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Sample records for factor nsf sorting

  1. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CATALYTIC CYCLE OF THE N-ETHYLMALEIMIDE-SENSITIVE FACTOR (NSF)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunxia; Smith, Everett C.; Whiteheart, Sidney W.

    2014-01-01

    The N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF) was one of the initial members of the ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities Plus (AAA+) family. In this review, we discuss what is known about the mechanism of NSF action and how that relates to the mechanisms of other AAA+ proteins. Like other family members, NSF binds to a protein complex (i.e., SNAP-SNARE complex) and utilizes ATP hydrolysis to affect the conformations of that complex. SNAP-SNARE complex disassembly is essential for SNARE recycling and sustained membrane trafficking. NSF is a homo-hexamer; each protomer is composed of an N-terminal domain, NSF-N, and two adjacent AAA-domains, NSF-D1 and NSF-D2. Mutagenesis analysis has established specific roles for many of the structural elements of NSF-D1, the catalytic ATPase domain, and NSF-N, the SNAP-SNARE binding domain. Hydrodynamic analysis of NSF, labeled with (Ni2+-NTA)2-Cy3, detected conformational differences in NSF, in which the ATP-bound conformation appears more compact than the ADP-bound form. This indicates that NSF undergoes significant conformational changes as it progresses through its ATP-hydrolysis cycle. Incorporating these data, we propose a sequential mechanism by which NSF uses NSF-N and NSF-D1 to disassemble SNAP-SNARE complexes. We also illustrate how analytical centrifugation might be used to study other AAA+ proteins. PMID:21689688

  2. Review: Progresses in understanding N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF) mediated disassembly of SNARE complexes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Je-Kyung; Jahn, Reinhard; Yoon, Tae-Young

    2016-08-01

    N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF) is a key protein of intracellular membrane traffic. NSF is a highly conserved protein belonging to the ATPases associated with other activities (AAA+ proteins). AAA+ share common domains and all transduce ATP hydrolysis into major conformational movements that are used to carry out conformational work on client proteins. Together with its cofactor SNAP, NSF is specialized on disassembling highly stable SNARE complexes that form after each membrane fusion event. Although essential for all eukaryotic cells, however, the details of this reaction have long been enigmatic. Recently, major progress has been made in both elucidating the structure of NSF/SNARE complexes and in understanding the reaction mechanism. Advances in both cryo EM and single molecule measurements suggest that NSF, together with its cofactor SNAP, imposes a tight grip on the SNARE complex. After ATP hydrolysis and phosphate release, it then builds up mechanical tension that is ultimately used to rip apart the SNAREs in a single burst. Because the AAA domains are extremely well-conserved, the molecular mechanism elucidated for NSF is presumably shared by many other AAA+ ATPases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 518-531, 2016. PMID:27062050

  3. N-Ethylmaleimide Sensitive Factor (NSF) Inhibition Prevents Vascular Instability following Gram-Positive Pulmonary Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Linge, Helena M.; Ochani, Kanta; Lin, Ke; Miller, Edmund J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Pneumonia and sepsis are leading causes of ARDS, the pathophysiology of which includes increased pulmonary microvascular permeability and hemodynamic instability resulting in organ dysfunction. We hypothesized that N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF) regulates exocytosis of inflammatory mediators, such as Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), and cytoskeletal stability by modulating myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. Therefore, we challenged pulmonary cells, in vivo and in vitro, with Gram Positive bacterial cell wall components, lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN) and examined the effects of NSF inhibition. Methods Mice were pre-treated with an inhibitor of NSF, TAT-NSF700 (to prevent Ang-2 release). After 30min, LTA and PGN (or saline alone) were instilled intratracheally. Pulse oximetry was assessed in awake mice prior to, and 6 hour post instillation. Post mortem, tissues were collected for studies of inflammation and Ang-2. In vitro, pulmonary endothelial cells were assessed for their responses to LTA and PGN. Results Pulmonary challenge induced signs of airspace and systemic inflammation such as changes in neutrophil counts and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and tissue Ang-2 concentration, and decreased physiological parameters including oxygen saturation and pulse distention. TAT-NSF700 pre-treatment reduced LTA-PGN induced changes in lung tissue Ang-2, oxygen saturation and pulse distention. In vitro, LTA-PGN induced a rapid (<2 min) release of Ang-2, which was significantly attenuated by TAT-NSF700 or anti TLR2 antibody. Furthermore, TAT-NSF700 reduced LTA-PGN-induced MLC phosphorylation at low concentrations of 1–10 nM. Conclusions TAT-NSF700 decreased Ang-2 release, improved oxygen saturation and pulse distention following pulmonary challenge by inhibiting MLC phosphorylation, an

  4. Recent Advances in Deciphering the Structure and Molecular Mechanism of the AAA+ ATPase N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minglei; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-05-01

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), first discovered in 1988, is a key factor for eukaryotic trafficking, including protein and hormone secretion and neurotransmitter release. It is a member of the AAA+ family (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities). NSF disassembles soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes in conjunction with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP). Structural studies of NSF and its complex with SNAREs and SNAPs (known as 20S supercomplex) started about 20years ago. Crystal structures of individual N and D2 domains of NSF and low-resolution electron microscopy structures of full-length NSF and 20S supercomplex have been reported over the years. Nevertheless, the molecular architecture of the 20S supercomplex and the molecular mechanism of NSF-mediated SNARE complex disassembly remained unclear until recently. Here we review recent atomic-resolution or near-atomic resolution structures of NSF and of the 20S supercomplex, as well as recent insights into the molecular mechanism and energy requirements of NSF. We also compare NSF with other known AAA+ family members. PMID:26546278

  5. Processive ATP-driven Substrate Disassembly by the N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor (NSF) Molecular Machine*♦

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Daniel J.; Jung, Jaemyeong; Vivona, Sandro; Fenn, Timothy D.; Brunger, Axel T.; Bryant, Zev

    2013-01-01

    SNARE proteins promote membrane fusion by forming a four-stranded parallel helical bundle that brings the membranes into close proximity. Post-fusion, the complex is disassembled by an AAA+ ATPase called N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF). We present evidence that NSF uses a processive unwinding mechanism to disassemble SNARE proteins. Using a real-time disassembly assay based on fluorescence dequenching, we correlate NSF-driven disassembly rates with the SNARE-activated ATPase activity of NSF. Neuronal SNAREs activate the ATPase rate of NSF by ∼26-fold. One SNARE complex takes an average of ∼5 s to disassemble in a process that consumes ∼50 ATP. Investigations of substrate requirements show that NSF is capable of disassembling a truncated SNARE substrate consisting of only the core SNARE domain, but not an unrelated four-stranded coiled-coil. NSF can also disassemble an engineered double-length SNARE complex, suggesting a processive unwinding mechanism. We further investigated processivity using single-turnover experiments, which show that SNAREs can be unwound in a single encounter with NSF. We propose a processive helicase-like mechanism for NSF in which ∼1 residue is unwound for every hydrolyzed ATP molecule. PMID:23775070

  6. NSF appointment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    President Ronald Reagan has announced his intention to nominate Richard S. Nicholson as assistant director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) for mathematical and physical sciences. Nicholson has been acting deputy director and staff director of NSF since 1983.A research chemist by training, Nicholson was an associate professor of chemistry at Michigan State University before joining NSF in 1970. He served in a number of capacities at NSF, including executive director of the National Science Board commission on precollege education in mathematics, science, and technology, deputy assistant director for the mathematical and physical sciences, and senior planning officer for mathematical and physical sciences. The nomination is subject to Senate confirmation.

  7. Adolescent Sex Offenders' Rankings of Therapeutic Factors Using the Yalom Card Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sribney, Christine L.; Reddon, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Following 11-98 weeks of inpatient residential treatment, 69 male adolescent sex offenders completed the 60-item, 12-factor Yalom Card Sort. The rank orders were compared to adult sex offenders and a psychiatric adult outpatient group. Relative to adult psychiatric outpatients, the adolescent sex offenders had rated Instillation of Hope three…

  8. Nominations for NSF, NSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    President Ronald Reagan plans to nominate William J. Merrell, Jr., to be assistant director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) for Astronomical, Atmospheric, Earth, and Ocean Sciences (AAEO), according to an announcement by NSF. The President also has announced his intention to nominate Craig C. Black and Charles L. Hosier to the National Science Board (NSB), NSF said. The president's nominations are subject to Senate confirmation.

  9. A role for sorting nexin 2 in epidermal growth factor receptor down-regulation: evidence for distinct functions of sorting nexin 1 and 2 in protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Gullapalli, Anuradha; Garrett, Tiana A; Paing, May M; Griffin, Courtney T; Yang, Yonghua; Trejo, JoAnn

    2004-05-01

    Sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) and SNX2, homologues of the yeast vacuolar protein-sorting (Vps)5p, contain a phospholipid-binding motif termed the phox homology (PX) domain and a carboxyl terminal coiled-coil region. A role for SNX1 in trafficking of cell surface receptors from endosomes to lysosomes has been proposed; however, the function of SNX2 remains unknown. Toward understanding the function of SNX2, we first examined the distribution of endogenous protein in HeLa cells. We show that SNX2 resides primarily in early endosomes, whereas SNX1 is found partially in early endosomes and in tubulovesicular-like structures distributed throughout the cytoplasm. We also demonstrate that SNX1 interacts with the mammalian retromer complex through its amino terminal domain, whereas SNX2 does not. Moreover, activated endogenous epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) colocalizes markedly with SNX2-positive endosomes, but minimally with SNX1-containing vesicles. To assess SNX2 function, we examined the effect of a PX domain-mutated SNX2 that is defective in vesicle localization on EGFR trafficking. Mutant SNX2 markedly inhibited agonist-induced EGFR degradation, whereas internalization remained intact. In contrast, SNX1 PX domain mutants failed to effect EGFR degradation, whereas a SNX1 deletion mutant significantly inhibited receptor down-regulation. Interestingly, knockdown of SNX1 and SNX2 expression by RNA interference failed to alter agonist-induced EGFR down-regulation. Together, these findings suggest that both SNX1 and SNX2 are involved in regulating lysosomal sorting of internalized EGFR, but neither protein is essential for this process. These studies are the first to demonstrate a function for SNX2 in protein trafficking. PMID:14978220

  10. NSF Director to resign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Edward A. Knapp, director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) since late 1982, will resign his post later this year to return to research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. President Ronald Reagan has announced his intention to nominate Erich Bloch, vice president for technical personnel development at the IBM Corp., as Knapp's successor.Following formal nomination by President Reagan, the Senate must confirm Bloch as NSF director. If Bloch is confirmed, he is likely to bring to NSF the greater emphasis on engineering that the agency has sought in response to requests from Congress and the engineering community during the last year.

  11. Protected programs at NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Many scientists and science administrators say they are disturbed by the fact that Congress “protected” funding for some National Science Foundation (NSF) programs in the fiscal year (FY) 1987 budget at a cost to other NSF programs. Especially disturbing to some was the notion that the earmarking reportedly occurred as a result of special interest lobbying efforts by their fellow scientists. The favored programs, and those that were cut back to compensate for them, were mostly related to geophysics. The protection of these programs is likely to have some impact on the size and number of grants awarded in some other areas.

  12. Congress trims NSF budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The last-minute spending bill adopted by Congress just before its 1987 holiday recess provides $1,717 billion for the National Science Foundation (NSF) for fiscal year (FY) 1988. The approved figure is more than 9% lower than the request in President Reagan's budget plan. In addition, wording in the House version of the bill that mandated protection of ocean science and women and minorities programs did not appear in the final product that was approved by Congress and signed into law.In absolute terms, NSF's budget will be 6% more than in 1987, far less than expected by the agency and the White House, which had proposed a doubling of NSF's budget over the next several years. The Research and Related Activities section of the budget, out of which comes the bulk of NSF's support of basic research, was funded at $1,453 billion, $200 million less than its $1,653 billion request, and the Antarctic Research section received $124.8 million of $143 million in the President's budget. Science Education, on the other hand, was budgeted for $139.2 million, $25 million more than requested.

  13. NSF announces diversity programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruesi, Liz

    2016-04-01

    The US National Science Foundation (NSF) has initiated a new funding programme that will create schemes to increase diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The initiative – Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (INCLUDES) – aims to increase the participation of women, those with a low socioeconomic status, people with disabilities and those from minority racial backgrounds.

  14. Benefits of NSF work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Ted

    This fall I will leave my rotatorship as Associate Director for Chemical Oceanography at the National Science Foundation. I have very much enjoyed my duty and want to outline for those who may become “rotators” some of the job's benefits, since NSF is now seeking applicants to replace me. Batiza, Rea and Rumble [Eos, 69, 801, 1988] have discussed the rotator's experience; my comments supplement their points.The most important benefit in working at NSF is the breadth of vision you acquire. This is important for researchers, because it pulls you away from your narrowly focused subfield and forces you to review again, as you did as a graduate student, your entire field. For teachers, this benefit is equally important, because you will keep up with current research even while away from teaching your up-to-date balanced courses. During my stay here I have reviewed proposals to study trace metals scavenging, gas exchange, sediment traps, biochemical cycling, stable and unstable isotopes, lipid biomarkers, sediment diagenesis, anoxic redox processes, and many other exciting topics. Some research areas, such as the vent and seep studies, had not been conceived when I was a graduate student in the sixties, so my experience here has been, in fact, a real sabbatical.

  15. New directions at NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Albert B.

    1995-10-01

    The mission and scope of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and lightwave technology will be very briefly discussed. The focus of the presentation will be directed toward changes in research support that are taking place and the opportunities we have for aiming our research to meet the challenges and needs that face the nation. In the USA it is very clear that defense oriented research is downsizing and is being redirected into economy driven aresas, such as manufacturing, business, and industry. For those researchers who are willing to move into these areas and find a niche, the rewards may be very great. Industrial research partners should also seize these opportunities to enhance their resources in an otherwise bleak future for industrial support of basic research in lightwave technology and many other reserach disciplines. These activities of bringing together industry and academia will have the value added benefit of providing increased job opportunities for students. An outline of some of these opportunities and incentives will be presented. On the international front, there has never been a better time for the encouragement of joint research and collaboration across borders. The economic potential for involvement in Eastern Europe and Asia are enormous. Agencies like ourselves are open to help support of visiting scientist/engineer exchange, international conferences and forums and support of innovative ideas to help further enhance economic developemnt of the world and hence the quality of life. The presence of the Russian delegation here at these SPIE meetings in in part the result of NSF support. Concomitant with these changes is a growing interest in education. Academia is gradually realizing that education includes training for students to acquire jobs and hence we complete the cycle of the importance of interacting with industry. At the NSF a major new initiative is being introduced in Optical Science and Engineering (OSE). This effort has been

  16. Political Winds Still Buffeting NSF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Reviews the current status of the Bauman amendment that would have all National Science Foundation (NSF) grants subjected to prior Congressional approval on a monthly basis and discusses possible developments that may arise from pressure by conservative political organizations to make NSF funding more responsive to Congressional review. (GS)

  17. Astrophysicist nominated to head NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2013-09-01

    US president Barack Obama has nominated astrophysicist France Córdova as the next director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) - the country's biggest funder of basic research with an annual budget of 7bn.

  18. Knapp confirmed as NSF Director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward A. Knapp was confirmed by the Senate in a voice vote on April 15 as the director of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Senate vote followed a confirmation hearing by the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee. Knapp, who was nominated by President Reagan to head the foundation in November, had been assistant director for NSF's mathematical and physical sciences (MPS) directorate since July 1982.Allegations that he has been politicizing NSF have beleaguered Knapp since he asked for resignations or firm commitments to leave from three NSF top administrators in December (two of these administrators had been planning to leave, though no resignation dates had been set). Knapp assured the Senate committee during the April 13 confirmation hearings that he made the decision to ask for the resignations and that, although he had discussed his plan with Office of Science and Technology Policy officials, they did not request that certain people be removed in exchange for particular increases in the NSF budget. Knapp consistently has defended himself against the allegations by saying that he wants his own team at the agency.

  19. Sorting protein-related receptor SorLA controls regulated secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhao; Xu, Feng-Yi; Huang, Shu-Hong; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2011-12-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), after secreted from cells, plays a critical role in central and peripheral neuron survival and function. The secretion of GDNF can be either constitutive or regulated by physiological stimuli; however, the detailed mechanism driving GDNF secretion is still unknown. Here, we report that sorting protein-related receptor with A-type repeats (SorLA), a member of the mammal Vps10p domain receptor, interacts with GDNF and is localized to GDNF-containing vesicles. Overexpression of SorLA significantly increases, and knockdown of SorLA by siRNA decreases, the regulated secretion of GDNF in PC12 and MN9D cells but has no effect on GDNF constitutive secretion. In addition, overexpression of a truncated form of SorLA also impairs GDNF-regulated secretion. Finally, we found that the prodomain of GDNF mediates the interaction of GDNF with SorLA under acidic conditions. Moreover, overexpression of SorLA could enhance the regulated secretion of the GDNF prodomain-GFP fusion protein, suggesting that the prodomain of GDNF is responsible for its regulated secretion. Together, these findings will advance our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying GDNF-regulated secretion. PMID:21994944

  20. Sorting choanoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, Veronica I.; Miño, Gaston L.; Sparacino, Javier; Banchio, Adolfo J.; Condat, Carlos A.; Koehl, Mimi A. R.; King, Nicole; Stocker, Roman

    2015-03-01

    In freshwater environments, as well as in oceans, environmental conditions are in constant fluctuation. Some heterotrophic plankton must adapt their swimming behavior in order to survive under these conditions. In the case of the choanoflagellate, the closest animal ancestor, the ability to forage for food is given not only by its single flagellum, but also by its differentiation between fast and slow swimmers. The understanding of how these cells with different strategies to swim search for food can give us a better insight into how eukaryotes respond to different stimuli. In this work, we have designed a microfluidic device that sorts choanoflagellates by their speed. The optimal geometry was found by a numerical model using the experimentally determined motilities of each swimmer type.

  1. Histidine-domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase regulates platelet-derived growth factor receptor intracellular sorting and degradation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haisha; Wardega, Piotr; Mazaud, David; Klosowska-Wardega, Agnieszka; Jurek, Aleksandra; Engström, Ulla; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2015-11-01

    Histidine domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP) is a putative phosphatase that has been shown to affect the signaling and downregulation of certain receptor tyrosine kinases. To investigate if HD-PTP affects platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) signaling, we employed the overexpression of HA-tagged HD-PTP, as well as siRNA-mediated and lentivirus shRNA-mediated silencing of HD-PTP in NIH3T3 cells. We found that HD-PTP was recruited to the PDGFRβ in a ligand-dependent manner. Depletion of HD-PTP resulted in an inability of PDGF-BB to promote tyrosine phosphorylation of the ubiquitin ligases c-Cbl and Cbl-b, with a concomitant missorting and reduction of the degradation of activated PDGFRβ. In contrast, ligand-induced internalization of PDGFRβ was unaffected by HD-PTP silencing. Furthermore, the levels of STAM and Hrs of the ESCRT0 machinery were decreased, and immunofluorescence staining showed that in HD-PTP-depleted cells, PDGFRβ accumulated in large aberrant intracellular structures. After the reduction of HD-PTP expression, an NIH3T3-derived cell line that has autocrine PDGF-BB signaling (sis-3T3) showed increased ability of anchorage-independent growth. However, exogenously added PDGF-BB promoted efficient additional colony formation in control cells, but was not able to do so in HD-PTP-depleted cells. Furthermore, cells depleted of HD-PTP migrated faster than control cells. In summary, HD-PTP affects the intracellular sorting of activated PDGFRβ and the migration, proliferation and tumorigenicity of cells stimulated by PDGF. PMID:26232618

  2. NSF directors asked to resign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward A. Knapp, the Reagan administration's appointee to replace former NSF Director John Slaughter, who left the post to become chancellor o f the University of Maryland, has asked for, and received, the resignation of Deputy Director Donald N. Langenberg. Knapp has also requested the resignations of Assistant Directors Francis S. Johnson (astronomical, atmosphere, earth, and ocean sciences) and Eloise E. Clark (biological, behavioral, and social sciences). This leaves only one post at the top management levels o f NSF: the assistant director for mathematics and physical sciences—a post held, until Slaughter's resignation, by Knapp. The new director is the only one of the former top managers remaining; no assistant directors have yet been named.

  3. NSF and NASA budgets increased

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Research budgets of several of the federal government agencies were increased significantly over the Reagan administration's requests in the House of Representative's appropriations bill H.R. 4034. These budgets had been removed from the Reagan administration's omnibus reconciliation bill, and thus there were worries expressed that certain research funding could be in jeopardy. The rationale was that because the requests were voted on individually on the floor of the House, many sections of the budgets would be subjected to extra scrutiny, which would lead to more cuts.The National Science Foundation (NSF) budget request had been cut and reordered by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) by making sharp reductions in programs of the social sciences and in programs of science and engineering education. There were fears that these programs would be reinstated to the original request level, at the expense of the budgets of other research activities. These fears materialized, but only momentarily. Efforts to cut the research activities by the House Appropriations Committee were soundly defeated. The budget was supported, with additional increases to provide for the education programs, by a high margin, which included most Republican and Democratic members of the House of Representatives. The overall NSF budget, as passed, has a total appropriation of $1103.5 million, compared with the Administration's request of $1033.5 million (the Fiscal Year 1981 appropriation for the NSF was $1022.4 million). The House approved budget included increases of $44.9 million in research and $25.1 million in science and engineering education. Included in the research budget increase were recommendations by the House Appropriations Committee for support of the social sciences and for the international affairs programs. Also included in the recommendations was support of interdisciplinary research programs that cut across the directorates of the NSF.

  4. Derivation of sorting programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Joseph; Loganantharaj, Rasiah

    1990-01-01

    Program synthesis for critical applications has become a viable alternative to program verification. Nested resolution and its extension are used to synthesize a set of sorting programs from their first order logic specifications. A set of sorting programs, such as, naive sort, merge sort, and insertion sort, were successfully synthesized starting from the same set of specifications.

  5. Factors affecting carcass value and profitability in early-weaned Simmental steers: II. Days on feed endpoints and sorting strategies.

    PubMed

    Pyatt, N A; Berger, L L; Faulkner, D B; Walker, P M; Rodriguez-Zas, S L

    2005-12-01

    In a 4-yr study, early-weaned Simmental steers (n = 192) of known genetics were individually fed to determine EPD, performance, and carcass measurements explaining variation in carcass value and profitability across incremental days on feed (DOF) when sorted by HCW, calculated yield grade (YG), or at their highest profit endpoint (BEST). Steers were weaned at 88.0 +/- 1.1 d of age, pen-fed a high-concentrate diet for 84.5 +/- 0.4 d, individually fed for 249.7 +/- 0.7 d, and slaughtered at 423.3 +/- 1.4 d of age. Carcass weight, YG, and marbling score (MS) were predicted using real-time ultrasound throughout the finishing period to calculate carcass value and profitability at 90, 60, 30 d preslaughter and under three individual sorting strategies. Sorting strategies included marketing the 25 and 50% heaviest HCW, the highest YG at d 60 and 30, or the remaining 25% at 0-d endpoints. Independent variables were year, weaning weight EPD, yearling weight EPD, marbling EPD, DMI, ADG, HCW, YG, and MS. Profit was quadratic in response to increased DOF; the greatest economic return was noted on d 30 (pre-slaughter). Final weight, DMI, HCW, MS, and YG increased (linear; P < 0.001) with additional DOF, and ADG and G:F decreased (linear; P < 0.001). Total cost of gain was quadratic (P < 0.001), and incremental cost of gain rose at an increasing rate (quadratic; P < 0.001) with increased DOF. With increasing DOF, HCW importance decreased from 58 to 21%; MS was variable, ranging from 18 to 23%; and YG and DMI were minor contributors to profit variation. Among sorting strategies, final BW and HCW were greater for BEST, whereas other measurements were similar. Sorting individuals by HCW, YG, or at BEST increased profitability 3.70 dollars, 2.52 dollars, or 30.65 dollars over the optimal group DOF endpoint (d 30). Retrospective analyses illustrated that sorting does not need to pinpoint each animal's profit optimum to result in economic gains; rather, increasing HCW and decreasing

  6. Subcommittee on science reviews NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard M.

    With most attention focused on the appropriations legislation funding the National Science Foundation next year, less notice has been given to the agency's reauthorization legislation. During the last few months, the House Subcommittee on Science has held two hearings on this legislation to solicit views about the agency.Nine witnesses testified at a May 20 hearing. They were asked to address six questions, including some dealing with the balance between curiosity-driven research and strategic research, and between research and education activities. Views were also solicited on the modernization of academic research facilities, inadequately funded fields, international involvement in NSF-supported research, and academic block grants.

  7. NSF reviewed—An analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The awarding of scientific research grants jointly to investigators and their academic institutions by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (see news item above) is based on a concept of high ideals; review of proposed research ploys is done by peers selected from the academic community. The peer review process and the way awards of funds are made to an investigator's institution are often mildly criticized, but among members of the community there has long been an underlying respect of the concepts, a recognition that the process tends to lead to high standards in research. As peers are chosen, a certain degree of unevenness in the review process is to be expected. Just how much unevenness has been revealed in a recent study sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Science and Public Policy (COSPUP). The results indicate that the peer review process is random and unbiased. The results show some tendency toward unevenness between groups of peers, but the NSF process evidently is a finely tuned one, especially when compared with other more or less subjective methods of evaluation.

  8. Opportunities for Funding at NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafafi, Zakya H.

    2009-03-01

    lead to a better quality of life and improved economic development for people all over the world will also be given. As science is becoming increasingly global, DMR is particularly interested in preparing students to be agile thinkers in this universal environment and in forging collaborations and cooperation among scientists and engineers around the world. Free movement of knowledge without any obstacles can only be achieved through a more coordinated approach for international collaboration. Following the presentation there will be a question-and-answer period. For additional information, visit the DMR Web page at www.nsf.gov/materials

  9. NSF Acting Head Mulls Job, Science Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerkel, Fred H.

    1976-01-01

    Richard C. Atkinson, acting head of the National Science Foundation, gives his views on problems facing NSF and the science community and predicts growing support for basic research in the next decade. (MLH)

  10. A novel Sec18p/NSF-dependent complex required for Golgi-to-endosome transport in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Burd, C G; Peterson, M; Cowles, C R; Emr, S D

    1997-01-01

    The vacuolar protein-sorting (VPS) pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediates localization of proteins from the trans-Golgi to the vacuole via a prevacuolar endosome compartment. Mutations in class D vacuolar protein-sorting (vps) genes affect vesicle-mediated Golgi-to-endosome transport and result in secretion of vacuolar proteins. Temperature-sensitive-for-function (tsf) and dominant negative mutations in PEP12, encoding a putative SNARE vesicle receptor on the endosome, and tsf mutations in VAC1, a gene implicated in vacuole inheritance and vacuolar protein sorting, were constructed and used to demonstrate that Pep12p and Vac1p are components of the VPS pathway. The sequence of Vac1p contains two putative zinc-binding RING motifs, a zinc finger motif, and a coiled-coil motif. Site-directed mutations in the carboxyl-terminal RING motif strongly affected vacuolar protein sorting. Vac1p was found to be tightly associated with membranes as a monomer and in a large SDS-resistant complex. By using Pep12p affinity chromatography, we found that Vac1p, Vps45p (SEC1 family member), and Sec18p (yeast N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive factor, NSF) bind Pep12p. Consistent with a functional role for this complex in vacuolar protein sorting, double pep12tsfvac1tsf and pep12tsf vps45tsf mutants exhibited synthetic Vps- phenotypes, the tsf phenotype of the vac1tsf mutant was rescued by overexpression of VPS45 or PEP12, overexpression of a dominant pep12 allele in a sec18-1 strain resulted in a severe synthetic growth defect that was rescued by deletion of PEP12 or VAC1, and subcellular fractionation of vac1 delta cells revealed a striking change in the fractionation of Pep12p and Vps21p, a rab family GTPase required for vacuolar protein sorting. The functions of Pep12p, Vps45p, and Vps21p indicate that key aspects of Golgi-to-endosome trafficking are similar to other vesicle-mediated transport steps, although the role of Vac1p suggests that there are also novel components of the VPS

  11. Scalable, Multithreaded, Partially-in-Place Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Haglin, David J.; Adolf, Robert D.; Mackey, Greg E.

    2013-05-20

    A recent trend in hardware development is producing computing systems that are stretching the number of cores and size of shared-memory beyond where most fundamental serial algorithms perform well. The expectation is that this trend will continue. So it makes sense to rethink our fundamental algorithms such as sorting. There are many situations where data that needs to be sorted will actually fit into the shared memory so applications could benefit from an efficient parallel sorting algorithm. When sorting large data (at least hundreds of Gigabytes) in a single shared memory, there are two factors that affect the algorithm choice. First, does the algorithm sort in-place? And second, does the algorithm scale well beyond tens of threads? Surprisingly, existing algorithms posses either one of these factors, but not both. We present an approach that gracefully degrades in performance as the amount of available working memory decreases relative to the size of the input.

  12. Demonstration of differential quantitative requirements for NSF among multiple vesicle fusion pathways of GLUT4 using a dominant-negative ATPase-deficient NSF

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiaoli; Matsumoto, Hideko; Hinck, Cynthia S.; Al-Hasani, Hadi; St-Denis, Jean-Francois; Whiteheart, Sidney W.; Cushman, Samuel W. . E-mail: sam_cushman@nih.gov

    2005-07-22

    In this study, we investigated the relative participation of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) in vivo in a complex multistep vesicle trafficking system, the translocation response of GLUT4 to insulin in rat adipose cells. Transfections of rat adipose cells demonstrate that over-expression of wild-type NSF has no effect on total, or basal and insulin-stimulated cell-surface expression of HA-tagged GLUT4. In contrast, a dominant-negative NSF (NSF-D1EQ) can be expressed at a low enough level that it has little effect on total HA-GLUT4, but does reduce both basal and insulin-stimulated cell-surface HA-GLUT4 by {approx}50% without affecting the GLUT4 fold-translocation response to insulin. However, high expression levels of NSF-D1EQ decrease total HA-GLUT4. The inhibitory effect of NSF-D1EQ on cell-surface HA-GLUT4 is reversed when endocytosis is inhibited by co-expression of a dominant-negative dynamin (dynamin-K44A). Moreover, NSF-D1EQ does not affect cell-surface levels of constitutively recycling GLUT1 and TfR, suggesting a predominant effect of low-level NSF-D1EQ on the trafficking of GLUT4 from the endocytic recycling compared to the intracellular GLUT4-specific compartment. Thus, our data demonstrate that the multiple fusion steps in GLUT4 trafficking have differential quantitative requirements for NSF activity. This indicates that the rates of plasma and intracellular membrane fusion reactions vary, leading to differential needs for the turnover of the SNARE proteins.

  13. NSF's Career-Life Balance Initiative and the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajhar, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    In the fall of 2011, the National Science Foundation (NSF) began the Career-Life Balance Initiative to support graduate students, postdoctoral students, and early-career researchers in STEM fields. NSF is focusing first on its most prestigious programs for early-career scientists---the CAREER program and the postdoctoral programs, including the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships (AAPF)---where career-life balance opportunities can help retain a significant fraction of early career talent. Subject to budget constraints, NSF plans to further integrate and enhance career-life balance opportunities over time through other programs, like the Graduate Research Fellowships Program and ADVANCE, and subsequently through the broader portfolio of NSF activities. In addition, to comply with Title IX, NSF has regulations to ensure that educational programs that receive NSF funds are free of gender discrimination and harassment. A primary goal of this presentation is to put facts about NSF into the hands of students, faculty, staff, administrators and other policy makers to benefit the advancement of career-life balance in the astronomical community. The presentation focus areas will (1) address common misconceptions about NSF rules regarding parental leave; (2) discuss benefits already available through the AAPF program, Graduate Research Fellowships, and other programs; and (3) listen to community concerns and issues to bring these back to the foundation for consideration. Did you know that NSF allows paid parental leave under many circumstances? For example, the AAPF program currently allows two months of paid parental leave during the fellow's tenure. What are the rules for NSF Graduate Research Fellowships? Come to the session and find out; the answers to such questions might surprise you.

  14. Sorting to Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Sandy; McPherson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The world of higher education is a world of sorting, selecting, and ranking--on both sides of the market. Colleges select students to recruit and then to admit; students choose where to apply and which offer to accept. The sorting process that gets the most attention is in the higher reaches of the market, where it is not too much to say that…

  15. NSF cuts likely, says House panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard M.

    At key congressional hearings held recently on the National Science Foundation's budget for fiscal year 1993, the bottom line was clear: the agency should not expect the 18% increase it has requested.The chair of the House VA, HUD, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Subcommitee, Bob Traxler (D.-Mich.), indicated his support for NSF, but added that his subcommittee “lives and dies by its 602(b) allocation.” This is the amount with which the subcommittee funds programs under its jurisdiction, including veterans' health care and housing support. Traxler said the administration had “shortchanged” some activities to provide the NSF increase, and that money would have to be returned to other programs. Throughout the hearings, Traxler spoke of a possible 4-6% increase for NSF in fiscal 1993, less than one-third the amount requested.

  16. Sorting nexin 9 differentiates ligand-activated Smad3 from Smad2 for nuclear import and transforming growth factor β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Mark C.; Repellin, Claire E.; Kang, Jeong-Han; Andrianifahanana, Mahefatiana; Yin, Xueqian; Leof, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is a pleiotropic protein secreted from essentially all cell types and primary tissues. While TGFβ’s actions reflect the activity of a number of signaling networks, the primary mediator of TGFβ responses are the Smad proteins. Following receptor activation, these cytoplasmic proteins form hetero-oligomeric complexes that translocate to the nucleus and affect gene transcription. Here, through biological, biochemical, and immunofluorescence approaches, sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) is identified as being required for Smad3-dependent responses. SNX9 interacts with phosphorylated (p) Smad3 independent of Smad2 or Smad4 and promotes more rapid nuclear delivery than that observed independent of ligand. Although SNX9 does not bind nucleoporins Nup153 or Nup214 or some β importins (Imp7 or Impβ), it mediates the association of pSmad3 with Imp8 and the nuclear membrane. This facilitates nuclear translocation of pSmad3 but not SNX9. PMID:26337383

  17. Receptor-Mediated Uptake and Intracellular Sorting of Multivalent Lipid Nanoparticles Against the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and the Human EGFR 2 (HER2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, David Tu

    In the area of receptor-targeted lipid nanoparticles for drug delivery, efficiency has been mainly focused on cell-specificity, endocytosis, and subsequently effects on bioactivity such as cell growth inhibition. Aspects of targeted liposomal uptake and intracellular sorting are not well defined. This dissertation assessed a series of ligands as targeted functional groups against HER2 and EGFR for liposomal drug delivery. Receptor-mediated uptake, both mono-targeted and dual-targeted to multiple receptors of different ligand valence, and the intracellular sorting of lipid nanoparticles were investigated to improve the delivery of drugs to cancer cells. Lipid nanoparticles were functionalized through a new sequential micelle transfer---conjugation method, while the micelle transfer method was extended to growth factors. Through a combination of both techniques, anti-HER2 and anti-EGFR dual-targeted immunoliposomes with different combinations of ligand valence were developed for comparative studies. With the array of lipid nanoparticles, the uptake and cytotoxicity of lipid nanoparticles in relationship to ligand valence, both mono-targeting and dual-targeting, were evaluated on a small panel of breast cancer cell lines that express HER2 and EGFR of varying levels. Comparable uptake ratios of ligand to expressed receptor and apparent cooperativity were observed. For cell lines that express both receptors, additive dose-uptake effects were also observed with dual-targeted immunoliposomes, which translated to marginal improvements in cell growth inhibition with doxorubicin delivery. Colocalization analysis revealed that ligand-conjugated lipid nanoparticles settle to endosomal compartments similar to their attached ligands. Pathway transregulation and pathway saturation were also observed to affect trafficking. In the end, liposomes routed to the recycling endosomes were never observed to traffic beyond the endosomes nor to be exocytose like recycled ligands. Based on

  18. NSF program gives research experience to undergrads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Daniel W.

    Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) is a new National Science Foundation (NSF) program designed to attract talented undergraduates into research careers in science, engineering, and mathematics. The program is intended to provide active research experience to students while they are still in their undergraduate years. There are two categories of support under this program: REU Sites and REU Supplements. The supplement, as the name implies, is to supplement existing NSF grants to permit an investigator to hire an undergraduate assistant. Here, I will report o n the REU site award made to the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska for summer 1987.

  19. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Induces Genes Associated with Inflammation and Gliosis in the Retina: A Gene Profiling Study of Flow-Sorted, Müller Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, V. Joseph; Brooks, Matthew; Swaroop, Anand; Sarthy, Vijay P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial) cells exposed to CNTF in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20–30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE. Conclusions/Significance Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to

  20. Sorting Out Seasonal Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back to Health Library Sorting Out Seasonal Allergies Sneezing, runny nose, nasal congestion. Symptoms of the common ... simple preventive measures, you can help reduce your sneezing, coughing and general stuffiness, according to Pamela A. ...

  1. Microfluidic sorting of microtissues.

    PubMed

    Buschke, D G; Resto, P; Schumacher, N; Cox, B; Tallavajhula, A; Vivekanandan, A; Eliceiri, K W; Williams, J C; Ogle, B M

    2012-03-01

    Increasingly, invitro culture of adherent cell types utilizes three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds or aggregate culture strategies to mimic tissue-like, microenvironmental conditions. In parallel, new flow cytometry-based technologies are emerging to accurately analyze the composition and function of these microtissues (i.e., large particles) in a non-invasive and high-throughput way. Lacking, however, is an accessible platform that can be used to effectively sort or purify large particles based on analysis parameters. Here we describe a microfluidic-based, electromechanical approach to sort large particles. Specifically, sheath-less asymmetric curving channels were employed to separate and hydrodynamically focus particles to be analyzed and subsequently sorted. This design was developed and characterized based on wall shear stress, tortuosity of the flow path, vorticity of the fluid in the channel, sorting efficiency and enrichment ratio. The large particle sorting device was capable of purifying fluorescently labelled embryoid bodies (EBs) from unlabelled EBs with an efficiency of 87.3% ± 13.5%, and enrichment ratio of 12.2 ± 8.4 (n = 8), while preserving cell viability, differentiation potential, and long-term function. PMID:22505992

  2. Critical time for NSF, NASA funding bills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard

    Although the new fiscal year does not start until October, the next few weeks will be critical in determining the amount of money which the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration receive. Scientists who want to communicate their views to key representatives and senators about these agencies should do so now.Every year Congress must pass new funding, or appropriations, legislation. Both NSF and NASA funding come under the jurisdiction of the House and Senate appropriations subcommittees for the Veterans Administration, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies. These two subcommittees have already heard from NSF officials, and will wrap-up official NASA testimony this week. Several days of hearings from public witnesses are also scheduled.

  3. Clinton seeks additional funds for NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    A $207 million fiscal year 1993 supplemental appropriation for the National Science Foundation has been proposed by President Clinton for strategic research and core research programs. The funds would increase the agency's 1993 budget to $2.04 billion, a 14% increase over the fiscal 1992 budget. The request is part of a $16.3 billion supplemental bill awaiting action by Congress that would also create 500,000 new jobs.On February 23, NSF Director Walter E. Massey testified before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Veterans Affairs, HUD, and Independent Agencies to support the supplement. “NSF's activities contribute to improving the nation's productivity by generating new knowledge and investing in the future by training the current and next generation of scientists and engineers,” he said.

  4. Flow cytometry and cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sherrif F; van den Engh, Ger

    2007-01-01

    Flow cytometry and cell sorting are well-established technologies in clinical diagnostics and biomedical research. Heterogeneous mixtures of cells are placed in suspension and passed single file across one or more laser interrogation points. Light signals emitted from the particles are collected and correlated to entities such as cell morphology, surface and intracellular protein expression, gene expression, and cellular physiology. Based on user-defined parameters, individual cells can then be diverted from the fluid stream and collected into viable, homogeneous fractions at exceptionally high speeds and a purity that approaches 100%. As such, the cell sorter becomes the launching point for numerous downstream studies. Flow cytometry is a cornerstone in clinical diagnostics, and cheaper, more versatile machines are finding their way into widespread and varied uses. In addition, advances in computing and optics have led to a new generation of flow cytometers capable of processing cells at orders of magnitudes faster than their predecessors, and with staggering degrees of complexity, making the cytometer a powerful discovery tool in biotechnology. This chapter will begin with a discussion of basic principles of flow cytometry and cell sorting, including a technical description of factors that contribute to the performance of these instruments. The remaining sections will then be divided into clinical- and research-based applications of flow cytometry and cell sorting, highlighting salient studies that illustrate the versatility of this indispensable technology. PMID:17728993

  5. AGU acts on NSF Page Charge Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast action by Headquarters alerted AGU members to a proposed change to the National Science Foundation's page charge policy that would weaken the ability of scientific societies to serve the scientific community.If adopted, NSF's new policy, announced in the Federal Register December 18, would remove the prohibition against allowing page charges to commercially produced journals. The proposal for the change was supposedly put forth to obtain a reaction from the scientific community.

  6. Status of NSF's polar programs office raised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. Catherine

    Walter Massey, Director of the National Science Foundation, announced on January 13 that he has elevated the status of the Division of Polar Programs (DPP). It is now the Office of Polar Programs and, organizationally, part of the Office of the Director. Effective immediately, the newly created office began reporting to NSF's deputy director. Massey is also reactivating the Board's Committee on Polar Programs to provide NSF with continuing policy guidance and advice.In announcing the program's move, Massey said that NSF's Antarctic and Arctic activities have grown increasingly prominent in recent years as international attention has focused on research programs, environmental concerns, law enforcement, and other issues in both polar regions. “With the increased responsibility we have been given [in the polar regions] comes increased accountability,” Massey said. “I believe that heightening the stewardship for polar programs is an important way to help ensure that we meet the expectations and needs of the polar research communities and others,” he added.

  7. Dielectrophoretic Sorting of Membrane Protein Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Structure elucidation of large membrane protein complexes still comprises a considerable challenge yet is a key factor in drug development and disease combat. Femtosecond nanocrystallography is an emerging technique with which structural information of membrane proteins is obtained without the need to grow large crystals, thus overcoming the experimental riddle faced in traditional crystallography methods. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a microfluidic device capable of sorting membrane protein crystals based on size using dielectrophoresis. We demonstrate the excellent sorting power of this new approach with numerical simulations of selected sub-micrometer beads in excellent agreement with experimental observations. Crystals from batch crystallization broths of the huge membrane protein complex photosystem I were sorted without further treatment, resulting in a high degree of monodispersity and crystallinity in the ~ 100 nm size range. Microfluidic integration, continuous sorting, and nanometer-sized crystal fractions make this method ideal for direct coupling to femtosecond nanocrystallography. PMID:24004002

  8. 48 CFR 2515.215-70 - NSF negotiation authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... an NSF contract is for scientific activities which are determined by the NSF contracting officer to... Secretary of State or Secretary of Defense, specific scientific activities in connection with...

  9. 48 CFR 2515.215-70 - NSF negotiation authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... an NSF contract is for scientific activities which are determined by the NSF contracting officer to... Secretary of State or Secretary of Defense, specific scientific activities in connection with...

  10. 48 CFR 2515.215-70 - NSF negotiation authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... an NSF contract is for scientific activities which are determined by the NSF contracting officer to... Secretary of State or Secretary of Defense, specific scientific activities in connection with...

  11. 48 CFR 2515.215-70 - NSF negotiation authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... an NSF contract is for scientific activities which are determined by the NSF contracting officer to... Secretary of State or Secretary of Defense, specific scientific activities in connection with...

  12. Rubric Sorting Astronomy Essays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Len, P. M.

    2014-07-01

    Student essays on introductory astronomy exams can be consistently and efficiently graded by a single instructor, or by multiple graders for a large class. This is done by constructing a robust outcome rubric while sorting exams into separate stacks, then checking each stack for consistency. Certain online resources readily provide primary source prompts for writing astronomy exam essay questions.

  13. The NSF Science Education Controversy: Issues, Events, Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Karen B.

    Discussion of National Science Foundation (NSF) funding of precollege science education revolves around the controversy of whether NSF should fund "Man: A Course of Study" (MACOS). NSF had funded MACOS' curriculum development, implementation, and postevaluation during 1963-1975. The controversy began in March 1975 when U.S. Congressman John Conlan…

  14. Sorting quantum systems efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) – which direct photons according to their polarization – and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation. PMID:27142705

  15. Lipoprotein sorting in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and processed into mature forms on the cytoplasmic membrane. A lipid moiety attached to the N terminus anchors these proteins to the membrane surface. Many bacteria are predicted to express more than 100 lipoproteins, which play diverse functions on the cell surface. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes the localization of Escherichia coli lipoproteins to the outer membrane. Some lipoproteins play vital roles in the sorting of other lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and β-barrel proteins to the outer membrane. On the basis of results from biochemical, genetic, and structural studies, we discuss the biogenesis of lipoproteins in bacteria, their importance in cellular functions, and the molecular mechanisms underlying efficient sorting of hydrophobic lipoproteins to the outer membrane through the hydrophilic periplasm. PMID:21663440

  16. Sorting quantum systems efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) – which direct photons according to their polarization – and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation.

  17. Sorting quantum systems efficiently.

    PubMed

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) - which direct photons according to their polarization - and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation. PMID:27142705

  18. Event shape sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopečná, Renata; Tomášik, Boris

    2016-04-01

    We propose a novel method for sorting events of multiparticle production according to the azimuthal anisotropy of their momentum distribution. Although the method is quite general, we advocate its use in analysis of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions where a large number of hadrons is produced. The advantage of our method is that it can automatically sort out samples of events with histograms that indicate similar distributions of hadrons. It takes into account the whole measured histograms with all orders of anisotropy instead of a specific observable ( e.g., v_2 , v_3 , q_2 . It can be used for more exclusive experimental studies of flow anisotropies which are then more easily compared to theoretical calculations. It may also be useful in the construction of mixed-events background for correlation studies as it allows to select events with similar momentum distribution.

  19. NSF to receive 10% funding increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard M.

    Work is almost complete on the fiscal year 1994 funding bill for the National Science Foundation. On October 1, Conference Committee Chairs Louis Stokes (D-Ohio) and Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) and their colleagues completed work on the final version of HR2491, the VA, HUD, Independent Agencies Appropriations Bill. The House and Senate will soon give their final approval to the conference report for HR2491, after which it will lack only the president's signature. NSF's overall budget increase of 10%, raising total funding to %3,005.3 million, is the highest increase among all departments and agencies. Last year's increase in NSF funding was 6.3%.Funding for research and related activities will increase 7% to $1,986 million, a compromise between the 10% House increase and the 4% Senate figure. Last year's bill cut research funding. Education and human resources funding will increase 17% to $569.6 million. This is $13.5 million above the Clinton administration's request. Last year's increase for education and human resources was 4.7%.

  20. The NSF PAARE Projects at SC State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, Sean D.; Cash, Jennifer; Hartmann, Dieter; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Ho, Shirley; Howell, Steve B.; King, Jeremy R.; Leising, Mark D.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Smith, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We review our progress over the past 7.5 years and the path forward under the NSF program "Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)". Our first project, "A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)" was a part of the 2008 PAARE cohort which we finished on September 30, 2015. We will summarize the results of those years and look at our way forward under a second PAARE award made in August 2014 (POCA II). Our partnership under the second PAARE award includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) as well as individual investigators at NASA Ames and Carnegie Mellon University. Our recent work on variable and peculiar stars, work with the Kepler Observatory and our educational products in cosmology for non-STEM majors will be presented as well as our success with undergraduate and graduate students. We will also discuss how we are sharing resources with Clemson through distance learning and undergraduate research projects. Our support includes NSF awards AST-0750814 and AST-1358913 to South Carolina State University as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Support for the Kepler observations is provided by NASA to South Carolina State University under awards NNX11AB82G and NNX13AC24G. Additional details can be found at: http://physics.scsu.edu/paare/

  1. Chip-based droplet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  2. Weekly Log Record Sort (WLSORT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Thomas

    Computer routines to sort the weekly log records submitted by teachers participating in the Southwest Regional Laboratory's communications skills monitoring program are described. Written in Univac FORTRAN V, Weekly Log Record Sort (WLSORT) sorts log records on magnetic tape to enable subsequent computer programs to interpret the input data by…

  3. Sorting out Ideas about Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillen, Amy F.; Malik, LuAnn

    2013-01-01

    Card sorting has the potential to provide opportunities for exploration of a variety of topics and levels. In a card-sorting task, each participant is presented with a set of cards--each of which depicts a relationship--and is asked to sort the cards into categories that make sense to him or her. The concept of function is critical to…

  4. NSF assistant director for geosciences announces resignation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinki, Sarah

    Margaret Leinen, assistant director for geosciences at the U.S. National Science Foundation, announced on 7 December that she will be leaving NSF in January 2007 to become the chief science officer and vice president of Climos, a new company based in San Francisco, Calif., that plans to develop solutions to reduce greenhouse gases. Leinen will oversee efforts to better understand the planet's carbon cycle to address global climate change issues.Leinen has managed the Directorate for Geosciences since 2000. She also served as vice chair of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, which coordinates federal climate change research, and as co-chair of the National Science and Technology Council's Joint Committee on Ocean Science and Technology.

  5. Solar-terrestrial news from NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Dennis

    This is a difficult time for solar-terrestrial (S/T) research. The loss of the shuttle Challenger has disrupted the entire short-range launch schedule at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Gramm-Rudman-Hollings (GRH) Deficit Reduction Act has affected virtually all programs in fiscal year (FY) 1986 and no doubt will affect 1987 and beyond. Then again, every year has its own special problems, and even this year's difficulties could turn to our advantage. For example, GRH has demanded a serious rethinking of budgets and priorities. One outcome of this is the President's budget to Congress in 1987, which requests increases of 8.4% and 8.9% for the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NASA (research and development), respectively.

  6. The U.S.-NSF/NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The five-year research and development plan of the NSF/NASA Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) program is outlined. The program includes mission studies to determine energy use patterns and requirements and define specific applications for wind energy systems, wind energy resource assessment and development, and development of cost-effective components and subsystems. The program is also directed towards the development of energy storage systems to make wind powered systems firm power sources where appropriate. A 100 kW experimental wind generator (Model Zero) is being designed as a flexible test bed for a variety of system components. Designs will be developed for units in the 50 to 200 kW and 500 to 3000 kW size ranges.

  7. Effect of liquid storage on sorted boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Spinaci, M; Vallorani, C; Bucci, D; Bernardini, C; Tamanini, C; Seren, E; Galeati, G

    2010-09-15

    A routine use of boar sexed semen is far from being a reality due to many limiting factors among which is the long sorting time necessary to obtain the adequate number of sexed spermatozoa for artificial insemination and the high susceptibility to damages induced by cryopreservation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the modification induced by 24-26 h storage on sorted boar spermatozoa on the basis of their viability, acrosome status, Hsp70 presence, and in vitro fertilizing ability. The percentage of viable cells, according to SYBR green/PI staining, was negatively affected (P < 0.05) by sorting procedure. Moreover, liquid storage significantly (P < 0.05) reduced membrane integrity of sorted spermatozoa as compared to all the other groups. Neither sorting nor storage influenced the percentage of live cells with reacted acrosome, according to FITC-PNA/PI staining. Sorted samples, after 24-26 h storage, were characterized by an increase (P < 0.05) of sperm cells negative for Hsp70, as observed by immunofluorescence, and by a decrease (P < 0.05) in Hsp70 content, as evidenced by western blot. While sorting procedure did not adversely affect both penetration rate and total efficiency of fertilization, these parameters were negatively (P < 0.05) influenced by storage after sorting. In order to minimize damages that compromise fertility and function of sex-sorted boar spermatozoa, the mechanisms by which sorting and liquid storage cause these injures require further study. PMID:20570336

  8. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Engh, G. van den; Esposito, R.J.

    1996-01-09

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane. 8 figs.

  9. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger; Esposito, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane.

  10. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  11. 2001 BUDGET: NSF and NASA Score Last-Minute Victories.

    PubMed

    Lawler, A; Mervis, J

    2000-10-27

    Congress last week gave both NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) significant hikes for 2001: NSF got $4.42 billion, a $522 million boost over this year that nearly matched NSF's 17% request, and NASA received $14.3 billion, nearly twice the White House's request for a 3% boost-but with hundreds of millions of dollars in earmarks added on. PMID:17780498

  12. ESO and NSF Sign Agreement on ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-02-01

    Green Light for World's Most Powerful Radio Observatory On February 25, 2003, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF) are signing a historic agreement to construct and operate the world's largest and most powerful radio telescope, operating at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength. The Director General of ESO, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, and the Director of the NSF, Dr. Rita Colwell, act for their respective organizations. Known as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), the future facility will encompass sixty-four interconnected 12-meter antennae at a unique, high-altitude site at Chajnantor in the Atacama region of northern Chile. ALMA is a joint project between Europe and North America. In Europe, ESO is leading on behalf of its ten member countries and Spain. In North America, the NSF also acts for the National Research Council of Canada and executes the project through the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) operated by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI). The conclusion of the ESO-NSF Agreement now gives the final green light for the ALMA project. The total cost of approximately 650 million Euro (or US Dollars) is shared equally between the two partners. Dr. Cesarsky is excited: "This agreement signifies the start of a great project of contemporary astronomy and astrophysics. Representing Europe, and in collaboration with many laboratories and institutes on this continent, we together look forward towards wonderful research projects. With ALMA we may learn how the earliest galaxies in the Universe really looked like, to mention but one of the many eagerly awaited opportunities with this marvellous facility". "With this agreement, we usher in a new age of research in astronomy" says Dr. Colwell. "By working together in this truly global partnership, the international astronomy community will be able to ensure the research capabilities needed to meet the long-term demands of our scientific enterprise, and

  13. Teleoperated robotic sorting system

    DOEpatents

    Roos, Charles E.; Sommer, Jr., Edward J.; Parrish, Robert H.; Russell, James R.

    2008-06-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for classifying materials utilizing a computerized touch sensitive screen or other computerized pointing device for operator identification and electronic marking of spatial coordinates of materials to be extracted. An operator positioned at a computerized touch sensitive screen views electronic images of the mixture of materials to be sorted as they are conveyed past a sensor array which transmits sequences of images of the mixture either directly or through a computer to the touch sensitive display screen. The operator manually "touches" objects displayed on the screen to be extracted from the mixture thereby registering the spatial coordinates of the objects within the computer. The computer then tracks the registered objects as they are conveyed and directs automated devices including mechanical means such as air jets, robotic arms, or other mechanical diverters to extract the registered objects.

  14. Teleoperated robotic sorting system

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Charles E.; Sommer, Edward J.; Parrish, Robert H.; Russell, James R.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for classifying materials utilizing a computerized touch sensitive screen or other computerized pointing device for operator identification and electronic marking of spatial coordinates of materials to be extracted. An operator positioned at a computerized touch sensitive screen views electronic images of the mixture of materials to be sorted as they are conveyed past a sensor array which transmits sequences of images of the mixture either directly or through a computer to the touch sensitive display screen. The operator manually "touches" objects displayed on the screen to be extracted from the mixture thereby registering the spatial coordinates of the objects within the computer. The computer then tracks the registered objects as they are conveyed and directs automated devices including mechanical means such as air jets, robotic arms, or other mechanical diverters to extract the registered objects.

  15. The NSF Condensed Matter Physics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Paul

    The Condensed Matter Physics (CMP) program in the NSF Division of Materials Research (DMR) supports experimental, as well as combined experiment and theory projects investigating the fundamental physics behind phenomena exhibited by condensed matter systems. CMP is the largest Individual Investigator Award program in DMR and supports a broad portfolio of research spanning both hard and soft condensed matter. Representative research areas include: 1) phenomena at the nano- to macro-scale including: transport, magnetic, and optical phenomena; classical and quantum phase transitions; localization; electronic, magnetic, and lattice structure or excitations; superconductivity; topological insulators; and nonlinear dynamics. 2) low-temperature physics: quantum fluids and solids; 1D & 2D electron systems. 3) soft condensed matter: partially ordered fluids, granular and colloid physics, liquid crystals, and 4) understanding the fundamental physics of new states of matter as well as the physical behavior of condensed matter under extreme conditions e.g., low temperatures, high pressures, and high magnetic fields. In this talk I will review the current CMP portfolio and discuss future funding trends for the program. I will also describe recent activities in the program aimed at addressing the challenges facing current and future principal investigators.

  16. What NSF Expects in Project Evaluations for Educational Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, Judith L.

    1996-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsors a range of programs to fund innovative approaches to teaching and learning. Focuses on NSF's expectations for project evaluation beginning with a definition of evaluation and a discussion of why evaluation is needed. Also describes planning, formative, and summative evaluation stages and concludes…

  17. 78 FR 62609 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of... that the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) will be renewed for a two-year period. The... within the field of basic nuclear science research. Additionally, the renewal of the DOE/NSF...

  18. 75 FR 71425 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    .../NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory... nuclear science research. Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include discussions of the following:...

  19. 78 FR 69658 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    .../NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory... within the field of basic nuclear science research. Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include discussions...

  20. 45 CFR 674.6 - Submission of information to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Submission of information to NSF. 674.6 Section 674.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.6 Submission of information to NSF. A copy of the written procedures developed...

  1. 45 CFR 674.6 - Submission of information to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of information to NSF. 674.6 Section 674.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.6 Submission of information to NSF. A copy of the written procedures developed...

  2. Challenges and Opportunities for Engineering Education: An NSF Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Nam P.

    1985-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) believes three areas of engineering education require attention: (1) lack of qualified faculty; (2) updating and maintaining instructional instrumentation, equipment, and facilities; and (3) inability to transmit knowledge of some engineering disciplines to students. NSF approaches to solving these problems…

  3. 48 CFR 2527.7002 - NSF patent policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false NSF patent policy. 2527... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Disposition of Rights in Inventions 2527.7002 NSF patent policy. As authorized by the National Science Board at its 230th meeting, October 15-16, 1981,...

  4. 48 CFR 2527.7002 - NSF patent policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false NSF patent policy. 2527... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Disposition of Rights in Inventions 2527.7002 NSF patent policy. As authorized by the National Science Board at its 230th meeting, October 15-16, 1981,...

  5. 48 CFR 2527.7002 - NSF patent policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false NSF patent policy. 2527... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Disposition of Rights in Inventions 2527.7002 NSF patent policy. As authorized by the National Science Board at its 230th meeting, October 15-16, 1981,...

  6. 48 CFR 2527.7002 - NSF patent policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false NSF patent policy. 2527... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Disposition of Rights in Inventions 2527.7002 NSF patent policy. As authorized by the National Science Board at its 230th meeting, October 15-16, 1981,...

  7. 48 CFR 2527.7002 - NSF patent policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true NSF patent policy. 2527... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Disposition of Rights in Inventions 2527.7002 NSF patent policy. As authorized by the National Science Board at its 230th meeting, October 15-16, 1981,...

  8. 78 FR 716 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    .../NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, DOE. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC). DATES... advice and guidance on a continuing basis to the Department of Energy and the National Science...

  9. Cellular Functions of NSF: Not Just SNAPs and SNAREs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunxia; Slevin, John T.; Whiteheart, Sidney W.

    2007-01-01

    NSF is an AAA protein, broadly required for intracellular membrane fusion. NSF functions as a SNARE chaperone which binds, through SNAPs, to SNARE complexes and utilizes the energy of ATP hydrolysis to disassemble them thus facilitating SNARE recycling. While this is a major function of NSF, it does seem to interact with other proteins, such as the AMPA receptor subunit, GluR2, and β2-AR and is thought to affect their trafficking patterns. New data suggest that NSF may be regulated by transient post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and nitrosylation. These new aspects of NSF function as well as its role in SNARE complex dynamics will be discussed. PMID:17397838

  10. Cyberinfrastructure for the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, J. A.; Vernon, F. L.; Arrott, M.; Chave, A.; Krueger, I.; Schofield, O.; Glenn, S.; Peach, C.; Nayak, A.

    2007-12-01

    The Internet today is vastly different than the Internet that we knew even five years ago and the changes that will be evident five years from now, when the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) prototype has been installed, are nearly unpredictable. Much of this progress is based on the exponential growth in capabilities of consumer electronics and information technology; the reality of this exponential behavior is rarely appreciated. For example, the number of transistors on a square cm of silicon will continue to double every 18 months, the density of disk storage will double every year, and network bandwidth will double every eight months. Today's desktop 2TB RAID will be 64TB and the 10Gbps Regional Scale Network fiber optical connection will be running at 1.8Tbps. The same exponential behavior characterizes the future of genome sequencing. The first two sequences of composites of individuals' genes cost tens of millions of dollars in 2001. Dr. Craig Venter just published a more accurate complete human genome (his own) at a cost on the order of 100,000. The J. Craig Venter Institute has provided support for the X Prize for Genomics offering 10M to the first successful sequencing of a human genome for $1,000. It's anticipated that the prize will be won within five years. Major advances in technology that are broadly viewed as disruptive or revolutionary rather than evolutionary will often depend upon the exploitation of exponential expansions in capability. Applications of these ideas to the OOI will be discussed. Specifically, the agile ability to scale cyberinfrastructure commensurate with the exponential growth of sensors, networks and computational capability and demand will be described.

  11. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C.; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine’s effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  12. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine's effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  13. NSF Support for Physics at the Undergraduate Level: A View from Inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Duncan

    2015-03-01

    NSF has supported a wide range of projects in physics that involve undergraduate students. These projects include NSF research grants in which undergraduates participate; Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) centers and supplements; and education grants that range from upper-division labs that may include research, to curriculum development for upper- and lower-level courses and labs, to courses for non-majors, to Physics Education Research (PER). The NSF Divisions of Physics, Materials Research, and Astronomy provide most of the disciplinary research support, with some from other parts of NSF. I recently retired as the permanent physicist in NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE), which supports the education grants. I was responsible for a majority of DUE's physics grants and was involved with others overseen by a series of physics rotators. There I worked in programs entitled Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI); Course and Curriculum Development (CCD); Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI); Transforming Undergraduate STEM Education (TUES); and Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE). NSF support has enabled physics Principal Investigators to change and improve substantially the way physics is taught and the way students learn physics. The most important changes are increased undergraduate participation in physics research; more teaching using interactive engagement methods in classes; and growth of PER as a legitimate field of physics research as well as outcomes from PER that guide physics teaching. In turn these have led, along with other factors, to students who are better-prepared for graduate school and work, and to increases in the number of undergraduate physics majors. In addition, students in disciplines that physics directly supports, notably engineering and chemistry, and increasingly biology, are better and more broadly prepared to use their physics education in these fields. I will describe NSF

  14. Multiphase ferrofluid flows for micro-particle sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ran; Wang, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Utilizing negative magnetophoresis, ferrofluids have demonstrated great potential for sorting nonmagnetic micro-particles by size. Most of the existing techniques use single phase ferrofluids by pushing micro-particles to channel walls; the sorting speed is thus hindered. We demonstrate a novel sorting strategy by co-flowing a ferrofluid and a non-magnetic fluid in microchannels. Due to the magnetic force, the particles migrate across the ferrofluid stream at size-dependent velocities as they travel downstream. The laminar interface between the two fluids functions as a virtual boundary to accumulate particles, resulting in effective separation of particles. A stable and sharp interface is important to the success of this sorting technique. We investigate several factors that affect sorting efficiency, including magnetic field, susceptibility difference of the fluids, flow velocity, and channel geometry.

  15. To sort or not to sort: the impact of spike-sorting on neural decoding performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorova, Sonia; Sadtler, Patrick; Batista, Aaron; Chase, Steven; Ventura, Valérie

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a promising technology for restoring motor ability to paralyzed patients. Spiking-based BCIs have successfully been used in clinical trials to control multi-degree-of-freedom robotic devices. Current implementations of these devices require a lengthy spike-sorting step, which is an obstacle to moving this technology from the lab to the clinic. A viable alternative is to avoid spike-sorting, treating all threshold crossings of the voltage waveform on an electrode as coming from one putative neuron. It is not known, however, how much decoding information might be lost by ignoring spike identity. Approach. We present a full analysis of the effects of spike-sorting schemes on decoding performance. Specifically, we compare how well two common decoders, the optimal linear estimator and the Kalman filter, reconstruct the arm movements of non-human primates performing reaching tasks, when receiving input from various sorting schemes. The schemes we tested included: using threshold crossings without spike-sorting; expert-sorting discarding the noise; expert-sorting, including the noise as if it were another neuron; and automatic spike-sorting using waveform features. We also decoded from a joint statistical model for the waveforms and tuning curves, which does not involve an explicit spike-sorting step. Main results. Discarding the threshold crossings that cannot be assigned to neurons degrades decoding: no spikes should be discarded. Decoding based on spike-sorted units outperforms decoding based on electrodes voltage crossings: spike-sorting is useful. The four waveform based spike-sorting methods tested here yield similar decoding efficiencies: a fast and simple method is competitive. Decoding using the joint waveform and tuning model shows promise but is not consistently superior. Significance. Our results indicate that simple automated spike-sorting performs as well as the more computationally or manually intensive

  16. 48 CFR 2515.215-70 - NSF negotiation authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... is for scientific activities which are determined by the NSF contracting officer to be “necessary to... or Secretary of Defense, specific scientific activities in connection with matters relating...

  17. 45 CFR 674.6 - Submission of information to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.6 Submission of information to NSF. A copy of the written procedures developed by... sufficient to ensure that the meteorites will be properly collected, handled, documented, and curated....

  18. 45 CFR 674.6 - Submission of information to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.6 Submission of information to NSF. A copy of the written procedures developed by... sufficient to ensure that the meteorites will be properly collected, handled, documented, and curated....

  19. 45 CFR 674.6 - Submission of information to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.6 Submission of information to NSF. A copy of the written procedures developed by... sufficient to ensure that the meteorites will be properly collected, handled, documented, and curated....

  20. NSF realignment plan includes moving polar office into geosciences directorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) announced plans on 7 September to realign four program offices that are currently within the office of the NSF director, reducing the number of NSF directorates and offices within the director's office from 16 to 13 "to maximize research and education outcomes for science and engineering while enhancing NSF's operational agility." Under the realignment, which would begin 1 October, the Office of Polar Programs (OPP) would become a division within the Directorate for Geosciences (GEO); OPP, which is currently within the office of the director, had been part of GEO until 1993. The Office of Cyberinfrastructure, also currently in the director's office, would become a division within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering. Two other offices within the director's office—the Office of International Science and Engineering and the Office of Integrative Activities—would be merged to become the Office of International and Integrative Activities.

  1. Microspherical photonics: Sorting resonant photonic atoms by using light

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, Alexey V.; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2014-09-22

    A method of sorting microspheres by resonant light forces in vacuum, air, or liquid is proposed. Based on a two-dimensional model, it is shown that the sorting can be realized by allowing spherical particles to traverse a focused beam. Under resonance with the whispering gallery modes, the particles acquire significant velocity along the beam direction. This opens a unique way of large-volume sorting of nearly identical photonic atoms with 1/Q accuracy, where Q is the resonance quality factor. This is an enabling technology for developing super-low-loss coupled-cavity structures and devices.

  2. ALGORITHM FOR SORTING GROUPED DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    It is often desirable to sort data sets in ascending or descending order. This becomes more difficult for grouped data, i.e., multiple sets of data, where each set of data involves several measurements or related elements. The sort becomes increasingly cumbersome when more than a few elements exist for each data set. In order to achieve an efficient sorting process, an algorithm has been devised in which the maximum most significant element is found, and then compared to each element in succession. The program was written to handle the daily temperature readings of the Voyager spacecraft, particularly those related to the special tracking requirements of Voyager 2. By reducing each data set to a single representative number, the sorting process becomes very easy. The first step in the process is to reduce the data set of width 'n' to a data set of width '1'. This is done by representing each data set by a polynomial of length 'n' based on the differences of the maximum and minimum elements. These single numbers are then sorted and converted back to obtain the original data sets. Required input data are the name of the data file to read and sort, and the starting and ending record numbers. The package includes a sample data file, containing 500 sets of data with 5 elements in each set. This program will perform a sort of the 500 data sets in 3 - 5 seconds on an IBM PC-AT with a hard disk; on a similarly equipped IBM PC-XT the time is under 10 seconds. This program is written in BASIC (specifically the Microsoft QuickBasic compiler) for interactive execution and has been implemented on the IBM PC computer series operating under PC-DOS with a central memory requirement of approximately 40K of 8 bit bytes. A hard disk is desirable for speed considerations, but is not required. This program was developed in 1986.

  3. NASA/NSF Workshop on Antarctic Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Mary M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs that accompanied an Ames Research Center presentation address Ames' currently-supported life sciences activities. These include crew factor issues such as human, automation, and telecommunication systems; strategic behavior and workloads; sleep, fatigue, and circadian rhythms; and virtual reality and spatial instrumentation. The need, background, and examples of pertinent research are provided.

  4. NSF Funded Projects: Perspectives of Project Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Rodney L.; Loepp, Franzie; Martin, G. Eugene

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 23 principal investigators of National Science Foundation-funded projects identified the chief facilitating factor to be direct contact with program officers. They had difficulties conceptualizing and envisioning their projects, finding time and confidence for writing proposals, and dealing with the complexity of the guidelines and the…

  5. Congressional hearing reviews NSF major research and facilities projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    An 8 March congressional hearing about the U.S. National Science Foundation's Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (NSF MREFC) account focused on fiscal management and accountability of projects in that account and reviewed concerns raised by NSF's Office of Inspector General (OIG). NSF established the MREFC account in 1995 to better plan and manage investments in major equipment and facilities projects, which can cost from tens of millions to hundreds of millions of dollars, and the foundation has funded 17 MREFC projects since then. The Obama administration's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget includes funding for four MREFC projects: Advanced Laser Gravitational-Wave Observatory (AdvLIGO), Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), National Ecological Observatory (NEON), and Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). The hearing, held by a subcommittee of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, reviewed management oversight throughout the life cycles of MREFC projects and concerns raised in recent OIG reports about the use of budget contingency funds. NSF's February 2012 manual called "Risk management guide for large facilities" states that cost contingency is "that portion of the project budget required to cover `known unknowns,'" such as planning and estimating errors and omissions, minor labor or material price fluctuations, and design developments and changes within the project scope. Committee members acknowledged measures that NSF has made to improve the MREFC oversight process, but they also urged the agency to continue to take steps to ensure better project management.

  6. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  7. All sorts of options for food product sorting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most food products undergo significant processing before arrival at the grocery store or local market. A major component of this processing includes sorting the product according to quality attributes such as size, color, sweetness, and ripeness. In addition, removal of defects or contaminants is a ...

  8. An NSF rotator's perspective: view from inside the hamster wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Duncan McBride served as my unofficial mentor during my time at NSF as a ``rotator'' (or, in NSF-speak, an IPA, short for an Intergovernmental Personnel Act assignee), from fall 2012 through summer of 2013. A rotator's main job is to help keep the wheels of the grant submission process turning, shepherding individual proposal jackets through the submission cycle. While most proposals are eventually ``Declined'' it is the few that are funded that evoke the most vivid memories of my time there. I hope to relay a little bit about what that was like on a daily basis, to give one hamster's take on the machinations of the NSF machine, and testify to Duncan McBride's critical role in establishing physics as the leader in disciplinary based educational research (DBER). It was a heady experience in many ways, despite the sheer girth of proposal jackets to be processed and the uncertain footing upon which federal employees tread these days.

  9. Automated Sorting of Transuranic Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

    2001-03-01

    The HANDSS-55 Transuranic Waste Sorting Module is designed to sort out items found in 55-gallon drums of waste as determined by an operator. Innovative imaging techniques coupled with fast linear motor-based motion systems and a flexible end-effector system allow the operator to remove items from the waste stream by a touch of the finger. When all desired items are removed from the waste stream, the remaining objects are automatically moved to a repackaging port for removal from the glovebox/cell. The Transuranic Waste Sorting Module consists of 1) a high accuracy XYZ Stereo Measurement and Imaging system, 2) a vibrating/tilting sorting table, 3) an XY Deployment System, 4) a ZR Deployment System, 5) several user-selectable end-effectors, 6) a waste bag opening system, 7) control and instrumentation, 8) a noncompliant waste load-out area, and 9) a Human/Machine Interface (HMI). The system is modular in design to accommodate database management tools, additional load-out ports, and other enhancements. Manually sorting the contents of a 55-gallon drum takes about one day per drum. The HANDSS-55 Waste Sorting Module is designed to significantly increase the throughput of this sorting process by automating those functions that are strenuous and tiresome for an operator to perform. The Waste Sorting Module uses the inherent ability of an operator to identify the items that need to be segregated from the waste stream and then, under computer control, picks that item out of the waste and deposits it in the appropriate location. The operator identifies the object by locating the visual image on a large color display and touches the image on the display with his finger. The computer then determines the location of the object, and performing a highspeed image analysis determines its size and orientation, so that a robotic gripper can be deployed to pick it up. Following operator verification by voice or function key, the object is deposited into a specified location.

  10. NSF FY 1987 budget dealt blow in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Although it passed through the congressional authorization process unscathed, the budget request for the National Science Foundation (NSF) for fiscal year (FY) 1987 was dealt a serious blow on July 23, 1986, when a House appropriations subcommittee recommended that nearly $146 million be cut from the agency's request for “research and related activities” (R&RA). The full House Appropriations Committee went on to endorse this recommendation on July 31.The committee report accompanying the House appropriation bill leaves the distribution of cuts within R&RA up to the discretion of the NSF director. The report does, however, protect the budget request for the ocean drilling program from a cut.

  11. Research Misconduct: Policy and Practice at the NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, Aaron

    2004-03-01

    Under NSF's Office of Inspector General mandate to prevent fraud, waste, abuse, or mismanagement involving NSF's proposals and awards, our office also investigates allegations of research misconduct. I will discuss our office's handling of such matters, focusing on the ethical and legal obligations of proposal submitters and awardees and the role of the scientific community. To illustrate some other points that are of interest to the physics community, I will also discuss some of our investigative activities relevant to: duplicate funding, the accuracy of information in proposals, and collaborations.

  12. Deformability-based capsule sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Goff, Anne; Munier, Nadege; Maire, Pauline; Edwards-Levy, Florence; Salsac, Anne-Virginie

    2015-11-01

    Many microfluidic devices have been developed for cancer diagnosis applications, most of which relying on costly antibodies. Since some cancer cells display abnormal mechanical properties, new sorting tools based on mechanical sensing are of particular interest. We present a simple, passive pinched flow microfluidic system for capsule sorting. The device consists of a straight microchannel containing a cylindrical obstacle. Thanks to a flow-focusing module placed at the channel entrance, capsules arrive well-centered in the vicinity of the obstacle. Pure size-sorting can be achieved at low shear rate. When increasing the shear rate, capsules are deformed in the narrow space between the pillar and the wall. The softer the capsule, the more tightly it wraps around the obstacle. After the obstacle, streamlines diverge, allowing for the separation between soft capsules, that follow central streamlines, and stiff capsules, that drift away from the obstacle with a wider angle. This proves that we have developed a flexible multipurpose sorting microsystem based on a simple design.

  13. 78 FR 12044 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... on scientific priorities within the field of basic nuclear science research. Tentative Agenda:...

  14. 75 FR 37783 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... nuclear science research. Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include discussions of the following: Friday,...

  15. 77 FR 9219 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... the National Science Foundation on scientific priorities within the field of basic nuclear...

  16. 76 FR 31945 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... Science Foundation on scientific priorities within the field of basic nuclear science research....

  17. 76 FR 69252 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... Energy and the National Science Foundation on scientific priorities within the field of basic...

  18. 77 FR 51791 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... Energy and the National Science Foundation on scientific priorities within the field of basic...

  19. 76 FR 62050 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of... that the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) will be renewed for a two- year period... (National Science Foundation), on scientific priorities within the field of basic nuclear science...

  20. 76 FR 8359 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... scientific priorities within the field of basic nuclear science research. Tentative Agenda: Agenda...

  1. 78 FR 56870 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory. Committee (NSAC... and the National Science Foundation on scientific priorities within the field of basic nuclear...

  2. 75 FR 6651 - DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Nuclear Science Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC... the National Science Foundation on scientific priorities within the field of basic nuclear...

  3. Wakimoto discusses role as NSF's incoming assistant director of geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-12-01

    Roger Wakimoto's adrenaline “is starting to pump,” the incoming assistant director for geosciences (GEO) at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) told Eos during an exclusive interview at this month's AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Wakimoto, whose scientific expertise is in extreme weather, is scheduled to take charge as head of the NSF directorate for geosciences starting in February 2013. During his 4-year appointment at NSF, Wakimoto, 59 and an avowed workaholic, will head up the GEO directorate, which has about an $880 million annual funding portfolio and provides about 55% of federal funding for geosciences basic research at U.S. academic institutions. The directorate currently includes the divisions of atmospheric and geospace sciences, Earth sciences, and ocean sciences. In addition, NSF's Office of Polar Programs is slated to become a GEO division under a realignment plan announced on 7 September; Wakimoto said that shift had “no bearing” on his decision to accept the position.

  4. NSF Anticipates Pushing Boundaries on Open-Access Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF), in carrying out the Obama administration's new push for greater public access to research published in scientific journals, will consider exclusivity periods shorter than the 12-month standard in the White House directive, as well as trade-offs involving data-sharing and considerations of publishers'…

  5. The NSF Science Development Programs, Volume I: A Documentary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report, published in two volumes, provides a documentary record of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Science Development Program (SDP). Information is given on overall university funding levels and on other development programs, with SDP goals and procedures described in detail. Using information on budgets and goals as well as…

  6. Summary Report of the NSF/EPA WATERS Network Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) and The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) organized a workshop to support The WATer and Environmental Research Systems (WATERS) Network project. The WATERS Network is a new joint initiative of the environmental engineering and hydrol...

  7. NSF-Sponsored Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Copley, N.; Galvarino, C.; Gegg, S. R.; Glover, D. M.; Groman, R. C.; Wiebe, P. H.; Work, T. T.; Biological; Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    2010-12-01

    Ocean biogeochemistry and marine ecosystem research projects are inherently interdisciplinary and benefit from improved access to well-documented data. Improved data sharing practices are important to the continued exploration of research themes that are a central focus of the ocean science community and are essential to interdisciplinary and international collaborations that address complex, global research themes. In 2006, the National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) to serve the data management requirements of scientific investigators funded by the National Science Foundation’s Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections. BCO-DMO staff members work with investigators to manage marine biogeochemical, ecological, and oceanographic data and information developed in the course of scientific research. These valuable data sets are documented, stored, disseminated, and protected over short and intermediate time frames. One of the goals of the BCO-DMO is to facilitate regional, national, and international data and information exchange through improved data discovery, access, display, downloading, and interoperability. In May 2010, NSF released a statement to the effect that in October 2010, it is planning to require that all proposals include a data management plan in the form of a two-page supplementary document. The data management plan would be an element of the merit review process. NSF has long been committed to making data from NSF-funded research publicly available and the new policy will strengthen this commitment. BCO-DMO is poised to assist in creating the data management plans and in ultimately serving the data and information resulting from NSF OCE funded research. We will present an overview of the data management system capabilities including: geospatial and text-based data discovery and access systems; recent enhancements to data search tools; data

  8. NCALM: NSF Supported Center for Airborne Laser Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2003-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently awarded a grant to create a research center to support the use of airborne laser mapping technology in the scientific community. The NSF supported Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) will be operated jointly by the Department of Civil & Coastal Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Florida (UF) and the Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California-Berkeley (UCB). NCALM will use the Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) system jointly owned by UF and Florida International University (FIU), based at the UF Geosensing Engineering and Mapping (GEM) Research Center. The state-of-the-art laser surveying instrumentation, GPS systems, which are installed in a Cessna 337 Skymaster aircraft, will collect research grade data in areas selected through the competitive NSF grant review process. The ALSM observations will be analyzed both at UF and UCB, and made available to the PI through an archiving and distribution center at UCB-building upon the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) Northern California Earthquake Data Center system. The purpose of NCALM is to provide research grade data from ALSM technology to NSF supported research studies in geosciences. The Center will also contribute to software development that will increase the processing speed and data accuracy. This presentation will discuss NCALM operation and the process of submitting proposals to NSF. In addition, it will outline the process to request available NCALM seed project funds to help jump-start small scientific research studies. Funds are also available for travel by academic researchers and students for hands-on knowledge and experience in ALSM technology at UF and UCB.

  9. Application and commercialization of flow cytometrically sex-sorted semen.

    PubMed

    Rath, D; Johnson, L A

    2008-07-01

    The current technology to sort X and Y chromosome bearing sperm population requires individual identification and selection of spermatozoa in a modified high-speed flow cytometer. For farm animal species, the technology is capable of producing sexed sperm at greater than 90% purity. However, only in the bovine, the technology has reached a developmental level that allows its commercial application. Meanwhile, the demand for female calves has grown rapidly, which encourages the demand for sex-sorted semen from high genetic value bulls. The success of the technology will depend mainly on the fertilizing capacity of the sorted spermatozoa, as this is the most affecting and economically relevant factor. To date, fertility is still variable and is quite dependent on post-sort processing. New processing techniques are under investigation and will likely be able to improve the fertility rates after AI with sex-sorted semen. It is of great importance to select the right bulls and to test the sorted samples on a routine basis. In addition to the demand for sex-sorted semen by the cattle industry, there is also a significant demand expressed by pig farmers. However, it is still unknown if the use of sex-sorted semen through commercial pig AI will be economically feasible. For the pig, the combination of in vitro fertilization with sexed semen and non-surgical embryo transfer is an alternative that merits further scientific attention. Recent developments in ovine AI and ET will make it very likely that commercial sheep industry will adopt the sexing technology in their breeding concepts. PMID:18638144

  10. Sorted.

    PubMed

    Towers, S

    1997-04-01

    Each year in Accident and Emergency an increasing number of young people present with acute problems related to social drugs. These problems range from mild symptoms to life-threatening conditions, many of which can be extremely difficult and time consuming for staff to manage. It has become apparent that as with sex the experimental age for taking drugs is getting younger as youths are now far more 'streetwise' than their predecessors. This is one of the main reasons for this paper being written; it is imperative that staff are equipped with the appropriate knowledge to deal with the challenge and are educated about the problems associated with current drug trends. This potentially improves the quality of care and, in turn, good communication improves relationships. Ecstasy is once again becoming increasingly popular within mainstream clubs, as recently highlighted in the media, and with it reappear its problems. This article discusses the historical aspects of Ecstasy and aims to educate staff about its use and effects and provides health promotion advice for those who are involved in the care of people who take Ecstasy. PMID:9171546

  11. Sorting of solid radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, J.; Pecival, I.; Hejtman, J.; Wildman, J.; Cechak, T.

    1993-12-31

    In the nuclear power plants solid radioactive wastes are produced during regular operation and during small repairs. It is necessary to sort them into the highly contaminated wastes for which a special procedure for storage is necessary and waste that is not radioactive and can be stored in the environment under specific regulations. The aim of the project was to propose and to construct equipment, which is able to sort the waste with a high degree of reliability and to distinguish highly contaminated wastes from wastes which are less dangerous to the environment. The sensitivity of the detection system was tested by a mathematical model. The radioactive wastes from the primary part of the nuclear power plant can have three composition types. Details of the composition of the radioisotopes mixture are presented.

  12. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  13. N-Ethylmaleimide Dissociates α7 ACh Receptor from a Complex with NSF and Promotes Its Delivery to the Presynaptic Membrane.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive factor (NSF) associates with soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP), that binds to SNAP receptors (SNAREs) including syntaxin, SNAP25, and synaptobrevin. The complex of NSF/SNAP/SNAREs plays a critical role in the regulation of vesicular traffic. The present study investigated NEM-regulated α7 ACh receptor translocation. NSF associated with β-SNAP and the SNAREs syntaxin 1 and synaptobrevin 2 in the rat hippocampus. NSF also associated with the α7 ACh receptor subunit, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2, and the γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor γ2 subunit. NEM, an inhibitor of NSF, significantly dissociated the α7 ACh receptor subunit from a complex with NSF and increased cell surface localization of the receptor subunit, but such effect was not obtained with the GluA1, GluA2 or γ2 subunits. NEM, alternatively, dissociated synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2. NEM significantly increased the rate of nicotine-triggered AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, without affecting the amplitude, in rat hippocampal slices. The results of the present study indicate that NEM releases the α7 ACh receptor subunit and synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of α7 ACh receptor subunit/NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2, thereby promoting delivery of the α7 ACh receptor subunit to presynaptic membrane. PMID:27105867

  14. Word Sorts for General Music Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2015-01-01

    Word sorts are standard practice for aiding children in acquiring skills in English language arts. When included in the general music classroom, word sorts may aid students in acquiring a working knowledge of music vocabulary. The author shares a word sort activity drawn from vocabulary in John Lithgow's children's book "Never Play…

  15. NSF's Handling of Allegations of Misconduct in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, Aaron

    2000-03-01

    Under NSF's Office of Inspector General mandate to prevent fraud, waste, abuse, or mismanagement involving NSF's proposals and awards, our office is unique in that it also investigates allegations of misconduct in science. I will discuss our office's handling of such matters, focusing on the ethical and legal obligations of proposal submitters and awardees and the role of the scientific community. To illustrate some of these points that are of interest to the physics community, I will discuss some of our investigative activities relevant to: duplicate funding, cost sharing, and the accuracy of information in proposals. If the OSTP policy on research misconduct has been released for public comment, I will briefly discuss this policy, which is meant to be adopted by all federal funding agencies, and what it will mean for us and the community we serve.

  16. Improved Access to NSF Funded Ocean Research Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Kinkade, D.; Shepherd, A.; Rauch, S.; Allison, M. D.; Gegg, S. R.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Data from NSF-funded, hypothesis-driven research comprise an essential part of the research results upon which we base our knowledge and improved understanding of the impacts of climate change. Initially funded in 2006, the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) works with marine scientists to ensure that data from NSF-funded ocean research programs are fully documented and freely available for future use. BCO-DMO works in partnership with information technology professionals, other marine data repositories and national data archive centers to ensure long-term preservation of these valuable environmental research data. Data contributed to BCO-DMO by the original investigators are enhanced with sufficient discipline-specific documentation and published in a variety of standards-compliant forms designed to enable discovery and support accurate re-use.

  17. Report: NSF Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement Grants in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    The 1996 awards in chemistry under the Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement Program (ILI) of the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) have been announced and are listed below. The ILI program provides matching funds in the range of 5,000 to 100,000 for purchasing equipment for laboratory improvement. Since the recipient institution must provide matching funds equaling or exceeding the NSF award, the supported projects range in cost from 10,000 to over 200,000. The 311 chemistry proposals requesting 13 million constituted 21% of the total number of proposals submitted to the ILI program. A total of 3.9 million was awarded in support of 110 projects in chemistry. The instruments requested most frequently were high field NMRs, GC/MS instruments, computers for data analysis, and FT-IRs; next most commonly requested were UV-vis spectrophotometers, followed by HPLCs, lasers, computers for molecular modeling, AAs, and GCs. In addition, one award was made this year in chemistry within the Leadership in Laboratory Development category. The next deadline for submission of ILI proposals is November 14, 1997. Guidelines for the preparation of proposals are found in the DUE Program Announcement (NSF 96-10), which may be obtained by calling (703) 306-1666 or by e-mail: undergrad@nsf.gov. Other information about DUE programs and activities and abstracts of the funded proposals can be found on the DUE Home Page at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. We thank Sandra D. Nelson, Science Education Analyst in DUE, for assistance in data gathering.

  18. Congressional geohazards showcase presented by NSF and AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2011-10-01

    On Wednesday, 7 September 2011, two weeks after the magnitude 5.8 earthquake in Mineral, Va., and a week after Hurricane Irene struck the U.S. East Coast, AGU cosponsored a showcase of National Science Foundation (NSF)—funded hazards research in recognition of National Preparedness Month. This annual event highlights NSF—funded hazards research from all over the United States, with more than 30 exhibitors demonstrating the latest research and technology on hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and oil spills, as well as emergency and social responses to these events. The event took place at the Hart Senate Office Building, where many members of Congress and their staff could attend and discuss the importance of hazards research with the researchers and NSF staff. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) kicked off with a panel of speakers, which included remarks by Mary Voytek, a member of the AGU Board of Directors, and Subra Suresh, director of NSF. Expert presentations were also given on hazard prediction, human safety, and social response. Following the event, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) hosted a small event to meet directly with a few of the exhibitors to discuss the importance of investment in scientific research and development.

  19. NSF funding opportunities in the behavioral and cognitive sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Philip

    2003-04-01

    This presentation will provide a brief overview of existing and emerging funding opportunities at the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS) at the NSF supports research to develop and advance scientific knowledge focusing on human cognition, language, social behavior and culture, as well as research on the interactions between human societies and the physical environment. BCS programs consider proposals that fall squarely within disciplines, but they also encourage and support interdisciplinary projects, which are evaluated through joint review among Programs in BCS, as well as a joint review with programs in other Divisions, and NSF-wide multi-disciplinary panels, as appropriate. All programs in BCS consider proposals for research projects, conferences, and workshops. Some programs also consider proposals for doctoral dissertation improvement assistance, the acquisition of specialized research and computing equipment, group international travel, and large-scale data collection. BCS participates in special initiatives and competitions on a number of topics, including cognitive neuroscience, children's research, human origins, and the development of infrastructure to improve data resources, data archives, collaboratories, and centers.

  20. Former NSF assistant director Killeen reflects on geosciences and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-12-01

    “This is prime time for the geosciences,” Tim Killeen, former assistant director for geosciences at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF GEO), told Eos during a recent exclusive interview. Killeen, who served at NSF from July 2008 until his term expired in June 2012, oversaw a number of new initiatives and an expansion of the geoscience directorate's annual funding portfolio from $752 million to about $880 million. NSF announced on 7 November that Roger Wakimoto, director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, will start as the new geosciences assistant director in February 2013 (see related article, this page, and Eos, 93(47), 475, doi:10.1029/ 2012EO470004). During the broad-ranging interview, Killeen reflected on the importance of the geosciences and their relationship to society. Killeen has been president of the Research Foundation for the State University of New York (RFSUNY) and SUNY vice chancellor for research since 9 July. He took the helm of RFSUNY after some personnel there “took advantage of lax oversight to cheat taxpayers,” according to New York State comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Killeen, who was AGU president from 2006 to 2008, is responsible for the supervision and operation of RFSUNY, which supports about $1 billion in research at SUNY, an institution with 64 campuses and nearly 470,000 students.

  1. Viability and DNA fragmentation in differently sorted boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    De Ambrogi, M; Spinaci, M; Galeati, G; Tamanini, C

    2006-11-01

    Sperm cell defense against DNA damage relies on two factors: the tight packaging of chromatin, based on condensation and substitution of histones with protamines, and the antioxidant agents present in seminal plasma. These defenses are extremely important as mature sperm is unable to repair DNA damage and even if a successful fertilization occurs, embryo undergoes apoptosis at the time of genomic activation. Sex-sorting exposes spermatozoa to stress sources such as high pressure, laser beam and electrical charge. The aim of this work was to determine how sorting procedures affect viability and DNA integrity in boar spermatozoa, by using the newly developed Sperm-Sus-Halomax. Four sperm populations were considered: CONTROL (no treatment), REAL (sex-sorted semen), BULK (semen sorted without sex separation) and NO LASER (semen only exposed to the high pressure, but including also cells normally discarded from sex-sorting). A significantly (P=0.019) lower viability in NO LASER (64.71%) than in CONTROL (78.6%) and REAL (80.5%) groups was found; this was accompanied by a significantly (P=0.001) higher DNA fragmentation index (DFI) in NO LASER group (6.86%) respect to CONTROL (3.30%) and REAL (3.42%) groups. BULK group did not show any difference in viability or DFI as compared to the other groups. In conclusion, we may believe that sex-sorting procedure as a whole does not affect either viability or DFI and that shear mechanical forces are a relevant source of DNA damage for sorted semen. PMID:16814375

  2. Integrating Research and Education in NSF's Office of Polar Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, R. A.; Crain, R. D.

    2003-12-01

    The National Science Foundation invests in activities that integrate research and education, and that develop reward systems to support teaching, mentoring and outreach. Effective integration of research and education at all levels can infuse learning with the excitement of discovery. It can also ensure that the findings and methods of research are quickly and effectively communicated in a broader context and to a larger audience. This strategy is vital to the accomplishment of NSF's strategic goals of ensuring a world-class science and engineering workforce, new knowledge across the frontiers of science and engineering, and the tools to get the job done efficiently and effectively. The NSF's Office of Polar Programs sponsors educational projects at all levels of learning, making full use of the variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies in the polar regions to attract and invigorate students. An array of efforts from the Arctic and Antarctic scientific communities link research activities with education. There has been an advance from the beneficial but isolated impacts of individual researcher visits to K-12 classrooms to large-scale developments, such as field research experiences for teachers and undergraduate students, online sharing of polar field experiences with rural classrooms, the institution of interdisciplinary graduate research programs through NSF initiatives, and opportunities for minority and underrepresented groups in polar sciences. The NSF's criterion for evaluating proposals based upon the broader impacts of the research activity has strengthened efforts to link research and education, resulting in partnerships and innovations that infuse research into education from kindergarten through postdoctoral studies and reaching out to the general public. In addition, the Office of Polar Programs partners with other directorates at NSF to broaden OPP's efforts and benefit from resources and experience in the Education and Human Resources

  3. Retromer-Mediated Protein Sorting and Vesicular Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Jia

    2016-04-20

    Retromer is an evolutionarily conserved multimeric protein complex that mediates intracellular transport of various vesicular cargoes and functions in a wide variety of cellular processes including polarized trafficking, developmental signaling and lysosome biogenesis. Through its interaction with the Rab GTPases and their effectors, membrane lipids, molecular motors, the endocytic machinery and actin nucleation promoting factors, retromer regulates sorting and trafficking of transmembrane proteins from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the plasma membrane. In this review, I highlight recent progress in the understanding of retromer-mediated protein sorting and vesicle trafficking and discuss how retromer contributes to a diverse set of developmental, physiological and pathological processes. PMID:27157806

  4. Redox sorting of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gui, Hui; Streit, Jason K; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Hight Walker, Angela R; Zhou, Chongwu; Zheng, Ming

    2015-03-11

    This work expands the redox chemistry of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by investigating its role in a number of SWCNT sorting processes. Using a polyethylene glycol (PEG)/dextran (DX) aqueous two-phase system, we show that electron-transfer between redox molecules and SWCNTs triggers reorganization of the surfactant coating layer, leading to strong modulation of nanotube partition in the two phases. While the DX phase is thermodynamically more favored by an oxidized SWCNT mixture, the mildly reducing PEG phase is able to recover SWCNTs from oxidation and extract them successively from the DX phase. Remarkably, the extraction order follows SWCNT bandgap: semiconducting nanotubes of larger bandgap first, followed by semiconducting nanotubes of smaller bandgap, then nonarmchair metallic tubes of small but nonvanishing bandgap, and finally armchair metallic nanotubes of zero bandgap. Furthermore, we show that redox-induced surfactant reorganization is a common phenomenon, affecting nanotube buoyancy in a density gradient field, affinity to polymer matrices, and solubility in organic solvents. These findings establish redox modulation of surfactant coating structures as a general mechanism for tuning a diverse range of SWCNT sorting processes and demonstrate for the first time that armchair and nonarmchair metallic SWCNTs can be separated by their differential response to redox. PMID:25719939

  5. 45 CFR 689.5 - Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. 689.5 Section 689.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 689.5 Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. (a) NSF staff who learn of alleged misconduct will promptly...

  6. 45 CFR 689.5 - Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. 689.5 Section 689.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 689.5 Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. (a) NSF staff who learn...

  7. 45 CFR 689.5 - Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. 689.5 Section 689.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 689.5 Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. (a) NSF staff who learn...

  8. 45 CFR 689.5 - Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. 689.5 Section 689.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 689.5 Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. (a) NSF staff who learn of alleged misconduct will promptly...

  9. 45 CFR 689.5 - Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. 689.5 Section 689.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 689.5 Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. (a) NSF staff who learn...

  10. 45 CFR 681.6 - When may NSF issue a complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When may NSF issue a complaint? 681.6 Section 681.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... may NSF issue a complaint? NSF may issue a complaint: (a) If the Attorney General (or...

  11. 45 CFR 681.6 - When may NSF issue a complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When may NSF issue a complaint? 681.6 Section 681.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... may NSF issue a complaint? NSF may issue a complaint: (a) If the Attorney General (or...

  12. 45 CFR 681.6 - When may NSF issue a complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When may NSF issue a complaint? 681.6 Section 681.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... may NSF issue a complaint? NSF may issue a complaint: (a) If the Attorney General (or...

  13. 45 CFR 681.6 - When may NSF issue a complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When may NSF issue a complaint? 681.6 Section 681.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... may NSF issue a complaint? NSF may issue a complaint: (a) If the Attorney General (or...

  14. 45 CFR 681.6 - When may NSF issue a complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When may NSF issue a complaint? 681.6 Section 681.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... may NSF issue a complaint? NSF may issue a complaint: (a) If the Attorney General (or...

  15. Recyclable Waste Paper Sorting Using Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiur Rahman, Mohammad; Hussain, Aini; Scavino, Edgar; Hannan, M. A.; Basri, Hassan

    This paper explores the application of image processing techniques in recyclable waste paper sorting. In recycling, waste papers are segregated into various grades as they are subjected to different recycling processes. Highly sorted paper streams will facilitate high quality end products, and save processing chemicals and energy. Since 1932 to 2009, different mechanical and optical paper sorting methods have been developed to fill the demand of paper sorting. Still, in many countries including Malaysia, waste papers are sorted into different grades using manual sorting system. Due to inadequate throughput and some major drawbacks of mechanical paper sorting systems, the popularity of optical paper sorting systems is increased. Automated paper sorting systems offer significant advantages over human inspection in terms of fatigue, throughput, speed, and accuracy. This research attempts to develop a smart vision sensing system that able to separate the different grades of paper using Template Matching. For constructing template database, the RGB components of the pixel values are used to construct RGBString for template images. Finally, paper object grade is identified based on the maximum occurrence of a specific template image in the search image. The outcomes from the experiment in classification for White Paper, Old Newsprint Paper and Old Corrugated Cardboard are 96%, 92% and 96%, respectively. The remarkable achievement obtained with the method is the accurate identification and dynamic sorting of all grades of papers using simple image processing techniques.

  16. Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Graduates Show Persistent Difficulties in an Intradimensional Shift Card Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rossi, Vanessa; Karmel, Bernard Z.; Gardner, Judith M.; Flory, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) graduates, a group at risk for attention problems and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, performed an intradimensional shift card sort at 34, 42, 51, and 60 months to assess executive function and to examine effects of individual risk factors. In the "silly" game, children sorted cards…

  17. Viable cell sorting of dinoflagellates by multi-parametric flow cytometry.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electronic cell sorting for isolation and culture of dinoflagellates and other marine eukaryotic phytoplankton was compared to the traditional method of manually picking of cells using a micropipette. Trauma to electronically sorted cells was not a limiting factor as fragile dinoflagellates, such a...

  18. Supporting Geoscientists in Partnerships for K-12 Education at NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinen, M.

    2001-12-01

    NSF Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) education activities have evolved over the last decade based on advice from a broad segment of the geosciences community. These activities gained momentum when a Geosciences Education Working Group (GEWG, 1996) recognized the shift from traditional priorities that emphasized only research, to those that support education in geosciences as well. The GEWG report embraced this increased emphasis on education as a component of NSF's role in assuring the long-term health of the geosciences and endorsed the principle that research and education should be well integrated. While many geosciences education activities are funded by the Education and Human Resources Directorate (EHR) of NSF, the GEWG report highlighted the need to have more active participation by research geoscientists in K-12 education activities, and the need to train them to be able to do so. While some roles in education are clearly best left to educational professionals (e.g. large-scale systemic reform projects, pedagogical development at the K-12 level, and many teacher enhancement projects), activities such as undergraduate research, technology advancement, curriculum content development and informal science are ones in which GEO should actively seek to collaborate with programs in EHR. The GEO education program has expanded over the last decade. Our first education activity, Awards to Facilitate Geoscience Education (AFGE), was very successful in attracting some of the leading researchers in geosciences. This program evolved to become the Geoscience Education Program. An important program funded by GEO that developed from community activity is the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE). This program grew out of a joint EHR/GEO award and a series of community workshops. The program will establish an Internet portal for geoscience curricular materials and other teacher resources that will enable further collaboration between the research and education

  19. Systemic Education Reform: Links from the NSF Web Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    1999-02-01

    In the late 1980s, the National Science Foundation began a process of including large, systematic-change grants in several of its education programs. The fruits of these are a major resouce of multi-institutional reform efforts, often with a great variety of materials, ideas, and research that is applicable to K-16 education in science and mathematics. Information about the recipients of these systemic-change grants is often available directly from NSF, which also hosts links on special Web pages.

  20. Neuroendocrine transcriptional programs adapt dynamically to the supply and demand for neuropeptides as revealed in NSF mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kurrasch, Deborah M; Nevin, Linda M; Wong, Jinny S; Baier, Herwig; Ingraham, Holly A

    2009-01-01

    Background Regulated secretion of specialized neuropeptides in the vertebrate neuroendocrine system is critical for ensuring physiological homeostasis. Expression of these cell-specific peptide markers in the differentiating hypothalamus commences prior to birth, often predating the physiological demand for secreted neuropeptides. The conserved function and spatial expression of hypothalamic peptides in vertebrates prompted us to search for critical neuroendocrine genes in newly hatched zebrafish larvae. Results We screened mutant 5 days post-fertilization zebrafish larvae that fail to undergo visually mediated background adaptation for disruption in hypothalamic pomc expression. To our surprise, the ATPase N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (nsf) was identified as an essential gene for maintenance of neuroendocrine transcriptional programs during the embryo-to-larva transition. Despite normal hypothalamic development in nsfst53 mutants, neuropeptidergic cells exhibited a dramatic loss of cell-specific markers by 5 days post-fertilization that is accompanied by elevated intracellular neuropeptide protein. Consistent with the role of NSF in vesicle-membrane fusion events and intracellular trafficking, cytoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum-like membranes accumulate in nsf-/- hypothalamic neurons similar to that observed for SEC18 (nsf ortholog) yeast mutants. Our data support a model in which unspent neuropeptide cargo feedbacks to extinguish transcription in neuropeptidergic cells just as they become functionally required. In support of this model we found that gnrh3 transcripts remained unchanged in pre-migratory, non-functional gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in nsf-/- zebrafish. Furthermore, oxytocin-like (oxtl, intp) transcripts, which are found in osmoreceptive neurons and persist in mutant zebrafish, drop precipitously after mutant zebrafish are acutely challenged with high salt. Conclusion Our analyses of nsf mutant zebrafish reveal an unexpected

  1. Abnormal expression of NSF, α-SNAP and SNAP23 in pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats treated with monocrotaline

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Luo, Qin; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Zhi-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent researches have shown that dysfunctional intracellular vesicular trafficking exists in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the expression of proteins involved in intracellular vesicular trafficking in pulmonary vasculature in PAH remains unclear. Objective: To elucidate possible roles of proteins involved in intracellular vesicular trafficking in the development of PAH in rats treated with monocrotaline, changes in the expression of N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), α-soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP) and synaptosome-associated membrane protein (SNAP) 23 were examined together with expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1), endogenous nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), type 2 bone morphogenetic receptor (BMPR2) and cellular apoptosis. Methods: The mRNA expression was investigated by real time-PCR and protein expression by immunoblot method in rat lung. Caspase-3 was used as an indicator of cellular apoptosis and examined by immunoblot method. Results: During the development of PAH, mRNA and protein expression of NSF, α-SNAP and SNAP23 all significantly increased before pulmonary arterial pressure started to increase, then all significantly decreased when PAH established. The expression of eNOS and BMPR2 changed similarly, while the mRNA and protein of cav-1 both downregulated after monocrotaline treatment. Caspase-3 was also increased after exposure to monocrotaline. Conclusions: Since the expression of NSF, α-SNAP and SNAP23 changed greatly during the onset of PAH and accompanied with abnormal expression of eNOS, BMPR2 and cav-1 and with enhanced cellular apoptosis, NSF, α-SNAP and SNAP23 appear to be associated with the development of PAH in rats treated with monocrotaline. PMID:25932111

  2. Flow sorting of microorganisms for molecular analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, G; Fuchs, B; Spring, S; Beisker, W; Amann, R

    1997-01-01

    Not only classical cultivation-based methods but also the new molecular approaches may result in incomplete and selective information on the natural diversity of microbial communities. Flow sorting of microorganisms from environmental samples allows the deliberate selection of cell populations of interest from highly diverse systems for molecular analysis. Several cellular parameters that can be measured by flow cytometry are useful as sort criteria. Here, we report sorting of bacteria from activated sludge, lake water, and lake sediment according to differences in light scattering, DNA content, and/or affiliation to certain phylogenetic groups as assessed by fluorescein-labeled, rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. Microscopy of the sorted cells showed that populations of originally low abundance could be strongly enriched by flow sorting (up to 280-fold), depending on the original abundance of the cells of interest and the type of sample sorted. The purity of the cells of interest could be further increased by repeated sorting, but this increase was limited by cell aggregation in the case of activated-sludge samples. It was possible to amplify almost full-length 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragments from sorted microbial cells by PCR, even after fixation with paraformaldehyde and in situ hybridization. Dot blot hybridization and sequencing demonstrated that most of the amplified rDNA originated from those cells that had been selected for by flow sorting. Comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences revealed previously unknown species of magnetotactic or activated-sludge bacteria. PMID:9361408

  3. ORNL/NSF elementary science leadership leadership institute

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, T.L.

    1994-12-31

    Begun as a Teacher Enhancement Project in 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is now hosting as annual four-week Elementary Science Leadership summer institute for twenty-five teacher/administrator participants. During 1993-95 summer institutes, the participants receive instruction in science/math content, pedagogy, leadership training, and evaluation techniques. Science topics and instruction will be selected from the best available resources at ORNL, pedagogy and evaluation techniques will be directed by the University of Tennessee`s College of Education, and leadership training will be based on established leadership training models. During the academic year component, participants will: (1) share new math/science knowledge and curriculum with their students and fellow teachers while continuing to develop additional curriculum to share with other Leadership Institute participants, (2) work with the established state-wide advisory group to contribute to systemic reform in math/science education, and (3) prepare and deliver NSF leadership Institute-related math/science presentations at local and state educational conferences. Graduate credit for summer and academic-year participation in the NSF Leadership Institute will be offered through the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

  4. Six NSF-NATO postdocs go to geoscientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six Earth scientists will study in the United Kingdom, Norway, and Italy on postdoctoral fellowships administered by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of a program sponsored by the North American Treaty Organization (NATO). In all, 57 NSF-NATO postdoctoral fellowships in science were awarded in March 1988 for study abroad for up to 12 months.The six students that received fellowships for study in geosciences are Henry N. (Spike) Berry (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass.), to study geology at the University of Oslo, Norway; Marcus I. Bursik (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.), to study geology at Cambridge University, Cambridge, U.K.; Mary S. Hubbard (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.), to study geology at the University of Leicester, Leicester, U. K.); Paul R. Lundgren (Northwestern University, Chicago, III.), to study geophysics at the National Institute of Geophysics, Rome; James Webster (U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Va.), to study experiment petrology at the University of Edinburgh, U.K.; and Joseph R. Pawlik (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.), to study biological oceanography at the Marine Science Laboratories, Menai Bridge, U.K.

  5. NSF Geosciences Initiatives and Plans Reviewed at Advisory Committee Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-10-01

    In its semiannual meeting on 6-7 October, the U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF) Advisory Committee for Geosciences (GEO) reviewed GEO initiatives, programs, and plans, including the GEO directorate's fast and significant response to support research related to various aspects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico through Rapid Response Research (RAPID) awards and other measures. An undercurrent during the meeting was concern about workload stress among GEO staff. Assistant director of geosciences Tim Killeen noted that the proposed budget for fiscal year (FY) 2011, which began on 1 October, would increase directorate funding 7.4% over FY 2010, if the budget is approved by Congress. A continuing resolution in Congress maintains FY 2010 funding levels until at least 3 December. Killeen said NSF's budget request for FY 2012 has been submitted to the White House Office of Management and Budget, adding that although he cannot discuss details of that budget yet, GEO Vision, a long­range strategy document for the directorate released in October 2009, “is reflected in our thinking going forward.”

  6. Crystal Structures of the Sec1/Munc18 (SM) Protein Vps33, Alone and Bound to the Homotypic Fusion and Vacuolar Protein Sorting (HOPS) Subunit Vps16*

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Richard W.; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Hughson, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular membrane fusion requires the regulated assembly of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein receptor) proteins anchored in the apposed membranes. To exert the force required to drive fusion between lipid bilayers, juxtamembrane SNARE motifs zipper into four-helix bundles. Importantly, SNARE function is regulated by additional factors, none more extensively studied than the SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) proteins. SM proteins interact with both individual SNAREs and SNARE complexes, likely chaperoning SNARE complex formation and protecting assembly intermediates from premature disassembly by NSF. Four families of SM proteins have been identified, and representative members of two of these families (Sec1/Munc18 and Sly1) have been structurally characterized. We report here the 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of an SM protein from the third family, Vps33. Although Vps33 shares with the first two families the same basic three-domain architecture, domain 1 is displaced by 15 Å, accompanied by a 40° rotation. A unique feature of the Vps33 family of SM proteins is that its members function as stable subunits within a multi-subunit tethering complex called HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuolar protein sorting). Integration into the HOPS complex depends on the interaction between Vps33 and a second HOPS subunit, Vps16. The crystal structure of Vps33 bound to a C-terminal portion of Vps16, also at 2.6 Å resolution, reveals the structural basis for this interaction. Despite the extensive interface between the two HOPS subunits, the conformation of Vps33 is only subtly affected by binding to Vps16. PMID:23840694

  7. Design and realization of sort manipulator of crystal-angle sort machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming-shun; Chen, Shu-ping; Guan, Shou-ping; Zhang, Yao-wei

    2005-12-01

    It is a current tendency of development in automation technology to replace manpower with manipulators in working places where dangerous, harmful, heavy or repetitive work is involved. The sort manipulator is installed in a crystal-angle sort machine to take the place of manpower, and engaged in unloading and sorting work. It is the outcome of combing together mechanism, electric transmission, and pneumatic element and micro-controller control. The step motor makes the sort manipulator operate precisely. The pneumatic elements make the sort manipulator be cleverer. Micro-controller's software bestows some simple artificial intelligence on the sort manipulator, so that it can precisely repeat its unloading and sorting work. The combination of manipulator's zero position and step motor counting control puts an end to accumulating error in long time operation. A sort manipulator's design in the practice engineering has been proved to be correct and reliable.

  8. Data parallel sorting for particle simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1992-01-01

    Sorting on a parallel architecture is a communications intensive event which can incur a high penalty in applications where it is required. In the case of particle simulation, only integer sorting is necessary, and sequential implementations easily attain the minimum performance bound of O (N) for N particles. Parallel implementations, however, have to cope with the parallel sorting problem which, in addition to incurring a heavy communications cost, can make the minimun performance bound difficult to attain. This paper demonstrates how the sorting problem in a particle simulation can be reduced to a merging problem, and describes an efficient data parallel algorithm to solve this merging problem in a particle simulation. The new algorithm is shown to be optimal under conditions usual for particle simulation, and its fieldwise implementation on the Connection Machine is analyzed in detail. The new algorithm is about four times faster than a fieldwise implementation of radix sort on the Connection Machine.

  9. NSF Policies on Software and Data Sharing and their Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Since January 2011, the National Science Foundation has required a Data Management plan to be submitted with all proposals. This plan should include a description of how the proposers will share the products of the research (http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/dmp.jsp). What constitutes such data will be determined by the community of interest through the process of peer review and program management. This may include, but is not limited to: data, publications, samples, physical collections, software and models. In particular, “investigators and grantees are encouraged to share software and inventions created under an award or otherwise make them or their products widely available and usable.”

  10. NSF FY1982 update: Support for basic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    When the Appropriation Committees of the House of Representatives and the Senate meet in conference this month, discussion of the Astronomical, Atmospheric, Earth, and Ocean Sciences (AAEO) sections of the National Science Foundation (NSF) will be limited. Both the House and the Senate committees made some slight increases to the Office of Management and Budget requests, and the program by program agreement between the two was unusual.The House appropriation bill, H.R. 4034, provides $70 million over the administration request of $1033.5 million. Of the increase, $44.9 million was added in the area of research and related activities and $25.1 million for science and engineering education.

  11. Past and Future: NSF PAARE at SC State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, Sean D.; Cash, Jennifer; Hartmann, Dieter; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Ho, Shirley; Howell, Steve B.; King, Jeremy R.; Leising, Mark D.; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Smith, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    We review our progress to date and the path forward under the NSF program 'Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)'. Our project 'A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)' was a part of the 2008 PAARE cohort and in August 2014 we received a second award (POCA II) to continue for another three years. Our partnership includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory as well as individual investigators at NASA Ames and Carnegie Mellon University. We present our recent publications which include educational courseware in cosmology, a study of long-period variables using Kepler and spectroscopic variability of peculiar stars. Our graduate student successes include support for two females who have completed their Ph.Ds. in astronomy plus two additional students from underrepresented groups who have received their M.S. degrees in astronomy but are continuing their doctoral work in related fields. At SC State we have graduated 3 physics majors with the astronomy option with five more in the pipeline and review the challenges and obstacles faced along the way. We discuss our strategic plan for POCA II, which is based on lessons learned under POCA and moves us forward to the follow-on period when our efforts will be sustained by other resources.Our support includes NSF awards AST-0750814 and AST-1358913 to South Carolina State University as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Support for the Kepler observations is provided by NASA to South Carolina State University under awards NNX11AB82G and NNX13AC24G. Additional details can be found at: http://physics.scsu.edu/paare/

  12. Geoscience Workforce Development at UNAVCO: Leveraging the NSF GAGE Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Miller, M.

    2013-12-01

    Global economic development demands that the United States remain competitive in the STEM fields, and developing a forward-looking and well-trained geoscience workforce is imperative. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the geosciences will experience a growth of 19% by 2016. Fifty percent of the current geoscience workforce is within 10-15 years of retirement, and as a result, the U.S. is facing a gap between the supply of prepared geoscientists and the demand for well-trained labor. Barring aggressive intervention, the imbalance in the geoscience workforce will continue to grow, leaving the increased demand unmet. UNAVCO, Inc. is well situated to prepare undergraduate students for placement in geoscience technical positions and advanced graduate study. UNAVCO is a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences and in addition UNAVCO manages the NSF Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) facility. The GAGE facility supports many facets of geoscience research including instrumentation and infrastructure, data analysis, cyberinfrastructure, and broader impacts. UNAVCO supports the Research Experiences in the Solid Earth Sciences for Students (RESESS), an NSF-funded multiyear geoscience research internship, community support, and professional development program. The primary goal of the RESESS program is to increase the number of historically underrepresented students entering graduate school in the geosciences. RESESS has met with high success in the first 9 years of the program, as more than 75% of RESESS alumni are currently in Master's and PhD programs across the U.S. Building upon the successes of RESESS, UNAVCO is launching a comprehensive workforce development program that will network underrepresented groups in the geosciences to research and opportunities throughout the geosciences. This presentation will focus on the successes of the RESESS program and plans to expand on this success with broader

  13. NSF ADVANCE: Institutional Transformation to Achieve Faculty Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, E. Y.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF ADVANCE initiative is designed to enhance gender equity in academic science and engineering faculty. One of its components - Institutional Transformation - has the goal of establishing strategies and policies that will revolutionize institutional climate so that diverse faculty flourish. The University of Texas at El Paso is one of 19 institutions to currently hold a 5-year grant under the Institutional Transformation program. This poster presentation highlights practices from the participating institutions. Two general aspects of the program are: 1) co-principal investigators are a blend of administrators and active researchers. This blend ensures a bottom-up, top-down approach to presenting gender equity to faculty. 2) Many of the investigators have diversity as their research focus, which is intended to result in rigorous, peer-reviewed dissemination of institutional results. Specific effors for all institutions relate to recruitment, retention, and advancement of female faculty and, by establishing equitable conditions, to improvement of the workplace for all faculty. To aid recruitment, institutions have committed faculty involved in the search process, including training of search committees in diversity strategies and interaction with candidates. A close working relationship with the campus EO officer is essential. Retention strategies center on mentoring, monetary support for research, and policy implementation. Policies focus on work-family balance. Advancement of females to important administrative and non-administrative leadership roles is the third focus. Workshops and seminars on leadership skills are common in the various institutions. Finally, a central theme of the program is that, in addition to specific strategies, institutions must articulate diversity as a core value and reflect on the means to actualize this value. More information on the NSF ADVANCE program, including links to the Institutional Transformation grantees, may be found on

  14. Association of the fusion protein NSF with clathrin-coated vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Steel, G J; Tagaya, M; Woodman, P G

    1996-01-01

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) is a component of intracellular transport reactions. In order to understand the role of NSF during the fusion of endocytic transport vesicles with the endosome, we have investigated the binding of NSF to purified clathrin-coated vesicle components. First, we have examined whether detergent-solubilized coated vesicle membranes will support formation of NSF-containing 'fusion complexes'. Our results show that these membranes are substantially enriched in components capable of driving formation of these complexes, when compared with membranes from other sources. Secondly, we have analysed coated vesicle preparations for their NSF content. Coated vesicle preparations contain significant amounts of NSF. This was shown to be associated with coated vesicles rather than contaminating membranes by a number of criteria, and was found to be bound in an ATP-independent manner. These findings are discussed in the light of current models for vesicle fusion. Images PMID:8631296

  15. An Unsupervised Online Spike-Sorting Framework.

    PubMed

    Knieling, Simeon; Sridharan, Kousik S; Belardinelli, Paolo; Naros, Georgios; Weiss, Daniel; Mormann, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular neuronal microelectrode recordings can include action potentials from multiple neurons. To separate spikes from different neurons, they can be sorted according to their shape, a procedure referred to as spike-sorting. Several algorithms have been reported to solve this task. However, when clustering outcomes are unsatisfactory, most of them are difficult to adjust to achieve the desired results. We present an online spike-sorting framework that uses feature normalization and weighting to maximize the distinctiveness between different spike shapes. Furthermore, multiple criteria are applied to either facilitate or prevent cluster fusion, thereby enabling experimenters to fine-tune the sorting process. We compare our method to established unsupervised offline (Wave_Clus (WC)) and online (OSort (OS)) algorithms by examining their performance in sorting various test datasets using two different scoring systems (AMI and the Adamos metric). Furthermore, we evaluate sorting capabilities on intra-operative recordings using established quality metrics. Compared to WC and OS, our algorithm achieved comparable or higher scores on average and produced more convincing sorting results for intra-operative datasets. Thus, the presented framework is suitable for both online and offline analysis and could substantially improve the quality of microelectrode-based data evaluation for research and clinical application. PMID:26711713

  16. Automated multi-parametric sorting of micron-sized particles via multi-trap laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaputa, Daniel S.

    The capabilities of laser tweezers have rapidly expanded since the first demonstration by Ashkin and co-workers in 1970 of the ability to trap particles using optical energy. Laser tweezers have been used to measure piconewton forces in many biological and material science application, sort bacteria, measure DNA bond strength, and even perform microsurgery. The laser tweezers system developed for this dissertation foreshadows the next generation of laser tweezer systems that provide automated particle sorted based upon multiple criteria. Many laser tweezer sorting applications today entail the operator sorting cells from a bulk sample, one by one. This dissertation demonstrates the technologies of pattern recognition and image processing that allow for an entire microscope slide to be sorted without any operator intervention. We already live in an automated world where the cars we drive are built by machines instead of humans. The technology is there, and the only factors limiting the advancements of fully automated biological instrumentation is the lack of developers with the appropriate knowledge sets. This dissertation introduces the concept of sorting particles via a multi-parametric approach where several parameters such as size, fluorescence, and Raman spectra are used as sorting criteria. Since the advent of laser tweezers, several groups have demonstrated the ability to sort cells and other particle by size, or by fluorescence, or by any other parameter, but to our knowledge there does not exist a laser tweezer sorting system that can sort particles based upon multiple parameters. Sorting via a single parameter can be a severe limitation as the method lacks the robustness and class specificity that exists when sorting based upon multiple parameters. Simply put, it makes more sense to determine the worth of a baseball card by considering it's condition as well as it's age, rather then solely upon its condition. By adding another parameter such as the name of

  17. An improved infrared technique for sorting pecans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeve, Thorsten; Dereniak, Eustace L.; Lamonica, John A., Jr.

    1991-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of pecan spectral reflectances. It describes an experiment for measuring the contrast between several components of raw pecan product to be sorted. An analysis of the experimental data reveals high contrast ratios in the infrared spectrum, suggesting a potential improvement in sorting efficiency when separating pecan meat from shells. It is believed that this technique has the potential to dramatically improve the efficiency of current sorting machinery, and to reduce the cost of processing pecans for the consumer market.

  18. On Sorting Genomes with DCJ and Indels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Marília D. V.

    A previous work of Braga, Willing and Stoye compared two genomes with unequal content, but without duplications, and presented a new linear time algorithm to compute the genomic distance, considering double cut and join (DCJ) operations, insertions and deletions. Here we derive from this approach an algorithm to sort one genome into another one also using DCJ, insertions and deletions. The optimal sorting scenarios can have different compositions and we compare two types of sorting scenarios: one that maximizes and one that minimizes the number of DCJ operations with respect to the number of insertions and deletions.

  19. NRAO Response to NSF Senior Review of Astronomy Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Astronomy Senior Review Committee report (pdf file), released today, made major recommendations for restructuring the NSF's ground-based astronomy efforts, including significant changes for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The committee's report urged that leadership in radio astronomy, including millimeter- and submillimeter-wave observatories, "remain centered at NRAO as it is, by far, the largest radio astronomy organization in the world." The report praised the record of management of NRAO and the scientific capabilities of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). However, the report also recommended that some reductions and changes occur at the NRAO by 2011. Specifically, the report recommended that: (a) VLBA operations make a transition to a significant reliance on international funding or risk closure; (b) GBT operations costs be reduced; and (c) NRAO scientific staff costs be reduced. "The Senior Review Committee had the very difficult task of reconciling the needs of current facilities and funding new facilities for the future of astronomy. We appreciate their efforts and look forward to working with the NSF to ensure that the valuable and unique research capabilities of our NRAO telescopes continue to serve the astronomical community," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. The VLBA provides the greatest angular resolution, or ability to see fine detail, of any telescope in the world, greatly exceeding the capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope and the future Square Kilometre Array. The committee recognized that, "if the VLBA is closed, a unique capability would likely be lost for decades." "The VLBA is used by scientists from around the world because of its unique capabilities. It has produced landmark research milestones and the committee recognized in its

  20. 13. SANDSORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS FOR SAND SORTING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAND-SORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS FOR SAND SORTING, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Mill "C" Complex, Sand-Sorting Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  1. Intuitive, Image-Based Cell Sorting Using Opto-fluidic Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, J. R.; Voldman, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present a microfluidic cell sorting device which augments microscopy with the capability to perform facile image-based cell sorting. This combination enables intuitive, complex phenotype sorting based on spatio-temporal fluorescence or cell morphology. The microfluidic device contains a microwell array that can be passively loaded with mammalian cells via sedimentation and can be subsequently inspected with microscopy. After inspection, we use the scattering force from a focused infrared laser to levitate cells of interest from their wells into a flow field for collection. First, we demonstrate image-based sorting predicated on whole-cell fluorescence, which could enable sorting based on temporal whole-cell fluorescence behavior. Second, we demonstrate image-based sorting predicated on fluorescence localization (nuclear vs. whole-cell fluorescence), highlighting the capability of our approach to sort based on imaged sub-cellular events, such as localized protein expression or translocation events. We achieve post-sort purities up to 89%, and up to 155-fold enrichment of target cells. Optical manipulation literature and a direct cell viability assay suggest that cells remain viable after using our technique. The architecture is highly scalable and supports over 10,000 individually addressable trap sites. Our approach enables sorting of significant populations based on sub-cellular spatio-temporal information, which is difficult or impossible with existing widespread sorting technologies. PMID:18004819

  2. Morphology and Environmental Significance of Relict Sorted Polygons, Krkonoše Mountains, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uxa, Tomáš; Křížek, Marek

    2014-05-01

    The development of sorted polygons is driven by several interconnected processes related to freeze-thaw cycles, the frequency and/or intensity of which is determined by regional climatic factors and site-specific factors that influence local microclimate, such as relief, lithology, snow cover, drainage and vegetation. The interplay of the above factors generates different ground thermal and moisture regimes and therefore influences the spatial distribution and morphology of sorted polygons. In this paper, we describe relict large-scale sorted polygons in the Krkonoše Mountains (Czech Republic) and we aim (1) to determine the relations between polygon morphology and clast distribution; (2) to determine the extent to which the morphology and clast distribution of the polygons were influenced by past microclimates; and (3) to present palaeoenvironmental evidence from the periglacial environment of the summit area of the Krkonoše Mountains during the Last Glacial/Holocene period. Sixty-two sorted polygons with an average length of 194 cm and an average height of 21.5 cm and in total 7740 clasts were measured at four sites on Mt Luční hora (50°43'40"N; 15°40'57"E), at elevations of 1455 to 1555 m asl. Larger sorted polygons are formed by larger clasts and tend to occur in poorly drained sites at lower altitudes. Smaller polygons and polygons with greater relative height are better sorted. More up-domed and better sorted polygons are located at higher altitudes suggesting more severe and longer-lasting microclimates suitable for the development of sorted polygons. The altitudinal gradient in polygon morphology and sorting, preserved since the Last Glacial period, indicates the high palaeoenvironmental potential of the relict large-scale sorted polygons located on flat or convex parts of the terrain. Polygon development probably involves positive feedback between morphology and frost susceptibility, driven by microclimate. The proposed method for evaluating frost

  3. SORTING IT OUT: REGULATION OF EXOSOME LOADING

    PubMed Central

    Villarroya-Beltri, Carolina; Baixauli, Francesc; Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Cristina; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Mittelbrunn, María

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), a term that includes both exosomes of endocytic origin and vesicles derived from plasma membranes, are continuously secreted by cells to the extracellular environment, and represent a novel vehicle for cell-cell communication. Exosomes contain specific repertoires of proteins and RNAs, indicating the existence of mechanisms that control the sorting of molecules into them. Although the molecular mechanisms that regulate the loading of proteins into exosomes have been studied for years, the sorting of RNA has been elusive until recently. Here we review the molecular mechanisms that control the sorting of molecules into exosomes, with special attention to the sorting of RNA. We also discuss how the cellular context affects the composition of exosomes, and thus the outcome of the communication between the exosome-producer and recipient cells, with particular focus on the communication between tumor cells and with cells of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24769058

  4. Filter-less submicron hydrodynamic size sorting.

    PubMed

    Fouet, M; Mader, M-A; Iraïn, S; Yanha, Z; Naillon, A; Cargou, S; Gué, A-M; Joseph, P

    2016-02-21

    We propose a simple microfluidic device able to separate submicron particles (critical size ∼0.1 μm) from a complex sample with no filter (minimum channel dimension being 5 μm) by hydrodynamic filtration. A model taking into account the actual velocity profile and hydrodynamic resistances enables prediction of the chip sorting properties for any geometry. Two design families are studied to obtain (i) small sizes within minutes (low-aspect ratio, two-level chip) and (ii) micron-sized sorting with a μL flow rate (3D architecture based on lamination). We obtain quantitative agreement of sorting performances both with experiments and with numerical solving, and determine the limits of the approach. We therefore demonstrate a passive, filter-less sub-micron size sorting with a simple, robust, and easy to fabricate design. PMID:26778818

  5. Glycosaminoglycans: Sorting determinants in intracellular protein traffic.

    PubMed

    Mihov, Deyan; Spiess, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular transport of proteins to their appropriate destinations is crucial for the maintenance of cellular integrity and function. Sorting information is contained either directly in the amino acid sequence or in a protein's post-translational modifications. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are characteristic modifications of proteoglycans. GAGs are long unbranched polysaccharide chains with unique structural and functional properties also contributing to protein sorting in various ways. By deletion or insertion of GAG attachment sites it has been shown that GAGs affect polarized sorting in epithelial cells, targeting to and storage in secretory granules, and endocytosis. Most recently, the role of GAGs as signals for rapid trans-Golgi-to-cell surface transport, dominant over the cytosolic sorting motifs in the core protein, was demonstrated. Here, we provide an overview on existing data on the roles of GAGs on protein and proteoglycan trafficking. PMID:26327396

  6. Card Sorts, State Tests, and Meaningful Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauvot, Jennifer B.; Benson, Sharon L. D.

    2008-01-01

    This article shares card-sorting activities that involve state-mandated test items to use with prospective and practicing mathematics teachers to teach about accountability measures while exploring reform-minded mathematics instruction recommendations. (Contains 2 figures.)

  7. Automatic Spike Sorting Using Tuning Information

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Current spike sorting methods focus on clustering neurons’ characteristic spike waveforms. The resulting spike-sorted data are typically used to estimate how covariates of interest modulate the firing rates of neurons. However, when these covariates do modulate the firing rates, they provide information about spikes’ identities, which thus far have been ignored for the purpose of spike sorting. This letter describes a novel approach to spike sorting, which incorporates both waveform information and tuning information obtained from the modulation of firing rates. Because it efficiently uses all the available information, this spike sorter yields lower spike misclassification rates than traditional automatic spike sorters. This theoretical result is verified empirically on several examples. The proposed method does not require additional assumptions; only its implementation is different. It essentially consists of performing spike sorting and tuning estimation simultaneously rather than sequentially, as is currently done. We used an expectation-maximization maximum likelihood algorithm to implement the new spike sorter. We present the general form of this algorithm and provide a detailed implementable version under the assumptions that neurons are independent and spike according to Poisson processes. Finally, we uncover a systematic flaw of spike sorting based on waveform information only. PMID:19548802

  8. NSF nanomanufacturing program and its implications for measurement and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2013-09-01

    The NSF Nanomanufacturing Program supports fundamental research in novel methods and techniques for batch and continuous processes, and top-down and bottom-up processes leading to the formation of complex nanostructures, nanodevices and nanosystems. The program leverages advances in the understanding of nano-scale phenomena and processes, nanomaterials discovery, novel nanostructure architectures, innovative nanodevice and nanosystem design. It seeks to address issues such as quality, efficiency, scalability, reliability, safety and affordability. The program encourages research in the development of new nano-scale processes and production systems based on computation, modeling and simulation and use of process sensing, monitoring, and control. Research in instrumentation and metrology is an integral part of the program. Additionally, the program supports education of the next generation of researchers, and encourages building a workforce trained in nanotechnology and nanomanufacturing systems. It is also interested in understanding long-term societal implications of large-scale production and use of nano-scale materials. For this, it encourages the development of standards. This paper will describe the program philosophy.

  9. National Science Foundation Fiscal Year 1986 Awards (by State and NSF Directorate).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    Provided is a listing of National Science Foundation (NSF) program grants and contracts awarded in Fiscal Year 1986. Data, current as of Feburary 13, 1987, are arranged as follows: (1) by state, with totals for each state (foreign countries are alphabetized with states); (2) by NSF Directorate, with award and dollar totals for each NSF…

  10. 75 FR 63450 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    .../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory... CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of...

  11. 45 CFR 680.11 - Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... clearly spelled out in the proposal. (c) In accordance with 5 CFR 5301.103(a)(1), an NSF employee may not... SCIENCE FOUNDATION NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RULES OF PRACTICE Rules of Practice for the National Science Foundation § 680.11 Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards. (a)(1) Many...

  12. 45 CFR 650.14 - Request for conveyance of title to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Request for conveyance of title to NSF. 650.14 Section 650.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PATENTS § 650.14 Request for conveyance of title to NSF. (a) The procedures established by...

  13. 45 CFR 650.14 - Request for conveyance of title to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Request for conveyance of title to NSF. 650.14 Section 650.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PATENTS § 650.14 Request for conveyance of title to NSF. (a) The procedures established by...

  14. 45 CFR 650.14 - Request for conveyance of title to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Request for conveyance of title to NSF. 650.14 Section 650.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PATENTS § 650.14 Request for conveyance of title to NSF. (a) The procedures established by...

  15. 45 CFR 650.14 - Request for conveyance of title to NSF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Request for conveyance of title to NSF. 650.14 Section 650.14 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PATENTS § 650.14 Request for conveyance of title to NSF. (a) The procedures established by...

  16. 45 CFR 680.11 - Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... clearly spelled out in the proposal. (c) In accordance with 5 CFR 5301.103(a)(1), an NSF employee may not... SCIENCE FOUNDATION NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RULES OF PRACTICE Rules of Practice for the National Science Foundation § 680.11 Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards. (a)(1) Many...

  17. 45 CFR 680.11 - Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... clearly spelled out in the proposal. (c) In accordance with 5 CFR 5301.103(a)(1), an NSF employee may not... SCIENCE FOUNDATION NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RULES OF PRACTICE Rules of Practice for the National Science Foundation § 680.11 Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards. (a)(1) Many...

  18. 45 CFR 680.11 - Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... clearly spelled out in the proposal. (c) In accordance with 5 CFR 5301.103(a)(1), an NSF employee may not... SCIENCE FOUNDATION NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RULES OF PRACTICE Rules of Practice for the National Science Foundation § 680.11 Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards. (a)(1) Many...

  19. Geophysical science in the 1996 Budget: NSF gets qualified good news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Clinton Administration is seeking a 3% hike for the National Science Foundation (NSF) in FY 1996. NSF Director Neal Lane characterized the $3.36 billion request as “good news in tight times.” The request, which represents the smallest increase proposed by any recent president, would essentially keep funding flat in real dollars.However, money within the NSF budget for research and related activities would see a roughly 8% or $174 million increase. Within this $2.45 billion account, NSF is also giving a high priority to supporting individuals and small research groups. This increase would be offset by cuts in education and research facility construction. In the geosciences, NSF estimates that the funding rate for competitive awards would be frozen at about 35% in FY 1996. Both the median and average annuated award size would increase by about 4% to $65,000 and $87,500, respectively.

  20. Effect of Wildfire on Sediment Sorting in a Steep Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsheim, J. L.; Chin, A.; O'Hirok, L.; Storesund, R.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfire is an external forcing factor in the landscape. In chaparral environments, wildfire initiates transport of well-sorted fine sediment through dry-ravel processes on hillslopes and facilitates delivery of sediment to stream channels. In turn, this periodic post-fire sediment influx governs sorting of channel-bed material during subsequent floods that mobilize and transport the sediment downstream. We investigated the effects of the May 2013 Springs Wildfire in the Santa Monica Mountains in semi-arid southern California with field measurements and terrestrial LiDAR scanning. Before the fire, sediment sorting within the heterogeneous bed material present in Big Sycamore Creek was controlled by organized step-pool bedforms. Boulders formed steps with relatively finer cobbles, gravel, and sand filling the pools. Before the fire, the grain size distribution present in the substrate between boulder steps was relatively coarse (D84 = 250 mm), in contrast to that in the influx of sediment contributed by post-fire dry-ravel processes deposited at channel margins (D84 = 8 mm). Flow shear stress during one small flood in 2014 (post-fire) was adequate to mobilize fine dry ravel- related sediment. Transport capacity was sufficient to mobilize and transport this sediment within a study reach; however, it was not adequate to flush the fine material downstream. Shear stress required to mobilize sediment contributed by dry ravel was substantially less than that required to transport the substrate material present before the wildfire. The small flood deposited fine sediment (D84 = 16 mm) as flow lost capacity. Resulting deposition buried bedforms, changing the step-pool profile to a plane bed. The relatively poorly sorted, coarse, rough bed changed to a well sorted, fine, smooth, bed. These changes have implications for sediment transport dynamics and aquatic ecology. In steep, semi-arid, chaparral fluvial systems, sediment derived from dry-ravel processes influences the

  1. NSF Internships in Public Science Education: Sensing the Radio Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, L.; Boltuch, D.; Fultz, C.; Buck, S.; Smith, T.; Harris, R.; Moffett, D.; LaFratta, M.; Walsh, L.; Castelaz, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    The intent of the "Sensing the Radio Sky" project is to teach high school students the concepts and relevance of radio astronomy through presentations in STARLAB portable planetariums. The two year project began in the summer of 2004. A total of twelve interns and four faculty mentors from Furman University and UNCA have participated at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute to develop the Radio Sky project. The project united physics and multimedia majors and allowed these students to apply their knowledge of different disciplines to a common goal. One component of the project is the development and production of a cylinder to be displayed in portable STARLAB planetariums. The cylinder gives a thorough view of the Milky Way and of several other celestial sources in radio wavelengths, yet these images are difficult to perceive without prior knowledge of radio astronomy. Consequently, the Radio Sky team created a multimedia presentation to accompany the cylinder. This multimedia component contains six informative lessons on radio astronomy assembled by the physics interns and numerous illustrations and animations created by the multimedia interns. The cylinder and multimedia components complement each other and provide a unique, thorough, and highly intelligible perspective on radio astronomy. The project is near completion and the final draft will be sent to Learning Technologies, Inc., for marketing to owners of STARLAB planetariums throughout the world. The development of the Radio Sky project has also provided a template for potential similar projects that examine our universe in different wavelengths, such as gamma ray, x-ray, and infrared. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  2. CAISE: A NSF Resource Center for Informal Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickow, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Informal science education (ISE) is playing an increasingly important role in how and where the public engages with science. A growing body of research is showing that people learn the majority of their science knowledge outside of school (Falk & Dierking, 2010). The ISE field includes a wide variety of sources, including the internet, TV programs, magazines, hobby clubs and museums. These experiences touch large numbers of people throughout their lifetimes. If you would like to share your research with the public, ISE can be an effective conduit for meaningful science communication. However, because the ISE field is so diverse, it can be overwhelming with its multiple entry points. If you already are part of an ISE initiative, knowing how to access the most useful resources easily can also be daunting. CAISE, the Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education, is a resource center for the ISE field funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). CAISE can help connect you to the knowledge and people of ISE, through its website, products and in-person convenings. The proposed CAISE presentation will outline the diversity of the field and concisely present data that will make the case for the impact of ISE. We will focus on examples of successful programs that connect science with the public and that bring together AAS's science research community with practitioners and researchers within ISE. Pathways to various ISE resources in the form of current CAISE initiatives will be described as well. The presentation will include an interview section in which a CAISE staff member will ask questions of a scientist involved in an ISE initiative in order to detail one example of how ISE can be a valuable tool for engaging the public in science. Time for audience Q&A also will be included in the session.

  3. Fruit Sorting Using Fuzzy Logic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamvazuthi, Irraivan; Sinnadurai, Rajendran; Aftab Ahmed Khan, Mohamed Khan; Vasant, Pandian

    2009-08-01

    Fruit and vegetables market is getting highly selective, requiring their suppliers to distribute the goods according to very strict standards of quality and presentation. In the last years, a number of fruit sorting and grading systems have appeared to fulfill the needs of the fruit processing industry. However, most of them are overly complex and too costly for the small and medium scale industry (SMIs) in Malaysia. In order to address these shortcomings, a prototype machine was developed by integrating the fruit sorting, labeling and packing processes. To realise the prototype, many design issues were dealt with. Special attention is paid to the electronic weighing sub-system for measuring weight, and the opto-electronic sub-system for determining the height and width of the fruits. Specifically, this paper discusses the application of fuzzy logic techniques in the sorting process.

  4. Sorting nexins provide diversity for retromer-dependent trafficking events

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Peter J.; Korswagen, Hendrik C.

    2013-01-01

    Sorting nexins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved phosphoinositide-binding proteins that play fundamental roles in orchestrating the process of cargo sorting through the membranous maze that is the endosomal network. One ancient group of sorting nexin-containing complexes is the retromers. Here we discuss how retromer complexes regulate endosomal sorting, and describe how this is generating exciting new insight into the central role played by endosomal sorting in development, and normal tissue homeostasis. PMID:22193161

  5. Lipid Sorting and Multivesicular Endosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, Christin

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular organelles, including endosomes, show differences not only in protein but also in lipid composition. It is becoming clear from the work of many laboratories that the mechanisms necessary to achieve such lipid segregation can operate at very different levels, including the membrane biophysical properties, the interactions with other lipids and proteins, and the turnover rates or distribution of metabolic enzymes. In turn, lipids can directly influence the organelle membrane properties by changing biophysical parameters and by recruiting partner effector proteins involved in protein sorting and membrane dynamics. In this review, we will discuss how lipids are sorted in endosomal membranes and how they impact on endosome functions. PMID:24086044

  6. An optimal procedure for magnet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Koul, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    A new magnet sorting method for accelerators is developed. It is based on the linearized analysis of the effects of errors on accelerators. It is implementable in two steps. The first step is completely analytical in character while the second step involves the comparison of computed values with the measured error values. The whole process is repeated at most n'' times, where n'' is the number of magnets to be chosen from at a time. Simulations of the method, using Mathematica[reg sign], have been implemented for sorting the APS injector synchrotron dipoles and quadrupoles with excellent results.

  7. An optimal procedure for magnet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Koul, R.K.

    1992-12-31

    A new magnet sorting method for accelerators is developed. It is based on the linearized analysis of the effects of errors on accelerators. It is implementable in two steps. The first step is completely analytical in character while the second step involves the comparison of computed values with the measured error values. The whole process is repeated at most ``n`` times, where ``n`` is the number of magnets to be chosen from at a time. Simulations of the method, using Mathematica{reg_sign}, have been implemented for sorting the APS injector synchrotron dipoles and quadrupoles with excellent results.

  8. Brokering technologies to realize the hydrology scenario in NSF BCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Easton, Zachary; Fuka, Daniel; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In the National Science Foundation (NSF) BCube project an international team composed of cyber infrastructure experts, geoscientists, social scientists and educators are working together to explore the use of brokering technologies, initially focusing on four domains: hydrology, oceans, polar, and weather. In the hydrology domain, environmental models are fundamental to understand the behaviour of hydrological systems. A specific model usually requires datasets coming from different disciplines for its initialization (e.g. elevation models from Earth observation, weather data from Atmospheric sciences, etc.). Scientific datasets are usually available on heterogeneous publishing services, such as inventory and access services (e.g. OGC Web Coverage Service, THREDDS Data Server, etc.). Indeed, datasets are published according to different protocols, moreover they usually come in different formats, resolutions, Coordinate Reference Systems (CRSs): in short different grid environments depending on the original data and the publishing service processing capabilities. Scientists can thus be impeded by the burden of discovery, access and normalize the desired datasets to the grid environment required by the model. These technological tasks of course divert scientists from their main, scientific goals. The use of GI-axe brokering framework has been experimented in a hydrology scenario where scientists needed to compare a particular hydrological model with two different input datasets (digital elevation models): - the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) dataset, v.2. - the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset, v.3. These datasets were published by means of Hyrax Server technology, which can provide NetCDF files at their original resolution and CRS. Scientists had their model running on ArcGIS, so the main goal was to import the datasets using the available ArcPy library and have EPSG:4326 with the same resolution grid as the

  9. The NSF-RCN Urban Heat Island Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twine, T. E.; Snyder, P. K.; Hamilton, P.; Shepherd, M.; Stone, B., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    In much of the world cities are warming at twice the rate of outlying rural areas. The frequency of urban heat waves is projected to increase with climate change through the 21st century. Addressing the economic, environmental, and human costs of urban heat islands requires a better understanding of their behavior from many disciplinary perspectives. The goal of this four-year Urban Heat Island Network is to (1) bring together scientists studying the causes and impacts of urban warming, (2) advance multidisciplinary understanding of urban heat islands, (3) examine how they can be ameliorated through engineering and design practices, and (4) share these new insights with a wide array of stakeholders responsible for managing urban warming to reduce their health, economic, and environmental impacts. The NSF-RCN Urban Heat Island Network involves atmospheric scientists, engineers, architects, landscape designers, urban planners, public health experts, and education and outreach experts, who will share knowledge, evaluate research directions, and communicate knowledge and research recommendations to the larger research community as well as stakeholders engaged in developing strategies to adapt to and mitigate urban warming. The first Urban Climate Institute was held in Saint Paul, MN in July 2013 and focused on the characteristics of urban heat islands. Scientists engaged with local practitioners to improve communication pathways surrounding issues of understanding, adapting to, and mitigating urban warming. The second Urban Climate Institute was held in Atlanta, Georgia in July 2014 and focused on urban warming and public health. The third Urban Climate Institute was held in Athens, GA in July 2015 and focused on urban warming and the role of the built environment. Scientists and practitioners discussed strategies for mitigation and adaptation. Evaluation experts at the Science Museum of Minnesota have extensively evaluated the Institutes to inform other research

  10. Battling the GPA Bias: Selecting NSF-REU Participants for Transformative Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Kim, C. S.; Osborn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Student grade point average (GPA) is one of the most common metrics used to select REU participants, with >85% of NSF-funded research participants nationally having an average GPA at or above 3.0 (Russell, 2004). Yet, as efforts are made to expand and diversify the pool of undergraduates participating in research experiences, privileging candidates with GPAs above 3.0 may exclude promising STEM students who can most benefit from a research experience, including community college students and recent transfer students from community colleges. Myriad factors that impinge on student GPAs are salient in the literature, including (1) early academic failure related to pre-college under-preparation (Feldman, 1993); (2) transfer shock (Molinaro, 2014; Diaz, 1992); (3) employment (DeSimone, 2008); (4) limited social support for academic pursuits (Cheng, Ickes, & Verhofstadt, 2012); (5) food insecurity (Maroto, 2013); and inadequate advising (Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005). A discussion of these factors with examples from student transcripts and an overview of a scoring rubric that minimizes GPA bias and can assist PIs with an alternate approach to participant selection will be included in this session.

  11. Microwave Conductivity of Sorted CNT Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Bulmer, John S.; Martens, Jon; Kurzepa, Lukasz; Gizewski, Tomasz; Egilmez, M.; Blamire, M. G.; Yahya, Noorhana; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with tailored growth and post-process sorting enables carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies with predominantly metallic or semi-conducting concentrations. Cryogenic and microwave measurements performed here show transport dimensionality and overall order increasing with increasing metallic concentration, even in atmospheric doping conditions. By 120 GHz, the conductivity of predominantly semi-conducting assemblies grew to 400% its DC value at an increasing growth rate, while other concentrations a growth rate that tapered off. A generalized Drude model fits to the different frequency dependent behaviors and yields useful quality control parameters such as plasma frequency, mean free path, and degree of localization. As one of the first demonstrations of waveguides fabricated from this material, sorted CNTs from both as-made and post-process sources were inserted into sections of practical micro-strip. With both sources, sorted CNT micro-strip increasingly outperformed the unsorted with increasing frequency-- illustrating that sorted CNT assemblies will be important for high frequency applications. PMID:24446019

  12. Microwave conductivity of sorted CNT assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bulmer, John S; Martens, Jon; Kurzepa, Lukasz; Gizewski, Tomasz; Egilmez, M; Blamire, M G; Yahya, Noorhana; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with tailored growth and post-process sorting enables carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies with predominantly metallic or semi-conducting concentrations. Cryogenic and microwave measurements performed here show transport dimensionality and overall order increasing with increasing metallic concentration, even in atmospheric doping conditions. By 120 GHz, the conductivity of predominantly semi-conducting assemblies grew to 400% its DC value at an increasing growth rate, while other concentrations a growth rate that tapered off. A generalized Drude model fits to the different frequency dependent behaviors and yields useful quality control parameters such as plasma frequency, mean free path, and degree of localization. As one of the first demonstrations of waveguides fabricated from this material, sorted CNTs from both as-made and post-process sources were inserted into sections of practical micro-strip. With both sources, sorted CNT micro-strip increasingly outperformed the unsorted with increasing frequency-- illustrating that sorted CNT assemblies will be important for high frequency applications. PMID:24446019

  13. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  14. Integration through a Card-Sort Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kris; Ricca, Bernard P.

    2015-01-01

    Learning to compute integrals via the various techniques of integration (e.g., integration by parts, partial fractions, etc.) is difficult for many students. Here, we look at how students in a college level Calculus II course develop the ability to categorize integrals and the difficulties they encounter using a card sort-resort activity. Analysis…

  15. Systematic Sorting: Teacher Characteristics and Class Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalogrides, Demetra; Loeb, Susanna; Beteille, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Although prior research has documented differences in the distribution of teacher characteristics across schools serving different student populations, few studies have examined the extent to which teacher sorting occurs within schools. This study uses data from one large urban school district and compares the class assignments of teachers who…

  16. A multispectral sorting device for wheat kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low-cost multispectral sorting device was constructed using three visible and three near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LED) with peak emission wavelengths of 470 nm (blue), 527 nm (green), 624 nm (red), 850 nm, 940 nm, and 1070 nm. The multispectral data were collected by rapidly (~12 kHz) blin...

  17. 45 CFR 615.4 - Legal proceedings before NSF or in which the United States is a party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Legal proceedings before NSF or in which the United States is a party. 615.4 Section 615.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... NSF or in which the United States is a party. In any legal proceeding before NSF or to which...

  18. 45 CFR 615.4 - Legal proceedings before NSF or in which the United States is a party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Legal proceedings before NSF or in which the United States is a party. 615.4 Section 615.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... NSF or in which the United States is a party. In any legal proceeding before NSF or to which...

  19. 45 CFR 615.4 - Legal proceedings before NSF or in which the United States is a party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Legal proceedings before NSF or in which the United States is a party. 615.4 Section 615.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... NSF or in which the United States is a party. In any legal proceeding before NSF or to which...

  20. Administration's Proposed NSF Budget Includes a 5.5% Increase for Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-04-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 2014 proposed federal budget for the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) is $7.63 billion, 7.3% above the FY 2012 actual amount. NSF acting director Cora Marrett said the budget reflects the administration's recognition of NSF and the importance of funding basic research. "We are pleased about where we stand and hope that Congress will be just as pleased with the budget proposal and will help move things forward," she said during a meeting of the NSF Advisory Committee for Geosciences on 11 April. Budget comparisons are to FY 2012 because the 2013 appropriations were enacted at the end of March, less than 2 weeks before President Barack Obama sent the proposed budget to Congress.

  1. Neurally expressed Drosophila genes encoding homologs of the NSF and SNAP secretory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, R W; Pallanck, L; Ganetzky, B

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of investigation have now converged to indicate that the neurotransmitter release apparatus is formed by assembly of cytosolic proteins with proteins of the synaptic vesicle and presynaptic terminal membranes. We are undertaking a genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the functions of two types of cytosolic proteins thought to function in this complex: N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) and the soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs). We have identified Drosophila homologs of the vertebrate and yeast NSF and SNAP genes. Both Drosophila genes encode polypeptides that closely resemble their vertebrate counterparts and are expressed in the nervous system; neither appears to be in a family of closely related Drosophila genes. These results indicate that the Drosophila NSF and SNAP genes are excellent candidates for mutational analysis of neurotransmitter release. Images PMID:8202553

  2. Gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agents: important variations on a theme for NSF.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Phillip H

    2008-01-01

    Millions of doses of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are administered annually to improve the clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging. All the approved agents incorporate one atom of the rare earth metal gadolinium into a chelate to improve the safety of the ordinarily toxic free gadolinium. The undeniable epidemiologic link between GBCAs and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) has prompted renewed investigation into the different chemical properties of the GBCAs despite their clinical interchangeability. Gadolinium-based contrast agents can be divided into different categories: linear versus macrocyclic structure, ionic versus nonionic, and non-protein-binding versus protein-binding agents. The GBCAs differ significantly with respect to transmetallation and kinetic and thermodynamic stability and therefore their propensity to release free gadolinium, which is hypothesized to induce NSF. That gadodiamide, with its susceptibility to transmetallation and relatively low thermodynamic and kinetic stability, is associated with the most cases of NSF supports this hypothesis. On the other hand, the greater stability of a macrocyclic agent hypothetically would confer a greater safety margin with regard to NSF. Because few published data on an experimental model of NSF exist, continuing vigilance is necessary to report new cases of NSF, especially with regard to the agents with small market share. PMID:18180006

  3. PhySortR: a fast, flexible tool for sorting phylogenetic trees in R.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Timothy G; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Ragan, Mark A; Chan, Cheong Xin

    2016-01-01

    A frequent bottleneck in interpreting phylogenomic output is the need to screen often thousands of trees for features of interest, particularly robust clades of specific taxa, as evidence of monophyletic relationship and/or reticulated evolution. Here we present PhySortR, a fast, flexible R package for classifying phylogenetic trees. Unlike existing utilities, PhySortR allows for identification of both exclusive and non-exclusive clades uniting the target taxa based on tip labels (i.e., leaves) on a tree, with customisable options to assess clades within the context of the whole tree. Using simulated and empirical datasets, we demonstrate the potential and scalability of PhySortR in analysis of thousands of phylogenetic trees without a priori assumption of tree-rooting, and in yielding readily interpretable trees that unambiguously satisfy the query. PhySortR is a command-line tool that is freely available and easily automatable. PMID:27190724

  4. PhySortR: a fast, flexible tool for sorting phylogenetic trees in R

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Timothy G.; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Ragan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    A frequent bottleneck in interpreting phylogenomic output is the need to screen often thousands of trees for features of interest, particularly robust clades of specific taxa, as evidence of monophyletic relationship and/or reticulated evolution. Here we present PhySortR, a fast, flexible R package for classifying phylogenetic trees. Unlike existing utilities, PhySortR allows for identification of both exclusive and non-exclusive clades uniting the target taxa based on tip labels (i.e., leaves) on a tree, with customisable options to assess clades within the context of the whole tree. Using simulated and empirical datasets, we demonstrate the potential and scalability of PhySortR in analysis of thousands of phylogenetic trees without a priori assumption of tree-rooting, and in yielding readily interpretable trees that unambiguously satisfy the query. PhySortR is a command-line tool that is freely available and easily automatable. PMID:27190724

  5. Hrs recognizes a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in cytokine receptors during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuji; Yamashita, Yuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2011-04-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a component of the ESCRT-0 protein complex that captures ubiquitylated cargo proteins and sorts them to the lysosomal pathway. Although Hrs acts as a key transporter for ubiquitin-dependent endosomal sorting, we previously reported that Hrs is also involved in ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of interleukin-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ). Here, we show direct interactions between bacterially expressed Hrs and interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), indicating that their binding is not required for ubiquitylation of the receptors, similar to the case for IL-2Rβ. Examinations of the Hrs binding regions of the receptors reveal that a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in both IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα is essential for the binding. Whereas the wild-type receptors are delivered to LAMP1-positive late endosomes, mutant receptors lacking the hydrophobic amino acid cluster are sorted to lysobisphosphatidic acid-positive late endosomes rather than LAMP1-positive late endosomes. We also show that the degradation of these mutant receptors is attenuated. Accordingly, Hrs functions during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of the receptors by recognizing the hydrophobic amino acid cluster. These findings suggest the existence of a group of cargo proteins that have this hydrophobic amino acid cluster as a ubiquitin-independent sorting signal. PMID:21362618

  6. Differential expression of axon-sorting molecules in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Naoki; Nakashima, Ai; Hoshina, Naosuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takeuchi, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    In the mouse olfactory system, the axons of olfactory sensory neurons that express the same type of odorant receptor (OR) converge to a specific set of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB). It is widely accepted that expressed OR molecules instruct glomerular segregation by regulating the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Although the relationship between the expression of axon-sorting molecules and OR types has been analyzed in detail, those between the expressions of axon-sorting molecules remain to be elucidated. Here we collected the expression profiles of four axon-sorting molecules from a large number of glomeruli in the OB. These molecules demonstrated position-independent mosaic expressions, but their patterns were not identical in the OB. Comparing their expressions identified positive and negative correlations between several pairs of genes even though they showed various expressions. Furthermore, the principal component analysis revealed that the factor loadings in the principal component 1, which explain the largest amount of variation, were most likely to reflect the degree of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel dependence on the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Thus, neural activity generated through the CNG channel is a major component in the generation of a wide variety of expressions of axon-sorting molecules in glomerular segregation. PMID:27207328

  7. Microscale synthesis and characterization of polystyrene: NSF-POLYED scholars project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quaal, Karen S.; Wu, Chang-Ning

    1994-01-01

    Polystyrene is a familiar polymer with many commercial uses. Its applications range from the clear, high index of refraction, brittle plastic used to form audio cassette and CD cases to the foamed material used in insulated drink cups and packaging material. Polystyrene constitutes 11 percent of the plastics used in packaging with only High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) contributing a larger share: so much polystyrene is used today, it is one of six common plastics that manufacturers have assigned an identification code. The code helps recycling efforts. Polystyrene's code is (PS code 6). During the summer and fall of 1992 several new polymeric experiments were developed by the NSF POLYED Scholars for introduction into the chemistry core curriculum. In this presentation, one such project will be discussed. This laboratory project is recommended for a first or second year laboratory course allowing the introduction of polymeric science to undergraduates at the earliest opportunity. The reliability of the experiments which make up this project and the recognition factor of polystyrene, a material we come in contact with everyday, makes the synthesis and characterization of polystyrene a good choice for the introduction of polymerization to undergraduates. This laboratory project appeals to the varied interests of students enrolled in the typical first year chemistry course and becomes an ideal way to introduce polymers to a wide variety of science and engineering students.

  8. Characterization of Secretory Genes ypt1/yptA and nsf1/nsfA from Two Filamentous Fungi: Induction of Secretory Pathway Genes of Trichoderma reesei under Secretion Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Saloheimo, Markku; Wang, Huaming; Valkonen, Mari; Vasara, Tuija; Huuskonen, Anne; Riikonen, Marjukka; Pakula, Tiina; Ward, Michael; Penttilä, Merja

    2004-01-01

    Two genes involved in protein secretion, encoding the Rab protein YPT1/YPTA and the general fusion factor NSFI/NSFA, were characterized from two filamentous fungi, Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger var. awamori. The isolated genes showed a high level of conservation with their Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian counterparts, and T. reesei ypt1 was shown to complement yeast Ypt1p depletion. The transcriptional regulation of the T. reesei ypt1, nsf1, and sar1 genes, involved in protein trafficking, was studied with mycelia treated with the folding inhibitor dithiothreitol (DTT) and with brefeldin A, which inhibits membrane traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. The well-known inducer of the yeast and T. reesei unfolded protein response (UPR), DTT, induced the nsf1 gene and the protein disulfide isomerase gene, pdi1, in both of the experiments, and sar1 mRNA increased in only one experiment under strong UPR induction. The ypt1 mRNA did not show a clear increase during DTT treatment. Brefeldin A strongly induced pdi1 and all of the intracellular trafficking genes studied. These results suggest the possibility that the whole secretory pathway of T. reesei could be induced at the transcriptional level by stress responses caused by protein accumulation in the secretory pathway. PMID:14711675

  9. Information sharing and sorting in a community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Biplab; Manna, S. S.; Mukherjee, Animesh

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of a detailed numerical study of a model for the sharing and sorting of information in a community consisting of a large number of agents. The information gathering takes place in a sequence of mutual bipartite interactions where randomly selected pairs of agents communicate with each other to enhance their knowledge and sort out the common information. Although our model is less restricted compared to the well-established naming game, the numerical results strongly indicate that the whole set of exponents characterizing this model are different from those of the naming game and they assume nontrivial values. Finally, it appears that in analogy to the emergence of clusters in the phenomenon of percolation, one can define clusters of agents here having the same information. We have studied in detail the growth of the largest cluster in this article and performed its finite-size scaling analysis.

  10. Efficient Sorting on the Tilera Manycore Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Morari, Alessandro; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste; Secchi, Simone; Valero, Mateo

    2012-10-24

    e present an efficient implementation of the radix sort algo- rithm for the Tilera TILEPro64 processor. The TILEPro64 is one of the first successful commercial manycore processors. It is com- posed of 64 tiles interconnected through multiple fast Networks- on-chip and features a fully coherent, shared distributed cache. The architecture has a large degree of flexibility, and allows various optimization strategies. We describe how we mapped the algorithm to this architecture. We present an in-depth analysis of the optimizations for each phase of the algorithm with respect to the processor’s sustained performance. We discuss the overall throughput reached by our radix sort implementation (up to 132 MK/s) and show that it provides comparable or better performance-per-watt with respect to state-of-the art implemen- tations on x86 processors and graphic processing units.

  11. A mower detector to judge soil sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlitt, E.T.; Johnson, N.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thermo Nuclear Services (TNS) has developed a mower detector as an inexpensive and fast means for deciding potential value of soil sorting for cleanup. It is a shielded detector box on wheels pushed over the ground (as a person mows grass) at 30 ft/min with gamma-ray counts recorded every 0.25 sec. It mirror images detection by the TNS transportable sorter system which conveys soil at 30 ft/min and toggles a gate to send soil on separate paths based on counts. The mower detector shows if contamination is variable and suitable for sorting, and by unique calibration sources, it indicates detection sensitivity. The mower detector has been used to characterize some soil at Department of Energy sites in New Jersey and South Carolina.

  12. Parallel integer sorting with medium and fine-scale parallelism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1993-01-01

    Two new parallel integer sorting algorithms, queue-sort and barrel-sort, are presented and analyzed in detail. These algorithms do not have optimal parallel complexity, yet they show very good performance in practice. Queue-sort designed for fine-scale parallel architectures which allow the queueing of multiple messages to the same destination. Barrel-sort is designed for medium-scale parallel architectures with a high message passing overhead. The performance results from the implementation of queue-sort on a Connection Machine CM-2 and barrel-sort on a 128 processor iPSC/860 are given. The two implementations are found to be comparable in performance but not as good as a fully vectorized bucket sort on the Cray YMP.

  13. Fluorescence-Activated Nucleolus Sorting in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Boyer-Clavel, Myriam; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar isolation allows exhaustive characterization of the nucleolar content. Centrifugation-based protocols are not adapted to isolation of nucleoli directly from a plant tissue because of copurification of cellular debris. We describe here a method that allows the purification of nucleoli using fluorescent-activated cell sorting from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. This approach requires the expression of a specific nucleolar protein such as fibrillarin fused to green fluorescent protein in planta. PMID:27576720

  14. Sorting network for the partial selection problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzile, Jean; Savaria, Yvon; Haccoun, David

    Sorting networks and switching networks are widely used in the communication world. Partial selection networks have applications in areas where a single answer is desired but several paths are explored such as in suboptimal breadth-first tree searching algorithms. A technique is introduced which permits the evaluation of any network in terms of average selection and in terms of the number of elements that are always in the partial selection set. The Banyan network was examined using the method and it was found that the quality of the selection decreases as the size of the input set grows. It was also shown that the sorting networks such as the Banyan are not necessarily the best choices for selection problems. Networks which partially sort two sets and then compare the two sets together can achieve much better selection. These two types of network offer a higher number of guaranteed items than the Banyan network for all considered values of elements. Finally, it was noted that deterministic pre-ordering, if present, can also be used to configure a network.

  15. How Schwann Cells Sort Axons: New Concepts.

    PubMed

    Feltri, M Laura; Poitelon, Yannick; Previtali, Stefano Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves contain large myelinated and small unmyelinated (Remak) fibers that perform different functions. The choice to myelinate or not is dictated to Schwann cells by the axon itself, based on the amount of neuregulin I-type III exposed on its membrane. Peripheral axons are more important in determining the final myelination fate than central axons, and the implications for this difference in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are discussed. Interestingly, this choice is reversible during pathology, accounting for the remarkable plasticity of Schwann cells, and contributing to the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system. Radial sorting is the process by which Schwann cells choose larger axons to myelinate during development. This crucial morphogenetic step is a prerequisite for myelination and for differentiation of Remak fibers, and is arrested in human diseases due to mutations in genes coding for extracellular matrix and linkage molecules. In this review we will summarize progresses made in the last years by a flurry of reverse genetic experiments in mice and fish. This work revealed novel molecules that control radial sorting, and contributed unexpected ideas to our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control radial sorting of axons. PMID:25686621

  16. Systolic s/sup 2/-way merge sort is optimal

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeck, H.; Schroder, H.; Starke, C.

    1989-07-01

    The time complexity of Thompson and Kun's s/sup 2/-way merge sort is analyzed and shown to be asymptotically optimal with respect to the recently improved lower bound on sorting on a mesh-connected n x n array. Furthermore, new lower bounds for systolic sorting are derived. A systolic version of s/sup 2/-way merge sort is systematically constructed and shown to be asymptotically optimal as well.

  17. Development and validation of the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool (SORT)

    PubMed Central

    Protopapa, K L; Simpson, J C; Smith, N C E; Moonesinghe, S R

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing risk stratification tools have limitations and clinical experience suggests they are not used routinely. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a preoperative risk stratification tool to predict 30-day mortality after non-cardiac surgery in adults by analysis of data from the observational National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) Knowing the Risk study. Methods The data set was split into derivation and validation cohorts. Logistic regression was used to construct a model in the derivation cohort to create the Surgical Outcome Risk Tool (SORT), which was tested in the validation cohort. Results Prospective data for 19 097 cases in 326 hospitals were obtained from the NCEPOD study. Following exclusion of 2309, details of 16 788 patients were analysed (derivation cohort 11 219, validation cohort 5569). A model of 45 risk factors was refined on repeated regression analyses to develop a model comprising six variables: American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status (ASA-PS) grade, urgency of surgery (expedited, urgent, immediate), high-risk surgical specialty (gastrointestinal, thoracic, vascular), surgical severity (from minor to complex major), cancer and age 65 years or over. In the validation cohort, the SORT was well calibrated and demonstrated better discrimination than the ASA-PS and Surgical Risk Scale; areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were 0·91 (95 per cent c.i. 0·88 to 0·94), 0·87 (0·84 to 0·91) and 0·88 (0·84 to 0·92) respectively (P < 0·001). Conclusion The SORT allows rapid and simple data entry of six preoperative variables, and provides a percentage mortality risk for individuals undergoing surgery. PMID:25388883

  18. Applying Single Kernel Sorting Technology to Developing Scab Resistant Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are using automated single-kernel near-infrared (SKNIR) spectroscopy instrumentation to sort fusarium head blight (FHB) infected kernels from healthy kernels, and to sort segregating populations by hardness to enhance the development of scab resistant hard and soft wheat varieties. We sorted 3 r...

  19. Gender Sorting across K-12 Schools in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Mark C.; Conger, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    This article documents evidence of nonrandom gender sorting across K-12 schools in the United States. The sorting exists among coed schools and at all grade levels, and it is highest in the secondary school grades. We observe some gender sorting across school sectors and types: for instance, males are slightly underrepresented in private schools…

  20. My eSorts and Digital Extensions of Word Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Tricia A.; Invernizzi, Marcia

    2008-01-01

    "My eSorts" is a strategy for helping children learn to read and spell in a socially motivated context. It is based on developmental spelling research and the word study approach to teaching phonics and spelling. "eSorting" employs digital desktop publishing tools that allow children to author their own electronic word sorts and then share these…

  1. Categorizing Variations of Student-Implemented Sorting Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taherkhani, Ahmad; Korhonen, Ari; Malmi, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined freshmen students' sorting algorithm implementations in data structures and algorithms' course in two phases: at the beginning of the course before the students received any instruction on sorting algorithms, and after taking a lecture on sorting algorithms. The analysis revealed that many students have insufficient…

  2. Airborne microorganisms associated with packaging glass sorting facilities.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Marta Jorge de Vasconcelos; Veiga, José Miguel; Fernandes, Paulo; Ramos, Carla; Gonçalves, Sérgio; Velho, Maria Manuela Lemos Vaz; Guerreiro, Joana Santos

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, efforts have been undertaken to reduce the volume of residual waste through sorting and recycling. The waste management and recycling sector is thriving and the number of workers there is increasing. In this context, prior knowledge of the risks to which workers may be exposed is of crucial importance, and preventive measures need to be put in place to accurately identify and quantify those risks. This study aimed to assess occupational risk of exposure to biological agents (viable bacteria and fungi) in a Portuguese waste packaging glass sorting plant. Air samples were collected from selected locations in waste sorting cabins (critical area, CA), administrative services (noncritical area, NCA) and outdoors (control point, CP). Duplicate air samples were collected through an impaction method. The investigation was carried out over an 8-mo period with two collection periods, autumn/winter (AW) and spring/summer (SS), in order to access the influence of any seasonal variation. In the 36 air samples collected, 319 bacterial and 196 mold identifications were performed. Air samples revealed existence of high environmental contamination by bacteria (1.6 × 10(4) colony forming units [cfu]/m(3)) and fungi (1.5 × 10(4) cfu/m(3)). The predominant bacterial genus was Staphylococcus (coagulase negative) with values ranging from 29.6 to 60% of the total count of bacteria. Genera Bacillus, Micrococcus, and Staphylococcus (coagulase negative) were also present at all sampling sites, regardless of the season. However, the counts of these genera, in the CA, were higher in warmer seasons. The genus Penicillium was the most frequent genus present with an approximate value of 95% of total fungal count in the CA. Seasonal variation was a significant factor for total bacteria and fungi, except for NCA versus CP. Overall, the highest levels of bacterial and fungal species (10(4) cfu/m(3)) were found in the waste sorting cabin (CA). These results highlight the

  3. Study of Sort Stories: Leveled Reading Supplement to Words Their Way: Word Sorts for Letter Name-Alphabet Spellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zugel, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    "Sort Stories: Leveled Reading Supplement to Words Their Way: Word Sorts for Letter Name-Alphabet Spellers" effectiveness was tested using five English language learner (ELL) students in the fifth and sixth grade. "Sort Stories" uses the word lists and accompanying clip-art from "Words Their Way" in developmental, grade-level specific, short read…

  4. Thermal conductivity of chirality-sorted carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Feifei; Llinas, Juan P.; Li, Zuanyi; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of significant interest, yet their dependence on SWNT chirality has been, until now, not explored experimentally. Here, we used electrical heating and infrared thermal imaging to simultaneously study thermal and electrical transport in chirality-sorted SWNT networks. We examined solution processed 90% semiconducting, 90% metallic, purified unsorted (66% semiconducting), and as-grown HiPco SWNT films. The thermal conductivities of these films range from 80 to 370 W m-1 K-1 but are not controlled by chirality, instead being dependent on the morphology (i.e., mass and junction density, quasi-alignment) of the networks. The upper range of the thermal conductivities measured is comparable to that of the best metals (Cu and Ag), but with over an order of magnitude lower mass density. This study reveals important factors controlling the thermal properties of light-weight chirality-sorted SWNT films, for potential thermal and thermoelectric applications.

  5. The NSF/RANN FY 1975 program for geothermal resources research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, P.

    1974-01-01

    The specific goal of the NSF geothermal program is the rapid development by industry of the nation's geothermal resources that can be demonstrated to be commercially, environmentally and socially acceptable as alternate energy sources. NSF, as the lead agency for the federal geothermal energy research program, is expediting a program which encompasses the objectives necessary for significant utilization. These include: acceleration of exploration and assessment methods to identify commercial geothermal resources; development of innovative and improved technology to achieve economic feasibility; evaluation of policy options to resolve environmental, legal, and institutional problems; and support of experimental research facilities for each type of geothermal resource. Specific projects in each of these four objective areas are part of the NSF program for fiscal year 1975.

  6. Online sorting of recovered wood waste by automated XRF-technology: part II. Sorting efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Hasan, A Rasem; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Townsend, Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Sorting of waste wood is an important process practiced at recycling facilities in order to detect and divert contaminants from recycled wood products. Contaminants of concern include arsenic, chromium and copper found in chemically preserved wood. The objective of this research was to evaluate the sorting efficiencies of both treated and untreated parts of the wood waste stream, and metal (As, Cr and Cu) mass recoveries by the use of automated X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. A full-scale system was used for experimentation. This unit consisted of an XRF-detection chamber mounted on the top of a conveyor and a pneumatic slide-way diverter which sorted wood into presumed treated and presumed untreated piles. A randomized block design was used to evaluate the operational conveyance parameters of the system, including wood feed rate and conveyor belt speed. Results indicated that online sorting efficiencies of waste wood by XRF technology were high based on number and weight of pieces (70-87% and 75-92% for treated wood and 66-97% and 68-96% for untreated wood, respectively). These sorting efficiencies achieved mass recovery for metals of 81-99% for As, 75-95% for Cu and 82-99% of Cr. The incorrect sorting of wood was attributed almost equally to deficiencies in the detection and conveyance/diversion systems. Even with its deficiencies, the system was capable of producing a recyclable portion that met residential soil quality levels established for Florida, for an infeed that contained 5% of treated wood. PMID:21194917

  7. Insect's intestinal organ for symbiont sorting.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Tsubasa; Takeshita, Kazutaka; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nikoh, Naruo; Koga, Ryuichi; Meng, Xian-Ying; Tago, Kanako; Hori, Tomoyuki; Hayatsu, Masahito; Asano, Kozo; Kamagata, Yoichi; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2015-09-15

    Symbiosis has significantly contributed to organismal adaptation and diversification. For establishment and maintenance of such host-symbiont associations, host organisms must have evolved mechanisms for selective incorporation, accommodation, and maintenance of their specific microbial partners. Here we report the discovery of a previously unrecognized type of animal organ for symbiont sorting. In the bean bug Riptortus pedestris, the posterior midgut is morphologically differentiated for harboring specific symbiotic bacteria of a beneficial nature. The sorting organ lies in the middle of the intestine as a constricted region, which partitions the midgut into an anterior nonsymbiotic region and a posterior symbiotic region. Oral administration of GFP-labeled Burkholderia symbionts to nymphal stinkbugs showed that the symbionts pass through the constricted region and colonize the posterior midgut. However, administration of food colorings revealed that food fluid enters neither the constricted region nor the posterior midgut, indicating selective symbiont passage at the constricted region and functional isolation of the posterior midgut for symbiosis. Coadministration of the GFP-labeled symbiont and red fluorescent protein-labeled Escherichia coli unveiled selective passage of the symbiont and blockage of E. coli at the constricted region, demonstrating the organ's ability to discriminate the specific bacterial symbiont from nonsymbiotic bacteria. Transposon mutagenesis and screening revealed that symbiont mutants in flagella-related genes fail to pass through the constricted region, highlighting that both host's control and symbiont's motility are involved in the sorting process. The blocking of food flow at the constricted region is conserved among diverse stinkbug groups, suggesting the evolutionary origin of the intestinal organ in their common ancestor. PMID:26324935

  8. Lateral chirality-sorting optical forces

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Amaury; Mueller, J. P. Balthasar; Capasso, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The transverse component of the spin angular momentum of evanescent waves gives rise to lateral optical forces on chiral particles, which have the unusual property of acting in a direction in which there is neither a field gradient nor wave propagation. Because their direction and strength depends on the chiral polarizability of the particle, they act as chirality-sorting and may offer a mechanism for passive chirality spectroscopy. The absolute strength of the forces also substantially exceeds that of other recently predicted sideways optical forces. PMID:26453555

  9. In quest of the missing neuron: spike sorting based on dominant-sets clustering.

    PubMed

    Adamos, Dimitrios A; Laskaris, Nikolaos A; Kosmidis, Efstratios K; Theophilidis, George

    2012-07-01

    Spike sorting algorithms aim at decomposing complex extracellular signals to independent events from single neurons in the electrode's vicinity. The decision about the actual number of active neurons is still an open issue, with sparsely firing neurons and background activity the most influencing factors. We introduce a graph-theoretical algorithmic procedure that successfully resolves this issue. Dimensionality reduction coupled with a modern, efficient and progressively executable clustering routine proved to achieve higher performance standards than popular spike sorting methods. Our method is validated extensively using simulated data for different levels of SNR. PMID:22136935

  10. Institutional transformation: An analysis of change initiatives at NSF ADVANCE institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Ellen W.

    The purpose of this study was to examine how institutional culture promoted or impeded the implementation of round one and two NSF ADVANCE initiatives designed to improve academic climates for women in science and engineering. This study was conducted in two phases. In phase one, 35 participants from 18 institutions were interviewed to answer three research questions. Participants identified a policy, process, or program designed to improve academic cultures for women in science and engineering fields. Participants also identified strategies that promoted the implementation of these efforts, and discussed factors that impeded these efforts. In phase two, site visits were conducted at two institutions to answer a fourth research question. How did institutional culture shape the design and implementation of faculty search processes? Policies, processes, and programs were implemented by participants at the institutional, departmental, and individual levels and included family friendly and dual career policies at the institutional level, improved departmental faculty search and climate improvement processes, and mentoring programs and training for department heads at the individual level. Communication and leadership strategies were key to the successful implementation of policies, processes, and programs designed to achieve institutional transformation. Communication strategies involved shaping change messages to reach varied audiences often with the argument that change efforts would improve the climate for everyone not just women faculty members. Administrative and faculty leaders from multiple levels proved important to change efforts. Institutional Transformation Institutional culture shaped initiatives to improve faculty search processes. Faculty leaders in both settings used data to persuade faculty members of the need for change. At one site, data that included national availability information was critical to advancing the change agenda. At the other site