vaccines against highly variable pathogens like HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, and Helicobacter pylori; however, none of these products has yet progressed into clinical stages. Linear epitopes identified by conventional mapping techniques only partially reflect the immunogenic properties of the epitope in its natural conformation, thus limiting the success of this approach. To investigate antigen-antibody interactions and assess the potential of the most common epitope mapping techniques, we generated a series of mAbs against factor H binding protein (fHbp), a key virulence factor and vaccine antigen of Neisseria meningitidis. The interaction of fHbp with the bactericidal mAb 12C1 was studied by various epitope mapping methods. Although a 12-residue epitope in the C terminus of fHbp was identified by both Peptide Scanning and Phage Display Library screening, other approaches, such as hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (MS) and X-ray crystallography, showed that mAb 12C1 occupies an area of ∼1,000 Å(2) on fHbp, including >20 fHbp residues distributed on both N- and C-terminal domains. Collectively, these data show that linear epitope mapping techniques provide useful but incomplete descriptions of B-cell epitopes, indicating that increased efforts to fully characterize antigen-antibody interfaces are required to understand and design effective immunogens. PMID:23396847

  8. The Effect of α-Mating Factor Secretion Signal Mutations on Recombinant Protein Expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P.; Stark, Carolyn M.; Kim, Daniel; Chang, Jennifer; Shaheen, Nadia; Poerwanto, Hansel; Agari, Kimiko; Moua, Pachai; Low, Lauren K.; Tran, Namphuong; Huang, Amy D.; Nattestad, Maria; Oshiro, Kristin T.; Chang, John William; Chavan, Archana; Tsai, Jerry W.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan

    2013-01-01

    The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, has been genetically engineered to produce many heterologous proteins for industrial and research purposes. In order to secrete proteins for easier purification from the extracellular medium, the coding sequence of recombinant proteins are initially fused to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-mating factor secretion signal leader. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis of the prepro region of the α-mating factor secretion signal sequence was performed in order to determine the effects of various deletions and substitutions on expression. Though some mutations clearly dampened protein expression, deletion of amino acids 57-70, corresponding to the predicted 3rd alpha helix of α-mating factor secretion signal, increased secretion of reporter proteins horseradish peroxidase and lipase at least 50% in small-scale cultures. These findings raise the possibility that the secretory efficiency of the leader can be further enhanced in the future. PMID:23454485

  9. Protein S testing in patients with protein S deficiency, factor V Leiden, and rivaroxaban by North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Smock, Kristi J; Plumhoff, Elizabeth A; Meijer, Piet; Hsu, Peihong; Zantek, Nicole D; Heikal, Nahla M; Van Cott, Elizabeth M

    2016-07-01

    In 2010-2012, the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association (NASCOLA) distributed 12 proficiency testing challenges to evaluate laboratory testing for protein S (PS). Results were analysed to assess the performance of PS activity, PS free antigen, and PS total antigen testing. Statistical analysis was performed on the numeric results and qualitative classification submitted for each method. There were 2,106 total results: 716 results from PS activity assays, 833 results from PS free antigen assays, and 557 results from PS total antigen assays. The three assay types performed well in the classification of five normal samples and nine abnormal samples, although certain PS activity methods were more likely to classify normal samples as abnormal and one PS total antigen assay was more likely to classify abnormal samples as normal. PS activity methods were affected by interfering substances such as heterozygous or homozygous factor V Leiden mutation (underestimation) and the anticoagulant drug rivaroxaban (overestimation). In conclusion, NASCOLA laboratories using a variety of PS assays performed well in the classification of clearly normal and abnormal samples. Laboratories performing PS activity assays should be aware of potential interferences in samples positive for FV Leiden or containing certain anticoagulant medications. PMID:27075008

  10. Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins control developmental programs through translational regulation of auxin response factors

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Abel; Li, Ruixi; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Hsu, Emily; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2012-01-01

    Upstream ORFs are elements found in the 5′-leader sequences of specific mRNAs that modulate the translation of downstream ORFs encoding major gene products. In Arabidopsis, the translational control of auxin response factors (ARFs) by upstream ORFs has been proposed as a regulatory mechanism required to respond properly to complex auxin-signaling inputs. In this study, we identify and characterize the aberrant auxin responses in specific ribosomal protein mutants in which multiple ARF transcription factors are simultaneously repressed at the translational level. This characteristic lends itself to the use of these mutants as genetic tools to bypass the genetic redundancy among members of the ARF family in Arabidopsis. Using this approach, we were able to assign unique functions for ARF2, ARF3, and ARF6 in plant development. PMID:23144218