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Sample records for factor mechanistic implications

  1. Outer mitochondrial membrane localization of apoptosis-inducing factor: mechanistic implications for release

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Yingfei; Frydenlund, Didrik S; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos) plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor), but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders. PMID:19863494

  2. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Tryptophan Synthase Quinonoid Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Barends,T.; Domratcheva, T.; Kulik, V.; Blumenstein, L.; Niks, D.; Dunn, M.; Schlichting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Quinonoid intermediates play a key role in the catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Whereas structures of other PLP-bound reaction intermediates have been determined, a high-quality structure of a quinonoid species has not been reported. We present the crystal structure of the indoline quinonoid intermediate of tryptophan synthase (see figure) and discuss its implications for the enzymatic mechanism and allosteric regulation.

  3. Ferritin Diversity: Mechanistic Studies, Disease Implications, and Materials Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.

    2011-07-01

    The study of ferritin includes a rich history of discoveries and scientific progress. Initially, the composition of ferritin was determined. Soon, it was shown that ferritin is a spherical, hollow protein. Eventually, over several decades of research, the structure and some function of this interesting protein was elucidated. However, the ferritin field was not completely satisfied. Today, for example, researchers are interested in refining the details of ferritin function, in discovering the role of ferritin in a variety of diseases, and in using ferritin for materials chemistry applications. The work presented in this dissertation highlights the progress that we have made in each of these three areas: (1) Mechanistic studies: The buffer used during horse spleen ferritin iron loading significantly influences the mineralization process and the quantity of iron deposited in ferritin. The ferrihydrite core of ferritin is crystalline and ordered when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of imidazole buffer. On the other hand, when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of MOPS buffer, the ferrihydrite core is less crystalline and less ordered, and a smaller amount of total iron is loaded in ferritin. We also show that iron can be released from the ferritin core in a non-reductive manner. The rate of Fe3+ release from horse spleen ferritin was measured using the Fe3+-specific chelator desferoxamine. We show that iron release occurs by three kinetic events. (2) Disease studies: In order to better understand iron disruption during disease states, we performed in vitro assays that mimicked chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of serum phosphate interrupted normal iron binding by transferrin and ferritin. Results show that phosphate competes for iron, forming an iron(III)-phosphate complex that is inaccessible to either transferrin or ferritin. Ferritin samples separated from the iron(III)-phosphate complex shows that as the

  4. Ultrasound and Microbubble Guided Drug Delivery: Mechanistic Understanding and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Machtaler, Steven; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound mediated drug delivery using microbubbles is a safe and noninvasive approach for spatially localized drug administration. This approach can create temporary and reversible openings on cellular membranes and vessel walls (a process called “sonoporation”), allowing for enhanced transport of therapeutic agents across these natural barriers. It is generally believed that the sonoporation process is highly associated with the energetic cavitation activities (volumetric expansion, contraction, fragmentation, and collapse) of the microbubble. However, a thorough understanding of the process was unavailable until recently. Important progress on the mechanistic understanding of sonoporation and the corresponding physiological responses in vitro and in vivo has been made. Specifically, recent research shed light on the cavitation process of microbubbles and fluid motion during insonation of ultrasound, on the spatio-temporal interactions between microbubbles and cells or vessel walls, as well as on the temporal course of the subsequent biological effects. These findings have significant clinical implications on the development of optimal treatment strategies for effective drug delivery. In this article, current progress in the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound and microbubble mediated drug delivery and its implications for clinical translation is discussed. PMID:24372231

  5. Mechanistic duality of transcription factor function in phytochrome signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phytochrome (phy) family of sensory photoreceptors (phyA–E in Arabidopsis) elicit changes in gene expression after light-induced migration to the nucleus, where they interact with basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors, such as phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3). The mechanism by whic...

  6. Stoichiometry of proton translocation by respiratory complex I and its mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and several bacteria functions as a redox-driven proton pump that contributes to the generation of the protonmotive force across the inner mitochondrial or bacterial membrane and thus to the aerobic synthesis of ATP. The stoichiometry of proton translocation is thought to be 4 H+ per NADH oxidized (2 e-). Here we show that a H+/2 e- ratio of 3 appears more likely on the basis of the recently determined H+/ATP ratio of the mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase of animal mitochondria and of a set of carefully determined ATP/2 e- ratios for different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This lower H+/2 e- ratio of 3 is independently supported by thermodynamic analyses of experiments with both mitochondria and submitochondrial particles. A reduced H+/2 e- stoichiometry of 3 has important mechanistic implications for this proton pump. In a rough mechanistic model, we suggest a concerted proton translocation mechanism in the three homologous and tightly packed antiporter-like subunits L, M, and N of the proton-translocating membrane domain of complex I. PMID:22392981

  7. Pollution and skin: from epidemiological and mechanistic studies to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Krutmann, Jean; Liu, Wei; Li, Li; Pan, Xiaochuan; Crawford, Martha; Sore, Gabrielle; Seite, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the health effects associated with air pollution have been intensively studied. Most studies focus on air pollution effects on the lung and the cardiovascular system. More recently, however, epidemiological and mechanistic studies suggest that air pollution is also affecting skin integrity. This state-of-the-art review focuses on this latter aspect; it was developed with the collaboration of European and Chinese board of experts with specific interests in environmental health, clinical and basic research in dermatology and cosmetic dermatology. A literature review limited to pollution and health effects and (sensitive) skin was performed using PubMed. Review and original articles were chosen. We summarize the existing scientific evidence that air pollution exerts detrimental effects on human skin, discuss potential clinical implications and suggest specific and unspecific cosmetic protective measures. PMID:25278222

  8. Eukaryotic selenoprotein synthesis: mechanistic insight incorporating new factors and new functions for old factors.

    PubMed

    Squires, Jeffrey E; Berry, Marla J

    2008-04-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient that has been linked to various aspects of human health. Selenium exerts its biological activity through the incorporation of the amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), into a unique class of proteins termed selenoproteins. Sec incorporation occurs cotranslationally at UGA codons in archaea, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes. UGA codons specify Sec coding rather than termination by the presence of specific secondary structures in mRNAs termed selenocysteine insertion (SECIS) elements, and trans-acting factors that associate with SECIS elements. Herein, we discuss the various proteins known to function in eukaryotic selenoprotein biosynthesis, including several players whose roles have only been elucidated very recently. PMID:18344183

  9. Chemiexcitation in the peroxidative metabolism of N-methylcarbazole: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    de Melo, M P; Cilento, G

    1994-06-01

    The peroxidative metabolism of N-methylcarbazole emits light independently of the presence of oxygen. It is likely that two chemiexcited transients are formed by electron transfer to the activated peroxidase, the cation radical by one electron transfer and a cation biradical by two electron transfer consistent with the failure to observe horseradish peroxidase-II in the steady state of the reaction. In the spectral range investigated (390-700 nm) the observed emission (570-700 nm) is ascribed to the biradical, as the latter is equivalent to an excited state of the postulated iminium cation. While lipoxygenase has no effect upon N-methylcarbazole, it markedly enhances the emission if peroxidase is present. This effect requires oxygen and is ascribed to an excited product formed by lipoxygenase acting upon an intermediate hydroperoxide of the aerobic process promoted by peroxidase. Our results are of importance on two counts. First they extend to N-methylcarbazole the formation of excited species in the peroxidative metabolism of important xenobiotics. Second, the mechanistic information they provide supports the scheme of metabolism postulated by Kedderis et al. (1986, J. Biol. Chem. 261, 15910-15914). PMID:8066126

  10. Structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters and their mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug resistance poses grand challenges to the effective treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. Integral membrane proteins from the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family contribute to multidrug resistance by exporting a wide variety of therapeutic drugs across cell membranes. MATE proteins are conserved from bacteria to humans and can be categorized into the NorM, DinF and eukaryotic subfamilies. MATE transporters hold great appeal as potential therapeutic targets for curbing multidrug resistance, yet their transport mechanism remains elusive. During the past 5 years, X-ray structures of 4 NorM and DinF transporters have been reported and guided biochemical studies to reveal how MATE transporters extrude different drugs. Such advances, although substantial, have yet to be discussed collectively. Herein I review these structures and the unprecedented mechanistic insights that have been garnered from those structure-inspired studies, as well as lay out the outstanding questions that present exciting opportunities for future work. PMID:26488689

  11. Structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters and their mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min

    2016-03-01

    Multidrug resistance poses grand challenges to the effective treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. Integral membrane proteins from the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family contribute to multidrug resistance by exporting a wide variety of therapeutic drugs across cell membranes. MATE proteins are conserved from bacteria to humans and can be categorized into the NorM, DinF and eukaryotic subfamilies. MATE transporters hold great appeal as potential therapeutic targets for curbing multidrug resistance, yet their transport mechanism remains elusive. During the past 5 years, X-ray structures of 4 NorM and DinF transporters have been reported and guided biochemical studies to reveal how MATE transporters extrude different drugs. Such advances, although substantial, have yet to be discussed collectively. Herein I review these structures and the unprecedented mechanistic insights that have been garnered from those structure-inspired studies, as well as lay out the outstanding questions that present exciting opportunities for future work. PMID:26488689

  12. Recurrent Glioblastomas Reveal Molecular Subtypes Associated with Mechanistic Implications of Drug-Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kee; Jung, Shin; Park, Eun Sung; Lee, Ju-Seog; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Woo, Hyun Goo

    2015-01-01

    Previously, transcriptomic profiling studies have shown distinct molecular subtypes of glioblastomas. It has also been suggested that the recurrence of glioblastomas could be achieved by transcriptomic reprograming of tumors, however, their characteristics are not yet fully understood. Here, to gain the mechanistic insights on the molecular phenotypes of recurrent glioblastomas, gene expression profiling was performed on the 43 cases of glioblastomas including 15 paired primary and recurrent cases. Unsupervised clustering analyses revealed two subtypes of G1 and G2, which were characterized by proliferation and neuron-like gene expression traits, respectively. While the primary tumors were classified as G1 subtype, the recurrent glioblastomas showed two distinct expression types. Compared to paired primary tumors, the recurrent tumors in G1 subtype did not show expression alteration. By contrast, the recurrent tumors in G2 subtype showed expression changes from proliferation type to neuron-like one. We also observed the expression of stemness-related genes in G1 recurrent tumors and the altered expression of DNA-repair genes (i.e., AURK, HOX, MGMT, and MSH6) in the G2 recurrent tumors, which might be responsible for the acquisition of drug resistance mechanism during tumor recurrence in a subtype-specific manner. We suggest that recurrent glioblastomas may choose two different strategies for transcriptomic reprograming to escape the chemotherapeutic treatment during tumor recurrence. Our results might be helpful to determine personalized therapeutic strategy against heterogeneous glioma recurrence. PMID:26466313

  13. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ziying; Madara, Jonathan J.; Herbert, Andrew; Prugar, Laura I.; Ruthel, Gordon; Lu, Jianhong; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaohong; Wrobel, Jay E.; Reitz, Allen B.; Dye, John M.; Harty, Ronald N.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses), are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1) and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms. PMID:26513362

  14. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention.

    PubMed

    Han, Ziying; Madara, Jonathan J; Herbert, Andrew; Prugar, Laura I; Ruthel, Gordon; Lu, Jianhong; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaohong; Wrobel, Jay E; Reitz, Allen B; Dye, John M; Harty, Ronald N; Freedman, Bruce D

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses), are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1) and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms. PMID:26513362

  15. Cellular factors implicated in filovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Hope, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Although filoviral infections are still occurring in different parts of the world, there are no effective preventive or treatment strategies currently available against them. Not only do filoviruses cause a deadly infection, but they also have the potential of being used as biological weapons. This makes it imperative to comprehensively study these viruses in order to devise effective strategies to prevent the occurrence of these infections. Entry is the foremost step in the filoviral replication cycle and different studies have reported the involvement of a myriad of cellular factors including plasma membrane components, cytoskeletal proteins, endosomal components, and cytosolic factors in this process. Signaling molecules such as the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases comprising of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer have also been implicated as putative entry factors. Additionally, filoviruses are suggested to bind to a common receptor and recent studies have proposed T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as potential receptor candidates. This paper summarizes the existing literature on filoviral entry with a special focus on cellular factors involved in this process and also highlights some fundamental questions. Future research aimed at answering these questions could be very useful in designing novel antiviral therapeutics. PMID:23365575

  16. The New Unified Theory of ATP Synthesis/Hydrolysis and Muscle Contraction, Its Manifold Fundamental Consequences and Mechanistic Implications and Its Applications in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Complete details of the thermodynamics and molecular mechanisms of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and muscle contraction are offered from the standpoint of the torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis and the rotation-uncoiling-tilt (RUT) energy storage mechanism of muscle contraction. The manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications of the unified theory for oxidative phosphorylation and muscle contraction are explained. The consistency of current mechanisms of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction with experiment is assessed, and the novel insights of the unified theory are shown to take us beyond the binding change mechanism, the chemiosmotic theory and the lever arm model. It is shown from first principles how previous theories of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction violate both the first and second laws of thermodynamics, necessitating their revision. It is concluded that the new paradigm, ten years after making its first appearance, is now perfectly poised to replace the older theories. Finally, applications of the unified theory in cell life and cell death are outlined and prospects for future research are explored. While it is impossible to cover each and every specific aspect of the above, an attempt has been made here to address all the pertinent details and what is presented should be sufficient to convince the reader of the novelty, originality, breakthrough nature and power of the unified theory, its manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications, and its applications in health and disease. PMID:19325832

  17. The new unified theory of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and muscle contraction, its manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications and its applications in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sunil

    2008-09-01

    Complete details of the thermodynamics and molecular mechanisms of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and muscle contraction are offered from the standpoint of the torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis and the rotation-uncoiling-tilt (RUT) energy storage mechanism of muscle contraction. The manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications of the unified theory for oxidative phosphorylation and muscle contraction are explained. The consistency of current mechanisms of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction with experiment is assessed, and the novel insights of the unified theory are shown to take us beyond the binding change mechanism, the chemiosmotic theory and the lever arm model. It is shown from first principles how previous theories of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction violate both the first and second laws of thermodynamics, necessitating their revision. It is concluded that the new paradigm, ten years after making its first appearance, is now perfectly poised to replace the older theories. Finally, applications of the unified theory in cell life and cell death are outlined and prospects for future research are explored. While it is impossible to cover each and every specific aspect of the above, an attempt has been made here to address all the pertinent details and what is presented should be sufficient to convince the reader of the novelty, originality, breakthrough nature and power of the unified theory, its manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications, and its applications in health and disease. PMID:19325832

  18. Mechanistic basis and clinical relevance of the role of transforming growth factor-β in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Run-Long; Zhao, Lu-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a key factor in cancer development and progression. TGF-β can suppress tumorigenesis by inhibiting cell cycle progression and stimulating apoptosis in early stages of cancer progression. However, TGF-β can modulate cancer-related processes, such as cell invasion, distant metastasis, and microenvironment modification that may be used by cancer cells to their advantage in late stages. Corresponding mechanisms include angiogenesis promotion, anti-tumor immunity suppression, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction. The correlation between TGF-β expression and cancer prognosis has also been extensively investigated. Results suggest that TGF-β pathway can be targeted to treat cancer; as such, the feasibility of this treatment is investigated in clinical trials. PMID:26779375

  19. Computational Identification of Mechanistic Factors That Determine the Timing and Intensity of the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Sridevi; Reifman, Jaques; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y.

    2015-01-01

    Timely resolution of inflammation is critical for the restoration of homeostasis in injured or infected tissue. Chronic inflammation is often characterized by a persistent increase in the concentrations of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators, whose distinct amount and timing characteristics offer an opportunity to identify effective therapeutic regulatory targets. Here, we used our recently developed computational model of local inflammation to identify potential targets for molecular interventions and to investigate the effects of individual and combined inhibition of such targets. This was accomplished via the development and application of computational strategies involving the simulation and analysis of thousands of inflammatory scenarios. We found that modulation of macrophage influx and efflux is an effective potential strategy to regulate the amount of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators in both normal and chronic inflammatory scenarios. We identified three molecular mediators − tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and the chemokine CXCL8 − as potential molecular targets whose individual or combined inhibition may robustly regulate both the amount and timing properties of the kinetic trajectories for neutrophils and macrophages in chronic inflammation. Modulation of macrophage flux, as well as of the abundance of TNF-α, TGF-β, and CXCL8, may improve the resolution of chronic inflammation. PMID:26633296

  20. Concurrent esterification and N-acetylation of amino acids with orthoesters: A useful reaction with interesting mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Sarah; Romero, Dickie; Jacobs, Hollie K; Gopalan, Aravamudan S

    2010-12-22

    The concurrent esterification and N-acetylation of amino acids has been studied with triethyl orthoacetate (TEOA) and triethyl orthoformate (TEOF). In a surprising finding, only one equivalent of TEOA in refluxing toluene was necessary to convert L-proline and L-phenylalanine to the corresponding N-acetyl ethyl esters in good yield. The same transformation using TEOF was not effective. Stereochemical outcome and stoichiometric studies as well as structural variation of the amino acids in this reaction provided unexpected mechanistic insight. PMID:21286246

  1. Concurrent esterification and N-acetylation of amino acids with orthoesters: A useful reaction with interesting mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Sarah; Romero, Dickie; Jacobs, Hollie K.; Gopalan, Aravamudan S.

    2010-01-01

    The concurrent esterification and N-acetylation of amino acids has been studied with triethyl orthoacetate (TEOA) and triethyl orthoformate (TEOF). In a surprising finding, only one equivalent of TEOA in refluxing toluene was necessary to convert L-proline and L-phenylalanine to the corresponding N-acetyl ethyl esters in good yield. The same transformation using TEOF was not effective. Stereochemical outcome and stoichiometric studies as well as structural variation of the amino acids in this reaction provided unexpected mechanistic insight. PMID:21286246

  2. Network-based discovery through mechanistic systems biology. Implications for applications--SMEs and drug discovery: where the action is.

    PubMed

    Benson, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Phase II attrition remains the most important challenge for drug discovery. Tackling the problem requires improved understanding of the complexity of disease biology. Systems biology approaches to this problem can, in principle, deliver this. This article reviews the reports of the application of mechanistic systems models to drug discovery questions and discusses the added value. Although we are on the journey to the virtual human, the length, path and rate of learning from this remain an open question. Success will be dependent on the will to invest and make the most of the insight generated along the way. PMID:26464089

  3. Computational Modelling Approaches on Epigenetic Factors in Neurodegenerative and Autoimmune Diseases and Their Mechanistic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khanam Irin, Afroza; Tom Kodamullil, Alpha; Gündel, Michaela; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative as well as autoimmune diseases have unclear aetiologies, but an increasing number of evidences report for a combination of genetic and epigenetic alterations that predispose for the development of disease. This review examines the major milestones in epigenetics research in the context of diseases and various computational approaches developed in the last decades to unravel new epigenetic modifications. However, there are limited studies that systematically link genetic and epigenetic alterations of DNA to the aetiology of diseases. In this work, we demonstrate how disease-related epigenetic knowledge can be systematically captured and integrated with heterogeneous information into a functional context using Biological Expression Language (BEL). This novel methodology, based on BEL, enables us to integrate epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation or acetylation of histones into a specific disease network. As an example, we depict the integration of epigenetic and genetic factors in a functional context specific to Parkinson's disease (PD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). PMID:26636108

  4. Distinct properties of semiquinone species detected at the ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 and their mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Sarewicz, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The two-electron ubiquinol oxidation or ubiquinone reduction typically involves semiquinone (SQ) intermediates. Natural engineering of ubiquinone binding sites of bioenergetic enzymes secures that SQ is sufficiently stabilized, so that it does not leave the site to membranous environment before full oxidation/reduction is completed. The ubiquinol oxidation Qo site of cytochrome bc1 (mitochondrial complex III, cytochrome b6f in plants) has been considered an exception with catalytic reactions assumed to involve highly unstable SQ or not to involve any SQ intermediate. This view seemed consistent with long-standing difficulty in detecting any reaction intermediates at the Qo site. New perspective on this issue is now offered by recent, independent reports on detection of SQ in this site. Each of the described SQs seems to have different spectroscopic properties leaving space for various interpretations and mechanistic considerations. Here, we comparatively reflect on those properties and their consequences on the SQ stabilization, the involvement of SQ in catalytic reactions, including proton transfers, and the reactivity of SQ with oxygen associated with superoxide generation activity of the Qo site. PMID:27194483

  5. Mechanistic validation.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Thomas; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Stephens, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Validation of new approaches in regulatory toxicology is commonly defined as the independent assessment of the reproducibility and relevance (the scientific basis and predictive capacity) of a test for a particular purpose. In large ring trials, the emphasis to date has been mainly on reproducibility and predictive capacity (comparison to the traditional test) with less attention given to the scientific or mechanistic basis. Assessing predictive capacity is difficult for novel approaches (which are based on mechanism), such as pathways of toxicity or the complex networks within the organism (systems toxicology). This is highly relevant for implementing Toxicology for the 21st Century, either by high-throughput testing in the ToxCast/Tox21 project or omics-based testing in the Human Toxome Project. This article explores the mostly neglected assessment of a test's scientific basis, which moves mechanism and causality to the foreground when validating/qualifying tests. Such mechanistic validation faces the problem of establishing causality in complex systems. However, pragmatic adaptations of the Bradford Hill criteria, as well as bioinformatic tools, are emerging. As critical infrastructures of the organism are perturbed by a toxic mechanism we argue that by focusing on the target of toxicity and its vulnerability, in addition to the way it is perturbed, we can anchor the identification of the mechanism and its verification. PMID:23665802

  6. A hybrid empirical-mechanistic modeling approach for extrapolating biota-sediment accumulation factors and bioaccumulation factors across species, time, and/or ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, Lawrence P; Cook, Philip M; Lukasewycz, Marta T

    2006-07-01

    An approach is presented for extrapolating field-measured biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) across species, time, and/or ecosystems. This approach, called the hybrid bioaccumulation modeling approach, uses mechanistic bioaccumulation models to extrapolate field-measured bioaccumulation data (i.e., BSAFs and BAFs) to new sets of ecological conditions. The hybrid approach predicts relative differences in bioaccumulation using food web models with two sets of ecological conditions and parameters: One set for the ecosystem where the BSAFs and/or BAFs were measured, and the other set for the ecological conditions and parameters for which the extrapolated BSAFs and/or BAFs are desired. The field-measured BSAF (or BAF) is extrapolated by adjusting the measured BSAF (or BAF) by the predicted relative difference, which is derived from two separate solutions of the food web model. Extrapolations of polychlorinated biphenyl BSAFs and BAFs for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from southern Lake Michigan to Green Bay of Lake Michigan (Green Bay, WI, USA) walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) and brown trout (Salmo trutta), as well as Hudson River largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and yellow perch (Perca flavescens), resulted in generally better agreement between measured and predicted BSAFs and BAFs with the hybrid approach. PMID:16833159

  7. The Role of {Ca2+ / CO32-} Ratio in Calcite Dissolution and Growth: Implications for Mechanistic Control of Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R. S.; Davis, K. J.; Luttge, A.

    2003-12-01

    The hypothesis that secular variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater have exerted a fundamental control over the mineralogy and abundance of both skeletal and nonskeletal carbonates has received substantial support from both experimental and field data. In this context, ongoing efforts directed at understanding the mechanistic basis for interaction of Mg and Sr with carbonate mineral surfaces during growth (e.g., Davis et al. 2000) are of obvious importance. However, a growing body of experimental dissolution data records additional site-specific interactions between the surface and dissolved free carbon species and carbonate complexes. We suggest these data may provide additional insight into mechanisms by which organisms maintain skeletal integrity under variable conditions, including the possible development of surface precursors of mixed carbonate phases. For example, recent data have shown that kink dynamics along the fast, obtuse (+) step directions are highly sensitive to the ratio of magnesium to carbonate ion. We have used these observations as the basis for exploration of the relationship between the simple ratio of dissolved calcium to carbonate ion and surface dynamics. In sets of carefully designed experiments, we sought to maintain (1) a constant distance from equilibrium by varying {Ca2+ / CO32-} ratio at constant IAP, (2) constant {Ca2+ / CO32-} at variable IAP, (3) all under conditions of both over- and undersaturation ranging from far to close to equilibrium. Using an integrated approach, observations were made over a wide range of space and time scales using both AFM and VSI (vertical scanning interferometry). These coupled observations provide resolution of the relationship between the overall rate of reaction (total change in surface topography) and detailed observations of characteristic step dynamics developed during both dissolution and growth. Our preliminary results confirm a strong sensitivity of the conventional fast step direction to

  8. Mechanism of action of adenosylcobalamin: 3-fluoro-1,2-propranediol as substrate for propanediol dehydrase--mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Eagar, R G; Bachovchin, W W; Richards, J H

    1975-12-16

    3-Fluro-1,2-propanediol has been found to be a substrate for propanediol dehydrase and has very similar binding and catalytic constants compared to the natural substrate. The only isolable products of the reaction are acrolein and inorganic fluoride; with 3-fluoro-3,3-dideuterio-1,2-propanediol as substrate, only 3,3-dideuterioacrolein is obtained. These results indicate that the primary product of the reaction is 3-fluoropropionaldehyde which spontaneously loses hydrogen fluoride to yield acrolein. The similar kinetic parameters for the fluorinated as compared to the normal substrate suggest that significant charge does not develop on the fluorinated or, by implication, the natural substrate during any rate-limiting steps of the reaction. These results support a radical, as contrasted to an ionic pathway for reactions involving adenosylcobalamin and diol dehydrase. PMID:1201278

  9. Theoretical models on the Cu2O2 torture track: mechanistic implications for oxytyrosinase and small-molecule analogues.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Christopher J; Włoch, Marta; Piecuch, Piotr; Puzzarini, Cristina; Gagliardi, Laura

    2006-02-01

    Accurately describing the relative energetics of alternative bis(mu-oxo) and mu-eta2:eta2 peroxo isomers of Cu2O2 cores supported by 0, 2, 4, and 6 ammonia ligands is remarkably challenging for a wide variety of theoretical models, primarily owing to the difficulty of maintaining a balanced description of rapidly changing dynamical and nondynamical electron correlation effects and a varying degree of biradical character along the isomerization coordinate. The completely renormalized coupled-cluster level of theory including triple excitations and extremely efficient pure density functional levels of theory quantitatively agree with one another and also agree qualitatively with experimental results for Cu2O2 cores supported by analogous but larger ligands. Standard coupled-cluster methods, such as CCSD(T), are in most cases considerably less accurate and exhibit poor convergence in predicted relative energies. Hybrid density functionals significantly underestimate the stability of the bis(mu-oxo) form, with the magnitude of the error being directly proportional to the percentage Hartree-Fock exchange in the functional. Single-root CASPT2 multireference second-order perturbation theory, by contrast, significantly overestimates the stability of bis(mu-oxo) isomers. Implications of these results for modeling the mechanism of C-H bond activation by supported Cu2O2 cores, like that found in the active site of oxytyrosinase, are discussed. PMID:16451035

  10. Hard tick factors implicated in pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang Ye; Bonnet, Sarah I

    2014-01-01

    Ticks are the most common arthropod vector, after mosquitoes, and are capable of transmitting the greatest variety of pathogens. For both humans and animals, the worldwide emergence or re-emergence of tick-borne disease is becoming increasingly problematic. Despite being such an important issue, our knowledge of pathogen transmission by ticks is incomplete. Several recent studies, reviewed here, have reported that the expression of some tick factors can be modulated in response to pathogen infection, and that some of these factors can impact on the pathogenic life cycle. Delineating the specific tick factors required for tick-borne pathogen transmission should lead to new strategies in the disruption of pathogen life cycles to combat emerging tick-borne disease. PMID:24498444

  11. Factors impacting bladder underactivity and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Van Koeveringe, G A; Rademakers, K L J

    2015-06-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms in the voiding phase can be due to an underactive bladder, but are usually similar to symptoms of infravesical obstruction or dysfunctional voiding. The underactive bladder can be caused by an impaired detrusor contraction but also by a derangement of local and central neuro-cognitive regulatory systems or an impairment of bladder sensation. Potential risk factors of bladder underactivity include: ageing, diabetes, neurogenic disease, cardiovascular disease, obstruction and psychological causes. Comprehensive diagnostic and detection techniques for an underactive detrusor are necessary. To establish the diagnosis and follow up new treatments, useful urodynamic parameters and threshold values have to be determined. As neuro-cognitive regulation plays an important role in the control of voiding, psychological factors have to be taken into account during the assessment in these patients. Ambulatory urodynamic techniques therefore have to be considered. Voiding is determined by the balance of both the detrusor contraction and the resistance of the bladder outlet, a dysfunction in one factor can be compensated by a counter-acting function of the other factor. Therefore, to predict voiding problems in the future, it will be indicated to assess the compensatory capacity of the detrusor contractility, contractile reserve, and the outlet relaxation capacity. If novel treatments and evaluation techniques have become available, it is likely that in the future, many patients that get a TURP now, can be treated by pharmacological agents directed towards increasing the bladder contractility in a balanced combination with medication directed towards lowering the bladder outlet resistance. PMID:25645344

  12. Mechanistic, Mathematical Model to Predict the Dynamics of Tissue Genesis in Bone Defects via Mechanical Feedback and Mediation of Biochemical Factors

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Shannon R.; Saidel, Gerald M.; Knothe, Ulf; Knothe Tate, Melissa L.

    2014-01-01

    The link between mechanics and biology in the generation and the adaptation of bone has been well studied in context of skeletal development and fracture healing. Yet, the prediction of tissue genesis within - and the spatiotemporal healing of - postnatal defects, necessitates a quantitative evaluation of mechano-biological interactions using experimental and clinical parameters. To address this current gap in knowledge, this study aims to develop a mechanistic mathematical model of tissue genesis using bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) to represent of a class of factors that may coordinate bone healing. Specifically, we developed a mechanistic, mathematical model to predict the dynamics of tissue genesis by periosteal progenitor cells within a long bone defect surrounded by periosteum and stabilized via an intramedullary nail. The emergent material properties and mechanical environment associated with nascent tissue genesis influence the strain stimulus sensed by progenitor cells within the periosteum. Using a mechanical finite element model, periosteal surface strains are predicted as a function of emergent, nascent tissue properties. Strains are then input to a mechanistic mathematical model, where mechanical regulation of BMP-2 production mediates rates of cellular proliferation, differentiation and tissue production, to predict healing outcomes. A parametric approach enables the spatial and temporal prediction of endochondral tissue regeneration, assessed as areas of cartilage and mineralized bone, as functions of radial distance from the periosteum and time. Comparing model results to histological outcomes from two previous studies of periosteum-mediated bone regeneration in a common ovine model, it was shown that mechanistic models incorporating mechanical feedback successfully predict patterns (spatial) and trends (temporal) of bone tissue regeneration. The novel model framework presented here integrates a mechanistic feedback system based on the

  13. Involvement in Denitrification is Beneficial to the Biofilm Lifestyle of Comamonas testosteroni: A Mechanistic Study and Its Environmental Implications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao; Shukal, Sudha; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cao, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Comamonas is one of the most abundant microorganisms in biofilm communities driving wastewater treatment. Little has been known about the role of this group of organisms and their biofilm mode of life. In this study, using Comamonas testosteroni as a model organism, we demonstrated the involvement of Comamonas biofilms in denitrification under bulk aerobic conditions and elucidated the influence of nitrate respiration on its biofilm lifestyle. Our results showed that C. testosteroni could use nitrate as the sole electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Under bulk aerobic condition, biofilms of C. testosteroni were capable of reducing nitrate, and intriguingly, nitrate reduction significantly enhanced viability of the biofilm-cells and reduced cell detachment from the biofilms. Nitrate respiration was further shown to play an essential role in maintaining high cell viability in the biofilms. RNA-seq analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a higher level of bis(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) in cells respiring on nitrate than those grown aerobically (1.3 × 10(-4) fmol/cell vs 7.9 × 10(-6) fmol/cell; P < 0.01). C-di-GMP is one universal signaling molecule that regulates the biofilm mode of life, and a higher c-di-GMP concentration reduces cell detachment from biofilms. Taking these factors together, this study reveals that nitrate reduction occurs in mature biofilms of C. testosteroni under bulk aerobic conditions, and the respiratory reduction of nitrate is beneficial to the biofilm lifestyle by providing more metabolic energy to maintain high viability and a higher level of c-di-GMP to reduce cell detachment. PMID:26327221

  14. Mechanistic insights into elastin degradation by pseudolysin, the major virulence factor of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Hui-Lin; Ran, Li-Yuan; Li, Chun-Yang; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Su, Hai-Nan; Shi, Mei; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudolysin is the most abundant protease secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is the major extracellular virulence factor of this opportunistic human pathogen. Pseudolysin destroys human tissues by solubilizing elastin. However, the mechanisms by which pseudolysin binds to and degrades elastin remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of action of pseudolysin on elastin binding and degradation by biochemical assay, microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis. Pseudolysin bound to bovine elastin fibers and preferred to attack peptide bonds with hydrophobic residues at the P1 and P1' positions in the hydrophobic domains of elastin. The time-course degradation processes of both bovine elastin fibers and cross-linked human tropoelastin by pseudolysin were further investigated by microscopy. Altogether, the results indicate that elastin degradation by pseudolysin began with the hydrophobic domains on the fiber surface, followed by the progressive disassembly of macroscopic elastin fibers into primary structural elements. Moreover, our site-directed mutational results indicate that five hydrophobic residues in the S1-S1' sub-sites played key roles in the binding of pseudolysin to elastin. This study sheds lights on the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:25905792

  15. Study of Uridine 5'-Diphosphate (UDP)-Galactopyranose Mutase Using UDP-5-Fluorogalactopyranose as a Probe: Incubation Results and Mechanistic Implications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Geng-Min; Sun, He G; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2016-07-15

    Uridine 5'-diphosphate-5-fluorogalactopyranose (UDP-5F-Galp, 7) was synthesized, and its effect on UDP-Galp mutase (UGM) was investigated. UGM facilitated the hydrolysis of 7 to yield UDP and 5-oxogalactose (24), but no 11 was detected. (19)F NMR and trapping experiments demonstrated that the reaction involves the initial formation of a substrate-cofactor adduct followed by decomposition of the resulting C5 gem-fluorohydrin to generate a 5-oxo intermediate (10). The results support the current mechanistic proposal for UGM and suggest new directions for designing mechanism-based inhibitors. PMID:27384425

  16. MECHANISTIC INDICATORS OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA (MICA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is interested in the interplay of environmental and genetic factors on the development and exacerbation of asthma. The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) study will use exposure measurements and markers of environmental ...

  17. The Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP) in Osteoblast Response to Microgravity: Mechanistic Implications for Osteoporosis Development.

    PubMed

    Camirand, Anne; Goltzman, David; Gupta, Ajay; Kaouass, Mohammadi; Panda, Dibyendu; Karaplis, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged skeletal unloading through bedrest results in bone loss similar to that observed in elderly osteoporotic patients, but with an accelerated timeframe. This rapid effect on weight-bearing bones is also observed in astronauts who can lose up to 2% of their bone mass per month spent in Space. Despite the important implications for Spaceflight travelers and bedridden patients, the exact mechanisms involved in disuse osteoporosis have not been elucidated. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) regulates many physiological processes including skeletal development, and has been proposed as a mechanosensor. To investigate the role of PTHrP in microgravity-induced bone loss, trabecular and calvarial osteoblasts (TOs and COs) from Pthrp +/+ and -/- mice were subjected to actual Spaceflight for 6 days (Foton M3 satellite). Pthrp +/+, +/- and -/- osteoblasts were also exposed to simulated microgravity for periods varying from 6 days to 6 weeks. While COs displayed little change in viability in 0g, viability of all TOs rapidly decreased in inverse proportion to PTHrP expression levels. Furthermore, Pthrp+/+ TOs displayed a sharp viability decline after 2 weeks at 0g. Microarray analysis of Pthrp+/+ TOs after 6 days in simulated 0g revealed expression changes in genes encoding prolactins, apoptosis/survival molecules, bone metabolism and extra-cellular matrix composition proteins, chemokines, insulin-like growth factor family members and Wnt-related signalling molecules. 88% of 0g-induced expression changes in Pthrp+/+ cells overlapped those caused by Pthrp ablation in normal gravity, and pulsatile treatment with PTHrP1-36 not only reversed a large proportion of 0g-induced effects in Pthrp+/+ TOs but maintained viability over 6-week exposure to microgravity. Our results confirm PTHrP efficacy as an anabolic agent to prevent microgravity-induced cell death in TOs. PMID:27463808

  18. The Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP) in Osteoblast Response to Microgravity: Mechanistic Implications for Osteoporosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Camirand, Anne; Goltzman, David; Gupta, Ajay; Kaouass, Mohammadi; Panda, Dibyendu; Karaplis, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged skeletal unloading through bedrest results in bone loss similar to that observed in elderly osteoporotic patients, but with an accelerated timeframe. This rapid effect on weight-bearing bones is also observed in astronauts who can lose up to 2% of their bone mass per month spent in Space. Despite the important implications for Spaceflight travelers and bedridden patients, the exact mechanisms involved in disuse osteoporosis have not been elucidated. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) regulates many physiological processes including skeletal development, and has been proposed as a mechanosensor. To investigate the role of PTHrP in microgravity-induced bone loss, trabecular and calvarial osteoblasts (TOs and COs) from Pthrp +/+ and -/- mice were subjected to actual Spaceflight for 6 days (Foton M3 satellite). Pthrp +/+, +/- and -/- osteoblasts were also exposed to simulated microgravity for periods varying from 6 days to 6 weeks. While COs displayed little change in viability in 0g, viability of all TOs rapidly decreased in inverse proportion to PTHrP expression levels. Furthermore, Pthrp+/+ TOs displayed a sharp viability decline after 2 weeks at 0g. Microarray analysis of Pthrp+/+ TOs after 6 days in simulated 0g revealed expression changes in genes encoding prolactins, apoptosis/survival molecules, bone metabolism and extra-cellular matrix composition proteins, chemokines, insulin-like growth factor family members and Wnt-related signalling molecules. 88% of 0g-induced expression changes in Pthrp+/+ cells overlapped those caused by Pthrp ablation in normal gravity, and pulsatile treatment with PTHrP1-36 not only reversed a large proportion of 0g-induced effects in Pthrp+/+ TOs but maintained viability over 6-week exposure to microgravity. Our results confirm PTHrP efficacy as an anabolic agent to prevent microgravity-induced cell death in TOs. PMID:27463808

  19. Overlapping 16p13.11 deletion and gain of copies variations associated with childhood onset psychosis include genes with mechanistic implications for autism associated pathways: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Catherine A; Kleiman, Robin J; Engle, Elizabeth C; Towne, Meghan C; D'Angelo, Eugene J; Yu, Timothy W; Beggs, Alan H; Picker, Jonathan; Fogler, Jason M; Carroll, Devon; Schmitt, Rachel C O; Wolff, Robert R; Shen, Yiping; Lip, Va; Bilguvar, Kaya; Kim, April; Tembulkar, Sahil; O'Donnell, Kyle; Gonzalez-Heydrich, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Copy number variability at 16p13.11 has been associated with intellectual disability, autism, schizophrenia, epilepsy, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Adolescent/adult- onset psychosis has been reported in a subset of these cases. Here, we report on two children with CNVs in 16p13.11 that developed psychosis before the age of 7. The genotype and neuropsychiatric abnormalities of these patients highlight several overlapping genes that have possible mechanistic relevance to pathways previously implicated in Autism Spectrum Disorders, including the mTOR signaling and the ubiquitin-proteasome cascades. A careful screening of the 16p13.11 region is warranted in patients with childhood onset psychosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26887912

  20. Roles of mechanistic target of rapamycin and transforming growth factor-β signaling in the molting gland (Y-organ) of the blackback land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis.

    PubMed

    Abuhagr, Ali M; MacLea, Kyle S; Mudron, Megan R; Chang, Sharon A; Chang, Ernest S; Mykles, Donald L

    2016-08-01

    Molting in decapod crustaceans is controlled by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH), an eyestalk neuropeptide that suppresses production of ecdysteroids by a pair of molting glands (Y-organs or YOs). Eyestalk ablation (ESA) activates the YOs, which hypertrophy and increase ecdysteroid secretion. At mid premolt, which occurs 7-14days post-ESA, the YO transitions to the committed state; hemolymph ecdysteroid titers increase further and the animal reaches ecdysis ~3weeks post-ESA. Two conserved signaling pathways, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), are expressed in the Gecarcinus lateralis YO. Rapamycin, an mTOR antagonist, inhibits YO ecdysteroidogenesis in vitro. In this study, rapamycin lowered hemolymph ecdysteroid titer in ESA G. lateralis in vivo; levels were significantly lower than in control animals at all intervals (1-14days post-ESA). Injection of SB431542, an activin TGF-β receptor antagonist, lowered hemolymph ecdysteroid titers 7 and 14days post-ESA, but had no effect on ecdysteroid titers at 1 and 3days post-ESA. mRNA levels of mTOR signaling genes Gl-mTOR, Gl-Akt, and Gl-S6k were increased by 3days post-ESA; the increases in Gl-mTOR and Gl-Akt mRNA levels were blocked by SB431542. Gl-elongation factor 2 and Gl-Rheb mRNA levels were not affected by ESA, but SB431542 lowered mRNA levels at Days 3 and 7 post-ESA. The mRNA level of an activin TGF-β peptide, Gl-myostatin-like factor (Mstn), increased 5.5-fold from 0 to 3days post-ESA, followed by a 50-fold decrease from 3 to 7days post-ESA. These data suggest that (1) YO activation involves an up regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway; (2) mTOR is required for YO commitment; and (3) a Mstn-like factor mediates the transition of the YO from the activated to the committed state. PMID:27040186

  1. Intron mobility in phage T4 is dependent upon a distinctive class of endonucleases and independent of DNA sequences encoding the intron core: mechanistic and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Pedersen, D; Quirk, S; Clyman, J; Belfort, M

    1990-01-01

    Although mobility of the phylogenetically widespread group I introns appears to be mechanistically similar, the phage T4 intron-encoded endonucleases that promote mobility of the td and sunY introns are different from their eukaryotic counterparts. Most notably, they cleave at a distance from the intron insertion sites. The td enzyme was shown to cleave 23-26 nt 5' and the sunY endonuclease 13-15 nt 3' to the intron insertion site to generate 3-nt or 2-nt 3'-OH extensions, respectively. The absolute coconversion of exon markers between the distant cleavage and insertion sites is consistent with the double-strand-break repair model for intron mobility. As a further critical test of the model we have demonstrated that the mobility event is independent of DNA sequences that encode the catalytic intron core structure. Thus, in derivatives in which the lacZ or kanR coding sequences replace the intron, these marker genes are efficiently inserted into intron-minus alleles when the cognate endonuclease is provided in trans. The process is therefore endonuclease-dependent, rather than dependent on the intron per se. These findings, which imply that the endonucleases rather than the introns themselves were the primordial mobile elements, are incorporated into a model for the evolution of mobile introns. Images PMID:2165250

  2. Wild-Type and Mutant Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptides Alter Bilayer Structure as Well as Kinetics and Activation Thermodynamics of Stalk and Pore Formation Differently: Mechanistic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Hirak; Tarafdar, Pradip K.; Klapper, David G.; Lentz, Barry R.

    2013-01-01

    Viral fusion peptides are short N-terminal regions of type-1 viral fusion proteins that are critical for virus entry. Although the importance of viral fusion peptides in virus-cell membrane fusion is established, little is known about how they function. We report the effects of wild-type (WT) hemagglutinin (HA) fusion peptide and its G1S, G1V, and W14A mutants on the kinetics of poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG)-mediated fusion of small unilamellar vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol (molar ratio of 35:30:15:20). Time courses of lipid mixing, content mixing, and content leakage were obtained using fluorescence assays at multiple temperatures and analyzed globally using either a two-step or three-step sequential ensemble model of the fusion process to obtain the rate constant and activation thermodynamics of each step. We also monitored the influence of peptides on bilayer interfacial order, acyl chain order, bilayer free volume, and water penetration. All these data were considered in terms of a recently published mechanistic model for the thermodynamic transition states for each step of the fusion process. We propose that WT peptide catalyzes Step 1 by occupying bilayer regions vacated by acyl chains that protrude into interbilayer space to form the Step 1 transition state. It also uniquely contributes a positive intrinsic curvature to hemi-fused leaflets to eliminate Step 2 and catalyzes Step 3 by destabilizing the highly stressed edges of the hemi-fused microstructures that dominate the ensemble of the intermediate state directly preceding fusion pore formation. Similar arguments explain the catalytic and inhibitory properties of the mutant peptides and support the hypothesis that the membrane-contacting fusion peptide of HA fusion protein is key to its catalytic activity. PMID:24314080

  3. Hierarchical Structure and General Factor Saturation of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index: Evidence and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinbarg, Richard E.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.

    1997-01-01

    A hierarchical factor model of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) (S. Reiss and others, 1986) was evaluated with 432 psychiatric outpatients and 32 people with no mental disorder. Results support a hierarchical factor structure of three lower order factors and one higher order factor. Implications for the assessment of anxiety sensitivity are…

  4. Development of the Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey: Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Shengli; MacDonald-Wilson, Kim L.; Fabian, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to explore the latent factors in the "Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey" (RAFS) instrument and (b) to compare scores on the latent factors of the RAFS by participant's role. Eight latent factors were identified through an exploratory factor analysis with orthogonal rotation. The reliability tests indicated…

  5. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jaime L; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C; Colbert, Christopher L

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this strict control, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here, we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism of this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small-angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation all indicate that, in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. These combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation. PMID:26313375

  6. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Jaime L.; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C.; Colbert, Christopher L.

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this tight regulation, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism of this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, all indicate that in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. Lastly, these combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.

  7. Mechanistic Implications of the Unique Structural Features and Dimerization of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Pseudomonas Sigma Regulator, PupR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jensen, Jaime L.; Balbo, Andrea; Neau, David B.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Zhao, Huaying; Sinha, Sangita C.; Colbert, Christopher L.

    2015-09-29

    Gram-negative bacteria tightly regulate intracellular levels of iron, an essential nutrient. To ensure this tight regulation, some outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) that are responsible for iron import stimulate their own transcription in response to extracellular binding by an iron-laden siderophore. This process is mediated by an inner membrane sigma regulator protein (an anti-sigma factor) that transduces an unknown periplasmic signal from the TBDT to release an intracellular sigma factor from the inner membrane, which ultimately upregulates TBDT transcription. Here we use the Pseudomonas putida ferric-pseudobactin BN7/BN8 sigma regulator, PupR, as a model system to understand the molecular mechanism ofmore » this conserved class of sigma regulators. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the cytoplasmic anti-sigma domain (ASD) of PupR to 2.0 Å. Size exclusion chromatography, small angle X-ray scattering, and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation, all indicate that in contrast to other ASDs, the PupR-ASD exists as a dimer in solution. Mutagenesis of residues at the dimer interface identified from the crystal structure disrupts dimerization and protein stability, as determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and thermal denaturation circular dichroism spectroscopy. Lastly, these combined results suggest that this type of inner membrane sigma regulator may utilize an unusual mechanism to sequester their cognate sigma factors and prevent transcription activation.« less

  8. The mare reproductive loss syndrome and the eastern tent caterpillar: a toxicokinetic/statistical analysis with clinical, epidemiologic, and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Manu; Gantz, Marie G; Tobin, Thomas; Harkins, J Daniel; Bosken, Jeffrey M; Hughes, Charlie; Harrison, Lenn R; Bernard, William V; Richter, Dana L; Fitzgerald, Terrence D

    2003-01-01

    During 2001, central Kentucky experienced acute transient epidemics of early and late fetal losses, pericarditis, and unilateral endophthalmitis, collectively referred to as mare reproductive loss syndrome (MRLS). A toxicokinetic/statistical analysis of experimental and field MRLS data was conducted using accelerated failure time (AFT) analysis of abortions following administration of Eastern tent caterpillars (ETCs; 100 or 50 g/day or 100 g of irradiated caterpillars/day) to late-term pregnant mares. In addition, 2001 late-term fetal loss field data were used in the analysis. Experimental data were fitted by AFT analysis at a high (P <.0001) significance. Times to first abortion ("lag time") and abortion rates were dose dependent. Lag times decreased and abortion rates increased exponentially with dose. Calculated dose x response data curves allow interpretation of abortion data in terms of "intubated ETC equivalents." Analysis suggested that field exposure to ETCs in 2001 in central Kentucky commenced on approximately April 27, was initially equivalent to approximately 5 g of intubated ETCs/day, and increased to approximately 30 g/day at the outbreak peak. This analysis accounts for many aspects of the epidemiology, clinical presentations, and manifestations of MRLS. It allows quantitative interpretation of experimental and field MRLS data and has implications for the basic mechanisms underlying MRLS. The results support suggestions that MRLS is caused by exposure to or ingestion of ETCs. The results also show that high levels of ETC exposure produce intense, focused outbreaks of MRLS, closely linked in time and place to dispersing ETCs, as occurred in central Kentucky in 2001. With less intense exposure, lag time is longer and abortions tend to spread out over time and may occur out of phase with ETC exposure, obscuring both diagnosis of this syndrome and the role of the caterpillars. PMID:15136975

  9. Problems with Single Interest Scales: Implications of the General Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of the general factor in interest and self-efficacy assessment and its meaning are reviewed. The general factor is found in all interest and self-efficacy assessment and has been viewed as (a) a nuisance factor with little effect on assessment, (b) a variable having substantive meaning and thus worthy of including in interpretation,…

  10. Targeted Regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/NF-κB Signaling by Indole Compounds and their Derivatives: Mechanistic Details and Biological Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aamir; Biersack, Bernhard; Li, Yiwei; Kong, Dejuan; Bao, Bin; Schobert, Rainer; Padhye, Subhash B.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2014-01-01

    Indole compounds, found in cruciferous vegetables, are potent anti-cancer agents. Studies with indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its dimeric product, 3,3’-diindolylmethane (DIM) suggest that these compounds have the ability to deregulate multiple cellular signaling pathways, including PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These natural compounds are also effective modulators of downstream transcription factor NF-κB signaling which might help explain their ability to inhibit invasion and angiogenesis, and the reversal of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype and drug resistance. Signaling through PI3K/Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathway is increasingly being realized to play important role in EMT through the regulation of novel miRNAs which further validates the importance of this signaling network and its regulations by indole compounds. Here we will review the available literature on the modulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/NF-κB signaling by both parental I3C and DIM, as well as their analogs/derivatives, in an attempt to catalog their anticancer activity. PMID:23272910

  11. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study has been designed to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to examine the physiological and environmental factors that interact to increase the risk of asthmatic responses. MICA is primarily a clinically-bases obser...

  12. ABO blood group and von Willebrand factor: biological implications.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Crestani, Silvia; Frattini, Francesco; Sissa, Cinzia; Bonfanti, Carlo

    2014-09-01

    ABO blood group antigens are complex carbohydrate molecules expressed on the surface of red blood cells and a variety of human cells and tissues. It is well known that ABO blood type exerts a profound influence on hemostasis, being a major determinant of von Willebrand factor (VWF), and consequently factor VIII, plasma levels. In this review, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between ABO blood group and VWF in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24945431

  13. Risk Factors in Adolescent Substance Abuse: Treatment and Management Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Connie S.; Schandler, Steven L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses research on adolescent substance abuse risk factors and their role in the management of adolescent substance abuse disorders. A selective literature review suggests specific intervention strategies; no generic approach fits all adolescent substance-use clients. Effective techniques require individual assessments, including the context in…

  14. Factors modulating fibrates response: therapeutic implications and alternative strategies.

    PubMed

    Panadero, M I; González, M C; Herrera, E; Bocos, C

    2009-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) regulates transcription of genes involved both in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as in inflammation. Fibrates are PPARalpha ligands used to normalize lipid and glucose parameters and exert antiinflammatory effects. In fact, fibrates have already been demonstrated to benefit metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. This article reviews the mechanism of action and the functional roles of fibrates, emphasizing the factors modulating their capacity to activate PPARalpha and affecting their effectiveness. These factors may possibly explain the findings obtained in animal studies and clinical trials with fibrates which showed either untoward effects and/or inefficient hypolipidemic action of PPARalpha activation. We also discuss briefly the natural and synthetic agonists of PPARalphawhich are currently being developed and supposedly display greater effectiveness and fewer adverse effects than fibrates. PMID:19594420

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Bathina, Siresha

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in neuronal survival and growth, serves as a neurotransmitter modulator, and participates in neuronal plasticity, which is essential for learning and memory. It is widely expressed in the CNS, gut and other tissues. BDNF binds to its high affinity receptor TrkB (tyrosine kinase B) and activates signal transduction cascades (IRS1/2, PI3K, Akt), crucial for CREB and CBP production, that encode proteins involved in β cell survival. BDNF and insulin-like growth factor-1 have similar downstream signaling mechanisms incorporating both p-CAMK and MAPK that increase the expression of pro-survival genes. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates glucose and energy metabolism and prevents exhaustion of β cells. Decreased levels of BDNF are associated with neurodegenerative diseases with neuronal loss, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and Huntington's disease. Thus, BDNF may be useful in the prevention and management of several diseases including diabetes mellitus. PMID:26788077

  16. Risk factors for falls among seniors: implications of gender.

    PubMed

    Chang, Vicky C; Do, Minh T

    2015-04-01

    Despite extensive literature on falls among seniors, little is known about gender-specific risk factors. To determine the prevalence of falls by gender and sociodemographic, lifestyle/behavioral, and medical factors, we conducted a cross-sectional study in a nationally representative sample of Canadian adults who were 65 years of age or older (n = 14,881) from the Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging (2008-2009). Logistic regression models were applied to investigate gender-specific associations between potential risk factors and falls. In men, stroke (odds ratio (OR) = 1.91), nutritional risk (OR = 1.86), post-secondary school degree (OR = 1.68), eye disorder (OR = 1.35), widowed/separated/divorced marital status (OR = 1.28), and arthritis (OR = 1.27) were independently associated with significantly higher odds of falls. In women, significant independent correlates of falls included stroke (OR = 1.53), age of 85 years or older (OR = 1.51), nutritional risk (OR = 1.39), consumption of at least 1 alcoholic drink per week (OR = 1.39), use of 5 or more medications (OR = 1.36), arthritis (OR = 1.36), diabetes (OR = 1.31), and osteoporosis (OR = 1.22). Higher physical activity levels were protective in both genders, and higher household income was protective in women. Gender should be considered when planning fall prevention strategies. PMID:25700887

  17. Factors affecting the initiation of breastfeeding: implications for breastfeeding promotion.

    PubMed

    Earle, Sarah

    2002-09-01

    Breastfeeding rates in the United Kingdom (UK) are one of the lowest in the developed world and certainly the lowest in Europe. There have been numerous studies of breastfeeding in the UK, most of which have adopted a quantitative approach, and they have largely focused on obstetric or socio-demographic factors in the decision to breastfeed. Whilst these studies have an important role to play, this paper draws on a study that adopts a qualitative methodology to explore women's personal experiences and perceptions of breastfeeding. A qualitative study of 19 primagravidae was undertaken and completed in 1998. Participants were recruited to the study via 12 antenatal clinics in the West Midlands, England, UK. Their ages ranged from 16 to 30 years and the majority described themselves as 'white'. The majority of participants were in paid employment in a variety of occupations. The study was prospective in design. Participants were interviewed three times either during pregnancy or after childbirth: the first stage was between 6 and 14 weeks of pregnancy; the second stage was between 34 and 39 weeks; and the third stage was between 6 and 14 weeks after childbirth. The data indicate that there are several factors affecting breastfeeding initiation. First, infant feeding decisions seem to be made prior to, or irrespective of, contact with health professionals. Secondly, the data suggest that health promotion campaigns in the UK have been influential in their ability to educate women about the benefits of breastfeeding. However, this did not dissuade participants from formula feeding once their decision was made. The desire for paternal involvement also seemed to be another influential factor; fathers were either seen as able to alleviate the daily grind of early motherhood, or there was a desire for 'shared parenting'. Finally, some of the formula feeding women expressed a strong desire to re-establish their identities as separate individuals and as 'non-mothers'. PMID

  18. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: review of implicated genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Ackerman, Michael J; Marazita, Mary L; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M

    2007-04-15

    Genetic studies in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) have been motivated by clinical, epidemiological, and/or neuropathological observations in SIDS victims, with subsequent pursuit of candidate genes in five categories: (1) genes for ion channel proteins based on electrocardiographic evidence of prolonged QT intervals in SIDS victims, (2) gene for serotonin transporter based on decreased serotonergic receptor binding in brainstems of SIDS victims, (3) genes pertinent to the early embryology of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) (and with a link to the 5-HT system) based on reports of ANS dysregulation in SIDS victims, (4) genes for nicotine metabolizing enzymes based on evidence of cigarette smoking as a modifiable risk factor for SIDS, and (5) genes regulating inflammation, energy production, hypoglycemia, and thermal regulation based on reports of postnatal infection, low birth weight, and/or overheating in SIDS victims. Evidence for each of these classes of candidate genes is reviewed in detail. As this review indicates, a number of genetically controlled pathways appear to be involved in at least some cases of SIDS. Given the diversity of results to date, genetic studies support the clinical impression that SIDS is heterogeneous with more than one entity and with more than one possible genetic etiology. Future studies should consider expanded phenotypic features that might help clarify the heterogeneity and improve the predictive value of the identified genetic factors. Such features should be evaluated to the extent possible in both SIDS victims and their family members. With 2,162 infants dying from SIDS in 2003 in the U.S. alone, and improved but still imperfect parent and caretaker compliance with known modifiable risk factors for SIDS, it behooves clinicians, researchers, and parents to combine efforts to reach a common goal. The message of the "Back to Sleep" campaign needs to be re-introduced/re-engineered to reach families and caretakers of all

  19. Snail Family Transcription Factors Are Implicated in Thyroid Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Robert G.; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Ines; Anderson, Catriona; Flores, Teresa; Hughes, Sharon; Tselepis, Chris; Ross, James A.; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2007-01-01

    E-Cadherin (CDH1) expression is reduced in thyroid carcinomas by primarily unknown mechanisms. In several tissues, SNAIL (SNAI1) and SLUG (SNAI2) induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition by altering target gene transcription, including CDH1 repression, but these transcription factors have not been studied in thyroid carcinoma. Recently, our group has provided direct evidence that ectopic SNAI1 expression induces epithelial and mesenchymal mouse tumors. SNAI1, SNAI2, and CDH1 expression were analyzed in thyroid-derived cell lines and samples of human follicular and papillary thyroid carcinoma by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The effect of SNAI1 expression on CDH1 transcription was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in ori-3 cells. Thyroid carcinoma development was analyzed in CombitTA-Snail mice, in which SNAI1 levels are up-regulated. SNAI1 and SNAI2 were not expressed in cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, or in normal human thyroid samples, but were highly expressed in cell lines derived from thyroid carcinomas, in human thyroid carcinoma samples, and their metastases. SNAI1 expression in ori-3 cells repressed CDH1 transcription. Combi-TA mice developed papillary thyroid carcinomas, the incidence of which was increased by concomitant radiotherapy. In conclusion, SNAI1 and SNAI2 are ectopically expressed in thyroid carcinomas, and aberrant expression in mice is associated with papillary carcinoma development. PMID:17724139

  20. Evidence of Second-Order Factor Structure in a Diagnostic Problem Space: Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papa, Frank J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Chest pain was identified as a specific medical problem space, and disease classes were modeled to define it. Results from a test taken by 628 medical residents indicate a second-order factor structure that suggests that chest pain is a multidimensional problem space. Implications for medical education are discussed. (SLD)

  1. Generation Y Student-Teachers' Motivational Factors: Retention Implications for K-12 Educational Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontempo, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Generation Y represents a growing number of student-teachers who will impact the future of educational practice, yet little research has been conducted for this demographic group. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to identify motivational factors of neophyte teachers and the retention implications these findings had on Kindergarten…

  2. Implications of epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced egf receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Lund, K; Wiley, H S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the role of receptor aggregation in EGF binding, we construct a mathematical model describing receptor dimerization (and higher levels of aggregation) that permits an analysis of the influence of receptor aggregation on ligand binding. We answer two questions: (a) Can Scatchard plots of EGF binding data be analyzed productively in terms of two noninteracting receptor populations with different affinities if EGF induced receptor aggregation occurs? No. If two affinities characterize aggregated and monomeric EGF receptors, we show that the Scatchard plot should have curvature characteristic of positively cooperative binding, the opposite of that observed. Thus, the interpretation that the high affinity population represents aggregated receptors and the low affinity population nonaggregated receptors is wrong. If the two populations are interpreted without reference to receptor aggregation, an important determinant of Scatchard plot shape is ignored. (b) Can a model for EGF receptor aggregation and EGF binding be consistent with the "negative curvature" (i.e., curvature characteristic of negatively cooperative binding) observed in most Scatchard plots of EGF binding data? Yes. In addition, the restrictions on the model parameters required to obtain negatively curved Scatchard plots provide new information about binding and aggregation. In particular, EGF binding to aggregated receptors must be negatively cooperative, i.e., binding to a receptor in a dimer (or higher oligomer) having one receptor already bound occurs with lower affinity than the initial binding event. A third question we consider is whether the model we present can be used to detect the presence of mechanisms other than receptor aggregation that are contributing to Scatchard plot curvature. For the membrane and cell binding data we analyzed, the best least squares fits of the model to each of the four data sets deviate systematically from the data, indicating that additional factors are

  3. AIR POLLUTION, INFLAMMATION AND PRETERM BIRTH: A POTENTIAL MECHANISTIC LINK

    PubMed Central

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G.; O´Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth. PMID:24382337

  4. Implications of Our Developing Understanding of Risk and Protective Factors in the Treatment of Adult Male Sexual Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes our developing knowledge of factors that contribute added risk of sexual recidivism (risk factors) and factors that are associated with a reduced risk of sexual recidivism (protective factors). Specific implications for the design of future treatment programs are drawn. This information is contrasted with the common foci of…

  5. Molecular Motions as a Drug Target: Mechanistic Simulations of Anthrax Toxin Edema Factor Function Led to the Discovery of Novel Allosteric Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Élodie; Martínez, Leandro; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse; Blondel, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF) is a component of Bacillus anthracis toxin essential for virulence. Its adenylyl cyclase activity is induced by complexation with the ubiquitous eukaryotic cellular protein, calmodulin (CaM). EF and its complexes with CaM, nucleotides and/or ions, have been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography. Those structural data allowed molecular simulations analysis of various aspects of EF action mechanism, including the delineation of EF and CaM domains through their association energetics, the impact of calcium binding on CaM, and the role of catalytic site ions. Furthermore, a transition path connecting the free inactive form to the CaM-complexed active form of EF was built to model the activation mechanism in an attempt to define an inhibition strategy. The cavities at the surface of EF were determined for each path intermediate to identify potential sites where the binding of a ligand could block activation. A non-catalytic cavity (allosteric) was found to shrink rapidly at early stages of the path and was chosen to perform virtual screening. Amongst 18 compounds selected in silico and tested in an enzymatic assay, 6 thiophen ureidoacid derivatives formed a new family of EF allosteric inhibitors with IC50 as low as 2 micromolars. PMID:23012649

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B.

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  7. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  8. Mechanistic links between oxidative/nitrosative stress and tumor necrosis factor alpha in letrozole-induced murine polycystic ovary: biochemical and pathological evidences for beneficial effect of pioglitazone.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, M A; Rezvanfar, M A; Ahmadi, A; Saadi, H A Shojaei; Baeeri, M; Abdollahi, M

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible relationship between ovarian functionality and the oxidative response during cystogenesis induced by hyperandrogenization with letrozole and examine protective effect of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist, pioglitazone (PIO), in polycystic ovary (PCO). Ovarian cysts were induced by oral administration of letrozol (1 mg/kg/day) for 21 consecutive days in the female rats. Effective dose of PIO (20 mg/kg/day) was administrated orally for 21 days. Serum estradiol (E), progesterone (P), testosterone (T), and the ovarian immunomodulator prostaglandin E (PGE) were analyzed as biomarkers of ovarian function. To determine the role of oxidative stress in PCO, the level of cellular lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and peroxynitrite (ONOO), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as a marker of inflammation and apoptosis were measured in serum and the ovaries. Letrozole-induced PCO in rats exhibited a significant increase in LPO and ONOO in serum and ovary while significantly decreased serum and ovarian SOD, CAT, and GPx. Serum T and TNF-α, and ovarian PGE were increased in animals with cysts compared with healthy controls, while E and P diminished. When compared to control group, letrozole-treated group showed irregular sexual cycles, polycystic ovaries characterized by high incidence of sub-capsular ovarian cyst with diminished or scant granulosa cell layer, increased number of atretic pre-antral and antral follicles and absence of corpus luteum. There were almost no primary, secondary, and tertiary follicles observed in PCO rats. All measured parameters were improved by PIO and reached close to normal levels. The present study further supports the role of oxidative/nitrosative stress and infiammatory responses in the pathogenesis of letrozole-induced hyperandrogenic PCO rats. Results indicate that PIO is able to exert direct

  9. Human factors in space station architecture 1: Space station program implications for human factors research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The space station program is based on a set of premises on mission requirements and the operational capabilities of the space shuttle. These premises will influence the human behavioral factors and conditions on board the space station. These include: launch in the STS Orbiter payload bay, orbital characteristics, power supply, microgravity environment, autonomy from the ground, crew make-up and organization, distributed command control, safety, and logistics resupply. The most immediate design impacts of these premises will be upon the architectural organization and internal environment of the space station.

  10. The role of angiogenic factors in fibroid pathogenesis: potential implications for future therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Reshef; Segars, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well established that tumors are dependent on angiogenesis for their growth and survival. Although uterine fibroids are known to be benign tumors with reduced vascularization, recent work demonstrates that the vasculature of fibroids is grossly and microscopically abnormal. Accumulating evidence suggests that angiogenic growth factor dysregulation may be implicated in these vascular and other features of fibroid pathophysiology. Methods Literature searches were performed in PubMed and Google Scholar for articles with content related to angiogenic growth factors and myometrium/leiomyoma. The findings are hereby reviewed and discussed. Results Multiple growth factors involved in angiogenesis are differentially expressed in leiomyoma compared with myometrium. These include epidermal growth factor (EGF), heparin-binding-EGF, vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-β and adrenomedullin. An important paradox is that although leiomyoma tissues are hypoxic, leiomyoma feature down-regulation of key molecular regulators of the hypoxia response. Furthermore, the hypoxic milieu of leiomyoma may contribute to fibroid development and growth. Notably, common treatments for fibroids such as GnRH agonists and uterine artery embolization (UAE) are shown to work at least partly via anti-angiogenic mechanisms. Conclusions Angiogenic growth factors play an important role in mechanisms of fibroid pathophysiology, including abnormal vasculature and fibroid growth and survival. Moreover, the fibroid's abnormal vasculature together with its aberrant hypoxic and angiogenic response may make it especially vulnerable to disruption of its vascular supply, a feature which could be exploited for treatment. Further experimental studies are required in order to gain a better understanding of the growth factors that are involved in normal and pathological myometrial angiogenesis, and to assess

  11. Sociocultural factors and breast cancer in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Tetteh, Dinah A; Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is on the rise in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and efforts at early diagnosis have not been very successful because the public has scant knowledge about the disease, a large percentage of breast cancer cases are diagnosed late and mainly rural SSA women's practice of breast self-examination is poor. In this paper, we argue that an examination of the social and cultural contexts of SSA that influence breast cancer diagnosis and management in the region is needed. We discuss the implications of sociocultural factors, such as gender roles and spirituality, on breast cancer diagnosis and management in SSA. PMID:26757491

  12. Suicidal behavior inLatinas: explanatory cultural factors and implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Luis H; Pilat, Allyson M

    2008-06-01

    We posit that the high rates of suicidal behavior by teenage Hispanic females reported in large-scale surveys can be understood as a cultural phenomenon, a product of specific elements of the history, tradition, ideology, or social norms of a particular society, and that treatment interventions must take family and cultural factors into consideration. For over a decade, surveys have reported that among ethnic and racial minority youth in the United States, Latinas have the highest rates of suicidal behavior compared to African American and non-Hispanic White adolescent females. However, other research shows that the psychological profiles of suicidal Latina adolescent girls and the risk factors for Latina suicidal behavior may not be that different from non-Hispanic suicidal adolescent females. The unique situation of adolescent Latinas involves the convergence of cultural and familial factors (i.e., familism, acculturation, relatedness, autonomy, etc.) with the developmental, social, and individual factors frequently associated with suicidal behaviors. Based on this background, family-oriented interventions appear to be the most appropriate approach to the prevention and treatment of Hispanic suicidal girls. Factors implicated in Latina suicidal behavior and community-based interventions that include the adolescent and her family are suggested. PMID:18611132

  13. Spatialised fate factors for nitrate in catchments: modelling approach and implication for LCA results.

    PubMed

    Basset-Mens, Claudine; Anibar, Lamiaa; Durand, Patrick; van der Werf, Hayo M G

    2006-08-15

    The challenge for environmental assessment tools, such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is to provide a holistic picture of the environmental impacts of a given system, while being relevant both at a global scale, i.e., for global impact categories such as climate change, and at a smaller scale, i.e., for regional impact categories such as aquatic eutrophication. To this end, the environmental mechanisms between emission and impact should be taken into account. For eutrophication in particular, which is one of the main impacts of farming systems, the fate factor of eutrophying pollutants in catchments, and particularly of nitrate, reflects one of these important and complex environmental mechanisms. We define this fate factor as: the ratio of the amount of nitrate at the outlet of the catchment over the nitrate emitted from the catchment's soils. In LCA, this fate factor is most often assumed equal to 1, while the observed fate factor is generally less than 1. A generic approach for estimating the range of variation of nitrate fate factors in a region of intensive agriculture was proposed. This approach was based on the analysis of different catchment scenarios combining different catchment types and different effective rainfalls. The evolution over time of the nitrate fate factor as well as the steady state fate factor for each catchment scenario was obtained using the INCA simulation model. In line with the general LCA model, the implications of the steady state fate factors for nitrate were investigated for the eutrophication impact result in the framework of an LCA of pig production. A sensitivity analysis to the fraction of nitrate lost as N(2)O was presented for the climate change impact category. This study highlighted the difference between the observed fate factor at a given time, which aggregates both storage and transformation processes and a "steady state fate factor", specific to the system considered. The range of steady state fate factors obtained for

  14. Early Health Risk Factors for Violence: Conceptualization, Review of the Evidence, and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2010-01-01

    Violence and aggression are public health problems that can benefit from ongoing research into risk reduction and prevention. Current developmental theories of violence and aggression emphasize biological and psychosocial factors, particularly during adolescence. However, there has been less focus on understanding the interactive, multiplicative effects of these processes. Furthermore, little attention has been given to the pre-, peri-, and postnatal periods, where prevention and intervention may yield effective results. Early health risk factors that influence negative behavioral outcomes include prenatal and postnatal nutrition, tobacco use during pregnancy, maternal depression, birth complications, traumatic brain injury, lead exposure, and child abuse. There is an ample literature to suggest that these early health risk factors may increase the likelihood of childhood externalizing behaviors, aggression, juvenile delinquency, adult criminal behavior, and/or violence. This paper proposes an early health risk factors framework for violence prediction, built on existing developmental theories of criminal behavior and supported by empirical findings. This framework addresses gaps in the adolescent psychopathology literature and presents a novel conceptualization of behavioral disturbance that emphasizes the pre-, peri-, and post-natal periods, when a child’s development is critical and the opportunity for behavioral and environmental modification is high. Implications for such a framework on violence prevention programs are discussed. PMID:21399727

  15. Metabolic Risk Factors of Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease: Implications in the Pathology, Pathogenesis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Banerjee, Anindita; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Biswas, Atanu

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the major cause of dementia among the elderly world-wide, manifests in familial and sporadic forms, and the latter variety accounts for the majority of the patients affected by this disease. The etiopathogenesis of sporadic AD is complex and uncertain. The autopsy studies of AD brain have provided limited understanding of the antemortem pathogenesis of the disease. Experimental AD research with transgenic animal or various cell based models has so far failed to explain the complex and varied spectrum of AD dementia. The review, therefore, emphasizes the importance of AD related risk factors, especially those with metabolic implications, identified from various epidemiological studies, in providing clues to the pathogenesis of this complex disorder. Several metabolic risk factors of AD like hypercholesterolemia, hyperhomocysteinemia and type 2 diabetes have been studied extensively both in epidemiology and experimental research, while much less is known about the role of adipokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines and vitamin D in this context. Moreover, the results from many of these studies have shown a degree of variability which has hindered our understanding of the role of AD related risk factors in the disease progression. The review also encompasses the recent recommendations regarding clinical and neuropathological diagnosis of AD and brings out the inherent uncertainty and ambiguity in this area which may have a distinct impact on the outcome of various population-based studies on AD-related risk factors. PMID:26236550

  16. Educational achievement, personality, and behavior: assessment, factor structure and implications for theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Tim W; Perryman, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to first examine the evidence regarding the factor structure of educational achievement tests in the context of two theoretical models of cognitive ability (psychometric g and mutualism) that have been proposed to explain this structure as well as the underlying processes that may be responsible for its emergence in dimensionality studies. Then, the factor structure underlying a sample of the standardized educational achievement tests used by California in its statewide school accountability program was compared to those emerging from a selection of behavioral and personality assessments. As expected, the educational achievement tests exhibited a strong and uniformly positive manifold resulting in greater unidimensionality as evidenced by a dominant general factor in bi-factor analysis then either the personality or behavioral assessments. The implications of these structural differences are discussed with respect to the two theoretical perspective as well as in the context of formative and summative educational inferences in particular, and the school accountability and reform movement in general. PMID:22805361

  17. Early Health Risk Factors for Violence: Conceptualization, Review of the Evidence, and Implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong

    2011-01-01

    Violence and aggression are public health problems that can benefit from ongoing research into risk reduction and prevention. Current developmental theories of violence and aggression emphasize biological and psychosocial factors, particularly during adolescence. However, there has been less focus on understanding the interactive, multiplicative effects of these processes. Furthermore, little attention has been given to the pre-, peri-, and postnatal periods, where prevention and intervention may yield effective results. Early health risk factors that influence negative behavioral outcomes include prenatal and postnatal nutrition, tobacco use during pregnancy, maternal depression, birth complications, traumatic brain injury, lead exposure, and child abuse. There is an ample literature to suggest that these early health risk factors may increase the likelihood of childhood externalizing behaviors, aggression, juvenile delinquency, adult criminal behavior, and/or violence. This paper proposes an early health risk factors framework for violence prediction, built on existing developmental theories of criminal behavior and supported by empirical findings. This framework addresses gaps in the adolescent psychopathology literature and presents a novel conceptualization of behavioral disturbance that emphasizes the pre-, peri-, and post-natal periods, when a child's development is critical and the opportunity for behavioral and environmental modification is high. Implications for such a framework on violence prevention programs are discussed. PMID:21399727

  18. Metabolic Risk Factors of Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease: Implications in the Pathology, Pathogenesis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Banerjee, Anindita; Chatterjee, Gargi; Ganguly, Anirban; Biswas, Atanu

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the major cause of dementia among the elderly world-wide, manifests in familial and sporadic forms, and the latter variety accounts for the majority of the patients affected by this disease. The etiopathogenesis of sporadic AD is complex and uncertain. The autopsy studies of AD brain have provided limited understanding of the antemortem pathogenesis of the disease. Experimental AD research with transgenic animal or various cell based models has so far failed to explain the complex and varied spectrum of AD dementia. The review, therefore, emphasizes the importance of AD related risk factors, especially those with metabolic implications, identified from various epidemiological studies, in providing clues to the pathogenesis of this complex disorder. Several metabolic risk factors of AD like hypercholesterolemia, hyperhomocysteinemia and type 2 diabetes have been studied extensively both in epidemiology and experimental research, while much less is known about the role of adipokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines and vitamin D in this context. Moreover, the results from many of these studies have shown a degree of variability which has hindered our understanding of the role of AD related risk factors in the disease progression. The review also encompasses the recent recommendations regarding clinical and neuropathological diagnosis of AD and brings out the inherent uncertainty and ambiguity in this area which may have a distinct impact on the outcome of various population-based studies on AD-related risk factors. PMID:26236550

  19. Factors That Influence HIV Risk among Hispanic Female Immigrants and Their Implications for HIV Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Amy M.; Zule, William A.; Karg, Rhonda S.; Browne, Felicia A.; Wechsberg, Wendee M.

    2012-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in North Carolina with increasing incidence of HIV infection. Gender roles, cultural expectations, and acculturation of women may explain some of Hispanic women's risks. The perspectives of Hispanic female immigrants and community-based providers were sought to identify services they offer, understand HIV risk factors, and support the adaptation of a best-evidence HIV behavioural intervention for Hispanic women. Two sets of focus groups were conducted to explicate risks and the opportunities to reach women or couples and the feasibility to conduct HIV prevention in an acceptable manner. Salient findings were that Hispanic female immigrants lacked accurate HIV/AIDS and STI knowledge and that traditional gender roles shaped issues surrounding sexual behaviour and HIV risks, as well as condom use, partner communication, and multiple sexual partnerships. Intervention implications are discussed such as developing and adapting culturally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for Hispanics that address gender roles and partner communication. PMID:22518308

  20. A critical examination of the U.S. nursing shortage: contributing factors, public policy implications.

    PubMed

    Fox, Rebekah L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Despite short-lived periods of adequacy in nurse availability, the nursing shortage has endured. In order to better understand the myriad factors that influence the current shortage of nurses, as well as possible solutions, this project addresses the influence of social factors and government policy on nurse staffing inadequacy. When the government intervenes in a philosophically free-market economy, the assumption is that a problem, such as the current nursing shortage, could not be solved without such intervention. PURPOSE. Nursing care arguably falls into the realm of protecting the common good, and therefore requires government oversight. We provide a critical analysis of policy intervention efforts into the nursing shortage debate by examining the passage of legislation, the provision of educational assistance, and the establishment of minimum staffing requirements and minimum quality standards for reimbursement, which all impact nursing supply and demand. RESULTS. Arguments supporting and opposing policy intervention in general, and its impact on the overall provision of nursing care in the United States, were examined. Without policy incentive to place financial value on the quality of care provided by nurses, a simple increase in the number of available nurses is unlikely to solve the current problem. IMPLICATIONS. Important considerations that should be factored into policy creation include measurement and compensation for quality care, the nature of recruitment efforts of new nurses, and the complex nature of a nursing work. PMID:19954463

  1. Implications of diesel emissions control failures to emission factors and road transport NOx evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Papadimitriou, Giannis; Ligterink, Norbert; Hausberger, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Diesel NOx emissions have been at the forefront of research and regulation scrutiny as a result of failures of late vehicle technologies to deliver on-road emissions reductions. The current study aims at identifying the actual emissions levels of late light duty vehicle technologies, including Euro 5 and Euro 6 ones. Mean NOx emission factor levels used in the most popular EU vehicle emission models (COPERT, HBEFA and VERSIT+) are compared with latest emission information collected in the laboratory over real-world driving cycles and on the road using portable emissions measurement systems (PEMS). The comparison shows that Euro 5 passenger car (PC) emission factors well reflect on road levels and that recently revealed emissions control failures do not call for any significant corrections. However Euro 5 light commercial vehicles (LCVs) and Euro 6 PCs in the 2014-2016 period exhibit on road emission levels twice as high as used in current models. Moreover, measured levels vary a lot for Euro 6 vehicles. Scenarios for future evolution of Euro 6 emission factors, reflecting different degree of effectiveness of emissions control regulations, show that total NOx emissions from diesel Euro 6 PC and LCV may correspond from 49% up to 83% of total road transport emissions in 2050. Unless upcoming and long term regulations make sure that light duty diesel NOx emissions are effectively addressed, this will have significant implications in meeting future air quality and national emissions ceilings targets.

  2. Clinical implications of insulin-like growth factor 1 system in early-stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y-F; Shen, M-R; Hsu, K-F; Cheng, Y-M; Chou, C-Y

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to identify the expression and the correlation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) system and their prognostic impacts in cervical cancer. Seventy-two patients with early-stage cervical cancer were eligible. We obtained the serum levels of total IGF-1 and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the expression of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) in cancerous tissue by immuno-fluorescent (IF) stains. The 5-year recurrence-free and overall survival rates were significantly lower (P=0.003 and P=0.01, respectively) among patients with high-grade expression of tissue IGF-1R, compared with those with low-grade expression. After adjustment for other factors, preoperative serum total IGF-1 or IGFBP-3 levels failed to predict cancer death and recurrence. High-grade expression of IGF-1R and elevated preoperative squamous cell carcinoma antigen level were independent predictors of both death and recurrence, and combination of both factors could further help identify the subgroup of patients at higher death risk. The IF staining indicates the colocalisation of IGF-1 and IGF-1R in the cancerous tissues, whereas the IGF-1R expression is not correlated with circulating levels of IGF-1 or IGFBP-3. In early-stage cervical cancer, IGF-1 system may have a paracrine or autocrine function and the adverse impacts on prognosis by IGF-1R overexpression are implicated. PMID:18781172

  3. Mechanistically Consistent Reduced Models of Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Terán-Romero, Luis; Silber, Mary; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-01-01

    Designing genetic networks with desired functionalities requires an accurate mathematical framework that accounts for the essential mechanistic details of the system. Here, we formulate a time-delay model of protein translation and mRNA degradation by systematically reducing a detailed mechanistic model that explicitly accounts for the ribosomal dynamics and the cleaving of mRNA by endonucleases. We exploit various technical and conceptual advantages that our time-delay model offers over the mechanistic model to probe the behavior of a self-repressing gene over wide regions of parameter space. We show that a heuristic time-delay model of protein synthesis of a commonly used form yields a notably different prediction for the parameter region where sustained oscillations occur. This suggests that such heuristics can lead to erroneous results. The functional forms that arise from our systematic reduction can be used for every system that involves transcription and translation and they could replace the commonly used heuristic time-delay models for these processes. The results from our analysis have important implications for the design of synthetic gene networks and stress that such design must be guided by a combination of heuristic models and mechanistic models that include all relevant details of the process. PMID:23663853

  4. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution.

    PubMed

    Okpeku, Moses; Esmailizadeh, Ali; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Peters, Sunday O; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats' populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima's D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat IRF3

  5. The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W; Hopkins, John

    2013-11-01

    The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights. PMID:23565807

  6. Modeling Bird Migration under Climate Change: A Mechanistic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2009-01-01

    How will migrating birds respond to changes in the environment under climate change? What are the implications for migratory success under the various accelerated climate change scenarios as forecast by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change? How will reductions or increased variability in the number or quality of wetland stop-over sites affect migratory bird species? The answers to these questions have important ramifications for conservation biology and wildlife management. Here, we describe the use of continental scale simulation modeling to explore how spatio-temporal changes along migratory flyways affect en-route migration success. We use an individually based, biophysical, mechanistic, bird migration model to simulate the movement of shorebirds in North America as a tool to study how such factors as drought and wetland loss may impact migratory success and modify migration patterns. Our model is driven by remote sensing and climate data and incorporates important landscape variables. The energy budget components of the model include resting, foraging, and flight, but presently predation is ignored. Results/Conclusions We illustrate our model by studying the spring migration of sandpipers through the Great Plains to their Arctic breeding grounds. Why many species of shorebirds have shown significant declines remains a puzzle. Shorebirds are sensitive to stop-over quality and spacing because of their need for frequent refueling stops and their opportunistic feeding patterns. We predict bird "hydrographs that is, stop-over frequency with latitude, that are in agreement with the literature. Mean stop-over durations predicted from our model for nominal cases also are consistent with the limited, but available data. For the shorebird species simulated, our model predicts that shorebirds exhibit significant plasticity and are able to shift their migration patterns in response to changing drought conditions. However, the question remains as to whether this

  7. Mechanistic investigations of shuttle glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Holtzclaw, K. W.; Krech, R. H.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Leone, A.; Blumberg, W. A. M.

    1993-01-01

    A series of laboratory measurements have been performed in order to provide a mechanistic interpretation for the visible shuttle glow. These studies involved interactions of an 8 km/s oxygen atom beam with both contaminant dosed surfaces and gaseous targets. We conclude that visible shuttle glow arises from surface mediated O + NO recombination via a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and that the gas-phase exchange reaction O + N2 - NO + N provides a viable source of precursor NO above surfaces oriented in the ram direction.

  8. Mechanistic investigations of shuttle glow

    SciTech Connect

    Caledonia, G.E.; Holtzclaw, K.W.; Krech, R.H.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. ); Leone, A. ); Blumber, W.A.M. )

    1993-03-01

    A series of laboratory measurements have been performed in order to provide a mechanistic interpretation for the visible shuttle glow. These studies involved interactions in an 8 km/s oxygen atom beam with both contaminant dosed surfaces and gaseous targets. The authors conclude that visible shuttle glow arises from surface mediated O + NO recombination via a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and that the gas-phase exchange reaction O + N[sub 2] [r arrow] NO + N provides a viable source of precursor NO above surfaces oriented in the ram direction. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Implications of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Activation in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Andarini, Sita; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Syahruddin, Elisna; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) has been intensively investigated in many preclinical studies using cell lines and animal models, and the results have provided important knowledge to help improve the understanding of cancer biology. IGF1R is highly expressed in patients with lung cancer, and high levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), the main ligand for IGF1R, increases the risk of developing lung malignancy in the future. Several phase I clinical trials have supported the potential use of an IGF1R-targeted strategy for cancer, including lung cancer. However, the negative results from phase III studies need further attention, especially in selecting patients with specific molecular signatures, who will gain benefits from IGF1R inhibitors with minimal side effects. This review will discuss the basic concept of IGF1R in lung cancer biology, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction and cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance, and also the clinical implications of IGF1R for lung cancer patients, such as prognostic value and cancer therapy resistance. PMID:27418865

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Converting Enzyme: Implications for Ocular Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, Kota V

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) –converting enzyme (TACE), a member of the family of metalloproteinase disintegrin proteins, is responsible for the conversion of inactive TNF-α precursor from to active mature form. TNF-α is a pleiotropic cytokine that contributes to cellular immunity and inflammatory response in wide range of inflammatory pathologies. Although a large number of studies indicate the use of TACE inhibitors, which prevents processing of TNF-α as potential therapeutic drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and cancer, very few studies indicate its use in ocular pathologies. It is still not clearly understood how the TACE-mediated shedding of cytokines and growth factors in various ocular tissues plays a critical role in the cytotoxic signals causing tissue dysfunction and damage leading to blindness. Regulation of TACE activity is likely to have wide implications for ocular immunology and inflammatory diseases. Specifically, since anti-TNF-α therapies have been used to prevent ocular inflammatory complications, the use of TACE inhibitors could be a novel therapeutic approach for ocular inflammatory diseases especially uveitis. PMID:20303413

  11. Insulin-like growth factor 1, glycation and bone fragility: implications for fracture resistance of bone.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) action on the growing skeleton, its role in skeletal homeostasis during aging and age-related development of certain diseases is still unclear. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from glucose are implicated in osteoporosis and a number of diabetic complications. We hypothesized that because in humans and rodents IGF1 stimulates uptake of glucose (a glycation substrate) from the bloodstream in a dose-dependent manner, the decline of IGF1 could be associated with the accumulation of glycation products and the decreasing resistance of bone to fracture. To test the aforementioned hypotheses, we used human tibial posterior cortex bone samples to perform biochemical (measurement of IGF1, fluorescent AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) contents) and mechanical tests (crack initiation and propagation using compact tension specimens). Our results for the first time show a significant, age-independent association between the levels of IGF1 and AGEs. Furthermore, AGEs (fAGEs, PEN) predict propensity of bone to fracture (initiation and propagation) independently of age in human cortical bone. Based on these results we propose a model of IGF1-based regulation of bone fracture. Because IGF1 level increases postnatally up to the juvenile developmental phase and decreases thereafter with aging, we propose that IGF1 may play a protective role in young skeleton and its age-related decline leads to bone fragility and an increased fracture risk. Our results may also have important implications for current understanding of osteoporosis- and diabetes-related bone fragility as well as in the development of new diagnostic tools to screen for fragile bones. PMID:25629402

  12. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1, Glycation and Bone Fragility: Implications for Fracture Resistance of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sroga, Grażyna E.; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) action on the growing skeleton, its role in skeletal homeostasis during aging and age-related development of certain diseases is still unclear. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from glucose are implicated in osteoporosis and a number of diabetic complications. We hypothesized that because in humans and rodents IGF1 stimulates uptake of glucose (a glycation substrate) from the bloodstream in a dose-dependent manner, the decline of IGF1 could be associated with the accumulation of glycation products and the decreasing resistance of bone to fracture. To test the aforementioned hypotheses, we used human tibial posterior cortex bone samples to perform biochemical (measurement of IGF1, fluorescent AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) contents) and mechanical tests (crack initiation and propagation using compact tension specimens). Our results for the first time show a significant, age-independent association between the levels of IGF1 and AGEs. Furthermore, AGEs (fAGEs, PEN) predict propensity of bone to fracture (initiation and propagation) independently of age in human cortical bone. Based on these results we propose a model of IGF1-based regulation of bone fracture. Because IGF1 level increases postnatally up to the juvenile developmental phase and decreases thereafter with aging, we propose that IGF1 may play a protective role in young skeleton and its age-related decline leads to bone fragility and an increased fracture risk. Our results may also have important implications for current understanding of osteoporosis- and diabetes-related bone fragility as well as in the development of new diagnostic tools to screen for fragile bones. PMID:25629402

  13. Food for Thought ... Mechanistic Validation

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Thomas; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Stephens, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Validation of new approaches in regulatory toxicology is commonly defined as the independent assessment of the reproducibility and relevance (the scientific basis and predictive capacity) of a test for a particular purpose. In large ring trials, the emphasis to date has been mainly on reproducibility and predictive capacity (comparison to the traditional test) with less attention given to the scientific or mechanistic basis. Assessing predictive capacity is difficult for novel approaches (which are based on mechanism), such as pathways of toxicity or the complex networks within the organism (systems toxicology). This is highly relevant for implementing Toxicology for the 21st Century, either by high-throughput testing in the ToxCast/ Tox21 project or omics-based testing in the Human Toxome Project. This article explores the mostly neglected assessment of a test's scientific basis, which moves mechanism and causality to the foreground when validating/qualifying tests. Such mechanistic validation faces the problem of establishing causality in complex systems. However, pragmatic adaptations of the Bradford Hill criteria, as well as bioinformatic tools, are emerging. As critical infrastructures of the organism are perturbed by a toxic mechanism we argue that by focusing on the target of toxicity and its vulnerability, in addition to the way it is perturbed, we can anchor the identification of the mechanism and its verification. PMID:23665802

  14. FACTORS IMPLICATED IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN THE US, AND AN EVALUATION OF THE CASE FOR INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from 267 species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in a forthcoming book. Land use was the most frequently implicated adverse ...

  15. Somatodendritic dopamine release: recent mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Rice, Margaret E; Patel, Jyoti C

    2015-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key transmitter in motor, reward and cogitative pathways, with DA dysfunction implicated in disorders including Parkinson's disease and addiction. Located in midbrain, DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta project via the medial forebrain bundle to the dorsal striatum (caudate putamen), and DA neurons in the adjacent ventral tegmental area project to the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) and prefrontal cortex. In addition to classical vesicular release from axons, midbrain DA neurons exhibit DA release from their cell bodies and dendrites. Somatodendritic DA release leads to activation of D2 DA autoreceptors on DA neurons that inhibit their firing via G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels. This helps determine patterns of DA signalling at distant axonal release sites. Somatodendritically released DA also acts via volume transmission to extrasynaptic receptors that modulate local transmitter release and neuronal activity in the midbrain. Thus, somatodendritic release is a pivotal intrinsic feature of DA neurons that must be well defined in order to fully understand the physiology and pathophysiology of DA pathways. Here, we review recent mechanistic aspects of somatodendritic DA release, with particular emphasis on the Ca(2+) dependence of release and the potential role of exocytotic proteins. PMID:26009764

  16. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  17. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  18. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 is a novel inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases with implications for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Michael P.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Kisiel, Walter; Foster, Don; Kehry, Marilyn R.; Libby, Peter; Schönbeck, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of ECM, particularly interstitial collagen, promotes plaque instability, rendering atheroma prone to rupture. Previous studies implicated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in these processes, suggesting that dysregulated MMP activity, probably due to imbalance with endogenous inhibitors, promotes complications of atherosclerosis. We report here that the serine proteinase inhibitor tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) can function as an MMP inhibitor. TFPI-2 diminished the ability of the interstitial collagenases MMP-1 and MMP-13 to degrade triple-helical collagen, the primary load-bearing molecule of the ECM within human atheroma. In addition, TFPI-2 also reduced the activity of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. In contrast to the “classical” tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), TFPI-2 expression in situ correlated inversely with MMP levels in human atheroma. TFPI-2 colocalized primarily with smooth muscle cells in the normal media as well as the plaque’s fibrous cap. Conversely, the macrophage-enriched shoulder region, the prototypical site of matrix degradation and plaque rupture, stained only weakly for TFPI-2 but intensely for gelatinases and interstitial collagenases. Evidently, human mononuclear phagocytes, an abundant source of MMPs within human atheroma, lost their ability to express this inhibitor during differentiation in vitro. These findings establish a new, anti-inflammatory function of TFPI-2 of potential pathophysiological significance for human diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:11342575

  19. Cadmium in edible mushrooms from NW Spain: Bioconcentration factors and consumer health implications.

    PubMed

    Melgar, M Julia; Alonso, Julián; García, M Angeles

    2016-02-01

    Mushrooms do not constitute a significant portion of the human diet, but the consumption of wild and cultivated mushrooms has become increasingly in recent years. Some species accumulate high levels of toxic metals, both in unpolluted and polluted areas. In this study, we examined the accumulation capacity of cadmium in edible mushrooms in relation to certain factors and their possible toxicological implications. Cadmium concentrations were determined by an ICP-MS spectrometer in 238 samples of the fruiting bodies of 28 wild and cultivated growing edible mushrooms species and the underlying soil. The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The highest mean cadmium concentration (mg/kg dry weight) was found in Agaricus macrosporus (52.9 in H and 28.3 in RFB). All mushroom species accumulated cadmium in relation to the underlying soils. There were statistically significant differences between the hymenophore and the rest of the fruiting body (p < 0.001). Cadmium concentrations were compared to data in the literature and to levels set by legislation. It was concluded that consumption of our studied mushrooms is not a toxicological risk as far as cadmium content is concerned, although the species A. macrosporus should not be consumed. PMID:26702984

  20. Inhibition of transcription factors by plant-derived compounds and their implications in inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ríos, J L; Recio, M C; Escandell, J M; Andújar, I

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation is a general term used to describe various pathological processes with diverse causes that can include infection, trauma, or an autoimmune response. Due to its many causes, the inflammatory response involves multiple and varied mediators, including vasoactive amines, free radicals, and both lipidic and peptidic mediators. Medicinal plants and the compounds derived from them are a good source of new and specific inhibitors of the inflammatory process. The past decade has witnessed many important discoveries in this field, with new findings challenging the more traditional views of pharmacologists. Various studies, for example, have demonstrated the positive effects of plant-derived phenolics, which act as anti-oxidants, free radical scavengers, and inhibitors of nitric-oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase, and lipoxygenase. The anti-inflammatory activity of chalcones has been correlated with the induction of heme oxygenase-1 while phlorotannins have been found to inhibit matrix metalloproteinase, which is implicated in arthritis, chronic inflammation, and wrinkle formation. Sesquiterpene lactones have been studied as inhibitors of NF-kappaB activity and the relationship between their chemical structure and pharmacological activity has been clearly established. Recently, cucurbitacins have been described as inhibitors of JAK -STAT and NF-AT functions related to inflammation; they were also found to induce apoptosis of cells involved in the inflammatory response. This review focuses mainly on the effects of natural products on transcription factors, which are the most promising targets for designing new active drugs against inflammation and cancer. PMID:19355962

  1. Do participant, facilitator, or group factors moderate effectiveness of the Body Project? Implications for dissemination.

    PubMed

    Butryn, Meghan L; Rohde, Paul; Marti, C Nathan; Stice, Eric

    2014-10-01

    The Body Project is a dissonance-based selective eating disorder prevention program with a broad evidence-base. The study sought to determine if previous findings regarding participant moderators replicate in an effectiveness trial under more real-world conditions. This study also had the novel aim of examining facilitator characteristics and group-level variables as potential outcome predictors. These aims are critical for understanding when the intervention is most effective and for whom. Participants were 408 young women with body image concerns recruited from seven universities. Change in eating disorder symptoms at 1-year follow-up was the primary outcome. Intervention effects were significant for both participants who had low or high baseline symptom levels, but the effect size was approximately twice as large for participants with high initial symptom levels (d = 0.58 vs. 0.24). Intervention effects were not predicted by facilitator factors (education, age, BMI, sex) or by group size or attendance rate. This study demonstrates that participants with either low or high eating disorder symptoms will benefit from the intervention but if resources are limited, targeting those with elevated eating disorder symptoms may be sensible. Results also suggest that a wide variety of facilitators can effectively deliver the Body Project, which has encouraging implications for dissemination. PMID:25199580

  2. Do Participant, Facilitator, or Group Factors Moderate Effectiveness of the Body Project? Implications for Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Butryn, Meghan L.; Rohde, Paul; Marti, C. Nathan; Stice, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The Body Project is a dissonance-based a selective eating disorder prevention program with a broad evidence-base. The study sought to determine if previous findings regarding participant moderators replicate in an effectiveness trial under more real-world conditions. This study also had the novel aim of examining facilitator characteristics and group-level variables as potential outcome predictors. These aims are critical for understanding when the intervention is most effective and for whom. Participants were 408 young women with body image concerns recruited from seven universities. Change in eating disorder symptoms at 1-year follow-up was the primary outcome. Intervention effects were significant for both participants who had low or high baseline symptom levels, but the effect size was approximately twice as large for participants with high initial symptom levels (d = 0.58 vs. 0.24). Intervention effects were not predicted by facilitator factors (education, age, BMI, sex) or by group size or attendance rate. This study demonstrates that participants with either low or high eating disorder symptoms will benefit from the intervention but if resources are limited, targeting those with elevated eating disorder symptoms may be sensible. Results also suggest that a wide variety of facilitators can effectively deliver the Body Project, which has encouraging implications for dissemination. PMID:25199580

  3. Explaining the Rapid Increase in Nigeria's Sex Ratio at Birth: Factors and Implications.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Amadu J

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the rapid increase in Nigeria's sex ratio at birth from 1.03 boys born for every 1 girl born in each year from 1996-2008 to 1.06 in each year from 2009-2014, second only to Tunisia in Africa at 1.07. The average sex ratio at birth in the world in 2014 was 1.07. In most Black African nations or Black majority nations, it is 1.03 or less. Among the factors presented for this development are: historical fluctuations of sex ratio at birth; geography and ethnicity; male preference/chasing a son; Age of parents; high death rates of male infants and males in general; and wealth/socioeconomic status. Among the potential implications are: young and poor men in Nigeria may not be able to find brides and form families due to a potential shortage of females; emigration of young and poor Nigerian men to West (Africa) and elsewhere to seek brides and form families; immigration of marriage age women from West (Africa) and around the world to Nigeria to seek husbands; and low contraceptive use and high fertility rates in Nigeria. PMID:26506655

  4. Factors that affect the hydraulic performance of raingardens: implications for design and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Virahsawmy, Harry K; Stewardson, Michael J; Vietz, Geoff; Fletcher, Tim D

    2014-01-01

    Raingardens are becoming an increasingly popular technology for urban stormwater treatment. However, their hydraulic performance is known to reduce due to clogging from deposition of fine-grained sediments on the surface. This impacts on their capacity to treat urban runoff. It has been recently hypothesised that plants can help to mitigate the effect of surface clogging on infiltration. A conceptual model is therefore presented to better understand key processes, including those associated with plant cover, which influences surface infiltration mechanisms. Based on this understanding, a field evaluation was carried out to test the hypothesis that plants increase the infiltration rate, and to investigate factors that influence the deposition of fine-grained sediments within raingardens. The results show that infiltration rates around plants are statistically higher than bare areas, irrespective of the degree of surface clogging. This suggests that preferential flow pathways exist around plants. Sediment deposition processes are also influenced by design elements of raingardens such as the inlet configuration. These findings have implications for the design and maintenance of raingardens, in particular the design of the inlet configuration, as well as maintenance of the filter media surface layer and vegetation. PMID:24622546

  5. Natural selection and mechanistic regularity.

    PubMed

    DesAutels, Lane

    2016-06-01

    In this article, I address the question of whether natural selection operates regularly enough to qualify as a mechanism of the sort characterized by Machamer, Darden, and Craver (2000). Contrary to an influential critique by Skipper and Millstein (2005), I argue that natural selection can be seen to be regular enough to qualify as an MDC mechanism just fine-as long as we pay careful attention to some important distinctions regarding mechanistic regularity and abstraction. Specifically, I suggest that when we distinguish between process vs. product regularity, mechanism-internal vs. mechanism-external sources of irregularity, and abstract vs. concrete regularity, we can see that natural selection is only irregular in senses that are unthreatening to its status as an MDC mechanism. PMID:26921876

  6. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines by a soluble factor of Propionibacterium acnes: implications for chronic inflammatory acne.

    PubMed

    Vowels, B R; Yang, S; Leyden, J J

    1995-08-01

    Although many cytokines have been implicated in the development and persistence of inflammatory immune responses, it is unknown if any of these are important in inflammatory acne. This study investigated the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-1 beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by human monocytic cell lines, ThP-1 and U937, and by freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from acne patients. Both Propionibacterium acnes and supernatants obtained from 72-h P. acnes cultures could induce significant concentrations of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-8 by both cell lines and by peripheral blood mononuclear cells as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was no significant difference between acne and non-acne subjects. Endotoxin quantification and addition of polymyxin B to assays indicated no lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. P. acnes supernatant was fractionated into components with molecular weights of < 3,000, < 10,000, and < 30,000 and assayed for the ability to induce IL-8 and TNF production in ThP-1 cells. Nearly 90% of the original activity was found in the < 30,000-molecular-weight fraction, 50% was in the < 10,000-molecular-weight fraction, and only 15% remained in the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction. The effluent from the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction contained about 70% activity, indicating that the inducing factor was not retained in the membrane. Incubation of P. acnes supernatant with various concentrations of mutanolysin or lysozyme resulted in a loss of 60% of the original activity. The addition of jimson lectin, which binds peptidoglycan, resulted in a loss of 70% of the activity in a dose-response manner, whereas peanut lectin had little or no effect on the activity. Heating of the P. acnes supernatant to 65 degrees C also had no effect on the activity. Blocking of CD14, a receptor for both LPS and peptidoglycan, reduced cytokine production by > 50%, suggesting that

  7. Rational and Mechanistic Perspectives on Reinforcement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This special issue describes important recent developments in applying reinforcement learning models to capture neural and cognitive function. But reinforcement learning, as a theoretical framework, can apply at two very different levels of description: "mechanistic" and "rational." Reinforcement learning is often viewed in mechanistic terms--as…

  8. Factors promoting larch dominance in Eastern Siberia: fire versus growth performance and implications for carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Wirth, C.; Mollicone, D.; von Lüpke, N.; Ziegler, W.; Achard, F.; Mund, M.; Prokushkin, A.; Scherbina, S.

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of fire and climate in determining canopy species composition and aboveground carbon stocks were investigated. Measurements were made along a transect extending from the dark taiga zone of Central Siberia, where Picea and Abies dominate the canopy, into the Larix zone of Eastern Siberia. We test the hypotheses that the change in canopy species composition is based (1) on climate-driven performance only, (2) on fire only, or (3) on fire-performance interactions. We show that the evergreen conifers Picea obovata and Abies sibirica are the natural late-successional species both in Central and Eastern Siberia, provided there has been no fire for an extended period of time. There are no changes in the climate-driven performance of the observed species. Fire appears to be the main factor explaining the dominance of Larix. Of lesser influence were longitude, hydrology and active-layer thickness. Stand-replacing fires decreased from 300 to 50 yr between the Yenisei Ridge and the upper Tunguska. Repeated non-stand-replacing surface fires eliminated the regeneration of Abies and Picea. With every 100 yr since the last fire, the percentage of Larix decreased by 20 %. Biomass of stems of single trees did not show signs of age-related decline. Relative diameter increment was 0.41 ± 0.20 % at breast height and stem volume increased linearly over time with a rate of about 0.36 t C ha-1 yr-1 independent of age class and species. Stand volumes reached about 130 t C ha-1 (equivalent to about 520 m3 ha-1). Individual trees of Larix were older than 600 yr. The maximum age and biomass seemed to be limited by fungal rot of heart wood. 60 % of old Larix and Picea and 30 % of Pinus sibirica trees were affected by stem rot. Implications for the future role of fire and of plant diseases are discussed.

  9. Factors Influencing Lava-Substrate Heat Transfer and Implications for Thermomechanical Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Greeley, R.; Lenat, J. F. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    We develop numerical simulations of basaltic lava flowing laminarly over a basalt substrate in order to examine the details of the lava dynamics and thermal boundary layers and to understand the implications for substrate heating. As the initial stage of a larger study of thermomechanical erosion in different planetary environments, we aim to understand why erosion occurs on Earth, why erosion features are not ubiquitous given the high temperatures involved, and whether it is a plausible mechanism for the formation of planetary channels such as lunar sinuous rilles and Venusian canali. Here we confine our attention to terrestrial lavas with well-known properties and eruption parameters. With relatively simple computational fluid dynamic simulations, most closely representing tube-fed hawaiian basalts (for which erosion has been documented), we demonstrate the importance of incorporating several key factors in models of lava flow/ substrate heat transfer, which have commonly been neglected in previous treatments. By addressing the interaction of the flow dynamics and heat transfer in the lava, our work suggests that the development of a temperature gradient in the base of the lava, even for undeveloped flow, has a significant influence on substrate temperature. The sensitivity of the lava-substrate interface temperature to the thermophysical properties of the lava and substrate suggests that a delicate balance is required for partial melting to occur. Thus, it might take weeks of continuous flow to initiate partial melting of the substrate at distances of several kilometers from the vent. These durations exceed the periods of stability typical of lava flowing in tubes; pauses, blockages, surges, and break-outs frequently disrupt the flow. However, natural irregularities in the flow dynamics or substrate topography might help to initiate and maintain substrate melting on shorter timescales by disturbing the intimately coupled dynamic and thermal boundary layers

  10. Factors affecting computer mouse use for young children: implications for AAC.

    PubMed

    Costigan, F Aileen; Light, Janice C; Newell, Karl M

    2012-06-01

    More than 12% of preschoolers receiving special education services have complex communication needs, including increasing numbers of children who do not have significant motor impairments (e.g., children with autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, etc.). In order to meet their diverse communication needs (e.g., face-to-face, written, Internet, telecommunication), these children may use mainstream technologies accessed via the mouse, yet little is known about factors that affect the mouse performance of young children. This study used a mixed factorial design to investigate the effects of age, target size, and angle of approach on accuracy and time required for accurate target selection with a mouse for 20 3-year-old and 20 4-year-old children. The 4-year-olds were generally more accurate and faster than the 3-year-olds. Target size and angle mediated differences in performance within age groups. The 3-year-olds were more accurate and faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target, were faster in selecting the large relative to the medium target, and were faster in selecting targets along the vertical relative to the diagonal angle. The 4-year-olds were faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target. Implications for improving access to AAC include the preliminary suggestion of age-related threshold target sizes that support sufficient accuracy, the possibility of efficiency benefits when target size is increased up to an age-related threshold, and identification of the potential utility of the vertical angle as a context for training navigational input device use. PMID:22670726

  11. Kinetic and Stereochemical Analysis of YwhB, a 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase Homologue in Bacillus subtilis: Mechanistic Implications for the YwhB- and 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase-catalyzed Reactions†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Susan C; Johnson, William H.; Czerwinski, Robert M.; Stamps, Stacy L.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2008-01-01

    YwhB, a 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) homologue in Bacillus subtilis, has no known biological role and the gene has no apparent genomic context. The kinetic and stereochemical properties of YwhB have been examined using available enol and dienol compounds. The kinetic analysis shows that YwhB has a relatively non-specific 1,3- and 1,5-keto-enol tautomerase activity, with the former activity prevailing. Replacement of Pro-1 or Arg-11 with an alanine significantly reduces or abolishes these activities, implicating both residues as critical ones for the activities. In D2O, ketonization of two monoacid substrates (2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoate and phenylenolpyruvate) produces a mixture of stereoisomers {2-keto-3-[2H]-4-pentenoate and 3-[2H]-phenylpyruvate}, where the (3R)-isomers predominate. Ketonization of 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate, a diacid, in D2O affords mostly the opposite enantiomer, (3S)-2-oxo-[3-2H]-4-hexenedioate. The mono- and diacids apparently bind in different orientations in the active site of YwhB, but the highly stereoselective nature of the YwhB reaction using a diacid suggests that the biological substrate for YwhB may be a diacid. Moreover, of the three dienols examined, 1,3- and 1,5-keto-enol tautomerization reactions are only observed for 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate, indicating that the C-3 and C-5 positions are accessible for protonation in this compound. Incubation of 4-OT with 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate in D2O results in a racemic mixture of 2-oxo-[3-2H]-4-hexenedioate, suggesting that 4-OT may not catalyze a 1,3-keto-enol tautomerization reaction using this dienol. It has previously been shown that 4-OT catalyzes the near stereospecific conversion of 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate to (5S)-[5-2H]-2-oxo-3-hexenedioate in D2O. Taken together, these observations suggest that 4-OT might function as a 1,5-keto-enol tautomerase using 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate. PMID:17902707

  12. Data graphs and mechanistic explanation.

    PubMed

    Burnston, Daniel C

    2016-06-01

    It is a widespread assumption in philosophy of science that representations of data are not explanatory-that they are mere stepping stones towards an explanation, such as a representation of a mechanism. I draw on instances of representational and explanatory practice from mammalian chronobiology to suggest that this assumption is unsustainable. In many instances, biologists employ representations of data in explanatory ways that are not reducible to constraints on or evidence for representations of mechanisms. Data graphs are used to represent relationships between quantities across conditions, and often these representations are necessary for explaining particular aspects of the phenomena under study. The benefit of the analysis is two-fold. First, it provides a more accurate account of explanatory practice in broadly mechanistic investigation in biology. Second, it suggests that there is not an explanatorily "fundamental" type of representation in biology. Rather, the practice of explanation consists in the construction of different types of representations and their employment for distinct explanatory purposes. PMID:26871740

  13. Predictive toxicodynamics: Empirical/mechanistic approaches.

    PubMed

    Frazier, J M

    1997-10-01

    A major objective of the toxicological sciences is to predict the in vivo toxicological consequences of human exposure to pure chemicals, complex mixtures and commercial formulations. Historically, the experimental approach to this goal has been to investigate toxicological processes in whole animal models and extrapolate the results obtained to predict human risk using various extrapolation procedures (high-dose/low-dose extrapolation, interspecies extrapolation and route-to-route extrapolation). Can in vitro methods be more widely employed in quantitative risk assessment? One major limitation to the broader application of in vitro toxicity testing methods is the lack of validated techniques for the extrapolation of in vitro-derived toxicodynamic data to the in vivo situation. The objective of this paper is to describe some approaches to the development of techniques to extrapolate in vitro toxicity testing data to predict in vivo toxicological responses. An empirical approach within the context of a mechanistic framework is explored. The basic hypothesis is that the in vivo response can be constructed from a cellular toxicity factor that accounts for the cellular response and a toxicodynamic factor that relates toxicological events at the cellular level to the observable in vivo responses. A predictive paradigm to describe the in vivo acute target organ toxicity (hepatotoxicity) of a model chemical (cadmium) is discussed. The cellular toxicity factor is derived from in vitro toxicity testing studies using isolated rat hepatocytes. The toxicodynamic factor is derived through Biologically-Based Response (BBR) modelling techniques to predict target organ toxicity markers (i.e. plasma hepatic enzyme levels as markers for acute hepatotoxicity). The ultimate goal is to develop validated extrapolation procedures that can be applied to predicting target organ toxicity quantitatively in human populations based on in vitro toxicity studies using human cellular models. PMID

  14. Negative mechanistic reasoning in medical intervention assessment.

    PubMed

    Jerkert, Jesper

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, mechanistic reasoning has been assigned a negligible role in standard EBM (evidence-based medicine) literature, although some recent authors have argued for an upgrade. Even so, the mechanistic reasoning that has received attention has almost exclusively been positive--both in an epistemic sense of claiming that there is a mechanistic chain and in a health-related sense of there being claimed benefits for the patient. Negative mechanistic reasoning has been neglected, both in the epistemic and in the health-related sense. I distinguish three main types of negative mechanistic reasoning and subsume them under a new definition of mechanistic reasoning in the context of assessing medical interventions. This definition is wider than a previous suggestion in the literature. Each negative type corresponds to a range of evidential strengths, and it is argued that there are differences with respect to typical evidential strengths. The variety of negative mechanistic reasoning should be acknowledged in EBM, and it presents a serious challenge to proponents of so-called medical hierarchies of evidence. PMID:26597869

  15. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Youth With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: Implications of a Factor Analysis of Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Ma, Bo; Lawson, Andrew; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Liese, Angela D.; Dabelea, Dana; Dolan, Lawrence; Pettitt, David J.; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; Williams, Desmond

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The extent to which cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors cluster in youth with a diagnosis of type 1 (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is unclear. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate potential clustering of traditional CVD risk factors that may reflect an unmeasured but unifying single pathology that may explain the phenomenon of the metabolic syndrome in these youths. Methods Youths who participated in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study with diabetes diagnosed <20 years, with current age >10 years (maximum current age, 22 years) were included. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed to determine statistical associations among CVD risk factors, including obesity, blood pressure, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Diabetes type was defined by diabetes autoantibodies (DAA) and fasting C-peptide (FCP); type 1 (T1DM, DAA positive, and FCP <0.8 ng/mL, n = 1198) and type 2 (T2DM, DAA negative, and FCP >2.9 ng/mL, n = 95). For T1DM, the sample was split randomly and analyses were conducted separately in each split sample. Results Among five prespecified data structures ranging from a single underlying factor to a hierarchical structure of factors, the worst-fitting model for both of the T1DM split samples was the single-factor structure and the best-fitting model was a three-correlated-factor structure. The three correlated factors identified were obesity, lipids, and blood pressure. Results were very similar for youths with T2DM. Conclusion There is little evidence that a single factor underlies the CVD risk factor pattern in youths with diabetes. The concept of the metabolic syndrome provides a useful description of clinical characteristics but does not efficiently capture a single target for etiologic research among youths with diabetes. PMID:18847385

  16. Sexual abuse and subsequent suicidal behaviour. Exacerbating factors and implications for recovery.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Cate

    2006-01-01

    Suicidal behaviour is a cause for concern among many western countries; in general, it is most common among young women. This research used qualitative methods to explore the narratives of 24 women, to contextualise their insights, and to examine the meanings of events leading to and implicated in the recovery from suicidal behaviour. The research confirms sexual abuse as a common precursor to suicidal behaviour; several women asserted that they would not have attempted suicide if they did not have a sexual abuse history. The women noted that the effects of sexual abuse were exacerbated by problems with disclosure, linking to issues of control, with implications for intervention and recovery. PMID:16702144

  17. REDUCING UNCERTAINTY IN RISK ASSESSMENT USING MECHANISTIC DATA: ENHANCING THE U.S. EPA DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY TESTING GUIDELINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUMMARY: Mechanistic data should provide the Agency with a more accurate basis to estimate risk than do the Agency’s default assumptions (10x uncertainty factors, etc.), thereby improving risk assessment decisions. NTD is providing mechanistic data for toxicant effects on two maj...

  18. Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Suicidal Behaviour: Exacerbating Factors and Implications for Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Cate

    2006-01-01

    Suicidal behaviour is a cause for concern among many western countries; in general, it is most common among young women. This research used qualitative methods to explore the narratives of 24 women, to contextualise their insights, and to examine the meanings of events leading to and implicated in the recovery from suicidal behaviour. The research…

  19. The Anthropological Implications of Sex Role Differences: Class and Ethnic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jerome W.

    The implications of physical and biological sex differences on sex role behavior cannot be understood without analyzing the complementary role of the sociocultural meaning of sex roles. The normative aspect of gender role behavior is fluid and can be affected by culture, class, and ethnicity. All societies recognize differences between the sexes.…

  20. Combustion aerosols: factors governing their size and composition and implications to human health.

    PubMed

    Lighty, J S; Veranth, J M; Sarofim, A F

    2000-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions from stationary combustion sources burning coal, fuel oil, biomass, and waste, and PM from internal combustion (IC) engines burning gasoline and diesel, are a significant source of primary particles smaller than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) in urban areas. Combustion-generated particles are generally smaller than geologically produced dust and have unique chemical composition and morphology. The fundamental processes affecting formation of combustion PM and the emission characteristics of important applications are reviewed. Particles containing transition metals, ultrafine particles, and soot are emphasized because these types of particles have been studied extensively, and their emissions are controlled by the fuel composition and the oxidant-temperature-mixing history from the flame to the stack. There is a need for better integration of the combustion, air pollution control, atmospheric chemistry, and inhalation health research communities. Epidemiology has demonstrated that susceptible individuals are being harmed by ambient PM. Particle surface area, number of ultrafine particles, bioavailable transition metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and other particle-bound organic compounds are suspected to be more important than particle mass in determining the effects of air pollution. Time- and size-resolved PM measurements are needed for testing mechanistic toxicological hypotheses, for characterizing the relationship between combustion operating conditions and transient emissions, and for source apportionment studies to develop air quality plans. Citations are provided to more specialized reviews, and the concluding comments make suggestions for further research. PMID:11055157

  1. Black tea polyphenols: a mechanistic treatise.

    PubMed

    Butt, M S; Imran, A; Sharif, M K; Ahmad, Rabia Shabir; Xiao, Hang; Imran, M; Rsool, H A

    2014-01-01

    Dietary interventions are among the emerging trends to curtail physiological malfunctioning like cancer, diabetes, cardiac complications, etc. The essence of phytonutrients has developed the concept of nutraceuticals at the junction of diet health linkages. In this context, theaflavin & thearubigins are the oxidized derivatives of black tea catechins during fermentation having nutraceutical potential owing to esterification of hydroxyl ring with digallate esters. Theaflavin may influence activation of transcription factors such as NFnB or AP-1 that ultimately hinder the formation of nitric oxide expression gene. Likewise, black tea contains a unique amino acid theanine acts as neurotransmitter owing to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Moreover, it boasts immunity by enhancing the disease-fighting ability of gamma delta T cells. Theaflavin & thearubigins act as safeguard against oxidative stress thereby effective in the cardiac functioning. The mechanistic approach of these antioxidants is likely to be associated with inhibition of redox sensitive transcription factors & pro-oxidant enzymes such as xanthine oxidase or nitric oxide synthase. However, their involvement in antioxidative enzyme induction as in glutathione-S-transferases is also well documented. They act as curative agent against numerous pathological disorders by disrupting the electron chain thus inhibiting the progression of certain ailments. Black tea polyphenols established themselves as strong antioxidants due to their standard one-electron potential, and their vitality is dependent on the concentration of polyphenols and pH for their inclusive execution. Present review is an attempt to enrich the readers regarding the health promoting aspects of black tea polyphenols. Concomitantly, it needs core attention of researchers for the exploitations of black tea flavanols as an important dietary constituent for the vulnerable segment. PMID:24499118

  2. A Mechanistic Proof-of-concept Clinical Trial With JX-594, a Targeted Multi-mechanistic Oncolytic Poxvirus, in Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tae-Ho; Moon, Anne; Burke, James; Ribas, Antoni; Stephenson, Joe; Breitbach, Caroline J; Daneshmand, Manijeh; De Silva, Naomi; Parato, Kelley; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Lee, Yeon-Sook; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Bell, John C; Kirn, David H

    2011-01-01

    JX-594 is a targeted and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing oncolytic poxvirus designed to selectively replicate in and destroy cancer cells through viral oncolysis and tumor-specific immunity. In order to study the mechanisms-of-action (MOA) of JX-594 in humans, a mechanistic proof-of-concept clinical trial was performed at a low dose equivalent to ≤10% of the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) in other clinical trials. Ten patients with previously treated stage IV melanoma were enrolled. Tumors were injected weekly for up to nine total treatments. Blood samples and tumor biopsies were analyzed for evidence of transgene activity, virus replication, and immune stimulation. The β-galactosidase (β-gal) transgene was expressed in all patients as evidenced by antibody induction. Six patients had significant induction of GM-CSF-responsive white blood cell (WBC) subsets such as neutrophils (25–300% increase). JX-594 replication and subsequent shedding into blood was detectable in five patients after cycles 1–9. Tumor biopsies demonstrated JX-594 replication, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, and diffuse tumor necrosis. Mild flu-like symptoms were the most common adverse events. In sum, JX-594 replication, oncolysis, and expression of both transgenes were demonstrated; replication was still evident after multiple cycles. These findings have implications for further clinical development of JX-594 and other transgene-armed oncolytic viruses. PMID:21772252

  3. PCDD/F TEQ INDICATORS AND THEIR MECHANISTIC IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous research studies have been conducted to establish indicator compounds for fast and less costly prediction of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) toxix equivalent (TEQ) concentrations. Chlorobenzene has been suggested as one potential PCDD/F TEQ predi...

  4. PCDD/F TEQ INDICATORS AND THEIR MECHANISTIC IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stack gas samples from two incinerator facilities with different operating conditions were investigated to find polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin/furan (PCDD/F) toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) indicators from amongst the 210 PCDD/F isomers. Similarities in isomer patterns were als...

  5. Rotation Criteria and Hypothesis Testing for Exploratory Factor Analysis: Implications for Factor Pattern Loadings and Interfactor Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Thomas A.; Sass, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) has long been used in the social sciences to depict the relationships between variables/items and latent traits. Researchers face many choices when using EFA, including the choice of rotation criterion, which can be difficult given that few research articles have discussed and/or demonstrated their differences.…

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor is upregulated by l-dopa in the parkinsonian brain: implications for the development of dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Francardo, Veronica; Lindgren, Hanna S.; Sillivan, Stephanie E.; O’Sullivan, Sean S.; Luksik, Andrew S.; Vassoler, Fair M.; Lees, Andrew J.; Konradi, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis and increased permeability of the blood–brain barrier have been reported to occur in animal models of Parkinson’s disease and l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, but the significance of these phenomena has remained unclear. Using a validated rat model of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia, this study demonstrates that chronic treatment with l-dopa dose dependently induces the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the basal ganglia nuclei. Vascular endothelial growth factor was abundantly expressed in astrocytes and astrocytic processes in the proximity of blood vessels. When co-administered with l-dopa, a small molecule inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor signalling significantly attenuated the development of dyskinesia and completely blocked the angiogenic response and associated increase in blood–brain barrier permeability induced by the treatment. The occurrence of angiogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor upregulation was verified in post-mortem basal ganglia tissue from patients with Parkinson’s disease with a history of dyskinesia, who exhibited increased microvascular density, microvascular nestin expression and an upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor messenger ribonucleic acid. These congruent findings in the rat model and human patients indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor is implicated in the pathophysiology of l-dopa-induced dyskinesia and emphasize an involvement of the microvascular compartment in the adverse effects of l-dopa pharmacotherapy in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:21771855

  7. Dosage Effects of Cohesin Regulatory Factor PDS5 on Mammalian Development: Implications for Cohesinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Chang, Jufang; Fu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Kashyap, Rakesh; Salavaggione, Ezequiel; Jain, Sanjay; Shashikant, Kulkarni; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Uzielli, Maria L. Giovannucci; Dorsett, Dale; Beebe, David C.; Jay, Patrick Y.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.; Krantz, Ian; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B). Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B−/− mice. While Pds5A−/− and Pds5B−/− mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A−/− or Pds5B−/− mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q) in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS. PMID:19412548

  8. Dosage effects of cohesin regulatory factor PDS5 on mammalian development: implications for cohesinopathies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chang, Jufang; Fu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Kashyap, Rakesh; Salavaggione, Ezequiel; Jain, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shashikant, Kulkarni; Deardorff, Matthew A; Uzielli, Maria L Giovannucci; Dorsett, Dale; Beebe, David C; Jay, Patrick Y; Heuckeroth, Robert O; Krantz, Ian; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B). Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B(-/-) mice. While Pds5A(-/-) and Pds5B(-/-) mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A(-/-) or Pds5B(-/-) mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q) in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS. PMID:19412548

  9. Targeting transcription factors by small compounds-Current strategies and future implications.

    PubMed

    Hagenbuchner, Judith; Ausserlechner, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Transcription factors are central regulators of gene expression and critically steer development, differentiation and death. Except for ligand-activated nuclear receptors, direct modulation of transcription factor function by small molecules is still widely regarded as "impossible". This "un-druggability" of non-ligand transcription factors is due to the fact that the interacting surface between transcription factor and DNA is huge and subject to significant changes during DNA-binding. Besides some "success studies" with compounds that directly interfere with DNA binding, drug targeting approaches mostly address protein-protein interfaces with essential co-factors, transcription factor dimerization partners, chaperone proteins or proteins that regulate subcellular shuttling. An alternative strategy represent DNA-intercalating, alkylating or DNA-groove-binding compounds that either block transcription factor-binding or change the 3D-conformation of the consensus DNA-strand. Recently, much interest has been focused on chromatin reader proteins that steer the recruitment and activity of transcription factors to a gene transcription start site. Several small compounds demonstrate that these epigenetic reader proteins are exciting new drug targets for inhibiting lineage-specific transcription in cancer therapy. In this research update we will discuss recent advances in targeting transcription factors with small compounds, the challenges that are related to the complex function and regulation of these proteins and also the possible future directions and applications of transcription factor drug targeting. PMID:26686579

  10. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  11. Identifying personality subtypes based on the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners: implications for psychopathy and criminal offending.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Tavernier, Geert; Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Smith, Sarah Francis; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to identify personality subtypes on the basis of the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners. Participants included 110 Flemish male prisoners assessed by means of the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness Five Factor Inventory and different symptom, personality, and coping measures. We found two clusters: an emotionally stable/resilient cluster and an aggressive/undercontrolled cluster. Prisoners within the aggressive/undercontrolled cluster scored significantly higher on almost all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 basic scales, (in)direct aggression measures, and depressive coping scales compared with resilients. They also scored higher on drug abuse and committed more sexual offenses than resilient prisoners. These two personality subtypes bear theoretically and practically important implications for psychopathy subtypes and different pathways to criminal offenses. PMID:23123385

  12. Contextual approach to technology assessment: Implications for one-factor fix solutions to complex social problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    The contextual approach is discussed which undertakes to demonstrate that technology assessment assists in the identification of the full range of implications of taking a particular action and facilitates the consideration of alternative means by which the total affected social problem context might be changed by available project options. It is found that the social impacts of an application on participants, institutions, processes, and social interests, and the accompanying interactions may not only induce modifications in the problem contest delineated for examination with respect to the design, operations, regulation, and use of the posited application, but also affect related social problem contexts.

  13. Impact of Health-Related Family Factors on School Enrollment in Bolivia: Implications for Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Dearden, Kirk; Heaton, Tim; Forste, Renata

    2005-01-01

    This study identified the extent to which family factors increase school enrollment in Bolivia, after adjusting for human and financial capital. The sample was drawn from the 1998 Demographic and Health Survey. Logistic regression models were used to determine the effect of human capital, financial capital and family factors on school enrollment.…

  14. Wellness Factors as Predictors of Alcohol Use among Undergraduates: Implications for Prevention and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Todd F.; Myers, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    A pilot study examining holistic wellness factors and drinking behaviors among undergraduate students revealed several significant relationships. Two second-order wellness factors of the Indivisible Self model of wellness--Coping Self and Essential Self--were negatively associated with both alcohol use intensity and drinking consequences.…

  15. Hand factors as regulators of cardiac morphogenesis and implications for congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Vincentz, Joshua W.; Barnes, Ralston M.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2011-01-01

    Almost 15 years of careful study have established the related bHLH transcription factors Hand1 and Hand2 as critical for heart development across evolution. Hand factors make broad contributions, revealed through animal models, to the development of multiple cellular lineages that ultimately contribute to the heart. They perform critical roles in ventricular cardiomyocyte growth, differentiation, morphogenesis, and conduction. They are also important for the proper development of the cardiac outflow tract, epicardium, and endocardium. Molecularly, they function both through DNA-binding and through protein-protein interactions, which are regulated transcriptionally, post-transcriptionally by microRNAs, and post-translationally through phospho-regulation, Although direct Hand factor transcriptional targets are progressively being identified, confirmed direct targets of Hand factor transcriptional activity in the heart are limited. Identification of these targets will be critical to model the mechanisms by which Hand factor bHLH interactions affect developmental pathways. Improved understanding of Hand factor-mediated transcriptional cascades will be necessary to determine how Hand factor disregulation translates to human disease phenotypes. The following review summarizes the insight animal models have provided into the regulation and function of these factors during heart development, and the recent findings that suggest roles for HAND1 and HAND2 in human congenital heart disease. PMID:21462297

  16. Analysis of Factors and Implications Influencing Leadership Ascension of Female Athletic Directors in Intercollegiate Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, Rolanda C.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative analysis/life story study was designed to understand the factors influencing the career trajectory of female athletic directors in National Collegiate Athletic Association affiliated institutions and to discover how those factors functioned as a road map for future female administrators. Both social role and role congruity theories…

  17. Dipole-field sums and Lorentz factors for orthorhombic lattices, and implications for polarizable molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.; Taylor, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A method for computing the Lorentz tensor components in single crystals via rapidly convergent sums of Bessels functions is developed using the relationship between dipole-field sums and the tensor components. The Lorentz factors for simple, body-centered, and base-centered orthorhombic lattices are computed using this method, and the derivative Lorentz factors for simple orthorhombic lattices are also determined. Both the Lorentz factors and their derivatives are shown to be very sensitive to a lattice structure. The equivalent of the Clausius-Mossotti relation for general orthorhombic lattices is derived using the Lorentz-factor formalism, and the permanent molecular dipole moment is related to crystal polarization for the case of a ferroelectric of polarizable point dipoles. It is concluded that the polarization enhancement due to self-polarization familiar from classical theory may actually be a reduction in consequences of negative Lorentz factors in one or two lattice directions for noncubic crystals.

  18. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L.; Tomas, Juan M.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  19. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  20. Growth factor modulation of fibroblast proliferation, differentiation, and invasion: implications for tissue valve engineering.

    PubMed

    Narine, Kishan; De Wever, Olivier; Van Valckenborgh, Dillis; Francois, Katrien; Bracke, Marc; DeSmet, Stefaan; Mareel, Marc; Van Nooten, Guido

    2006-10-01

    We have previously shown that transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) stimulates transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into smooth muscle alpha-actin (alpha-SMA) positive myofibroblasts. However, TGF-beta, as such, is unsuitable for effective population of a heart valve matrix, because it dose-dependently inhibits growth of fibroblasts. The aim of this study was to investigate combinations of other growth factors with TGF-beta to stimulate the proliferation of suitably differentiated cells and to enhance their invasion into aortic valve matrices. Human dermal mesenchymal cells (hDMC1.1) were treated with combinations of growth factors to stimulate these cells to trans-differentiate into myofibroblasts, to proliferate, and to invade. Growth factors were chosen after expression of their respective receptors was confirmed in hDMC1.1 using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We combined TGF-beta with several growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1, IGF-2), epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AA, PDGF-BB, and PDGFAB). Nuclear Ki67 staining, MTT assay, and cell counting revealed that only EGF and bFGF were capable of overcoming TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition. However, bFGF but not EGF inhibited TGF-beta-induced alpha-SMA expression, as evidenced by immuno-cytochemistry and Western blotting. A growth factor cocktail (TGF-beta, EGF, bFGF) has been established that maintains TGF-beta-induced trans-differentiation but overcomes TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition while stimulating fibroblast proliferation and invasion. PMID:17518640

  1. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  2. Implications of Risk Factors for Alzheimer’s Disease in Canada’s Indigenous Population

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Julia Petrasek; Barnes, Deborah E.; Middleton, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Indigenous peoples in Canada have higher prevalence of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The relative importance of these risk factors on AD risk management is poorly understood. Methods Relative risks from literature and prevalence of risk factors from Statistics Canada or the First Nations Regional Health Survey were used to determine projected population attributable risk (PAR) associated with modifiable risk factors for AD (low education and vascular risk factors) among on- and off-reserve Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada using the Levin formula. Results Physical inactivity had the highest PAR for AD among Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada (32.5% [10.1%–51.1%] and 30.5% [9.2%–48.8%] respectively). The PAR for most modifiable risk factors was higher among Indigenous peoples in Canada, particularly among on-reserve groups. The greatest differences in PAR were for low educational attainment and smoking, which were approximately 10% higher among Indigenous peoples in Canada. The combined PAR for AD for all six modifiable risk factors was 79.6% among on-reserve Indigenous, 74.9% among off-reserve Indigenous, and 67.1% among non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. (All differences significant to p < .001.) Conclusions Modifiable risk factors are responsible for the most AD cases among Indigenous peoples in Canada. Further research is necessary to determine the prevalence of AD and the impact of risk factor modification among Indigenous peoples in Canada. PMID:26495049

  3. Dynamics, mechanisms, and functional implications of transcription factor binding evolution in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Transcription factor binding differences can contribute to organismal evolution by altering downstream gene expression programmes. Recent genome-wide studies in Drosophila and mammals have revealed common quantitative and combinatorial properties of in vivo DNA-binding, as well as significant differences in the rate and mechanisms of metazoan transcription factor binding evolution. Here, we review the recently-discovered, rapid re-wiring of in vivo transcription factor binding between related metazoan species and summarize general principles underlying the observed patterns of evolution. We then consider what might explain genome evolution differences between metazoan phyla, and outline the conceptual and technological challenges facing the field. PMID:24590227

  4. Analytic model for academic research productivity having factors, interactions and implications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Financial support is dear in academia and will tighten further. How can the research mission be accomplished within new restraints? A model is presented for evaluating source components of academic research productivity. It comprises six factors: funding; investigator quality; efficiency of the research institution; the research mix of novelty, incremental advancement, and confirmatory studies; analytic accuracy; and passion. Their interactions produce output and patterned influences between factors. Strategies for optimizing output are enabled. PMID:22130145

  5. Factor Analysis Demonstrates a Common Schizoidal Phenotype within Autistic and Schizotypal Tendency: Implications for Neuroscientific Studies.

    PubMed

    Ford, Talitha C; Crewther, David P

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and cognitive dysfunction, particularly social and communication impairments, are shared between autism and schizophrenia spectrum disorders, while evidence for a diametric autism-positive schizophrenia symptom profile is inconsistent. We investigated the shared phenotype at a personality trait level, particularly its resemblance to schizoid personality disorder, as well as differential aspects of the autism-schizophrenia model. Items of the autism spectrum quotient (AQ) and schizotypal personality questionnaire (SPQ) were pseudo-randomly combined, and were completed by 449 (162 male, 287 female) non-clinical participants aged 18-40. A factor analysis revealed three factors; the first represented a shared social disorganization phenotype, the second reflected perceptual oddities specific to schizotypy while the third reflected social rigidity specific to autism. The AQ and SPQ were strongly correlated with Factor 1 (AQ: r = 0.75, p < 0.001; SPQ: r = 0.96, p < 0.001), SPQ score was correlated with Factor 2 (r = 0.51, p < 0.001), particularly in cognitive-perceptual features (r = 0.66, p < 0.001), and AQ score was strongly correlated with Factor 3 (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). Furthermore, there was no relationship between Factor 1 and Factor 2. Thus, there is robust evidence for a shared social disorganization phenotype in autistic and schizotypal tendency, which reflects the schizoid phenotype. Discriminating and independent dimensions of schizotypal and autistic tendency exist in Factors 2 and 3, respectively. Current diagnostic protocols could result in different diagnoses depending on the instrument used, suggesting the need for neuromarkers that objectively differentiate autistic and schizotypal traits and resolve the question of commonality versus co-morbidity. PMID:25221527

  6. Risk for anxiety and implications for treatment: developmental, environmental, and genetic factors governing fear regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Catherine A.; Casey, BJ

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common of the psychiatric disorders affecting as many as 10% of youth, with a peak during adolescence. A core component of these disorders is an unremitting fear in the absence of present threat. One of the most commonly used therapies to treat these disorders is exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy that identifies the source of the fear and anxiety and then desensitizes the individual to it. This treatment builds on basic principles of fear extinction learning. A number of patients improve with this therapy, but 40–50% do not. This paper provides an overview of recent empirical studies employing both human imaging and cross-species behavioral genetics to examine how fear regulation varies across individuals and across development, especially during adolescence. These studies have important implications for understanding who may be at risk for anxiety disorders and for whom and when during development exposure-based therapies may be most effective. PMID:24147742

  7. CREB in the Pathophysiology of Cancer: Implications for Targeting Transcription Factors for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kathleen M.; Frank, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of the pattern of gene expression in a cell and directly control central processes such as proliferation, survival, self-renewal, and invasion. Given this critical role, the function of transcription factors is normally regulated closely, often through transient phosphorylation. Although transcription factors are not often directly modified by mutations in cancer cells, they frequently become activated constitutively through mutations affecting “upstream” pathways. By continually driving the expression of key target genes, these oncogenic transcription factors play a central role in tumor pathogenesis. One such transcription factor is the cAMP-regulatory element-binding protein (CREB), which can be activated through phosphorylation by a number of kinases, including Akt, p90Rsk, protein kinase A, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases and regulates genes whose deregulated expression promotes oncogenesis, including cyclins, Bcl-2 family members, and Egr-1. CREB is overexpressed and constitutively phosphorylated in a number of forms of human cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and non – small cell lung cancer, and appears to play a direct role in disease pathogenesis and prognosis. Although transcription factors have not been a central focus of drug development, recent advances suggest that CREB and other such proteins may be worthwhile targets for cancer therapy. PMID:19351775

  8. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  9. Development and Predictive Effects of Eating Disorder Risk Factors during Adolescence: Implications for Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Marti, C. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although several prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating disorders, little is known about when these risk factors emerge and escalate, or when they begin to predict future eating disorder onset. The objective of this report was to address these key research gaps. Method Data were examined from a prospective study of 496 community female adolescents (M = 13.5, SD = 0.7 at baseline) who completed eight annual assessments of potential risk factors and eating disorders from preadolescence to young adulthood. Results Three variables exhibited positive linear increases: Perceived pressure to be thin, thin-ideal internalization and body dissatisfaction; three were best characterized as quadratic effects: dieting (essentially little change); negative affectivity (overall decrease), and BMI (overall increase). Elevated body dissatisfaction at ages 13, 14, 15, and 16 predicted DSM-5 eating disorders onset in the 4 year period after each assessment, but the predictive effects of other risk factors were largely confined to age 14; BMI did not predict eating disorders at any age. Discussion The results imply that these risk factors are present by early adolescence, though eating disorders tend to emerge in late adolescence and early adulthood. These findings emphasize the need for efficacious eating disorder prevention programs for early adolescent girls, perhaps targeting 14 year olds, when risk factors appear to be most predictive. In early adolescence, it might be fruitful to target girls with body dissatisfaction, as this was the most consistent predictor of early eating disorder onset in this study. PMID:24599841

  10. Mechanistic species distribution modelling as a link between physiology and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tyler G.; Diamond, Sarah E.; Kelly, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change conservation planning relies heavily on correlative species distribution models that estimate future areas of occupancy based on environmental conditions encountered in present-day ranges. The approach benefits from rapid assessment of vulnerability over a large number of organisms, but can have poor predictive power when transposed to novel environments and reveals little in the way of causal mechanisms that define changes in species distribution or abundance. Having conservation planning rely largely on this single approach also increases the risk of policy failure. Mechanistic models that are parameterized with physiological information are expected to be more robust when extrapolating distributions to future environmental conditions and can identify physiological processes that set range boundaries. Implementation of mechanistic species distribution models requires knowledge of how environmental change influences physiological performance, and because this information is currently restricted to a comparatively small number of well-studied organisms, use of mechanistic modelling in the context of climate change conservation is limited. In this review, we propose that the need to develop mechanistic models that incorporate physiological data presents an opportunity for physiologists to contribute more directly to climate change conservation and advance the field of conservation physiology. We begin by describing the prevalence of species distribution modelling in climate change conservation, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of both mechanistic and correlative approaches. Next, we emphasize the need to expand mechanistic models and discuss potential metrics of physiological performance suitable for integration into mechanistic models. We conclude by summarizing other factors, such as the need to consider demography, limiting broader application of mechanistic models in climate change conservation. Ideally, modellers, physiologists and

  11. Mechanistic species distribution modelling as a link between physiology and conservation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler G; Diamond, Sarah E; Kelly, Morgan W

    2015-01-01

    Climate change conservation planning relies heavily on correlative species distribution models that estimate future areas of occupancy based on environmental conditions encountered in present-day ranges. The approach benefits from rapid assessment of vulnerability over a large number of organisms, but can have poor predictive power when transposed to novel environments and reveals little in the way of causal mechanisms that define changes in species distribution or abundance. Having conservation planning rely largely on this single approach also increases the risk of policy failure. Mechanistic models that are parameterized with physiological information are expected to be more robust when extrapolating distributions to future environmental conditions and can identify physiological processes that set range boundaries. Implementation of mechanistic species distribution models requires knowledge of how environmental change influences physiological performance, and because this information is currently restricted to a comparatively small number of well-studied organisms, use of mechanistic modelling in the context of climate change conservation is limited. In this review, we propose that the need to develop mechanistic models that incorporate physiological data presents an opportunity for physiologists to contribute more directly to climate change conservation and advance the field of conservation physiology. We begin by describing the prevalence of species distribution modelling in climate change conservation, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of both mechanistic and correlative approaches. Next, we emphasize the need to expand mechanistic models and discuss potential metrics of physiological performance suitable for integration into mechanistic models. We conclude by summarizing other factors, such as the need to consider demography, limiting broader application of mechanistic models in climate change conservation. Ideally, modellers, physiologists and

  12. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects.

    PubMed

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2015-11-22

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg(-1)) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes. PMID:26609084

  13. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  14. Memory factors in Rey AVLT: Implications for early staging of cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Fernaeus, Sven-Erik; Ostberg, Per; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Hellström, Ake

    2014-12-01

    Supraspan verbal list learning is widely used to assess dementia and related cognitive disorders where declarative memory deficits are a major clinical sign. While the overall learning rate is important for diagnosis, serial position patterns may give insight into more specific memory processes in patients with cognitive impairment. This study explored these patterns in a memory clinic clientele. One hundred eighty three participants took the Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). The major groups were patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VD), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and Subjective Cognitive Impairment (SCI) as well as healthy controls (HC). Raw scores for the five trials and five serial partitions were factor analysed. Three memory factors were found and interpreted as Primacy, Recency, and Resistance to Interference. AD and MCI patients had impaired scores in all factors. SCI patients were significantly impaired in the Resistance to Interference factor, and in the Recency factor at the first trial. The main conclusion is that serial position data from word list testing reflect specific memory capacities which vary with levels of cognitive impairment. PMID:25112600

  15. Subsite specificity of anthrax lethal factor and its implications for inhibitor development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Terzyan, Simon; Tang, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    The lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis is a major factor for lethality of anthrax infection by this bacterium. With the aid of the protective antigen, lethal factor gains excess to the cell cytosol where it manifests toxicity as a metalloprotease. For better understanding of its specificity, we have determined its residue preferences of nineteen amino acids in six subsites (from P3 to P3’) as relative kcat/Km values (specificity constants). These results showed that lethal factor has a broad specificity with preference toward hydrophobic residues, but not charged or branched residues. The most preferred residues in these six subsites are, from P1 to P3’, Trp, Leu, Met, Tyr, Pro, and Leu. The result of residue preference was used to design new substrates with superior hydrolytic characteristics and inhibitors with high potency. For better use of the new findings for inhibitor design, we have modeled the most preferred residues in the active site of lethal factor. The observed interactions provide new insights to future inhibitor designs. PMID:21396916

  16. Hepatic Leukemia Factor Promotes Resistance To Cell Death: Implications For Therapeutics and Chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation.

  17. BioAge: Toward A Multi-Determined, Mechanistic Account of Cognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, Correne A.; Tuokko, Holly A.; Williams, Dorothy; Dixon, Roger A.; MacDonald, Stuart W.S.

    2014-01-01

    The search for reliable early indicators of age-related cognitive decline represents a critical avenue for progress in aging research. Chronological age is a commonly used developmental index; however, it offers little insight into the mechanisms underlying cognitive decline. In contrast, biological age (BioAge), reflecting the vitality of essential biological systems, represents a promising operationalization of developmental time. Current BioAge models have successfully predicted age-related cognitive deficits. Research on aging-related cognitive function indicates that the interaction of multiple risk and protective factors across the human lifespan confers individual risk for late-life cognitive decline, implicating a multi-causal explanation. In this review, we explore current BioAge models, describe three broad yet pathologically relevant biological processes linked to cognitive decline, and propose a novel operationalization of BioAge accounting for both moderating and causal mechanisms of cognitive decline and dementia. We argue that a multivariate and mechanistic BioAge approach will lead to a greater understanding of disease pathology as well as more accurate prediction and early identification of late-life cognitive decline. PMID:25278166

  18. Factors that influence physical activity for pregnant and postpartum women and implications for primary care.

    PubMed

    Doran, Frances; Davis, Kierrynn

    2011-01-01

    Many pregnant women and women of child-bearing age do not engage in the recommended levels of physical activity despite the well known benefits. Pregnancy and the postpartum period can be a time when inactivity actually increases. Women who experience gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during their pregnancy are often advised to become more active in order to ameliorate their increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Health professionals have an influential role in promoting physical activity, which would be enhanced with an understanding of the factors that positively and negatively influence women's participation in physical activity during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. This research sought to explore these factors with pregnant and postpartum women including those who had experienced GDM and the attention given to physical activity during pregnancy. A survey was developed after a critical review of factors identified from previous studies. Women were recruited from the antenatal clinic, community health centres and the local media. Results from 72 women are reported from a predominately well educated, Caucasian population. Overall, the results were confirmatory of factors previously identified. Lack of child care, time constraints, no time and feeling unwell during pregnancy hindered activity and factors that facilitated activity included family support, enjoyment of activity and to prevent later health problems. It was also found that non-GDM women are given minimal advice about exercise during pregnancy. A checklist has been developed for health professionals, in partnership with women, to direct attention to the factors that enable and hinder participation in physical activity during and after pregnancy. PMID:21616029

  19. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  20. Mammalian dwarfins are phosphorylated in response to transforming growth factor beta and are implicated in control of cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Yingling, J M; Das, P; Savage, C; Zhang, M; Padgett, R W; Wang, X F

    1996-01-01

    The dwarfin protein family has been genetically implicated in transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-like signaling pathways in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. To investigate the role of these proteins in mammalian signaling pathways, we have isolated and studied two murine dwarfins, dwarfin-A and dwarfin-C. Using antibodies against dwarfin-A and dwarfin-C, we show that these two dwarfins and an immunogenically related protein, presumably also a dwarfin, are phosphorylated in a time- and dose-dependent manner in response to TGF-beta. Bone morphogenetic protein 2, a TGF-beta superfamily ligand, induces phosphorylation of only the related dwarfin protein. Thus, TGF-beta superfamily members may use overlapping yet distinct dwarfins to mediate their intracellular signals. Furthermore, transient overexpression of either dwarfin-A or dwarfin-C causes growth arrest, implicating the dwarfins in growth regulation. This work provides strong biochemical and preliminary functional evidence that dwarfin-A and dwarfin-C represent prototypic members of a family of mammalian proteins that may serve as mediators of signaling pathways for TGF-beta superfamily members. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8799132

  1. Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic, and Treatment Parallels

    PubMed Central

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A.; Shaikh, Amir Y.; Ahmed, Mohamed; McManus, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition and the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in ambulatory and hospital practice. Several clinical risk factors for AF include age, sex, valvular heart disease, obesity, sleep apnea, heart failure, and hypertension (HTN). Of all the risk factors, HTN is the most commonly encountered condition in patients with incident AF. Hypertension is associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of developing new-onset AF and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of progression to permanent AF. Hypertension predisposes to cardiac structural changes that influence the development of AF such as atrial remodeling. The renin angiotensin aldosterone system has been demonstrated to be a common mechanistic link in the pathogenesis of HTN and AF. Importantly, HTN is one of the few modifiable AF risk factors, and guideline-directed management of HTN may reduce the incidence of AF. PMID:27057292

  2. Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic, and Treatment Parallels.

    PubMed

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A; Shaikh, Amir Y; Ahmed, Mohamed; McManus, David D

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition and the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in ambulatory and hospital practice. Several clinical risk factors for AF include age, sex, valvular heart disease, obesity, sleep apnea, heart failure, and hypertension (HTN). Of all the risk factors, HTN is the most commonly encountered condition in patients with incident AF. Hypertension is associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of developing new-onset AF and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of progression to permanent AF. Hypertension predisposes to cardiac structural changes that influence the development of AF such as atrial remodeling. The renin angiotensin aldosterone system has been demonstrated to be a common mechanistic link in the pathogenesis of HTN and AF. Importantly, HTN is one of the few modifiable AF risk factors, and guideline-directed management of HTN may reduce the incidence of AF. PMID:27057292

  3. Factors Influencing Self-Esteem among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness: Implications for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, Sang Kyoung; Mowbray, Carol

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed factors affecting self-esteem among individuals with severe mental illness to identify effective targets for social work interventions. Data were obtained from 290 individuals with psychiatric disability recruited from community-based psychosocial rehabilitation agencies. Analyses using structural equation modeling revealed…

  4. A Study of Societal Factors Influencing the Growth of Castleton State College: Implications for Future Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest, Robert F.

    Analyzed are certain societal factors--political, demographic, financial, public relations, student profiles, and mission statements as they have influenced the growth of Castleton State College since becoming a member of the Vermont State College system in 1961. Data for the study were gathered from a literature review of one of the daily…

  5. Factors Affecting Faculty Use of Learning Technologies: Implications for Models of Technology Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Tom; Sainter, Phillip; Saunders, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    This study examines factors associated with the use of learning technologies by higher education faculty. In an online survey in a UK university, 114 faculty respondents completed a measure of Internet self-efficacy, and reported on their use of learning technologies along with barriers to their adoption. Principal components analysis suggested…

  6. ANTHRACYCLINE-INDUCED SUPRESSION OF GATA-4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR: IMPLICATION REGULATION OF CARDIAC MYOCYTE APOPTOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthracyclines are effective cancer chemotherapeutic agents but can induce serious cardiotoxicity. Understanding the mechanism of cardiac damage by these agents will help in development of better therapeutic strategies against cancer. The GATA-4 transcription factor is an important regulator of ca...

  7. Implications for risk assessment of host factors causing large pharmacokinetic variations

    SciTech Connect

    Vesell, E.S.

    1985-12-01

    Normal human subjects vary widely in their capacity to eliminate many drugs and environmental chemicals. These variations range in magnitude from fourfold to fortyfold depending on the drug and the population studied. Pharmacogenetics deals with only one of many host factors responsible for these large pharmacokinetic differences. Age, sex, diet and exposure to other drugs and chemicals, including oral contraceptives, ethanol and cigarette smoking, can alter the genetically determined rate at which a particular subject eliminates drugs and environmental chemicals. These elimination rates, therefore, are dynamic and change even in the same subject with time and condition. Regulatory legislation has only recently begun to recognize this very broad spectrum of human susceptibility and the existence of multiple special subgroups of particularly sensitive subjects. In setting standards for environmental chemicals, EPA and NIOSH have attempted to protect the most sensitive humans and should be encouraged to continue this policy. For some drugs and environmental chemicals, the commonly used safety factor of 100 may be too low; for these chemicals large, interindividual pharmacokinetic variations produced by pharmacogenetic and other host factors may make a safety factor of 400 or 500 more adequate.

  8. Contextual Factors Affecting Learning in Laos and the Implications for Information Literacy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Daniel G.; Gorman, G. E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Laos is used as a case study of how factors such as culture and indigenous knowledge must be considered to plan for information literacy education that is culturally and contextually appropriate. Method: Data were obtained from observations during visits to four Lao schools and from interviews with fourteen teachers at these schools.…

  9. Individual and Contextual Factors for Bullying and Peer Victimization: Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivolo, Alana M.; Holt, Melissa K.; Massetti, Greta M.

    2011-01-01

    The Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to preventing youth violence. For the past decade, DVP has supported research on risk and protective factors associated with youth interpersonal violence and the development and evaluation of prevention programs. This commentary addresses…

  10. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Perry, Leslie M.; Pan, Chongle; Lankford, Patricia K.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequence GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.

  11. Survey of piloting factors in V/STOL aircraft with implications for flight control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Craig, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flight control system design factors involved for pilot workload relief are identified. Major contributors to pilot workload include configuration management and control and aircraft stability and response qualities. A digital fly by wire stability augmentation, configuration management, and configuration control system is suggested for reduction of pilot workload during takeoff, hovering, and approach.

  12. Factors Affecting Students' Choice to Enroll at HCC: Implications for Marketing, Recruitment, and Advising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinley, John W.

    A study was conducted to analyze the factors which affect students' decisions to enroll at Harford Community College (HCC), Harford County, Maryland. An entrant follow-up survey was sent in spring 1984 to all students who were enrolled in a Maryland community college for the first time in fall 1982. The survey sought to evaluate the extent to…

  13. Constraints on the form factors for K ---> pi l nu and implications for |V(us)|

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Richard J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    Rigorous bounds are established for the expansion coefficients governing the shape of semileptonic K {yields} {pi} form factors. The constraints enforced by experimental data from {tau} {yields} K{pi}{nu} eliminate uncertainties associated with model parameterizations in the determination of |V{sub us}|. The results support the validity of a powerful expansion that can be applied to other semileptonic transitions.

  14. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Perry, Leslie M.; Pan, Chongle; Lankford, Patricia K.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequencemore » GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.« less

  15. Adolescent Girls' Perceptions of Smoking Risk and Protective Factors: Implications for Message Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curbow, Barbara; Bowie, Janice; Binko, JoAnn; Smith, Stephanie; Dreyling, Erin; McDonnell, Karen A.

    2007-01-01

    Using a snowball technique, in-depth interviews were conducted with 108 girls emanating from seven demographically dissimilar social networks. Girls were asked to classify 58 items as either a risk or protective factor for smoking initiation and then to assign an importance weighting to each. All items except one (worries about her weight) were…

  16. Prognostic clinical factors in pretreated colorectal cancer patients receiving regorafenib: Implications for clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Michela; Giampieri, Riccardo; Loupakis, Fotios; Prochilo, Tiziana; Salvatore, Lisa; Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Bittoni, Alessandro; Aprile, Giuseppe; Zaniboni, Alberto; Falcone, Alfredo; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the impact on survival of angiogenesis and inflammation-related factors, particularly LDH serum levels, platelet, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), in metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving regorafenib monotherapy. Methods LDH serum levels, neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts were collected at the start of regorafenib monotherapy. Cut-off values were calculated by ROC curve analysis. Survival analyses were performed by Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis by Cox method. Results A total of 208 patients were eligible for analysis. Among factors who were related with worse overall survival and who maintained their role at the multivariate analysis, high platelet count (Exp(b):1.4963, 95% CI:1.0130–2.2103, p = 0.0439) and high neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (Exp(b):1.6963, 95% CI:1.0757–2.6751, p = 0.0237) were those who more deeply were related to worse overall survival. High lymphocyte count (Exp(b):0.4527, 95% CI:0.2801–0.7316, p = 0.0013) was correlated with improved overall survival. Conclusions High neutrophil, high platelet, low lymphocyte count and/or high NLR may represent negative prognostic factors in patients receiving regorafenib monotherapy. It is advisable that these factors are taken into account in the design of subsequent trials in colorectal cancer patients receiving this drug. PMID:26334693

  17. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Depression in Urban Adolescent Females: Implications for Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Jewelle Taylor

    Despite an increased interest in adolescent depression from theoretical and clinical perspectives, there have been few attempts to investigate depression in non-clinical populations. To identify demographic, sociocultural, and behavioral factors related to adolescent depression in a non-clinical population of urban adolescent females, a racially…

  18. Factor Structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale: Implications for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karama, Sherif; Amor, Leila Ben; Grizenko, Natalie; Ciampi, Antonio; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Lageix, Philippe; Baron, Chantal; Schwartz, George; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Background: To study the factor structure of the Restricted Academic Situation Scale (RASS), a psychometric tool used to assess behavior in children with ADHD, 117 boys and 21 girls meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV") criteria for ADHD and aged between 6 and 12 years were recruited. Assessments were…

  19. Biofilm formation by Streptococcus agalactiae: influence of environmental conditions and implicated virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Rosini, Roberto; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an important human pathogen that colonizes the urogenital and/or the lower gastro-intestinal tract of up to 40% of healthy women of reproductive age and is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis in the neonates. GBS can also infect the elderly and immuno-compromised adults, and is responsible for mastitis in bovines. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS can form biofilm-like three-dimensional structures that could enhance its ability to colonize and persist in the host. Biofilm formation by GBS has been investigated in vitro and appears tightly controlled by environmental conditions. Several adhesins have been shown to play a role in the formation of GBS biofilm-like structures, among which are the protein components of pili protruding outside the bacterial surface. Remarkably, antibodies directed against pilus proteins can prevent the formation of biofilms. The implications of biofilm formation in the context of GBS asymptomatic colonization and dissemination to cause invasive disease remain to be investigated in detail. PMID:25699242

  20. Implications of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster: Man-Made Hazards, Vulnerability Factors, and Risk to Environmental Health.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Christopher; Sase, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article was to examine the environmental health implications of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster from an all-hazards perspective. The authors performed a literature review that included Japanese and international nuclear guidance and policy, scientific papers, and reports on the Chernobyl and Three Mile Island disasters while also considering all-hazards preparedness rubrics in the U.S. The examination of the literature resulted in the following: a) the authors' "All-Hazards Planning Reference Model" that distinguishes three planning categories-Disaster Trigger Event, Man-Made Hazards, and Vulnerability Factors; b) the generalization of their model to other countries; and c) advocacy for environmental health end fate to be considered in planning phases to minimize risk to environmental health. This article discusses inconsistencies in disaster planning and nomenclature existing in the studied materials and international guidance and proposes new opportunity for developing predisaster risk assessment, risk communication, and prevention capacity building. PMID:26427265

  1. New insight in expression, transport, and secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Implications in brain-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Naoki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Richards, Misty; Nakajima, Shingo; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) attracts increasing attention from both research and clinical fields because of its important functions in the central nervous system. An adequate amount of BDNF is critical to develop and maintain normal neuronal circuits in the brain. Given that loss of BDNF function has been reported in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases, understanding basic properties of BDNF and associated intracellular processes is imperative. In this review, we revisit the gene structure, transcription, translation, transport and secretion mechanisms of BDNF. We also introduce implications of BDNF in several brain-related diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, depression and schizophrenia. PMID:25426265

  2. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator: Dangerous Partners in Tumorigenesis—Implications in Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santibanez, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic factor, with several different roles in health and disease. TGF-β has been postulated as a dual factor in tumor progression, since it represses epithelial tumor development in early stages, whereas it stimulates tumor progression in advanced stages. During tumorigenesis, cancer cells acquire the capacity to migrate and invade surrounding tissues and to metastasize different organs. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system, comprising uPA, the uPA cell surface receptor, and plasminogen-plasmin, is involved in the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix and regulates key cellular events by activating intracellular signal pathways, which together allow cancer cells to survive, thus, enhancing cell malignance during tumor progression. Due to their importance, uPA and its receptor are tightly transcriptionally regulated in normal development, but are deregulated in cancer, when their activity and expression are related to further development of cancer. TGF-β regulates uPA expression in cancer cells, while uPA, by plasminogen activation, may activate the secreted latent TGF-β, thus, producing a pernicious cycle which contributes to the enhancement of tumor progression. Here we review the specific roles and the interplay between TGF-β and uPA system in cancer cells and their implication in skin cancer. PMID:23984088

  3. Host immunity to Bacillus anthracis lethal factor and other immunogens: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Daniel M

    2015-03-01

    Infections of humans with Bacillus anthracis are an issue with respect to the biothreat both to civilians and military personnel, infections of individuals by infected livestock in endemic regions and, recently, infections of intravenous drug users injecting anthrax-contaminated heroin. Existing vaccination regimens are reliant on protective antigen neutralization induced by repeated boosts with the AVA or AVP vaccines. However, there is ongoing interest in updated approaches in light of the intensive booster regime and extent of reactogenicity inherent in the current protocols. Several other immunogens from the B. anthracis proteome have been characterized in recent years, including lethal factor. Lethal factor induces strong CD4 T-cell immunity and encompasses immunodominant epitopes of relevance across diverse HLA polymorphisms. Taken together, recent studies emphasize the potential benefits of vaccines able to confer synergistic immunity to protective antigen and to other immunogens, targeting both B-cell and T-cell repertoires. PMID:25400140

  4. Human factor implications of the Eurocopter AS332L-1 Super Puma cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padfield, R. Randall

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe some of the human factor problems which can occur in the cockpit of a modern civilian helicopter. After examining specific hardware and software problems in the cockpit design of the Eurocopter (Aerospatiale) AS332L-1 Super Puma, the author proposes several principles that can be used to avoid similar human factors problems in the design of future cockpits. These principles relate to the use and function of warning lights, the design of autopilots in two-pilot aircraft, and the labeling of switches and warning lights, specifically with respect to abbreviations and translations from languages other than English. In the final section of the paper, the author describes current trends in society which he suggests should be taken into consideration when designing future aircraft cockpits.

  5. Sleep disturbances in caregivers of persons with dementia: Contributing factors and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    McCurry, Susan M.; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; Teri, Linda; Vitiello, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    Estimates suggest that there are more than 10 million adult caregivers of persons with dementia, two-thirds of who experience some form of sleep disturbance during the course of their caregiving career. Health care professionals are in the best position to detect and address this significant public health problem. Three major contributors to caregiver sleep disturbance are discussed in this paper: 1) the presence of caregiver disrupted sleep routines; 2) caregiver burden and depression; and, 3) the caregiver’s physical health status. Successful treatment of a caregiver’s sleep disturbance requires careful consideration of each of these contributors. We review and analyze the scientific literature concerning the multiple complex factors associated with the development and maintenance of sleep disturbances in caregivers. We provide a clinical vignette that illustrates the interplay of these contributing factors, and close by providing recommendations for clinicians and researchers treating and investigating the development and maintenance of sleep problems in family caregivers. PMID:17287134

  6. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) in Cancers: Overexpression and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Nida; Iqbal, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family having tyrosine kinase activity. Dimerization of the receptor results in the autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues within the cytoplasmic domain of the receptors and initiates a variety of signaling pathways leading to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Amplification or overexpression of HER2 occurs in approximately 15–30% of breast cancers and 10–30% of gastric/gastroesophageal cancers and serves as a prognostic and predictive biomarker. HER2 overexpression has also been seen in other cancers like ovary, endometrium, bladder, lung, colon, and head and neck. The introduction of HER2 directed therapies has dramatically influenced the outcome of patients with HER2 positive breast and gastric/gastroesophageal cancers; however, the results have been proved disappointing in other HER2 overexpressing cancers. This review discusses the role of HER2 in various cancers and therapeutic modalities available targeting HER2. PMID:25276427

  7. Direct calibration in megavoltage photon beams using Monte Carlo conversion factor: validation and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica E; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Harty, Peter D; Oliver, Chris; Webb, David V; Butler, Duncan J

    2015-01-21

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established a method for ionisation chamber calibrations using megavoltage photon reference beams. The new method will reduce the calibration uncertainty compared to a (60)Co calibration combined with the TRS-398 energy correction factor. The calibration method employs a graphite calorimeter and a Monte Carlo (MC) conversion factor to convert the absolute dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water. EGSnrc is used to model the linac head and doses in the calorimeter and water phantom. The linac model is validated by comparing measured and modelled PDDs and profiles. The relative standard uncertainties in the calibration factors at the ARPANSA beam qualities were found to be 0.47% at 6 MV, 0.51% at 10 MV and 0.46% for the 18 MV beam. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 gave results of 0.9965(55), 0.9924(60) and 0.9932(59) for the 6, 10 and 18 MV beams, respectively, with all beams within 1σ of the participant average. The measured kQ values for an NE2571 Farmer chamber were found to be lower than those in TRS-398 but are consistent with published measured and modelled values. Users can expect a shift in the calibration factor at user energies of an NE2571 chamber between 0.4-1.1% across the range of calibration energies compared to the current calibration method. PMID:25565406

  8. Direct calibration in megavoltage photon beams using Monte Carlo conversion factor: validation and clinical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica E.; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Harty, Peter D.; Oliver, Chris; Webb, David V.; Butler, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has established a method for ionisation chamber calibrations using megavoltage photon reference beams. The new method will reduce the calibration uncertainty compared to a 60Co calibration combined with the TRS-398 energy correction factor. The calibration method employs a graphite calorimeter and a Monte Carlo (MC) conversion factor to convert the absolute dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water. EGSnrc is used to model the linac head and doses in the calorimeter and water phantom. The linac model is validated by comparing measured and modelled PDDs and profiles. The relative standard uncertainties in the calibration factors at the ARPANSA beam qualities were found to be 0.47% at 6 MV, 0.51% at 10 MV and 0.46% for the 18 MV beam. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 gave results of 0.9965(55), 0.9924(60) and 0.9932(59) for the 6, 10 and 18 MV beams, respectively, with all beams within 1σ of the participant average. The measured kQ values for an NE2571 Farmer chamber were found to be lower than those in TRS-398 but are consistent with published measured and modelled values. Users can expect a shift in the calibration factor at user energies of an NE2571 chamber between 0.4-1.1% across the range of calibration energies compared to the current calibration method.

  9. Differential Kinetics of Coagulation Factors and Natural Anticoagulants in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis: Potential Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Tischendorf, Michael; Miesbach, Wolfgang; Chattah, Umer; Chattah, Zenab; Maier, Sebastian; Welsch, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Lange, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced liver diseases are associated with profound alterations of the coagulation system increasing the risk not only of bleeding, but also of thromboembolic complications. A recent milestone study has shown that prophylactic anticoagulation in liver cirrhosis patients results in a reduced frequency of hepatic decompensation. Yet, INR measurement, one of the most widely applied tests to assess liver function, only inaccurately predicts the risk of hepatic decompensation related to alterations of the coagulation system. To assess the relationship between selected coagulation factors / natural anticoagulants with INR, MELD score, and hepatic decompensation, we performed the present pilot study. A total number of 92 patients with various stages of liver cirrhosis were included and prospectively followed for at least 6 months. We found that important natural anticoagulants, namely antithrombin and protein C, as well as factor XI (which may also serve as an anticoagulant) decreased earlier and by a larger magnitude than one would expect from classical coagulation test results. The correlation between these factors and INR was only moderate. Importantly, reduced plasma activities of natural anticoagulants but not INR or MELD score were independent predictors of hepatic encephalopathy (P = 0.013 and 0.003 for antithrombin and protein C, respectively). Conclusion In patients with liver cirrhosis plasma activities of several natural anticoagulants are earlier and stronger affected than routine coagulation tests. Reduced activities of natural anticoagulants may be predictive for the development of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27171213

  10. Clinicopathological implications of vascular endothelial growth factor 165b expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma stroma.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Masahiro; Kondo, Seiji; Mukudai, Yoshiki; Kamatani, Takaaki; Akizuki, Ayako; Yaso, Atsushi; Shimane, Toshikazu; Shirota, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most important angiogenic factors. VEGF165b was recently isolated as the anti-angiogenic VEGF splice variant. In the present study, we examined the association between VEGF165b expression and clinicopathological characteristics in order to determine how VEGF165b produced from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) affects the stromal cell biological activity. We examined the relationships between the expressions of both VEGF isoforms in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) and OSCC cell lines (HSC2, 3, 4 and SAS). Our analyses indicated that both the mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF165b in the HSC2 and SAS cells were higher than those in the NHDFs. VEGF165b did not promote cell growth or invasive capabilities, but it induced the cell adhesive capabilities to ECM. Although strong expression of the VEGF165 isoforms in tumor cells of OSCC tissues was observed, there was no significant difference in the VEGF165b expression level among the various degrees of malignancy. OSCC cells secrete VEGF165b into the stroma, and this factor may contribute to the process of anti-angiogenesis by inhibiting gelatinase-expressing cells and activating cell adhesive capabilities to ECM, such as that of fibroblasts surrounding tumor cells. PMID:27221145

  11. Factors associated with uterine endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra in wild canids: implications for fertility.

    PubMed

    Asa, Cheryl S; Bauman, Karen L; Devery, Sarah; Zordan, Martín; Camilo, Gerardo R; Boutelle, Sally; Moresco, Anneke

    2014-01-01

    The ability to safely and effectively manage reproduction is central to the success of AZA captive-breeding programs. Although the AZA Wildlife Contraception Center routinely monitors contraceptive safety, there have been no studies that compare the effects of contraceptive use to separation of males from females, the other option for preventing reproduction. We used retrospective medical records and pathology reports submitted by AZA and related facilities for the seven AZA-managed canid species to assess rates of uterine pathology relative to female reproductive life histories. Our results showed that the prevalence of both pyometra and endometrial hyperplasia (EH) was associated not only with treatment with the two most common contraceptives (Suprelorin® and MGA implants) but also with the number of years barren (i.e., not producing a litter and not contracepted). Rates of pyometra and EH were especially high in African painted dogs and red wolves, but lowest in swift and fennec foxes. The number of years producing a litter had a low association, suggesting it could be protective against uterine pathology. A more recently developed Suprelorin® protocol using Ovaban® to prevent the initial stimulation phase, followed by implant removal when reversal is desired, may be a safer contraceptive option. These results concerning the relationship between reproductive management and uterine health have important implications for AZA-managed programs, since the unsustainability of many captive populations may be due at least in part to infertility. Managing a female's reproductive lifespan to optimize or maintain fertility will require a reconsideration of how breeding recommendations are formulated. PMID:23553688

  12. Different Factors Affecting Human ANP Amyloid Aggregation and Their Implications in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Millucci, Lia; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Laschi, Marcella; Consumi, Marco; Spreafico, Adriano; Tanganelli, Piero; Lupetti, Pietro; Magnani, Agnese; Santucci, Annalisa

    2011-01-01

    Aims Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP)-containing amyloid is frequently found in the elderly heart. No data exist regarding ANP aggregation process and its link to pathologies. Our aims were: i) to experimentally prove the presumptive association of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) and Isolated Atrial Amyloidosis (IAA); ii) to characterize ANP aggregation, thereby elucidating IAA implication in the CHF pathogenesis. Methods and Results A significant prevalence (85%) of IAA was immunohistochemically proven ex vivo in biopsies from CHF patients. We investigated in vitro (using Congo Red, Thioflavin T, SDS-PAGE, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy) ANP fibrillogenesis, starting from α-ANP as well as the ability of dimeric β-ANP to promote amyloid formation. Different conditions were adopted, including those reproducing β-ANP prevalence in CHF. Our results defined the uncommon rapidity of α-ANP self-assembly at acidic pH supporting the hypothesis that such aggregates constitute the onset of a fibrillization process subsequently proceeding at physiological pH. Interestingly, CHF-like conditions induced the production of the most stable and time-resistant ANP fibrils suggesting that CHF affected people may be prone to develop IAA. Conclusions We established a link between IAA and CHF by ex vivo examination and assessed that β-ANP is, in vitro, the seed of ANP fibrils. Our results indicate that β-ANP plays a crucial role in ANP amyloid deposition under physiopathological CHF conditions. Overall, our findings indicate that early IAA-related ANP deposition may occur in CHF and suggest that these latter patients should be monitored for the development of cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:21814559

  13. Designing new β-lactams: implications from their targets, resistance factors and synthesizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Goo, Kian-Sim; Sim, Tiow-Suan

    2011-03-01

    Penicillins and cephalosporins are β-lactam antibiotics widely used to treat bacterial infectious diseases. They mainly target the cell wall biosynthesis pathway to inhibit bacterial growth. The targets, known as penicillin-binding proteins, are enzymes involved in the polymerization of glycan chains, cross-linking them during bacterial cell wall formation. However, the dispensation of these antibiotics has been concomitant with increasing incidence of resistance to them. Reportedly, this is due to the evolvement of two resistance mechanisms in the bacterial pathogens. One is the production of β -lactamases that cleave the β -lactam rings of penicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics, rendering them ineffective against the pathogens. Another is the modification of the targets, resulting in their inability to bind β -lactam antibiotics. Nevertheless, β -lactam antibiotics remain clinically relevant due to their high target specificity in bacteria and low toxicity to humans. Thus, to overcome the continuing emergence of resistance in pathogens, more efficacious β -lactams have to be developed and cephalosporins are often preferred over penicillins due to two alkyl sites in the cephalosporin core structure amenable for modification. Transformed β -lactams are expected to have improved antimicrobial spectra and pharmacokinetics. This is illustrated by the development of two cephalosporins, namely ceftobiprole and ceftaroline, which have shown good antimicrobial activities and are currently undergoing clinical trials. This review will discuss computer-aided studies of three enzymes closely related to cephalosporins: (1) its synthesizing enzyme, deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase, (2) its targets, the penicillin-binding proteins, and (3) its degrading enzyme, the β -lactamases, and their implications in the development of new cephalosporins. PMID:20883204

  14. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  15. A mechanistic insight into a proteasome-independent constitutive inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation pathway in WEHI-231 B-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shumway, Stuart D; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2004-01-01

    Inducible activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) is classically mediated by proteasomal degradation of its associated inhibitors, IkappaBalpha (inhibitory kappaBalpha) and IkappaBbeta. However, certain B-lymphocytes maintain constitutively nuclear NF-kappaB activity (a p50-c-Rel heterodimer) which is resistant to inhibition by proteasome inhibitors. This activity in the WEHI-231 B-cell line is associated with continual and preferential degradation of IkappaBalpha, which is also unaffected by proteasome inhibitors. Pharmacological studies indicated that there was a correlation between inhibition of IkappaBalpha degradation and constitutive p50-c-Rel activity. Domain analysis of IkappaBalpha by deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that an N-terminal 36-amino-acid sequence of IkappaBalpha represented an instability determinant for constitutive degradation. Moreover, domain grafting studies indicated that this sequence was sufficient to cause IkappaBbeta, but not chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, to be rapidly degraded in WEHI-231 B-cells. However, this sequence was insufficient to target IkappaBbeta to the non-proteasome degradation pathway, suggesting that there was an additional cis-element(s) in IkappaBalpha that was required for complete targeting. Nevertheless, the NF-kappaB pool associated with IkappaBbeta now became constitutively active by virtue of IkappaBbeta instability in these cells. These findings further support the notion that IkappaB instability governs the maintenance of constitutive p50-c-Rel activity in certain B-cells via a unique degradation pathway. PMID:14763901

  16. Variability in Isotope Discrimination Factors in Coral Reef Fishes: Implications for Diet and Food Web Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Alex S. J.; Waite, Anya M.; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Interpretation of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen (δ13C and δ15N) is generally based on the assumption that with each trophic level there is a constant enrichment in the heavier isotope, leading to diet-tissue discrimination factors of 3.4‰ for 15N (ΔN) and ∼0.5‰ for 13C (ΔC). Diet-tissue discrimination factors determined from paired tissue and gut samples taken from 152 individuals from 26 fish species at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia demonstrate a large amount of variability around constant values. While caution is necessary in using gut contents to represent diet due to the potential for high temporal variability, there were significant effects of trophic position and season that may also lead to variability in ΔN under natural conditions. Nitrogen enrichment increased significantly at higher trophic levels (higher tissue δ15N), with significantly higher ΔN in carnivorous species. Changes in diet led to significant changes in ΔN, but not tissue δ15N, between seasons for several species: Acanthurus triostegus, Chromis viridis, Parupeneus signatus and Pomacentrus moluccensis. These results confirm that the use of meta-analysis averages for ΔN is likely to be inappropriate for accurately determining diets and trophic relationships using tissue stable isotope ratios. Where feasible, discrimination factors should be directly quantified for each species and trophic link in question, acknowledging the potential for significant variation away from meta-analysis averages and, perhaps, controlled laboratory diets and conditions. PMID:21060681

  17. Risk factors for secondary transmission of Shigella infection within households: implications for current prevention policy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Internationally, guidelines to prevent secondary transmission of Shigella infection vary widely. Cases, their contacts with diarrhoea, and those in certain occupational groups are frequently excluded from work, school, or daycare. In the Netherlands, all contacts attending pre-school (age 0–3) and junior classes in primary school (age 4–5), irrespective of symptoms, are also excluded pending microbiological clearance. We identified risk factors for secondary Shigella infection (SSI) within households and evaluated infection control policy in this regard. Methods This retrospective cohort study of households where a laboratory confirmed Shigella case was reported in Amsterdam (2002–2009) included all households at high risk for SSI (i.e. any household member under 16 years). Cases were classified as primary, co-primary or SSIs. Using univariable and multivariable binomial regression with clustered robust standard errors to account for household clustering, we examined case and contact factors (Shigella serotype, ethnicity, age, sex, household size, symptoms) associated with SSI in contacts within households. Results SSI occurred in 25/ 337 contacts (7.4%): 20% were asymptomatic, 68% were female, and median age was 14 years (IQR: 4–38). In a multivariable model adjusted for case and household factors, only diarrhoea in contacts was associated with SSI (IRR 8.0, 95% CI:2.7-23.8). In a second model, factors predictive of SSI in contacts were the age of case (0–3 years (IRRcase≥6 years:2.5, 95% CI:1.1-5.5) and 4–5 years (IRRcase≥6 years:2.2, 95% CI:1.1-4.3)) and household size (>6 persons (IRR2-4 persons 3.4, 95% CI:1.2-9.5)). Conclusions To identify symptomatic and asymptomatic SSI, faecal screening should be targeted at all household contacts of preschool cases (0–3 years) and cases attending junior class in primary school (4–5 years) and any household contact with diarrhoea. If screening was limited to these groups, only one

  18. Summary of factors contributing to falls in older adults and nursing implications.

    PubMed

    Enderlin, Carol; Rooker, Janet; Ball, Susan; Hippensteel, Dawn; Alderman, Joanne; Fisher, Sarah Jean; McLeskey, Nanci; Jordan, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Falls are a common cause of serious injury and injury-related death in the older adult population, and may be associated with multiple risks such as age, history of falls, impaired mobility, balance and gait problems, and medications. Sensory and environmental factors as well as the fear of falling may also increase the risk of falls. The purpose of this article is to review current best practice on screening fall risks and fear of falling, fall prevention strategies, and fall prevention resources to assist gerontological nurses in reducing falls by their older adult clients. PMID:26343008

  19. NDUFA12L mitochondrial complex-I assembly factor: Implications for taupathies

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Mohamed; Mohamed, Wael M.Y.

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong correlation between taupathies and the development and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Abnormal tau becomes hyperphosphorylated and dissociated from microtubules with the aggregation of intracellular tau aggregates within the patient's brain. The current review is divided into two broad sections. In the first section we discuss the molecular biology and the clinicopathologic features of taupathies. While in the second section we discuss the relationship between mitochondrial complex-I and taupathies. Polymorphism in NDUFA12L may be a crucial factor for development of neurodegenerative taupathies. Thus NDUFA12L screening may be an early biomarker for identifying risk groups for such disorders. PMID:26937358

  20. Sexually transmitted diseases in Ethiopia. Social factors contributing to their spread and implications for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Plorde, D S

    1981-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases in developing countries are causing concern to those responsible for their control and eradication. To gain a better understanding of the problems involved in a country struggling with development, the economic and psychosocial factors influencing the spread of STD in Ethiopia have been studied. Increased migration and urbanisation and the changing role of women have led to a rise in prostitution. Thus changes in the social structure--particularly in relation to the education and employment of women--and improved medical services are essential for the long-term control of STD. PMID:6895708

  1. Stem CO2 efflux in six co-occurring tree species: underlying factors and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calcerrada, Jesús; López, Rosana; Salomón, Roberto; Gordaliza, Guillermo G; Valbuena-Carabaña, María; Oleksyn, Jacek; Gil, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Stem respiration plays a role in species coexistence and forest dynamics. Here we examined the intra- and inter-specific variability of stem CO2 efflux (E) in dominant and suppressed trees of six deciduous species in a mixed forest stand: Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea [Matt.] Liebl, Quercus pyrenaica Willd., Prunus avium L., Sorbus aucuparia L. and Crataegus monogyna Jacq. We conducted measurements in late autumn. Within species, dominants had higher E per unit stem surface area (Es ) mainly because sapwood depth was higher than in suppressed trees. Across species, however, differences in Es corresponded with differences in the proportion of living parenchyma in sapwood and concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC). Across species, Es was strongly and NSC marginally positively related with an index of drought tolerance, suggesting that slow growth of drought-tolerant trees is related to higher NSC concentration and Es . We conclude that, during the leafless period, E is indicative of maintenance respiration and is related with some ecological characteristics of the species, such as drought resistance; that sapwood depth is the main factor explaining variability in Es within species; and that the proportion of NSC in the sapwood is the main factor behind variability in Es among species. PMID:25292455

  2. MRN1 Implicates Chromatin Remodeling Complexes and Architectural Factors in mRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Düring, Louis; Thorsen, Michael; Petersen, Darima Sophia Njama; Køster, Brian; Jensen, Torben Heick; Holmberg, Steen

    2012-01-01

    A functional relationship between chromatin structure and mRNA processing events has been suggested, however, so far only a few involved factors have been characterized. Here we show that rsc nhp6ΔΔ mutants, deficient for the function of the chromatin remodeling factor RSC and the chromatin architectural proteins Nhp6A/Nhp6B, accumulate intron-containing pre-mRNA at the restrictive temperature. In addition, we demonstrate that rsc8-ts16 nhp6ΔΔ cells contain low levels of U6 snRNA and U4/U6 di-snRNA that is further exacerbated after two hours growth at the restrictive temperature. This change in U6 snRNA and U4/U6 di-snRNA levels in rsc8-ts16 nhp6ΔΔ cells is indicative of splicing deficient conditions. We identify MRN1 (multi-copy suppressor of rsc nhp6ΔΔ) as a growth suppressor of rsc nhp6ΔΔ synthetic sickness. Mrn1 is an RNA binding protein that localizes both to the nucleus and cytoplasm. Genetic interactions are observed between 2 µm-MRN1 and the splicing deficient mutants snt309Δ, prp3, prp4, and prp22, and additional genetic analyses link MRN1, SNT309, NHP6A/B, SWI/SNF, and RSC supporting the notion of a role of chromatin structure in mRNA processing. PMID:23028530

  3. Inflammation and cancer-related fatigue: Mechanisms, contributing factors, and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Julienne E.; Lamkin, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Guided by basic research on neuro-immune interactions, a growing body of research has examined the hypothesis that cancer-related fatigue is driven by activation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine network. In this review, we examine the current state of the evidence linking inflammation and cancer-related fatigue, drawing from recent human research and from experimental animal models probing effects of cancer and cancer treatment on inflammation and fatigue. In addition, we consider two key questions that are currently driving research in this area: what are the neural mechanisms of fatigue, and what are the biological and psychological factors that influence the onset and/or persistence of inflammation and fatigue in cancer patients and survivors? Identification of the mechanisms driving cancer-related fatigue and associated risk factors will facilitate the development of targeted interventions for vulnerable patients. PMID:22776268

  4. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in hereditary and neoplastic disease: biologic and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Helsten, Teresa; Schwaederle, Maria; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are transmembrane growth factor receptors with wide tissue distribution. FGF/FGFR signaling is involved in neoplastic behavior and also development, differentiation, growth, and survival. FGFR germline mutations (activating) can cause skeletal disorders, primarily dwarfism (generally mutations in FGFR3), and craniofacial malformation syndromes (usually mutations in FGFR1 and FGFR2); intriguingly, some of these activating FGFR mutations are also seen in human cancers. FGF/FGFR aberrations reported in cancers are mainly thought to be gain-of-function changes, and several cancers have high frequencies of FGFR alterations, including breast, bladder, or squamous cell carcinomas (lung and head and neck). FGF ligand aberrations (predominantly gene amplifications) are also frequently seen in cancers, in contrast to hereditary syndromes. There are several pharmacologic agents that have been or are being developed for inhibition of FGFR/FGF signaling. These include both highly selective inhibitors as well as multi-kinase inhibitors. Of note, only four agents (ponatinib, pazopanib, regorafenib, and recently lenvatinib) are FDA-approved for use in cancer, although the approval was not based on their activity against FGFR. Perturbations in the FGFR/FGF signaling are present in both inherited and malignant diseases. The development of potent inhibitors targeting FGF/FGFR may provide new tools against disorders caused by FGF/FGFR alterations. PMID:26224133

  5. Growth Hormone Induces Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein in Podocytes: Implications for Podocyte Depletion and Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Chitra, P Swathi; Swathi, T; Sahay, Rakesh; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Menon, Ram K; Kumar, P Anil

    2015-09-01

    The glomerular podocytes form a major size selective barrier for the filtration of serum proteins and reduced podocyte number is a critical event in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during diabetic nephropathy (DN). An elevated level of growth hormone (GH) is implicated as a causative factor in the development of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that podocytes express GH receptor and are a target for GH action. To elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of GH on podocyte depletion, we conducted PCR-array analyses for extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in podocytes. Our studies reveal that GH increases expression of a gene that encodes transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) expression. Similarly, microarray data retrieved from the Nephromine database revealed elevation of TGFBIp in patients with DN. Treatment with GH results in increased secretion of extracellular TGFBIp by podocytes. Both GH and TGFBIp induced apoptosis and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes. Exposure of podocytes to GH and TGFBIp resulted in increased migration of cells and altered podocyte permeability to albumin across podocyte monolayer. Administration of GH to rats induced EMT and apoptosis in the glomerular fraction of the kidney. Therefore, we conclude that the GH-dependent increase in TGFBIp in the podocyte is one of the mechanisms responsible for podocyte depletion in DN. PMID:25740786

  6. Clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 protein expression in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Changjun; Sun, Dawei; Bai, Xue; Li, Yingbin; Xu, Hai; Xu, Shidong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 (beta-IGH3) protein expression in lung cancer remain unclear. This study investigated beta-IGH3 protein expression levels and biological function, as well as lung cancer prognosis. Methods Beta-IGH3 protein expression levels were measured in 236 lung cancers and were matched with adjacent noncancerous tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Subsequently, the relationship between beta-IGH3 protein expression, clinical–pathological parameters, and lung cancer prognosis was evaluated. Results Beta-IGH3 protein expression was significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues (61.86% vs 22.88%; P=0.01). Of the 236 enrolled cases, 146 (61.86%) showed high beta-IGH3 levels. Tumor size, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis were significantly related to beta-IGH3 protein expression in univariate analysis (P=0.001, 0.044, and 0.029, respectively), whereas age, sex, and histological type were not (P=0.038, 0.756, and 0.889, respectively). Finally, a Cox regression model also identified beta-IGH3 as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.01). Conclusion Beta-IGH3 is highly expressed in lung cancers and may be a potential target for lung cancer treatments. PMID:27563252

  7. An evaluation of factors influencing pore pressure in accretionary complexes: Implications for taper angle and wedge mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    At many subduction zones, accretionary complexes form as sediment is off-scraped from the subducting plate. Mechanical models that treat accretionary complexes as critically tapered wedges of sediment demonstrate that pore pressure controls their taper angle by modifying basal and internal shear strength. Here, we combine a numerical model of groundwater flow with critical taper theory to quantify the effects of sediment and de??collement permeability, sediment thickness, sediment partitioning between accretion and underthrusting, and plate convergence rate on steady state pore pressure. Our results show that pore pressure in accretionary wedges can be viewed as a dynamically maintained response to factors which drive pore pressure (source terms) and those that limit flow (permeability and drainage path length). We find that sediment permeability and incoming sediment thickness are the most important factors, whereas fault permeability and the partitioning of sediment have a small effect. For our base case model scenario, as sediment permeability is increased, pore pressure decreases from near-lithostatic to hydrostatic values and allows stable taper angles to increase from ??? 2.5?? to 8??-12.5??. With increased sediment thickness in our models (from 100 to 8000 m), increased pore pressure drives a decrease in stable taper angle from 8.4??-12.5?? to 15?? to <4??) with increased sediment thickness (from <1 to 7 km). One key implication is that hydrologic properties may strongly influence the strength of the crust in a wide range of geologic settings. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Parastomal hernia: an exploration of the risk factors and the implications.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Anthony; Porrett, Theresa; Heyman, Bob

    Risk may be defined as 'the chance that something may happen to cause loss or an adverse effect' (Concise Oxford Medical Dictionary, 2003). Patients undergoing stoma formation are at risk of developing a wide range of complications following surgery. A parastomal hernia is an adverse effect that can contribute to postoperative morbidity. The risk of developing a parastomal hernia is dependent upon a number of variables, and stoma care nurses need to be aware of these to plan the appropriate care for patients undergoing stoma formation. This article discusses the issues surrounding the development of parastomal hernias and also looks at ways in which the risk factors associated with the development of a parastomal hernia may be minimized. PMID:16628167

  9. Implication of tubby proteins as transcription factors by structure-based functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Boggon, T J; Shan, W S; Santagata, S; Myers, S C; Shapiro, L

    1999-12-10

    Tubby-like proteins (TULPs) are found in a broad range of multicellular organisms. In mammals, genetic mutation of tubby or other TULPs can result in one or more of three disease phenotypes: obesity (from which the name "tubby" is derived), retinal degeneration, and hearing loss. These disease phenotypes indicate a vital role for tubby proteins; however, no biochemical function has yet been ascribed to any member of this protein family. A structure-directed approach was employed to investigate the biological function of these proteins. The crystal structure of the core domain from mouse tubby was determined at a resolution of 1.9 angstroms. From primarily structural clues, experiments were devised, the results of which suggest that TULPs are a unique family of bipartite transcription factors. PMID:10591637

  10. Estimates of utility weights in hemophilia: implications for cost-utility analysis of clotting factor prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Scott D; Chaugule, Shraddha S; Hay, Joel W

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of preference-weighted health outcomes or health state utilities are needed to assess improvements in health in terms of quality-adjusted life-years. Gains in quality-adjusted life-years are used to assess the cost–effectiveness of prophylactic use of clotting factor compared with on-demand treatment among people with hemophilia, a congenital bleeding disorder. Published estimates of health utilities for people with hemophilia vary, contributing to uncertainty in the estimates of cost–effectiveness of prophylaxis. Challenges in estimating utility weights for the purpose of evaluating hemophilia treatment include selection bias in observational data, difficulty in adjusting for predictors of health-related quality of life and lack of preference-based data comparing adults with lifetime or primary prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis living within the same country and healthcare system. PMID:25585817

  11. Mechanistic analysis of challenge-response experiments.

    PubMed

    Shotwell, M S; Drake, K J; Sidorov, V Y; Wikswo, J P

    2013-09-01

    We present an application of mechanistic modeling and nonlinear longitudinal regression in the context of biomedical response-to-challenge experiments, a field where these methods are underutilized. In this type of experiment, a system is studied by imposing an experimental challenge, and then observing its response. The combination of mechanistic modeling and nonlinear longitudinal regression has brought new insight, and revealed an unexpected opportunity for optimal design. Specifically, the mechanistic aspect of our approach enables the optimal design of experimental challenge characteristics (e.g., intensity, duration). This article lays some groundwork for this approach. We consider a series of experiments wherein an isolated rabbit heart is challenged with intermittent anoxia. The heart responds to the challenge onset, and recovers when the challenge ends. The mean response is modeled by a system of differential equations that describe a candidate mechanism for cardiac response to anoxia challenge. The cardiac system behaves more variably when challenged than when at rest. Hence, observations arising from this experiment exhibit complex heteroscedasticity and sharp changes in central tendency. We present evidence that an asymptotic statistical inference strategy may fail to adequately account for statistical uncertainty. Two alternative methods are critiqued qualitatively (i.e., for utility in the current context), and quantitatively using an innovative Monte-Carlo method. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting opportunities in optimal design of response-to-challenge experiments. PMID:23859366

  12. Factors influencing performance in the Hecht vault and implications for modelling.

    PubMed

    King, Mark A; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigated the factors that influence Hecht vault performance and assessed the level of model complexity required to give an adequate representation of vaulting. A five-segment planar simulation model with a visco-elastic shoulder joint and a torque generator at the shoulder joint was used to simulate the contact phase in vaulting. The model was customized to an elite gymnast by determining subject-specific segmental inertia and joint torque parameters. The simulation model was matched to a performance of the Hecht vault by varying the visco-elastic characteristics of the shoulders and the arm-horse interface and the activation time history of the shoulder torque generator until the best match was found. Perturbing the matching simulation demonstrated that appropriate initial kinematics are necessary for a successful performance. Fixing the hip and knee angles at their initial values had a small effect with 3 degrees less rotation. Applying shoulder torque during the contact phase also had a small effect with only a 7 degrees range in landing angles. Excluding the hand segment from the model was found to have a moderate effect with 15 degrees less rotation and the time of contact reduced by 38%. Removing shoulder elasticity resulted in 50 degrees less rotation. The use of a five-segment simulation model confirmed that the use of shoulder torque plays a minor role in vaulting performance and that having appropriate initial kinematics at touchdown is essential. However, factors such as shoulder elasticity and the hands which have previously been ignored also have a substantial influence on performance. PMID:15519350

  13. Factors associated with early growth in Egyptian infants: implications for addressing the dual burden of malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Kavle, Justine A; Flax, Valerie L; Abdelmegeid, Ali; Salah, Farouk; Hafez, Seham; Ramzy, Magda; Hamed, Doaa; Saleh, Gulsen; Galloway, Rae

    2016-01-01

    Optimal nutrition is critical to the attainment of healthy growth, human capital and sustainable development. In Egypt, infants and young children face overlapping forms of malnutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies, stunting and overweight. Yet, in this setting, little is known about the factors associated with growth during the first year of life. A rise in stunting in Lower Egypt from 2005 to 2008 prompted this implementation research study, which followed a longitudinal cohort of infants from birth to 1 year of age within the context of a USAID-funded maternal and child health integrated programme. We sought to determine if growth patterns and factors related to early growth differed in Lower and Upper Egypt, and examined the relationship between weight loss and subsequent stunting at 12 months of age. Growth patterns revealed that length-for-age z-score (LAZ) decreased and weight-for-length z-score (WLZ) increased from 6 to 12 months of age in both regions. One-quarter of infants were stunted and nearly one-third were overweight by 12 months of age in lower Egypt. Minimum dietary diversity was significantly associated with WLZ in Lower Egypt (β = 0.22, P < 0.05), but not in Upper Egypt. Diarrhoea, fever and programme exposure were not associated with any growth outcome. Weight loss during any period was associated with a twofold likelihood of stunting at 12 months in Lower Egypt, but not Upper Egypt. In countries, like Egypt, facing the nutrition transition, infant and young child nutrition programmes need to address both stunting and overweight through improving dietary quality and reducing reliance on energy-dense foods. PMID:26373408

  14. Imbalance of the Nerve Growth Factor and Its Precursor: Implication in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Riyaz; El-Remessy, Azza B

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in working age in US and worldwide. Neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) are known to be essential for growth, differentiation and survival of neurons in the developing and mature retina. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence supports an emerging role of neurotrophins in retinal diseases and in particular, diabetic retinopathy. Neurotrophins are initially synthesized in a pro-form and undergo proteolytic cleavage to produce the mature form that activates two distinctive receptors, the tyrosine kinase tropomycin receptor (Trk) and, to lesser extent, the common low affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Despite tight glycemic and metabolic control, many diabetic patients continue to experience progressive retinal damage. Understanding the molecular events involved in diabetic retinopathy is extremely important to identify novel therapeutic strategies to halt the disease progression. Diabetes induces imbalance in neurotrophins by increasing its proform, which is associated with upregulation of the p75NTR receptor in the retina. A growing body of evidence supports a link between the imbalance of pro-neurotrophins and early retinal inflammation, neuro-and microvascular degeneration. Therefore, examining changes in the levels of neurotrophins and its receptors might provide a therapeutically beneficial target to combat disease progression in diabetic patients. This commentary aims to highlight the impact of diabetes-impaired balance of neurotrophins and in particular, the NGF and its receptors; TrkA and p75NTR in the pathology of DR. PMID:26807305

  15. Lead in New York City Community Garden Chicken Eggs: Influential Factors and Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Spliethoff, Henry M.; Mitchell, Rebecca G.; Ribaudo, Lisa N.; Taylor, Owen; Shayler, Hannah A.; Greene, Virginia; Oglesby, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Raising chickens for eggs in urban areas is becoming increasingly common. Urban chickens may be exposed to lead, a common urban soil contaminant. We measured lead concentrations in chicken eggs from New York City (NYC) community gardens and collected information on factors that might affect those concentrations. Lead was detected between 10 and 167 μg/kg in 48% of NYC eggs. Measures of lead in eggs from a henhouse were significantly associated (p<0.005) with lead concentrations in soil. The association between soil and egg lead has been evaluated only once before, by a study of a rural region in Belgium. In our study, the apparent lead soil-to-egg transfer efficiency was considerably lower than that found in Belgium, suggesting that there may be important geographic differences in this transfer. We developed models that suggested that, for sites like ours, lead concentrations in >50% of eggs from a henhouse would exceed store-bought egg concentrations (<7–13 μg/kg; 3% above detection limit) at soil lead concentrations >120 mg/kg, and that the concentration in one of six eggs from a henhouse would exceed a 100 μg/kg guidance value at soil lead concentrations >410 mg/kg. Our models also suggested that the availability of dietary calcium supplements was another influential factor that reduced egg lead concentrations. Estimates of health risk from consuming eggs with the lead concentrations we measured generally were not significant. However, soil lead concentrations in this study were <600 mg/kg, and considerably higher concentrations are not uncommon. Efforts to reduce lead transfer to chicken eggs and associated exposure are recommended for urban chicken keepers. PMID:24287691

  16. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  17. Candidaemia with uncommon Candida species: predisposing factors, outcome, antifungal susceptibility, and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C A; Marriott, D; Playford, E G; Nguyen, Q; Ellis, D; Meyer, W; Sorrell, T C; Slavin, M

    2009-07-01

    The risk factors for and clinical features of bloodstream infection with uncommon Candida spp. (species other than C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicals and C. krusei) are incompletely defined. To identify clinical variables associated with these species that might guide management, 57 cases of candidaemia resulting from uncommon Candida spp. were analysed in comparison with 517 episodes of Candida albicans candidaemia (2001-2004). Infection with uncommon Candida spp. (5.3% of candidaemia cases), as compared with C. albicans candidaemia, was significantly more likely to be outpatient-acquired than inpatient-acquired (15 of 57 vs. 65 of 517 episodes, p 0.01). Prior exposure to fluconazole was uncommon (n=1). Candida dubliniensis was the commonest species (n=22, 39%), followed by Candida guilliermondii (n=11, 19%) and Candida lusitaniae (n=7, 12%).C. dubliniensis candidaemia was independently associated with recent intravenous drug use (p 0.01) and chronic liver disease (p 0.03), and infection with species other than C. dubliniensis was independently associated with age<65 years (p 0.02), male sex (p 0.03) and human immunodeficiency virus infection (p 0.05). Presence of sepsis at diagnosis and crude 30-day mortality rates were similar for C. dubliniensis-related, non-C. dubliniensis-related and C. albicans-related candidaemia. Haematological malignancy was the commonest predisposing factor in C. guilliermondii (n=3, 27%) and C. lusitaniae (n=3, 43%) candidaemia. The 30-day mortality rate of C. lusitaniae candidaemia was higher than the overall death rate for all uncommon Candida spp. (42.9% vs. 25%, p not significant). All isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin; five strains (9%) had fluconazole MIC values of 16-32 mg/L. Candidaemia due to uncommon Candida spp. is emerging among hospital outpatients; certain clinical variables may assist in recognition of this entity. PMID:19614718

  18. HPV Literacy and Associated Factors Among Hmong American Immigrants: Implications for Reducing Cervical Cancer Disparity.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Raiza; Simms, Tina; Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies show that certain minority and ethnic communities experience low human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates despite a higher cervical cancer burden. HPV is known to be responsible for almost all cervical cancer cases. Hmong Americans, a growing Asian American population, appear to be at increased risk. The cervical cancer incidence rate among Hmong American women is three times higher than other Asian/Pacific Islanders and more than four times higher than Non-Hispanic Whites. Despite such alarming statistics, there is limited research focusing on HPV literacy and its associated factors in the Hmong American community. This study's objectives are to investigate: (1) the level of HPV knowledge among Hmong Americans; (2) HPV vaccination initiation and completion rates of Hmong Americans; and (3) factors associated with HPV literacy in the Hmong American community. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was used as the study's theoretical framework. A self-administered paper and online health survey was completed by192 Hmong Americans living in a major metropolitan area in Minnesota. Results revealed a mean score of 4.76 (SD 1.67) for the 7-item questionnaire measuring HPV knowledge. The HPV vaccination initiation rate was 46.3 % (n = 56), with 32.7 % completing the recommended three doses. Multiple regression analysis found that participants' level of education, number of doctor visits, and cervical cancer screening literacy were significantly associated with HPV knowledge. This study's results indicate the important role of health providers in educating Hmong Americans patients about HPV and cervical cancer prevention to decrease the cervical cancer burden in this high-risk population. PMID:26696118

  19. Factors Affecting Diet Variation in the Pyrenean Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica): Conservation Implications.

    PubMed

    García-González, Ricardo; Aldezabal, Arantza; Laskurain, Nere Amaia; Margalida, Antoni; Novoa, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Pyrenean rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica) lives at one of the southernmost limits of the ptarmigan range. Their small population sizes and the impacts of global changes are limiting factors in the conservation of this threatened subspecies. An effective conservation policy requires precise basic knowledge of a species' food and habitat requirements, information that is practically non-existent for this Pyrenean population. Here, we describe the diet of a ptarmigan population in the Eastern Pyrenees, the environmental factors influencing its variability and the relationship between diet floristic composition and quality. Diet composition was determined by microhistological analysis of faeces and diet quality was estimated from free-urate faecal N content. Our results show that grouse diet is based mainly on arctic-alpine shrubs of the Ericaceae family, as well as dwarf willows (Salix spp.) and Dryas octopetala. The most frequently consumed plant species was Rhododendron ferrugineum, but its abundance in the diet was negatively related to the diet nitrogen content. Conversely, the abundance of Salix spp., grass leaves and arthropods increased the nitrogen content of the diet. Seasonality associated with snow-melting contributed the most to variability in the Pyrenean ptarmigan diet, differentiating winter from spring/summer diets. The latter was characterised by a high consumption of dwarf willows, flowers, arthropods and tender forb leaves. Geographic area and sex-age class influenced diet variability to a lesser extent. Current temperature increases in the Pyrenees due to global warming may reduce the persistence and surface area of snow-packs where preferred plants for rock ptarmigan usually grow, thus reducing food availability. The high consumption of Rh. ferrugineum characterised the diet of the Pyrenean population. Given the toxicity of this plant for most herbivores, its potential negative effect on Pyrenean ptarmigan populations should be

  20. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Singapore: Its Implications to Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xinyan; Tey, Siew Ling; Leong, Claudia; Quek, Rina; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is a global health challenge and has been linked to type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. However, the relationship between vitamin D status, body composition, and cardiovascular risks has not been well characterized in Asian populations. The objectives of this study were to examine the factors associated with the low vitamin D levels in a sunny tropical region and to assess the role of vitamin D status in cardiovascular risk factors. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. One hundred and fourteen healthy participants (59 males and 55 females) residing in Singapore took part in this study. Plasma 25OH-D3 concentration was measured by using LC-MS/MS. Body fat (%) was measured by using three different techniques including bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), BOD POD, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Basic anthropometric measurements, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FSI), and lipid profiles were obtained using standard protocols. Results Approximately 42% of the participants were vitamin D deficient (< 20 ng/mL). Vitamin D status was inversely associated with body fat (%), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein (TC/HDL) ratio, while positively associated with lean body mass (LBM) and hand grip strength (HGS). Conclusions The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a sunny tropical region reinforces the need to recognize that sunlight alone is not the precursor for optimal vitamin D status. This raises the need to investigate public health measures that will encourage exposure to sunlight without overexposure that is harmful to skin. More importantly, vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular risks, i.e. HOMA-IR, TC/HDL, and LDL/HDL. Future studies should attempt to elucidate the potential mechanisms. PMID:26799569

  1. Factors Affecting Diet Variation in the Pyrenean Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica): Conservation Implications

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Ricardo; Aldezabal, Arantza; Laskurain, Nere Amaia; Margalida, Antoni; Novoa, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Pyrenean rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta pyrenaica) lives at one of the southernmost limits of the ptarmigan range. Their small population sizes and the impacts of global changes are limiting factors in the conservation of this threatened subspecies. An effective conservation policy requires precise basic knowledge of a species' food and habitat requirements, information that is practically non-existent for this Pyrenean population. Here, we describe the diet of a ptarmigan population in the Eastern Pyrenees, the environmental factors influencing its variability and the relationship between diet floristic composition and quality. Diet composition was determined by microhistological analysis of faeces and diet quality was estimated from free-urate faecal N content. Our results show that grouse diet is based mainly on arctic-alpine shrubs of the Ericaceae family, as well as dwarf willows (Salix spp.) and Dryas octopetala. The most frequently consumed plant species was Rhododendron ferrugineum, but its abundance in the diet was negatively related to the diet nitrogen content. Conversely, the abundance of Salix spp., grass leaves and arthropods increased the nitrogen content of the diet. Seasonality associated with snow-melting contributed the most to variability in the Pyrenean ptarmigan diet, differentiating winter from spring/summer diets. The latter was characterised by a high consumption of dwarf willows, flowers, arthropods and tender forb leaves. Geographic area and sex-age class influenced diet variability to a lesser extent. Current temperature increases in the Pyrenees due to global warming may reduce the persistence and surface area of snow-packs where preferred plants for rock ptarmigan usually grow, thus reducing food availability. The high consumption of Rh. ferrugineum characterised the diet of the Pyrenean population. Given the toxicity of this plant for most herbivores, its potential negative effect on Pyrenean ptarmigan populations should be

  2. Density profiles of CDM microhalos and their implications for annihilation boost factors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderhalden, Donnino; Diemand, Juerg E-mail: diemand@physik.uzh.ch

    2013-04-01

    In a standard cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology, microhalos at the CDM cutoff scale are the first and smallest objects expected to form in the universe. Here we present results of high resolution simulations of three representative roughly Earth-mass microhalos in order to determine their inner density profile. We find that CDM microhalos in simulations without a cutoff in the power spectrum roughly follow the NFW density profile, just like the much larger CDM halos on galaxy and galaxy cluster scales. But having a cutoff in the initial power spectrum at a typical neutralino free streaming scale of 10{sup −7}M{sub s}un makes their inner density profiles considerably steeper, i.e. ρ∝r{sup −(1.3−1.4)}, in good agreement with the results from Ishiyama et al. (2010). An extrapolation of the halo and subhalo mass functions down to the cutoff scale indicates that microhalos are extremely abundant throughout the present day dark matter distribution and might contribute significantly to indirect dark matter detection signals. Assuming a transition from a NFW to a steeper inner profile (ρ∝r{sup −1.4}) two orders of magnitude above the cutoff scale, the total boost factor for a Milky Way sized dark matter halo increases from about 3.5 to 4. We further find that CDM microhalo concentrations are consistent with the Bullock et al. (2001) model and clearly rule out simplistic power law models for the mass dependence of concentrations and subhalo annihilation, which would erroneously lead to very large boost factors (a few hundred for galaxy halos and over 1000 for clusters)

  3. Meningococcal Factor H Binding Proteins in Epidemic Strains from Africa: Implications for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Fergus, Andrew M.; Koeberling, Oliver; Caugant, Dominique A.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Factor H binding protein (fHbp) is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH), which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81%) had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates), 9 (W-135), or 74 (X) in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135) in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine. Conclusion/Significance NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate

  4. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Oxidative Stress Interplay: Implications in Tumorigenesis and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Krstić, Jelena; Trivanović, Drenka; Mojsilović, Slavko; Santibanez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and oxidative stress/Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) both have pivotal roles in health and disease. In this review we are analyzing the interplay between TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. They have contradictory roles in cancer progression since both can have antitumor effects, through the induction of cell death, senescence and cell cycle arrest, and protumor effects by contributing to cancer cell spreading, proliferation, survival, and metastasis. TGF-β can control ROS production directly or by downregulating antioxidative systems. Meanwhile, ROS can influence TGF-β signaling and increase its expression as well as its activation from the latent complex. This way, both are building a strong interplay which can be taken as an advantage by cancer cells in order to increment their malignancy. In addition, both TGF-β and ROS are able to induce cell senescence, which in one way protects damaged cells from neoplastic transformation but also may collaborate in cancer progression. The mutual collaboration of TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis is highly complex, and, due to their differential roles in tumor progression, careful consideration should be taken when thinking of combinatorial targeting in cancer therapies. PMID:26078812

  5. [Mechanism of production and release of tumor necrosis factor implicated in inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Hide, Izumi

    2003-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine involved in many pathophysiological conditions including rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Despite recent evidence regarding signal transduction via TNF receptor and its biological actions, the mechanism of TNF release remains poorly understood. To clarify how production and release of TNF are regulated, we focused on mast cells and microglia which are involved in allergic inflammation and brain damage or recovery, respectively. In RBL-2H3 mast cells, anti-allergic drugs including azelastine inhibited the release of TNF more potently than degranulation in response to antigen or ionomycin. It was also demonstrated that TNF releasing steps are regulated via the PKC alpha-dependent pathway. Furthermore, Rho GTPases, possibly Rac, were shown to be involved in antigen-induced TNF transcription through activating PKC beta I. In cultured rat brain microglia, we found that extracellular ATP triggers the release of TNF via the P2X7 receptor. ERK and JNK are also involved in ATP-induced TNF transcription, while p38 regulates the transport of TNF mRNA from the nucleus to the cytosol. Additionally, JNK and p38, but not ERK, are activated via the P2X7 receptor. A better understanding of the specific pathways that regulate TNF release for each effector cell may offer further possible therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases. PMID:12673950

  6. Stress-Related Factors in Cannabis Use and Misuse: Implications for Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Scott M.; Sinha, Rajita

    2009-01-01

    We examined the role of stress as a risk factor and motivation for cannabis use/misuse. A systematic review of studies gathered from PsychINFO and MEDLINE databases was conducted. Findings suggest that cannabis is commonly used as a stress-coping strategy. Negative life events, trauma, and maladaptive coping were all related to consumption. Cannabis use for stress-coping purposes was most evident when examining chronic as compared with experimental use. While many individuals may be able to use cannabis without consequences, there appears to be a subset of individuals who experience greater life stress and who may be more likely to use for stress-coping purposes. These individuals may be at greatest risk for addiction. Chronic use may potentiate stress-related motivation to use/abuse cannabis and is associated with decision making deficits and alterations in brain-stress pathways that may exacerbate compulsive drug-seeking and sensitize individuals to stress-related drug use. Overall, stress-coping interventions and harm reduction focused on reducing the amount ingested may facilitate prevention and recovery efforts. PMID:19004601

  7. Psychological factors influencing adoption of postural training devices: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Fleiter, Judy; Walsh, Shari; Biggs, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    This paper details an exploratory investigation of psychological factors that may influence the adoption/rejection of postural training devices from the perspectives of two potential user groups (clients and practitioners). The aim was to elicit perceived advantages and disadvantages from potential users and to apply psychological principles to examine, and potentially counter perceived barriers to use. A small sample (50) of general public members, physiotherapists and occupational therapists were surveyed using open-ended questions designed to elicit information about current practices and attitudinal beliefs about postural training. Results suggested that members of the public fall into two categories according to whether they would use the device for prevention or treatment. This group identified issues such as lack of need, time consuming, and motivations to comply. Practitioners highlighted that lack of research, lack of ability to trial a product, and issues of cost and non-compliance by consumers and were seen as prohibitory to use. A number of theoretical principles of behaviour change were then related to the findings including: the stages of change model, behavioural learning, message framing, persuasion, attitude-behaviour relationships, motivations and impression management. Client cost objections to treatments and the need to integrate research findings into practice are also discussed. PMID:19276521

  8. Factors influencing the oxidation of cysteamine and other thiols: implications for hyperthermic sensitization and radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.E.; Issels, R.W.; Gerweck, L.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Jacobson, B.; Mittchell, J.B.; Russo, A.

    1984-11-01

    Some of the factors influencing the oxygen uptake and peroxide formation for cysteamine (MEA) and other thiols in serum-supplemented modified McCoy's 5A, a well-known medium used to cultivate a variety of cells in vitro, have been studied. The oxidation of MEA and cysteine in modified McCoy's 5A has been compared with that in Ham's F-12, MEM, and phosphate-buffered saline. The ability to produce peroxide is dependent upon the temperature, the concentration of thiol, the presence of copper ions, and pH of the medium. Catalase also reduces the oxygen uptake for all thiols. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was found to stimulate the oxygen uptake in the case of MEA and cysteine, but had little or no effect with DTT and glutathione. The combined presence of SOD and catalase resulted in less inhibition of oxygen uptake than that obtained by catalase alone. Alkaline pH was found to enhance the oxidation of cysteine and MEA. The results indicate that many problems may arise when thiols are added to various media. A major consideration is concerned with the production of peroxide, superoxide, and reduced trace metal intermediates. The presence of these intermediates may result in the production of hydroxyl radical intermediates as well as the eventual oxygen depletion from the medium.

  9. Factors influencing sorption of ciprofloxacin onto activated sludge: experimental assessment and modelling implications.

    PubMed

    Polesel, Fabio; Lehnberg, Kai; Dott, Wolfgang; Trapp, Stefan; Thomas, Kevin V; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-01-01

    Many of the pharmaceuticals and personal care products occurring in municipal sewage are ionizing substances, and their partitioning behaviour is affected by ionic interactions with solid matrices. In activated sludge systems, such interactions have currently not been adequately understood and described, particularly for zwitterionic chemicals. Here we present an assessment of the effects of pH and iron salt dosing on the sorption of ciprofloxacin onto activated sludge using laboratory experiments and full-scale fate modelling. Experimental results were described with Freundlich isotherms and showed that non-linear sorption occurred under all the conditions tested. The greatest sorption potential was measured at pH=7.4, at which ciprofloxacin is speciated mostly as zwitterion. Iron salt dosing increased sorption under aerobic and, to a lesser extent, anoxic conditions, whereas no effect was registered under anaerobic conditions. The activated sludge model for xenobiotics (ASM-X) was extended with Freundlich-based sorption kinetics and used to predict the fate of ciprofloxacin in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Scenario simulations, using experimental Freundlich parameters, were used to identify whether the assessed factors caused a significant increase of aqueous ciprofloxacin concentration in full-scale bioreactors. Simulation results suggest that a pH increase, rather than a reduction in iron salt dosing, could be responsible for a systematic deterioration of sorption of ciprofloxacin in the WWTP. PMID:24972177

  10. Desmoglein 4 is Regulated by Transcription Factors Implicated in Hair Shaft Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bazzi, Hisham; Demehri, Shadmehr; Potter, Christopher S.; Barber, Alison G.; Awgulewitsch, Alexander; Kopan, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    The hair fiber is made of specialized keratinocytes, known as trichocytes, that primarily express hair keratins which are cemented by a multitude of keratin-associated proteins (KAPs). The hair keratins form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of the trichocytes, which are linked to abundant cell-cell adhesion junctions, called desmosomes. Desmoglein 4 (DSG4) is the major desmosomal cadherin expressed in the hair shaft cortex where the hair keratins are highly expressed. In humans, mutations affecting either the hair keratins or DSG4 lead to beaded hair phenotypes with features of monilethrix. In this work, we postulated that the regulatory pathways governing the expression of hair shaft components, such as hair keratins and DSG4, are similar. Therefore, we studied the transcriptional regulation of DSG4 by transcription factors/pathways that are known regulators of hair keratin or KAP expression. We show that HOXC13, LEF1 and FOXN1 repress DSG4 transcription and provide in vitro and in vivo evidence correlating the Notch pathway with the activation and/or maintenance of DSG4 expression in the hair follicle. PMID:19683850

  11. Targeting frequent users of emergency departments: Prominent risk factors and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Leporatti, Lucia; Ameri, Marta; Trinchero, Chiara; Orcamo, Patrizia; Montefiori, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of frequent users of accident and emergency departments (AEDs) and recommends alternative medical services for such patients. Prominent demographic and clinical risk factors for individuals accessing seven AEDs located in the metropolitan area of Genoa, Italy are identified and analysed. A truncated count data model is implemented to establish the determinants of access, while a multinomial logistic regression is used to highlight potential differences among different user categories. According to previous studies, empirical findings suggest that despite the relevance of demographic drivers, vulnerability conditions (e.g. abuse of alcohol and drugs, chronic conditions, and psychological distress) are the main reasons behind frequent AED use; the analysis seems to confirm an association between AED frequent use and lower level of urgency. Since frequent and highly frequent users are found responsible for disproportionate resource absorption with respect to total amount of AED costs (they represent roughly 10% of the total number of patients, but contribute to more than 19% of the total annual AED cost), policies aiming to reduce frequent use of AEDs could bring significant savings in economic resources. Thus, efficient actions could be oriented toward extending primary care services outside AED and toward instituting local aid services specifically addressed to people under the influence of substances or in conditions of mental distress. PMID:27033015

  12. African Swine Fever Virus Infection Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production: Implications in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez del Moral, M.; Ortuño, E.; Fernández-Zapatero, P.; Alonso, F.; Alonso, C.; Ezquerra, A.; Domínguez, J.

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced by in vitro infection with African swine fever (ASF) virus (ASFV) and the systemic and local release of this inflammatory cytokine upon in vivo infection. An early increase in TNF-α mRNA expression was detected in ASFV-infected alveolar macrophages, and high levels of TNF-α protein were detected by ELISA in culture supernatants from these cells. When animals were experimentally infected with a virulent isolate (E-75), enhanced TNF-α expression in mainly affected organs correlated with viral protein expression. Finally, elevated levels of TNF-α were detected in serum, corresponding to the onset of clinical signs. TNF-α has been reported to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of major clinical events in ASF, such as intravascular coagulation, tissue injury, apoptosis, and shock. In the present study, TNF-α containing supernatants from ASFV-infected cultures induced apoptosis in uninfected lymphocytes; this effect was partially abrogated by preincubation with an anti-TNF-α specific antibody. These results suggest a relevant role for TNF-α in the pathogenesis of ASF. PMID:9971800

  13. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF-21) in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: Natural History and Metabolic Implications

    PubMed Central

    González, Elena; Díez, Juan J.; Bajo, M. Auxiliadora; del Peso, Gloria; Grande, Cristina; Rodríguez, Olaia; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Background Human fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF-21) is an endocrine liver hormone that stimulates adipocyte glucose uptake independently of insulin, suppresses hepatic glucose production and is involved in the regulation of body fat. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients suffer potential interference with FGF-21 status with as yet unknown repercussions. Objectives The aim of this study was to define the natural history of FGF-21 in PD patients, to analyze its relationship with glucose homeostasis parameters and to study the influence of residual renal function and peritoneal functional parameters on FGF-21 levels and their variation over time. Methods We studied 48 patients with uremia undergoing PD. Plasma samples were routinely obtained from each patient at baseline and at 1, 2 and 3 years after starting PD therapy. Results Plasma FGF-21 levels substantially increased over the first year and were maintained at high levels during the remainder of the study period (253 pg/ml (59; 685) at baseline; 582 pg/ml (60.5–949) at first year and 647 pg/ml (120.5–1116.6) at third year) (p<0.01). We found a positive correlation between time on dialysis and FGF-21 levels (p<0.001), and also, those patients with residual renal function (RRF) had significantly lower levels of FGF-21 than those without RRF (ρ -0.484, p<0.05). Lastly, there was also a significant association between FGF-21 levels and peritoneal protein losses (PPL), independent of the time on dialysis (ρ 0.410, p<0.05). Conclusion Our study shows that FGF-21 plasma levels in incident PD patients significantly increase during the first 3 years. This increment is dependent on or is associated with RRF and PPL (higher levels in patients with lower RRF and higher PPL). FGF-21 might be an important endocrine agent in PD patients and could act as hormonal signaling to maintain glucose homeostasis and prevent potential insulin resistance. These preliminary results suggest that FGF-21 might play a protective role as

  14. Mechanistic Modeling of Emergency Events: Assessing the Impact of Hypothetical Releases of Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Isukapalli, S. S.; Lioy, P. J.; Georgopoulos, P. G.

    2011-01-01

    A modular system for source-to-dose-to-effect modeling analysis has been developed based on the modeling environment for total risk studies (MENTOR),(1) and applied to study the impacts of hypothetical atmospheric releases of anthrax spores. The system, MENTOR-2E (MENTOR for Emergency Events), provides mechanistically consistent analysis of inhalation exposures for various release scenarios, while allowing consideration of specific susceptible subpopulations (such as the elderly) at the resolution of individual census tracts. The MENTOR-2E application presented here includes atmospheric dispersion modeling, statistically representative samples of individuals along with corresponding activity patterns, and population-based dosimetry modeling that accounts for activity and physiological variability. Two hypothetical release scenarios were simulated: a 100 g release of weaponized B. anthracis over a period of (a) one hour and (b) 10 hours, and the impact of these releases on population in the State of New Jersey was studied. Results were compared with those from simplified modeling of population dynamics (location, activities, etc.), and atmospheric dispersion of anthrax spores. The comparisons showed that in the two release scenarios simulated, each major approximation resulted in an overestimation of the number of probable infections by a factor of 5 to 10; these overestimations can have significant public health implications when preparing for and responding effectively to an actual release. This is in addition to uncertainties in dose-response modeling, which result in an additional factor of 5 to 10 variation in estimated casualties. The MENTOR-2E system has been developed in a modular fashion so that improvements in individual modules can be readily made without impacting the other modules, and provides a first step toward the development of models that can be used in supporting real-time decision making. PMID:18643828

  15. Mechanistic study of copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling of arylboronic esters and methanol: insights into an organometallic oxidase reaction.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda E; Brunold, Thomas C; Stahl, Shannon S

    2009-04-15

    Copper-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling of arylboronic acid derivatives and heteroatom nucleophiles is a highly useful method for the formation of aryl-heteroatom bonds. Mechanistic studies reveal that this reaction proceeds via an "oxidase"-style mechanism. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies establish that transmetalation of the aryl group from boron to Cu(II) is the turnover-limiting step and reoxidation of the reduced catalyst by O(2) is rapid. Further mechanistic analysis implicates the involvement of an aryl-copper(III) intermediate that undergoes facile C-O bond formation. PMID:19309072

  16. Tissue factor expression in ovarian cancer: implications for immunotherapy with hI-con1, a factor VII-IgGF(c) chimeric protein targeting tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Emiliano; Varughese, Joyce; Buza, Natalia; Bellone, Stefania; Lin, Ken-Yu; Bellone, Marta; Todeschini, Paola; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E; Rutherford, Thomas J; Carrara, Luisa; Tassi, Renata; Pecorelli, Sergio; Lockwood, Charles J; Santin, Alessandro D

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the expression of tissue factor (TF) in ovarian cancer (EOC) and the potential of hI-con1, an antibody-like molecule targeting TF, as a novel form of therapy against chemotherapy-resistant ovarian disease. We studied the expression of TF in 88 EOC by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time-PCR (qRT-PCR) and the levels of membrane-bound-complement-regulatory-proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 in primary EOC cell lines by flow-cytometry. Sensitivity to hI-con1-dependent-cell-mediated-cytotoxicity (IDCC), complement-dependent-cell-cytotoxicity and inhibition of IDCC by γ-immunoglobulin were evaluated in 5-h (51)chromium-release-assays. Cytoplasmic and/or membrane TF expression was observed in 24 out of 25 (96%) of the EOC samples tested by IHC, but not in normal ovarian-tissue. EOC with clear cell histology significantly overexpress TF when compared to serous, endometrioid, or undifferentiated tumors by qRT-PCR. With a single exception, all primary EOC that overexpressed TF demonstrated high levels of CD46, CD55 and CD59 and regardless of their histology or resistance to chemotherapy, were highly sensitive to IDCC. The effect of complement and physiologic doses of γ-immunoglobulin on IDCC in ovarian cancer cell lines overexpressing TF was tumor specific and related to the overexpression of CD59 on tumor cells. Small-interfering-RNA-mediated knockdown of CD59 expression in ovarian tumors significantly increased hI-con1-mediated cytotoxic activity in vitro. Finally, low doses of interleukin-2 further increased the cytotoxic effect induced by hI-con1 (P < 0.01). hI-con1 molecule induces strong cytotoxicity against primary chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines overexpressing TF and may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of ovarian tumors refractory to standard treatment modalities. PMID:21725665

  17. Tissue factor expression in ovarian cancer: implications for immunotherapy with hI-con1, a factor VII-IgGFc chimeric protein targeting tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Cocco, Emiliano; Varughese, Joyce; Buza, Natalia; Bellone, Stefania; Lin, Ken-Yu; Bellone, Marta; Todeschini, Paola; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Carrara, Luisa; Tassi, Renata; Pecorelli, Sergio; Lockwood, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the expression of tissue factor (TF) in ovarian cancer (EOC) and the potential of hI-con1, an antibody-like molecule targeting TF, as a novel form of therapy against chemotherapy-resistant ovarian disease. We studied the expression of TF in 88 EOC by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time-PCR (qRT-PCR) and the levels of membrane-bound-complement-regulatory-proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 in primary EOC cell lines by flow-cytometry. Sensitivity to hI-con1-dependent-cell-mediated-cytotoxicity (IDCC), complement-dependent-cell-cytotoxicity and inhibition of IDCC by γ-immunoglobulin were evaluated in 5-h 51chromium-release-assays. Cytoplasmic and/or membrane TF expression was observed in 24 out of 25 (96%) of the EOC samples tested by IHC, but not in normal ovarian-tissue. EOC with clear cell histology significantly overexpress TF when compared to serous, endometrioid, or undifferentiated tumors by qRT-PCR. With a single exception, all primary EOC that overexpressed TF demonstrated high levels of CD46, CD55 and CD59 and regardless of their histology or resistance to chemotherapy, were highly sensitive to IDCC. The effect of complement and physiologic doses of γ-immunoglobulin on IDCC in ovarian cancer cell lines overexpressing TF was tumor specific and related to the overexpression of CD59 on tumor cells. Small-interfering-RNA-mediated knockdown of CD59 expression in ovarian tumors significantly increased hI-con1-mediated cytotoxic activity in vitro. Finally, low doses of interleukin-2 further increased the cytotoxic effect induced by hI-con1 (P < 0.01). hI-con1 molecule induces strong cytotoxicity against primary chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines overexpressing TF and may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of ovarian tumors refractory to standard treatment modalities. PMID:21725665

  18. Ecological factors influencing HIV sexual risk and resilience among young people in rural Kenya: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Harper, Gary W; Riplinger, Andrew J; Neubauer, Leah C; Murphy, Alexandra G; Velcoff, Jessica; Bangi, Audrey K

    2014-02-01

    Most new HIV infections in Kenya occur among young people. The purpose of this study was to understand ecological factors that influence HIV-related sexual risk and resilience among young people in rural Kenya and to elicit their ideas for HIV prevention interventions. Nine focus groups (N = 199) were conducted with both female (55%) and male (45%) participants (ages 14-24 years) living in rural communities in Kenya. Findings were organized into thematic areas related to the following systems of influence: (i) intrapersonal (substance use, HIV knowledge), (ii) interpersonal (peer pressure, lack of parent-child communication, interpersonal sexual violence), (iii) institutional/community (pornography, transactional sex, 'idleness', lack of role models) and (iv) socio-cultural/policy (Kikuyu culture, Western influence, religious beliefs, HIV-related stigma and gendered sexual scripts). Results regarding the types of HIV prevention programs that participants believed should be developed for young people in rural Kenya revealed seven primary themes, including (i) HIV prevention community/group workshops, (ii) condom distribution, (iii) job skills trainings, (iv) athletic and social clubs, (v) HIV-related stigma reduction campaigns, (vi) community-wide demonstrations and (vii) other HIV/AIDS activities led by young people. Implications for the development of culturally and developmentally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for young people in rural Kenya are discussed. PMID:23969629

  19. Factors influencing spatial pattern in tropical forest clearance and stand age: Implications for carbon storage and species diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, E. H.; Brandeis, Thomas J.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Kennaway, Todd

    2008-06-01

    Little is known about the tropical forests that undergo clearing as urban/built-up and other developed lands spread. This study uses remote sensing-based maps of Puerto Rico, multinomial logit models and forest inventory data to explain patterns of forest age and the age of forests cleared for land development and assess their implications for forest carbon storage and tree species richness. Accessibility, arability and spatial contagion emerge strongly as overriding spatial controls on tropical forest age, determining (1) the pattern of agricultural abandonment that permits forest regrowth, and (2) where humans leave old-growth forest remnants. Covariation between the factors patterning forest age and land development explains why most forest cleared for land development is younger. Forests are increasingly younger in more accessible and fertile areas where agriculture has lasted longer and land development is most common. All else equal, more species-rich older forest on less arable lands are somewhat less likely to undergo development, but they are still vulnerable to clearing for land development if close to urban centers and unprotected. Accounting for forest age leads to a 19% lower estimate of forest biomass cleared for land development than if forest age is not accounted for.

  20. DNA methylation analysis of Homeobox genes implicates HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Rochtus, Anne; Izzi, Benedetta; Vangeel, Elise; Louwette, Sophie; Wittevrongel, Christine; Lambrechts, Diether; Moreau, Yves; Winand, Raf; Verpoorten, Carla; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Though family- and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component, the responsible genes for NTDs are still largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, are predicted to be involved in NTDs. Homeobox (HOX) genes play a role in spinal cord development and are tightly regulated in a spatiotemporal and collinear manner, partly by epigenetic modifications. We have quantified DNA methylation for the different HOX genes by subtracting values from a genome-wide methylation analysis using leukocyte DNA from 10 myelomeningocele (MMC) patients and 6 healthy controls. From the 1575 CpGs profiled for the 4 HOX clusters, 26 CpGs were differentially methylated (P-value < 0.05; β-difference > 0.05) between MMC patients and controls. Seventy-seven percent of these CpGs were located in the HOXA and HOXB clusters, with the most profound difference for 3 CpGs within the HOXB7 gene body. A validation case-control study including 83 MMC patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls confirmed a significant association between MMC and HOXB7 hypomethylation (-14.4%; 95% CI: 11.9–16.9%; P-value < 0.0001) independent of the MTHFR 667C>T genotype. Significant HOXB7 hypomethylation was also present in 12 unaffected siblings, each related to a MMC patient, suggestive of an epigenetic change induced by the mother. The inclusion of a neural tube formation model using zebrafish showed that Hoxb7a overexpression but not depletion resulted in deformed body axes with dysmorphic neural tube formation. Our results implicate HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for NTDs and highlight the importance for future genome-wide DNA methylation analyses without preselecting candidate pathways. PMID:25565354

  1. DNA methylation analysis of Homeobox genes implicates HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Rochtus, Anne; Izzi, Benedetta; Vangeel, Elise; Louwette, Sophie; Wittevrongel, Christine; Lambrechts, Diether; Moreau, Yves; Winand, Raf; Verpoorten, Carla; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Though family- and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component, the responsible genes for NTDs are still largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, are predicted to be involved in NTDs. Homeobox (HOX) genes play a role in spinal cord development and are tightly regulated in a spatiotemporal and collinear manner, partly by epigenetic modifications. We have quantified DNA methylation for the different HOX genes by subtracting values from a genome-wide methylation analysis using leukocyte DNA from 10 myelomeningocele (MMC) patients and 6 healthy controls. From the 1575 CpGs profiled for the 4 HOX clusters, 26 CpGs were differentially methylated (P-value < 0.05; β-difference > 0.05) between MMC patients and controls. Seventy-seven percent of these CpGs were located in the HOXA and HOXB clusters, with the most profound difference for 3 CpGs within the HOXB7 gene body. A validation case-control study including 83 MMC patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls confirmed a significant association between MMC and HOXB7 hypomethylation (-14.4%; 95% CI: 11.9-16.9%; P-value < 0.0001) independent of the MTHFR 667C>T genotype. Significant HOXB7 hypomethylation was also present in 12 unaffected siblings, each related to a MMC patient, suggestive of an epigenetic change induced by the mother. The inclusion of a neural tube formation model using zebrafish showed that Hoxb7a overexpression but not depletion resulted in deformed body axes with dysmorphic neural tube formation. Our results implicate HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for NTDs and highlight the importance for future genome-wide DNA methylation analyses without preselecting candidate pathways. PMID:25565354

  2. Mechanistic facility safety and source term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-06-09

    A PC-based computer program was created for facility safety and source term analysis at Hanford The program has been successfully applied to mechanistic prediction of source terms from chemical reactions in underground storage tanks, hydrogen combustion in double contained receiver tanks, and proccss evaluation including the potential for runaway reactions in spent nuclear fuel processing. Model features include user-defined facility room, flow path geometry, and heat conductors, user-defined non-ideal vapor and aerosol species, pressure- and density-driven gas flows, aerosol transport and deposition, and structure to accommodate facility-specific source terms. Example applications are presented here.

  3. Mechanistic studies of carbon monoxide reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, G.L.

    1990-06-12

    The progress made during the current grant period (1 January 1988--1 April 1990) in three different areas of research is summarized. The research areas are: (1) oxidatively-induced double carbonylation reactions to form {alpha}-ketoacyl complexes and studies of the reactivity of the resulting compounds, (2) mechanistic studies of the carbonylation of nitroaromatics to form isocyanates, carbamates, and ureas, and (3) studies of the formation and reactivity of unusual metallacycles and alkylidene ligands supported on binuclear iron carbonyl fragments. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations hav e been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are pr esented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical sig nificance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distr ibution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  5. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distribution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  6. Evaluating National Environmental Sustainability: Performance Measures and Influential Factors for OECD-Member Countries featuring Canadian Performance and Policy Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbick, Kenneth S.

    This research reviews five studies that evaluate national environmental sustainability with composite indices; performs uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of techniques for building a composite index; completes principal components factor analysis to help build subindices measuring waste and pollution, sustainable energy, sustainable food, nature conservation, and sustainable cities (Due to its current importance, the greenhouse gases (GHG) indicator is included individually as another policy measure.); analyses factors that seem to influence performance: climate, population growth, population density, economic output, technological development, industrial structure, energy prices, environmental governance, pollution abatement and control expenditures, and environmental pricing; and explores Canadian policy implications of the results. The techniques to build composite indices include performance indicator selection, missing data treatment, normalisation technique, scale-effect adjustments, weights, and aggregation method. Scale-effect adjustments and normalisation method are significant sources of uncertainty inducing 68% of the observed variation in a country's final rank at the 95% level of confidence. Choice of indicators also introduces substantial variation as well. To compensate for this variation, the current study recommends that a composite index should always be analysed with other policy subindices and individual indicators. Moreover, the connection between population and consumption indicates that per capita scale-effect adjustments should be used for certain indicators. Rather than ranking normalisation, studies should use a method that retains information from the raw indicator values. Multiple regression and cluster analyses indicate economic output, environmental governance, and energy prices are major influential factors, with energy prices the most important. It is statistically significant for five out of seven performance measures at the 95

  7. Appropriateness of mechanistic and non-mechanistic models for the application of ultrafiltration to mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Henry; Ghosehajra, Malay

    2007-07-01

    This study asks two questions: (1) How appropriate is the use of a basic filtration equation to the application of ultrafiltration of mixed waste, and (2) How appropriate are non-parametric models for permeate rates (volumes)? To answer these questions, mechanistic and non-mechanistic approaches are developed for permeate rates and volumes associated with an ultrafiltration/mixed waste system in dia-filtration mode. The mechanistic approach is based on a filtration equation which states that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. The coefficients associated with this linear regression are composed of physical/chemical parameters of the system and based the mass balance equation associated with the membrane and associated developing cake layer. For several sets of data, a high correlation is shown that supports the assertion that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. It is also shown that non-mechanistic approaches, i.e., the use of regression models to are not appropriate. One models considered is Q(p) = a*ln(Cb)+b. Regression models are inappropriate because the scale-up from a bench scale (pilot scale) study to full-scale for permeate rates (volumes) is not simply the ratio of the two membrane surface areas. (authors)

  8. Pathways to neurodegeneration: mechanistic insights from GWAS in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Vijay K; Saykin, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of causative genetic mutations in affected family members has historically dominated our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Nevertheless, most cases of neurodegenerative disease are not explained by Mendelian inheritance of known genetic variants, but instead are thought to have a complex etiology with numerous genetic and environmental factors contributing to susceptibility. Although unbiased genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified novel associations to neurodegenerative diseases, most of these hits explain only modest fractions of disease heritability. In addition, despite the substantial overlap of clinical and pathologic features among major neurodegenerative diseases, surprisingly few GWAS-implicated variants appear to exhibit cross-disease association. These realities suggest limitations of the focus on individual genetic variants and create challenges for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, which traditionally target an isolated molecule or mechanistic step. Recently, GWAS of complex diseases and traits have focused less on individual susceptibility variants and instead have emphasized the biological pathways and networks revealed by genetic associations. This new paradigm draws on the hypothesis that fundamental disease processes may be influenced on a personalized basis by a combination of variants - some common and others rare, some protective and others deleterious - in key genes and pathways. Here, we review and synthesize the major pathways implicated in neurodegeneration, focusing on GWAS from the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders, AD and PD. Using literature mining, we also discover a novel regulatory network that is enriched with AD- and PD-associated genes and centered on the SP1 and AP-1 (Jun/Fos) transcription factors. Overall, this pathway- and

  9. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Sangar, Vineet; Eddy, James A.; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based (CB) models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell. PMID:23112774

  10. Physical activity and its mechanistic effects on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, A; Harrison, M; Watson, R W

    2015-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity have been illustrated in numerous aspects of health. With the increasing incidence of prostate cancer and changes in physical activity of men, understanding the link between the two has important implications for changing this cancer burden. Both positive and negative associations between physical activity and prostate cancer have been previously demonstrated in observational epidemiological studies. Elucidating the biological mechanisms would lead to a better understanding of how physical activity influences the progression of prostate cancer. This review was undertaken to: (1) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle secretomes, (2) indicate the plausible signaling pathways these proteins might activate, and (3) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the roles of the signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression and regression. We also discuss proposed biological mechanisms and signaling pathways by which physical activity may prevent the development and progression of prostate cancer. We discuss proteins involved in the normal and aberrant growth and development of the prostate gland that may be affected by physical activity. We further identify future directions for research, including a better understanding of the biological mechanisms, the need to standardize physical activity and identify mechanistic end points of physical activity that can then be correlated with outcomes. PMID:25800589