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Sample records for factor rbp-j-mediated signaling

  1. Sortilins in neurotrophic factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Glerup, S; Nykjaer, A; Vaegter, C B

    2014-01-01

    The sortilin family of Vps10p-domain receptors includes sortilin, SorLA, and SorCS1-3. These type-I transmembrane receptors predominate in distinct neuronal tissues, but expression is also present in certain specialized non-neuronal cell populations including hepatocytes and cells of the immune system. The biology of sortilins is complex as they participate in both cell signaling and in intracellular protein sorting. Sortilins function physiologically in signaling by pro- and mature neurotrophins in neuronal viability and functionality. Recent genome-wide association studies have linked members to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorder and outside the nervous system to development of coronary artery disease and type-2 diabetes. Particularly well described are the receptor functions in neuronal signaling by pro- (proNT) and mature (NT) neurotrophins and in the processing/metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP). PMID:24668473

  2. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed. PMID:24212642

  3. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  4. Epidermal growth factor signaling in transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB) family play a critical role in normal cell growth and development. However, many ErbB family members, especially EGFR, are aberrantly expressed or deregulated in tumors and are thought to play crucial roles in cancer development and metastatic progression. In this chapter, we provide an overview of key mechanisms contributing to aberrant EGFR/ErbB signaling in transformed cells which results in many phenotypic changes associated with the earliest stages of tumor formation, including several hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These changes often occur through interaction with other major signaling pathways important to tumor progression resulting in a multitude of transcriptional changes that ultimately impact cell morphology, proliferation and adhesion, all of which are crucial for tumor progression. The resulting mesh of signaling networks will need to be taken into account as new regimens are designed for targeting EGFR for therapeutic intervention. As new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cross-talk of EGFR signaling with other signaling pathways and their role in therapeutic resistance to anti-EGFR therapies are gained a continual reassessment of clinical therapeutic regimes and strategies will be required. Understanding the consequences and complexity of EGF signaling and how it relates to tumor progression is critical for the development of clinical compounds and establishing clinical protocols for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25619714

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  6. Interdependent epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sylwia; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signalling regulates diverse cellular functions, promoting cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell growth and survival. EGFR signalling is critical during embryogenesis, in particular in epithelial development, and disruption of the EGFR gene results in epithelial immaturity and perinatal death. EGFR signalling also functions during wound healing responses through accelerating wound re-epithelialisation, inducing cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. Upregulation of EGFR signalling is often observed in carcinomas and has been shown to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore aberrant EGFR signalling is a common target for anticancer therapies. Various reports indicate that EGFR signalling primarily occurs at the plasma membrane and EGFR degradation following endocytosis greatly attenuates signalling. Other studies argue that EGFR internalisation is essential for complete activation of downstream signalling cascades and that endosomes can serve as signalling platforms. The aim of this review is to discuss current understanding of intersection between EGFR signalling and trafficking. PMID:24681003

  7. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A.; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O’Shea, Erin K.

    2013-01-01

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with “programmable” signal processing functions. PMID:23349292

  8. Future Antidepressant Targets: Neurotrophic Factors and Related Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Heath D.; Banasr, Mounira; Duman, Ronald S.

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that neurotrophic factors play critical roles in the etiology and treatment of depression. While the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants remain unknown, increasing evidence supports a role for increased trophic support in the treatment of depression. Furthermore, antidepressants block or reverse stress-induced down regulation of neurotrophic factor expression in limbic and cortical nuclei involved in the underlying pathophysiology of depression. Thus, components of neurotrophic factor-mediated signaling cascades or the signal transduction pathways that regulate neurotrophic factor expression may provide additional targets for the development of novel, more efficacious antidepressant drugs. PMID:19802372

  9. Mapping growth-factor-modulated Akt signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-05-15

    Growth factors alter cellular behavior through shared signaling cascades, raising the question of how specificity is achieved. Here, we have determined how growth factor actions are encoded into Akt signaling dynamics by real-time tracking of a fluorescent sensor. In individual cells, Akt activity was encoded in an analog pattern, with similar latencies (∼2 min) and half-maximal peak response times (range of 5-8 min). Yet, different growth factors promoted dose-dependent and heterogeneous changes in signaling dynamics. Insulin treatment caused sustained Akt activity, whereas EGF or PDGF-AA promoted transient signaling; PDGF-BB produced sustained responses at higher concentrations, but short-term effects at low doses, actions that were independent of the PDGF-α receptor. Transient responses to EGF were caused by negative feedback at the receptor level, as a second treatment yielded minimal responses, whereas parallel exposure to IGF-I caused full Akt activation. Small-molecule inhibitors reduced PDGF-BB signaling to transient responses, but only decreased the magnitude of IGF-I actions. Our observations reveal distinctions among growth factors that use shared components, and allow us to capture the consequences of receptor-specific regulatory mechanisms on Akt signaling. PMID:27044757

  10. Beyond microarrays: Finding key transcription factors controlling signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kel, Alexdander; Voss, Nico; Jauregui, Ruy; Kel-Margoulis, Olga; Wingender, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    Background Massive gene expression changes in different cellular states measured by microarrays, in fact, reflect just an "echo" of real molecular processes in the cells. Transcription factors constitute a class of the regulatory molecules that typically require posttranscriptional modifications or ligand binding in order to exert their function. Therefore, such important functional changes of transcription factors are not directly visible in the microarray experiments. Results We developed a novel approach to find key transcription factors that may explain concerted expression changes of specific components of the signal transduction network. The approach aims at revealing evidence of positive feedback loops in the signal transduction circuits through activation of pathway-specific transcription factors. We demonstrate that promoters of genes encoding components of many known signal transduction pathways are enriched by binding sites of those transcription factors that are endpoints of the considered pathways. Application of the approach to the microarray gene expression data on TNF-alpha stimulated primary human endothelial cells helped to reveal novel key transcription factors potentially involved in the regulation of the signal transduction pathways of the cells. Conclusion We developed a novel computational approach for revealing key transcription factors by knowledge-based analysis of gene expression data with the help of databases on gene regulatory networks (TRANSFAC® and TRANSPATH®). The corresponding software and databases are available at . PMID:17118134

  11. An integrated signal transduction network of macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Variar, Prathyaksha; Advani, Jayshree; Nair, Bipin; Shankar, Subramanian; Gowda, Harsha; Saussez, Sven; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a glycosylated multi-functional protein that acts as an enzyme as well as a cytokine. MIF mediates its actions through a cell surface class II major histocompatibility chaperone, CD74 and co-receptors such as CD44, CXCR2, CXCR4 or CXCR7. MIF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Although MIF is a molecule of biomedical importance, a public resource of MIF signaling pathway is currently lacking. In view of this, we carried out detailed data mining and documentation of the signaling events pertaining to MIF from published literature and developed an integrated reaction map of MIF signaling. This resulted in the cataloguing of 68 molecules belonging to MIF signaling pathway, which includes 24 protein-protein interactions, 44 post-translational modifications, 11 protein translocation events and 8 activation/inhibition events. In addition, 65 gene regulation events at the mRNA levels induced by MIF signaling have also been catalogued. This signaling pathway has been integrated into NetPath ( http://www.netpath.org ), a freely available human signaling pathway resource developed previously by our group. The MIF pathway data is freely available online in various community standard data exchange formats. We expect that data on signaling events and a detailed signaling map of MIF will provide the scientific community with an improved platform to facilitate further molecular as well as biomedical investigations on MIF. PMID:27139435

  12. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, David E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  13. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, David E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  14. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in skeletal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M.; Marie, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways are essential regulators of vertebrate skeletal development. FGF signaling regulates development of the limb bud and formation of the mesenchymal condensation and has key roles in regulating chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and bone and mineral homeostasis. This review updates our review on FGFs in skeletal development published in Genes & Development in 2002, examines progress made on understanding the functions of the FGF signaling pathway during critical stages of skeletogenesis, and explores the mechanisms by which mutations in FGF signaling molecules cause skeletal malformations in humans. Links between FGF signaling pathways and other interacting pathways that are critical for skeletal development and could be exploited to treat genetic diseases and repair bone are also explored. PMID:26220993

  15. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in development and skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Teven, Chad M.; Farina, Evan M.; Rivas, Jane; Reid, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) and their receptors serve many functions in both the developing and adult organism. Humans contain 18 FGF ligands and four FGF receptors (FGFR). FGF ligands are polypeptide growth factors that regulate several developmental processes including cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration, morphogenesis, and patterning. FGF-FGFR signaling is also critical to the developing axial and craniofacial skeleton. In particular, the signaling cascade has been implicated in intramembranous ossification of cranial bones as well as cranial suture homeostasis. In the adult, FGFs and FGFRs are crucial for tissue repair. FGF signaling generally follows one of three transduction pathways: RAS/MAP kinase, PI3/AKT, or PLCγ. Each pathway likely regulates specific cellular behaviors. Inappropriate expression of FGF and improper activation of FGFRs are associated with various pathologic conditions, unregulated cell growth, and tumorigenesis. Additionally, aberrant signaling has been implicated in many skeletal abnormalities including achondroplasia and craniosynostosis. The biology and mechanisms of the FGF family have been the subject of significant research over the past 30 years. Recently, work has focused on the therapeutic targeting and potential of FGF ligands and their associated receptors. The majority of FGF-related therapy is aimed at age-related disorders. Increased understanding of FGF signaling and biology may reveal additional therapeutic roles, both in utero and postnatally. This review discusses the role of FGF signaling in general physiologic and pathologic embryogenesis and further explores it within the context of skeletal development. PMID:25679016

  16. Burkholderia Diffusible Signal Factor Signals to Francisella novicida To Disperse Biofilm and Increase Siderophore Production

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Scott N.; Chung, Myung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    In many bacteria, the ability to modulate biofilm production relies on specific signaling molecules that are either self-produced or made by neighboring microbes within the ecological niche. We analyzed the potential interspecies signaling effect of the Burkholderia diffusible signal factor (BDSF) on Francisella novicida, a model organism for Francisella tularensis, and demonstrated that BDSF both inhibits the formation and causes the dispersion of Francisella biofilm. Specificity was demonstrated for the cis versus the trans form of BDSF. Using transcriptome sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and activity assays, we found that BDSF altered the expression of many F. novicida genes, including genes involved in biofilm formation, such as chitinases. Using a chitinase inhibitor, the antibiofilm activity of BDSF was also shown to be chitinase dependent. In addition, BDSF caused an increase in RelA expression and increased levels of (p)ppGpp, leading to decreased biofilm production. These results support our observation that exposure of F. novicida to BDSF causes biofilm dispersal. Furthermore, BDSF upregulated the genes involved in iron acquisition (figABCD), increasing siderophore production. Thus, this study provides evidence for a potential role and mechanism of diffusible signal factor (DSF) signaling in the genus Francisella and suggests the possibility of interspecies signaling between Francisella and other bacteria. Overall, this study suggests that in response to the interspecies DSF signal, F. novicida can alter its gene expression and regulate its biofilm formation. PMID:26231649

  17. Application of homomorphic signal processing to stress wave factor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karagulle, H.; Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal, which is the output of an ultrasonic testing system where the transmitting and receiving transducers are coupled to the same face of the test structure, is analyzed in the frequency domain. The SWF signal generated in an isotropic elastic plate is modelled as the superposition of successive reflections. The reflection which is generated by the stress waves which travel p times as a longitudinal (P) wave and s times as a shear (S) wave through the plate while reflecting back and forth between the bottom and top faces of the plate is designated as the reflection with p, s. Short-time portions of the SWF signal are considered for obtaining spectral information on individual reflections. If the significant reflections are not overlapped, the short-time Fourier analysis is used. A summary of the elevant points of homomorphic signal processing, which is also called cepstrum analysis, is given. Homomorphic signal processing is applied to short-time SWF signals to obtain estimates of the log spectra of individual reflections for cases in which the reflections are overlapped. Two typical SWF signals generated in aluminum plates (overlapping and non-overlapping reflections) are analyzed.

  18. Application of homomorphic signal processing to stress wave factor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Karaguelle, H.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal, which is the output of an ultrasonic testing system where the transmitting and receiving transducers are coupled to the same face of the test structure, is analyzed in the frequency domain. The SWF signal generated in an isotropic elastic plate is modelled as the superposition of successive reflections. The reflection which is generated by the stress waves which travel P times as a longitudinal (P) wave and s times as a shear (S) wave through the plate while reflecting back and forth between the bottom and top faces of the plate is designated as the reflection with P, s. Short-time portions of the SWF signal are considered for obtaining spectral information on individual reflections. If the significant reflections are not overlapped, the short-time Fourier analysis is used. A summary of the elevant points of homomorphic signal processing, which is also called cepstrum analysis, is given. Homomorphic signal processing is applied to short-time SWF signals to obtain estimates of the log spectra of individual reflections for cases in which the reflections are overlapped. Two typical SWF signals generated in aluminum plates (overlapping and non-overlapping reflections) are analyzed.

  19. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression. PMID:25639875

  20. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352

  1. Hypoxia-inducible factors and sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Ader, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Hypoxia, defined as reduced tissue oxygen concentration, is a characteristic of solid tumors and is an indicator of unfavorable diagnosis in patients. At the cellular level, the adaptation to hypoxia is under the control of two related transcription factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor), which activate expression of genes promoting angiogenesis, metastasis, increased tumor growth and resistance to treatments. A role for HIF-1α and HIF-2α is also emerging in hematologic malignancies such as lymphoma and l eukemia. Recent studies have identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) signaling pathway - which elicits various cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell survival or angiogenesis - as a new regulator of HIF-1α or HIF-2α activity. This review will consider how targeting the SphK1/S1P signaling could represent an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:21707486

  2. DELLA-mediated gibberellin signalling regulates Nod factor signalling and rhizobial infection.

    PubMed

    Fonouni-Farde, Camille; Tan, Sovanna; Baudin, Maël; Brault, Mathias; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Niebel, Andreas; Frugier, Florian; Diet, Anouck

    2016-01-01

    Legumes develop symbiotic interactions with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Bacterial Nod factors (NFs) and plant regulatory pathways modulating NF signalling control rhizobial infections and nodulation efficiency. Here we show that gibberellin (GA) signalling mediated by DELLA proteins inhibits rhizobial infections and controls the NF induction of the infection marker ENOD11 in Medicago truncatula. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active DELLA protein in the epidermis is sufficient to promote ENOD11 expression in the absence of symbiotic signals. We show using heterologous systems that DELLA proteins can interact with the nodulation signalling pathway 2 (NSP2) and nuclear factor-YA1 (NF-YA1) transcription factors that are essential for the activation of NF responses. Furthermore, MtDELLA1 can bind the ERN1 (ERF required for nodulation 1) promoter and positively transactivate its expression. Overall, we propose that GA-dependent action of DELLA proteins may directly regulate the NSP1/NSP2 and NF-YA1 activation of ERN1 transcription to regulate rhizobial infections. PMID:27586842

  3. Diffusible Signal Factor-Dependent Cell-Cell Signaling and Virulence in the Nosocomial Pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia▿

    PubMed Central

    Fouhy, Yvonne; Scanlon, Karl; Schouest, Katherine; Spillane, Charles; Crossman, Lisa; Avison, Matthew B.; Ryan, Robert P.; Dow, J. Maxwell

    2007-01-01

    The genome of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia encodes a cell-cell signaling system that is highly related to the diffusible signal factor (DSF)-dependent system of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris. Here we show that in S. maltophilia, DSF signaling controls factors contributing to the virulence and antibiotic resistance of this important nosocomial pathogen. PMID:17468254

  4. Resistance to targeted cancer drugs through hepatocyte growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heynen, Guus JJE; Fonfara, Aldona; Bernards, René

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapeutics that target a signaling pathway to which the cancer cells are addicted can deliver dramatic initial responses, but resistance is nearly always inevitable. A variety of mechanisms that cancer cells employ to escape from targeted cancer drugs have been described. We review here the role of Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) and its receptor MET in drug resistance. We present data demonstrating that HGF can confer resistance to a number of kinase inhibitors in a variety of cancer cell lines and discuss our results in relation to the findings of others. Together, these data point at a major role for HGF/MET signaling in resistance to a variety of targeted cancer drugs. PMID:25426675

  5. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  6. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling networks in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Frank B.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    As tumours evolve, the daughter cells of the initiating cell often become molecularly heterogeneous and develop different functional properties and therapeutic vulnerabilities. In glioblastoma (GBM), a lethal form of brain cancer, the heterogeneous expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) poses a substantial challenge for the effective use of EGFR-targeted therapies. Understanding the mechanisms that cause EGFR heterogeneity in GBM should provide better insights into how they, and possibly other amplified receptor tyrosine kinases, affect cellular signalling, metabolism and drug resistance. PMID:25855404

  7. Railway signals passed at danger. Situational and personal factors underlying stop signal abuse.

    PubMed

    van der Flier, H; Schoonman, W

    1988-06-01

    Based upon a systematic registration of cases of unauthorised passing through signals at danger (SPD cases) during the period 1 January 1983 to 1 January 1985, the contribution of situational and personal factors to the occurrence of this kind of safety error was studied. Exposural deviances were taken into account by presenting the relevant exposural details as well as the SPD frequencies. To study the effect of personal factors, the group of drivers involved was compared with an individually matched control group. Data analysis indicated that SPD cases tended to be fairly evenly dispersed over the months of the year. The distribution of incidents throughout the days of the week corresponded rather closely to the numbers of train driver shifts. Neither technical nor mechanical faults nor weather nor visibility conditions seemed to be significant contributory factors. SPD cases were relatively many during the morning hours (midnight till 6 am and 8 am till noon) and at the start of duty periods. At a number of (black) spots two or more cases were recorded accounting for a relatively high percentage of all cases. The most frequently mentioned hazard was that of the signal being situated behind a bend. About 90% of the cases took place at or near stations and most were with arriving trains. The direct cause of an SPD case often seemed to be that a signal was overlooked or not anticipated. Personal factors (age, time on duty, length of service or track and rolling-stock experience) did not seem to be important variables. However, it was proven that previous incidents, worse performance with multiple choice reaction tests, and less job satisfaction are predictive of a future SPD case. In this study the consequences of SPD cases were not as serious as they could be. Most damage was to points (forced open). Other consequences include level crossings not closed and a very small number of crashes. There were no fatalities and only one person was injured as a result of stop

  8. Structural Insights into mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhubing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yanyan; Li, Chuanchuan; Wang, Xin; He, Feng; Sun, Lina; Jiao, Shi; Shi, Weiyang; Zhou, Zhaocai

    2015-10-30

    In response to viral infection, cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors sense viral RNA and promote oligomerization of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), which then recruits tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family proteins, including TRAF6, to activate an antiviral response. Currently, the interaction between MAVS and TRAF6 is only partially understood, and atomic details are lacking. Here, we demonstrated that MAVS directly interacts with TRAF6 through its potential TRAF6-binding motif 2 (T6BM2; amino acids 455-460). Further, we solved the crystal structure of MAVS T6BM2 in complex with the TRAF6 TRAF_C domain at 2.95 Å resolution. T6BM2 of MAVS binds to the canonical adaptor-binding groove of the TRAF_C domain. Structure-directed mutational analyses in vitro and in cells revealed that MAVS binding to TRAF6 via T6BM2 instead of T6BM1 is essential but not sufficient for an optimal antiviral response. Particularly, a MAVS mutant Y460E retained its TRAF6-binding ability as predicted but showed significantly impaired signaling activity, highlighting the functional importance of this tyrosine. Moreover, these observations were further confirmed in MAVS(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Collectively, our work provides a structural basis for understanding the MAVS-TRAF6 antiviral response. PMID:26385923

  9. Endocytic control of growth factor signalling: multivesicular bodies as signalling organelles

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Radek; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction and endocytosis are intertwined processes. The internalization of ligand-activated receptors by endocytosis has classically been thought to attenuate signals by targeting receptors for degradation in lysosomes, but it can also maintain signals in early signalling endosomes. In both cases, localization to multivesicular endosomes en route to lysosomes is thought to terminate signalling. However, during WNT signal transduction, sequestration of the enzyme glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inside multivesicular endosomes results in the stabilization of many cytosolic proteins. Thus, the role of endocytosis during signal transduction may be more diverse than anticipated, and multivesicular endosomes may constitute a crucial signalling organelle. PMID:22108513

  10. Nuclear Factor-kappa B Signaling in Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Malhotra, Shweta; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy/wasting is a serious complication of a wide range of diseases and conditions such as aging, disuse, AIDS, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, space travel, muscular dystrophy, chronic heart failure, sepsis, and cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is one of most important signaling pathways linked to the loss of skeletal muscle mass in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Activation of NF-κB in skeletal muscle leads to degradation of specific muscle proteins, induces inflammation and fibrosis, and blocks the regeneration of myofibers after injury/atrophy. Recent studies employing genetic mouse models have provided strong evidence that NF-κB can serve as an important molecular target for the prevention of skeletal muscle loss. In this article, we have outlined the current understanding regarding the role of NF-κB in skeletal muscle with particular reference to different models of muscle-wasting and the development of novel therapy. PMID:18574572

  11. From tyrosine to melanin: Signaling pathways and factors regulating melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, Zuzanna; Buszman, Ewa; Beberok, Artur; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Melanins are natural pigments of skin, hair and eyes and can be classified into two main types: brown to black eumelanin and yellow to reddish-brown pheomelanin. Biosynthesis of melanins takes place in melanosomes, which are specialized cytoplasmic organelles of melanocytes - dendritic cells located in the basal layer of the epidermis, uveal tract of the eye, hair follicles, as well as in the inner ear, central nervous system and heart. Melanogenesis is a multistep process and begins with the conversion of amino acid L-tyrosine to DOPAquinone. The addition of cysteine or glutathione to DOPAquinone leads to the intermediates formation, followed by subsequent transformations and polymerization to the final product, pheomelanin. In the absence of thiol compounds DOPAquinone undergoes an intramolecular cyclization and oxidation to form DOPAchrome, which is then converted to 5,6-dihydroksyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). Eumelanin is formed by polymerization of DHI and DHICA and their quinones. Regulation of melanogenesis is achieved by physical and biochemical factors. The article presents the intracellular signaling pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB/MITF cascade, MAP kinases cascade, PLC/DAG/PKCβ cascade and NO/cGMP/PKG cascade, which are involved in the regulation of expression and activity of the melanogenesis-related proteins by ultraviolet radiation and endogenous agents (cytokines, hormones). Activity of the key melanogenic enzyme, tyrosinase, is also affected by pH and temperature. Many pharmacologically active substances are able to inhibit or stimulate melanin biosynthesis, as evidenced by in vitro studies on cultured pigment cells. PMID:27356601

  12. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Suppresses Renal Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yasui, Takahiro; Naiki, Taku; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported evidence suggesting that migrating macrophages (Mϕs) eliminate renal crystals in hyperoxaluric mice. Mϕs can be inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2), and colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) mediates polarization to the M2Mϕ phenotype. M2Mϕs promote renal tissue repair and regeneration, but it is not clear whether these cells are involved in suppressing renal crystal formation. We investigated the role of M2Mϕs in renal crystal formation during hyperoxaluria using CSF-1–deficient mice, which lack M2Mϕs. Compared with wild-type mice, CSF-1–deficient mice had significantly higher amounts of renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Treatment with recombinant human CSF-1 increased the expression of M2-related genes and markedly decreased the number of renal crystals in both CSF-1–deficient and wild-type mice. Flow cytometry of sorted renal Mϕs showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in a smaller population of CD11b+F4/80+CD163+CD206hi cells, which represent M2-like Mϕs. Additionally, transfusion of M2Mϕs into CSF-1–deficient mice suppressed renal crystal deposition. In vitro phagocytosis assays with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals showed a higher rate of crystal phagocytosis by M2-polarized Mϕs than M1-polarized Mϕs or renal tubular cells. Gene array profiling showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in disordered M2- and stone-related gene expressions. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence for a suppressive role of CSF-1 signaling in renal crystal formation. PMID:24578130

  13. Mechanistic duality of transcription factor function in phytochrome signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phytochrome (phy) family of sensory photoreceptors (phyA–E in Arabidopsis) elicit changes in gene expression after light-induced migration to the nucleus, where they interact with basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors, such as phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3). The mechanism by whic...

  14. Vascular Endothelial growth factor signaling in hypoxia and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Anand, Vidhu; Roy, Sabita

    2014-01-01

    Infection, cancer and cardiovascular diseases are the major causes for morbidity and mortality in the United States according to the Center for Disease Control. The underlying etiology that contributes to the severity of these diseases is either hypoxia induced inflammation or inflammation resulting in hypoxia. Therefore, molecular mechanisms that regulate hypoxia-induced adaptive responses in cells are important areas of investigation. Oxygen availability is sensed by molecular switches which regulate synthesis and secretion of growth factors and inflammatory mediators. As a consequence, tissue microenvironment is altered by reprogramming metabolic pathways, angiogenesis, vascular permeability, pH homeostasis to facilitate tissue remodeling. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is the central mediator of hypoxic response. HIF regulates several hundred genes and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the primary target genes. Understanding the regulation of HIF and its influence on inflammatory response offers unique opportunities for drug development to modulate inflammation and ischemia in pathological conditions. PMID:24610033

  15. The Host Plant Metabolite Glucose Is the Precursor of Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) Family Signals in Xanthomonas campestris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. 13C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence. PMID:25681189

  16. The host plant metabolite glucose is the precursor of diffusible signal factor (DSF) family signals in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Liu, Xiaoling; Wu, Ji'en; Lee, Jasmine; Chen, Shaohua; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris produces cis-11-methyl-2-dodecenoic acid (diffusible signal factor [DSF]) as a cell-cell communication signal to regulate biofilm dispersal and virulence factor production. Previous studies have demonstrated that DSF biosynthesis is dependent on the presence of RpfF, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase, but the DSF synthetic mechanism and the influence of the host plant on DSF biosynthesis are still not clear. We show here that exogenous addition of host plant juice or ethanol extract to the growth medium of X. campestris pv. campestris could significantly boost DSF family signal production. It was subsequently revealed that X. campestris pv. campestris produces not only DSF but also BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) and another novel DSF family signal, which was designated DSF-II. BDSF was originally identified in Burkholderia cenocepacia to be involved in regulation of motility, biofilm formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Functional analysis suggested that DSF-II plays a role equal to that of DSF in regulation of biofilm dispersion and virulence factor production in X. campestris pv. campestris. Furthermore, chromatographic separation led to identification of glucose as a specific molecule stimulating DSF family signal biosynthesis in X. campestris pv. campestris. (13)C-labeling experiments demonstrated that glucose acts as a substrate to provide a carbon element for DSF biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that X. campestris pv. campestris could utilize a common metabolite of the host plant to enhance DSF family signal synthesis and therefore promote virulence. PMID:25681189

  17. TGF-β signaling deficient fibroblasts enhance Hepatocyte Growth Factor signaling in mammary carcinoma cells to promote scattering and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nikki; Chytil, Anna; Shyr, Yu; Joly, Alison; Moses, Harold L.

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblasts are major cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, regulating tumor cell behavior in part through secretion of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors and angiogenic factors. In previous studies, conditional deletion of the type II TGF-β receptor in fibroblasts (Tgfbr2FspKO) was shown to promote mammary tumor metastasis in fibroblast: epithelial cell co-transplantation studies in mice, correlating with increased expression of HGF. Here, we advance our findings to show that Tgfbr2FspKO fibroblasts enhance HGF/c-Met and HGF/Ron signaling to promote scattering and invasion of mammary carcinoma cells. Blockade of c-Met and Ron by siRNA silencing and pharmacologic inhibitors significantly reduced mammary carcinoma cell scattering and invasion caused by Tgfbr2FspKO fibroblasts. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to c-Met and Ron significantly inhibited HGF-induced cell scattering and invasion correlating with reduced Stat3 and p42/44MAPK phosphorylation. Investigation of the Stat3 and MAPK signaling pathways by pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA silencing revealed a cooperative interaction between the two pathways to regulate HGF- induced invasion, scattering and motility of mammary tumor cells. Furthermore, while c-Met was found to regulate both the Stat3 and MAPK signaling pathways, Ron was found to regulate Stat3, but not MAPK signaling in mammary carcinoma cells. These studies demonstrate a tumor suppressive role for TGF-β signaling in fibroblasts, in part by suppressing HGF signaling between mammary fibroblasts and epithelial cells. These studies characterize complex functional roles for HGF and TGF-β signaling in mediating tumor: stromal interactions during mammary tumor cell scattering and invasion, with important implications in the metastatic process. PMID:18922968

  18. Diffusible signal factor family signals provide a fitness advantage to Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris in interspecies competition.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yinyue; Wu, Jien; Yin, Wenfang; Li, Peng; Zhou, Jianuan; Chen, Shaohua; He, Fei; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Diffusible signal factor (DSF) represents a new class of widely conserved quorum sensing signals, which regulates various biological functions through intra- or interspecies signaling. The previous studies identified that there is an antagonistic interaction between Xanthomonas and Bacillus species bacteria in natural ecosystem, but the detailed molecular mechanism of interspecies competition is not clear. This study showed that Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) interfered with morphological transition and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis in mixed cultures, whereas abrogation of the DSF synthase RpfF reduced the interference. DSF inhibited B. thuringiensis cell division and sporulation through modulation of ftsZ, which encodes an important cell division protein in bacterial cells. In addition, RpfF is essential for production of six DSF-family signals in Xcc, which employ the same signaling pathways to regulate biological functions in Xcc and play similar effects on reduction of cell division, sporulation and antibiotic resistance of B. thuringiensis. Furthermore, abrogation of RpfF decreased the competitive capability of Xcc against B. thuringiensis on the surface of Chinese cabbage leaves. Our findings provide new insights into the role of DSF-family signals in interspecies competition and depict molecular mechanisms with which Xcc competes with B. thuringiensis. PMID:26913592

  19. Ecdysone signaling opposes epidermal growth factor signaling in regulating cyst differentiation in the male gonad of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yue; Dominado, Nicole; Zoller, Richard; Ng, Chun; Kudyba, Karl; Siddall, Nicole A; Hime, Gary R; Schulz, Cordula

    2014-10-15

    The development of stem cell daughters into the differentiated state normally requires a cascade of proliferation and differentiation steps that are typically regulated by external signals. The germline cells of most animals, in specific, are associated with somatic support cells and depend on them for normal development. In the male gonad of Drosophila melanogaster, germline cells are completely enclosed by cytoplasmic extensions of somatic cyst cells, and these cysts form a functional unit. Signaling from the germline to the cyst cells via the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is required for germline enclosure and has been proposed to provide a temporal signature promoting early steps of differentiation. A temperature-sensitive allele of the EGFR ligand Spitz (Spi) provides a powerful tool for probing the function of the EGRF pathway in this context and for identifying other pathways regulating cyst differentiation via genetic interaction studies. Using this tool, we show that signaling via the Ecdysone Receptor (EcR), a known regulator of developmental timing during larval and pupal development, opposes EGF signaling in testes. In spi mutant animals, reducing either Ecdysone synthesis or the expression of Ecdysone signal transducers or targets in the cyst cells resulted in a rescue of cyst formation and cyst differentiation. Despite of this striking effect in the spi mutant background and the expression of EcR signaling components within the cyst cells, activity of the EcR pathway appears to be dispensable in a wildtype background. We propose that EcR signaling modulates the effects of EGFR signaling by promoting an undifferentiated state in early stage cyst cells. PMID:25169192

  20. High-power optical millimeter-wave signal generation with tunable frequency multiplication factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi-shi; Zheng, Zhenyu; Luo, Zhixiao; Min, Zhixuan; Xu, Ou; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates a simple and novel scheme for millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation using optical multi-sidebands (OMSB) modulation. In the proposed methods, several pairs of optical sidebands can be generated by employing parallel phase modulators driven by a low frequency radio frequency (RF) signal. The optical sidebands will beat at a photodetector (PD) to generate high frequency MMW signal with tunable frequency multiplication factor, such as frequency octupling, 12-tupling, 16-tupling and 18-tupling. Since no optical filters or DC bias are used, the MMW signal has the evident character of high-power output. A generalized analytic expression and simulation verification for generating the frequency multi-tupling MMW signal are developed. The influences caused by non-ideal factors are discussed in detail, and undesired power ratios versus non-ideal factors are plotted and analyzed.

  1. KRÜPPEL-LIKE FACTOR 9 AND REGULATION OF ENDOMETRIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA SIGNALING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endometrial cancer risk is linked to aberrant estrogen receptor-alpha (ER alpha) signaling caused by increased ER alpha activation due to hyper-estrogenic environments or mutations in growth-regulatory factors. We had shown that ER alpha signaling is attenuated by the Sp1-related transcription facto...

  2. Growth Factor Signaling and Memory Formation: Temporal and Spatial Integration of a Molecular Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopec, Ashley M.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Growth factor (GF) signaling is critically important for developmental plasticity. It also plays a crucial role in adult plasticity, such as that required for memory formation. Although different GFs interact with receptors containing distinct types of kinase domains, they typically signal through converging intracellular cascades (e.g.,…

  3. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  4. Signal transduction in human pancreatic cancer: roles of transforming growth factor beta, somatostatin receptors, and other signal intermediates.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Becnel, Lauren S; Li, Wei; Fisher, William E; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease because of the lack of early detection markers and effective treatments. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in western countries, including the United States. The mechanisms of pancreatic cancer progression remain unknown. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine, regulates cell growth and differentiation in healthy tissues, yet fails to do so in pancreatic cancer. Alterations of the TGF-beta and TGF-beta receptor/Smad signal transduction pathway have been implicated in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, both the TGF-beta receptor and Smad proteins interact with a variety of cellular signal pathways, such as the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), ERK1/2, and Wnt signal transduction cascades. This suggests that pancreatic cancer is a multi-gene-controlled malignancy and that effective treatments for pancreatic cancer should be aimed at multiple targets. In this review, we summarized the major signal intermediates involved in pancreatic cancer signal transduction pathways and specifically discussed how alterations in the regulatory functions of TGF-beta and Smad proteins allow for pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:16314822

  5. The best-laid plans go oft awry: synaptogenic growth factor signaling in neuropsychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Aislinn J.; Umemori, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Growth factors play important roles in synapse formation. Mouse models of neuropsychiatric diseases suggest that defects in synaptogenic growth factors, their receptors, and signaling pathways can lead to disordered neural development and various behavioral phenotypes, including anxiety, memory problems, and social deficits. Genetic association studies in humans have found evidence for similar relationships between growth factor signaling pathways and neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Accumulating data suggest that dysfunction in neuronal circuitry, caused by defects in growth factor-mediated synapse formation, contributes to the susceptibility to multiple neuropsychiatric diseases, including epilepsy, autism, and disorders of thought and mood (e.g., schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively). In this review, we will focus on how specific synaptogenic growth factors and their downstream signaling pathways might be involved in the development of neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:24672476

  6. A pathway to bone: signaling molecules and transcription factors involved in chondrocyte development and maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Lassar, Andrew B.; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Decades of work have identified the signaling pathways that regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes during bone formation, from their initial induction from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we review how multiple signaling molecules, mechanical signals and morphological cell features are integrated to activate a set of key transcription factors that determine and regulate the genetic program that induces chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. Moreover, we describe recent findings regarding the roles of several signaling pathways in modulating the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes in the growth plate, which is the ‘engine’ of bone elongation. PMID:25715393

  7. Rhizobium nod factor signaling. Evidence for a g protein-mediated transduction mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pingret, JL; Journet, EP; Barker, DG

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobium nodulation (Nod) factors are lipochitooligosaccharide signals that elicit key symbiotic developmental responses in the host legume root. In this study, we have investigated Nod factor signal transduction in the Medicago root epidermis by using a pharmacological approach in conjunction with transgenic plants expressing the Nod factor-responsive reporter construct pMtENOD12-GUS. Evidence for the participation of heterotrimeric G proteins in Nod factor signaling has come from three complementary observations: (1) the amphiphilic peptides mastoparan and Mas7, known G protein agonists, are able to mimic Nod factor-induced epidermal MtENOD12 expression; (2) growth of plants in nodulation-inhibiting conditions (10 mM NH4NO3) leads to a dramatic reduction in both Nod factor- and mastoparan-elicited gene expression; and (3) bacterial pertussis toxin, a well-characterized G protein antagonist, blocks the activities of both the Nod factor and mastoparan. In addition, we have found that antagonists that interfere with phospholipase C activity (neomycin and U73122) and Ca2+ influx/release (EGTA, La3+, and ruthenium red) block Nod factor/mastoparan activity. Taken together, these results are consistent with a Nod factor signal transduction mechanism involving G protein mediation coupled to the activation of both phosphoinositide and Ca2+ second messenger pathways. PMID:9596628

  8. Regulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking by Src and Eps8

    PubMed Central

    Auciello, Giulio; Cunningham, Debbie L.; Tatar, Tulin; Heath, John K.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) mediate a wide spectrum of cellular responses that are crucial for development and wound healing. However, aberrant FGFR activity leads to cancer. Activated growth factor receptors undergo stimulated endocytosis, but can continue to signal along the endocytic pathway. Endocytic trafficking controls the duration and intensity of signalling, and growth factor receptor signalling can lead to modifications of trafficking pathways. We have developed live-cell imaging methods for studying FGFR dynamics to investigate mechanisms that coordinate the interplay between receptor trafficking and signal transduction. Activated FGFR enters the cell following recruitment to pre-formed clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). However, FGFR activation stimulates clathrin-mediated endocytosis; FGF treatment increases the number of CCPs, including those undergoing endocytosis, and this effect is mediated by Src and its phosphorylation target Eps8. Eps8 interacts with the clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery and depletion of Eps8 inhibits FGFR trafficking and immediate Erk signalling. Once internalized, FGFR passes through peripheral early endosomes en route to recycling and degredative compartments, through an Src- and Eps8-dependent mechanism. Thus Eps8 functions as a key coordinator in the interplay between FGFR signalling and trafficking. This work provides the first detailed mechanistic analysis of growth factor receptor clustering at the cell surface through signal transduction and endocytic trafficking. As we have characterised the Src target Eps8 as a key regulator of FGFR signalling and trafficking, and identified the early endocytic system as the site of Eps8-mediated effects, this work provides novel mechanistic insight into the reciprocal regulation of growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking. PMID:23203811

  9. [Signaling molecules in the brain and epigenetic factors in neurodegenerative and mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomazkov, O A

    2015-01-01

    The literature on a role of signaling molecules in the organization of memory and cognitive functions is analyzed basing on mechanisms of memory physiology determined by a complex of biochemical processes initiated by the transmission of the signal to the synapse and completed by the synthesis of functionally significant molecules in the neuronal genetic apparatus. The center of these processes is a coordinated system of signal transduction, transcription, epigenetic and neurotrophic molecules. The dissonance of signal mechanisms is a prime cause of memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction as social maladaptation factors. The results of experimental and clinical studies of a role of the multilevel signaling system in age-related, neurodegenerative (Alzheimer’s disease) and mental (depression) disorders are discussed. At the same time, signaling molecules may be considered as particular targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26649375

  10. Signal transduction pathways and transcription factors triggered by arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, Daigo; Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is widely used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Several lines of evidence have indicated that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects signal transduction and transactivation of transcription factors, resulting in the stimulation of apoptosis in leukemia cells, because some transcription factors are reported to associate with the redox condition of the cells, and arsenicals cause oxidative stress. Thus, the disturbance and activation of the cellular signaling pathway and transcription factors due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during arsenic exposure may explain the ability of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} to induce a complete remission in relapsed APL patients. In this report, we review recent findings on ROS generation and alterations in signal transduction and in transactivation of transcription factors during As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure in leukemia cells.

  11. Interference with Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis inhibits virulence factor expression by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, M. Worth; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that controls numerous virulence factors through intercellular signals. This bacterium has two quorum-sensing systems (las and rhl), which act through the intercellular signals N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), respectively. P. aeruginosa also produces a third intercellular signal that is involved in virulence factor regulation. This signal, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone [referred to as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS)], is a secondary metabolite that is part of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing hierarchy. PQS can induce both lasB (encodes LasB elastase) and rhlI (encodes the C4-HSL synthase) in P. aeruginosa and is produced maximally during the late stationary phase of growth. Because PQS is an intercellular signal that is part of the quorum-sensing hierarchy and controls multiple virulence factors, we began basic studies designed to elucidate its biosynthetic pathway. First, we present data that strongly suggest that anthranilate is a precursor for PQS. P. aeruginosa converted radiolabeled anthranilate into radioactive PQS, which was bioactive. We also found that an anthranilate analog (methyl anthranilate) would inhibit the production of PQS. This analog was then shown to have a major negative effect on elastase production by P. aeruginosa. These data provide evidence that precursors of intercellular signals may provide viable targets for the development of therapeutic treatments that will reduce P. aeruginosa virulence. PMID:11573001

  12. The nuclear factor-kappaB-interleukin-6 signalling pathway mediating vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Allan R

    2010-05-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common pathophysiological response to diverse cardiovascular disease processes, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and aortic aneurysms/dissection. Inflammation is an ordered process initiated by vascular injury that produces enhanced leucocyte adherence, chemotaxis, and finally activation in situ. This process is coordinated by local secretion of adhesion molecules, chemotactic factors, and cytokines whose expression is the result of vascular injury-induced signal transduction networks. A wide variety of mediators of the vascular injury response have been identified; these factors include vasoactive peptides (angiotensin II, Ang II), CD40 ligands, oxidized cholesterol, and advanced glycation end-products. Downstream, the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription factor performs an important signal integration step, responding to mediators of vascular injury in a stimulus-dependent and cell type-specific manner. The ultimate consequence of NF-kappaB signalling is the activation of inflammatory genes including adhesion molecules and chemotaxins. However, clinically, the hallmark of vascular NF-kappaB activation is the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), whose local role in vascular inflammation is relatively unknown. The recent elucidation for the role of the IL-6 signalling pathway in Ang II-induced vascular inflammation as one that controls monocyte activation as well as its diverse signalling mechanism will be reviewed. These new discoveries further our understanding for the important role of the NF-kappaB-IL-6 signalling pathway in the process of vascular inflammation. PMID:20202975

  13. Growth factor signaling in lung morphogenetic centers: automaticity, stereotypy and symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, David; Bellusci, Saverio; Del Moral, Pierre-Marie; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lee, Matt; Tefft, Denise; Shi, Wei

    2003-01-01

    Lung morphogenesis is stereotypic, both for lobation and for the first several generations of airways, implying mechanistic control by a well conserved, genetically hardwired developmental program. This program is not only directed by transcriptional factors and peptide growth factor signaling, but also co-opts and is modulated by physical forces. Peptide growth factors signal within repeating epithelial-mesenchymal temporospatial patterns that constitute morphogenetic centers, automatically directing millions of repetitive events during both stereotypic branching and nonstereotypic branching as well as alveolar surface expansion phases of lung development. Transduction of peptide growth factor signaling within these centers is finely regulated at multiple levels. These may include ligand expression, proteolytic activation of latent ligand, ligand bioavailability, ligand binding proteins and receptor affinity and presentation, receptor complex assembly and kinase activation, phosphorylation and activation of adapter and messenger protein complexes as well as downstream events and cross-talk both inside and outside the nucleus. Herein we review the critical Sonic Hedgehog, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Bone Morphogenetic Protein, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Transforming Growth Factorβ signaling pathways and propose how they may be functionally coordinated within compound, highly regulated morphogenetic gradients that drive first stereotypic and then non-stereotypic, automatically repetitive, symmetrical as well as asymmetrical branching events in the lung. PMID:12818006

  14. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses. PMID:26103991

  15. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor signaling by the cardiac glycoside ouabain in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wolle, Daniel; Lee, Seung Joon; Li, Zhiqin; Litan, Alisa; Barwe, Sonali P; Langhans, Sigrid A

    2014-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling regulates cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Upon receptor binding, EGF triggers cascades of downstream signaling, including the MAPK and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathways. Aberrant expression/activation of EGFR is found in multiple human cancers, including medulloblastoma, the most prevalent pediatric brain cancer, and often has been associated with metastasis, poor prognosis, and resistance to chemotherapy. Na,K-ATPase is an ion pump well known for its role in intracellular ion homeostasis. Recent studies showed that Na,K-ATPase also functions as a signaling platform and revealed a role in EGFR, MAPK, and PI3K signaling. While both EGFR and Na,K-ATPase seem to modulate similar signaling pathways, cardiac glycosides that are steroid-like inhibitors of Na,K-ATPase, exhibit antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties in cancer cells. Thus, we sought to better understand the relationship between EGF and cardiac glycoside signaling. Here, we show that in medulloblastoma cells, both EGF and ouabain activate Erk1/2 and PI3K/Akt signaling. Nevertheless, in medulloblastoma cells ouabain did not transactivate EGFR as has been reported in various other cell lines. Indeed, ouabain inhibited EGF-induced Erk1/2 and Akt activation and, moreover, prevented EGF-induced formation of actin stress fibers and cell motility, probably by activating a stress signaling response. Na,K-ATPase has been proposed to act as a signaling scaffold and our studies suggest that in medulloblastoma cells Na,K-ATPase might act as a check point to integrate EGF-associated signaling pathways. Thus, Na,K-ATPase might serve as a valid target to develop novel therapeutic approaches in tumors with aberrant activation of the EGFR signaling cascades. PMID:25052069

  16. Transcription factors and cognate signalling cascades in the regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vemika; Bhagyaraj, Ella; Parkesh, Raman; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a process that maintains the equilibrium between biosynthesis and the recycling of cellular constituents; it is critical for avoiding the pathophysiology that results from imbalance in cellular homeostasis. Recent reports indicate the need for the design of high-throughput screening assays to identify targets and small molecules for autophagy modulation. For such screening, however, a better understanding of the regulation of autophagy is essential. In addition to regulation by various signalling cascades, regulation of gene expression by transcription factors is also critical. This review focuses on the various transcription factors as well as the corresponding signalling molecules that act together to translate the stimuli to effector molecules that up- or downregulate autophagy. This review rationalizes the importance of these transcription factors functioning in tandem with cognate signalling molecules and their interfaces as possible therapeutic targets for more specific pharmacological interventions. PMID:25651938

  17. Dual Control of Muscle Cell Survival by Distinct Growth Factor-Regulated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Margaret A.; Feng, Xiuhong; Everding, Daniel R.; Sieger, Kerry; Stewart, Claire E. H.; Rotwein, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In addition to their ability to stimulate cell proliferation, polypeptide growth factors are able to maintain cell survival under conditions that otherwise lead to apoptotic death. Growth factors control cell viability through regulation of critical intracellular signal transduction pathways. We previously characterized C2 muscle cell lines that lacked endogenous expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). These cells did not differentiate but underwent apoptotic death in low-serum differentiation medium. Death could be prevented by IGF analogues that activated the IGF-I receptor or by unrelated growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB). Here we analyze the signaling pathways involved in growth factor-mediated myoblast survival. PDGF treatment caused sustained activation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1 and -2), while IGF-I only transiently induced these enzymes. Transient transfection of a constitutively active Mek1, a specific upstream activator of ERKs, maintained myoblast viability in the absence of growth factors, while inhibition of Mek1 by the drug UO126 blocked PDGF-mediated but not IGF-stimulated survival. Although both growth factors activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) to similar extents, only IGF-I treatment led to sustained stimulation of its downstream kinase, Akt. Transient transfection of a constitutively active PI3-kinase or an inducible Akt promoted myoblast viability in the absence of growth factors, while inhibition of PI3-kinase activity by the drug LY294002 selectively blocked IGF- but not PDGF-mediated muscle cell survival. In aggregate, these observations demonstrate that distinct growth factor-regulated signaling pathways independently control myoblast survival. Since IGF action also stimulates muscle differentiation, these results suggest a means to regulate myogenesis through selective manipulation of different signal transduction pathways. PMID:10757809

  18. Membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease, antagonizes ABA signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun-Fan; Sun, Le; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Engström, Peter; Song, Ze-Ting; Lu, Sun-Jie; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Abscisic acid plays important roles in maintaining seed dormancy while gibberellins (GA) and other phytohormones antagonize ABA to promote germination. However, how ABA signaling is desensitized during the transition from dormancy to germination is still poorly understood. We functionally characterized the role of membrane-associated transcription factor peptidase, site-2 protease (S2P), in ABA signaling during seed germination in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that loss-of-function of S2P conferred high ABA sensitivity during seed germination, and expression of the activated form of membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17, in which the transmembrane domain and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen-facing C-terminus were deleted, in the S2P mutant rescued its ABA-sensitive phenotype. MYC and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bZIP17 were processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus in response to ABA treatment. Furthermore, genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling, such as the transcription factor ATHB7 and its target genes HAB1, HAB2, HAI1 and AHG3, were up-regulated in seeds of the wild-type upon ABA treatment; this up-regulation was impaired in seeds of S2P mutants. Our results suggest that S2P desensitizes ABA signaling during seed germination through regulating the activation of the membrane-associated transcription factor bZIP17 and therefore controlling the expression level of genes encoding negative regulators of ABA signaling. PMID:25919792

  19. Epidermal Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates adipocyte differentiation via secretion of adipogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Giacomo; Proserpio, Valentina; Lichtenberger, Beate Maria; Natsuga, Ken; Sinclair, Rodney; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the hair follicle growth cycle and oscillation in the thickness of the underlying adipocyte layer are synchronized. Although factors secreted by adipocytes are known to regulate the hair growth cycle, it is unclear whether the epidermis can regulate adipogenesis. We show that inhibition of epidermal Wnt/β-catenin signaling reduced adipocyte differentiation in developing and adult mouse dermis. Conversely, ectopic activation of epidermal Wnt signaling promoted adipocyte differentiation and hair growth. When the Wnt pathway was activated in the embryonic epidermis, there was a dramatic and premature increase in adipocytes in the absence of hair follicle formation, demonstrating that Wnt activation, rather than mature hair follicles, is required for adipocyte generation. Epidermal and dermal gene expression profiling identified keratinocyte-derived adipogenic factors that are induced by β-catenin activation. Wnt/β-catenin signaling-dependent secreted factors from keratinocytes promoted adipocyte differentiation in vitro, and we identified ligands for the bone morphogenetic protein and insulin pathways as proadipogenic factors. Our results indicate epidermal Wnt/β-catenin as a critical initiator of a signaling cascade that induces adipogenesis and highlight the role of epidermal Wnt signaling in synchronizing adipocyte differentiation with the hair growth cycle. PMID:24706781

  20. Genetic factors influencing bystander signaling in murine bladder epithelium after low-dose irradiation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Lyng, Fiona; Seymour, Colin; Maguire, Paula; Lorimore, Sally; Wright, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects occur in cells that are not directly hit by radiation tracks but that receive signals from hit cells. They are well-documented in vitro consequences of low-dose exposure, but their relevance to in vivo radiobiology is not established. To investigate the in vivo production of bystander signals, bladder explants were established from two strains of mice known to differ significantly in both short-term and long-term radiation responses. These were investigated for the ability of 0.5 Gy total-body irradiation in vivo to induce production of bystander signals in bladder epithelium. The studies demonstrate that irradiated C57BL/6 mice, but not CBA/Ca mice, produce bystander signals that induce apoptosis and reduce clonogenic survival in reporter HPV-G-transfected keratinocytes. Transfer of medium from explants established from irradiated animals to explants established from unirradiated animals confirmed these differences in bladder epithelium. The responses to the in vivo-generated bystander signal exhibit genotypic differences in calcium signaling and also in signaling pathways indicative of a major role for the balance of pro-apoptosis and anti-apoptosis proteins in determining the overall response. The results clearly demonstrate the in vivo induction of bystander signals that are strongly influenced by genetic factors and have implications for radiation protection, medical imaging, and radiotherapy. PMID:15799694

  1. Foetal phonocardiographic signal denoising based on non-negative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, V S; Tiwari, A K; Gangopadhyay, R; Akant, K A

    2012-01-01

    Foetal phonocardiography (fPCG) is a non-invasive, cost-effective and simple technique for antenatal care. The fPCG signals contain vital information of diagnostic importance regarding the foetal health. However, the fPCG signal is usually contaminated by various noises and thus requires robust signal processing to denoise the signal. The main aim of this paper is to develop a methodology for removal of unwanted noise from the fPCG signal. The proposed methodology utilizes the non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm. The developed methodology is tested on both simulated and real-time fPCG signals. The performance of the developed methodology has been evaluated in terms of the gain in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved through the process of denoising. In particular, using the NMF algorithm, a substantial improvement in SNR of the fPCG signals in the range of 12-30 dB has been achieved, providing a high quality assessment of foetal well-being. PMID:22136609

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Retamales, A.; Zuloaga, R.; Valenzuela, C.A.; Gallardo-Escarate, C.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2015-08-21

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast.

  3. Regulation of bone and cartilage development by network between BMP signalling and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Riko; Hata, Kenji; Matsubara, Takuma; Wakabayashi, Makoto; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2012-03-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein(s) (BMP) are very powerful cytokines that induce bone and cartilage formation. BMP also stimulate osteoblast and chondrocyte differentiation. During bone and cartilage development, BMP regulates the expression and/or the function of several transcription factors through activation of Smad signalling. Genetic studies revealed that Runx2, Osterix and Sox9, all of which function downstream of BMP, play essential roles in bone and/or cartilage development. In addition, two other transcription factors, Msx2 and Dlx5, which interact with BMP signalling, are involved in bone and cartilage development. The importance of these transcription factors in bone and cartilage development has been supported by biochemical and cell biological studies. Interestingly, BMP is regulated by several negative feedback systems that appear necessary for fine-tuning of bone and cartilage development induced by BMP. Thus, BMP harmoniously regulates bone and cartilage development by forming network with several transcription factors. PMID:22253449

  4. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates. PMID:22046564

  5. Dexras1 links glucocorticoids to insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling in adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Cha, Jiyoung Y; Seok, Jo Woon; Choi, Yoonjeong; Yoon, Bo Kyung; Choi, Hyeonjin; Yu, Jung Hwan; Song, Su Jin; Kim, Ara; Lee, Hyemin; Kim, Daeun; Han, Ji Yoon; Kim, Jae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are associated with obesity, but the underlying mechanism by which they function remains poorly understood. Previously, we showed that small G protein Dexras1 is expressed by glucocorticoids and leads to adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored the mechanism by which Dexras1 mediates adipogenesis and show a link to the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway. Without Dexras1, the activation of MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is abolished, thereby inhibiting mitotic clonal expansion and further adipocyte differentiation. Dexras1 translocates to the plasma membrane upon insulin or IGF-1 treatment, for which the unique C-terminal domain (amino acids 223-276) is essential. Dexras1-dependent MAPK activation is selectively involved in the IGF-1 signaling, because another Ras protein, H-ras localized to the plasma membrane independently of insulin treatment. Moreover, neither epidermal growth factor nor other cell types shows Dexras1-dependent MAPK activation, indicating the importance of Dexras1 in IGF-1 signaling in adipogenesis. Dexras1 interacts with Shc and Raf, indicating that Dexras1-induced activation of MAPK is largely dependent on the Shc-Grb2-Raf complex. These results suggest that Dexras1 is a critical mediator of the IGF-1 signal to activate MAPK, linking glucocorticoid signaling to IGF-1 signaling in adipogenesis. PMID:27345868

  6. Dexras1 links glucocorticoids to insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling in adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Cha, Jiyoung Y.; Seok, Jo Woon; Choi, Yoonjeong; Yoon, Bo Kyung; Choi, Hyeonjin; Yu, Jung Hwan; Song, Su Jin; Kim, Ara; Lee, Hyemin; Kim, Daeun; Han, Ji Yoon; Kim, Jae-woo

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are associated with obesity, but the underlying mechanism by which they function remains poorly understood. Previously, we showed that small G protein Dexras1 is expressed by glucocorticoids and leads to adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored the mechanism by which Dexras1 mediates adipogenesis and show a link to the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway. Without Dexras1, the activation of MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is abolished, thereby inhibiting mitotic clonal expansion and further adipocyte differentiation. Dexras1 translocates to the plasma membrane upon insulin or IGF-1 treatment, for which the unique C-terminal domain (amino acids 223–276) is essential. Dexras1-dependent MAPK activation is selectively involved in the IGF-1 signaling, because another Ras protein, H-ras localized to the plasma membrane independently of insulin treatment. Moreover, neither epidermal growth factor nor other cell types shows Dexras1-dependent MAPK activation, indicating the importance of Dexras1 in IGF-1 signaling in adipogenesis. Dexras1 interacts with Shc and Raf, indicating that Dexras1-induced activation of MAPK is largely dependent on the Shc-Grb2-Raf complex. These results suggest that Dexras1 is a critical mediator of the IGF-1 signal to activate MAPK, linking glucocorticoid signaling to IGF-1 signaling in adipogenesis. PMID:27345868

  7. Krüppel-like factors are effectors of nuclear receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Knoedler, Joseph R.; Denver, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Binding of steroid and thyroid hormones to their cognate nuclear receptors (NRs) impacts virtually every aspect of postembryonic development, physiology and behavior, and inappropriate signaling by NRs may contribute to disease. While NRs regulate genes by direct binding to hormone response elements in the genome, their actions may depend on the activity of other transcription factors (TFs) that may or may not bind DNA. The Krüppel-like family of transcription factors (KLF) is an evolutionarily conserved class of DNA-binding proteins that influence many aspects of development and physiology. Several members of this family have been shown to play diverse roles in NR signaling. For example, KLFs 1) act as accessory transcription factors for NR actions, 2) regulate expression of NR genes, and 3) as gene products of primary NR response genes function as key players in NR-dependent transcriptional networks. In mouse models, deletion of different KLFs leads to aberrant transcriptional and physiological responses to hormones, underscoring the importance of these proteins in the regulation of hormonal signaling. Understanding the functional relationships between NRs and KLFs will yield important insights into mechanisms of NR signaling. In this review we present a conceptual framework for understanding how KLFs participate in NR signaling, and we provide examples of how these proteins function to effect hormone action. PMID:24642391

  8. Differential Effects of Myopathy-Associated Caveolin-3 Mutants on Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brauers, Eva; Dreier, Agnes; Roos, Andreas; Wormland, Berthold; Weis, Joachim; Krüttgen, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Caveolin-3 is an important scaffold protein of cholesterol-rich caveolae. Mutations of caveolin-3 cause hereditary myopathies that comprise remarkably different pathologies. Growth factor signaling plays an important role in muscle physiology; it is influenced by caveolins and cholesterol-rich rafts and might thus be affected by caveolin-3 dysfunction. Prompted by the observation of a marked chronic peripheral neuropathy in a patient suffering from rippling muscle disease due to the R26Q caveolin-3 mutation and because TrkA is expressed by neuronal cells and skeletal muscle fibers, we performed a detailed comparative study on the effect of pathogenic caveolin-3 mutants on the signaling and trafficking of the TrkA nerve growth factor receptor and, for comparison, of the epidermal growth factor receptor. We found that the R26Q mutant slightly and the P28L strongly reduced nerve growth factor signaling in TrkA-transfected cells. Surface biotinylation experiments revealed that the R26Q caveolin-3 mutation markedly reduced the internalization of TrkA, whereas the P28L did not. Moreover, P28L expression led to increased, whereas R26Q expression decreased, epidermal growth factor signaling. Taken together, we found differential effects of the R26Q and P28L caveolin-3 mutants on growth factor signaling. Our findings are of clinical interest because they might help explain the remarkable differences in the degree of muscle lesions caused by caveolin-3 mutations and also the co-occurrence of peripheral neuropathy in the R26Q caveolinopathy case presented. PMID:20472890

  9. Wnt signaling induces gene expression of factors associated with bone destruction in lung and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachelle W; Merkel, Alyssa R; Page, Jonathan M; Ruppender, Nazanin S; Guelcher, Scott A; Sterling, Julie A

    2014-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is an important regulator of bone destruction in bone metastatic tumors. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates PTHrP production in part through the transcription factor Gli2, which is regulated independent of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in osteolytic cancer cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β in vivo does not fully inhibit tumor growth in bone or tumor-induced bone destruction, suggesting other pathways are involved. While Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 in development, the role of Wnt signaling in bone metastasis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 expression in tumor cells that induce bone destruction. We report here that Wnt activation by β-catenin/T cell factor 4 (TCF4) over-expression or lithium chloride (LiCl) treatment increased Gli2 and PTHrP expression in osteolytic cancer cells. This was mediated through the TCF and Smad binding sites within the Gli2 promoter as determined by promoter mutation studies, suggesting cross-talk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Culture of tumor cells on substrates with bone-like rigidity increased Gli2 and PTHrP production, enhanced autocrine Wnt activity and led to an increase in the TCF/Wnt signaling reporter (TOPFlash), enriched β-catenin nuclear accumulation, and elevated Wnt-related genes by PCR-array. Stromal cells serve as an additional paracrine source of Wnt ligands and enhanced Gli2 and PTHrP mRNA levels in MDA-MB-231 and RWGT2 cells in vitro and promoted tumor-induced bone destruction in vivo in a β-catenin/Wnt3a-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that a combination of matrix rigidity and stromal-secreted factors stimulate Gli2 and PTHrP through Wnt signaling in osteolytic breast cancer cells, and there is significant cross-talk between the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. This suggests that the Wnt signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor cell response to the bone

  10. Wnt signaling induces gene expression of factors associated with bone destruction in lung and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rachelle W.; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Page, Jonathan M.; Ruppender, Nazanin S.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is an important regulator of bone destruction in bone metastatic tumors. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates PTHrP production in part through the transcription factor Gli2, which is regulated independent of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in osteolytic cancer cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β in vivo does not fully inhibit tumor growth in bone or tumor-induced bone destruction, suggesting other pathways are involved. While Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 in development, the role of Wnt signaling in bone metastasis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 expression in tumor cells that induce bone destruction. We report here that Wnt activation by β-catenin/T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) over-expression or lithium chloride (LiCl) treatment increased Gli2 and PTHrP expression in osteolytic cancer cells. This was mediated through the TCF and Smad binding sites within the Gli2 promoter as determined by promoter mutation studies, suggesting cross-talk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Culture of tumor cells on substrates with bone-like rigidity increased Gli2 and PTHrP production, enhanced autocrine Wnt activity and led to an increase in the TCF/Wnt signaling reporter (TOPFlash), enriched β-catenin nuclear accumulation, and elevated Wnt-related genes by PCR-array. Stromal cells serve as an additional paracrine source of Wnt ligands and enhanced Gli2 and PTHrP mRNA levels in MDA-MB-231 and RWGT2 cells in vitro and promoted tumor-induced bone destruction in vivo in a β-catenin/Wnt3a-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that a combination of matrix rigidity and stromal-secreted factors stimulate Gli2 and PTHrP through Wnt signaling in osteolytic breast cancer cells, and there is significant cross-talk between the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. This suggests that the Wnt signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor cell response to the bone

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Glioma: Signal Transduction, Neuropathology, Imaging, and Radioresistance1

    PubMed Central

    Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Burma, Sandeep; Zhao, Dawen; Habib, Amyn A

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is common in cancer. Increased expression of wild type and mutant EGFR is a widespread feature of diverse types of cancer. EGFR signaling in cancer has been the focus of intense investigation for decades primarily for two reasons. First, aberrant EGFR signaling is likely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer, and therefore, the mechanisms of EGFR-mediated oncogenic signaling are of interest. Second, the EGFR signaling system is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. EGFR gene amplification and overexpression are a particularly striking feature of glioblastoma (GBM), observed in approximately 40% of tumors. GBM is the most common primary malignant tumor of the central nervous system in adults. In approximately 50% of tumors with EGFR amplification, a specific EGFR mutant (EGFRvIII, also known as EGFR type III, de2-7, ΔEGFR) can be detected. This mutant is highly oncogenic and is generated from a deletion of exons 2 to 7 of the EGFR gene, which results in an in-frame deletion of 267 amino acids from the extracellular domain of the receptor. EGFRvIII is unable to bind ligand, and it signals constitutively. Although EGFRvIII has the same signaling domain as the wild type receptor, it seems to generate a distinct set of downstream signals that may contribute to an increased tumorigenicity. In this review, we discuss recent progress in key aspects of EGFR signaling in GBM, focusing on neuropathology, signal transduction, imaging of the EGFR, and the role of the EGFR in mediating resistance to radiation therapy in GBM. PMID:20824044

  12. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling as therapeutic targets in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Masakazu; Matsuoka, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) regulate a variety of cellular functions, from embryogenesis to adult tissue homeostasis. FGFR signaling also plays significant roles in the proliferation, invasion, and survival of several types of tumor cells. FGFR-induced alterations, including gene amplification, chromosomal translocation, and mutations, have been shown to be associated with the tumor initiation and progression of gastric cancer, especially in diffuse-type cancers. Therefore, the FGFR signaling pathway might be one of the therapeutic targets in gastric cancer. This review aims to provide an overview of the role of FGFR signaling in tumorigenesis, tumor progression, proliferation, and chemoresistance. We also discuss the accumulating evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of using clinical therapeutic agents to inhibit FGFR signaling for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26937130

  13. Signal Detection Analysis of Factors Associated with Diabetes among Semirural Mexican American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanni, K. D.; Ahn, D. A.; Winkleby, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Signal detection analysis was used to evaluate a combination of sociodemographic, acculturation, mental health, health care, and chronic disease risk factors potentially associated with diabetes in a sample of 4,505 semirural Mexican American adults. Overall, 8.9% of adults had been diagnosed with diabetes. The analysis resulted in 12 mutually…

  14. MECHANISMS OF ZN-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MECHANISMS OF Zn-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)
    James M. Samet*, Lee M. Graves? and Weidong Wu?. *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and ?Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North C...

  15. Cellular Signaling by Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) and Their Receptors (FGFRs) in Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Leanne M.; O’Bryan, Moira K.; Hinton, Barry T.

    2008-01-01

    The major function of the reproductive system is to ensure the survival of the species by passing on hereditary traits from one generation to the next. This is accomplished through the production of gametes and the generation of hormones that function in the maturation and regulation of the reproductive system. It is well established that normal development and function of the male reproductive system is mediated by endocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), their receptors (FGFRs), and signaling cascades have been implicated in a diverse range of cellular processes including: proliferation, apoptosis, cell survival, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, motility, and differentiation. The maintenance and regulation of correct FGF signaling is evident from human and mouse genetic studies which demonstrate that mutations leading to disruption of FGF signaling cause a variety of developmental disorders including dominant skeletal diseases, infertility, and cancer. Over the course of this review, we will provide evidence for differential expression of FGFs/FGFRs in the testis, male germ cells, the epididymis, the seminal vesicle, and the prostate. We will show that this signaling cascade has an important role in sperm development and maturation. Furthermore, we will demonstrate that FGF/FGFR signaling is essential for normal epididymal function and prostate development. To this end, we will provide evidence for the involvement of the FGF signaling system in the regulation and maintenance of the male reproductive system. PMID:18216218

  16. Blocking Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Inhibits Tumor Growth, Lymphangiogenesis, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu-Lahargue, Frédéric; Welm, Alana L.; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Alitalo, Kari; Li, Dean Y.; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor (FGFR) activity plays crucial roles in tumor growth and patient survival. However, FGF (Fibroblast Growth Factor) signaling as a target for cancer therapy has been under-investigated compared to other receptor tyrosine kinases. Here, we studied the effect of FGFR signaling inhibition on tumor growth, metastasis and lymphangiogenesis by expressing a dominant negative FGFR (FGFR-2DN) in an orthotopic mouse mammary 66c14 carcinoma model. We show that FGFR-2DN-expressing 66c14 cells proliferate in vitro slower than controls. 66c14 tumor outgrowth and lung metastatic foci are reduced in mice implanted with FGFR-2DN-expressing cells, which also exhibited better overall survival. We found 66c14 cells in the lumen of tumor lymphatic vessels and in lymph nodes. FGFR-2DN-expressing tumors exhibited a decrease in VEGFR-3 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3) or podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels, an increase in isolated intratumoral lymphatic endothelial cells and a reduction in VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C) mRNA expression. FGFs may act in an autocrine manner as the inhibition of FGFR signaling in tumor cells suppresses VEGF-C expression in a COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) or HIF1-α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α) independent manner. FGFs may also act in a paracrine manner on tumor lymphatics by inducing expression of pro-lymphangiogenic molecules such as VEGFR-3, integrin α9, prox1 and netrin-1. Finally, in vitro lymphangiogenesis is impeded in the presence of FGFR-2DN 66c14 cells. These data confirm that both FGF and VEGF signaling are necessary for the maintenance of vascular morphogenesis and provide evidence that targeting FGFR signaling may be an interesting approach to inhibit tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastatic spread. PMID:22761819

  17. Regulation of integrin and growth factor signaling in biomaterials for osteodifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiang; Pohl, Theresa L M; Seckinger, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem cells respond to the microenvironment (niche) they are located in. Under natural conditions, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is the essential component the in stem cell niche, in which both integrin ligands and growth factors are important regulators to directly or indirectly modulate the cell behavior. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the potential of integrin ligands and growth factors to induce osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, and discuss the signaling pathways that are initiated by both individual and cooperative parameters. The joint effect of integrin ligands and growth factors is highlighted as the multivalent interactions for bone therapy. PMID:26124879

  18. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release. PMID:26641634

  19. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling and experimental persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Wedgwood, Stephen; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Schumacker, Paul T.; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activity are increased in a lamb model of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). These events can trigger hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling in response to hypoxia, which has been shown to contribute to pulmonary vascular remodeling in rodent models of pulmonary hypertension. However, the role of HIF signaling in chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension is not well understood. Aim: To determine if HIF signaling is increased in the lamb model of PPHN, and to identify the underlying mechanisms. Results: PPHN was induced in lambs by antenatal ligation of the ductus arteriosus at 128 days gestation. After 9 days, lungs and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) were isolated from control and PPHN lambs. HIF-1α expression was increased in PPHN lungs and HIF activity was increased in PPHN PASMC relative to controls. Hypoxia increased HIF activity to a greater degree in PPHN vs. control PASMC. Control PASMC were exposed to cyclic stretch at 1 Hz and 15% elongation for 24 h, as an in vitro model of vascular stress. Stretch increased HIF activity, which was attenuated by inhibition of mitochondrial complex III and NFκB. Conclusion: Increased HIF signaling in PPHN is triggered by stretch, via mechanisms involving mitochondrial ROS and NFκB. Hypoxia substantially amplifies HIF activity in PPHN vascular cells. Targeting these signaling molecules may attenuate and reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling associated with PPHN. PMID:25814954

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 2 can replace ectodermal signaling for feather development.

    PubMed

    Song, H; Wang, Y; Goetinck, P F

    1996-09-17

    The initiation and morphogenesis of cutaneous appendages depend on a series of reciprocal signaling events between the epithelium and mesenchyme of the embryonic skin. In the development of feather germs, early dermal signals induce the formation of epidermal placodes that in turn signal the mesoderm to form dermal condensations immediately beneath them. We find a spatially and temporally restricted pattern of transcription for the genes that encode fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 and FGF receptor (FGFR) 1 in developing feather germs of the chicken embryo. FGF-2 expression is restricted to the epidermal placodes, whereas FGFR-1 expression is limited to the dermal condensations. Transcription of these genes could not be detected in skins of scaleless (sc/sc) embryos that fail to develop feathers as a result of an ectodermal defect. Treatment of sc/sc skins with FGF-2 results in the formation of feathers at the site of application of the growth factor and the induced feathers express FGFR-1 in their dermal condensations. Thus, we have established FGF-2 as an epidermal signal in early feather germ formation. The observation that FGF-2 can rescue the mutant phenotype of sc/sc embryos suggests that FGF-2 either is, or is downstream from, the signal that the sc/sc mutant ectoderm fails to generate. PMID:8816784

  1. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kenneth A; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bates, Carlton M

    2016-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and FGF ligands are highly expressed in the developing kidney and lower urinary tract. Several classic studies showed many effects of exogenous FGF ligands on embryonic renal tissues in vitro and in vivo. Another older landmark publication showed that mice with a dominant negative Fgfr fragment had severe renal dysplasia. Together, these studies revealed the importance of FGFR signaling in kidney and lower urinary tract development. With the advent of modern gene targeting techniques, including conditional knockout approaches, several publications have revealed critical roles for FGFR signaling in many lineages of the kidney and lower urinary tract at different stages of development. FGFR signaling has been shown to be critical for early metanephric mesenchymal patterning, Wolffian duct patterning including induction of the ureteric bud, ureteric bud branching morphogenesis, nephron progenitor survival and nephrogenesis, and bladder mesenchyme patterning. FGFRs pattern these tissues by interacting with many other growth factor signaling pathways. Moreover, the many genetic Fgfr and Fgf animal models have structural defects mimicking numerous congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract seen in humans. Finally, many studies have shown how FGFR signaling is critical for kidney and lower urinary tract patterning in humans. PMID:26293980

  2. Dynamics of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling in Wound Healing and Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Finnson, Kenneth W.; McLean, Sarah; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M.; Philip, Anie

    2013-01-01

    Significance Wound healing is an intricate biological process in which the skin, or any other tissue, repairs itself after injury. Normal wound healing relies on the appropriate levels of cytokines and growth factors to ensure that cellular responses are mediated in a coordinated manner. Among the many growth factors studied in the context of wound healing, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is thought to have the broadest spectrum of effects. Recent Advances Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway have been elucidated, and the role of TGF-β in wound healing has been well characterized. Targeting the TGF-β signaling pathway using therapeutic agents to improve wound healing and/or reduce scarring has been successful in pre-clinical studies. Critical Issues Although TGF-β isoforms (β1, β2, β3) signal through the same cell surface receptors, they display distinct functions during wound healing in vivo through mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. The challenge of translating preclinical studies targeting the TGF-β signaling pathway to a clinical setting may require more extensive preclinical research using animal models that more closely mimic wound healing and scarring in humans, and taking into account the spatial, temporal, and cell-type–specific aspects of TGF-β isoform expression and function. Future Directions Understanding the differences in TGF-β isoform signaling at the molecular level and identification of novel components of the TGF-β signaling pathway that critically regulate wound healing may lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for treatment of impaired wound healing and pathological scarring. PMID:24527343

  3. Analysis of corkscrew signaling in the Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor pathway during myogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson Hamlet, M R; Perkins, L A

    2001-01-01

    The Drosophila nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, Corkscrew (Csw), functions positively in multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways, including signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Detailed phenotypic analyses of csw mutations have revealed that Csw activity is required in many of the same developmental processes that require EGFR function. However, it is still unclear where in the signaling hierarchy Csw functions relative to other proteins whose activities are also required downstream of the receptor. To address this issue, genetic interaction experiments were performed to place csw gene activity relative to the EGFR, spitz (spi), rhomboid (rho), daughter of sevenless (DOS), kinase-suppressor of ras (ksr), ras1, D-raf, pointed (pnt), and moleskin. We followed the EGFR-dependent formation of VA2 muscle precursor cells as a sensitive assay for these genetic interaction studies. First, we established that Csw has a positive function during mesoderm development. Second, we found that tissue-specific expression of a gain-of-function csw construct rescues loss-of-function mutations in other positive signaling genes upstream of rolled (rl)/MAPK in the EGFR pathway. Third, we were able to infer levels of EGFR signaling in various mutant backgrounds during myogenesis. This work extends previous studies of Csw during Torso and Sevenless RTK signaling to include an in-depth analysis of the role of Csw in the EGFR signaling pathway. PMID:11729154

  4. Drosophila Vps4 promotes Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of its role in receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Legent, Kevin; Liu, Hui Hua; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking of signaling receptors is an important mechanism for limiting signal duration. Components of the Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT), which target ubiquitylated receptors to intra-lumenal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies, are thought to terminate signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and direct it for lysosomal degradation. In a genetic screen for mutations that affect Drosophila eye development, we identified an allele of Vacuolar protein sorting 4 (Vps4), which encodes an AAA ATPase that interacts with the ESCRT-III complex to drive the final step of ILV formation. Photoreceptors are largely absent from Vps4 mutant clones in the eye disc, and even when cell death is genetically prevented, the mutant R8 photoreceptors that develop fail to recruit surrounding cells to differentiate as R1-R7 photoreceptors. This recruitment requires EGFR signaling, suggesting that loss of Vps4 disrupts the EGFR pathway. In imaginal disc cells mutant for Vps4, EGFR and other receptors accumulate in endosomes and EGFR target genes are not expressed; epistasis experiments place the function of Vps4 at the level of the receptor. Surprisingly, Vps4 is required for EGFR signaling even in the absence of Shibire, the Dynamin that internalizes EGFR from the plasma membrane. In ovarian follicle cells, in contrast, Vps4 does not affect EGFR signaling, although it is still essential for receptor degradation. Taken together, these findings indicate that Vps4 can promote EGFR activity through an endocytosis-independent mechanism. PMID:25790850

  5. Rationale for targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    André, Fabrice; Cortés, Javier

    2015-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling is involved in multiple biological processes, including cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis during embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. Given its role in the activation of critical signaling pathways, aberrant FGFR signaling has been implicated in multiple cancer types. A comprehensive search of PubMed and congress abstracts was conducted to identify reports on FGFR pathway components in breast cancer. In breast cancers, FGFR1 and FGFR4 gene amplification and single nucleotide polymorphisms in FGFR2 and FGFR4 have been detected. Commonly, these FGFR aberrations and gene amplifications lead to increased FGFR signaling and have been linked with poor prognosis and resistance to breast cancer treatments. Here, we review the role of FGFR signaling and the impact of FGFR genetic amplifications/aberrations on breast tumors. In addition, we summarize the most recent preclinical and clinical data on FGFR-targeted therapies in breast cancer. Finally, we highlight the ongoing clinical trials of the FGFR-targeted agents dovitinib, AZD4547, lucitanib, BGJ398, and JNJ-42756493, which are selected for patients with FGFR pathway-amplified breast cancer. Aberrant FGFR pathway amplification may drive some breast cancers. Inhibition of FGFR signaling is being explored in the clinic, and data from these trials may refine our ability to select patients who would best respond to these treatments. PMID:25677745

  6. Neuroendocrine Control of the Gut During Stress: Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Signaling Pathways in the Spotlight

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress’s impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways mediates both the inhibition of upper gastrointestinal (GI) and the stimulation of lower GI motor function through interaction with different CRF receptor subtypes. Here, we review how various stressors affect the gut, with special emphasis on the central and peripheral CRF signaling systems. PMID:18928406

  7. Neuroendocrine control of the gut during stress: corticotropin-releasing factor signaling pathways in the spotlight.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress's impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways mediates both the inhibition of upper gastrointestinal (GI) and the stimulation of lower GI motor function through interaction with different CRF receptor subtypes. Here, we review how various stressors affect the gut, with special emphasis on the central and peripheral CRF signaling systems. PMID:18928406

  8. Processing of cell-surface signalling anti-sigma factors prior to signal recognition is a conserved autoproteolytic mechanism that produces two functional domains.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Karlijn C; Otero-Asman, Joaquín R; Luirink, Joen; Bitter, Wilbert; Llamas, María A

    2015-09-01

    Cell-surface signalling (CSS) enables Gram-negative bacteria to transduce an environmental signal into a cytosolic response. This regulatory cascade involves an outer membrane receptor that transmits the signal to an anti-sigma factor in the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the activation of an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor. Recent studies have demonstrated that RseP-mediated proteolysis of the anti-sigma factors is key to σ(ECF) activation. Using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa FoxR anti-sigma factor, we show here that RseP is responsible for the generation of an N-terminal tail that likely contains pro-sigma activity. Furthermore, it has been reported previously that this anti-sigma factor is processed in two separate domains prior to signal recognition. Here, we demonstrate that this process is common in these types of proteins and that the processing event is probably due to autoproteolytic activity. The resulting domains interact and function together to transduce the CSS signal. However, our results also indicate that this processing event is not essential for activity. In fact, we have identified functional CSS anti-sigma factors that are not cleaved prior to signal perception. Together, our results indicate that CSS regulation can occur through both complete and initially processed anti-sigma factors. PMID:25581349

  9. Nanoconjugation prolongs endosomal signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor and enhances apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Xu, F.; Reinhard, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF mediated apoptosis at effective concentrations that do not induce apoptosis in the case of free EGF. Overall, these findings indicate nanoconjugation as a rational strategy for modifying signaling that acts by modulating the temporo-spatial distribution of the activated EGF-EGFR ligand-receptor complex.It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF

  10. Factor Xa stimulates fibroblast procollagen production, proliferation, and calcium signaling via PAR{sub 1} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P. . E-mail: olivier.blanc-brude@larib.inserm.fr; Archer, Fabienne; Leoni, Patricia; Derian, Claudia; Bolsover, Steven; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2005-03-10

    Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activity and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.

  11. Extrinsic and intrinsic signals converge on the Runx1/CBFβ transcription factor for nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Siyi; O'Donovan, Kevin J; Turner, Eric E; Zhong, Jian; Ginty, David D

    2015-01-01

    The generation of diverse neuronal subtypes involves specification of neural progenitors and, subsequently, postmitotic neuronal differentiation, a relatively poorly understood process. Here, we describe a mechanism whereby the neurotrophic factor NGF and the transcription factor Runx1 coordinate postmitotic differentiation of nonpeptidergic nociceptors, a major nociceptor subtype. We show that the integrity of a Runx1/CBFβ holocomplex is crucial for NGF-dependent nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation. NGF signals through the ERK/MAPK pathway to promote expression of Cbfb but not Runx1 prior to maturation of nonpeptidergic nociceptors. In contrast, transcriptional initiation of Runx1 in nonpeptidergic nociceptor precursors is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor Islet1, which is largely dispensable for Cbfb expression. Thus, an NGF/TrkA-MAPK-CBFβ pathway converges with Islet1-Runx1 signaling to promote Runx1/CBFβ holocomplex formation and nonpeptidergic nociceptor maturation. Convergence of extrinsic and intrinsic signals to control heterodimeric transcription factor complex formation provides a robust mechanism for postmitotic neuronal subtype specification. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10874.001 PMID:26418744

  12. The glucose-sensing transcription factor MLX promotes myogenesis via myokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Liam C.; Xu, Beisi; Finkelstein, David; Fan, Yiping; Carroll, Patrick A.; Cheng, Pei-Feng; Eisenman, Robert N.; Demontis, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic stress and changes in nutrient levels modulate many aspects of skeletal muscle function during aging and disease. Growth factors and cytokines secreted by skeletal muscle, known as myokines, are important signaling factors, but it is largely unknown whether they modulate muscle growth and differentiation in response to nutrients. Here, we found that changes in glucose levels increase the activity of the glucose-responsive transcription factor MLX (Max-like protein X), which promotes and is necessary for myoblast fusion. MLX promotes myogenesis not via an adjustment of glucose metabolism but rather by inducing the expression of several myokines, including insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), whereas RNAi and dominant-negative MLX reduce IGF2 expression and block myogenesis. This phenotype is rescued by conditioned medium from control muscle cells and by recombinant IGF2, which activates the myogenic kinase Akt. Importantly, MLX-null mice display decreased IGF2 induction and diminished muscle regeneration in response to injury, indicating that the myogenic function of MLX is manifested in vivo. Thus, glucose is a signaling molecule that regulates myogenesis and muscle regeneration via MLX/IGF2/Akt signaling. PMID:26584623

  13. Deletion of ocular transforming growth factor β signaling mimics essential characteristics of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Braunger, Barbara M; Leimbeck, Sarah V; Schlecht, Anja; Volz, Cornelia; Jägle, Herbert; Tamm, Ernst R

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a major cause of blindness, is characterized by a distinct phenotype. The molecular causes of the phenotype are not sufficiently clear. Here, we report that deletion of transforming growth factor β signaling in the retinal microenvironment of newborn mice induces changes that largely mimic the phenotype of nonproliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in humans. Lack of transforming growth factor β signaling leads to the formation of abundant microaneurysms, leaky capillaries, and retinal hemorrhages. Retinal capillaries are not covered by differentiated pericytes, but by a coat of vascular smooth muscle-like cells and a thickened basal lamina. Reactive microglia is found in close association with retinal capillaries. In older animals, loss of endothelial cells and the formation of ghost vessels are observed, findings that correlate with the induction of angiogenic molecules and the accumulation of retinal hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, indicating hypoxia. Consequently, retinal and vitreal neovascularization occurs, a scenario that leads to retinal detachment, vitreal hemorrhages, neuronal apoptosis, and impairment of sensory function. We conclude that transforming growth factor β signaling is required for the differentiation of retinal pericytes during vascular development of the retina. Lack of differentiated pericytes initiates a scenario of structural and functional changes in the retina that mimics those of diabetic retinopathy strongly indicating a common mechanism. PMID:25857227

  14. Serum deprivation response inhibits breast cancer progression by blocking transforming growth factorsignaling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yao; Yu, Yue; Hou, Li-Kun; Chi, Jiang-Rui; Mao, Jie-Fei; Xia, Li; Wang, Xin; Wang, Ping; Cao, Xu-Chen

    2016-03-01

    Serum deprivation response (SDPR), a key substrate for protein kinase C, play a critical role in inducing membrane curvature and participate in the formation of caveolae. However, the function of SDPR in cancer development and progression is still not clear. Here, we found that SDPR is downregulated in human breast cancer. Overexpression of SDPR suppresses cell proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells, while depletion of SDPR promotes cell proliferation and invasion in MCF10A cells. Subsequently, SDPR depletion induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype. Finally, knockdown of SDPR activates transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling by upregulation of TGF-β1 expression. In conclusion, our results showed that SDPR inhibits breast cancer progression by blocking TGF-β signaling. Serum deprivation response suppresses cell proliferation and invasion in breast cancer cells. SDPR depletion induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition by activation of TGF-β signaling. PMID:26749136

  15. Redox regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling during the development of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rafikova, Olga; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kangath, Archana; Qu, Ning; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Sharma, Shruti; Desai, Julin; Fields, Taylor; Ludewig, Britta; Yuan, Jason X-Y; Jonigk, Danny; Black, Stephen M

    2016-06-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) involves the uncontrolled proliferation of pulmonary smooth muscle cells via increased growth factor receptor signaling. However, the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is controversial, as humans with advanced PH exhibit no changes in EGFR protein levels and purpose of the present study was to determine whether there are post-translational mechanisms that enhance EGFR signaling in PH. The EGFR inhibitor, gefinitib, significantly attenuated EGFR signaling and prevented the development of PH in monocrotaline (MCT)-exposed rats, confirming the contribution of EGFR activation in MCT induced PH. There was an early MCT-mediated increase in hydrogen peroxide, which correlated with the binding of the active metabolite of MCT, monocrotaline pyrrole, to catalase Cys377, disrupting its multimeric structure. This early oxidative stress was responsible for the oxidation of EGFR and the formation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stable EGFR dimers through dityrosine cross-linking. These cross-linked dimers exhibited increased EGFR autophosphorylation and signaling. The activation of EGFR signaling did not correlate with pp60(src) dependent Y845 phosphorylation or EGFR ligand expression. Importantly, the analysis of patients with advanced PH revealed the same enhancement of EGFR autophosphorylation and covalent dimer formation in pulmonary arteries, while total EGFR protein levels were unchanged. As in the MCT exposed rat model, the activation of EGFR in human samples was independent of pp60(src) phosphorylation site and ligand expression. This study provides a novel molecular mechanism of oxidative stress stimulated covalent EGFR dimerization via tyrosine dimerization that contributes into development of PH. PMID:26928584

  16. Signal-Induced Functions of the Transcription Factor TFII-I

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ananda L

    2007-01-01

    We have learned a great deal over the last several years about the molecular mechanisms that govern cell growth, cell division and cell death. Normal cells pass through cell cycle (growth) and divide in response to mitogenic signals that are transduced through their cognate cell surface receptors to the nucleus. Despite the fact that cellular growth and division are mechanistically distinct steps, they are usually coordinately regulated, which is critical for normal cellular proliferation. The precise mechanistic basis for this coordinated regulation is unclear. TFII-I is a unique, signal induced multifunctional transcription factor that is activated upon a variety of signaling pathways and appears to participate in distinct phases of cell growth. For instance, TFII-I is required for growth factor-induced transcriptional activation of the c-fos gene, which is essential for cell cycle entry. Two alternatively spliced isoforms of TFII-I exhibit opposing but necessary functions for mitogen-induced transcriptional activation of c-fos. Besides transcriptional activation of the c-fos proto-oncogene and eventual entry into cell cycle, TFII-I also appears to have a role in later phases of the cell cycle and cell division. Here we discuss how a multitude of signaling inputs target TFII-I isoforms, which may exert their functions in distinct phases of the cell cycle and play a key role in the coordinated regulation of cellular proliferation. PMID:17976384

  17. Reduction of Nup107 attenuates the growth factor signaling in the senescent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Young; Kang, Hyun Tae; Choi, Hae Ri; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Decreased expression of Nup107 in aged cells and organs. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 results in impaired nuclear translocation of p-ERK. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 affects downstream effectors of ERK signaling. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 inhibits cell proliferation of oligodendroglioma cells. -- Abstract: Hypo-responsiveness to growth factors is a fundamental feature of cellular senescence. In this study, we found markedly decreased level of Nup107, a key scaffold protein in nuclear pore complex assembly, in senescent human diploid fibroblasts as well as in organs of aged mice. Depletion of Nup107 by specific siRNA in young human diploid fibroblasts prevented the effective nuclear translocation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, and decreased the expression of c-Fos in consequence. The disturbances in ERK signaling in Nup107 depleted cells closely mirror the similar changes in senescent cells. Knockdown of Nup107 in anaplastic oligodendroglioma cells caused cell death, rather than growth retardation, indicating a greater sensitivity to Nup107 depletion in cancer cells than in normal cells. These findings support the notion that Nup107 may contribute significantly to the regulation of cell fate in aged and transformed cells by modulating nuclear trafficking of signal molecules.

  18. Src tyrosine kinase signaling antagonizes nuclear localization of FOXO and inhibits its transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Margret H; Bülow, Torsten R; Hoch, Michael; Pankratz, Michael J; Jünger, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical experiments in mammalian cells have linked Src family kinase activity to the insulin signaling pathway. To explore the physiological link between Src and a central insulin pathway effector, we investigated the effect of different Src signaling levels on the Drosophila transcription factor dFOXO in vivo. Ectopic activation of Src42A in the starved larval fatbody was sufficient to drive dFOXO out of the nucleus. When Src signaling levels were lowered by means of loss-of-function mutations or pharmacological inhibition, dFOXO localization was shifted to the nucleus in growing animals, and transcription of the dFOXO target genes d4E-BP and dInR was induced. dFOXO loss-of-function mutations rescued the induction of dFOXO target gene expression and the body size reduction of Src42A mutant larvae, establishing dFOXO as a critical downstream effector of Src signaling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the regulation of FOXO transcription factors by Src is evolutionarily conserved in mammalian cells. PMID:24513978

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Augments Transforming Growth Factor-β Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Swati; Kelley, Kathleen; Melichian, Denisa S.; Tamaki, Zenshiro; Fang, Feng; Su, Yunyun; Feng, Gilbert; Pope, Richard M.; Budinger, G.R. Scott; Mutlu, Gökhan M.; Lafyatis, Robert; Radstake, Timothy; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Varga, John

    2014-01-01

    Because recent studies implicate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, we sought to investigate the in vitro and in vivo role and mechanism of TLR4-mediated fibroblast responses in fibrogenesis. We found that TLR4 was constitutively expressed, and accumulation of endogenous TLR4 ligands significantly elevated, in lesional skin and lung tissues from patients with scleroderma. Activation of TLR4 signaling in explanted fibroblasts resulted in enhanced collagen synthesis and increased expression of multiple genes involved in tissue remodeling and extracellular matrix homeostasis. Moreover, TLR4 dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of fibroblasts to the stimulatory effect of transforming growth factor-β1. These profibrotic responses were abrogated by both genetic and pharmacological disruption of TLR4 signaling in vitro, and skin fibrosis induced by bleomycin in vivo was attenuated in mice harboring a mutated TLR4. Activation of TLR4 in fibroblasts augmented the intensity of canonical Smad signaling, and was accompanied by suppression of anti-fibrotic microRNA expression. Together, these results suggest a novel model to account for persistent fibrogenesis in scleroderma, in which activation of fibroblast TLR4 signaling, triggered by damage-associated endogenous TLR4 ligands, results in augmented transforming growth factor-β1 sensitivity with increased matrix production and progressive connective tissue remodeling. Under these conditions, fibroblast TLR4 serves as the switch for converting self-limited tissue repair into intractable fibrosis. PMID:23141927

  20. A role for Runx transcription factor signaling in dorsal root ganglion sensory neuron diversification.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Ina; Sigrist, Markus; de Nooij, Joriene C; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Jessell, Thomas M; Arber, Silvia

    2006-02-01

    Subpopulations of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) can be characterized on the basis of sensory modalities that convey distinct peripheral stimuli, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie sensory neuronal diversification remain unclear. Here, we have used genetic manipulations in the mouse embryo to examine how Runx transcription factor signaling controls the acquisition of distinct DRG neuronal subtype identities. Runx3 acts to diversify an Ngn1-independent neuronal cohort by promoting the differentiation of proprioceptive sensory neurons through erosion of TrkB expression in prospective TrkC+ sensory neurons. In contrast, Runx1 controls neuronal diversification within Ngn1-dependent TrkA+ neurons by repression of neuropeptide CGRP expression and controlling the fine pattern of laminar termination in the dorsal spinal cord. Together, our findings suggest that Runx transcription factor signaling plays a key role in sensory neuron diversification. PMID:16446142

  1. Lineage-Specific Modulation of Interleukin 4 Signaling by Interferon Regulatory Factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Jiang, Man; Anthony, Alissa; Pernis, Alessandra B.

    1999-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 is an immunoregulatory cytokine that exerts distinct biological activities on different cell types. Our studies indicate that interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-4 is both a target and a modulator of the IL-4 signaling cascade. IRF-4 expression is strongly upregulated upon costimulation of B cells with CD40 and IL-4. Furthermore, we find that IRF-4 can interact with signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)6 and drive the expression of IL-4–inducible genes. The transactivating ability of IRF-4 is blocked by the repressor factor BCL-6. Since expression of IRF-4 is mostly confined to lymphoid cells, these data provide a potential mechanism by which IL-4–inducible genes can be regulated in a lineage-specific manner. PMID:10601358

  2. ATAR, a novel tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, signals through TRAF2 and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H; Solovyev, I; Colombero, A; Elliott, R; Kelley, M; Boyle, W J

    1997-05-23

    Members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family signal largely through interactions with death domain proteins and TRAF proteins. Here we report the identification of a novel TNFR family member ATAR. Human and mouse ATAR contain 283 and 276 amino acids, respectively, making them the shortest known members of the TNFR superfamily. The receptor is expressed mainly in spleen, thymus, bone marrow, lung, and small intestine. The intracellular domains of human and mouse ATAR share only 25% identity, yet both interact with TRAF5 and TRAF2. This TRAF interaction domain resides at the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Like most other TRAF-interacting receptors, overexpression of ATAR activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Co-expression of ATAR with TRAF5, but not TRAF2, results in synergistic activation of NF-kappaB, suggesting potentially different roles for TRAF2 and TRAF5 in post-receptor signaling. PMID:9153189

  3. Unraveling Growth Factor Signaling and Cell Cycle Progression in Individual Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Cultured cells require the actions of growth factors to enter the cell cycle, but how individual members of a population respond to the same stimulus remains unknown. Here we have employed continuous monitoring by live cell imaging in a dual-reporter cell model to investigate the regulation of short-term growth factor signaling (protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activity) and longer-term progression through the cell cycle (cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity). In the total population, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-enhanced cell cycle entry by >5-fold compared with serum-free medium (from 13.5 to 78%), but at the single cell level we observed a broad distribution in the timing of G1 exit (4-24 h, mean ∼12 h) that did not vary with either the amount or duration of IGF-I treatment. Cells that failed to re-enter the cell cycle exhibited similar responses to IGF-I in terms of integrated Akt activity and migration distance compared with those that did. We made similar observations with EGF, PDGF-AA, and PDGF-BB. As potential thresholds of growth factor-mediated cell cycle progression appeared to be heterogeneous within the population, the longer-term proliferative outcomes of individual cells to growth factor stimulation could not be predicted based solely on acute Akt signaling responses, no matter how robust these might be. Thus, although we could define a relationship at the population level between growth factor-induced Akt signaling dynamics and cell cycle progression, we could not predict the fate of individual cells. PMID:27226630

  4. Distinct Roles for Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Cerebellar Development and Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Emmenegger, Brian A.; Hwang, Eugene I.; Moore, Colin; Markant, Shirley L.; Brun, Sonja N.; Dutton, John W.; Read, Tracy-Ann; Fogarty, Marie P.; Singh, Alok R.; Durden, Donald L.; Yang, Chaofeng; McKeehan, Wallace L.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule neurons are the most abundant neurons in the brain, and a critical element of the circuitry that controls motor coordination and learning. In addition, granule neuron precursors (GNPs) are thought to represent cells of origin for medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Thus, understanding the signals that control the growth and differentiation of these cells has important implications for neurobiology and neuro-oncology. Our previous studies have shown that proliferation of GNPs is regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh), and that aberrant activation of the Shh pathway can lead to medulloblastoma. Moreover, we have demonstrated that Shh-dependent proliferation of GNPs and medulloblastoma cells can be blocked by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). But while the mitogenic effects of Shh signaling have been confirmed in vivo, the inhibitory effects of bFGF have primarily been studied in culture. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking FGF signaling in GNPs exhibit no discernable changes in GNP proliferation or differentiation. In contrast, activation of FGF signaling has a potent effect on tumor growth: treatment of medulloblastoma cells with bFGF prevents them from forming tumors following transplantation, and inoculation of tumor-bearing mice with bFGF markedly inhibits tumor growth in vivo. These results suggest that activators of FGF signaling may be useful for targeting medulloblastoma and other Shh-dependent tumors. PMID:23045271

  5. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Signaling in Pheochromocytoma: Turning the Rudder in the Right Direction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many solid tumors, including pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL), are characterized by a (pseudo)hypoxic signature. (Pseudo)hypoxia has been shown to promote both tumor progression and resistance to therapy. The major mediators of the transcriptional hypoxic response are hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). High levels of HIFs lead to transcription of hypoxia-responsive genes, which are involved in tumorigenesis. PHEOs and PGLs are catecholamine-producing tumors arising from sympathetic- or parasympathetic-derived chromaffin tissue. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding the metabolic disturbances present in PHEO and PGL, especially because of the identification of some disease-susceptibility genes. To date, fifteen PHEO and PGL susceptibility genes have been identified. Based on the main transcription signatures of the mutated genes, PHEOs and PGLs have been divided into two clusters, pseudohypoxic cluster 1 and cluster 2, rich in kinase receptor signaling and protein translation pathways. Although these two clusters seem to show distinct signaling pathways, recent data suggest that both clusters are interconnected by HIF signaling as the important driver in their tumorigenesis, and mutations in most PHEO and PGL susceptibility genes seem to affect HIF-α regulation and its downstream signaling pathways. HIF signaling appears to play an important role in the development and growth of PHEOs and PGLs, which could suggest new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these tumors. PMID:23940289

  6. Targeting the Transforming Growth FactorSignaling Pathway in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Nagathihalli S

    2009-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular processes. TGF-β switches its role from tumor suppressor in normal or dysplastic cells to a tumor promoter in advanced cancers. It is widely believed that Smad-dependent pathway is involved in TGF-β tumor suppressive functions, whereas activation of Smad-independent pathways coupled with the loss of tumor suppressor functions of TGF-β is important for its pro-oncogenic functions. TGF-β signaling has been considered as a very suitable therapeutic target. The discovery of oncogenic actions of TGF-β has generated a great deal of enthusiasm for developing TGF-β signaling inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. The challenge is to identify the group of patients where targeted tumors are not only refractory to TGF-β-induced tumor suppressor functions but also responsive to tumor promoting effects of TGF-β. TGF-β pathway inhibitors including small and large molecules have now entered clinical trials. Preclinical studies with these inhibitors have shown promise in a variety of different tumor models. Here we emphasize on the mechanisms of signaling and specific targets of the TGF-β pathway that are critical effectors of tumor progression and invasion. This report also focuses on the therapeutic intervention of TGF-β signaling in human cancers. PMID:20001556

  7. Nanoconjugation prolongs endosomal signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor and enhances apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Xu, F; Reinhard, B M

    2016-07-14

    It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF mediated apoptosis at effective concentrations that do not induce apoptosis in the case of free EGF. Overall, these findings indicate nanoconjugation as a rational strategy for modifying signaling that acts by modulating the temporo-spatial distribution of the activated EGF-EGFR ligand-receptor complex. PMID:27378391

  8. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling pathway regulates liver homeostasis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Mei; Liu, Da-Wei; Wang, Wen-Pin

    2013-04-01

    In mammals, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling controls liver specification and regulates the metabolism of lipids, cholesterol, and bile acids. FGF signaling also promotes hepatocyte proliferation, and helps detoxify hepatotoxin during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. However, the function of Fgf in zebrafish liver is not yet well understood, specifically for postnatal homeostasis. The current study analyzed the expression of fgf receptors (fgfrs) in the liver of zebrafish. We then investigated the function of Fgf signaling in the zebrafish liver by expressing a dominant-negative Fgf receptor in hepatocytes (lfabp:dnfgfr1-egfp, lf:dnfr). Histological analysis showed that our genetic intervention resulted in a small liver size with defected medial expansion of developing livers in transgenic (Tg) larvae. Morphologically, the liver lobe of lf:dnfr adult fish was shorter than that of control. Ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes was observed in fish as young as 3 months. Further examination revealed the development of hepatic steatosis and cholestasis. In adult Tg fish, we unexpectedly observed increased liver-to-body-weight ratios, with higher percentages of proliferating hepatocytes. Considering all these findings, we concluded that as in mammals, in adult zebrafish the metabolism of lipid and bile acids in the liver are regulated by Fgf signaling. Disruption of the Fgf signal-mediated metabolism might indirectly affect hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:22820869

  9. Role of NF-κB Transcription Factors in Antiinflammatory and Proinflammatory Actions of Mechanical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sudha; Deschner, James; Long, Ping; Verma, Anupam; Hofman, Cynthia; Evans, Christopher H.; Piesco, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms by which chondrocytes convert biomechanical signals into intracellular biochemical events are not well understood. In this study, we sought to determine the intracellular mechanisms of the magnitude-dependent actions of mechanical signals. Methods Chondrocytes isolated from rabbit articular cartilage were grown on flexible membranes. Cells were subjected to cyclic tensile strain (CTS) of various magnitudes in the presence or absence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which was used as a proinflammatory signal for designated time intervals. The regulation of NF-κB was measured by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and immunofluorescence. Results CTS of low magnitudes (4–8% equibiaxial strain) was a potent inhibitor of IL-1β–dependent NF-κB nuclear translocation. Cytoplasmic retention of NF-κB and reduction of its synthesis led to sustained suppression of proinflammatory gene induction. In contrast, proinflammatory signals generated by CTS of high magnitudes (15–18% equibiaxial strain) mimicked the actions of IL-1β and induced rapid nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunits p65 and p50. Conclusion Magnitude-dependent signals of mechanical strain utilize the NF-κB transcription factors as common elements to abrogate or aggravate proinflammatory responses. Furthermore, the intracellular events induced by mechanical overload are similar to those that are initiated by proinflammatory cytokines in arthritis. PMID:15529376

  10. Analysis of growth factor signaling in genetically diverse breast cancer lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Soluble growth factors present in the microenvironment play a major role in tumor development, invasion, metastasis, and responsiveness to targeted therapies. While the biochemistry of growth factor-dependent signal transduction has been studied extensively in individual cell types, relatively little systematic data are available across genetically diverse cell lines. Results We describe a quantitative and comparative dataset focused on immediate-early signaling that regulates the AKT (AKT1/2/3) and ERK (MAPK1/3) pathways in a canonical panel of well-characterized breast cancer lines. We also provide interactive web-based tools to facilitate follow-on analysis of the data. Our findings show that breast cancers are diverse with respect to ligand sensitivity and signaling biochemistry. Surprisingly, triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs; which express low levels of ErbB2, progesterone and estrogen receptors) are the most broadly responsive to growth factors and HER2amp cancers (which overexpress ErbB2) the least. The ratio of ERK to AKT activation varies with ligand and subtype, with a systematic bias in favor of ERK in hormone receptor positive (HR+) cells. The factors that correlate with growth factor responsiveness depend on whether fold-change or absolute activity is considered the key biological variable, and they differ between ERK and AKT pathways. Conclusions Responses to growth factors are highly diverse across breast cancer cell lines, even within the same subtype. A simple four-part heuristic suggests that diversity arises from variation in receptor abundance, an ERK/AKT bias that depends on ligand identity, a set of factors common to all receptors that varies in abundance or activity with cell line, and an “indirect negative regulation” by ErbB2. This analysis sets the stage for the development of a mechanistic and predictive model of growth factor signaling in diverse cancer lines. Interactive tools for looking up these results and

  11. Imbalanced signal transduction in regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dapeng; Farache, Julia; Mingueneau, Michael; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells have a fundamental role in immunological tolerance, with transcriptional and functional phenotypes that demarcate them from conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconv). Differences between these two lineages in the signaling downstream of T-cell receptor-triggered activation have been reported, and there are different requirements for some signaling factors. Seeking a comprehensive view, we found that Treg cells have a broadly dampened activation of several pathways and signaling nodes upon TCR-mediated activation, with low phosphorylation of CD3ζ, SLP76, Erk1/2, AKT, or S6 and lower calcium flux. In contrast, STAT phosphorylation triggered by interferons, IL2 or IL6, showed variations between Treg and Tconv in magnitude or choice of preferential STAT activation but no general Treg signaling defect. Much, but not all, of the Treg/Tconv difference in TCR-triggered responses could be attributed to lower responsiveness of antigen-experienced cells with CD44(hi) or CD62L(lo) phenotypes, which form a greater proportion of the Treg pool. Candidate regulators were tested, but the Treg/Tconv differential could not be explained by overexpression in Treg cells of the signaling modulator CD5, the coinhibitors PD-1 and CTLA4, or the regulatory phosphatase DUSP4. However, transcriptome profiling in Dusp4-deficient mice showed that DUSP4 enhances the expression of a segment of the canonical Treg transcriptional signature, which partially overlaps with the TCR-dependent Treg gene set. Thus, Treg cells, likely because of their intrinsically higher reactivity to self, tune down TCR signals but seem comparatively more attuned to cytokines or other intercellular signals. PMID:26627244

  12. Growth factor signaling to mTORC1 by amino acid–laden macropinosomes

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Sei; Pacitto, Regina; Yao, Yao; Inoki, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The rapid activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) by growth factors is increased by extracellular amino acids through yet-undefined mechanisms of amino acid transfer into endolysosomes. Because the endocytic process of macropinocytosis concentrates extracellular solutes into endolysosomes and is increased in cells stimulated by growth factors or tumor-promoting phorbol esters, we analyzed its role in amino acid–dependent activation of mTORC1. Here, we show that growth factor-dependent activation of mTORC1 by amino acids, but not glucose, requires macropinocytosis. In murine bone marrow–derived macrophages and murine embryonic fibroblasts stimulated with their cognate growth factors or with phorbol myristate acetate, activation of mTORC1 required an Akt-independent vesicular pathway of amino acid delivery into endolysosomes, mediated by the actin cytoskeleton. Macropinocytosis delivered small, fluorescent fluid-phase solutes into endolysosomes sufficiently fast to explain growth factor–mediated signaling by amino acids. Therefore, the amino acid–laden macropinosome is an essential and discrete unit of growth factor receptor signaling to mTORC1. PMID:26438830

  13. Blind estimation of channel parameters and source components for EEG signals: a sparse factorization approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanqing; Cichocki, Andrzej; Amari, Shun-Ichi

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we use a two-stage sparse factorization approach for blindly estimating the channel parameters and then estimating source components for electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. EEG signals are assumed to be linear mixtures of source components, artifacts, etc. Therefore, a raw EEG data matrix can be factored into the product of two matrices, one of which represents the mixing matrix and the other the source component matrix. Furthermore, the components are sparse in the time-frequency domain, i.e., the factorization is a sparse factorization in the time frequency domain. It is a challenging task to estimate the mixing matrix. Our extensive analysis and computational results, which were based on many sets of EEG data, not only provide firm evidences supporting the above assumption, but also prompt us to propose a new algorithm for estimating the mixing matrix. After the mixing matrix is estimated, the source components are estimated in the time frequency domain using a linear programming method. In an example of the potential applications of our approach, we analyzed the EEG data that was obtained from a modified Sternberg memory experiment. Two almost uncorrelated components obtained by applying the sparse factorization method were selected for phase synchronization analysis. Several interesting findings were obtained, especially that memory-related synchronization and desynchronization appear in the alpha band, and that the strength of alpha band synchronization is related to memory performance. PMID:16566469

  14. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets. PMID:26025535

  15. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved.

    PubMed

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  16. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved

    PubMed Central

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  17. Membrane-To-Nucleus Signaling Links Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1- and Stem Cell Factor-Activated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Asuzu, David T.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Aarsvold, Kirsten H.; Bardsley, Michael R.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Mathison, Angela J.; Kendrick, Michael L.; Shen, K. Robert; Taguchi, Takahiro; Gupta, Anu; Rubin, Brian P.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Urrutia, Raul A.; Ordog, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell factor (mouse: Kitl, human: KITLG) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), acting via KIT and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), respectively, are critical for the development and integrity of several tissues. Autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT and IGF1-IGF1R signaling are also activated in several cancers including gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), the most common sarcoma. In murine gastric muscles, IGF1 promotes Kitl-dependent development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), the non-neoplastic counterpart of GIST, suggesting cooperation between these pathways. Here, we report a novel mechanism linking IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT signaling in both normal and neoplastic cells. In murine gastric muscles, the microenvironment for ICC and GIST, human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2), a model for cancer niches, and GIST cells, IGF1 stimulated Kitl/KITLG protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity by activating several signaling pathways including AKT-mediated glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibition (GSK3i). GSK3i alone also stimulated Kitl/KITLG expression without activating mitogenic pathways. Both IGF1 and GSK3i induced chromatin-level changes favoring transcriptional activation at the Kitl promoter including increased histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3 lysine (K) 4 methylation, reduced H3K9 and H3K27 methylation and reduced occupancy by the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2. By pharmacological or RNA interference-mediated inhibition of chromatin modifiers we demonstrated that these changes have the predicted impact on KITLG expression. KITLG knock-down and immunoneutralization inhibited the proliferation of GIST cells expressing wild-type KIT, signifying oncogenic autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT signaling. We conclude that membrane-to-nucleus signaling involving GSK3i establishes a previously unrecognized link between the IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT pathways, which is active in both physiologic and oncogenic contexts and can be exploited for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24116170

  18. Involvement of Toll-like receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in epithelial expression of airway remodeling factors.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tetsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E; Suh, Lydia A; Carter, Roderick G; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti-TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti-TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α-dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  19. Involvement of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Epithelial Expression of Airway Remodeling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick G.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti–TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2–dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti–TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α–dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  20. The ERF11 Transcription Factor Promotes Internode Elongation by Activating Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Tyler, Ludmila; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Qiu, Kai; Lumba, Shelley; Desveaux, Darrell; McCourt, Peter; Sun, Tai-ping

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in promoting stem elongation in plants. Previous studies show that GA activates its signaling pathway by inducing rapid degradation of DELLA proteins, GA signaling repressors. Using an activation-tagging screen in a reduced-GA mutant ga1-6 background, we identified AtERF11 to be a novel positive regulator of both GA biosynthesis and GA signaling for internode elongation. Overexpression of AtERF11 partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of ga1-6. AtERF11 is a member of the ERF (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR) subfamily VIII-B-1a of ERF/AP2 transcription factors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Overexpression of AtERF11 resulted in elevated bioactive GA levels by up-regulating expression of GA3ox1 and GA20ox genes. Hypocotyl elongation assays further showed that overexpression of AtERF11 conferred elevated GA response, whereas loss-of-function erf11 and erf11 erf4 mutants displayed reduced GA response. In addition, yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and transient expression assays showed that AtERF11 enhances GA signaling by antagonizing the function of DELLA proteins via direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, AtERF11 overexpression also caused a reduction in the levels of another phytohormone ethylene in the growing stem, consistent with recent finding showing that AtERF11 represses transcription of ethylene biosynthesis ACS genes. The effect of AtERF11 on promoting GA biosynthesis gene expression is likely via its repressive function on ethylene biosynthesis. These results suggest that AtERF11 plays a dual role in promoting internode elongation by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis and activating GA biosynthesis and signaling pathways. PMID:27255484

  1. The ERF11 Transcription Factor Promotes Internode Elongation by Activating Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Park, Jeongmoo; Tyler, Ludmila; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Qiu, Kai; Nam, Edward A; Lumba, Shelley; Desveaux, Darrell; McCourt, Peter; Kamiya, Yuji; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in promoting stem elongation in plants. Previous studies show that GA activates its signaling pathway by inducing rapid degradation of DELLA proteins, GA signaling repressors. Using an activation-tagging screen in a reduced-GA mutant ga1-6 background, we identified AtERF11 to be a novel positive regulator of both GA biosynthesis and GA signaling for internode elongation. Overexpression of AtERF11 partially rescued the dwarf phenotype of ga1-6 AtERF11 is a member of the ERF (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR) subfamily VIII-B-1a of ERF/AP2 transcription factors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Overexpression of AtERF11 resulted in elevated bioactive GA levels by up-regulating expression of GA3ox1 and GA20ox genes. Hypocotyl elongation assays further showed that overexpression of AtERF11 conferred elevated GA response, whereas loss-of-function erf11 and erf11 erf4 mutants displayed reduced GA response. In addition, yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation, and transient expression assays showed that AtERF11 enhances GA signaling by antagonizing the function of DELLA proteins via direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, AtERF11 overexpression also caused a reduction in the levels of another phytohormone ethylene in the growing stem, consistent with recent finding showing that AtERF11 represses transcription of ethylene biosynthesis ACS genes. The effect of AtERF11 on promoting GA biosynthesis gene expression is likely via its repressive function on ethylene biosynthesis. These results suggest that AtERF11 plays a dual role in promoting internode elongation by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis and activating GA biosynthesis and signaling pathways. PMID:27255484

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is altered in the forebrain of Engrailed-2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zunino, G; Messina, A; Sgadò, P; Baj, G; Casarosa, S; Bozzi, Y

    2016-06-01

    Engrailed-2 (En2), a homeodomain transcription factor involved in regionalization and patterning of the midbrain and hindbrain regions has been associated to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). En2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice show ASD-like features accompanied by a significant loss of GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus and neocortex. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a crucial factor for the postnatal development of forebrain GABAergic neurons, and altered GABA signaling has been hypothesized to underlie the symptoms of ASD. Here we sought to determine whether interneuron loss in the En2(-/-) forebrain might be related to altered expression of BDNF and its signaling receptors. We first evaluated the expression of different BDNF mRNA isoforms in the neocortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT) and En2(-/-) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR showed a marked down-regulation of several splicing variants of BDNF mRNA in the neocortex but not hippocampus of adult En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT controls. Accordingly, levels of mature BDNF protein were lower in the neocortex but not hippocampus of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT. Increased levels of phosphorylated TrkB and decreased levels of p75 receptor were also detected in the neocortex of mutant mice. Accordingly, the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and RhoA, two genes regulated via p75 was significantly altered in forebrain areas of mutant mice. These data indicate that BDNF signaling alterations might be involved in the anatomical changes observed in the En2(-/-) forebrain and suggest a pathogenic role of altered BDNF signaling in this mouse model of ASD. PMID:26987954

  3. Glypican-1 controls brain size through regulation of fibroblast growth factor signaling in early neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Yi-Huei Linda; Musacchio, Michele; Lander, Arthur D

    2009-01-01

    Background Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) act as co-receptors for multiple families of growth factors that regulate animal cell proliferation, differentiation and patterning. Elimination of heparan sulfate during brain development is known to produce severe structural abnormalities. Here we investigate the developmental role played by one particular HSPG, glypican-1 (Gpc1), which is especially abundant on neuronal cell membranes, and is the major HSPG of the adult rodent brain. Results Mice with a null mutation in Gpc1 were generated and found to be viable and fertile. The major phenotype associated with Gpc1 loss is a highly significant reduction in brain size, with only subtle effects on brain patterning (confined to the anterior cerebellum). The brain size difference emerges very early during neurogenesis (between embryonic days 8.5 and 9.5), and remains roughly constant throughout development and adulthood. By examining markers of different signaling pathways, and the differentiation behaviors of cells in the early embryonic brain, we infer that Gpc1-/- phenotypes most likely result from a transient reduction in fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Through the analysis of compound mutants, we provide strong evidence that Fgf17 is the FGF family member through which Gpc1 controls brain size. Conclusion These data add to a growing literature that implicates the glypican family of HSPGs in organ size control. They also argue that, among heparan sulfate-dependent signaling molecules, FGFs are disproportionately sensitive to loss of HSPGs. Finally, because heterozygous Gpc1 mutant mice were found to have brain sizes half-way between homozygous and wild type, the data imply that endogenous HSPG levels quantitatively control growth factor signaling, a finding that is both novel and relevant to the general question of how the activities of co-receptors are exploited during development. PMID:19732411

  4. Calcium-dependent regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor signalling by copine.

    PubMed Central

    Tomsig, Jose Luis; Sohma, Hitoshi; Creutz, Carl E

    2004-01-01

    The role of copines in regulating signalling from the TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) receptor was probed by the expression of a copine dominant-negative construct in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells. The construct was found to reduce activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) by TNF-alpha. The introduction of calcium into HEK293 cells either through the activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors or through the application of the ionophore A23187 was found to enhance TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappaB. This effect of calcium was completely blocked by the copine dominant-negative construct. TNF-alpha was found to greatly enhance the expression of endogenous copine I, and the responsiveness of the TNF-alpha signalling pathway to muscarinic stimulation increased in parallel with the increased copine I expression. The copine dominant-negative construct also inhibited the TNF-alpha-dependent degradation of IkappaB, a regulator of NF-kappaB. All of the effects of the dominant-negative construct could be reversed by overexpression of full-length copine I, suggesting that the construct acts specifically through competitive inhibition of copine. One of the identified targets of copine I is the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme UBC12 (ubiquitin C12), that promotes the degradation of IkappaB through the ubiquitin ligase enzyme complex SCF(betaTrCP). Therefore the copine dominant-negative construct might inhibit TNF-alpha signalling by dysregulation or mislocalization of UBC12. Based on these results, a hypothesis is presented for possible roles of copines in regulating other signalling pathways in animals, plants and protozoa. PMID:14674885

  5. Molecular mechanisms of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-induced calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Van der Linden, Ilse; Van Kolen, Kristof; Verhoeven, Kim F C; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing calcium signal transduction of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were investigated. Calcium signaling strictly depended on intracellular calcium sources, and this is the first study to establish a prominent contribution of the three major G-protein families to CRF receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Overexpression of Galpha(q/11) and Galpha(16) led to leftward shifts of the agonist concentration-response curves. Blockade of Galpha(q/11) proteins by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology partially reduced agonist-mediated calcium responses in CRF(1)- and CRF(2(a))-expressing HEK293 cells, thereby proving a contribution of the G(q) protein family. A small but significant inhibition of calcium signaling was recorded by pharmacological inhibition of G(i/o) proteins with pertussis toxin treatment. This effect was mediated by direct binding of Gbetagamma subunits to phospholipase C. G(i/o) inhibition also elevated cAMP responses in CRF receptor-overexpressing HEK293 cells and in Y79 retinoblastoma cells endogenously expressing human CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) receptors, thereby demonstrating natural coupling of G(i) proteins to both CRF receptors. The strongest reduction of CRF receptor-mediated calcium mobilization was noted when blocking the G(s) signaling protein either by cholera toxin or by siRNA. It is noteworthy that simultaneous inhibition of two G-proteins shed light on the additive effects of G(s) and G(q) on the calcium signaling and, hence, that they act in parallel. On the other hand, G(i) coupling required prior G(s) activation. PMID:19098121

  6. Adequate hypoxia inducible factorsignaling is indispensable for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Steve; Deprez, Sanne; Eelen, Guy; Torrekens, Sophie; Van Looveren, Riet; Goveia, Jermaine; Ghesquière, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Engineered cell-based constructs are an appealing strategy to treat large skeletal defects. However, transplanted cells are often confronted with an environment that is deprived of oxygen and nutrients. Upon hypoxia, most cell types activate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling, but its importance for implanted osteoprogenitor cells during bone regeneration is not elucidated. To this end, we specifically deleted the HIF--1α isoform in periosteal progenitor cells and show that activation of HIF-1α signaling in these cells is critical for bone repair by modulating angiogenic and metabolic processes. Activation of HIF-1α is not only crucial for blood vessel invasion, by enhancing angiogenic growth factor production, but also for periosteal cell survival early after implantation, when blood vessels have not yet invaded the construct. HIF-1α signaling limits oxygen consumption to avoid accumulation of harmful ROS and preserve redox balance, and additionally induces a switch to glycolysis to prevent energetic distress. Altogether, our results indicate that the proangiogenic capacity of implanted periosteal cells is HIF-1α regulated and that metabolic adaptations mediate post-implantation cell survival. PMID:27058876

  7. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Signaling Axis Meets p53 Genome Protection Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Haim; Sarfstein, Rive; LeRoith, Derek; Bruchim, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental evidence indicate that the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are important mediators in the biochemical chain of events that lead from a phenotypically normal to a neoplastic cell. The IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), which mediates the biological actions of IGF1 and IGF2, exhibits potent pro-survival and antiapoptotic activities. The IGF1R is highly expressed in most types of cancer and is regarded as a promising therapeutic target in oncology. p53 is a transcription factor with tumor suppressor activity that is usually activated in response to DNA damage and other forms of cellular stress. On the basis of its protective activities, p53 is commonly regarded as the guardian of the genome. We provide evidence that the IGF signaling axis and p53 genome protection pathways are tightly interconnected. Wild-type, but not mutant, p53 suppresses IGF1R gene transcription, leading to abrogation of the IGF signaling network, with ensuing cell cycle arrest. Gain-of-function, or loss-of-function, mutations of p53 in tumor cells may disrupt its inhibitory activity, thus generating oncogenic molecules capable of transactivating the IGF1R gene. The interplay between the IGF1 and p53 pathways is also of major relevance in terms of metabolic regulation, including glucose transport and glycolysis. A better understanding of the complex physical and functional interactions between these important signaling pathways will have major basic and translational relevance. PMID:27446805

  8. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in hereditary and neoplastic disease: biologic and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Helsten, Teresa; Schwaederle, Maria; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are transmembrane growth factor receptors with wide tissue distribution. FGF/FGFR signaling is involved in neoplastic behavior and also development, differentiation, growth, and survival. FGFR germline mutations (activating) can cause skeletal disorders, primarily dwarfism (generally mutations in FGFR3), and craniofacial malformation syndromes (usually mutations in FGFR1 and FGFR2); intriguingly, some of these activating FGFR mutations are also seen in human cancers. FGF/FGFR aberrations reported in cancers are mainly thought to be gain-of-function changes, and several cancers have high frequencies of FGFR alterations, including breast, bladder, or squamous cell carcinomas (lung and head and neck). FGF ligand aberrations (predominantly gene amplifications) are also frequently seen in cancers, in contrast to hereditary syndromes. There are several pharmacologic agents that have been or are being developed for inhibition of FGFR/FGF signaling. These include both highly selective inhibitors as well as multi-kinase inhibitors. Of note, only four agents (ponatinib, pazopanib, regorafenib, and recently lenvatinib) are FDA-approved for use in cancer, although the approval was not based on their activity against FGFR. Perturbations in the FGFR/FGF signaling are present in both inherited and malignant diseases. The development of potent inhibitors targeting FGF/FGFR may provide new tools against disorders caused by FGF/FGFR alterations. PMID:26224133

  9. SOX9: a stem cell transcriptional regulator of secreted niche signaling factors.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Keyes, Brice E; Lin, Mingyan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Genander, Maria; Polak, Lisa; Stokes, Nicole; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-02-15

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cyclical periods of growth, which are fueled by stem cells (SCs) at the base of the resting follicle. HF-SC formation occurs during HF development and requires transcription factor SOX9. Whether and how SOX9 functions in HF-SC maintenance remain unknown. By conditionally targeting Sox9 in adult HF-SCs, we show that SOX9 is essential for maintaining them. SOX9-deficient HF-SCs still transition from quiescence to proliferation and launch the subsequent hair cycle. However, once activated, bulge HF-SCs begin to differentiate into epidermal cells, which naturally lack SOX9. In addition, as HF-SC numbers dwindle, outer root sheath production is not sustained, and HF downgrowth arrests prematurely. Probing the mechanism, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify SOX9-dependent transcriptional changes and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify SOX9-bound genes in HF-SCs. Intriguingly, a large cohort of SOX9-sensitive targets encode extracellular factors, most notably enhancers of Activin/pSMAD2 signaling. Moreover, compromising Activin signaling recapitulates SOX9-dependent defects, and Activin partially rescues them. Overall, our findings reveal roles for SOX9 in regulating adult HF-SC maintenance and suppressing epidermal differentiation in the niche. In addition, our studies expose a role for SCs in coordinating their own behavior in part through non-cell-autonomous signaling within the niche. PMID:24532713

  10. Multipronged attenuation of macrophage-colony stimulating factor signaling by Epstein-Barr virus BARF1

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Chang, Rhoda Ahn; Chen, Xiaoyan; Longnecker, Richard; He, Xiaolin

    2014-10-02

    The ubiquitous EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several types of cancers. The EBV genome encodes an early gene product, BARF1, which contributes to pathogenesis, potentially through growth-altering and immune-modulating activities, but the mechanisms for such activities are poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of BARF1 in complex with human macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a hematopoietic cytokine with pleiotropic functions in development and immune response. BARF1 and M-CSF form a high-affinity, stable, ring-like complex in both solution and the crystal, with a BARF1 hexameric ring surrounded by three M-CSF dimers in triangular array. The binding of BARF1 to M-CSF dramatically reduces but does not completely abolish M-CSF binding and signaling through its cognate receptor FMS. A three-pronged down-regulation mechanism is proposed to explain the biological effect of BARF1 on M-CSF:FMS signaling. These prongs entail control of the circulating and effective local M-CSF concentration, perturbation of the receptor-binding surface of M-CSF, and imposition of an unfavorable global orientation of the M-CSF dimer. Each prong may reduce M-CSF:FMS signaling to a limited extent but in combination may alter M-CSF:FMS signaling dramatically. The downregulating mechanism of BARF1 underlines a viral modulation strategy, and provides a basis for understanding EBV pathogenesis.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Artur A.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) signal in a paracrine or endocrine fashion to mediate a myriad of biological activities, ranging from issuing developmental cues, maintaining tissue homeostasis, and regulating metabolic processes. FGFs carry out their diverse functions by binding and dimerizing FGF receptors (FGFRs) in a heparan sulfate (HS) cofactor- or Klotho coreceptor-assisted manner. The accumulated wealth of structural and biophysical data in the past decade has transformed our understanding of the mechanism of FGF signaling in human health and development, and has provided novel concepts in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Among these contributions are the elucidation of HS-assisted receptor dimerization, delineation of the molecular determinants of ligand–receptor specificity, tyrosine kinase regulation, receptor cis-autoinhibition, and tyrosine trans-autophosphorylation. These structural studies have also revealed how disease-associated mutations highjack the physiological mechanisms of FGFR regulation to contribute to human diseases. In this paper, we will discuss the structurally and biophysically derived mechanisms of FGF signaling, and how the insights gained may guide the development of therapies for treatment of a diverse array of human diseases. PMID:23732477

  12. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Breitel, Dario A; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-03-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  13. AMPA Receptor-Induced Local Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling Mediates Motor Recovery after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Andrew N.; Overman, Justine J.; Zhong, Sheng; Mueller, Rudolf; Lynch, Gary; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Recovery after stroke shares similar molecular and cellular properties with learning and memory. A main component of learning-induced plasticity involves signaling through AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We systematically tested the role of AMPAR function in motor recovery in a mouse model of focal stroke. AMPAR function controls functional recovery beginning 5 d after the stroke. Positive allosteric modulators of AMPARs enhance recovery of limb control when administered after a delay from the stroke. Conversely, AMPAR antagonists impair motor recovery. The contributions of AMPARs to recovery are mediated by release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in periinfarct cortex, as blocking local BDNF function in periinfarct cortex blocks AMPAR-mediated recovery and prevents the normal pattern of motor recovery. In contrast to a delayed AMPAR role in motor recovery, early administration of AMPAR agonists after stroke increases stroke damage. These findings indicate that the role of glutamate signaling through the AMPAR changes over time in stroke: early potentiation of AMPAR signaling worsens stroke damage, whereas later potentiation of the same signaling system improves functional recovery. PMID:21389231

  14. Regulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling by Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Patrick; Schooler, Kevin; Wiley, H S.

    2001-06-01

    Ligand activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) leads to its rapid internalization and eventual delivery to lysosomes. This process is thought to be a mechanism to attenuate signaling, but signals could potentially be generated following endocytosis. To directly evaluate EGFR signaling during receptor trafficking, we developed a technique to rapidly and selectively isolate internalized EGFR and associated molecules using reversibly-biotinylated anti-EGFR antibodies. In addition, we developed antibodies specific to tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR. Using a combination of fluorescence imaging and affinity precipitation approaches, we evaluated the state of EGFR activation and substrate association during trafficking in epithelial cells. We found that following internalization, EGFR remained active in the early endosomes. However, receptors were inactivated prior to degradation, apparently due to ligand removal from endosomes. Adapter molecules, such as Shc, were associated with EGFR both at the cell surface and within endosomes. Some molecules, such as Grb2, were primarily found associated with surface EGFR, while others, such as Eps8, were only found with intracellular receptors. During the inactivation phase, c-Cbl became EGFR-associated, consistent with its postulated role in receptor attenuation. We conclude that the association of the EGFR with different proteins is compartment-specific . In addition, ligand loss is the proximal cause of EGFR inactivation. Thus, regulated trafficking could potentially influence the pattern as well as the duration of signal transduction.

  15. Role of Ras signaling in the induction of snail by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kana; Shirakihara, Takuya; Nakano, Ayako; Imamura, Takeshi; Miyazono, Kohei; Saitoh, Masao

    2009-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial morphological event that occurs during the progression of epithelial tumors. EMT can be induced by transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta in some tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate the molecular mechanism whereby Snail, a key regulator of EMT, is induced by TGF-beta in tumor cells. Snail induction by TGF-beta was highly dependent on cooperation with active Ras signals, and silencing of Ras abolished Snail induction by TGF-beta in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells. Transfection of constitutively active Ras into HeLa cells led to induction of Snail by TGF-beta, while representative direct targets of TGF-beta, including Smad7 and PAI-1, were not affected by Ras signaling. Using mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors or Smad3 or Smad2 mutants, we found that phosphorylation at the linker region of Smad2/3 was not required for the induction of Snail by TGF-beta. Taken together, these findings indicate that Ras and TGF-beta-Smad signaling selectively cooperate in the induction of Snail, which occurs in a Smad-dependent manner, but independently of phosphorylation at the linker region of R-Smads by Ras signaling. PMID:19010789

  16. KRIT1 Protein Depletion Modifies Endothelial Cell Behavior via Increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Kuebel, Julia M.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.; Glading, Angela J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1+/− mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1. PMID:25320085

  17. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  18. Molecular mechanisms of fibroblast growth factor signaling in physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Belov, Artur A; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) signal in a paracrine or endocrine fashion to mediate a myriad of biological activities, ranging from issuing developmental cues, maintaining tissue homeostasis, and regulating metabolic processes. FGFs carry out their diverse functions by binding and dimerizing FGF receptors (FGFRs) in a heparan sulfate (HS) cofactor- or Klotho coreceptor-assisted manner. The accumulated wealth of structural and biophysical data in the past decade has transformed our understanding of the mechanism of FGF signaling in human health and development, and has provided novel concepts in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Among these contributions are the elucidation of HS-assisted receptor dimerization, delineation of the molecular determinants of ligand-receptor specificity, tyrosine kinase regulation, receptor cis-autoinhibition, and tyrosine trans-autophosphorylation. These structural studies have also revealed how disease-associated mutations highjack the physiological mechanisms of FGFR regulation to contribute to human diseases. In this paper, we will discuss the structurally and biophysically derived mechanisms of FGF signaling, and how the insights gained may guide the development of therapies for treatment of a diverse array of human diseases. PMID:23732477

  19. MTMR4 attenuates transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling by dephosphorylating R-Smads in endosomes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junjing; Pan, Lei; Qin, Xincheng; Chen, Hua; Xu, Youli; Chen, Yeguang; Tang, Hong

    2010-03-12

    Homeostasis of Smad phosphorylation at its C-terminal SXS motif is essential for transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling. Whereas it is known that TGFbeta signaling can be terminated by phosphatases, which dephosphorylate R-Smads in the nucleus, it is unclear whether there are any cytoplasmic phosphatase(s) that can attenuate R-Smad phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Here we demonstrate that myotubularin-related protein 4 (MTMR4), a FYVE domain-containing dual-specificity protein phosphatase (DSP), attenuates TGFbeta signaling by reducing the phosphorylation level of R-Smads in early endosomes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that endogenous MTMR4 interacts with phosphorylated R-Smads, and that this interaction is correlated with dephosphorylation of R-Smads. Further analysis showed that overexpression of MTMR4 resulted in the sequestration of activated Smad3 in the early endosomes, thus reducing its nuclear translocation. However, both point mutations at the conserved catalytic site of the phosphatase (MTMR4-C407S) and small interference RNA of endogenous Mtmr4 expression led to sustained Smad3 activation. This work therefore suggests that MTMR4 plays an important role in preventing the overactivation of TGFbeta signaling by dephosphorylating activated R-Smads that have been trafficked to early endosomes. PMID:20061380

  20. The endothelial transcription factor ERG promotes vascular stability and growth through Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Birdsey, Graeme M; Shah, Aarti V; Dufton, Neil; Reynolds, Louise E; Osuna Almagro, Lourdes; Yang, Youwen; Aspalter, Irene M; Khan, Samia T; Mason, Justin C; Dejana, Elisabetta; Göttgens, Berthold; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan; Gerhardt, Holger; Adams, Ralf H; Randi, Anna M

    2015-01-12

    Blood vessel stability is essential for embryonic development; in the adult, many diseases are associated with loss of vascular integrity. The ETS transcription factor ERG drives expression of VE-cadherin and controls junctional integrity. We show that constitutive endothelial deletion of ERG (Erg(cEC-KO)) in mice causes embryonic lethality with vascular defects. Inducible endothelial deletion of ERG (Erg(iEC-KO)) results in defective physiological and pathological angiogenesis in the postnatal retina and tumors, with decreased vascular stability. ERG controls the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by promoting β-catenin stability, through signals mediated by VE-cadherin and the Wnt receptor Frizzled-4. Wnt signaling is decreased in ERG-deficient endothelial cells; activation of Wnt signaling with lithium chloride, which stabilizes β-catenin levels, corrects vascular defects in Erg(cEC-KO) embryos. Finally, overexpression of ERG in vivo reduces permeability and increases stability of VEGF-induced blood vessels. These data demonstrate that ERG is an essential regulator of angiogenesis and vascular stability through Wnt signaling. PMID:25584796

  1. The Mobile bypass Signal Arrests Shoot Growth by Disrupting Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance, Cytokinin Signaling, and WUS Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Parrott, David L; Adhikari, Emma; Fraser, Nisa; Sieburth, Leslie E

    2016-07-01

    The bypass1 (bps1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produces a root-sourced compound (the bps signal) that moves to the shoot and is sufficient to arrest growth of a wild-type shoot; however, the mechanism of growth arrest is not understood. Here, we show that the earliest shoot defect arises during germination and is a failure of bps1 mutants to maintain their shoot apical meristem (SAM). This finding suggested that the bps signal might affect expression or function of SAM regulatory genes, and we found WUSCHEL (WUS) expression to be repressed in bps1 mutants. Repression appears to arise from the mobile bps signal, as the bps1 root was sufficient to rapidly down-regulate WUS expression in wild-type shoots. Normally, WUS is regulated by a balance between positive regulation by cytokinin (CK) and negative regulation by CLAVATA (CLV). In bps1, repression of WUS was independent of CLV, and, instead, the bps signal down-regulates CK responses. Cytokinin treatment of bps1 mutants restored both WUS expression and activity, but only in the rib meristem. How the bps signal down-regulates CK remains unknown, though the bps signal was sufficient to repress expression of one CK receptor (AHK4) and one response regulator (AHP6). Together, these data suggest that the bps signal pathway has the potential for long-distance regulation through modification of CK signaling and altering gene expression. PMID:27208247

  2. Autocrine epidermal growth factor signaling stimulates directionally persistent mammary epithelial cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, Gargi; Wiley, H Steven ); Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2001-12-24

    Autocrine receptor/ligand signaling loops were first identified in tumor cells, where it was found that transformation of cells resulted in overexpression of certain growth factors leading to unregulated proliferation of the tumor cells (Sporn and Todaro, 1980). However, in the ensuing decades autocrine signaling has been found to operate in numerous physiological situations (Sporn and Roberts, 1992), including wound healing (Tokumaru et al., 2000), angiogenesis (Seghezzi et al., 1998), and tissue organization during development (Wasserman and Freeman, 1998) and reproductive cycles (Xie et al., 1997). Although it is becoming evident that autocrine loops play crucial roles in regulation of cell function within tissue contexts, it is unclear whether their effects on cell responses are different from the effects of the same ligand presented in exogenous or paracrine manner.

  3. Journal Impact Factor Shapes Scientists’ Reward Signal in the Prospect of Publication

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Frieder Michel; Rademacher, Lena; Schäfer, Theo Alexander Jose; Müller-Pinzler, Laura; Krach, Sören

    2015-01-01

    The incentive structure of a scientist’s life is increasingly mimicking economic principles. While intensely criticized, the journal impact factor (JIF) has taken a role as the new currency for scientists. Successful goal-directed behavior in academia thus requires knowledge about the JIF. Using functional neuroimaging we examined how the JIF, as a powerful incentive in academia, has shaped the behavior of scientists and the reward signal in the striatum. We demonstrate that the reward signal in the nucleus accumbens increases with higher JIF during the anticipation of a publication and found a positive correlation with the personal publication record (pJIF) supporting the notion that scientists have incorporated the predominant reward principle of the scientific community in their reward system. The implications of this behavioral adaptation within the ecological niche of the scientist’s habitat remain unknown, but may also have effects which were not intended by the community. PMID:26555725

  4. Factor VII promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression through ERK-TSC signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M-C; Chen, K-D; Wang, C-C; Huang, K-T; Wu, C-H; Kuo, I-Y; Chen, L-Y; Hu, T-H; Goto, S; Nakano, T; Dorling, A; McVey, J H; Chen, C-L; Lin, C-C

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated PAR2 starts upstreamed with tissue factor (TF) and factor VII (FVII), inhibited autophagy via mTOR signaling in HCC. However, the mechanism underlying for merging functions of PAR2 with the coagulation system in HCC progression remained unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the role of TF, FVII and PAR2 in tumor progression of HCC. The expressions of TF, FVII and PAR2 from HCC specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemical stains and western blotting. We found that the expression of FVII, but not TF and PAR2, directly related to the vascular invasion and the clinical staging. Importantly, a lower level of FVII expression was significantly associated with the longer disease-free survival. The addition of FVII but not TF induced the expression of PAR2 and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, whereas knockdown of FVII decreased PAR2 expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in HCC cell lines. Furthermore, levels of phosphor-TSC2 (Ser664) were increased after treatment with FVII and PAR2 agonist whereas these were significantly abolished in the presence of a potent and specific MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126. Moreover, mTOR knockdown highly reduced Hep3B migration, which could be reverted by FVII but not TF and PAR2. These results indicated that FVII/PAR2 signaling through MEK/ERK and TSC2 axis for mTOR activation has potent effects on the migration of HCC cells. In addition, FVII/PAR2 signaling elicits an mTOR-independent signaling, which promotes hepatoma cell migration in consistent with the clinical observations. Our study indicates that levels of FVII, but not TF, are associated with tumor migration and invasiveness in HCC, and provides clues that evaluation of FVII expression in HCC may be useful as a prognostic indicator in patients with HCC and may form an alternative target for further therapy.

  5. Interactions between Nitric Oxide and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Signaling Pathways in Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; van der Vliet, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Induction and activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthases (NOS) and excessive production of NO are common features of almost all diseases associated with infection and acute or chronic inflammation, although the contribution of NO to the pathophysiology of these diseases is highly multifactorial and often still a matter of controversy. Because of its direct impact on tissue oxygenation and cellular oxygen (O2) consumption and redistribution, the ability of NO to regulate various aspects of hypoxia-induced signaling has received widespread attention. Conditions of tissue hypoxia and the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) have been implicated in hypoxia or in cancer biology, but are also being increasingly recognized as important features of acute and chronic inflammation. Thus, the activation of HIF transcription factors has been increasingly implicated in inflammatory diseases, and recent studies have indicated its critical importance in regulating phagocyte function, inflammatory mediator production, and regulation of epithelial integrity and repair processes. Finally, HIF also appears to contribute to important features of tissue fibrosis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, processes that are associated with tissue remodeling in various non-malignant chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we briefly summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to the general mechanisms involved in HIF regulation and the impact of NO on HIF activation. Secondly, we will summarize the major recent findings demonstrating a role for HIF signaling in infection, inflammation, and tissue repair and remodeling, and will address the involvement of NO. The growing interest in hypoxia-induced signaling and its relation with NO biology is expected to lead to further insights into the complex roles of NO in acute or chronic inflammatory diseases and may point to the importance of HIF signaling as key feature of NO-mediated events during these disorders. PMID

  6. Directed random walks and constraint programming reveal active pathways in hepatocyte growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kittas, Aristotelis; Delobelle, Aurélien; Schmitt, Sabrina; Breuhahn, Kai; Guziolowski, Carito; Grabe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to analyze mRNA expression data is to take advantage of established knowledge from pathway databases, using methods such as pathway-enrichment analyses. However, pathway databases are not case-specific and expression data could be used to infer gene-regulation patterns in the context of specific pathways. In addition, canonical pathways may not always describe the signaling mechanisms properly, because interactions can frequently occur between genes in different pathways. Relatively few methods have been proposed to date for generating and analyzing such networks, preserving the causality between gene interactions and reasoning over the qualitative logic of regulatory effects. We present an algorithm (MCWalk) integrated with a logic programming approach, to discover subgraphs in large-scale signaling networks by random walks in a fully automated pipeline. As an exemplary application, we uncover the signal transduction mechanisms in a gene interaction network describing hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell migration and proliferation from gene-expression measured with microarray and RT-qPCR using in-house perturbation experiments in a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture. The resulting subgraphs illustrate possible associations of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met nodes, differentially expressed genes and cellular states. Using perturbation experiments and Answer Set programming, we are able to select those which are more consistent with the experimental data. We discover key regulator nodes by measuring the frequency with which they are traversed when connecting signaling between receptors and significantly regulated genes and predict their expression-shift consistently with the measured data. The Java implementation of MCWalk is publicly available under the MIT license at: https://bitbucket.org/akittas/biosubg. PMID:26518250

  7. Transforming growth factor: beta signaling is essential for limb regeneration in axolotls.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Mathieu; Gatien, Samuel; Finnson, Kenneth; Desmeules, Sophie; Villiard, Eric; Pilote, Mireille; Philip, Anie; Roy, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Axolotls (urodele amphibians) have the unique ability, among vertebrates, to perfectly regenerate many parts of their body including limbs, tail, jaw and spinal cord following injury or amputation. The axolotl limb is the most widely used structure as an experimental model to study tissue regeneration. The process is well characterized, requiring multiple cellular and molecular mechanisms. The preparation phase represents the first part of the regeneration process which includes wound healing, cellular migration, dedifferentiation and proliferation. The redevelopment phase represents the second part when dedifferentiated cells stop proliferating and redifferentiate to give rise to all missing structures. In the axolotl, when a limb is amputated, the missing or wounded part is regenerated perfectly without scar formation between the stump and the regenerated structure. Multiple authors have recently highlighted the similarities between the early phases of mammalian wound healing and urodele limb regeneration. In mammals, one very important family of growth factors implicated in the control of almost all aspects of wound healing is the transforming growth factor-beta family (TGF-beta). In the present study, the full length sequence of the axolotl TGF-beta1 cDNA was isolated. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of TGF-beta1 in regenerating limbs shows that this gene is up-regulated during the preparation phase of regeneration. Our results also demonstrate the presence of multiple components of the TGF-beta signaling machinery in axolotl cells. By using a specific pharmacological inhibitor of TGF-beta type I receptor, SB-431542, we show that TGF-beta signaling is required for axolotl limb regeneration. Treatment of regenerating limbs with SB-431542 reveals that cellular proliferation during limb regeneration as well as the expression of genes directly dependent on TGF-beta signaling are down-regulated. These data directly implicate TGF-beta signaling in the

  8. Transforming Growth Factor: β Signaling Is Essential for Limb Regeneration in Axolotls

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Mathieu; Gatien, Samuel; Finnson, Kenneth; Desmeules, Sophie; Villiard, Éric; Pilote, Mireille; Philip, Anie; Roy, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Axolotls (urodele amphibians) have the unique ability, among vertebrates, to perfectly regenerate many parts of their body including limbs, tail, jaw and spinal cord following injury or amputation. The axolotl limb is the most widely used structure as an experimental model to study tissue regeneration. The process is well characterized, requiring multiple cellular and molecular mechanisms. The preparation phase represents the first part of the regeneration process which includes wound healing, cellular migration, dedifferentiation and proliferation. The redevelopment phase represents the second part when dedifferentiated cells stop proliferating and redifferentiate to give rise to all missing structures. In the axolotl, when a limb is amputated, the missing or wounded part is regenerated perfectly without scar formation between the stump and the regenerated structure. Multiple authors have recently highlighted the similarities between the early phases of mammalian wound healing and urodele limb regeneration. In mammals, one very important family of growth factors implicated in the control of almost all aspects of wound healing is the transforming growth factor-beta family (TGF-β). In the present study, the full length sequence of the axolotl TGF-β1 cDNA was isolated. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of TGF-β1 in regenerating limbs shows that this gene is up-regulated during the preparation phase of regeneration. Our results also demonstrate the presence of multiple components of the TGF-β signaling machinery in axolotl cells. By using a specific pharmacological inhibitor of TGF-β type I receptor, SB-431542, we show that TGF-β signaling is required for axolotl limb regeneration. Treatment of regenerating limbs with SB-431542 reveals that cellular proliferation during limb regeneration as well as the expression of genes directly dependent on TGF-β signaling are down-regulated. These data directly implicate TGF-β signaling in the initiation and control

  9. Severe inflammatory bowel disease associated with congenital alteration of transforming growth factor beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Naviglio, Samuele; Arrigo, Serena; Martelossi, Stefano; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Tommasini, Alberto; Loganes, Claudia; Fabretto, Antonella; Vignola, Silvia; Lonardi, Silvia; Ventura, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    Transforming growth factor beta is a pleiotropic cytokine which plays a central role in the homeostasis of the immune system. A complex dysregulation of its signaling occurs in Loeys-Dietz syndrome, a monogenic disorder caused by mutations of transforming growth factor beta receptors type 1 or type 2, characterized by skeletal involvement, craniofacial abnormalities, and arterial tortuosity with a strong predisposition for aneurysm and dissection. In addition, several immunologic abnormalities have been described in these patients, including an increased risk of allergic disorders as well as eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disorders has been also reported, but it is poorly documented. We describe two unrelated children with Loeys-Dietz syndrome affected by severe chronic inflammatory colitis appearing at an early age. The intestinal disease presented similar features in both patients, including a histopathological picture of non-eosinophilic chronic ulcerative colitis, striking elevation of inflammatory markers, and a distinctly severe clinical course leading to failure to thrive, with resistance to multiple immunosuppressive treatments. One of the patients also presented autoimmune thyroiditis. Our report confirms that chronic ulcerative colitis may be associated with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. This finding suggests that an alteration of transforming growth factor beta signaling may by itself predispose to inflammatory colitis in humans, and represent an invaluable model to understand inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:24486179

  10. Profiling of anti-fibrotic signaling by hepatocyte growth factor in renal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Schievenbusch, Stephanie; Strack, Ingo; Scheffler, Melanie; Wennhold, Kerstin; Maurer, Julia; Nischt, Roswitha; Dienes, Hans Peter; Odenthal, Margarete

    2009-07-17

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a multifunctional growth factor affecting cell proliferation and differentiation. Due to its mitogenic potential, HGF plays an important role in tubular repair and regeneration after acute renal injury. However, recent reports have shown that HGF also acts as an anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic factor, affecting various cell types such as renal fibroblasts and triggering tubulointerstitial fibrosis of the kidney. The present study provides evidence that HGF stimulation of renal fibroblasts results in the activation of both the Erk1/2 and the Akt pathways. As previously shown, Erk1/2 phosphorylation results in Smad-linker phosphorylation, thereby antagonizing cellular signals induced by TGF{beta}. By siRNA mediated silencing of the Erk1/2-Smad linkage, however, we now demonstrate that Akt signaling acts as an auxiliary pathway responsible for the anti-fibrotic effects of HGF. In order to define the anti-fibrotic function of HGF we performed comprehensive expression profiling of HGF-stimulated renal fibroblasts by microarray hybridization. Functional cluster analyses and quantitative PCR assays indicate that the HGF-stimulated pathways transfer the anti-fibrotic effects in renal interstitial fibroblasts by reducing expression of extracellular matrix proteins, various chemokines, and members of the CCN family.

  11. Towards an understanding of cell-specific functions of signal-dependent transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawn X; Glass, Christopher K

    2013-12-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner is a feature of many broadly expressed signal-dependent transcription factors (SDTFs), including nuclear hormone receptors and transcription factors that are activated by cell surface receptors for extracellular signals. As the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system, macrophages are responsive to a wide spectrum of regulatory molecules and provide a robust model system for investigation of the basis for cell-specific transcriptional responses at a genome-wide level. Here, focusing on recent studies in macrophages, we review the evidence suggesting a model in which cell-specific actions of SDTFs are the consequence of priming functions of lineage determining transcription factors. We also discuss recent findings relating lineage-determining and SDTF activity to alterations in the epigenetic landscape as well as the production and function of enhancer RNAs. These findings have implications for the understanding of how natural genetic variation impacts cell-specific programs of gene expression and suggest new approaches for altering gene expression in vivo. PMID:24130129

  12. Gliotoxin potentiates osteoblast differentiation by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GUANGYE; ZHANG, XIAOHAI; YU, BAOQING; REN, KE

    2015-01-01

    The differentiation of pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells to mature osteoblasts is crucial for the maintenance of the adult skeleton. In rheumatic arthritis, osteoblast differentiation is impaired by the overproduction of cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. It has been demonstrated that TNF-α is able to inhibit osteoblast differentiation through the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling. As a result of the critical role of TNF-α and NF-κB in the pathogenesis of bone-loss associated diseases, these factors are regarded as key targets for the development of therapeutic agents. In the current study, the role of the NF-κB inhibitor gliotoxin (GTX) in the regulation of osteoblast differentiation was evaluated. The non-toxic GTX doses were determined to be ≤3 μg/ml. It was revealed that GTX was able to block TNF-α-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation, as indicated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and ALP staining assays, as well as the expression levels of osteoblast-associated genes Col I, Ocn, Bsp, Runx2, Osx and ATF4. Additionally, it was identified that gliotoxin directly promoted bone morphoge-netic protein-2-induced osteoblast differentiation. GTX was found to inhibit the accumulation of NF-κB protein p65 in the nucleus and reduce NF-κB transcriptional activity, suggesting that GTX potentiated osteoblast differentiation via the suppression of NF-κB signaling. PMID:25816130

  13. Clinical significance of nerve growth factor and tropomyosin-receptor-kinase signaling pathway in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Qing; Xu, Yun-Fei; Guo, Sen; Liu, Yi; Ning, Shang-Lei; Lu, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Hui; Chen, Yu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between nerve growth factor-tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (NGF-TrkA) signaling pathway and prognosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC). METHODS: NGF and TrkA expression in 83 samples of IHCC was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Correlations between NGF-TrkA expression and clinicopathological features were analyzed by χ2 test. Moreover, we evaluated the association between NGF-TrkA and overall survival by univariate and multivariate analysis. With experiments in vitro, we investigated the crucial role of NGF-TrkA on proliferation and invasion of IHCC cells with recombinant NGF-β stimulation. RESULTS: We found that NGF and TrkA expression was significantly related with differentiation (P = 0.024) and intraneural invasion (P = 0.003), respectively. Additionally, double higher expression of NGF and TrkA was identified as an independent prognostic factor in IHCC (P = 0.003). Moreover, we demonstrated that NGF-TrkA signaling pathway can promote IHCC proliferation and invasion. CONCLUSION: NGF-TrkA double higher expression is an independent prognostic factor in IHCC. NGF-TrkA pathway can promote IHCC progression, indicating that NGF-TrkA may become a potential drug target. PMID:24744599

  14. Lysyl oxidase binds transforming growth factor-beta and regulates its signaling via amine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Kaku, Masaru; Fong, Keith S K; Csiszar, Katalin; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2008-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX), an amine oxidase critical for the initiation of collagen and elastin cross-linking, has recently been shown to regulate cellular activities possibly by modulating the functions of growth factors. In this study, we investigated the interaction between LOX and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), a potent growth factor abundant in bone, the effect of LOX on TGF-beta1 signaling, and its potential mechanism. The specific binding between mature LOX and mature TGF-beta1 was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pulldown assay in vitro. Both proteins were colocalized in the extracellular matrix in an osteoblastic cell culture system, and the binding complex was identified in the mineral-associated fraction of bone matrix. Furthermore, LOX suppressed TGF-beta1-induced Smad3 phosphorylation likely through its amine oxidase activity. The data indicate that LOX binds to mature TGF-beta1 and enzymatically regulates its signaling in bone and thus may play an important role in bone maintenance and remodeling. PMID:18835815

  15. Bacterial factors exploit eukaryotic Rho GTPase signaling cascades to promote invasion and proliferation within their host

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is a main target of many bacterial pathogens. Among the multiple regulation steps of the actin cytoskeleton, bacterial factors interact preferentially with RhoGTPases. Pathogens secrete either toxins which diffuse in the surrounding environment, or directly inject virulence factors into target cells. Bacterial toxins, which interfere with RhoGTPases, and to some extent with RasGTPases, catalyze a covalent modification (ADPribosylation, glucosylation, deamidation, adenylation, proteolysis) blocking these molecules in their active or inactive state, resulting in alteration of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers, which contributes to dissemination of bacteria in the host. Injected bacterial virulence factors preferentially manipulate the RhoGTPase signaling cascade by mimicry of eukaryotic regulatory proteins leading to local actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, which mediates bacterial entry into host cells or in contrast escape to phagocytosis and immune defense. Invasive bacteria can also manipulate RhoGTPase signaling through recognition and stimulation of cell surface receptor(s). Changes in RhoGTPase activation state is sensed by the innate immunity pathways and allows the host cell to adapt an appropriate defense response. PMID:25203748

  16. Molecular therapy targeting Sonic hedgehog and hepatocyte growth factor signaling in a mouse model of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Coon, Valerie; Laukert, Tamara; Pedone, Carolyn A; Laterra, John; Kim, K Jin; Fults, Daniel W

    2010-09-01

    The use of genetically engineered mice has provided insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the pediatric brain tumor medulloblastoma and revealed promising therapeutic targets. Ectopic expression of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in cerebellar neural progenitor cells induces medulloblastomas in mice, and coexpression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) enhances Shh-induced tumor formation. To determine whether Shh + HGF-driven medulloblastomas were responsive to Shh signaling blockade and whether treatment response could be enhanced by combination therapy targeting both HGF and Shh signaling pathways, we carried out a survival study in mice. We induced medulloblastomas by retrovirus-mediated expression of Shh and HGF, after which we treated the mice systemically with (a) HGF-neutralizing monoclonal antibody L2G7, (b) Shh signaling inhibitor cyclopamine, (c) Shh-neutralizing monoclonal antibody 5E1, (d) L2G7 + cyclopamine, or (e) L2G7 + 5E1. We report that monotherapy targeting either HGF signaling or Shh signaling prolonged survival and that anti-HGF therapy had a more durable response than Shh-targeted therapy. The effect of L2G7 + 5E1 combination therapy on cumulative survival was equivalent to that of L2G7 monotherapy and that of L2G7 + cyclopamine therapy was worse. The principal mechanism by which Shh- and HGF-targeted therapies inhibited tumor growth was a potent apoptotic death response in tumor cells, supplemented by a weaker suppressive effect on proliferation. Our observation that combination therapy either failed to improve or even reduced survival in mice bearing Shh + HGF-induced medulloblastomas compared with monotherapy underscores the importance of preclinical testing of molecular-targeted therapies in animal models of tumors in which the targeted pathways are known to be active. PMID:20807782

  17. Molecular Therapy Targeting Sonic Hedgehog and Hepatocyte Growth Factor Signaling in a Mouse Model of Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Valerie; Laukert, Tamara; Pedone, Carolyn A.; Laterra, John; Kim, K. Jin; Fults, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    The use of genetically engineered mice has provided insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the pediatric brain tumor medulloblastoma and revealed promising therapeutic targets. Ectopic expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in cerebellar neural progenitor cells induces medulloblastomas in mice, and coexpression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) enhances Shh-induced tumor formation. To determine whether Shh+HGF–driven medulloblastomas were responsive to Shh signaling blockade and whether treatment response could be enhanced by combination therapy targeting both HGF and Shh signaling pathways, we carried out a survival study in mice. We induced medulloblastomas by retrovirus-mediated expression of Shh and HGF, after which we treated the mice systemically with (a) HGF-neutralizing monoclonal antibody L2G7, (b) Shh signaling inhibitor cyclopamine, (c) Shh-neutralizing monoclonal antibody 5E1, (d) L2G7+cyclopamine, or (e) L2G7+5E1. We report that monotherapy targeting either HGF signaling or Shh signaling prolonged survival and that anti-HGF therapy had a more durable response than Shh-targeted therapy. The effect of L2G7+5E1 combination therapy on cumulative survival was equivalent to that of L2G7 monotherapy and that of L2G7+cyclopamine therapy was worse. The principal mechanism by which Shh- and HGF-targeted therapies inhibited tumor growth was a potent apoptotic death response in tumor cells, supplemented by a weaker suppressive effect on proliferation. Our observation that combination therapy either failed to improve or even reduced survival in mice bearing Shh+HGF induced medulloblastomas compared with monotherapy underscores the importance of preclinical testing of molecular-targeted therapies in animal models of tumors in which the targeted pathways are known to be active. PMID:20807782

  18. The Growth Factor Receptor ERBB2 Regulates Mitochondrial Activity on a Signaling Time Scale*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirav; Barrientos, Antoni; Landgraf, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of the ERBB2 receptor tyrosine kinase and the mitochondrial inner membrane protein UCP2 occurs frequently in aggressive cancers with dysfunctional mitochondria. Overexpressed ERBB2 signals constitutively and elevated UCP2 can uncouple mitochondria and alleviate oxidative stress. However, the physiological contributions of UCP2 and ERBB2 at the low expression levels that are typical of most tissues, as well as the path to oncogenic deregulation, are poorly understood. We now show that ERBB2 directly controls UCP2 levels, both at low physiological levels and oncogenic overexpression. At low levels of receptor and UCP2, ligand stimulation creates a distinct temporal response pattern driven by the opposing forces of translational suppression of the exceptionally short lived UCP2 protein and a time delayed transcriptional up-regulation. The latter becomes dominant through constitutive signaling by overexpressed ERBB2, resulting in high levels of UCP2 that contribute mitochondrial uncoupling. By contrast, ligand stimulation of non-overexpressed ERBB2 transiently removes UCP2 and paradoxically reduces the mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption, and OXPHOS on a signaling time scale. However, neither the transporter activity nor down-regulation of already low UCP2 levels drive this reduction in mitochondrial activity. Instead, UCP2 is required to establish mitochondria that are capable of responding to ligand. UCP2 knockdown impairs proliferation at high glucose but its absence specifically impairs ligand-induced growth when glucose levels fluctuate. These findings demonstrate the ability of growth factor signaling to control oxidative phosphorylation on a signaling time scale and point toward a non-transporter role for low levels of UCP2 in establishing dynamic response capability. PMID:24142693

  19. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hachem, Ahmed; Yacoub, Daniel; Zaid, Younes; Mourad, Walid; Merhi, Yahye

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  20. Factors shaping the ontogeny of vocal signals in a wild parrot.

    PubMed

    Berg, Karl S; Beissinger, Steven R; Bradbury, Jack W

    2013-01-15

    Parrots rely heavily on vocal signals to maintain their social and mobile lifestyles. We studied vocal ontogeny in nests of wild green-rumped parrotlets (Forpus passerinus) in Venezuela. We identified three successive phases of vocal signaling that corresponded closely to three independently derived phases of physiological development. For each ontogenetic phase, we characterized the relative importance of anatomical constraints, motor skills necessary for responding to specific contexts of the immediate environment, and the learning of signals that are necessary for adult forms of communication. We observed shifts in the relative importance of these three factors as individuals progressed from one stage to the next; there was no single fixed ratio of factors that applied across the entire ontogenetic sequence. The earliest vocalizations were short in duration, as predicted from physical constraints and under-developed motor control. Calls became longer and frequency modulated during intermediate nestling ages in line with motor skills required for competitive begging. In the week before fledging, calls drastically shortened in accordance with the flight-constrained short durations of adult contact calls. The latter constraints were made evident by the demonstrated links between wing-assisted incline running, a widespread prelude to avian flight, just before the shift from long-duration begging calls to short-duration contact calls. At least in this species, the shifting emphases of factors at different ontogenetic stages precluded the morphing of intermediate-stage begging calls into adult contact calls; as shown previously, the latter are influenced by sample templates provided by parents. PMID:23038735

  1. Integration of growth factor signals at the c-fos serum response element.

    PubMed

    Price, M A; Hill, C; Treisman, R

    1996-04-29

    A transcription factor ternary complex composed of serum response factor (SRF) and a second factor, ternary complex factor (TCF), mediates the response of the c-fos Serum Response Element to growth factors and mitogens. In NIH3T3 fibroblasts, TCF binding is required for transcriptional activation by the SRE in response to activation of the Ras-Raf-ERK pathway. We compared the properties of three members of the TCF family, Elk-1, SAP-1 and SAP-2 (ERP/NET). Although all the proteins contain sequences required for ternary complex formation with SRF, only Elk-1 and SAP-1 appear to interact with the c-fos SRE efficiently in vivo. Each TCF contains a C-terminal activation domain capable of transcriptional activation in response to activation of the Ras-Raf-ERK pathway, and this is dependent on the integrity of S/T-P motifs conserved between all the TCF family members. In contrast, activation of the SRE by whole serum and the mitogenic phospholipid LPA requires SRF binding alone. Constitutively activated members of the Rho subfamily of Ras-like GTPases are also capable of inducing activation of the SRE in the absence of TCF; unlike activated Ras itself, these proteins do not activate the TCFs in NIH3T3 cells. At the SRE, SRF- and TCF-linked signalling pathways act synergistically to potentiate transcription. PMID:8735278

  2. Role of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in the neuroendocrine control of human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2011-10-22

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is critical for a broad range of developmental processes. In 2003, Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) was discovered as a novel locus causing both forms of isolate GnRH Deficiency, Kallmann syndrome [KS with anosmia] and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism [nIHH] eventually accounting for approximately 10% of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency cases. Such cases are characterized by a broad spectrum of reproductive phenotypes from severe congenital forms of GnRH deficiency to reversal of HH. Additionally, the variable expressivity of both reproductive and non-reproductive phenotypes among patients and family members harboring the identical FGFR1 mutations has pointed to a more complex, oligogenic model for GnRH deficiency. Further, reversal of HH in patients carrying FGFR1 mutations suggests potential gene-environment interactions in human GnRH deficiency disorders. PMID:21664428

  3. CLAUSA Is a MYB Transcription Factor That Promotes Leaf Differentiation by Attenuating Cytokinin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bar, Maya; Israeli, Alon; Levy, Matan; Ben Gera, Hadas; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Kouril, Stepan; Tarkowski, Petr; Ori, Naomi

    2016-07-01

    Leaf morphogenesis and differentiation are highly flexible processes, resulting in a large diversity of leaf forms. The development of compound leaves involves an extended morphogenesis stage compared with that of simple leaves, and the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant clausa (clau) exposes a potential for extended morphogenesis in tomato leaves. Here, we report that the CLAU gene encodes a MYB transcription factor that has evolved a unique role in compound-leaf species to promote an exit from the morphogenetic phase of tomato leaf development. We show that CLAU attenuates cytokinin signaling, and that clau plants have increased cytokinin sensitivity. The results suggest that flexible leaf patterning involves a coordinated interplay between transcription factors and hormones. PMID:27385816

  4. UVB Generates Microvesicle Particle Release in Part Due to Platelet-activating Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bihl, Ji C; Rapp, Christine M; Chen, Yanfang; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    The lipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) and oxidized glycerophosphocholine PAF agonists produced by ultraviolet B (UVB) have been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in UVB-mediated processes, from acute inflammation to delayed systemic immunosuppression. Recent studies have provided evidence that microvesicle particles (MVPs) are released from cells in response to various signals including stressors. Importantly, these small membrane fragments can interact with various cell types by delivering bioactive molecules. The present studies were designed to test if UVB radiation can generate MVP release from epithelial cells, and the potential role of PAF receptor (PAF-R) signaling in this process. We demonstrate that UVB irradiation of the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT resulted in the release of MVPs. Similarly, treatment of HaCaT cells with the PAF-R agonist carbamoyl PAF also generated equivalent amounts of MVP release. Of note, pretreatment of HaCaT cells with antioxidants blocked MVP release from UVB but not PAF-R agonist N-methyl carbamyl PAF (CPAF). Importantly, UVB irradiation of the PAF-R-negative human epithelial cell line KB and KB transduced with functional PAF-Rs resulted in MVP release only in PAF-R-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that UVB can generate MVPs in vitro and that PAF-R signaling appears important in this process. PMID:26876152

  5. The transcription factor FOXL2 mobilizes estrogen signaling to maintain the identity of ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Georges, Adrien; L'Hôte, David; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Auguste, Aurélie; Legois, Bérangère; Zider, Alain; Veitia, Reiner A

    2014-01-01

    FOXL2 is a lineage determining transcription factor in the ovary, but its direct targets and modes of action are not fully characterized. In this study, we explore the targets of FOXL2 and five nuclear receptors in murine primary follicular cells. We found that FOXL2 is required for normal gene regulation by steroid receptors, and we show that estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) is the main vector of estradiol signaling in these cells. Moreover, we found that FOXL2 directly modulates Esr2 expression through a newly identified intronic element. Interestingly, we found that FOXL2 repressed the testis-determining gene Sox9 both independently of estrogen signaling and through the activation of ESR2 expression. Altogether, we show that FOXL2 mobilizes estrogen signaling to establish a coherent feed-forward loop repressing Sox9. This sheds a new light on the role of FOXL2 in ovarian maintenance and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04207.001 PMID:25369636

  6. Slow release of ions from internalized silver nanoparticles modifies the epidermal growth factor signaling response.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Kristen K; Maurer, Elizabeth I; Hussain, Saber M

    2014-11-01

    Due to their distinctive physiochemical properties, including a robust antibacterial activity and plasmonic capability, hundreds of consumer and medical products contain colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, even at sub-toxic dosages, AgNPs are able to disrupt cell functionality, through a yet unknown mechanism. Moreover, internalized AgNPs have the potential to prolong this disruption, even after the removal of excess particles. In the present study, we evaluated the impact, mechanism of action, and continual effects of 50 nm AgNP exposure on epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal transduction within a human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell line. After AgNP expose, EGF signaling was initially obstructed due to the dissolution of particles into silver ions. However, at longer durations, the internalized AgNPs increased EGF signaling activity. This latter behavior correlated to sustained HaCaT stress, believed to be maintained through the continual dissolution of internalized AgNPs. This study raises concerns that even after exposure ceases, the retained nanomaterials are capable of acting as a slow-release mechanism for metallic ions; continually stressing and modifying normal cellular functionality. PMID:25260222

  7. Adenosine and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Signaling in Intestinal Injury and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa has proven to be an interesting tissue in which to investigate disease-related metabolism. In this review, we outline some of the evidence that implicates hypoxia-mediated adenosine signaling as an important signature within both healthy and diseased mucosa. Studies derived from cultured cell systems, animal models, and human patients have revealed that hypoxia is a significant component of the inflammatory microenvironment. These studies have revealed a prominent role for hypoxia-induced factor (HIF) and hypoxia signaling at several steps along the adenine nucleotide metabolism and adenosine receptor signaling pathways. Likewise, studies to date in animal models of intestinal inflammation have demonstrated an almost uniformly beneficial influence of HIF stabilization on disease outcomes. Ongoing studies to define potential similarities with and differences between innate and adaptive immune responses will continue to teach us important lessons about the complexity of the gastrointestinal tract. Such information has provided new insights into disease pathogenesis and, importantly, will provide insights into new therapeutic targets. PMID:21942704

  8. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling and Regulates Angiogenesis in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingshan; Niu, Honglin; Li, Aiying; Nie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of 1-O-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a compound extracted from Inula britannica L., on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling and angiogenesis in endothelial cells (ECs). We showed that ABL promotes VEGF-induced cell proliferation, growth, migration, and tube formation in cultured human ECs. Furthermore, the modulatory effect of ABL on VEGF-induced Akt, MAPK p42/44, and p38 phosphorylation, as well as on upstream VEGFR-2 phosphorylation, were associated with VEGF-dependent Matrigel angiogenesis in vivo. In addition, animals treated with ABL (26 mg/kg/day) recovered blood flow significantly earlier than control animals, suggesting that ABL affects ischemia-mediated angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that ABL strongly reduced the levels of VEGFR-2 on the cell surface, enhanced VEGFR-2 endocytosis, which consistent with inhibited VE-cadherin, a negative regulator of VEGF signaling associated with VEGFR-2 complex formation, but did not alter VE-cadherin or VEGFR-2 expression in ECs. Our results suggest that ABL may serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for various cardiovascular diseases, including chronic ischemia, by regulating VEGF signaling and modulating angiogenesis. PMID:26863518

  9. Synergistic interaction between the fibroblast growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways in lens cells

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Bruce A.; Musil, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play a central role in two processes essential for lens transparency—fiber cell differentiation and gap junction–mediated intercellular communication (GJIC). Using serum-free primary cultures of chick lens epithelial cells (DCDMLs), we investigated how the FGF and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways positively cooperate to regulate lens development and function. We found that culturing DCDMLs for 6 d with the BMP blocker noggin inhibits the canonical FGF-to-ERK pathway upstream of FRS2 activation and also prevents FGF from stimulating FRS2- and ERK-independent gene expression, indicating that BMP signaling is required at the level of FGF receptors. Other experiments revealed a second type of BMP/FGF interaction by which FGF promotes expression of BMP target genes as well as of BMP4. Together these studies reveal a novel mode of cooperation between the FGF and BMP pathways in which BMP keeps lens cells in an optimally FGF-responsive state and, reciprocally, FGF enhances BMP-mediated gene expression. This interaction provides a mechanistic explanation for why disruption of either FGF or BMP signaling in the lens leads to defects in lens development and function. PMID:25947138

  10. A Salmonella virulence factor activates the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Winter, Maria G; Klein-Douwel, Daisy; Xavier, Mariana N; Winter, Sebastian E; Kim, Anita; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-01-01

    The invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) activates the transcription factor NF-κB in tissue culture cells and induces inflammatory responses in animal models through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that bacterial delivery or ectopic expression of SipA, a T3SS-1-translocated protein, led to the activation of the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway and consequent RIP2-mediated induction of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses. SipA-mediated activation of NOD1/NOD2 signaling was independent of bacterial invasion in vitro but required an intact T3SS-1. In the mouse colitis model, SipA triggered mucosal inflammation in wild-type mice but not in NOD1/NOD2-deficient mice. These findings implicate SipA-driven activation of the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway as a mechanism by which the T3SS-1 induces inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22186610

  11. A Salmonella Virulence Factor Activates the NOD1/NOD2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Marijke Keestra, A.; Winter, Maria G.; Klein-Douwel, Daisy; Xavier, Mariana N.; Winter, Sebastian E.; Kim, Anita; Tsolis, Renée M.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) activates the transcription factor NF-κB in tissue culture cells and induces inflammatory responses in animal models through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that bacterial delivery or ectopic expression of SipA, a T3SS-1-translocated protein, led to the activation of the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway and consequent RIP2-mediated induction of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses. SipA-mediated activation of NOD1/NOD2 signaling was independent of bacterial invasion in vitro but required an intact T3SS-1. In the mouse colitis model, SipA triggered mucosal inflammation in wild-type mice but not in NOD1/NOD2-deficient mice. These findings implicate SipA-driven activation of the NOD1/NOD2 signaling pathway as a mechanism by which the T3SS-1 induces inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22186610

  12. The MITF family of transcription factors: Role in endolysosomal biogenesis, Wnt signaling, and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ploper, Diego; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling influences cellular fate and proliferation through inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3) and the subsequent stabilization of its many substrates, most notably β-Catenin, a transcriptional co-activator. MITF, a melanoma oncogene member of the microphthalmia family of transcription factors (MiT), was recently found to contain novel GSK3 phosphorylation sites and to be stabilized by Wnt. Other MiT members, TFEB and TFE3, are known to play important roles in cellular clearance pathways by transcriptionally regulating the biogenesis of lysosomes and autophagosomes via activation of CLEAR elements in gene promoters of target genes. Recent studies suggest that MITF can also upregulate many lysosomal genes. MiT family members are dysregulated in cancer and are considered oncogenes, but the underlying oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Here we review the role of MiT members, including MITF, in lysosomal biogenesis, and how cancers overexpressing MITF, TFEB or TFE3 could rewire the lysosomal pathway, inhibit cellular senescence, and activate Wnt signaling by increasing sequestration of negative regulators of Wnt signaling in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Microarray studies suggest that MITF expression inhibits macroautophagy. In melanoma the MITF-driven increase in MVBs generates a positive feedback loop between MITF, Wnt, and MVBs. PMID:26003288

  13. The endogenous peptide antisecretory factor promotes tonic GABAergic signaling in CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Joakim; Lindquist, Catarina; Lange, Stefan; Asztely, Fredrik; Hanse, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Tonic GABAergic inhibition regulates neuronal excitability and has been implicated to be involved in both neurological and psychiatric diseases. We have previously shown that the endogenous peptide antisecretory factor (AF) decreases phasic GABAergic inhibition onto pyramidal CA1 neurons. In the present study, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we investigated the mechanisms behind this disinhibition of CA1 pyramidal neurons by AF. We found that application of AF to acute rat hippocampal slices resulted in a reduction of the frequency, but not of the amplitude, of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), were however not affected by AF, neither in CA1 pyramidal cells, nor in stratum radiatum interneurons. Instead, AF caused an increase of the tonic GABAA current in stratum radiatum interneurons, leaving the tonic GABAergic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells unaffected. These results show that the endogenous peptide AF enhances tonic, but not phasic, GABAergic signaling in CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons, without affecting tonic GABAergic signaling in CA1 pyramidal neurons. We suggest that this increased tonic GABAergic signaling in GABAergic interneurons could be a mechanism for the AF-mediated disinhibition of pyramidal neurons. PMID:24478633

  14. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  15. Cutting edge: TNF receptor-associated factor 4 restricts IL-17-mediated pathology and signaling processes.

    PubMed

    Zepp, Jarod A; Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen; Wu, Ling; Gulen, Muhammet F; Kang, Zizhen; Li, Xiaoxia

    2012-07-01

    The effector T cell subset, Th17, plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and of other autoimmune diseases. The signature cytokine, IL-17, engages the IL-17R and recruits the E3-ligase NF-κB activator 1 (Act1) upon stimulation. In this study, we examined the role of TNFR-associated factor (TRAF)4 in IL-17 signaling and Th17-mediated autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Primary cells from TRAF4-deficient mice displayed markedly enhanced IL-17-activated signaling pathways and induction of chemokine mRNA. Adoptive transfer of MOG35-55 specific wild-type Th17 cells into TRAF4-deficient recipient mice induced an earlier onset of disease. Mechanistically, we found that TRAF4 and TRAF6 used the same TRAF binding sites on Act1, allowing the competition of TRAF4 with TRAF6 for the interaction with Act1. Taken together, the results of this study reveal the necessity of a unique role of TRAF4 in restricting the effects of IL-17 signaling and Th17-mediated disease. PMID:22649194

  16. Intracellular signals involved in the effects of insulin-like growth factors and neuregulins on myofibre formation.

    PubMed

    Zorzano, Antonio; Kaliman, Perla; Gumà, Anna; Palacín, Manuel

    2003-02-01

    A number of extracellular factors are involved in the embryonic development of skeletal muscle and the muscle regeneration that is triggered in response to muscle damage. Some of them, such as insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-like molecules, leukemia inhibitor factor (LIF) or platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs), are involved in the activation of cell proliferation that operates before muscle differentiation. In addition, factors such as IGFs, neuregulins (NRGs), sonic hedgehog (Shh) or Wnt promote muscle differentiation. Here, we review the intracellular signals that are triggered in the myogenic effect of IGFs and neuregulin and we describe common pathways. A fuller understanding of the signalling pathways triggered by these factors may permit the design of new tools for muscle regeneration therapy. PMID:12464385

  17. Analytical expressions for the gate utilization factors of passive multiplicity counters including signal build-up

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A

    2010-01-01

    In the realm of nuclear safeguards, passive neutron multiplicity counting using shift register pulse train analysis to nondestructively quantify Pu in product materials is a familiar and widely applied technique. The approach most commonly taken is to construct a neutron detector consisting of {sup 3}He filled cylindrical proportional counters embedded in a high density polyethylene moderator. Fast neutrons from the item enter the moderator and are quickly slowed down, on timescales of the order of 1-2 {micro}s, creating a thermal population which then persists typically for several 10's {micro}s and is sampled by the {sup 3}He detectors. Because the initial transient is of comparatively short duration it has been traditional to treat it as instantaneous and furthermore to approximate the subsequent capture time distribution as exponential in shape. With these approximations simple expressions for the various Gate Utilization Factors (GUFs) can be obtained. These factors represent the proportion of time correlated events i.e. Doubles and Triples signal present in the pulse train that is detected by the coincidence gate structure chosen (predelay and gate width settings of the multiplicity shift register). More complicated expressions can be derived by generalizing the capture time distribution to multiple time components or harmonics typically present in real systems. When it comes to applying passive neutron multiplicity methods to extremely intense (i.e. high emission rate and highly multiplying) neutron sources there is a drive to use detector types with very fast response characteristics in order to cope with the high rates. In addition to short pulse width, detectors with a short capture time profile are also desirable so that a short coincidence gate width can be set in order to reduce the chance or Accidental coincidence signal. In extreme cases, such as might be realized using boron loaded scintillators, the dieaway time may be so short that the build

  18. FGF10: A multifunctional mesenchymal-epithelial signaling growth factor in development, health, and disease.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    The FGF family comprises 22 members with diverse functions in development and health. FGF10 specifically activates FGFR2b in a paracrine manner with heparan sulfate as a co-factor. FGF10and FGFR2b are preferentially expressed in the mesenchyme and epithelium, respectively. FGF10 is a mesenchymal signaling molecule in the epithelium. FGF10 knockout mice die shortly after birth due to the complete absence of lungs as well as fore- and hindlimbs. FGF10 is also essential for the development of multiple organs. The phenotypes of Fgf10 knockout mice are very similar to those of FGFR2b knockout mice, indicating that FGF10 acts as a ligand that is specific to FGFR2b in mouse multi-organ development. FGF10 also plays roles in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, the repair of tissue injury, and embryonic stem cell differentiation. In humans, FGF10 loss-of-function mutations result in inherited diseases including aplasia of lacrimal and salivary gland, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. FGF10 is also involved in the oncogenicity of pancreatic and breast cancers. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in FGF10 are also potential risk factors for limb deficiencies, cleft lip and palate, and extreme myopia. These findings indicate that FGF10 is a crucial paracrine signal from the mesenchyme to epithelium for development, health, and disease. PMID:26559461

  19. Transcription factor TLX1 controls retinoic acid signaling to ensure spleen development.

    PubMed

    Lenti, Elisa; Farinello, Diego; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Penkov, Dmitry; Castagnaro, Laura; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Wuputra, Kenly; Sandell, Lisa L; Tjaden, Naomi E Butler; Bernassola, Francesca; Caridi, Nicoletta; De Antoni, Anna; Wagner, Michael; Kozinc, Katja; Niederreither, Karen; Blasi, Francesco; Pasini, Diego; Majdic, Gregor; Tonon, Giovanni; Trainor, Paul A; Brendolan, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie spleen development and congenital asplenia, a condition linked to increased risk of overwhelming infections, remain largely unknown. The transcription factor TLX1 controls cell fate specification and organ expansion during spleen development, and Tlx1 deletion causes asplenia in mice. Deregulation of TLX1 expression has recently been proposed in the pathogenesis of congenital asplenia in patients carrying mutations of the gene-encoding transcription factor SF-1. Herein, we have shown that TLX1-dependent regulation of retinoic acid (RA) metabolism is critical for spleen organogenesis. In a murine model, loss of Tlx1 during formation of the splenic anlage increased RA signaling by regulating several genes involved in RA metabolism. Uncontrolled RA activity resulted in premature differentiation of mesenchymal cells and reduced vasculogenesis of the splenic primordium. Pharmacological inhibition of RA signaling in Tlx1-deficient animals partially rescued the spleen defect. Finally, spleen growth was impaired in mice lacking either cytochrome P450 26B1 (Cyp26b1), which results in excess RA, or retinol dehydrogenase 10 (Rdh10), which results in RA deficiency. Together, these findings establish TLX1 as a critical regulator of RA metabolism and provide mechanistic insights into the molecular determinants of human congenital asplenia. PMID:27214556

  20. Proteomic analysis of Rac1 signaling regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 is implicated in various cellular processes that are essential for normal cell function. Deregulation of Rac1 signaling has also been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. The diversity of Rac1 functioning in cells is mainly attributed to its ability to bind to a multitude of downstream effectors following activation by Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs). Despite the identification of a large number of Rac1 binding partners, factors influencing downstream specificity are poorly defined, thus hindering the detailed understanding of both Rac1's normal and pathological functions. In a recent study, we demonstrated a role for 2 Rac-specific GEFs, Tiam1 and P-Rex1, in mediating Rac1 anti- versus pro-migratory effects, respectively. Importantly, via conducting a quantitative proteomic screen, we identified distinct changes in the Rac1 interactome following activation by either GEF, indicating that these opposing effects are mediated through GEF modulation of the Rac1 interactome. Here, we present the full list of identified Rac1 interactors together with functional annotation of the differentially regulated Rac1 binding partners. In light of this data, we also provide additional insights into known and novel signaling cascades that might account for the GEF-mediated Rac1-driven cellular effects. PMID:27152953

  1. Mitochondria mediate tumor necrosis factor-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle myotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Y. P.; Atkins, C. M.; Sweatt, J. D.; Reid, M. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is implicated in muscle atrophy and weakness associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Recently, we reported that TNF-alpha directly induces muscle protein degradation in differentiated skeletal muscle myotubes, where it rapidly activates nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). We also have found that protein loss induced by TNF-alpha is NF-kappaB dependent. In the present study, we analyzed the signaling pathway by which TNF-alpha activates NF-kappaB in myotubes differentiated from C2C12 and rat primary myoblasts. We found that activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha was blocked by rotenone or amytal, inhibitors of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. On the other hand, antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III, enhanced TNF-alpha activation of NK-kappaB. These results suggest a key role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating NF-kappaB activation in muscle. In addition, we found that TNF-alpha stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) activity. However, other signal transduction mediators including ceramide, Ca2+, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and nitric oxide (NO) do not appear to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB.

  2. E1A inhibits transforming growth factor-beta signaling through binding to Smad proteins.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, A; Hanai, J; Imamura, T; Miyazono, K; Kawabata, M

    1999-10-01

    Smads form a recently identified family of proteins that mediate intracellular signaling of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta superfamily. Smads bind to DNA and act as transcriptional regulators. Smads interact with a variety of transcription factors, and the interaction is likely to determine the target specificity of gene induction. Smads also associate with transcriptional coactivators such as p300 and CBP. E1A, an adenoviral oncoprotein, inhibits TGF-beta-induced transactivation, and the ability of E1A to bind p300/CBP is required for the inhibition. Here we determined the Smad interaction domain (SID) in p300 and found that two adjacent regions are required for the interaction. One of the regions is the C/H3 domain conserved between p300 and CBP, and the other is a nonconserved region. p300 mutants containing SID inhibit transactivation by TGF-beta in a dose-dependent manner. E1A inhibits the interaction of Smad3 with a p300 mutant that contains SID but lacks the E1A binding domain. We found that E1A interacts specifically with receptor-regulated Smads, suggesting a novel mechanism whereby E1A antagonizes TGF-beta signaling. PMID:10497242

  3. The role of Zic transcription factors in regulating hindbrain retinoic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The reiterated architecture of cranial motor neurons aligns with the segmented structure of the embryonic vertebrate hindbrain. Anterior-posterior identity of cranial motor neurons depends, in part, on retinoic acid signaling levels. The early vertebrate embryo maintains a balance between retinoic acid synthetic and degradative zones on the basis of reciprocal expression domains of the retinoic acid synthesis gene aldhehyde dehydrogenase 1a2 (aldh1a2) posteriorly and the oxidative gene cytochrome p450 type 26a1 (cyp26a1) in the forebrain, midbrain, and anterior hindbrain. Results This manuscript investigates the role of zinc finger of the cerebellum (zic) transcription factors in regulating levels of retinoic acid and differentiation of cranial motor neurons. Depletion of zebrafish Zic2a and Zic2b results in a strong downregulation of aldh1a2 expression and a concomitant reduction in activity of a retinoid-dependent transgene. The vagal motor neuron phenotype caused by loss of Zic2a/2b mimics a depletion of Aldh1a2 and is rescued by exogenously supplied retinoic acid. Conclusion Zic transcription factors function in patterning hindbrain motor neurons through their regulation of embryonic retinoic acid signaling. PMID:23937294

  4. Interactions between SOX factors and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Kormish, Jay D; Sinner, Débora; Zorn, Aaron M

    2010-01-01

    The SOX family of transcription factors have emerged as modulators of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in diverse development and disease contexts. There are over 20 SOX proteins encoded in the vertebrate genome and recent evidence suggests that many of these can physically interact with beta-catenin and modulate the transcription of Wnt-target genes. The precise mechanisms by which SOX proteins regulate beta-catenin/TCF activity are still being resolved and there is evidence to support a number of models including: protein-protein interactions, the binding of SOX factors to Wnt-target gene promoters, the recruitment of co-repressors or co-activators, modulation of protein stability, and nuclear translocation. In some contexts, Wnt signaling also regulates SOX expression resulting in feedback regulatory loops that fine-tune cellular responses to beta-catenin/TCF activity. In this review, we summarize the examples of Sox-Wnt interactions and examine the underlying mechanisms of this potentially widespread and underappreciated mode of Wnt-regulation. PMID:19655378

  5. Proteomic analysis of Rac1 signaling regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small GTPase Rac1 is implicated in various cellular processes that are essential for normal cell function. Deregulation of Rac1 signaling has also been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. The diversity of Rac1 functioning in cells is mainly attributed to its ability to bind to a multitude of downstream effectors following activation by Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs). Despite the identification of a large number of Rac1 binding partners, factors influencing downstream specificity are poorly defined, thus hindering the detailed understanding of both Rac1's normal and pathological functions. In a recent study, we demonstrated a role for 2 Rac-specific GEFs, Tiam1 and P-Rex1, in mediating Rac1 anti- versus pro-migratory effects, respectively. Importantly, via conducting a quantitative proteomic screen, we identified distinct changes in the Rac1 interactome following activation by either GEF, indicating that these opposing effects are mediated through GEF modulation of the Rac1 interactome. Here, we present the full list of identified Rac1 interactors together with functional annotation of the differentially regulated Rac1 binding partners. In light of this data, we also provide additional insights into known and novel signaling cascades that might account for the GEF-mediated Rac1-driven cellular effects. PMID:27152953

  6. Epidermal growth factor promotes proliferation of dermal papilla cells via Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Nan, Weixiao; Wang, Shiyong; Zhang, Tietao; Si, Huazhe; Wang, Datao; Yang, Fuhe; Li, Guangyu

    2016-08-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the development and growth of hair follicle is controversial. In the present study, 2-20 ng/ml EGF promoted the growth of mink hair follicles in vitro, whereas 200 ng/ml EGF inhibited follicle growth. Further, dermal papilla (DP) cells, a group of mesenchymal cells that govern hair follicle development and growth, were isolated and cultured in vitro. Treatment with or forced expression of EGF accelerated proliferation and induced G1/S transition in DP cells. Moreover, EGF upregulated the expression of DP mesenchymal genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), as well as the Notch pathway molecules including Notch1, Jagged1, Hes1 and Hes5. In addition, inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by DAPT significantly reduced the basal and EGF-enhanced proliferation rate, and also suppressed cell cycle progression. We also show that the expression of several follicle-regulatory genes, such as Survivin and Msx2, were upregulated by EGF, and was inhibited by DAPT. In summary, our study demonstrates that the concentration of EGF is critical for the switch between hair follicle growth and inhibition, and EGF promotes DP cell proliferation via Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27109378

  7. REDOX RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1 is involved in age-dependent and systemic stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    REDOX RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1 (RRTF1) regulates redox homeostasis under stress, however the mechanism is mainly unknown. In a recent publication, we analyzed rrtf1 knockout (ko) and RRTF1 overexpressor lines of Arabidopsis thaliana and showed that RRTF1 plays a crucial role in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Ko line produces less and overexpressor lines constitutively high levels of ROS under stress, and the amount of ROS increases with increase in stress and the RRTF1 level in the plant. The transcription factor also activates systemic ROS signaling under stress.1 In this report, we show that RRTF1 exerts different roles in young and old leaves. While RRTF1 enhances defense responses to high light (HL) stress in young leaves, it induces senescence and chlorosis in older leaves. These findings suggest that RRTF1 and/or RRTF1-mediated ROS signaling induce stress responses in an age-dependent manner, and the age-dependent alteration in the RRTF1 function might be important for plants' acclimation to the stress environment. PMID:26479402

  8. Signaling of pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) in the Madeira cockroach Rhyparobia maderae.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongying; Yasar, Hanzey; Funk, Nico W; Giese, Maria; Baz, El-Sayed; Stengl, Monika

    2014-01-01

    The insect neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is a functional ortholog of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, the coupling factor of the mammalian circadian pacemaker. Despite of PDF's importance for synchronized circadian locomotor activity rhythms its signaling is not well understood. We studied PDF signaling in primary cell cultures of the accessory medulla, the circadian pacemaker of the Madeira cockroach. In Ca²⁺ imaging studies four types of PDF-responses were distinguished. In regularly bursting type 1 pacemakers PDF application resulted in dose-dependent long-lasting increases in Ca²⁺ baseline concentration and frequency of oscillating Ca²⁺ transients. Adenylyl cyclase antagonists prevented PDF-responses in type 1 cells, indicating that PDF signaled via elevation of intracellular cAMP levels. In contrast, in type 2 pacemakers PDF transiently raised intracellular Ca²⁺ levels even after blocking adenylyl cyclase activity. In patch clamp experiments the previously characterized types 1-4 could not be identified. Instead, PDF-responses were categorized according to ion channels affected. Application of PDF inhibited outward potassium or inward sodium currents, sometimes in the same neuron. In a comparison of Ca²⁺ imaging and patch clamp experiments we hypothesized that in type 1 cells PDF-dependent rises in cAMP concentrations block primarily outward K⁺ currents. Possibly, this PDF-dependent depolarization underlies PDF-dependent phase advances of pacemakers. Finally, we propose that PDF-dependent concomitant modulation of K⁺ and Na⁺ channels in coupled pacemakers causes ultradian membrane potential oscillations as prerequisite to efficient synchronization via resonance. PMID:25269074

  9. Microenvironmental stiffness enhances glioma cell proliferation by stimulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Vaibhavi; Rape, Andrew D; Ulrich, Theresa A; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The aggressive and rapidly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with profound tissue stiffening and genomic lesions in key members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that increasing microenvironmental stiffness in culture can strongly enhance glioma cell behaviors relevant to tumor progression, including proliferation, yet it has remained unclear whether stiffness and EGFR regulate proliferation through common or independent signaling mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that microenvironmental stiffness regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation in GBM tumor cells by altering EGFR-dependent signaling. We began by performing an unbiased reverse phase protein array screen, which revealed that stiffness modulates expression and phosphorylation of a broad range of signals relevant to proliferation, including members of the EGFR pathway. We subsequently found that culturing human GBM tumor cells on progressively stiffer culture substrates both dramatically increases proliferation and facilitates passage through the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, consistent with an EGFR-dependent process. Western Blots showed that increasing microenvironmental stiffness enhances the expression and phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream effector Akt. Pharmacological loss-of-function studies revealed that the stiffness-sensitivity of proliferation is strongly blunted by inhibition of EGFR, Akt, or PI3 kinase. Finally, we observed that stiffness strongly regulates EGFR clustering, with phosphorylated EGFR condensing into vinculin-positive focal adhesions on stiff substrates and dispersing as microenvironmental stiffness falls to physiological levels. Our findings collectively support a model in which tissue stiffening promotes GBM proliferation by spatially and biochemically amplifying EGFR signaling. PMID:25000176

  10. Chromatin-Remodeling-Factor ARID1B Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Georgia; Ekici, Arif B; Uebe, Steffen; Zweier, Christiane; Hoyer, Juliane; Engels, Hartmut; Behrens, Jürgen; Reis, André; Hadjihannas, Michel V

    2015-09-01

    The link of chromatin remodeling to both neurodevelopment and cancer has recently been highlighted by the identification of mutations affecting BAF chromatin-remodeling components, such as ARID1B, in individuals with intellectual disability and cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remains unknown. Here, we show that ARID1B is a repressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Through whole-transcriptome analysis, we find that in individuals with intellectual disability and ARID1B loss-of-function mutations, Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated. Using cellular models of low and high Wnt/β-catenin activity, we demonstrate that knockdown of ARID1B activates Wnt/β-catenin target genes and Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcriptional reporters in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Reciprocally, forced expression of ARID1B inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling downstream of the β-catenin destruction complex. Both endogenous and exogenous ARID1B associate with β-catenin and repress Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription through the BAF core subunit BRG1. Accordingly, mutations in ARID1B leading to partial or complete deletion of its BRG1-binding domain, as is often observed in intellectual disability and cancers, compromise association with β-catenin, and the resultant ARID1B mutant proteins fail to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Finally, knockdown of ARID1B in mouse neuroblastoma cells leads to neurite outgrowth through β-catenin. The data suggest that aberrations in chromatin-remodeling factors, such as ARID1B, might contribute to neurodevelopmental abnormalities and cancer through deregulation of developmental and oncogenic pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26340334

  11. Chromatin-Remodeling-Factor ARID1B Represses Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vasileiou, Georgia; Ekici, Arif B.; Uebe, Steffen; Zweier, Christiane; Hoyer, Juliane; Engels, Hartmut; Behrens, Jürgen; Reis, André; Hadjihannas, Michel V.

    2015-01-01

    The link of chromatin remodeling to both neurodevelopment and cancer has recently been highlighted by the identification of mutations affecting BAF chromatin-remodeling components, such as ARID1B, in individuals with intellectual disability and cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remains unknown. Here, we show that ARID1B is a repressor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Through whole-transcriptome analysis, we find that in individuals with intellectual disability and ARID1B loss-of-function mutations, Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated. Using cellular models of low and high Wnt/β-catenin activity, we demonstrate that knockdown of ARID1B activates Wnt/β-catenin target genes and Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcriptional reporters in a β-catenin-dependent manner. Reciprocally, forced expression of ARID1B inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling downstream of the β-catenin destruction complex. Both endogenous and exogenous ARID1B associate with β-catenin and repress Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription through the BAF core subunit BRG1. Accordingly, mutations in ARID1B leading to partial or complete deletion of its BRG1-binding domain, as is often observed in intellectual disability and cancers, compromise association with β-catenin, and the resultant ARID1B mutant proteins fail to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Finally, knockdown of ARID1B in mouse neuroblastoma cells leads to neurite outgrowth through β-catenin. The data suggest that aberrations in chromatin-remodeling factors, such as ARID1B, might contribute to neurodevelopmental abnormalities and cancer through deregulation of developmental and oncogenic pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26340334

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta during carcinogenesis: the shift from epithelial to mesenchymal signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2006-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (TbetaRI) but also c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), changing unphosphorylated Smad3 to its phosphoisoforms: C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C) and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L). While the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway inhibits growth of normal epithelial cells, JNK/pSmad3L-mediated signaling is involved in invasion by activated mesenchymal cells. During sporadic human colorectal carcinogenesis, TGF-beta signaling confers a selective advantage on tumor cells by shifting from the TbetaRI/pSmad3C pathway characteristic of mature epithelial cells to the JNK/pSmad3L pathway, which is more characteristic of the state of flux shown by the activated mesenchymal cells. JNK acts as a regulator of TGF-beta signaling by increasing the basal level of pSmad3L available for action in the nuclei of the invasive adenocarcinoma, in the meantime shutting down TGF-beta-dependent nuclear activity of pSmad3C. Loss of epithelial homeostasis and acquisition of a migratory, mesenchymal phenotype are essential for tumor invasion. From the viewpoint of TGF-beta signaling, a key therapeutic aim in cancer would be restoration of the lost tumor suppressor function observed in normal colorectal epithelial cells at the expense of effects promoting aggressive behavior of the adenocarcinoma. Specific inhibitors of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway might prove useful in this respect. In the case of molecularly targeted therapy for human cancer, pSmad3L and pSmad3C could be assessed as biomarkers to evaluate the likely benefit from specific inhibition of the JNK/pSmad3L pathway. PMID:16741607

  13. Oxidative Stress Promotes Ligand-independent and Enhanced Ligand-dependent Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Ozsoy, Hatice Z.; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Wieder, Eric D.; Pedersen, Steen; Mann, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1, p55) and 2 (TNFR2, p75) are characterized by several cysteine-rich modules in the extracellular domain, raising the possibility that redox-induced modifications of these cysteine residues might alter TNFR function. To test this possibility, we examined fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in 293T cells transfected with CFP- and YFP-tagged TNFRs exposed to the thiol oxidant diamide. Treatment with high concentrations of diamide (1 mm) resulted in an increase in the FRET signal that was sensitive to inhibition with the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting that oxidative stress resulted in TNFR self-association. Treatment of cells with low concentrations of diamide (1 μm) that was not sufficient to provoke TNFR self-association resulted in increased TNF-induced FRET signals relative to the untreated cells, suggesting that oxidative stress enhanced ligand-dependent TNFR signaling. Similar findings were obtained when the TNFR1- and TNFR2-transfected cells were pretreated with a cell-impermeable oxidase, DsbA, that catalyzes disulfide bond formation between thiol groups on cysteine residues. The changes in TNFR self-association were functionally significant, because pretreating the HeLa cells and 293T cells resulted in increased TNF-induced NF-κB activation and TNF-induced expression of IκB and syndecan-4 mRNA levels. Although pretreatment with DsbA did not result in an increase in TNF binding to TNFRs, it resulted in increased TNF-induced activation of NF-κB, consistent with an allosteric modification of the TNFRs. Taken together, these results suggest that oxidative stress promotes TNFR receptor self-interaction and ligand-independent and enhanced ligand-dependent TNF signaling. PMID:18544535

  14. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  15. Basic Aspects of Tumor Cell Fatty Acid-Regulated Signaling and Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Andrea; Lin, Yi-Hui; Eynard, Aldo Renato; Valentich, Mirta Ana; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin Ernesto; Pasqualini, Marìa Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge and experimental research about the mechanisms by which fatty acids and their derivatives control specific gene expression involved during carcinogenesis. Changes in dietary fatty acids, specifically the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 families and some derived eicosanoids from lipoxygenases (LOXs), cyclooxygenases (COXs), and cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450), seem to control the activity of transcription factor families involved in cancer cell proliferation or cell death. Their regulation may be carried out either through direct binding to DNA as peroxisome proliferator–activated receptors (PPARs) or via modulation in an indirect manner of signaling pathway molecules (e.g., protein kinase C [PKC]) and other transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B [NFκB] and sterol regulatory element binding protein [SREBP]). Knowledge of the mechanisms by which fatty acids control specific gene expression may identify important risk factors for cancer, and provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies for a better management of whole-body lipid metabolism. PMID:22048864

  16. Neuroprotective effects of physical activity on the brain: a closer look at trophic factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Cristy; Baktir, Mehmet Akif; Srivatsan, Malathi; Salehi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    While the relationship between increased physical activity and cognitive ability has been conjectured for centuries, only recently have the mechanisms underlying this relationship began to emerge. Convergent evidence suggests that physical activity offers an affordable and effective method to improve cognitive function in all ages, particularly the elderly who are most vulnerable to neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to improving cardiac and immune function, physical activity alters trophic factor signaling and, in turn, neuronal function and structure in areas critical for cognition. Sustained exercise plays a role in modulating anti-inflammatory effects and may play a role in preserving cognitive function in aging and neuropathological conditions. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that myokines released by exercising muscles affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor synthesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a finding that could lead to the identification of new and therapeutically important mediating factors. Given the growing number of individuals with cognitive impairments worldwide, a better understanding of how these factors contribute to cognition is imperative, and constitutes an important first step toward developing non-pharmacological therapeutic strategies to improve cognition in vulnerable populations. PMID:24999318

  17. Fibroblast growth factor signals regulate a wave of Hedgehog activation that is essential for coronary vascular development.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Kory J; White, Andrew C; Park, Changwon; Smith, Craig S; Choi, Kyunghee; Long, Fanxin; Hui, Chi-chung; Ornitz, David M

    2006-06-15

    Myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease are the leading cause of death in the industrial world. Therapies employed for treating these diseases are aimed at promoting increased blood flow to cardiac tissue. Pharmacological induction of new coronary growth has recently been explored, however, clinical trials with known proangiogenic factors have been disappointing. To identify novel therapeutic targets, we have explored signaling pathways that govern embryonic coronary development. Using a combination of genetically engineered mice and an organ culture system, we identified novel roles for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Hedgehog (HH) signaling in coronary vascular development. We show that FGF signals promote coronary growth indirectly by signaling to the cardiomyoblast through redundant function of Fgfr1 and Fgfr2. Myocardial FGF signaling triggers a wave of HH activation that is essential for vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A, Vegf-B, Vegf-C, and angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) expression. We demonstrate that HH is necessary for coronary vascular development and activation of HH signaling is sufficient to promote coronary growth and to rescue coronary defects due to loss of FGF signaling. These studies implicate HH signaling as an essential regulator of coronary vascular development and as a potential therapeutic target for coronary neovascularization. Consistent with this, activation of HH signaling in the adult heart leads to an increase in coronary vessel density. PMID:16778080

  18. Lhx2 Is an Essential Factor for Retinal Gliogenesis and Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Jimmy; Zibetti, Cristina; Clark, Brian S.; Hwang, Woochang; Miranda-Angulo, Ana L.; Qian, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Müller glia (MG) are the only glial cell type produced by the neuroepithelial progenitor cells that generate the vertebrate retina. MG are required to maintain retinal homeostasis and support the survival of retinal neurons. Furthermore, in certain vertebrate classes, MG function as adult stem cells, mediating retinal regeneration in response to injury. However, the mechanisms that regulate MG development are poorly understood because there is considerable overlap in gene expression between retinal progenitor cells and differentiated MG. We show that the LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lhx2 is required for the development of MG in the mouse retina. Temporally controlled knock-out studies reveal a requirement for Lhx2 during all stages of MG development, ranging from the proliferation of gliocompetent retinal progenitors, activation of Müller-specific gene expression, and terminal differentiation of MG morphological features. We show that Lhx2 regulates gliogenesis in part by regulating directly the expression of Notch pathway genes including Notch1, Dll1, and Dll3 and gliogenic transcription factors such as Hes1, Hes5, Sox8, and Rax. Conditional knock-out of Lhx2 resulted in a rapid downregulation of Notch pathway genes and loss of Notch signaling. We further demonstrate that Müller gliogenesis induced by misexpression of the potently gliogenic Notch pathway transcriptional effector Hes5 requires Lhx2 expression. These results indicate that Lhx2 not only directly regulates expression of Notch signaling pathway components, but also acts together with the gliogenic Notch pathway to drive MG specification and differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Müller glia (MG) are radial glial cells located in the vertebrate retina that are essential for the function and survival of retinal neurons. We found the LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lhx2 to be expressed in both retinal progenitor cells and MG. Using conditional knock-outs, we show that Lhx2 is required

  19. Organizational Metrics of Interchromatin Speckle Factor Domains: Integrative Classifier for Stem Cell Adhesion & Lineage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Sebastián L.; Dhaliwal, Anandika; Arvind, Varun; Patel, Parth J.; Beijer, Nick R. M.; de Boer, Jan; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Kohn, Joachim; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell fates on biomaterials are influenced by the complex confluence of microenvironmental cues emanating from soluble growth factors, cell-to-cell contacts, and biomaterial properties. Cell-microenvironment interactions influence the cell fate by initiating a series of outside-in signaling events that traverse from the focal adhesions to the nucleus via the cytoskeleton and modulate the sub-nuclear protein organization and gene expression. Here, we report a novel imaging-based framework that highlights the spatial organization of sub-nuclear proteins, specifically the splicing factor SC-35 in the nucleoplasm, as an integrative marker to distinguish between minute differences of stem cell lineage pathways in response to stimulatory soluble factors, surface topologies, and microscale topographies. This framework involves the high resolution image acquisition of SC-35 domains and imaging-based feature extraction to obtain quantitative nuclear metrics in tandem with machine learning approaches to generate a predictive cell state classification model. The acquired SC-35 metrics led to > 90% correct classification of emergent human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) phenotypes in populations of hMSCs exposed for merely 3 days to basal, adipogenic, or osteogenic soluble cues, as well as varying levels of dexamethasone-induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression. Early osteogenic cellular responses across a series of surface patterns, fibrous scaffolds, and micropillars were also detected and classified using this imaging-based methodology. Complex cell states resulting from inhibition of RhoGTPase, β-catenin, and FAK could be classified with > 90% sensitivity on the basis of differences in the SC-35 organizational metrics. This indicates that SC-35 organization is sensitively impacted by adhesion-related signaling molecules that regulate osteogenic differentiation. Our results show that diverse microenvironment cues affect different attributes of the SC-35

  20. Cell Type-Dependent Nonspecific Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Apert Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Erika; Atique, Rodrigo; Fanganiello, Roberto Dalto; Sunaga, Daniele Yumi; Ishiy, Felipe Augusto André; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2016-08-15

    Apert Syndrome (AS) is one of the most severe forms of craniosynostosis. It is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the receptor fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), which leads to ligand-receptor promiscuity. Here, we aimed to better understand the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and of fibroblastoid cells, cellular populations that are part of the suture complex, when stimulated with different fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). We also aimed to verify whether FGFR2 specificity loss due to AS mutations would change their signaling behavior. We tested this hypothesis through cell proliferation and differentiation assays and through gene expression profiling. We found that FGF19 and FGF10 increase proliferation of fibroblastoid cells harboring the FGFR2 p.S252W mutation, but not of mutant MSCs. FGF19 and FGF10 were associated with different expression profiles in p.S252W cells. Further, in accordance to our gene expression microarray data, FGF19 decreases bone differentiation rate of mutant fibroblastoid cells and increases bone differentiation rate of MSCs. This effect in osteogenesis appears to be mediated by BMP signaling. The present data indicate that non-natural FGFR2 ligands, such as FGF10 and FGF19, are important factors in the pathophysiology of AS. Further research is needed to determine the role of modulation of MSC proliferation or use of FGF19 or anti-BMP2 as inhibitors of osteogenesis in AS subjects' cells, and whether these findings can be used in the clinical management of AS. PMID:27339175

  1. Extracting signals robust to electrode number and shift for online simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control by factorization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Muceli, Silvia; Jiang, Ning; Farina, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Previous research proposed the extraction of myoelectric control signals by linear factorization of multi-channel electromyogram (EMG) recordings from forearm muscles. This paper further analyses the theoretical basis for dimensionality reduction in high-density EMG signals from forearm muscles. Moreover, it shows that the factorization of muscular activation patterns in weights and activation signals by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is robust with respect to the channel configuration from where the EMG signals are obtained. High-density surface EMG signals were recorded from the forearm muscles of six individuals. Weights and activation signals extracted offline from 10 channel configurations with varying channel numbers (6, 8, 16, 192 channels) were highly similar. Additionally, the method proved to be robust against electrode shifts in both transversal and longitudinal direction with respect to the muscle fibers. In a second experiment, six subjects directly used the activation signals extracted from high-density EMG for online goal-directed control tasks involving simultaneous and proportional control of two degrees-of-freedom of the wrist. The synergy weights for this control task were extracted from a reference configuration and activation signals were calculated online from the reference configuration as well as from the two shifted configurations, simulating electrode shift. Despite the electrode shift, the task completion rate, task completion time, and execution efficiency were generally not statistically different among electrode configurations. Online performances were also mostly similar when using either 6, 8, or 16 EMG channels. The robustness of the method to the number and location of channels, proved both offline and online, indicates that EMG signals recorded from forearm muscles can be approximated as linear instantaneous mixtures of activation signals and justifies the use of linear factorization algorithms for extracting, in a

  2. The Role of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor Signaling in Skeletal Muscle Growth, Injury and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Liam C; White, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines are an incredibly diverse group of secreted proteins with equally diverse functions. The actions of cytokines are mediated by the unique and sometimes overlapping receptors to which the soluble ligands bind. Classified within the interleukin-6 family of cytokines are leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin-M (OSM), cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). These cytokines all bind to the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) and gp130, and in some cases an additional receptor subunit, leading to activation of downstream kinases and transcriptional activators. LIFR is expressed on a broad range of cell types and can generate pleiotropic effects. In the context of skeletal muscle physiology, these cytokines have been shown to exert effects on motor neurons, inflammatory and muscle cells. From isolated cells through to whole organisms, manipulations of LIFR signaling cytokines have a wide range of outcomes influencing muscle cell growth, myogenic differentiation, response to exercise, metabolism, neural innervation and recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of muscle injury. This article will discuss the shared and distinct processes that LIFR cytokines regulate in a variety of experimental models with the common theme of skeletal muscle physiology. PMID:27003396

  3. Transcriptional Factors Mediating Retinoic Acid Signals in the Control of Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yueqiao; Li, Rui; Chen, Guoxun

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A (VA), is important for many physiological processes including energy metabolism. This is mainly achieved through RA-regulated gene expression in metabolically active cells. RA regulates gene expression mainly through the activation of two subfamilies in the nuclear receptor superfamily, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). RAR/RXR heterodimers or RXR/RXR homodimers bind to RA response element in the promoters of RA target genes and regulate their expressions upon ligand binding. The development of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes is often associated with profound changes in the expressions of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in metabolically active cells. RA regulates some of these gene expressions. Recently, in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that status and metabolism of VA regulate macronutrient metabolism. Some studies have shown that, in addition to RARs and RXRs, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor β/δ may function as transcriptional factors mediating RA response. Herein, we summarize current progresses regarding the VA metabolism and the role of nuclear receptors in mediating RA signals, with an emphasis on their implication in energy metabolism. PMID:26110391

  4. Beyond receptors and signaling: epigenetic factors in the regulation of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Stuti; Jeffrey, Kate L

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of innate immune cells with pathogens leads to changes in gene expression that elicit our body’s first line of defense against infection. Although signaling pathways and transcription factors have a central role, it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic factors, in the form of DNA or histone modifications, as well as noncoding RNAs, are critical for generating the necessary cell lineage as well as context-specific gene expression in diverse innate immune cell types. Much of the epigenetic landscape is set during cellular differentiation; however, pathogens and other environmental triggers also induce changes in histone modifications that can either promote tolerance or ‘train’ innate immune cells for a more robust antigen-independent secondary response. Here we review the important contribution of epigenetic factors to the initiation, maintenance and training of innate immune responses. In addition, we explore how pathogens have hijacked these mechanisms for their benefit and the potential of small molecules targeting chromatin machinery as a way to boost or subdue the innate immune response in disease. PMID:25559622

  5. Arabidopsis NAC transcription factor JUB1 regulates GA/BR metabolism and signalling.

    PubMed

    Shahnejat-Bushehri, Sara; Tarkowska, Danuse; Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) and brassinosteroids (BRs) are important phytohormones that control plant development and responses to environmental cues by involving DELLA proteins and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1) respectively as key transcription factors. Here, we reveal a new role for JUNGBRUNNEN1 (JUB1) as a transcriptional regulator of GA/BR signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana. JUB1 directly represses the hormone biosynthesis genes GA3ox1 and DWARF4 (DWF4), leading to reduced levels of GAs and BRs and typical GA/BR deficiency phenotypes exhibiting short hypocotyls, dwarfism, late flowering and male sterility. JUB1 also directly represses PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4), a transcription factor connecting hormonal and environmental stimuli. On the other hand, JUB1 activates the DELLA genes GA INSENSITIVE (GAI) and RGA-LIKE 1 (RGL1). In addition, BZR1 and PIF4 act as direct transcriptional repressors upstream of JUB1, establishing a negative feedback loop. Thus, JUB1 forms the core of a robust regulatory module that triggers DELLA accumulation, thereby restricting cell elongation while concomitantly enhancing stress tolerance. PMID:27249348

  6. Transcriptional Factors Mediating Retinoic Acid Signals in the Control of Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yueqiao; Li, Rui; Chen, Guoxun

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A (VA), is important for many physiological processes including energy metabolism. This is mainly achieved through RA-regulated gene expression in metabolically active cells. RA regulates gene expression mainly through the activation of two subfamilies in the nuclear receptor superfamily, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). RAR/RXR heterodimers or RXR/RXR homodimers bind to RA response element in the promoters of RA target genes and regulate their expressions upon ligand binding. The development of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes is often associated with profound changes in the expressions of genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in metabolically active cells. RA regulates some of these gene expressions. Recently, in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that status and metabolism of VA regulate macronutrient metabolism. Some studies have shown that, in addition to RARs and RXRs, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor β/δ may function as transcriptional factors mediating RA response. Herein, we summarize current progresses regarding the VA metabolism and the role of nuclear receptors in mediating RA signals, with an emphasis on their implication in energy metabolism. PMID:26110391

  7. Connective-tissue growth factor modulates WNT signalling and interacts with the WNT receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Sara; Latinkic, Branko; Itasaki, Nobue; Krumlauf, Robb; Smith, J C

    2004-05-01

    Connective-tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a member of the CCN family of secreted proteins. CCN family members contain four characteristic domains and exhibit multiple activities: they associate with the extracellular matrix, they can mediate cell adhesion, cell migration and chemotaxis, and they can modulate the activities of peptide growth factors. Many of the effects of CTGF are thought to be mediated by binding to integrins, whereas others may be because of its recently identified ability to interact with BMP4 and TGF beta. We demonstrate, using Xenopus embryos, that CTGF also regulates signalling through the Wnt pathway, in accord with its ability to bind to the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). This interaction is likely to occur through the C-terminal (CT) domain of CTGF, which is distinct from the BMP- and TGF beta-interacting domain. Our results define new activities of CTGF and add to the variety of routes through which cells regulate growth factor activity in development, disease and tissue homeostasis. PMID:15105373

  8. Sustained activation of fibroblast transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in a murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Takagawa, Shinsuke; Lakos, Gabriella; Mori, Yasuji; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Nishioka, Kiyoshi; Varga, John

    2003-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta is responsible for triggering a cascade of events leading to fibrosis in scleroderma. The Smads are intracellular signal transducers recently shown to mediate fibroblast activation and other profibrotic responses elicited by transforming growth factor-betain vitro. To understand better the involvement of Smads in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, we examined Smad expression and activation in situ in a murine model of scleroderma. Bleomycin injections induced striking dermal infiltration with macrophages by 3 d, and progressive fibrosis by 2 wk. Infiltrating macrophages and resident fibroblasts expressed Smad3, the positive mediator for transforming growth factor-beta responses. Importantly, in bleomycin-injected skin, fibroblasts showed predominantly nuclear localization of Smad3 and intense staining for phospho-Smad2/3. Furthermore, phosphorylated Smad2/3 in fibroblasts was detected even after the resolution of inflammation. Expression of Smad7, the endogenous inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling, was strongly induced in dermal cells by transforming growth factor-beta, but not by bleomycin injections. Collectively, these results indicate that bleomycin-induced murine scleroderma is associated with rapid and sustained induction of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in resident dermal fibroblasts. Despite apparent activation of the intracellular transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lesional dermis, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta-inducible Smad7 was not upregulated. In light of the critical function of Smad7 as an endogenous inhibitor of Smad signaling that restricts the duration and magnitude of transforming growth factor-beta responses, and as a mediator of apoptosis, relative Smad7 deficiency observed in the present studies may account for sustained activation of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in lesional tissues. These findings raise the

  9. Sparsity-enabled signal decomposition using tunable Q-factor wavelet transform for fault feature extraction of gearbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Gaigai; Chen, Xuefeng; He, Zhengjia

    2013-12-01

    Localized faults in gearboxes tend to result in periodic shocks and thus arouse periodic responses in vibration signals. Feature extraction has always been a key problem for localized fault diagnosis. This paper proposes a new fault feature extraction technique for gearboxes by using sparsity-enabled signal decomposition method. The sparsity-enabled signal decomposition method separates signals based on the oscillatory behavior of the signal rather than the frequency or scale. Thus, the fault feature can be nonlinearly extracted from vibration signals. During the implementation of the proposed method, tunable Q-factor wavelet transform, for which the Q-factor can be easily specified, is adopted to represent vibration signals in a sparse way, and then morphological component analysis (MCA) is employed to estimate and separate the distinct components. The corresponding optimization problem of MCA is solved by the split augmented Lagrangian shrinkage algorithm (SALSA). With the proposed method, vibration signals of the faulty gearbox can be nonlinearly decomposed into high-oscillatory component and low-oscillatory component which is the fault feature of gearboxes. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, this paper investigates the effect of two parameters pertinent to MCA and SALSA: the Lagrange multiplier and the penalty parameter. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by both the simulated and practical gearbox vibration signals. Results show the proposed method outperforms empirical mode decomposition and spectral kurtosis in extracting fault features of gearboxes.

  10. Surfactant protein D suppresses lung cancer progression by downregulation of epidermal growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Takahashi, M; Ariki, S; Asakawa, D; Tajiri, M; Wada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Nishitani, C; Takamiya, R; Saito, A; Uehara, Y; Hashimoto, J; Kurimura, Y; Takahashi, H; Kuroki, Y

    2015-02-12

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a member of the collectin family that has an important role in maintaining pulmonary homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrated that SP-D inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that SP-D suppressed epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in A549 cells, H441 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and human EGF receptor (EGFR) stable expression CHO-K1 cells. A binding study using (125)I-EGF demonstrated that SP-D downregulated the binding of EGF to EGFR. A ligand blot indicated that SP-D bound to EGFR, and a lectin blot suggested that EGFR in A549 cells had both high-mannose type and complex type N-glycans. We purified the recombinant extracellular domain of EGFR (soluble EGFR=soluble EGFR (sEGFR)), and demonstrated that SP-D directly bound to sEGFR in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. The binding of SP-D to sEGFR was suppressed by EDTA, mannose or N-glycopeptidase F treatment. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that N-glycans in domain III of EGFR were of a high-mannose type. These data suggest that SP-D reduces EGF binding to EGFR through the interaction between the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D and N-glycans of EGFR, and downregulates EGF signaling. Our finding suggests the novel type of regulation system of EGF signaling involving lectin-to-carbohydrate interaction and downregulation of ligand binding. PMID:24608429

  11. Glucocorticoids and Tumor Necrosis Factor α Increase Oxidative Stress and Suppress Wnt Protein Signaling in Osteoblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria; Han, Li; Ambrogini, Elena; Weinstein, Robert S.; Manolagas, Stavros C.

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) and inflammatory cytokines contribute to the age-associated loss of bone mass and strength, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for their deleterious effects on the aging skeleton are unclear. Based on evidence that oxidative stress is a causal mechanism of the insulin resistance produced by either one of these two agents, we tested the hypothesis that their adverse skeletal effects also result from increased oxidative stress. We report that administration of prednisolone to mice increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation of p66shc (an amplifier of H2O2 generation in mitochondria) in bone. Dexamethasone (Dex) and TNFα had a similar effect on osteoblastic cells in vitro. The generation of ROS by Dex and TNFα required PKCβ/p66shc signaling and was responsible for the activation of JNK and induction of apoptosis by both agents. The activity of Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors was also increased in response to ROS; however, FoxO activation opposed apoptosis induced by Dex and TNFα. In addition, both agents suppressed Akt phosphorylation as well as Wnt-induced proliferation and osteoblast differentiation. However, the inhibitory actions on Wnt signaling were independent of PKCβ/p66shc. Instead, they were mediated by inhibition of Akt and stimulation of FoxOs. These results demonstrate that ROS-induced activation of a PKCβ/p66shc/JNK signaling cascade is responsible for the pro-apoptotic effects of Dex and TNFα on osteoblastic cells. Moreover, modulation of Akt and FoxOs by GCs and TNFα are cell-autonomous mechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin antagonism contributing to the adverse effects of GC excess and inflammatory cytokines on bone alike. PMID:22030390

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor signaling blockade combined with radiation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Gregory W; Saba, Corey; Armstrong, Eric A; Huang, Shyh-Min; Benavente, Sergio; Ludwig, Dale L; Hicklin, Daniel J; Harari, Paul M

    2007-02-01

    Signaling through the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is implicated in cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, metastasis, and resistance to cytotoxic cancer therapies. Targeted disruption of IGF-IR signaling combined with cytotoxic therapy may therefore yield improved anticancer efficacy over conventional treatments alone. In this study, a fully human anti-IGF-IR monoclonal antibody A12 (ImClone Systems, Inc., New York, NY) is examined as an adjunct to radiation therapy. IGF-IR expression is shown for a diverse cohort of cell lines, whereas targeted IGF-IR blockade by A12 inhibits IGF-IR phosphorylation and activation of the downstream effectors Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Anchorage-dependent proliferation and xenograft growth is inhibited by A12 in a dose-dependent manner, particularly for non-small cell lung cancer lines. Clonogenic radiation survival of H226 and H460 cells grown under anchorage-dependent conditions is impaired by A12, demonstrating a radiation dose-enhancing effect for IGF-IR blockade. Postradiation anchorage-independent colony formation is inhibited by A12 in A549 and H460 cells. In the H460 xenograft model, combining A12 and radiation significantly enhances antitumor efficacy compared with either modality alone. These effects may be mediated by promotion of radiation-induced, double-stranded DNA damage and apoptosis as observed in cell culture. In summary, these results validate IGF-IR signal transduction blockade as a promising strategy to improve radiation therapy efficacy in human tumors, forming a basis for future clinical trials. PMID:17283150

  13. Positive and negative tissue-specific signaling by a nematode epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lesa, G M; Sternberg, P W

    1997-01-01

    The major determinants of receptor tissue tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling specificity have been proposed to be Src homology 2 (SH2) binding sites, phosphotyrosine-containing oligopeptides in the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor. The Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor homologue LET-23 has multiple functions during development and has eight potential SH2-binding sites in a region carboxyl terminal to its kinase domain. By analyzing transgenic nematodes for three distinct LET-23 functions, we show that six of eight potential sites function in vivo and that they are required for most, but not all, of LET-23 activity. A single site is necessary and sufficient to promote wild-type fertility. Three other sites activate the RAS pathway and are involved only in viability and vulval differentiation. A fifth site is promiscuous and can mediate all three LET-23 functions. An additional site mediates tissue-specific negative regulation. Putative SH2 binding sites are thus key effectors of both cell-specific and negative regulation in an intact organism. We suggest two distinct mechanisms for tissue-specific RTK-mediated signaling. A positive mechanism would promote RTK function through effectors present only in certain cell types. A negative mechanism would inhibit RTK function through tissue-specific negative regulators. Images PMID:9168466

  14. Granzyme B inhibits keratinocyte migration by disrupting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Merkulova, Yulia; Shen, Yue; Parkinson, Leigh G; Raithatha, Sheetal A; Zhao, Hongyan; Westendorf, Kathryn; Sharma, Mehul; Bleackley, Robert Chris; Granville, David J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds including diabetic, venous, and decubitus skin ulcers are currently lacking effective therapies. Non-healing diabetic ulcers can lead to amputations as progress into a highly chronic state before detection and existing treatments for these wounds often fail. Granzyme B (GzmB) is a serine protease that was, until recently, believed to function exclusively in cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated apoptosis. However, during excessive or chronic inflammation, GzmB can accumulate in the extracellular milieu, retain its activity, and cleave a number of important extracellular proteins. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor involved in cellular processes such as proliferation and migration. EGFR signaling is integral to the wound healing process. The present study investigated the effects of GzmB on keratinocyte cell migration using HaCaT cell line. Using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing and scratch assays, the present study demonstrates that GzmB inhibits keratinocyte migration by interfering with the EGFR pathway. GzmB limited cell transition into a migratory morphology and was found to reduce ligand-induced EGFR phosphorylation. Inhibition of GzmB reversed the aforementioned effects. In summary, data from the present study suggest key role for GzmB in the pathogenesis of impaired wound healing through the impairment of EGFR signaling and cell migration. PMID:27060743

  15. Characterization of Differential Protein Tethering at the Plasma Membrane in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan D.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Physical tethering of membrane proteins to the cortical actin cytoskeleton provides functional organization to the plasma membrane and contributes to diverse cellular processes including cell signaling, vesicular trafficking, endocytosis, and migration. For these processes to occur, membrane protein tethering must be dynamically regulated in response to environmental cues. In this study, we describe a novel biochemical scheme for isolating the complement of plasma membrane proteins that are physically tethered to the actin cytoskeleton. We utilized this method in combination with tandem liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) to demonstrate that cytoskeletal tethering of membrane proteins is acutely regulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in normal human kidney (HK2) cells. Our results indicate that several proteins known to be involved in EGF signaling, as well as other proteins not traditionally associated with this pathway, are tethered to the cytoskeleton in dynamic fashion. Further analysis of one hit from our proteomic survey, the receptor phosphotyrosine phosphatase PTPRS, revealed a correlation between cytoskeletal tethering and endosomal trafficking in response to EGF. This finding parallels previous indications that PTPRS is involved in the desensitization of EGFR and provides a potential mechanism to coordinate localization of these two membrane proteins in the same compartment upon EGFR activation. PMID:22559174

  16. Geraniol Suppresses Angiogenesis by Downregulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Christine; Scheuer, Claudia; Parakenings, Julia; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol exerts several direct pharmacological effects on tumor cells and, thus, has been suggested as a promising anti-cancer compound. Because vascularization is a major precondition for tumor growth, we analyzed in this study the anti-angiogenic action of geraniol. In vitro, geraniol reduced the migratory activity of endothelial-like eEND2 cells. Western blot analyses further revealed that geraniol downregulates proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and upregulates cleaved caspase-3 (Casp-3) expression in eEND2 cells. Moreover, geraniol blocked vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 signal transduction, resulting in a suppression of downstream AKT and ERK signaling pathways. In addition, geraniol significantly reduced vascular sprout formation in a rat aortic ring assay. In vivo, geraniol inhibited the vascularization of CT26 tumors in dorsal skinfold chambers of BALB/c mice, which was associated with a smaller tumor size when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed a decreased number of Ki67-positive cells and CD31-positive microvessels with reduced VEGFR-2 expression within geraniol-treated tumors. Taken together, these findings indicate that geraniol targets multiple angiogenic mechanisms and, therefore, is an attractive candidate for the anti-angiogenic treatment of tumors. PMID:26154255

  17. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits Insulin-Like Growth Factor Signaling, Growth, and Survival in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gary E.; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldenberg, David D.; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Weiss, William A.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Rosenthal, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling. PMID:17486636

  18. Interaction with ErbB4 Promotes Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1α Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Paatero, Ilkka; Jokilammi, Anne; Heikkinen, Pekka T.; Iljin, Kristiina; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Jones, Frank E.; Jaakkola, Panu M.; Elenius, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The receptor-tyrosine kinase ErbB4 was identified as a direct regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling. Cleaved intracellular domain of ErbB4 directly interacted with HIF-1α in the nucleus, and stabilized HIF-1α protein in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions by blocking its proteasomal degradation. The mechanism of HIF stabilization was independent of VHL and proline hydroxylation but dependent on RACK1. ErbB4 activity was necessary for efficient HRE-driven promoter activity, transcription of known HIF-1α target genes, and survival of mammary carcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, mammary epithelial specific targeting of Erbb4 in the mouse significantly reduced the amount of HIF-1α protein in vivo. ERBB4 expression also correlated with the expression of HIF-regulated genes in a series of 4552 human normal and cancer tissue samples. These data demonstrate that soluble ErbB4 intracellular domain promotes HIF-1α stability and signaling via a novel mechanism. PMID:22308027

  19. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K.; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis. PMID:27011166

  20. Role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in Schistosoma-induced experimental pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is significant evidence that Th2 (T helper 2)-mediated inflammation supports the pathogenesis of both human and experimental animal models of pulmonary hypertension (PH). A key immune regulator is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is produced by Th2 inflammation and can itself contribute to Th2 pulmonary responses. In this study, we interrogated the role of VEGF signaling in a murine model of schistosomiasis-induced PH with a phenotype of significant intrapulmonary Th2 inflammation, vascular remodeling, and elevated right ventricular pressures. We found that VEGF receptor blockade partially suppressed the levels of the Th2 inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 in both the lung and the liver after Schistosoma mansoni exposure and suppressed pulmonary vascular remodeling. These findings suggest that VEGF positively contributes to schistosomiasis-induced vascular inflammation and remodeling, and they also provide evidence for a VEGF-dependent signaling pathway necessary for pulmonary vascular remodeling and inflammation in this model. PMID:25006448

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Augments Resistance Artery Myogenic Tone in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Meghan; Hui, Sonya K; Dinh, Danny D; Foltz, Warren D; Momen, Abdul; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Offermanns, Stefan; Husain, Mansoor; Kroetsch, Jeffrey T; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes strongly associates with microvascular complications that ultimately promote multiorgan failure. Altered myogenic responsiveness compromises tissue perfusion, aggravates hypertension, and sets the stage for later permanent structural changes to the microcirculation. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle resistance arteries isolated from patients with diabetes have augmented myogenic tone, despite reasonable blood glucose control. To understand the mechanisms, we titrated a standard diabetes mouse model (high-fat diet plus streptozotocin [HFD/STZ]) to induce a mild increase in blood glucose levels. HFD/STZ treatment induced a progressive myogenic tone augmentation in mesenteric and olfactory cerebral arteries; neither HFD nor STZ alone had an effect on blood glucose or resistance artery myogenic tone. Using gene deletion models that eliminate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or sphingosine kinase 1, we demonstrate that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF drives the elevation of myogenic tone via enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. Therapeutically antagonizing TNF (etanercept) or S1P (JTE013) signaling corrects this defect. Our investigation concludes that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF augments resistance artery myogenic vasoconstriction in a diabetes model that induces a small elevation of blood glucose. Our data demonstrate that microvascular reactivity is an early disease marker and advocate establishing therapies that strategically target the microcirculation. PMID:27207546

  2. Noisy transcription factor NF-κB oscillations stabilize and sensitize cytokine signaling in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangstad, Sirin W.; Feldager, Cilie W.; Juul, Jeppe; Trusina, Ala

    2013-02-01

    NF-κB is a major transcription factor mediating inflammatory response. In response to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, it exhibits a characteristic response—a pulse followed by noisy oscillations in concentrations of considerably smaller amplitude. NF-κB is an important mediator of cellular communication, as it is both activated by and upregulates production of cytokines, signals used by white blood cells to find the source of inflammation. While the oscillatory dynamics of NF-κB has been extensively investigated both experimentally and theoretically, the role of the noise and the lower secondary amplitude has not been addressed. We use a cellular automaton model to address these issues in the context of spatially distributed communicating cells. We find that noisy secondary oscillations stabilize concentric wave patterns, thus improving signal quality. Furthermore, both lower secondary amplitude as well as noise in the oscillation period might be working against chronic inflammation, the state of self-sustained and stimulus-independent excitations. Our findings suggest that the characteristic irregular secondary oscillations of lower amplitude are not accidental. On the contrary, they might have evolved to increase robustness of the inflammatory response and the system's ability to return to a pre-stimulated state.

  3. Band-pass processing in a GPCR signaling pathway selects for NFAT transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Sumit, M; Neubig, R R; Takayama, S; Linderman, J J

    2015-11-01

    Many biological processes are rhythmic and proper timing is increasingly appreciated as being critical for development and maintenance of physiological functions. To understand how temporal modulation of an input signal influences downstream responses, we employ microfluidic pulsatile stimulation of a G-protein coupled receptor, the muscarinic M3 receptor, in single cells with simultaneous real-time imaging of both intracellular calcium and NFAT nuclear localization. Interestingly, we find that reduced stimulation with pulses of ligand can give more efficient transcription factor activation, if stimuli are timed appropriately. Our experiments and computational analyses show that M3 receptor-induced calcium oscillations form a low pass filter while calcium-induced NFAT translocation forms a high pass filter. The combination acts as a band-pass filter optimized for intermediate frequencies of stimulation. We demonstrate that receptor desensitization and NFAT translocation rates determine critical features of the band-pass filter and that the band-pass may be shifted for different receptors or NFAT dynamics. As an example, we show that the two NFAT isoforms (NFAT4 and NFAT1) have shifted band-pass windows for the same receptor. While we focus specifically on the M3 muscarinic receptor and NFAT translocation, band-pass processing is expected to be a general theme that applies to multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26374065

  4. Fetuin-A promotes primary keratinocyte migration: independent of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Hung, Betsy S; Kempf, Margit; Liu, Pei-Yun; Dalley, Andrew J; Saunders, Nicholas A; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-08-01

    Previously, we reported that fetuin-A is a major component of ovine foetal skin and significantly enhances 'wound closure' in primary keratinocyte cultures. In this study, we found that in human newborn foreskin, a high level of fetuin-A protein is detected throughout the dermis. However, in adult skin a low level of fetuin-A is observed throughout the epidermal and dermal layers, except at regions surrounding hair follicles and at the epidermal-dermal junction where the level of fetuin-A is relatively high. Fetuin-A significantly induces actin-rich protrusions in human primary keratinocytes. Interestingly, blockade of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signalling has a limited effect on fetuin-A promoted 'wound closure' on primary human keratinocytes, but significantly inhibits fetuin-A's effect on HaCaT cells. These results indicate that high levels of fetuin-A may partially contribute to less scar formation in newborn foreskin and that the effect of fetuin-A on primary keratinocyte migration is independent of EGF receptor signalling. PMID:19758338

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury as a Risk Factor for Alzheimer's Disease: Is Inflammatory Signaling a Key Player?

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Jelena; Sabbir, Mohammad Golam; Albensi, Benedict C

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a significant medical and social concern within the last 30 years. TBI has acute devastating effects, and in many cases, seems to initiate long-term neurodegeneration. With advances in medical technology, many people are now surviving severe brain injuries and their long term consequences. Post trauma effects include communication problems, sensory deficits, emotional and behavioral problems, physical complications and pain, increased suicide risk, dementia, and an increased risk for chronic CNS diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this review, we provide an introduction to TBI and hypothesize how it may lead to neurodegenerative disease in general and AD in particular. In addition, we discuss the evidence that supports the hypothesis that TBI may lead to AD. In particular, we focus on inflammatory responses as key processes in TBI-induced secondary injury, with emphasis on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling. PMID:26899581

  6. New horizons at the caudal embryos; coordinated urogenital/reproductive organ formation by growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Economides, Aris; Yanagita, Motoko; Graf, Daniel; Yamada, Gen

    2009-01-01

    Summary The cloaca/urogenital sinus and its adjacent region differentiate into the urogenital/reproductive organs. Caudal regression syndrome (CRS; including Mermaid syndrome), a type of severe cloacal malformation displays hindlimb fusion and urogenital organ defects, thus suggesting that such defects are caused by several morphogenetic alterations during early development. The attenuation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (Bmp) signaling at the posterior primitive streak of embryos leads to the caudal dysmorphogenesis including the cloaca and fusion of both hindlimbs. Genetic tissue lineage studies indicate the presence of coordinated organogenesis. Hedgehog (HH)-responding cells derived from peri-cloacal mesenchyme (PCM) contribute to the urogenital/reproductive organs. These findings indicate the existence o f developmental programs for the coordinated organogenesis of urogenital/reproductive tissues based on growth factor function and crosstalk. PMID:19765973

  7. CYLD negatively regulates transforming growth factor-β-signalling via deubiquitinating Akt

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Hyang; Jono, Hirofumi; Komatsu, Kensei; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jiyun; Miyata, Masanori; Matsuno, Takashi; Xu, Xiangbin; Huang, Yuxian; Zhang, Wenhong; Park, Soo Hyun; Kim, Yu-Il; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Shen, Huahao; Heo, Kyung-Sun; Xu, Haodong; Bourne, Patricia; Koga, Tomoaki; Xu, Haidong; Yan, Chen; Wang, Binghe; Chen, Lin-Feng; Feng, Xin-Hua; Li, Jian-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury, whether induced by infection or caustic chemicals, initiates a series of complex wound-healing responses. If uncontrolled, these responses may lead to fibrotic lung diseases and loss of function. Thus, resolution of lung injury must be tightly regulated. The key regulatory proteins required for tightly controlling the resolution of lung injury have yet to be identified. Here we show that loss of deubiquitinase CYLD led to the development of lung fibrosis in mice after infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. CYLD inhibited transforming growth factor-β-signalling and prevented lung fibrosis by decreasing the stability of Smad3 in an E3 ligase carboxy terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein-dependent manner. Moreover, CYLD decreases Smad3 stability by deubiquitinating K63-polyubiquitinated Akt. Together, our results unveil a role for CYLD in tightly regulating the resolution of lung injury and preventing fibrosis by deubiquitinating Akt. These studies may help develop new therapeutic strategies for preventing lung fibrosis. PMID:22491319

  8. Asymmetric activation of Dll4-Notch signaling by Foxn4 and proneural factors activates BMP/TGFβ signaling to specify V2b interneurons in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Kamana; Luo, Huijun; Li, Shengguo; Matise, Michael; Xiang, Mengqing

    2014-01-01

    During development of the ventral spinal cord, the V2 interneurons emerge from p2 progenitors and diversify into two major subtypes, V2a and V2b, that play key roles in locomotor coordination. Dll4-mediated Notch activation in a subset of p2 precursors constitutes the crucial first step towards generating neuronal diversity in this domain. The mechanism behind the asymmetric Notch activation and downstream signaling events are, however, unknown at present. We show here that the Ascl1 and Neurog basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proneural factors are expressed in a mosaic pattern in p2 progenitors and that Foxn4 is required for setting and maintaining this expression mosaic. By binding directly to a conserved Dll4 enhancer, Foxn4 and Ascl1 activate Dll4 expression, whereas Neurog proteins prevent this effect, thereby resulting in asymmetric activation of Dll4 expression in V2 precursors expressing different combinations of proneural and Foxn4 transcription factors. Lineage tracing using the Cre-LoxP system reveals selective expression of Dll4 in V2a precursors, whereas Dll4 expression is initially excluded from V2b precursors. We provide evidence that BMP/TGFβ signaling is activated in V2b precursors and that Dll4-mediated Notch signaling is responsible for this activation. Using a gain-of-function approach and by inhibiting BMP/TGFβ signal transduction with pathway antagonists and RNAi knockdown, we further demonstrate that BMP/TGFβ signaling is both necessary and sufficient for V2b fate specification. Our data together thus suggest that the mosaic expression of Foxn4 and proneural factors may serve as the trigger to initiate asymmetric Dll4-Notch and subsequent BMP/TGFβ signaling events required for neuronal diversity in the V2 domain. PMID:24257627

  9. Lhx2 Is an Essential Factor for Retinal Gliogenesis and Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Jimmy; Zibetti, Cristina; Clark, Brian S; Hwang, Woochang; Miranda-Angulo, Ana L; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth

    2016-02-24

    Müller glia (MG) are the only glial cell type produced by the neuroepithelial progenitor cells that generate the vertebrate retina. MG are required to maintain retinal homeostasis and support the survival of retinal neurons. Furthermore, in certain vertebrate classes, MG function as adult stem cells, mediating retinal regeneration in response to injury. However, the mechanisms that regulate MG development are poorly understood because there is considerable overlap in gene expression between retinal progenitor cells and differentiated MG. We show that the LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lhx2 is required for the development of MG in the mouse retina. Temporally controlled knock-out studies reveal a requirement for Lhx2 during all stages of MG development, ranging from the proliferation of gliocompetent retinal progenitors, activation of Müller-specific gene expression, and terminal differentiation of MG morphological features. We show that Lhx2 regulates gliogenesis in part by regulating directly the expression of Notch pathway genes including Notch1, Dll1, and Dll3 and gliogenic transcription factors such as Hes1, Hes5, Sox8, and Rax. Conditional knock-out of Lhx2 resulted in a rapid downregulation of Notch pathway genes and loss of Notch signaling. We further demonstrate that Müller gliogenesis induced by misexpression of the potently gliogenic Notch pathway transcriptional effector Hes5 requires Lhx2 expression. These results indicate that Lhx2 not only directly regulates expression of Notch signaling pathway components, but also acts together with the gliogenic Notch pathway to drive MG specification and differentiation. PMID:26911688

  10. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation. PMID:27114461

  11. Coordinate Control of Muscle Cell Survival by Distinct Insulin-like Growth Factor Activated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Margaret A.; Rotwein, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Peptide growth factors control diverse cellular functions by regulating distinct signal transduction pathways. In cultured myoblasts, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate differentiation and promote hypertrophy. IGFs also maintain muscle cell viability. We previously described C2 skeletal muscle lines lacking expression of IGF-II. These cells did not differentiate, but underwent progressive apoptotic death when incubated in differentiation medium. Viability could be sustained and differentiation enabled by IGF analogues that activated the IGF-I receptor; survival was dependent on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase). We now find that IGF action promotes myoblast survival through two distinguishable PI3-kinase–regulated pathways that culminate in expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21. Incubation with IGF-I or transfection with active PI3-kinase led to rapid induction of MyoD and p21, and forced expression of either protein maintained viability in the absence of growth factors. Ectopic expression of MyoD induced p21, and inhibition of p21 blocked MyoD-mediated survival, thus defining one PI3-kinase–dependent pathway as leading first to MyoD, and then to p21 and survival. Unexpectedly, loss of MyoD expression did not impede IGF-mediated survival, revealing a second pathway involving activation by PI3-kinase of Akt, and subsequent induction of p21. Since inhibition of p21 caused death even in the presence of IGF-I, these results establish a central role for p21 as a survival factor for muscle cells. Our observations also define a MyoD-independent pathway for regulating p21 in muscle, and demonstrate that distinct mechanisms help ensure appropriate expression of this key protein during differentiation. PMID:11121430

  12. Pioglitazone normalizes insulin signaling in the diabetic rat retina through reduction in tumor necrosis factor α and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Youde; Thakran, Shalini; Bheemreddy, Rajini; Ye, Eun-Ah; He, Hui; Walker, Robert J; Steinle, Jena J

    2014-09-19

    Dysfunctional insulin signaling is a key component of type 2 diabetes. Little is understood of the effects of systemic diabetes on retinal insulin signaling. A number of agents are used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes to normalize glucose levels and improve insulin signaling; however, little has been done to investigate the effects of these agents on retinal insulin signal transduction. We hypothesized that pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, would normalize retinal insulin signal transduction through reduced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) activities in whole retina and retinal endothelial cells (REC) and Müller cells. To test this hypothesis, we used the BBZDR/Wor type 2 diabetic rat model, as well as REC and Müller cells cultured in normoglycemia and hyperglycemic conditions, to investigate the effects of pioglitazone on TNFα, SOCS3, and downstream insulin signal transduction proteins. We also evaluated pioglitazone's effects on retinal function using electroretinogram and markers of apoptosis. Data demonstrate that 2 months of pioglitazone significantly increased electroretinogram amplitudes in type 2 diabetic obese rats, which was associated with improved insulin receptor activation. These changes occurred in both REC and Müller cells treated with pioglitazone, suggesting that these two cell types are key to insulin resistance in the retina. Taken together, these data provide evidence of impaired insulin signaling in type 2 diabetes rats, which was improved by increasing PPARγ activity. Further investigations of PPARγ actions in the retina may provide improved treatment options. PMID:25086044

  13. Transforming Growth FactorSignaling Guides the Differentiation of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Victor S; Cervantes-Barragan, Luisa; Robinette, Michelle L; Bando, Jennifer K; Wang, Yaming; Geiger, Theresa L; Gilfillan, Susan; Fuchs, Anja; Vivier, Eric; Sun, Joe C; Cella, Marina; Colonna, Marco

    2016-05-17

    The signals guiding differentiation of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) within tissues are not well understood. Salivary gland (SG) ILCs as well as liver and intestinal intraepithelial ILC1 have markers that denote tissue residency and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) imprinting. We deleted Tgfbr2 in cells expressing the ILC and NK marker NKp46 and found that SG ILCs were reduced in number. They lost distinct tissue markers, such as CD49a, and the effector molecules TRAIL and CD73. Expression of the transcription factor Eomes, which promotes NK cell differentiation, was elevated. Conversely, Eomes deletion in NKp46(+) cells enhanced TGF-β-imprinting of SG ILCs. Thus, TGF-β induces SG ILC differentiation by suppressing Eomes. TGF-β acted through a JNK-dependent, Smad4-independent pathway. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that SG ILCs had characteristic of both NK cells and ILC1. Finally, TGF-β imprinting of SG ILCs was synchronized with SG development, highlighting the impact of tissue microenvironment on ILC development. PMID:27156386

  14. Modular mechanism of Wnt signaling inhibition by Wnt inhibitory factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Aricescu, A. Radu; Lu, Weixian; Siebold, Christian; Jones, E. Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Wnt morphogens control embryonic development and homeostasis in adult tissues. In vertebrates the N-terminal WIF domain (WIF-1WD) of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1) binds Wnt ligands. Our crystal structure of WIF-1WD reveals a previously unidentified binding site for phospholipid; two acyl chains extend deep into the domain, and the head group is exposed to the surface. Biophysical and cellular assays indicate that there is a WIF-1WD Wnt-binding surface proximal to the lipid head group but also implicate the five epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains (EGFs I–V) in Wnt binding. The six-domain WIF-1 crystal structure shows that EGFs I–V are wrapped back, interfacing with WIF-1WD at EGF III. EGFs II–V contain a heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-binding site, consistent with conserved positively charged residues on EGF IV. This combination of HSPG- and Wnt-binding properties suggests a modular model for the localization of WIF-1 and for signal inhibition within morphogen gradients. PMID:21743455

  15. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  16. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  17. Loss of the proteostasis factor AIRAPL causes myeloid transformation by deregulating IGF-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Fernando G; Soria-Valles, Clara; Santiago-Fernández, Olaya; Bernal, Teresa; Mittelbrunn, María; Colado, Enrique; Rodríguez, Francisco; Bonzon-Kulichenko, Elena; Vázquez, Jesús; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Cerón, Julián; Fueyo, Antonio; Li, Juan; Green, Anthony R; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    AIRAPL (arsenite-inducible RNA-associated protein-like) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of cellular proteostasis linked to longevity in nematodes, but its biological function in mammals is unknown. We show herein that AIRAPL-deficient mice develop a fully-penetrant myeloproliferative neoplastic process. Proteomic analysis of AIRAPL-deficient mice revealed that this protein exerts its antineoplastic function through the regulation of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway. We demonstrate that AIRAPL interacts with newly synthesized insulin-related growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) polypeptides, promoting their ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Accordingly, genetic and pharmacological IGF1R inhibitory strategies prevent the hematological disease found in AIRAPL-deficient mice as well as that in mice carrying the Jak2(V617F) mutation, thereby demonstrating the causal involvement of this pathway in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Consistent with its proposed role as a tumor suppressor of myeloid transformation, AIRAPL expression is widely abrogated in human myeloproliferative disorders. Collectively, these findings support the oncogenic relevance of proteostasis deregulation in hematopoietic cells, and they unveil novel therapeutic targets for these frequent hematological neoplasias. PMID:26692333

  18. Non-canonical signaling mode of the epidermal growth factor receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heng-Huan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its family members are key players in both physiological and pathological settings for which they are well recognized as models for investigating the functions and regulations of other membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and serve as therapeutic targets critical to clinical need and fundamental research. The canonical view of the pivotal functions in the EGFR family has been well documented as being an initiator of signaling amplification cascades from the plasma membrane to different subcellular compartments via receptor endocytic trafficking, intermolecular interaction, and kinase-substrate reaction in a temporalspatial manner. However, several lines of evidence have identified non-canonical roles of the EGFR family, acting as a transcriptional factor and a chromatin regulator in the nucleus to regulate gene expression, DNA replication, and DNA damage repair. Moreover, the EGFR family can even exert its impact outside the host cell through exosomal vesicle secretion. The emerging concept of the non-canonical roles of the EGFR family reveals an astonishing and elaborate scheme on the molecular functions of membrane RTKs, offering new insights into the receptor biology as well as the development of comprehensive therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26693051

  19. Ethylene Response Factor 6 Is a Regulator of Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sewelam, Nasser; Kazan, Kemal; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Kidd, Brendan N.; Manners, John M.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in plant cells in response to diverse biotic and abiotic stresses as well as during normal growth and development. Although a large number of transcription factor (TF) genes are up- or down-regulated by ROS, currently very little is known about the functions of these TFs during oxidative stress. In this work, we examined the role of ERF6 (ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR6), an AP2/ERF domain-containing TF, during oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis. Mutant analyses showed that NADPH oxidase (RbohD) and calcium signaling are required for ROS-responsive expression of ERF6. erf6 insertion mutant plants showed reduced growth and increased H2O2 and anthocyanin levels. Expression analyses of selected ROS-responsive genes during oxidative stress identified several differentially expressed genes in the erf6 mutant. In particular, a number of ROS responsive genes, such as ZAT12, HSFs, WRKYs, MAPKs, RBOHs, DHAR1, APX4, and CAT1 were more strongly induced by H2O2 in erf6 plants than in wild-type. In contrast, MDAR3, CAT3, VTC2 and EX1 showed reduced expression levels in the erf6 mutant. Taken together, our results indicate that ERF6 plays an important role as a positive antioxidant regulator during plant growth and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:23940555

  20. Pharmacological inhibition of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor signaling ameliorates FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Wöhrle, Simon; Henninger, Christine; Bonny, Olivier; Thuery, Anne; Beluch, Noemie; Hynes, Nancy E; Guagnano, Vito; Sellers, William R; Hofmann, Francesco; Kneissel, Michaela; Graus Porta, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating factor secreted by osteocytes that is essential for phosphate homeostasis. In kidney proximal tubular cells FGF23 inhibits phosphate reabsorption and leads to decreased synthesis and enhanced catabolism of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2 D3 ). Excess levels of FGF23 cause renal phosphate wasting and suppression of circulating 1,25(OH)2 D3 levels and are associated with several hereditary hypophosphatemic disorders with skeletal abnormalities, including X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) and autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). Currently, therapeutic approaches to these diseases are limited to treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and phosphate supplementation, often merely resulting in partial correction of the skeletal aberrations. In this study, we evaluate the use of FGFR inhibitors for the treatment of FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemic disorders using NVP-BGJ398, a novel selective, pan-specific FGFR inhibitor currently in Phase I clinical trials for cancer therapy. In two different hypophosphatemic mouse models, Hyp and Dmp1-null mice, resembling the human diseases XLH and ARHR, we find that pharmacological inhibition of FGFRs efficiently abrogates aberrant FGF23 signaling and normalizes the hypophosphatemic and hypocalcemic conditions of these mice. Correspondingly, long-term FGFR inhibition in Hyp mice leads to enhanced bone growth, increased mineralization, and reorganization of the disturbed growth plate structure. We therefore propose NVP-BGJ398 treatment as a novel approach for the therapy of FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemic diseases. PMID:23129509

  1. Identification of approved and investigational drugs that inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Wen; Huang, Ruili; Khuc, Thai; Shou, David; Bullock, Joshua; Grooby, Suzanne; Griffin, Sue; Zou, Chaozhong; Little, Annette; Astley, Holly; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    One of the requirements for tumor development is blood supply, most often driven by hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Hypoxia induces the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), which induces expression of an angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The purpose of this study is to validate a new screening platform combined with orthogonal assays to rapidly identify HIF-1 inhibitors and to evaluate the effectiveness of approved drugs on modulating HIF-1 signaling. We generated an endogenous HIF-1α–NanoLuc luciferase reporter allele in the human HCT116 colon cancer cell line using genome editing and screened a panel of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to 960 druggable targets and approximately 2,500 drugs on a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) platform. Selected compounds were further investigated with secondary assays to confirm their anti-HIF activity and to study their mode of action. The qHTS assay identified over 300 drugs that inhibited HIF-1α-NanoLuc expression. The siRNA screening results supported the effectiveness of several target-specific inhibitors. Moreover, the identified HIF-1 inhibitors, such as mycophenolate mofetil, niclosamide, and trametinib, were able to suppress cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Our study indicates that blocking the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways effectively inhibits hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation and HIF-1α transactivation and that proteasome inhibitors induce accumulation and decrease transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These findings underline the importance of developing a battery of robust assay platforms and confirmation studies that focus on endogenous protein targets so that only relevant and reliable data will be taken into pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:26882567

  2. Identification of approved and investigational drugs that inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Wen; Huang, Ruili; Khuc, Thai; Shou, David; Bullock, Joshua; Grooby, Suzanne; Griffin, Sue; Zou, Chaozhong; Little, Annette; Astley, Holly; Xia, Menghang

    2016-02-16

    One of the requirements for tumor development is blood supply, most often driven by hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Hypoxia induces the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), which induces expression of an angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The purpose of this study is to validate a new screening platform combined with orthogonal assays to rapidly identify HIF-1 inhibitors and to evaluate the effectiveness of approved drugs on modulating HIF-1 signaling. We generated an endogenous HIF-1α-NanoLuc luciferase reporter allele in the human HCT116 colon cancer cell line using genome editing and screened a panel of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to 960 druggable targets and approximately 2,500 drugs on a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) platform. Selected compounds were further investigated with secondary assays to confirm their anti-HIF activity and to study their mode of action. The qHTS assay identified over 300 drugs that inhibited HIF-1α-NanoLuc expression. The siRNA screening results supported the effectiveness of several target-specific inhibitors. Moreover, the identified HIF-1 inhibitors, such as mycophenolate mofetil, niclosamide, and trametinib, were able to suppress cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Our study indicates that blocking the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways effectively inhibits hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation and HIF-1α transactivation and that proteasome inhibitors induce accumulation and decrease transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These findings underline the importance of developing a battery of robust assay platforms and confirmation studies that focus on endogenous protein targets so that only relevant and reliable data will be taken into pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:26882567

  3. Interactions of signaling proteins, growth factors and other proteins with heparan sulfate: mechanisms and mysteries.

    PubMed

    Billings, Paul C; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans (HSPGs) that, collectively, play crucial roles in many physiologic processes including cell differentiation, organ morphogenesis and cancer. A key function of HS is to bind and interact with signaling proteins, growth factors, plasma proteins, immune-modulators and other factors. In doing so, the HS chains and HSPGs are able to regulate protein distribution, bio-availability and action on target cells and can also serve as cell surface co-receptors, facilitating ligand-receptor interactions. These proteins contain an HS/heparin-binding domain (HBD) that mediates their association and contacts with HS. HBDs are highly diverse in sequence and predicted structure, contain clusters of basic amino acids (Lys and Arg) and possess an overall net positive charge, most often within a consensus Cardin-Weintraub (CW) motif. Interestingly, other domains and residues are now known to influence protein-HS interactions, as well as interactions with other glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate. In this review, we provide a description and analysis of HBDs in proteins including amphiregulin, fibroblast growth factor family members, heparanase, sclerostin and hedgehog protein family members. We discuss HBD structural and functional features and important roles carried out by other protein domains, and also provide novel conformational insights into the diversity of CW motifs present in Sonic, Indian and Desert hedgehogs. Finally, we review progress in understanding the pathogenesis of a rare pediatric skeletal disorder, Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME), characterized by HS deficiency and cartilage tumor formation. Advances in understanding protein-HS interactions will have broad implications for basic biology and translational medicine as well as for the development of HS-based therapeutics. PMID:26076122

  4. Intracellular Signaling Molecules Activated by Epstein-Barr Virus for Induction of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luwen; Wu, Lihong; Hong, Ke; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is the principal oncogenic protein in the EBV transformation process. LMP-1 induces the expression of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7) and activates IRF-7 protein by phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. LMP-1 is an integral membrane protein with two regions in its C terminus that initiate signaling processes, the C-terminal activator regions 1 (CTAR-1) and CTAR-2. Here, genetic analysis of LMP-1 has determined that the PXQXT motif that governs the interaction between LMP-1 CTAR-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) is needed to induce the expression of IRF-7. Mutations in the PXQXT motif in CTAR-1 that disrupt the interaction between LMP-1 and TRAFs abolished the induction of IRF-7. Also, dominant-negative mutants of TRAFs inhibited the induction of IRF-7 by CTAR-1. The last three amino acids (YYD) of CTAR-2 are also important for the induction of IRF-7. When both PXQXT and YYD were mutated (LMP-DM), the LMP-1 mutant failed to induce IRF-7. Also, LMP-DM blocked the induction of IRF-7 by wild-type LMP-1. These data strongly suggest that both CTAR-1 and CTAR-2 of LMP-1 independently induce the expression of IRF-7. In addition, NF-κB is involved in the induction of IRF-7. A superrepressor of IκB (sr-IκB) could block the induction of IRF-7 by LMP-1, and overexpression of NF-κB (p65 plus p50) could induce the expression of IRF-7. In addition, we have found that human IRF-7 is a stable protein, and sodium butyrate, a modifier of chromatin structure, induces IRF-7. PMID:11711629

  5. 2-Methoxystypandrone inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB signaling by inhibiting Janus kinase 2 and IκB kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shan; Qi, Chunting; Liu, Jiawei; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Qing; Sima, Zhenhua; Liu, Jingli; Li, Wuguo; Yu, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Constitutive activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) or the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway occurs frequently in cancer cells and contributes to oncogenesis. The activation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and IκB kinase (IKK) are key events in STAT3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively. We have identified 2-methoxystypandrone (2-MS) from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb Polygonum cuspidatum as a novel dual inhibitor of JAK2 and IKK. 2-MS inhibits both interleukin-6-induced and constitutively-activated STAT3, as well as tumor necrosis factor-α-induced NF-κB activation. 2-MS specifically inhibits JAK and IKKβ kinase activities but has little effect on activities of other kinases tested. The inhibitory effects of 2-MS on STAT3 and NF-κB signaling can be eliminated by DTT or glutathione and can last for 4 h after a pulse treatment. Furthermore, 2-MS inhibits growth and induces death of tumor cells, particularly those with constitutively-activated STAT3 or NF-κB signaling. We propose that the natural compound 2-MS, as a potent dual inhibitor of STAT3 and NF-κB pathways, is a promising anticancer drug candidate. PMID:24450414

  6. Interaction between insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and alphaVbeta3 integrin linked signaling pathways: cellular responses to changes in multiple signaling inputs.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, D R; Maile, L A

    2005-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins that mediate cell attachment to extracellular matrix, migration, division, and inhibition of apoptosis. Because growth factors are also important for these processes, there has been interest in cooperative signaling between growth factor receptors and integrins. IGF-I is an important growth factor for vascular cells. One integrin, alphaVbeta3, that is expressed in smooth muscle cells modulates IGF-I actions. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 is required for IGF-I to stimulate cell migration and division. Src homology 2 containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) is a tyrosine phosphatase whose recruitment to signaling molecules is stimulated by growth factors including IGF-I. If alphaVbeta3 ligand occupancy is inhibited, there is no recruitment of SHP-2 to alphaVbeta3 and its transfer to downstream signaling molecules is blocked. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of the beta3-subunit, resulting in recruitment of SHP-2. This transfer is mediated by an insulin receptor substrate-1-related protein termed DOK-1. Subsequently, SHP-2 is transferred to another transmembrane protein, SHPS-1. This transfer requires IGF-I receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of SHPS-1, which contains two YXXL motifs that mediate SHP-2 binding. The transfer of SHP-2 to SHPS-1 is also required for recruitment of Shc to SHPS-1. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 results in sustained Shc phosphorylation and enhanced Shc recruitment. Shc activation results in induction of MAPK. Inhibition of the Shc/SHPS-1 complex formation results in failure to achieve sustained MAPK activation and an attenuated mitogenic response. Thus, within the vessel wall, a mechanism exists whereby ligand occupancy of the alphaVbeta3 integrin is required for assembly of a multicomponent membrane signaling complex that is necessary for cells to respond optimally to IGF-I. PMID:15528274

  7. Piperlongumine inhibits lung tumor growth via inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Son, Dong Ju; Gu, Sun Mi; Woo, Ju Rang; Ham, Young Wan; Lee, Hee Pom; Kim, Wun Jae; Jung, Jae Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Piperlongumine has anti-cancer activity in numerous cancer cell lines via various signaling pathways. But there has been no study regarding the mechanisms of PL on the lung cancer yet. Thus, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects and possible mechanisms of PL on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vivo and in vitro. Our findings showed that PL induced apoptotic cell death and suppressed the DNA binding activity of NF-κB in a concentration dependent manner (0-15 μM) in NSCLC cells. Docking model and pull down assay showed that PL directly binds to the DNA binding site of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p50 subunit, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that PL binds to p50 concentration-dependently. Moreover, co-treatment of PL with NF-κB inhibitor phenylarsine oxide (0.1 μM) or p50 siRNA (100 nM) augmented PL-induced inhibitory effect on cell growth and activation of Fas and DR4. Notably, co-treatment of PL with p50 mutant plasmid (C62S) partially abolished PL-induced cell growth inhibition and decreased the enhanced expression of Fas and DR4. In xenograft mice model, PL (2.5-5 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth of NSCLC dose-dependently. Therefore, these results indicated that PL could inhibit lung cancer cell growth via inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27198178

  8. Piperlongumine inhibits lung tumor growth via inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Son, Dong Ju; Gu, Sun Mi; Woo, Ju Rang; Ham, Young Wan; Lee, Hee Pom; Kim, Wun Jae; Jung, Jae Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Piperlongumine has anti-cancer activity in numerous cancer cell lines via various signaling pathways. But there has been no study regarding the mechanisms of PL on the lung cancer yet. Thus, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects and possible mechanisms of PL on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vivo and in vitro. Our findings showed that PL induced apoptotic cell death and suppressed the DNA binding activity of NF-κB in a concentration dependent manner (0–15 μM) in NSCLC cells. Docking model and pull down assay showed that PL directly binds to the DNA binding site of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p50 subunit, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that PL binds to p50 concentration-dependently. Moreover, co-treatment of PL with NF-κB inhibitor phenylarsine oxide (0.1 μM) or p50 siRNA (100 nM) augmented PL-induced inhibitory effect on cell growth and activation of Fas and DR4. Notably, co-treatment of PL with p50 mutant plasmid (C62S) partially abolished PL-induced cell growth inhibition and decreased the enhanced expression of Fas and DR4. In xenograft mice model, PL (2.5–5 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth of NSCLC dose-dependently. Therefore, these results indicated that PL could inhibit lung cancer cell growth via inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27198178

  9. Corticotropin-releasing factor family peptide signaling in feline bladder urothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T.; Wolf-Johnston, Amanda; Roppolo, James R.; Tony Buffington, C. A.; Birder, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing (CRF) factor plays a central role in the orchestration of behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress. The family of CRF-related peptides (CRF and paralogs: Urocortin (Ucn) -I,-II and -III) and associated receptors (CRF-R1 and CRF-R2) are also expressed in peripheral tissues such as the skin and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Local signaling may exert multiple effects of stress-induced exacerbation of many complex syndromes including psoriasis and visceral hypersensitivity. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS), a chronic visceral pain syndrome characterized by urinary frequency, urgency and pelvic pain, is reported to be exacerbated by stress. Functional changes in the epithelial lining of the bladder, a vital blood-urine barrier called the urothelium, may play a role in IC/PBS. This study investigated the expression and functional activity of CRF-related peptides in the urothelium of normal cats and cats with feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), a chronic idiopathic cystitis exhibiting similarities to humans diagnosed with IC/PBS. Western blots showed urothelial (UT) expression of CRF-R1 and CRF-R2. Enzyme immunoassay revealed release of endogenous ligands (CRF and Ucn) by UT cells in culture. Evidence of functional activation of CRF-R1 and CRF-R2 by receptor selective agonists (CRF and UCN3 respectively) was shown by: (1)-measurement of ATP release using the luciferin-luciferase assay and (2)-the use of membrane impermeant fluorescent dyes (FM dyes) for fluorescence microscopy to assess membrane exocytotic responses in real-time. Our findings show evidence of CRF-related peptide signaling in the urothelium. Differences in functional responses between FIC and normal UT indicate that this system is altered in IC/PBS. PMID:24829219

  10. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  11. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor signaling in the central nervous system: new molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Richard L; Risbrough, Victoria; Brauns, Olaf; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2006-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related urocortin peptides mediate behavioral, cognitive, autonomic, neuroendocrine and immunologic responses to aversive stimuli by activating CRF(1) or CRF(2) receptors in the central nervous system and anterior pituitary. Markers of hyperactive central CRF systems, including CRF hypersecretion and abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, have been identified in subpopulations of patients with anxiety, stress and depressive disorders. Because CRF receptors are rapidly desensitized in the presence of high agonist concentrations, CRF hypersecretion alone may be insufficient to account for the enhanced CRF neurotransmission observed in these patients. Concomitant dysregulation of mechanisms stringently controlling magnitude and duration of CRF receptor signaling also may contribute to this phenomenon. While it is well established that the CRF(1) receptor mediates many anxiety- and depression-like behaviors as well as HPA axis stress responses, CRF(2) receptor functions are not well understood at present. One hypothesis holds that CRF(1) receptor activation initiates fear and anxiety-like responses, while CRF(2) receptor activation re-establishes homeostasis by counteracting the aversive effects of CRF(1) receptor signaling. An alternative hypothesis posits that CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors contribute to opposite defensive modes, with CRF(1) receptors mediating active defensive responses triggered by escapable stressors, and CRF(2) receptors mediating anxiety- and depression-like responses induced by inescapable, uncontrollable stressors. CRF(1) receptor antagonists are being developed as novel treatments for affective and stress disorders. If it is confirmed that the CRF(2) receptor contributes importantly to anxiety and depression, the development of small molecule CRF(2) receptor antagonists would be therapeutically useful. PMID:16918397

  12. Crosstalk between Src and major vault protein in epidermal growth factor-dependent cell signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euikyung; Lee, Seunghwan; Mian, Md Firoz; Yun, Sang Uk; Song, Minseok; Yi, Kye-Sook; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2006-02-01

    Vaults are highly conserved, ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles with an unidentified function. For the three protein species (TEP1, VPARP, and MVP) and a small RNA that comprises vault, expression of the unique 100-kDa major vault protein (MVP) is sufficient to form the basic vault structure. To identify and characterize proteins that interact with the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Src and potentially regulate Src activity, we used a pull-down assay using GST-Src-SH2 fusion proteins. We found MVP as a Src-SH2 binding protein in human stomach tissue. Interaction of Src and MVP was also observed in 253J stomach cancer cells. A subcellular localization study using immunofluorescence microscopy shows that epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation triggers MVP translocation from the nucleus to the cytosol and perinuclear region where it colocalizes with Src. We found that the interaction between Src and MVP is critically dependent on Src activity and protein (MVP) tyrosyl phosphorylation, which are induced by EGF stimulation. Our results also indicate MVP to be a novel substrate of Src and phosphorylated in an EGF-dependent manner. Interestingly, purified MVP inhibited the in vitro tyrosine kinase activity of Src in a concentration-dependent manner. MVP overexpression downregulates EGF-dependent ERK activation in Src overexpressing cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of MVP interacting with a protein tyrosine kinase involved in a distinct cell signalling pathway. It appears that MVP is a novel regulator of Src-mediated signalling cascades. PMID:16441665

  13. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in myofibroblasts differs from lipofibroblasts during alveolar septation in mice.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Stephen E; McCoy, Diann M

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary alveolar fibroblasts produce extracellular matrix in a temporally and spatially regulated pattern to yield a durable yet pliable gas-exchange surface. Proliferation ensures a sufficient complement of cells, but they must differentiate into functionally distinct subtypes: contractile myofibroblasts (MF), which generate elastin and regulate air-flow at the alveolar ducts, and, in mice and rats, lipofibroblasts (LF), which store neutral lipids. PDGF-A is required but acts in conjunction with other differentiation factors arising from adjacent epithelia or within fibroblasts. We hypothesized that FGF receptor (FGFR) expression and function vary for MF and LF and contributes to their divergent differentiation. Whereas approximately half of the FGFR3 was extracellular in MF, FGFR2 and FGFR4 were primarily intracellular. Intracellular FGFR3 localized to the multivesicular body, and its abundance may be modified by Sprouty and interaction with heat shock protein-90. FGF18 mRNA is more abundant in MF, whereas FGF10 mRNA predominated in LF, which also express FGFR1 IIIb, a receptor for FGF10. FGF18 diminished fibroblast proliferation and was chemotactic for cultured fibroblasts. Although PDGF receptor-α (PDGFR-α) primarily signals through phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt, p42/p44 MAP kinase (Erk1/2), a major signaling pathway for FGFRs, influenced the abundance of cell-surface PDGFR-α. Observing different FGFR and ligand profiles in MF and LF is consistent with their divergent differentiation although both subpopulations express PDGFR-α. These studies also emphasize the importance of particular cellular locations of FGFR3 and PDGFR-α, which may modify their effects during alveolar development or repair. PMID:26138642

  14. Disruption of transforming growth factor beta signaling by a novel ligand-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Tania; Amoroso, Stephanie; Sharpe, Shellyann; Jones, Gary M; Bliskovski, Valery; Kovalchuk, Alexander; Wakefield, Lalage M; Kim, Seong-Jin; Potter, Michael; Letterio, John J

    2002-05-20

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta is the prototype in a family of secreted proteins that act in autocrine and paracrine pathways to regulate cell development and function. Normal cells typically coexpress TGF-beta receptors and one or more isoforms of TGF-beta, thus the synthesis and secretion of TGF-beta as an inactive latent complex is considered an essential step in regula-ting the activity of this pathway. To determine whether intracellular activation of TGF-beta results in TGF-beta ligand-receptor interactions within the cell, we studied pristane-induced plasma cell tumors (PCTs). We now demonstrate that active TGF-beta1 in the PCT binds to intracellular TGF-beta type II receptor (TbetaRII). Disruption of the expression of TGF-beta1 by antisense TGF-beta1 mRNA restores localization of TbetaRII at the PCT cell surface, indicating a ligand-induced impediment in receptor trafficking. We also show that retroviral expression of a truncated, dominant-negative TbetaRII (dnTbetaRII) effectively competes for intracellular binding of active ligand in the PCT and restores cell surface expression of the endogenous TbetaRII. Analysis of TGF-beta receptor-activated Smad2 suggests the intracellular ligand-receptor complex is not capable of signaling. These data are the first to demonstrate the formation of an intracellular TGF-beta-receptor complex, and define a novel mechanism for modulating the TGF-beta signaling pathway. PMID:12021305

  15. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s−1, respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Johnson, William M.; Pilat, Jennifer M.; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca2+-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca2+-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. PMID:26416880

  17. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Matthew R; Johnson, William M; Pilat, Jennifer M; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y

    2015-12-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca(2+)-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. PMID:26416880

  18. Fibroblast growth factor 23 signaling in hippocampal cells: impact on neuronal morphology and synaptic density.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Niko; Schön, Anne; Konen, Timo; Lübben, Verena; Förthmann, Benjamin; Baron, Olga; Grothe, Claudia; Leifheit-Nestler, Maren; Claus, Peter; Haffner, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Endocrine fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is predominantly secreted by osteocytes and facilitates renal phosphate excretion. However, FGF23 is also present in cerebrospinal fluid. In chronic kidney disease, FGF23 serum levels are excessively elevated and associated with learning and memory deficits. Structural plasticity of the hippocampus such as formation of new synapses or an altered dendritic arborization comprises a cellular and morphological correlate of memory formation. Therefore, we hypothesize that FGF23 alters hippocampal neuron morphology and synapses. To address this, we prepared primary murine hippocampal cultures and incubated them with recombinant FGF23 alone or together with a soluble isoform of its co-receptor α-Klotho. Neuronal expression of a fluorescent reporter allowed for a detailed evaluation of the neuronal morphology by Sholl analysis. Additionally, we evaluated synaptic density, identified by stainings, for synaptic markers. We show an enhanced number of primary neurites combined with a reduced arborization, resulting in a less complex morphology of neurons treated with FGF23. Moreover, FGF23 enhances the synaptic density in a FGF-receptor (FGF-R) dependent manner. Finally, we addressed the corresponding signaling events downstream of FGF-R employing a combination of western blots and quantitative immunofluorescence. Interestingly, FGF23 induces phospholipase Cγ activity in primary hippocampal neurons. Co-application of soluble α-Klotho leads to activation of the Akt-pathway and modifies FGF23-impact on neuronal morphology and synaptic density. Compared with other FGFs, this alternative signaling pattern is a possible reason for differential effects of FGF23 on hippocampal neurons and may thereby contribute to learning and memory deficits in chronic kidney disease patients. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor 23 inhibits neuronal ramification and enhances the synaptic density in primary hippocampal cultures

  19. The Effect of α-Mating Factor Secretion Signal Mutations on Recombinant Protein Expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P.; Stark, Carolyn M.; Kim, Daniel; Chang, Jennifer; Shaheen, Nadia; Poerwanto, Hansel; Agari, Kimiko; Moua, Pachai; Low, Lauren K.; Tran, Namphuong; Huang, Amy D.; Nattestad, Maria; Oshiro, Kristin T.; Chang, John William; Chavan, Archana; Tsai, Jerry W.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan

    2013-01-01

    The methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, has been genetically engineered to produce many heterologous proteins for industrial and research purposes. In order to secrete proteins for easier purification from the extracellular medium, the coding sequence of recombinant proteins are initially fused to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-mating factor secretion signal leader. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis of the prepro region of the α-mating factor secretion signal sequence was performed in order to determine the effects of various deletions and substitutions on expression. Though some mutations clearly dampened protein expression, deletion of amino acids 57-70, corresponding to the predicted 3rd alpha helix of α-mating factor secretion signal, increased secretion of reporter proteins horseradish peroxidase and lipase at least 50% in small-scale cultures. These findings raise the possibility that the secretory efficiency of the leader can be further enhanced in the future. PMID:23454485

  20. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-MET receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway: Diverse roles in modulating immune cell functions.

    PubMed

    Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Villalobos-Hernandez, Alberto; Bobbala, Diwakar; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling via the MET receptor is essential for embryonic development and tissue repair. On the other hand, deregulated MET signaling promotes tumor progression in diverse types of cancers. Even though oncogenic MET signaling remains the major research focus, the HGF-MET axis has also been implicated in diverse aspects of immune cell development and functions. In the presence of other hematopoietic growth factors, HGF promotes the development of erythroid, myeloid and lymphoid lineage cells and thrombocytes. In monocytes and macrophages responding to inflammatory stimuli, induction of autocrine HGF-MET signaling can contribute to tissue repair via stimulating anti-inflammatory cytokine production. HGF-MET signaling can also modulate adaptive immune response by facilitating the migration of Langerhans cells and dendritic cells to draining lymph nodes. However, MET signaling has also been shown to induce tolerogenic dendritic cells in mouse models of graft-versus-host disease and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. HGF-MET axis is also implicated in promoting thymopoiesis and the survival and migration of B lymphocytes. Recent studies have shown that MET signaling induces cardiotropism in activated T lymphocytes. Further understanding of the HGF-MET axis in the immune system would allow its therapeutic manipulation to improve immune cell reconstitution, restore immune homeostasis and to treat immuno-inflammatory diseases. PMID:26822708

  1. Transforming growth factor β recruits persistent MAPK signaling to regulate long-term memory consolidation in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Shobe, Justin; Philips, Gary T; Carew, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we explore the mechanistic relationship between growth factor signaling and kinase activity that supports the protein synthesis-dependent phase of long-term memory (LTM) consolidation for sensitization ofAplysia Specifically, we examine LTM for tail shock-induced sensitization of the tail-elicited siphon withdrawal (T-SW) reflex, a form of memory that requires both (i) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2; MAPK) activity within identified sensory neurons (SNs) that mediate the T-SW and (ii) the activation of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling. We now report that repeated tail shocks that induce intermediate-term (ITM) and LTM for sensitization, also induce a sustained post-training phase of MAPK activity in SNs (lasting at least 1 h). We identified two mechanistically distinct phases of post-training MAPK: (i) an immediate phase that does not require ongoing protein synthesis or TGFβ signaling, and (ii) a sustained phase that requires both protein synthesis and extracellular TGFβ signaling. We find that LTM consolidation requires sustained MAPK, and is disrupted by inhibitors of protein synthesis and TGFβ signaling during the consolidation window. These results provide strong evidence that TGFβ signaling sustains MAPK activity as an essential mechanistic step for LTM consolidation. PMID:27084925

  2. Interferon-Regulatory Factor 5-Dependent Signaling Restricts Orthobunyavirus Dissemination to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Proenca-Modena, Jose Luiz; Hyde, Jennifer L.; Sesti-Costa, Renata; Lucas, Tiffany; Pinto, Amelia K.; Richner, Justin M.; Gorman, Matthew J.; Lazear, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon (IFN)-regulatory factor 5 (IRF-5) is a transcription factor that induces inflammatory responses after engagement and signaling by pattern recognition receptors. To define the role of IRF-5 during bunyavirus infection, we evaluated Oropouche virus (OROV) and La Crosse virus (LACV) pathogenesis and immune responses in primary cells and in mice with gene deletions in Irf3, Irf5, and Irf7 or in Irf5 alone. Deletion of Irf3, Irf5, and Irf7 together resulted in uncontrolled viral replication in the liver and spleen, hypercytokinemia, extensive liver injury, and an early-death phenotype. Remarkably, deletion of Irf5 alone resulted in meningoencephalitis and death on a more protracted timeline, 1 to 2 weeks after initial OROV or LACV infection. The clinical signs in OROV-infected Irf5−/− mice were associated with abundant viral antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in several regions of the brain. Circulating dendritic cell (DC) subsets in Irf5−/− mice had higher levels of OROV RNA in vivo yet produced lower levels of type I IFN than wild-type (WT) cells. This result was supported by data obtained in vitro, since a deficiency of IRF-5 resulted in enhanced OROV infection and diminished type I IFN production in bone marrow-derived DCs. Collectively, these results indicate a key role for IRF-5 in modulating the host antiviral response in peripheral organs that controls bunyavirus neuroinvasion in mice. IMPORTANCE Oropouche virus (OROV) and La Crosse virus (LACV) are orthobunyaviruses that are transmitted by insects and cause meningitis and encephalitis in subsets of individuals in the Americas. Recently, we demonstrated that components of the type I interferon (IFN) induction pathway, particularly the regulatory transcription factors IRF-3 and IRF-7, have key protective roles during OROV infection. However, the lethality in Irf3−/− Irf7−/− (DKO) mice infected with OROV

  3. Paracrine regulation of growth factor signaling by shed leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Wei; Holmlund, Camilla; Nilsson, Jonas; Inui, Shigeki; Lei, Ting; Itami, Satoshi; Henriksson, Roger; Hedman, Hakan

    2011-02-15

    Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is a recently discovered negative regulator of growth factor signaling. The LRIG1 integral membrane protein has been demonstrated to regulate various oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, including epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR), by cell-autonomous mechanisms. Here, we investigated whether LRIG1 ectodomains were shed, and if LRIG1 could regulate cell proliferation and EGF signaling in a paracrine manner. Cells constitutively shed LRIG1 ectodomains in vitro, and shedding was modulated by known regulators of metalloproteases, including the ADAM17 specific inhibitor TAPI-2. Furthermore, shedding was enhanced by ectopic expression of Adam17. LRIG1 ectodomains appeared to be shed in vivo, as well, as demonstrated by immunoblotting of mouse and human tissue lysates. Ectopic expression of LRIG1 in lymphocytes suppressed EGF signaling in co-cultured fibroblastoid cells, demonstrating that shed LRIG1 ectodomains can function in a paracrine fashion. Purified LRIG1 ectodomains suppressed EGF signaling without any apparent downregulation of EGFR levels. Taken together, the results show that the LRIG1 ectodomain can be proteolytically shed and can function as a non-cell-autonomous regulator of growth factor signaling. Thus, LRIG1 or its ectodomain could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of growth factor receptor-dependent cancers.

  4. A Novel Transcriptional Factor Nkapl Is a Germ Cell-Specific Suppressor of Notch Signaling and Is Indispensable for Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Hidenobu; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Takao, Tetsuya; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio; Miyata, Haruhiko; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Naoki; Wada, Morimasa; Tanaka, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an elaborately regulated system dedicated to the continuous production of spermatozoa via the genesis of spermatogonia. In this process, a variety of genes are expressed that are relevant to the differentiation of germ cells at each stage. Although Notch signaling plays a critical role in germ cell development in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans, its function and importance for spermatogenesis in mammals is controversial. We report that Nkapl is a novel germ cell-specific transcriptional suppressor in Notch signaling. It is also associated with several molecules of the Notch corepressor complex such as CIR, HDAC3, and CSL. It was expressed robustly in spermatogonia and early spermatocytes after the age of 3 weeks. Nkapl-deleted mice showed complete arrest at the level of pachytene spermatocytes. In addition, apoptosis was observed in this cell type. Overexpression of NKAPL in germline stem cells demonstrated that Nkapl induced changes in spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) markers and the reduction of differentiation factors through the Notch signaling pathway, whereas testes with Nkapl deleted showed inverse changes in those markers and factors. Therefore, Nkapl is indispensable because aberrantly elevated Notch signaling has negative effects on spermatogenesis, affecting SSC maintenance and differentiation factors. Notch signaling should be properly regulated through the transcriptional factor Nkapl. PMID:25875095

  5. Activation of the glutaredoxin-1 gene by Nuclear Factor kappa B enhances signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aesif, Scott W.; Kuipers, Ine; van der Velden, Jos; Tully, Jane E.; Guala, Amy S.; Anathy, Vikas; Sheely, Juliana I.; Reynaert, Niki L.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; van der Vliet, Albert; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M. W.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor, Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical regulator of inflammation and immunity, and is negatively regulated via S-glutathionylation. The inhibitory effect of S-glutathionylation is overcome by glutaredoxin-1 (Grx1), which under physiological conditions catalyses deglutathionylation and enhances NF-κB activation. The mechanisms whereby expression of the Glrx1 gene is regulated remain unknown. Here we examined the role of NF-κB in regulating activation of Glrx1. Transgenic mice which express a doxycyclin-inducible constitutively active version of inhibitory kappa B kinase-beta (CA-IKKβ) demonstrate elevated expression of Grx1. Transient transfection of CA-IKKβ also resulted in significant induction of Grx1. A 2kb region Glrx1 promoter that contains two putative NF-κB binding sites was activated by CA-IKKβ, RelA/p50, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed binding of RelA to the promoter of Glrx1 in response to LPS. Stimulation of C10 lung epithelial cells with LPS caused transient increases in Grx1 mRNA expression, and time-dependent increases in S-glutathionylation of IKKβ. Overexpression of Grx1 decreased S-glutathionylation of IKKβ, prolonged NF-κB activation, and increased levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Collectively, this study demonstrates that the Glrx1 gene is positively regulated by NF-κB, and suggests a feed forward mechanism to promote NF-κB signaling by decreasing S-glutathionylation. PMID:21762778

  6. Decorin interferes with platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling in experimental hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Baghy, Kornélia; Horváth, Zsolt; Regös, Eszter; Kiss, Katalin; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Iozzo, Renato V.; Kovalszky, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    Decorin, a secreted small leucine-rich proteoglycan, acts as a tumor repressor in a variety of cancers, mainly by blocking the action of several receptor tyrosine kinases such the receptors for hepatocyte, epidermal and insulin-like growth factors. In the present study we investigated the effects of decorin in an experimental model of thioacetamide-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, and its potential role in modulating the signaling of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα). Genetic ablation of decorin led to enhanced tumor prevalence and higher tumor count as compared to wild-type animals. These findings correlated with decreased levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and concurrent activation (phosphorylation) of PDGFRα in the hepatocellular carcinomas generated in the decorin-null vis-à-vis wild-type mice. Notably, in normal liver PDGFRα localized primarily to the membrane of non-parenchymal cells, whereas in the malignant counterpart PDGFRα was expressed by the malignant cells at their cell surfaces. This process was facilitated by a genetic background lacking endogenous decorin. Double immunostaining of the proteoglycan and the receptor revealed only minor colocalization leading to the hypothesis that decorin would bind to the natural ligand PDGF rather than the receptor itself. Indeed, we found that decorin binds to PDGF using purified proteins and immune blot assays. Collectively, our findings support the idea that decorin acts as a secreted tumor repressor during hepatocarcinogenesis by hindering the action of another receptor tyrosine kinase such as the PDGFRα, and could be a novel therapeutic agent in the battle against liver cancer. PMID:23448253

  7. Disturbance of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Mediated Beta Interferon Signaling in Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Hanke, Brigitte; Zawatzky, Rainer; Soto, Ubaldo; van Riggelen, Jan; zur Hausen, Harald; Rösl, Frank

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we show that malignant human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cells lost their ability to synthesize endogenous beta interferon (IFN-β) upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) treatment. IFN-β transcription, however, was reinducible in nonmalignant HPV-positive cells, which was confirmed in functional protection assays against encephalomyocarditis virus or vesicular stomatitis virus infections. Addition of neutralizing antibodies against IFN-β blocked the antiviral effect, excluding the possibility that other IFN types were involved. Conversely, both malignant and immortalized cells could be protected against viral cytolysis when either IFN-β, IFN-α, or IFN-γ was added exogenously. This indicates that only the cross talk between TNF-α and the IFN-β pathways, and not IFN-α/β and IFN-γ signaling in general, is perturbed in cervical carcinoma cells. Notably, full virus protection was restricted exclusively to nonmalignant cells, indicating that the antiviral effect correlates with the growth-inhibitory and virus-suppressive properties of TNF-α. The IFN-regulatory factors IRF-1 and p48 (ISGF3γ) emerged as key regulatory molecules in the differential IFN-β response, since their transcription was either absent or only inefficiently enhanced in tumorigenic cells upon treatment with TNF-α. Inducibility of both genes, however, became reestablished in cervical carcinoma cells, which were complemented to nontumorigenicity after somatic cell hybridization. Complementation was paralleled by the entire reconstitution of cytokine-mediated IFN-β expression and the ability of TNF-α to exert an antiviral state. In contrast, under conditions where tumor suppression was not accomplished upon somatic cell hybridization, neither expression of IRF-1, p48, and IFN-β nor antiviral activity could be restored. PMID:11739693

  8. Multiple Nuclear Localization Signals Mediate Nuclear Localization of the GATA Transcription Factor AreA

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Cameron C.; Siebert, Kendra S.; Downes, Damien J.; Wong, Koon Ho; Kreutzberger, Sara D.; Fraser, James A.; Clarke, David F.; Hynes, Michael J.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans GATA transcription factor AreA activates transcription of nitrogen metabolic genes in response to nitrogen limitation and is known to accumulate in the nucleus during nitrogen starvation. Sequence analysis of AreA revealed multiple nuclear localization signals (NLSs), five putative classical NLSs conserved in fungal AreA orthologs but not in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae functional orthologs Gln3p and Gat1p, and one putative noncanonical RRX33RXR bipartite NLS within the DNA-binding domain. In order to identify the functional NLSs in AreA, we constructed areA mutants with mutations in individual putative NLSs or combinations of putative NLSs and strains expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-AreA NLS fusion genes. Deletion of all five classical NLSs individually or collectively did not affect utilization of nitrogen sources or AreA-dependent gene expression and did not prevent AreA nuclear localization. Mutation of the bipartite NLS conferred the inability to utilize alternative nitrogen sources and abolished AreA-dependent gene expression likely due to effects on DNA binding but did not prevent AreA nuclear localization. Mutation of all six NLSs simultaneously prevented AreA nuclear accumulation. The bipartite NLS alone strongly directed GFP to the nucleus, whereas the classical NLSs collaborated to direct GFP to the nucleus. Therefore, AreA contains multiple conserved NLSs, which show redundancy and together function to mediate nuclear import. The noncanonical bipartite NLS is conserved in GATA factors from Aspergillus, yeast, and mammals, indicating an ancient origin. PMID:24562911

  9. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-κB. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks. PMID:26573836

  10. Stage-Specific Profiling of Transforming Growth Factor-β, Fibroblast Growth Factor and Wingless-int Signaling Pathways during Early Embryo Development in The Goat

    PubMed Central

    HosseinNia, Pouria; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Hajian, Mehdi; Ostadhosseini, Somayeh; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective This research intends to unravel the temporal expression profiles of genes in- volved in three developmentally important signaling pathways [transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and wingless/int (WNT)] during preand peri-implan- tation goat embryo development. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we examined the transcripts that encoded the ligand, receptor, intracellular signal transducer and modifier, and the down- stream effector, for each signaling pathway. In vitro mature MII oocytes and embryos at three distinctive stages [8-16 cell stage, day-7 (D7) blastocysts and day-14 (D14) blas- tocysts] were separately prepared in triplicate for comparative real-time reverse tran- scriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using the selected gene sets. Results Most components of the three signaling pathways were present at more or less stable levels throughout the assessed oocyte and embryo developmental stages. The transcripts for TGF-β, FGF and WNT signaling pathways were all induced in unfertilized MII-oocytes. However, developing embryos showed gradual patterns of decrease in the activities of TGF-β, FGF and WNT components with renewal thereafter. Conclusion The results suggested that TGF-β, FGF and WNT are maternally active signaling pathways required during earlier, rather than later, stages of preand peri- implantation goat embryo development. PMID:26862524

  11. Bid Promotes K63-Linked Polyubiquitination of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 6 (TRAF6) and Sensitizes to Mutant SOD1-Induced Proinflammatory Signaling in Microglia123

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Sinéad

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene contribute to motoneuron degeneration and are evident in 20% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases. Mutant SOD1 induces microglial activation through a stimulation of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4). In the present study, we identified the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bid as a positive regulator of mutant SOD1-induced TLR-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in microglia. bid-deficient primary mouse microglia showed reduced NF-κB signaling in response to TLR4 activation or exposure to conditioned medium derived from SOD1 G93A expressing NSC-34 cells. Attenuation of NF-κB signaling in bid-deficient microglia was associated with lower levels of phosphorylated IKKα/β and p65, with a delayed degradation of IκBα and enhanced degradation of Peli1. Upstream of IKK, we found that Bid interacted with, and promoted, the K63-linked polyubiquitination of the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in microglia. Our study suggests a key role for Bid in the regulation of TLR4-NF-κB proinflammatory signaling during mutant SOD1-induced disease pathology. Bid promotes TLR4-NF-κB signaling by interacting with TRAF6 and promoting TRAF6 K63-linked polyubiquitination in microglia. PMID:27257617

  12. Multiple Signaling Pathways of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor in Protection from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzi, Francesca; Prisco, Marco; Dews, Michael; Salomoni, Paolo; Grassilli, Emanuela; Romano, Gaetano; Calabretta, Bruno; Baserga, Renato

    1999-01-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), activated by its ligands, protects several cell types from a variety of apoptotic injuries. The main signaling pathway for IGF-1R-mediated protection from apoptosis has been previously elucidated and rests on the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/protein kinase B, and the phosphorylation and inactivation of BAD, a member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins. In 32D cells (a murine hemopoietic cell line devoid of insulin receptor substrate 1 [IRS-1]), the IGF-1R activates alternative pathways for protection from apoptosis induced by withdrawal of interleukin-3. One of these pathways leads to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, while a third pathway results in the mitochondrial translocation of Raf and depends on the integrity of a group of serines in the C terminus of the receptor that are known to interact with 14.3.3 proteins. All three pathways, however, result in BAD phosphorylation. The presence of multiple antiapoptotic pathways may explain the remarkable efficacy of the IGF-1R in protecting cells from apoptosis. PMID:10490655

  13. Matricellular Protein Periostin Mediates Intestinal Inflammation through the Activation of Nuclear Factor κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Seong-Joon; Choi, Younjeong; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Dae Woo; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is a matricellular protein that interacts with various integrin molecules on the cell surface. Although periostin is expressed in inflamed colonic mucosa, its role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation remains unclear. We investigated the role of periostin in intestinal inflammation using Postn-deficient (Postn-/-) mice. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were transfected by Postn small interfering RNAs. Periostin expression was determined in colon tissue samples from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. Oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or rectal administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, induced severe colitis in wild-type mice, but not in Postn-/- mice. Administration of recombinant periostin induced colitis in Postn-/- mice. The periostin neutralizing-antibody ameliorated the severity of colitis in DSS-treated wild-type mice. Silencing of Postn inhibited inteleukin (IL)-8 mRNA expression and NF-κB DNA-binding activity in IECs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α upregulated mRNA expression of Postn in IECs, and recombinant periostin strongly enhanced IL-8 expression in combination with TNF-α, which was suppressed by an antibody against integrin αv (CD51). Periostin and CD51 were expressed at significantly higher levels in UC patients than in controls. Periostin mediates intestinal inflammation through the activation of NF-κB signaling, which suggests that periostin is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26890265

  14. Discovery of an ergosterol-signaling factor that regulates Trypanosoma brucei growth[S

    PubMed Central

    Haubrich, Brad A.; Singha, Ujjal K.; Miller, Matthew B.; Nes, Craigen R.; Anyatonwu, Hosanna; Lecordier, Laurence; Patkar, Presheet; Leaver, David J.; Villalta, Fernando; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Chaudhuri, Minu; Nes, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Ergosterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei was analyzed by RNAi silencing and inhibition of sterol C24β-methyltransferase (TbSMT) and sterol 14α-demethylase [TbSDM (TbCYP51)] to explore the functions of sterols in T. brucei growth. Inhibition of the amount or activity of these enzymes depletes ergosterol from cells at <6 fg/cell for procyclic form (PCF) cells or <0.01 fg/cell for bloodstream form (BSF) cells and reduces infectivity in a mouse model of infection. Silencing of TbSMT expression by RNAi in PCF or BSF in combination with 25-azalanosterol (AZA) inhibited parasite growth and this inhibition was restored completely by adding synergistic cholesterol (7.8 μM from lipid-depleted media) with small amounts of ergosterol (1.2 μM) to the medium. These observations are consistent with the proposed requirement for ergosterol as a signaling factor to spark cell proliferation while imported cholesterol or the endogenously formed cholesta-5,7,24-trienol act as bulk membrane components. To test the potential chemotherapeutic importance of disrupting ergosterol biosynthesis using pairs of mechanism-based inhibitors that block two enzymes in the post-squalene segment, parasites were treated with AZA and itraconazole at 1 μM each (ED50 values) resulting in parasite death. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the ergosterol pathway is a prime drug target for intervention in T. brucei infection. PMID:25424002

  15. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haotian; Yang, Tianyu; Madakashira, Bhavani P.; Thiels, Cornelius A.; Bechtle, Chad A.; Garcia, Claudia M.; Zhang, Huiming; Yu, Kai; Ornitz, David M.; Beebe, David C.; Robinson, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    The vertebrate lens provides an excellent model to study the mechanisms that regulate terminal differentiation. Although fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are thought to be important for lens cell differentiation, it is unclear which FGF receptors mediate these processes during different stages of lens development. Deletion of three FGF receptors (Fgfr1-3) early in lens development demonstrated that expression of only a single allele of Fgfr2 or Fgfr3 was sufficient for grossly normal lens development, while mice possessing only a single Fgfr1 allele developed cataracts and microphthalmia. Profound defects were observed in lenses lacking all three Fgfrs. These included lack of fiber cell elongation, abnormal proliferation in prospective lens fiber cells, reduced expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p27kip1 and p57kip2, increased apoptosis and aberrant or reduced expression of Prox1, Pax6, c-Maf, E-cadherin and α-, β- and γ-crystallins. Therefore, while signaling by FGF receptors is essential for lens fiber differentiation, different FGF receptors function redundantly. PMID:18455718

  16. Transcription factor KLF11 integrates progesterone receptor signaling and proliferation in uterine leiomyoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Lin, Zhihong; Reierstad, Scott; Wu, Ju; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Marsh, Erica E; Innes, Joy; Cheng, Youhong; Pearson, Kerry; Coon, John Sayler; Kim, J Julie; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Bulun, Serdar E

    2010-02-15

    Uterine leiomyoma is the most common tumor of the female genital tract and the leading cause of hysterectomy. Although progesterone stimulates the proliferation of uterine leiomyoma cells, the mechanism of progesterone action is not well understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-cloning approach to identify progesterone receptor (PR) target genes in primary uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle cells. We identified 18 novel PR-binding sites, one of which was located 20.5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site of the Krüppel-like transcription factor 11 (KLF11) gene. KLF11 mRNA levels were minimally downregulated by progesterone but robustly upregulated by the progesterone antagonist RU486. Luciferase reporter assays showed significant baseline and RU486-inducible promoter activity in the KLF11 basal promoter or distal PR-binding region, both of which contained multiple Sp1-binding sequences but lacked classic progesterone response elements. RU486 stimulated recruitment of Sp1, RNA polymerase II, PR, and the coactivators SRC-1 and SRC-2 to the distal region and basal promoter. siRNA knockdown of PR increased KLF11 expression, whereas knockdown of KLF11 increased leiomyoma cell proliferation and abolished the antiproliferative effect of RU486. In vivo, KLF11 expression was significantly lower in leiomyoma tissues compared with adjacent myometrial tissues. Taken together, using a ChIP-cloning approach, we uncovered KLF11 as an integrator of PR signaling and proliferation in uterine leiomyoma cells. PMID:20124487

  17. Copper-induced modifications in early symbiotic signaling factors of Ensifer (Sinorhizobium)-Medicago interactions.

    PubMed

    Sharaff, Murali; Archana, G

    2016-09-01

    Cu is an essential micronutrient required during nitrogen fixation, but above threshold concentrations it becomes toxic. The present study was aimed at studying the effect of high Cu concentrations on the early plant-microbe interactions between Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) meliloti 1021, a symbiotic diazotrophic bacterium belonging to α-Proteobacteria, and its plant host Medicago truncatula. E. meliloti exhibited pleomorphism with elongated and branched growth at 100 µM Cu which brought about 50 % reduction in growth. Early symbiotic signaling factors like exopolysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides levels and biofilm formation were adversely affected at sublethal levels of Cu. Cu stress resulted in over-expression of proteins such as GroEL (60 kDa chaperonin) and WrbA (NAD(P)H dehydrogenase). E. meliloti was unable to show efficient attachment on the roots of M. truncatula at 3 µM Cu, which corresponds to 50 % growth inhibitory levels for the plant, indicating that plant root surface modifications may also contribute to adverse effect of Cu on early plant-microbe interactions during nodulation. PMID:27207673

  18. Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling decreases translation in Drosophila and mice

    PubMed Central

    Essers, Paul; Tain, Luke S.; Nespital, Tobias; Goncalves, Joana; Froehlich, Jenny; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can increase lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. In C. elegans, reduced IIS results in down-regulation of translation, which itself can extend lifespan. However, the effect of reduced IIS on translation has yet to be determined in other multicellular organisms. Using two long-lived IIS models, namely Drosophila lacking three insulin-like peptides (dilp2-3,5−/−) and mice lacking insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1−/−), and two independent translation assays, polysome profiling and radiolabeled amino acid incorporation, we show that reduced IIS lowers translation in these organisms. In Drosophila, reduced IIS decreased polysome levels in fat body and gut, but reduced the rate of protein synthesis only in the fat body. Reduced IIS in mice decreased protein synthesis rate only in skeletal muscle, without reducing polysomes in any tissue. This lowered translation in muscle was independent of Irs1 loss in the muscle itself, but a secondary effect of Irs1 loss in the liver. In conclusion, down-regulation of translation is an evolutionarily conserved response to reduced IIS, but the tissues in which it occurs can vary between organisms. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying lowered translation may differ in mice, possibly associated with the complexity of the regulatory processes. PMID:27452396

  19. Reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling decreases translation in Drosophila and mice.

    PubMed

    Essers, Paul; Tain, Luke S; Nespital, Tobias; Goncalves, Joana; Froehlich, Jenny; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) can increase lifespan in C. elegans, Drosophila and mice. In C. elegans, reduced IIS results in down-regulation of translation, which itself can extend lifespan. However, the effect of reduced IIS on translation has yet to be determined in other multicellular organisms. Using two long-lived IIS models, namely Drosophila lacking three insulin-like peptides (dilp2-3,5(-/-)) and mice lacking insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1(-/-)), and two independent translation assays, polysome profiling and radiolabeled amino acid incorporation, we show that reduced IIS lowers translation in these organisms. In Drosophila, reduced IIS decreased polysome levels in fat body and gut, but reduced the rate of protein synthesis only in the fat body. Reduced IIS in mice decreased protein synthesis rate only in skeletal muscle, without reducing polysomes in any tissue. This lowered translation in muscle was independent of Irs1 loss in the muscle itself, but a secondary effect of Irs1 loss in the liver. In conclusion, down-regulation of translation is an evolutionarily conserved response to reduced IIS, but the tissues in which it occurs can vary between organisms. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying lowered translation may differ in mice, possibly associated with the complexity of the regulatory processes. PMID:27452396

  20. Network Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling using Integrated Genomic, Proteomic and Phosphorylation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Liu, Tao; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Willse, Alan R.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Kathmann, Loel E.; Weber, Thomas J.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. S.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2012-03-29

    To understand how integration of multiple data types can help decipher cellular responses at the systems level, we analyzed the mitogenic response of human mammary epithelial cells to epidermal growth factor (EGF) using whole genome microarrays, mass spectrometry-based proteomics and large-scale western blots with over 1000 antibodies. A time course analysis revealed significant differences in the expression of 3172 genes and 596 proteins, including protein phosphorylation changes measured by western blot. Integration of these disparate data types showed that each contributed qualitatively different components to the observed cell response to EGF and that varying degrees of concordance in gene expression and protein abundance measurements could be linked to specific biological processes. Networks inferred from individual data types were relatively limited, whereas networks derived from the integrated data recapitulated the known major cellular responses to EGF and exhibited more highly connected signaling nodes than networks derived from any individual dataset. While cell cycle regulatory pathways were altered as anticipated, we found the most robust response to mitogenic concentrations of EGF was induction of matrix metalloprotease cascades, highlighting the importance of the EGFR system as a regulator of the extracellular environment. These results demonstrate the value of integrating multiple levels of biological information to more accurately reconstruct networks of cellular response.

  1. System theoretical investigation of human epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Shankaran, Harish; Opresko, Lee; Resat, Haluk

    2008-09-01

    The partitioning of biological networks into coupled functional modules is gaining increasing attention in the biological sciences. This approach has the advantage that predicting a system level response does not require a mechanistic description of the internal dynamics of each module. Identification of the input-output characteristics of the network modules and the connectivity between the modules provide the necessary quantitative representation of system dynamics. However, determination of the input-output relationships of the modules is not trivial; it requires the controlled perturbation of module inputs and systematic analysis of experimental data. In this report, we apply a system theoretical analysis approach to derive the causal input-output relationships of the functional module for the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) mediated Erk and Akt signaling pathways. Using a library of cell lines expressing varying levels of EGFR and HER2, we show that a transfer function-based representation can be successfully applied to quantitatively characterize information transfer in this system.

  2. Effects of Myoga on Memory and Synaptic Plasticity by Regulating Nerve Growth Factor-Mediated Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Lim, Soonmin; Hong, Jongki; Kim, Ae-Jung; Oh, Myung Sook

    2016-02-01

    The flower bud of Zingiber mioga Roscoe, known as 'myoga' or Japanese ginger, has a pungent aroma and is commonly consumed as a spice, with pickles, or as a health supplement in Eastern Asia. Here, we evaluated the activity of myoga in the brain, focusing especially on nerve growth factor (NGF), which is believed to mediate synaptic plasticity, supporting learning and memory. In a rat primary hippocampal astrocyte culture system, treatment with myoga extract for 24 h significantly stimulated the production of NGF. In mice administered myoga extract for 14 days, 200 and 400 mg/kg/day treatment resulted in increased NGF levels in the hippocampus. Myoga extract treatment also regulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and cAMP response element-binding protein in the mouse hippocampus, leading to increased synaptic plasticity. In addition, it significantly increased novel object recognition time and spontaneous alternation, indicating improvement in learning and memory. These results suggest that myoga helps regulate NGF and synaptic plasticity, increasing memory ability. PMID:26563629

  3. Determination of the wavelength dependence of the differential pathlength factor from near-infrared pulse signals.

    PubMed

    Kohl, M; Nolte, C; Heekeren, H R; Horst, S; Scholz, U; Obrig, H; Villringer, A

    1998-06-01

    For the calculation of changes in oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and the redox state of cytochrome-c-oxidase from attenuation data via a modified Beer-Lambert equation the wavelength dependence of the differential pathlength factor (DPF(lambda)) has to be taken into account. The DPF, i.e. the ratio of the mean optical pathlength and the physical light source-detector separation at each wavelength, determines the crosstalk between the different concentrations and is therefore essential for a sensitive detection of chromophore changes. Here a simple method is suggested to estimate the wavelength dependence of the DPF(lambda) from pulse-induced attenuation changes measured on the head of adult humans. The essence is that the DPF is the ratio of the attenuation changes over absorption coefficient changes, and that the spectral form of the pulse correlated absorption coefficient change can be assumed to be proportional to the extinction coefficient of blood. Indicators for the validity of the DPF(lambda) derived for wavelengths between 700 and 970 nm are the stability of the calculated haemoglobin and cytochrome signals with variations of the wavelength range included for their calculation and its overall agreement with the data available from the literature. PMID:9651039

  4. RNA-destabilizing Factor Tristetraprolin Negatively Regulates NF-κB Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian; Lei, Tianhua; Song, Yuting; Yanes, Natalie; Qi, Yongfen; Fu, Mingui

    2009-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a CCCH zinc finger-containing protein that destabilizes mRNA by binding to an AU-rich element. Mice deficient in TTP develop a severe inflammatory syndrome mainly because of overproduction of tumor necrosis factor α. We report here that TTP also negatively regulates NF-κB signaling at the transcriptional corepressor level, by which it may repress inflammatory gene transcription. TTP expression inhibited NF-κB-dependent transcription. However, overexpression of TTP did not affect reporter mRNA stability. Instead, TTP functioned as a corepressor of p65/NF-κB. In support of this concept, we found that TTP physically interacted with the p65 subunit of NF-κB and was also associated with HDAC1, -3, and -7 in vivo. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors or small interfering RNA induced HDAC1 or HDAC3 knockdown completely or partly abolished the inhibitory activity of TTP on NF-κB reporter activation. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed decreased recruitment of HDAC1 and increased recruitment of CREB-binding protein on the Mcp-1 promoter in TTP−/− cells compared with wild-type cells. Moreover, overexpression of TTP blocked CREB-binding protein-induced acetylation of p65/NF-κB. Taken together, these data suggest that TTP may also function in vivo as a modulator in suppressing the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. PMID:19738286

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A signaling in bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells exposed to hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Brian R; Wagner, Jordan R; Prisco, Anthony R; Janiak, Agnieszka; Greene, Andrew S

    2013-11-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (BM-EPCs) are stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and other potent proangiogenic factors. During angiogenesis, an increase in VEGF-A expression stimulates BM-EPCs to enhance endothelial tube formation and contribute to an increase in microvessel density. Hypoxia is known to produce an enhanced angiogenic response and heightened levels of VEGF-A have been seen in oxygen deprived epithelial and endothelial cells, yet the pathways for VEGF-A signaling in BM-EPCs have not been described. This study explores the influence of hypoxia on VEGF-A signaling in rat BM-EPCs utilizing a novel proteomic strategy to directly identify interacting downstream components of the combined VEGF receptor(s) signaling pathways, gene expression analysis, and functional phenotyping. VEGF-A signaling network analysis following liquid chromatographic separation and tandem mass spectrometry revealed proteins related to inositol/calcium signaling, nitric oxide signaling, cell survival, cell migration, and inflammatory responses. Alterations in BM-EPC expression of common angiogenic genes and tube formation in response to VEGF-A during hypoxia were measured and combined with the proteomic analysis to enhance and support the signaling pathways detected. BM-EPC tube formation assays in response to VEGF-A exhibited little tube formation; however, a cell projection/migratory phenotype supported the signaling data. Additionally, a novel assay measuring BM-EPC incorporation into preformed endothelial cell tubes indicated a significant increase of incorporated BM-EPCs after pretreatment with VEGF-A during hypoxia. This study verifies known VEGF-A pathway components and reveals several unidentified mechanisms of VEGF-A signaling in BM-EPCs during hypoxia that may be important for migration to sites of vascular regeneration. PMID:24022223

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A signaling in bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells exposed to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Brian R.; Wagner, Jordan R.; Prisco, Anthony R.; Janiak, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (BM-EPCs) are stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and other potent proangiogenic factors. During angiogenesis, an increase in VEGF-A expression stimulates BM-EPCs to enhance endothelial tube formation and contribute to an increase in microvessel density. Hypoxia is known to produce an enhanced angiogenic response and heightened levels of VEGF-A have been seen in oxygen deprived epithelial and endothelial cells, yet the pathways for VEGF-A signaling in BM-EPCs have not been described. This study explores the influence of hypoxia on VEGF-A signaling in rat BM-EPCs utilizing a novel proteomic strategy to directly identify interacting downstream components of the combined VEGF receptor(s) signaling pathways, gene expression analysis, and functional phenotyping. VEGF-A signaling network analysis following liquid chromatographic separation and tandem mass spectrometry revealed proteins related to inositol/calcium signaling, nitric oxide signaling, cell survival, cell migration, and inflammatory responses. Alterations in BM-EPC expression of common angiogenic genes and tube formation in response to VEGF-A during hypoxia were measured and combined with the proteomic analysis to enhance and support the signaling pathways detected. BM-EPC tube formation assays in response to VEGF-A exhibited little tube formation; however, a cell projection/migratory phenotype supported the signaling data. Additionally, a novel assay measuring BM-EPC incorporation into preformed endothelial cell tubes indicated a significant increase of incorporated BM-EPCs after pretreatment with VEGF-A during hypoxia. This study verifies known VEGF-A pathway components and reveals several unidentified mechanisms of VEGF-A signaling in BM-EPCs during hypoxia that may be important for migration to sites of vascular regeneration. PMID:24022223

  7. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders. PMID:25485589

  8. Fibroblast growth factor and canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling cooperate in suppression of chondrocyte differentiation in experimental models of FGFR signaling in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Buchtova, Marcela; Oralova, Veronika; Aklian, Anie; Masek, Jan; Vesela, Iva; Ouyang, Zhufeng; Obadalova, Tereza; Konecna, Zaneta; Spoustova, Tereza; Pospisilova, Tereza; Matula, Petr; Varecha, Miroslav; Balek, Lukas; Gudernova, Iva; Jelinkova, Iva; Duran, Ivan; Cervenkova, Iveta; Murakami, Shunichi; Kozubik, Alois; Dvorak, Petr; Bryja, Vitezslav; Krejci, Pavel

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling disturbs chondrocyte differentiation in skeletal dysplasia, but the mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. Recently, FGF was found to activate canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway in chondrocytes via Erk MAP kinase-mediated phosphorylation of WNT co-receptor Lrp6. Here, we explore the cellular consequences of such a signaling interaction. WNT enhanced the FGF-mediated suppression of chondrocyte differentiation in mouse limb bud micromass and limb organ cultures, leading to inhibition of cartilage nodule formation in micromass cultures, and suppression of growth in cultured limbs. Simultaneous activation of the FGF and WNT/β-catenin pathways resulted in loss of chondrocyte extracellular matrix, expression of genes typical for mineralized tissues and alteration of cellular shape. WNT enhanced the FGF-mediated downregulation of chondrocyte proteoglycan and collagen extracellular matrix via inhibition of matrix synthesis and induction of proteinases involved in matrix degradation. Expression of genes regulating RhoA GTPase pathway was induced by FGF in cooperation with WNT, and inhibition of the RhoA signaling rescued the FGF/WNT-mediated changes in chondrocyte cellular shape. Our results suggest that aberrant FGF signaling cooperates with WNT/β-catenin in suppression of chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:25558817

  9. SOXC Transcription Factors Induce Cartilage Growth Plate Formation in Mouse Embryos by Promoting Noncanonical WNT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenji; Bhattaram, Pallavi; Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo; Gadi, Abhilash; Lefebvre, Véronique

    2015-09-01

    Growth plates are specialized cartilage structures that ensure the elongation of most skeletal primordia during vertebrate development. They are made by chondrocytes that proliferate in longitudinal columns and then progress in a staggered manner towards prehypertrophic, hypertrophic and terminal maturation. Complex molecular networks control the formation and activity of growth plates, but remain incompletely understood. We investigated here the importance of the SoxC genes, which encode the SOX4, SOX11 and SOX12 transcription factors, in growth plates. We show that the three genes are expressed robustly in perichondrocytes and weakly in growth plate chondrocytes. SoxC(Prx1Cre) mice, which deleted SoxC genes in limb bud skeletogenic mesenchyme, were born with tiny appendicular cartilage primordia because of failure to form growth plates. In contrast, SoxC(Col2Cre) and SoxC(ATC) mice, which deleted SoxC genes primarily in chondrocytes, were born with mild dwarfism and fair growth plates. Chondrocytes in the latter mutants matured normally, but formed irregular columns, proliferated slowly and died ectopically. Asymmetric distribution of VANGL2 was defective in both SoxC(Prx1Cre) and SoxC(ATC) chondrocytes, indicating impairment of planar cell polarity, a noncanonical WNT signaling pathway that controls growth plate chondrocyte alignment, proliferation and survival. Accordingly, SoxC genes were necessary in perichondrocytes for expression of Wnt5a, which encodes a noncanonical WNT ligand required for growth plate formation, and in chondrocytes and perichondrocytes for expression of Fzd3 and Csnk1e, which encode a WNT receptor and casein kinase-1 subunit mediating planar cell polarity, respectively. Reflecting the differential strengths of the SOXC protein transactivation domains, SOX11 was more powerful than SOX4, and SOX12 interfered with the activity of SOX4 and SOX11. Altogether, these findings provide novel insights into the molecular regulation of skeletal

  10. Treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinomas by systemic inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Volker; Kornek, Miroslaw; Hilbert, Tobias; Dzienisowicz, Christian; Raskopf, Esther; Rabe, Christian; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Qian, Cheng; Caselmann, Wolfgang H

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Tumor angiogenesis has been shown to be promoted by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) via stimulating endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and survival. Blockade of VEGF signaling by different means has been demonstrated to result in reduced tumor growth and suppression of tumor angiogenesis in distinct tumor entities. Here, we tested a recombinant adenovirus, AdsFlt1-3, that encodes an antagonistically acting fragment of the VEGF receptor 1 (Flt-1), for systemic antitumor effects in pre-established subcutaneous CRC tumors in mice. METHODS: Murine colorectal carcinoma cells (CT26) were inoculated subcutaneously into Balb/c mice for in vivo studies. Tumor size and survival were determined. 293 cell line was used for propagation of the adenoviral vectors. Human lung cancer line A549 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were transfected for in vitro experiments. RESULTS: Infection of tumor cells with AdsFlt1-3 resulted in protein secretion into cell supernatant, demonstrating correct vector function. As expected, the secreted sFlt1-3 protein had no direct effect on CT26 tumor cell proliferation in vitro, but endothelial cell function was inhibited by about 46% as compared to the AdLacZ control in a tube formation assay. When AdsFlt1-3 (5×109 PFU/animal) was applied to tumor bearing mice, we found a tumor inhibition by 72% at d 12 after treatment initiation. In spite of these antitumoral effects, the survival time was not improved. According to reduced intratumoral microvessel density in AdsFlt1-3-treated mice, the antitumor mechanism can be attributed to angiostatic vector effects. We did not detect increased systemic VEGF levels after AdsFlt1-3 treatment and liver toxicity was low as judged by serum alanine aminotransferase determination. CONCLUSION: In this study we confirmed the value of a systemic administration of AdsFlt1-3 to block VEGF signaling as antitumor therapy in an experimental metastatic colorectal carcinoma model in mice. PMID

  11. Transforming growth factor-betas and their signaling receptors are coexpressed in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    di Mola, F F; Friess, H; Scheuren, A; Di Sebastiano, P; Graber, H; Egger, B; Zimmermann, A; Korc, M; Büchler, M W

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate mechanisms that contribute to tissue repair and tissue remodeling in Crohn's disease (CD). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-betas) are involved in different chronic inflammatory disorders. They function by binding to two receptors, type I (TbetaR-I) subtype ALK5 and type II (TbetaR-II), which are concomitantly required for signal transduction. METHODS: Tissues were obtained from 18 patients with CD (10 female patients, 8 male patients, median age 38.7 years [range 16 to 58 years]) undergoing surgery because of CD-related complications. Tissue samples of 18 healthy organ donors (10 female subjects, 8 male subjects, median age 50.3 years [range 15 to 65 years]) served as controls. The expression and localization of TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, TbetaR-IALK5, TbetaR-II, and TbetaR-III were studied by Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: On Northern blot analysis, 94% of the CD samples exhibited enhanced TGF-beta1, TGF-beta3, and TbetaR-II mRNA expression compared with controls. TGF-beta2 was increased in 72%, TbetaR-IALK5 in 72%, and TbetaR-III in 82% of the patients with CD. On in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis, TGF-beta1, TbetaR-IALK5, and TbetaR-II were seen to be colocalized in the lamina propria cells and in the lymphocytes closest to the luminal surface, but also in the remaining epithelial cells, and in fibroblasts of CD tissue samples. CONCLUSIONS: The concomitant overexpression of TGF-betas and their signaling receptors in CD points to a potential role of these regulatory molecules in the pathophysiology of CD. Activation of TGF-beta-mediated pathways might promote the repair of mucosal injury by enhancing the process of reepithelization, but might also contribute to extracellular matrix generation and subsequently to intramural fibrosis and intestinal obstruction. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9923802

  12. Local Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Mediates the Systemic Pathogenic Effects of Staphylococcus aureus Toxic Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Aaron N.; Stach, Christopher S.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2016-01-01

    Secreted factors of Staphylococcus aureus can activate host signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) contributes to mucosal cytokine production through a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-mediated shedding of EGFR ligands and subsequent EGFR activation. The secreted hemolysin, α-toxin, can also induce EGFR signaling and directly interacts with ADAM10, a sheddase of EGFR ligands. The current work explores the role of EGFR signaling in menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS), a disease mediated by TSST-1. The data presented show that TSST-1 and α-toxin induce ADAM- and EGFR-dependent cytokine production from human vaginal epithelial cells. TSST-1 and α-toxin also induce cytokine production from an ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa (PVM) model. EGFR signaling is responsible for the majority of IL-8 production from PVM in response to secreted toxins and live S. aureus. Finally, data are presented demonstrating that inhibition of EGFR signaling with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 significantly increases survival in a rabbit model of mTSS. These data indicate that EGFR signaling is critical for progression of an S. aureus exotoxin-mediated disease and may represent an attractive host target for therapeutics. PMID:27414801

  13. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gina A.; Fearnley, Gareth W.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR–VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome–lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR–VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. PMID:26285805

  14. Targeting insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 signaling pathways. A novel therapeutic approach for asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Kim, So Ri; Oh, Youngman; Cho, Seong Ho; Schleimer, Robert P; Lee, Yong Chul

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has been recognized to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of asthma, whereas IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 blocks crucial physiologic manifestations of asthma. IGF-I enhances subepithelial fibrosis, airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway smooth muscle hyperplasia by interacting with various inflammatory mediators and complex signaling pathways, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and the hypoxia-inducible factor/vascular endothelial growth factor axis. On the other hand, IGFBP-3 decreases airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness through IGFBP-3 receptor-mediated activation of caspases, which subsequently inhibits NF-κB signaling pathway. It also inhibits the IGF-I/hypoxia-inducible factor/vascular endothelial growth factor axis via IGF-I-dependent and/or IGF-I-independent mechanisms. This Translational Review summarizes the role of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in the context of allergic airway disease, and discusses the therapeutic potential of various strategies targeting the IGF-I and IGFBP-3 signaling pathways for the management of asthma. PMID:24219511

  15. Paracrine signaling between tumor subclones of mouse SCLC: a critical role of ETS transcription factor Pea3 in facilitating metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-chul; Proost, Natalie; Song, Ji-Ying; Sutherland, Kate D; Zevenhoven, John; Berns, Anton

    2015-08-01

    Tumor heterogeneity can create a unique symbiotic tumor microenvironment. Earlier, we showed that clonal evolution in mouse small cell lung cancer (SCLC) can result in subclones that, upon cografting, endow the neuroendocrine tumor cells with metastatic potential. We now show that paracrine signaling between SCLC subclones is a critical requirement in the early steps of the metastatic process, such as local invasion and intravasation. We further show evidence that paracrine signaling via fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2) and Mapk between these diverged tumor subclones causes enhanced expression of the Pea3 (polyomavirus enhancer activator 3) transcription factor, resulting in metastatic dissemination of the neuroendocrine tumor subclones. Our data reveal for the first time paracrine signaling between tumor cell subclones in SCLC that results in metastatic spread of SCLC. PMID:26215568

  16. Experimental Determination of Dual-Wavelength Mie Lidar Geometric form Factor Combining Side-Scatter and Back-Scatter Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenzhu; Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2016-06-01

    In theory, lidar overlap factor can be derived from the difference between the particle backscatter coefficient retrieved from lidar elastic signal without overlap correction and the actual particle backscatter coefficient, which can be obtained by other measured techniques. The side-scatter signal using a CCD camera is testified to be a powerful tool to detect the particle backscatter coefficient in near ground layer during night time. In experiment, by combining side-scatter and backscatter signals the geometric form factor for vertically-pointing Mie lidar in 532 nm channel is determined successfully, which is corrected by an iteration algorithm combining the retrieved particle backscatter coefficient using CCD sidescatter method and Fernald method. In this study, the method will be expanded to 1064 nm channel in dual-wavelength Mie lidar during routine campaigns. The experimental results in different atmosphere conditions demonstrated that the method present in this study is available in practice.

  17. The Bisecting GlcNAc on N-Glycans Inhibits Growth Factor Signaling and Retards Mammary Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yinghui; Aglipay, Jason A.; Bernstein, Joshua D.; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The branching of complex N-glycans attached to growth factor receptors promotes tumor progression by prolonging growth factor signaling. The addition of the bisecting GlcNAc to complex N-glycans by Mgat3 has varying effects on cell adhesion, cell migration and hepatoma formation. Here we show that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing Mgat3 and the Polyoma Middle T (PyMT) antigen have reduced cell proliferation and growth factor signaling dependent on a galectin lattice. The Mgat3 gene is not expressed in virgin mammary gland but is upregulated during lactation and is expressed in MMTV/PyMT tumors. Mice lacking Mgat3 that cannot transfer the bisecting GlcNAc to N-glycans acquire PyMT-induced mammary tumors more rapidly, have an increased tumor burden, increased migration of tumor cells, and increased early metastasis to lung. Tumors and tumor-derived cells lacking Mgat3 exhibit enhanced signaling through the Ras pathway, and reduced amounts of functionally-glycosylated α-dystroglycan. Constitutive overexpression of an MMTV/Mgat3 transgene inhibits early mammary tumor development and tumor cell migration. Thus the addition of the bisecting GlcNAc to complex N-glycans of mammary tumor cell glycoprotein receptors is a cell-autonomous mechanism serving to retard tumor progression by reducing growth factor signaling. PMID:20395209

  18. Some Interactions of Speech Rate, Signal Distortion, and Certain Linguistic Factors in Listening Comprehension. Professional Paper No. 39-68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas G.

    This experiment was designed to determine the relative effects of speech rate and signal distortion due to the time-compression process on listening comprehension. In addition, linguistic factors--including sequencing of random words into story form, and inflection and phraseology--were qualitatively considered for their effects on listening…

  19. Transforming Growth Factor ß Recruits Persistent MAPK Signaling to Regulate Long-Term Memory Consolidation in "Aplysia Californica"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shobe, Justin; Philips, Gary T.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explore the mechanistic relationship between growth factor signaling and kinase activity that supports the protein synthesis-dependent phase of long-term memory (LTM) consolidation for sensitization of "Aplysia." Specifically, we examine LTM for tail shock-induced sensitization of the tail-elicited siphon withdrawal…

  20. Transcription factor AP-2γ induces early Cdx2 expression and represses HIPPO signaling to specify the trophectoderm lineage

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zubing; Carey, Timothy S.; Ganguly, Avishek; Wilson, Catherine A.; Paul, Soumen; Knott, Jason G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell fate decisions are fundamental to the development of multicellular organisms. In mammals the first cell fate decision involves segregation of the pluripotent inner cell mass and the trophectoderm, a process regulated by cell polarity proteins, HIPPO signaling and lineage-specific transcription factors such as CDX2. However, the regulatory mechanisms that operate upstream to specify the trophectoderm lineage have not been established. Here we report that transcription factor AP-2γ (TFAP2C) functions as a novel upstream regulator of Cdx2 expression and position-dependent HIPPO signaling in mice. Loss- and gain-of-function studies and promoter analysis revealed that TFAP2C binding to an intronic enhancer is required for activation of Cdx2 expression during early development. During the 8-cell to morula transition TFAP2C potentiates cell polarity to suppress HIPPO signaling in the outside blastomeres. TFAP2C depletion triggered downregulation of PARD6B, loss of apical cell polarity, disorganization of F-actin, and activation of HIPPO signaling in the outside blastomeres. Rescue experiments using Pard6b mRNA restored cell polarity but only partially corrected position-dependent HIPPO signaling, suggesting that TFAP2C negatively regulates HIPPO signaling via multiple pathways. Several genes involved in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton (including Rock1, Rock2) were downregulated in TFAP2C-depleted embryos. Inhibition of ROCK1 and ROCK2 activity during the 8-cell to morula transition phenocopied TFAP2C knockdown, triggering a loss of position-dependent HIPPO signaling and decrease in Cdx2 expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that TFAP2C facilitates trophectoderm lineage specification by functioning as a key regulator of Cdx2 transcription, cell polarity and position-dependent HIPPO signaling. PMID:25858457

  1. Promiscuous Diffusible Signal Factor Production and Responsiveness of the Xylella fastidiosa Rpf System

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Michael; Yokota, Kenji; Antonova, Elena; Garcia, Angelica; Beaulieu, Ellen; Hayes, Terry; Iavarone, Anthony T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression in Xylella fastidiosa that is crucial to its switching between plant hosts and insect vectors is dependent on RpfF and its production of 2-enoic acids known as diffusible signal factor (DSF). We show that X. fastidiosa produces a particularly large variety of similar, relatively long-chain-length 2-enoic acids that are active in modulating gene expression. Both X. fastidiosa itself and a Pantoea agglomerans surrogate host harboring X. fastidiosa RpfF (XfRpfF) is capable of producing a variety of both saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids. However, only 2-cis unsaturated acids were found to be biologically active in X. fastidiosa. X. fastidiosa produces, and is particularly responsive to, a novel DSF species, 2-cis-hexadecanoic acid that we term XfDSF2. It is also responsive to other, even longer 2-enoic acids to which other taxa such as Xanthomonas campestris are unresponsive. The 2-enoic acids that are produced by X. fastidiosa are strongly affected by the cellular growth environment, with XfDSF2 not detected in culture media in which 2-tetradecenoic acid (XfDSF1) had previously been found. X. fastidiosa is responsive to much lower concentrations of XfDSF2 than XfDSF1. Apparently competitive interactions can occur between various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that block the function of those agonistic 2-enoic fatty acids. By altering the particular 2-enoic acids produced and the relative balance of free enoic and saturated fatty acids, X. fastidiosa might modulate the extent of DSF-mediated quorum sensing. PMID:27435463

  2. A novel epidermal growth factor receptor-signaling platform and its targeted translation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Alanna M; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Cheng, Timothy S W; Alghamdi, Farah; Jayanth, Preethi; O'Shea, Leah K; Geen, Olivia; Arvizu, Luis A; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2013-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EGFR tyrosine kinase receptor activation in cancer cell survival responses has become a strategic molecular-targeting clinical therapeutic intent, but the failures of these targeted approaches in the clinical setting demand alternate strategies. Here, we uncover a novel neuraminidase-1 (Neu1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) cross-talk in alliance with GPCR neuromedin B, which is essential for EGF-induced receptor activation and cellular signaling. Neu1 and MMP-9 form a complex with EGFR on the cell surface. Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate), anti-Neu1 antibodies, broad range MMP inhibitor galardin (GM6001), neuromedin B GPCR specific antagonist BIM-23127, the selective inhibitor of whole heterotrimeric G-protein complex BIM-46174 and MMP-9 specific inhibitor dose-dependently inhibited Neu1 activity associated with EGF stimulated 3T3-hEGFR cells. Tamiflu, anti-Neu1 antibodies and MMP9i attenuated EGFR phosphorylation associated with EGF-stimulated cells. Preclinical data provide the proof-of-evidence for a therapeutic targeting of Neu1 with Tamiflu in impeding human pancreatic cancer growth and metastatic spread in heterotopic xenografts of eGFP-MiaPaCa-2 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice. Tamiflu-treated cohort exhibited a reduction of phosphorylation of EGFR-Tyr1173, Stat1-Tyr701, Akt-Thr308, PDGFRα-Tyr754 and NFκBp65-Ser311 but an increase in phospho-Smad2-Ser465/467 and -VEGFR2-Tyr1175 in the tumor lysates from the xenografts of human eGFP-MiaPaCa-2 tumor-bearing mice. The findings identify a novel promising alternate therapeutic treatment of human pancreatic cancer. PMID:23993964

  3. Bile Acids Repress Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Signaling and Modulate the Airway Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Claire; Reen, F. Jerry; Woods, David F.; Mooij, Marlies J.; Adams, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) frequently occurs in patients with respiratory disease and is particularly prevalent in patients with cystic fibrosis. GER is a condition in which the duodenogastric contents of the stomach leak into the esophagus, in many cases resulting in aspiration into the respiratory tract. As such, the presence of GER-derived bile acids (BAs) has been confirmed in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and sputum of affected patients. We have recently shown that bile causes cystic fibrosis-associated bacterial pathogens to adopt a chronic lifestyle and may constitute a major host trigger underlying respiratory infection. The current study shows that BAs elicit a specific response in humans in which they repress hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) protein, an emerging master regulator in response to infection and inflammation. HIF-1α repression was shown to occur through the 26S proteasome machinery via the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) pathway. Further analysis of the downstream inflammatory response showed that HIF-1α repression by BAs can significantly modulate the immune response of airway epithelial cells, correlating with a decrease in interleukin-8 (IL-8) production, while IL-6 production was strongly increased. Importantly, the effects of BAs on cytokine production can also be more dominant than the bacterium-mediated effects. However, the effect of BAs on cytokine levels cannot be fully explained by their ability to repress HIF-1α, which is not surprising, given the complexity of the immune regulatory network. The suppression of HIF-1 signaling by bile acids may have a significant influence on the progression and outcome of respiratory disease, and the molecular mechanism underpinning this response warrants further investigation. PMID:24914220

  4. Identification and Validation of Genetic Variants that Influence Transcription Factor and Cell Signaling Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hause, Ronald J.; Stark, Amy L.; Antao, Nirav N.; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Chung, Sophie H.; Brown, Christopher D.; Wong, Shan S.; Gill, Daniel F.; Myers, Jamie L.; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-01-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression. PMID:25087611

  5. Transcription factor and microRNA-regulated network motifs for cancer and signal transduction networks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular networks are the basis of biological processes. Such networks can be decomposed into smaller modules, also known as network motifs. These motifs show interesting dynamical behaviors, in which co-operativity effects between the motif components play a critical role in human diseases. We have developed a motif-searching algorithm, which is able to identify common motif types from the cancer networks and signal transduction networks (STNs). Some of the network motifs are interconnected which can be merged together and form more complex structures, the so-called coupled motif structures (CMS). These structures exhibit mixed dynamical behavior, which may lead biological organisms to perform specific functions. Results In this study, we integrate transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs), miRNA targets and network motifs information to build the cancer-related TF-miRNA-motif networks (TMMN). This allows us to examine the role of network motifs in cancer formation at different levels of regulation, i.e. transcription initiation (TF → miRNA), gene-gene interaction (CMS), and post-transcriptional regulation (miRNA → target genes). Among the cancer networks and STNs we considered, it is found that there is a substantial amount of crosstalking through motif interconnections, in particular, the crosstalk between prostate cancer network and PI3K-Akt STN. Conclusions To validate the role of network motifs in cancer formation, several examples are presented which demonstrated the effectiveness of the present approach. A web-based platform has been set up which can be accessed at: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/pathway/. It is very likely that our results can supply very specific CMS missing information for certain cancer types, it is an indispensable tool for cancer biology research. PMID:25707690

  6. Disruption of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus in Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ann V.; Kavanaugh, Scott I.; Tsai, Pei-San

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 8 is essential for the development of multiple brain regions. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that reduced Fgf8 signaling led to the developmental alterations of neuroendocrine nuclei that originated within the diencephalon, including the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. To further understand the role of Fgf8 in the development of other hypothalamic nuclei, we examined if Fgf8 and its cognate receptor, Fgfr1, also impact the integrity of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). The SCN control an organism’s circadian rhythm and contain vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-producing neurons as the main input neurons. Mice hypomorphic for Fgf8, Fgfr1, or both were examined for their SCN volume and the number of VIP neurons on postnatal day (PN) 0; adult hypomorphic mice were further examined for SCN function by quantifying SCN neuronal activation using cFos as a marker. On PN0, mice homozygous for Fgf8 hypomorphy displayed the most severe reduction of the SCN volume and VIP neurons. Those heterozygous for Fgf8 hypomorphy alone or Fgf8 combined with Fgfr1 hypomorphy, called double heterozygotes (DH), showed normal SCN volume but significantly reduced VIP neurons, albeit less severely than the homozygotes. Adult wild type, heterozygous Fgf8 hypomorphs (F8 Het), and DH mice were also examined for SCN cFos activation at three time points: 1 h (morning), 6 h (afternoon), and 11 h (evening) after light onset. In F8 Het mice, a significant change in the pattern of cFos immunostaining that may reflect delayed morning SCN activation was observed. Overall, our studies provide evidence supporting that deficiencies in Fgf8 not only impact the structural integrity of the SCN but also the pattern of SCN activation in response to light. PMID:26903947

  7. Determination of the wavelength dependence of the differential pathlength factor from near-infrared pulse signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Matthias; Nolte, Christian; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Horst, Susanne; Scholz, Udo; Obrig, Hellmuth; Villringer, Arno

    1998-06-01

    For the calculation of changes in oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and the redox state of cytochrome-c-oxidase from attenuation data via a modified Beer-Lambert equation the wavelength dependence of the differential pathlength factor (DPF) has to be taken into account. The DPF, i.e. the ratio of the mean optical pathlength and the physical light source-detector separation at each wavelength, determines the crosstalk between the different concentrations and is therefore essential for a sensitive detection of chromophore changes. Here a simple method is suggested to estimate the wavelength dependence of the DPF from pulse-induced attenuation changes measured on the head of adult humans. The essence is that the DPF is the ratio of the attenuation changes over absorption coefficient changes, and that the spectral form of the pulse correlated absorption coefficient change can be assumed to be proportional to the extinction coefficient of blood. Indicators for the validity of the DPF derived for wavelengths between 700 and 970 nm are the stability of the calculated haemoglobin and cytochrome signals with variations of the wavelength range included for their calculation and its overall agreement with the data available from the literature.

  8. Xanthomonas campestris cell–cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-01-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell–cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell–cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  9. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Contributes to Mucosal Repair by β-Arrestin2-Mediated Extracellular Signal-Related Kinase Signaling in Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Zheng, Fengping; Tao, Jin; Tan, Siwei; Zeng, Lixian; Peng, Xiaojie; Wu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) possesses the ability to attenuate intestinal damage and promote mucosal repair of colitis. β-Arrestins, as the scaffolding proteins of G protein-coupled receptors or non-G protein-coupled receptors signaling, can be involved in IGF-1-mediated signaling pathways. However, the interaction of IGF-1 and β-arrestin2 in the mucosal repair of experimental colitis remains unexplored. Ulcerative colitis was induced in β-arrestin2 wild-type mice and β-arrestin2 knockout littermates by using 3% dextran sulfate sodium for 5 days, followed by regular water consumption for 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks to analyze the mucosal repair from experimental colitis. Disease activity index and histologic score analyses were performed. Apoptosis and proliferation were assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and Ki-67 staining, respectively. The expressions of β-arrestin2, phospho (p)-IGF-1R, and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 were examined. Furthermore, β-arrestin2 was overexpressed or altered in HCT116 cells by transfection before IGF-1 treatment in vitro. IGF-1 and β-arrestin2 expression was up-regulated in the repairing phase of experimental colitis. Targeted deletion of β-arrestin2 delayed the repair of colitis by inhibiting cell proliferation without affecting the levels of IGF-1 and p-IGF-1R. The β-arrestin2/ERK signaling pathway was involved in IGF-1-mediated mucosal repair through promoting epithelial cell and goblet cell regeneration from experimental colitis. These results indicate that IGF-1 contributes to the mucosal repair by β-arrestin2-mediated ERK signaling in experimental colitis. PMID:26362717

  10. Xanthomonas campestris cell-cell signalling molecule DSF (diffusible signal factor) elicits innate immunity in plants and is suppressed by the exopolysaccharide xanthan.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Akanksha; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Kondreddy, Anil; Pradhan, Binod Bihari; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2015-11-01

    Several secreted and surface-associated conserved microbial molecules are recognized by the host to mount the defence response. One such evolutionarily well-conserved bacterial process is the production of cell-cell signalling molecules which regulate production of multiple virulence functions by a process known as quorum sensing. Here it is shown that a bacterial fatty acid cell-cell signalling molecule, DSF (diffusible signal factor), elicits innate immunity in plants. The DSF family of signalling molecules are highly conserved among many phytopathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Xanthomonas as well as in opportunistic animal pathogens. Using Arabidopsis, Nicotiana benthamiana, and rice as model systems, it is shown that DSF induces a hypersensitivity reaction (HR)-like response, programmed cell death, the accumulation of autofluorescent compounds, hydrogen peroxide production, and the expression of the PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR-1) gene. Furthermore, production of the DSF signalling molecule in Pseudomonas syringae, a non-DSF-producing plant pathogen, induces the innate immune response in the N. benthamiana host plant and also affects pathogen growth. By pre- and co-inoculation of DSF, it was demonstrated that the DSF-induced plant defence reduces disease severity and pathogen growth in the host plant. In this study, it was further demonstrated that wild-type Xanthomonas campestris suppresses the DSF-induced innate immunity by secreting xanthan, the main component of extracellular polysaccharide. The results indicate that plants have evolved to recognize a widely conserved bacterial communication system and may have played a role in the co-evolution of host recognition of the pathogen and the communication machinery. PMID:26248667

  11. Cytokine-Like Factor 1, an Essential Facilitator of Cardiotrophin-Like Cytokine:Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Signaling and sorLA-Mediated Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Anders Mejer; Pallesen, Lone Tjener; Bauer, Johannes; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Madsen, Peder

    2016-01-01

    Cardiotrophin-like cytokine:cytokine-like factor-1 (CLC:CLF-1) is a heterodimeric neurotropic cytokine that plays a crucial role during neuronal development. Mice lacking CLC:CLF-1 die soon after birth due to a suckling defect and show reduced numbers of motor neurons. Humans carrying mutations in CLC:CLF-1 develop similar disorders, known as Sohar-Crisponi or cold-induced sweating syndrome, and have a high risk of early death. It is well known that CLC binds the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFRα) and is a prerequisite for signaling through the gp130/leukemia inhibitory factor receptor β (LIFRβ) heterodimer, whereas CLF-1 serves to promote the cellular release of CLC. However, the precise role of CLF-1 is unclear. Here, we report that CLF-1, based on its binding site for CLC and on two additional and independent sites for CNTFRα and sorLA, is a key player in CLC and CNTFRα signaling and turnover. The site for CNTFRα enables CLF-1 to promote CLC:CNTFRα complex formation and signaling. The second site establishes a link between the endocytic receptor sorLA and the tripartite CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα complex and allows sorLA to downregulate the CNTFRα pool in stimulated cells. Finally, sorLA may bind and concentrate the tripartite soluble CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα complex on cell membranes and thus facilitate its signaling through gp130/LIFRβ. PMID:26858303

  12. Cytokine-Like Factor 1, an Essential Facilitator of Cardiotrophin-Like Cytokine:Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Signaling and sorLA-Mediated Turnover.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jakob Vejby; Kristensen, Anders Mejer; Pallesen, Lone Tjener; Bauer, Johannes; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Madsen, Peder; Petersen, Claus Munck

    2016-04-15

    Cardiotrophin-like cytokine:cytokine-like factor-1 (CLC:CLF-1) is a heterodimeric neurotropic cytokine that plays a crucial role during neuronal development. Mice lacking CLC:CLF-1 die soon after birth due to a suckling defect and show reduced numbers of motor neurons. Humans carrying mutations in CLC:CLF-1 develop similar disorders, known as Sohar-Crisponi or cold-induced sweating syndrome, and have a high risk of early death. It is well known that CLC binds the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFRα) and is a prerequisite for signaling through the gp130/leukemia inhibitory factor receptor β (LIFRβ) heterodimer, whereas CLF-1 serves to promote the cellular release of CLC. However, the precise role of CLF-1 is unclear. Here, we report that CLF-1, based on its binding site for CLC and on two additional and independent sites for CNTFRα and sorLA, is a key player in CLC and CNTFRα signaling and turnover. The site for CNTFRα enables CLF-1 to promote CLC:CNTFRα complex formation and signaling. The second site establishes a link between the endocytic receptor sorLA and the tripartite CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα complex and allows sorLA to downregulate the CNTFRα pool in stimulated cells. Finally, sorLA may bind and concentrate the tripartite soluble CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα complex on cell membranes and thus facilitate its signaling through gp130/LIFRβ. PMID:26858303

  13. Targeted Disruption of Heparan Sulfate Interaction with Hepatocyte and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors Blocks Normal and Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Fabiola; Pajalunga, Deborah; Fowler, C. Andrew; Uren, Aykut; Rabe, Daniel C.; Peruzzi, Benedetta; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Blackman, Davida K.; Stahl, Stephen J.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Bottaro, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) regulate normal development and homeostasis, and drive disease progression in many forms of cancer. Both proteins signal by binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans on target cell surfaces. Basic residues comprising the primary HS binding sites on HGF and VEGF provide similar surface charge distributions without underlying structural similarity. Combining three acidic amino acid substitutions in these sites in the HGF isoform NK1 or the VEGF isoform VEGF165 transformed each into potent, selective competitive antagonists of their respective normal and oncogenic signaling pathways. Our findings illustrate the importance of HS in growth factor driven cancer progression and reveal an efficient strategy for therapeutic antagonist development. PMID:22897854

  14. Protein kinase B/Akt: a nexus of growth factor and cytokine signaling in determining muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Frost, Robert A; Lang, Charles H

    2007-07-01

    Although the boundaries of skeletal muscle size are fundamentally determined by genetics, this dynamic tissue also demonstrates great plasticity in response to environmental and hormonal factors. Recent work indicates that contractile activity, nutrients, growth factors, and cytokines all contribute to determining muscle mass. Muscle responds not only to endocrine hormones but also to the autocrine production of growth factors and cytokines. Skeletal muscle synthesizes anabolic growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and potentially inhibitory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and myostatin. These self-regulating inputs in turn influence muscle metabolism, including the use of nutrients such as glucose and amino acids. These changes are principally achieved by altering the activity of the protein kinase known as protein kinase B or Akt. Akt plays a central role in integrating anabolic and catabolic responses by transducing growth factor and cytokine signals via changes in the phosphorylation of its numerous substrates. Activation of Akt stimulates muscle hypertrophy and antagonizes the loss of muscle protein. Here we review the many signals that funnel through Akt to alter muscle mass. PMID:17332274

  15. Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor signaling networks inhibit mouse macrophage inflammatory responses by induction of microRNA-21

    PubMed Central

    Caescu, Cristina I.; Guo, Xingyi; Tesfa, Lydia; Bhagat, Tushar D.; Verma, Amit; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage polarization between the M2 (repair, protumorigenic) and M1 (inflammatory) phenotypes is seen as a continuum of states. The detailed transcriptional events and signals downstream of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) that contributes to amplification of the M2 phenotype and suppression of the M1 phenotype are largely unknown. Macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling promotes cell motility and enhancement of tumor cell invasion in vitro. Combining analysis of cellular systems for CSF-1R gain of function and loss of function with bioinformatic analysis of the macrophage CSF-1R pTyr-721–regulated transcriptome, we uncovered microRNA-21 (miR-21) as a downstream molecular switch controlling macrophage activation and identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB as CSF-1R pTyr-721–regulated signaling nodes. We show that CSF-1R pTyr-721 signaling suppresses the inflammatory phenotype, predominantly by induction of miR-21. Profiling of the miR-21–regulated messenger RNAs revealed that 80% of the CSF-1–regulated canonical miR-21 targets are proinflammatory molecules. Additionally, miR-21 positively regulates M2 marker expression. Moreover, miR-21 feeds back to positively regulate its own expression and to limit CSF-1R–mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and nuclear factor-κB. Consistent with an anti-inflammatory role of miRNA-21, intraperitoneal injection of mice with a miRNA-21 inhibitor increases the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and enhances the peritoneal monocyte/macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide. These results identify the CSF-1R–regulated miR-21 network that modulates macrophage polarization. PMID:25573988

  16. Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction-Mediated Delivery of a Transcription Factor Decoy Inhibits STAT3 Signaling and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Carson, Andrew R.; McTiernan, Charles F.; Chen, Xucai; Hasjim, Bima; Lavery, Linda; Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in many cancers where it acts to promote tumor progression. A STAT3-specific transcription factor decoy has been developed to suppress STAT3 downstream signaling, but a delivery strategy is needed to improve clinical translation. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has been shown to enhance image-guided local delivery of molecular therapeutics to a target site. The objective of this study was to deliver STAT3 decoy to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors using UTMD to disrupt STAT3 signaling and inhibit tumor growth. Studies performed demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles inhibited STAT3 signaling in SCC cells in vitro. Studies performed in vivo demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles induced significant tumor growth inhibition (31-51% reduced tumor volume vs. controls, p < 0.05) in mice bearing SCC tumors. Furthermore, expression of STAT3 downstream target genes (Bcl-xL and cyclin D1) was significantly reduced (34-39%, p < 0.05) in tumors receiving UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles compared to controls. In addition, the quantity of radiolabeled STAT3 decoy detected in tumors eight hours after treatment was significantly higher with UTMD treatment compared to controls (70-150%, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that UTMD can increase delivery of a transcription factor decoy to tumors in vivo and that the decoy can inhibit STAT3 signaling and tumor growth. These results suggest that UTMD treatment holds potential for clinical use to increase the concentration of a transcription factor signaling inhibitor in the tumor. PMID:26681983

  17. CTCF-dependent co-localization of canonical Smad signaling factors at architectural protein binding sites in D. melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Van Bortle, Kevin; Peterson, Aidan J; Takenaka, Naomi; O'Connor, Michael B; Corces, Victor G

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways transduce extracellular signals into tissue-specific transcriptional responses. During this process, signaling effector Smad proteins translocate into the nucleus to direct changes in transcription, but how and where they localize to DNA remain important questions. We have mapped Drosophila TGF-β signaling factors Mad, dSmad2, Medea, and Schnurri genome-wide in Kc cells and find that numerous sites for these factors overlap with the architectural protein CTCF. Depletion of CTCF by RNAi results in the disappearance of a subset of Smad sites, suggesting Smad proteins localize to CTCF binding sites in a CTCF-dependent manner. Sensitive Smad binding sites are enriched at low occupancy CTCF peaks within topological domains, rather than at the physical domain boundaries where CTCF may function as an insulator. In response to Decapentaplegic, CTCF binding is not significantly altered, whereas Mad, Medea, and Schnurri are redirected from CTCF to non-CTCF binding sites. These results suggest that CTCF participates in the recruitment of Smad proteins to a subset of genomic sites and in the redistribution of these proteins in response to BMP signaling. PMID:26125535

  18. Hepatocyte growth factor-induced differentiation of bone mesenchymal stem cells toward hepatocyte-like cells occurs through nuclear factor-kappa B signaling in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tongxi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Shasha; Liu, Xiaoping; Yu, Zhongjie

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is multifaceted cytokine that regulates proliferation, differentiation, morphology, and motility within numerous stem cells. More recently, HGF has been reported to induce the differentiation of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into mature hepatocytes, but the underlying biochemical and molecular signaling is largely unknown. We isolated BMSC from the bone marrow of rats, which were then cultured and exposed to HGF for 15 days. We subsequently assayed these cells for liver functionality and markers, and blocked NF-кB signaling at various stages of the pathway. The present results demonstrate that HGF induces the differentiation of BMSCs toward hepatocyte-like cells through the NF-кB signaling. More specifically, HGF upregulated the translocation of NF-кB to the nucleus. PMID:27249785

  19. Involvement of transcription factor Oct-1 in the regulation of JAK-STAT signaling pathway in cells of Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pankratova, E V; Stepchenko, A G; Krylova, I D; Portseva, T N; Georgieva, S G

    2016-05-01

    We studied the role of transcription factor Oct-1 in the regulation of expression of genes of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway in the Namalwa Burkitt's lymphoma cell line. Overexpression of Oct-1 isoforms (Oct-1A, Oct-1L, and Oct-1X) causes a decrease in the activity of four genes involved in the JAK-STAT signaling pathway-IFNAR2, STAT1, STAT2, and STAT4. As a result of our research, it was found that genes STAT2 and STAT4 are direct targets for Oct-1 protein. PMID:27417729

  20. Growth differentiation factor 9 signaling requires ERK1/2 activity in mouse granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Maxime; Ritter, Lesley J; Nguyen, Thao M; Liu, Fang; Mottershead, David G; Russell, Darryl L; Gilchrist, Robert B

    2010-09-15

    Ovarian folliculogenesis is driven by the combined action of endocrine cues and paracrine factors. The oocyte secretes powerful mitogens, such as growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), that regulate granulosa cell proliferation, metabolism, steroidogenesis and differentiation. This study investigated the role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2; also known as MAPK3/1) signaling pathway on GDF9 action on granulosa cells. Results show that mitogenic action of the oocyte is prevented by pharmacological inhibition of the EGFR-ERK1/2 pathway. Importantly, EGFR-ERK1/2 activity as well as rous sarcoma oncogene family kinases (SFK) are required for signaling through SMADs, mediating GDF9, activin A and TGFbeta1 mitogenic action in granulosa cells. GDF9 could not activate ERK1/2 or affect EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 in granulosa cells. However, induction of the SMAD3-specific CAGA reporter by GDF9 in granulosa cells required active EGFR, SFKs and ERK1/2 as did GDF9-responsive gene expression. Finally, the EGFR-SFKs-ERK1/2 pathway was shown to be required for the maintenance of phosphorylation of the SMAD3 linker region. Together our results suggest that receptivity of granulosa cells to oocyte-secreted factors, including GDF9, is regulated by the level of activation of the EGFR and resulting ERK1/2 activity, through the requisite permissive phosphorylation of SMAD3 in the linker region. Our results indicate that oocyte-secreted TGFbeta-like ligands and EGFR-ERK1/2 signaling are cooperatively required for the unique granulosa cell response to the signal from oocytes mediating granulosa cell survival and proliferation and hence the promotion of follicle growth and ovulation. PMID:20736313

  1. Forkhead Box F2 Regulation of Platelet-derived Growth Factor and Myocardin/Serum Response Factor Signaling Is Essential for Intestinal Development*

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Craig; Ren, Xiaomeng; Tomley, Tatiana; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Pradhan, Arun; Hoggatt, April; Kalin, Tanya V.; Herring, B. Paul; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the forkhead box F2 gene expression have been reported in numerous pathologies, and Foxf2−/− mice are perinatal lethal with multiple malformations; however, molecular mechanisms pertaining to Foxf2 signaling are severely lacking. In this study, Foxf2 requirements in murine smooth muscle cells were examined using a conditional knock-out approach. We generated novel Foxf2-floxed mice, which we bred to smMHC-Cre-eGFP mice to generate a mouse line with Foxf2 deleted specifically from smooth muscle. These mice exhibited growth retardation due to reduced intestinal length as well as inflammation and remodeling of the small intestine. Colons of Tg(smMHC-Cre-eGFP+/−);Foxf2−/− mice had expansion of the myenteric nerve plexus and increased proliferation of smooth muscle cells leading to thickening of the longitudinal smooth muscle layer. Foxf2 deficiency in colonic smooth muscle was associated with increased expression of Foxf1, PDGFa, PDGFb, PDGF receptor α, and myocardin. FOXF2 bound to promoter regions of these genes indicating direct transcriptional regulation. Foxf2 repressed Foxf1 promoter activity in co-transfection experiments. We also show that knockdown of Foxf2 in colonic smooth muscle cells in vitro and in transgenic mice increased myocardin/serum response factor signaling and increased expression of contractile proteins. Foxf2 attenuated myocardin/serum response factor signaling in smooth muscle cells through direct binding to the N-terminal region of myocardin. Our results indicate that Foxf2 signaling in smooth muscle cells is essential for intestinal development and serum response factor signaling. PMID:25631042

  2. Factors influencing the detectability of early warning signals of population collapse.

    PubMed

    Clements, Christopher F; Drake, John M; Griffiths, Jason I; Ozgul, Arpat

    2015-07-01

    The recent description of potentially generic early warning signals is a promising development that may help conservationists to anticipate a population's collapse prior to its occurrence. So far, the majority of such warning signals documented have been in highly controlled laboratory systems or in theoretical models. Data from wild populations, however, are typically restricted both temporally and spatially due to limited monitoring resources and intrinsic ecological heterogeneity-limitations that may affect the detectability of generic early warning signals, as they add additional stochasticity to population abundance estimates. Consequently, spatial and temporal subsampling may serve to either muffle or magnify early warning signals. Using a combination of theoretical models and analysis of experimental data, we evaluate the extent to which statistical warning signs are robust to data corruption. PMID:26098338

  3. Notch signaling represses hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts under cobalt-mimicked hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    LI, CHEN-TIAN; LIU, JIAN-XIU; YU, BO; LIU, RUI; DONG, CHAO; LI, SONG-JIAN

    2016-01-01

    The modification of Wnt and Notch signaling pathways by hypoxia, and its association with osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis remain to be fully elucidated. To investigate Wnt-Notch crosstalk, and its role in hypoxia-induced osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis regulation, the present study investigated the effects of cobalt-mimicked hypoxia on the mouse pre-osteoblast-like cell line, MC3T3-E1, when the Notch signals were repressed using a γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. The data showed that the cobalt-mimicked hypoxia suppressed cell proliferation under normal conditions, but increased cell proliferation under conditions of Notch repression, in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the cobalt treatment increased the levels of activated β-catenin protein and the expression levels of the target genes, axis inhibition protein 2 and myelocytomatosis oncogene, under DAPT-induced Notch repression. However, no significant changes were found in the expression levels of the Notch intracellular domain protein or the Notch target gene, hes1. In a β-catenin gene-knockdown experiment, the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 cells under hypoxia were decreased by DAPT treatment, and knockdown of the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) suppressed the cobalt-induced increase in Wnt target gene levels. No significant difference in cell proliferation rate was found following DAPT treatment when the expression of HIF-1α was knocked down. The results of the present study showed the opposing effects of Wnt and Notch signaling under cobalt-mimicked hypoxia, which were partially regulated by HIF-1α, The results also showed that osteoblast proliferation was dependent on Wnt-Notch signal crosstalk. PMID:27220406

  4. Fuz Regulates Craniofacial Development through Tissue Specific Responses to Signaling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zichao; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Niederreither, Karen; Venugopalan, Shankar; Florez, Sergio; Finnell, Richard H.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    The planar cell polarity effector gene Fuz regulates ciliogenesis and Fuz loss of function studies reveal an array of embryonic phenotypes. However, cilia defects can affect many signaling pathways and, in humans, cilia defects underlie several craniofacial anomalies. To address this, we analyzed the craniofacial phenotype and signaling responses of the Fuz−/− mice. We demonstrate a unique role for Fuz in regulating both Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling during craniofacial development. Fuz expression first appears in the dorsal tissues and later in ventral tissues and craniofacial regions during embryonic development coincident with cilia development. The Fuz−/− mice exhibit severe craniofacial deformities including anophthalmia, agenesis of the tongue and incisors, a hypoplastic mandible, cleft palate, ossification/skeletal defects and hyperplastic malformed Meckel's cartilage. Hh signaling is down-regulated in the Fuz null mice, while canonical Wnt signaling is up-regulated revealing the antagonistic relationship of these two pathways. Meckel's cartilage is expanded in the Fuz−/− mice due to increased cell proliferation associated with the up-regulation of Wnt canonical target genes and decreased non-canonical pathway genes. Interestingly, cilia development was decreased in the mandible mesenchyme of Fuz null mice, suggesting that cilia may antagonize Wnt signaling in this tissue. Furthermore, expression of Fuz decreased expression of Wnt pathway genes as well as a Wnt-dependent reporter. Finally, chromatin IP experiments demonstrate that β-catenin/TCF-binding directly regulates Fuz expression. These data demonstrate a new model for coordination of Hh and Wnt signaling and reveal a Fuz-dependent negative feedback loop controlling Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:21935430

  5. Thyrotropin (TSH)-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor in thyroid cancer cells in vitro: evaluation of TSH signal transduction and of angiogenesis-stimulating growth factors.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Scharrenbach, Vera; Wunderlich, Anette; Hassan, Iyad; Lingelbach, Susanne; Zielke, Andreas

    2004-12-01

    Thyroid tumor growth requires angiogenesis, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to be the most important endothelial mitogen. TSH is the major thyrotropic hormone, but its impact to modulate VEGF production has not yet been studied. Several other growth factors have also been shown to affect thyroid cancer cell growth and function in vitro. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to 1) establish the effect of TSH on VEGF as well as 2) evaluate the TSH signal transduction of this effect, and 3) screen other growth factors for the ability to modulate VEGF in thyroid cancer cell lines. HTC, a follicular cancer cell line lacking endogenous TSH receptor (TSHr), its receptor positive variant (HTC TSHr), and a cell line of Huerthle cell origin (XTC) were used. After stimulation with growth factors in vitro [TSH; epidermal growth factor (EGF), IGF, placenta growth factor, TGF-alpha, TGF-beta1, fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and hepatocyte growth factor] cells were analyzed for VEGF gene expression by Northern blotting and for VEGF protein by enzyme immunoassay. TSHr signal transduction was evaluated by analyzing the effect of stimulators (cholera toxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, forskolin, and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate) and inhibitors (2',5'-dideoxyadenosine and staurosporine) on VEGF protein levels under basal and TSH-stimulated conditions. TSH increased VEGF mRNA and protein in a dose-dependent manner in HTC TSHr and XTC cells by up to 40%. The effects of TSH were mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), rather than protein kinase A (PKA), stimulation, because inhibition of PKC by staurosporine resulted in a decrease in VEGF production of up to 65%, whereas inhibition of the PKA signal transduction pathway (2',5'-dideoxyadenosine) resulted in only a minor decrease. TSH was not the most powerful stimulator of VEGF production. TGF-beta1 and EGF were 1.5- to 2-fold more potent. Placenta growth factor and TGF-alpha did not

  6. Microfluidic platform for the study of intercellular communication via soluble factor-cell and cell-cell paracrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Matthew B; Trump, Lisa; Desai, Amit V; Schook, Lawrence B; Gaskins, H Rex; Kenis, Paul J A

    2014-07-01

    Diffusion of autocrine and paracrine signaling molecules allows cells to communicate in the absence of physical contact. This chemical-based, long-range communication serves crucial roles in tissue function, activation of the immune system, and other physiological functions. Despite its importance, few in vitro methods to study cell-cell signaling through paracrine factors are available today. Here, we report the design and validation of a microfluidic platform that enables (i) soluble molecule-cell and/or (ii) cell-cell paracrine signaling. In the microfluidic platform, multiple cell populations can be introduced into parallel channels. The channels are separated by arrays of posts allowing diffusion of paracrine molecules between cell populations. A computational analysis was performed to aid design of the microfluidic platform. Specifically, it revealed that channel spacing affects both spatial and temporal distribution of signaling molecules, while the initial concentration of the signaling molecule mainly affects the concentration of the signaling molecules excreted by the cells. To validate the microfluidic platform, a model system composed of the signaling molecule lipopolysaccharide, mouse macrophages, and engineered human embryonic kidney cells was introduced into the platform. Upon diffusion from the first channel to the second channel, lipopolysaccharide activates the macrophages which begin to produce TNF-α. The TNF-α diffuses from the second channel to the third channel to stimulate the kidney cells, which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in response. By increasing the initial lipopolysaccharide concentration an increase in fluorescent response was recorded, demonstrating the ability to quantify intercellular communication between 3D cellular constructs using the microfluidic platform reported here. Overall, these studies provide a detailed analysis on how concentration of the initial signaling molecules, spatiotemporal dynamics, and inter

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alkyl Quinolones Repress Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) Signaling through HIF-1α Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Claire; Reen, F. Jerry; Mooij, Marlies J.; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Adams, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has recently emerged to be a crucial regulator of the immune response following pathogen perception, including the response to the important human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, as mechanisms involved in HIF-1 activation by bacterial pathogens are not fully characterized, understanding how bacteria and bacterial compounds impact on HIF-1α stabilization remains a major challenge. In this context, we have focused on the effect of secreted factors of P. aeruginosa on HIF-1 regulation. Surprisingly, we found that P. aeruginosa cell-free supernatant significantly repressed HIF-1α protein levels. Further characterization revealed that HIF-1α downregulation was dependent on a subset of key secreted factors involved in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, the 2-alkyl-4-quinolone (AQ) quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules, and in particular the pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Under hypoxic conditions, the AQ-dependent downregulation of HIF-1α was linked to the suppressed induction of the important HIF-1 target gene hexokinase II. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AQ molecules directly target HIF-1α protein degradation through the 26S-proteasome proteolytic pathway but independently of the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD). In conclusion, this is the first report showing that bacterial molecules can repress HIF-1α protein levels. Manipulation of HIF-1 signaling by P. aeruginosa AQs could have major consequences for the host response to infection and may facilitate the infective properties of this pathogen. PMID:22949552

  8. Notch1 signaling antagonizes transforming growth factor-β pathway and induces apoptosis in rabbit trophoblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Jing; Niu, Yuyu; Si, Wei; Wei, Qiang; Ji, Weizhi

    2014-04-15

    During mammalian development, placental growth needs to be tightly controlled by apoptosis. However, despite the potentially significant problems, the strategies used to balance growth and apoptosis have remained elusive. Here we report that activation of the Notch1 signal pathway inhibits transduction of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling, which leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in rabbit trophoblast stem cells (TSCs). The subcellular location of notch intracellular domain 1 (NICD1) appears to determine whether TGF-β signaling will be inhibited or not. Moreover, changes in NICD1 subcellular location are regulated by intracellular calcium distribution. Collectively, these results establish a potential mechanism whereby TSCs can balance growth and apoptosis, and thus guarantee the development of the fetus. PMID:24251382

  9. Cytoplasmic domains determine signal specificity, cellular routing characteristics and influence ligand binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Dull, T J; Honegger, A M; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1989-01-01

    The cell surface receptors for insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both employ a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity to fulfil their distinct biological roles. To identify the structural domains responsible for various receptor activities, we have generated chimeric receptor polypeptides consisting of major EGF and insulin receptor structural domains and examined their biochemical properties and cellular signalling activities. The EGF-insulin receptor hybrids are properly synthesized and transported to the cell surface, where they form binding competent structures that are defined by the origin of their extracellular domains. While their ligand binding affinities are altered, we find that these chimeric receptors are fully functional in transmitting signals across the plasma membrane and into the cell. Thus, EGF receptor and insulin receptor cytoplasmic domain signalling capabilities are independent of their new heterotetrameric or monomeric environments respectively. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains carry the structural determinants that define kinase specificity, mitogenic and transforming potential, and receptor routing. Images PMID:2583088

  10. Transforming Growth Factor β/activin signalling induces epithelial cell flattening during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brigaud, Isabelle; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Chlasta, Julien; Le Bail, Sandrine; Couderc, Jean-Louis; Grammont, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the regulation of epithelial morphogenesis is essential for the formation of tissues and organs in multicellular organisms, little is known about how signalling pathways control cell shape changes in space and time. In the Drosophila ovarian epithelium, the transition from a cuboidal to a squamous shape is accompanied by a wave of cell flattening and by the ordered remodelling of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions. We show that activation of the TGFβ pathway is crucial to determine the timing, the degree and the dynamic of cell flattening. Within these cells, TGFβ signalling controls cell-autonomously the formation of Actin filament and the localisation of activated Myosin II, indicating that internal forces are generated and used to remodel AJ and to promote cytoskeleton rearrangement. Our results also reveal that TGFβ signalling controls Notch activity and that its functions are partly executed through Notch. Thus, we demonstrate that the cells that undergo the cuboidal-to-squamous transition produce active cell-shaping mechanisms, rather than passively flattening in response to a global force generated by the growth of the underlying cells. Thus, our work on TGFβ signalling provides new insights into the mechanisms through which signal transduction cascades orchestrate cell shape changes to generate proper organ structure. PMID:25681395

  11. The Drosophila Forkhead transcription factor FOXO mediates the reduction in cell number associated with reduced insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jünger, Martin A; Rintelen, Felix; Stocker, Hugo; Wasserman, Jonathan D; Végh, Mátyás; Radimerski, Thomas; Greenberg, Michael E; Hafen, Ernst

    2003-01-01

    Background Forkhead transcription factors belonging to the FOXO subfamily are negatively regulated by protein kinase B (PKB) in response to signaling by insulin and insulin-like growth factor in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals. In Drosophila, the insulin-signaling pathway regulates the size of cells, organs, and the entire body in response to nutrient availability, by controlling both cell size and cell number. In this study, we present a genetic characterization of dFOXO, the only Drosophila FOXO ortholog. Results Ectopic expression of dFOXO and human FOXO3a induced organ-size reduction and cell death in a manner dependent on phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase and nutrient levels. Surprisingly, flies homozygous for dFOXO null alleles are viable and of normal size. They are, however, more sensitive to oxidative stress. Furthermore, dFOXO function is required for growth inhibition associated with reduced insulin signaling. Loss of dFOXO suppresses the reduction in cell number but not the cell-size reduction elicited by mutations in the insulin-signaling pathway. By microarray analysis and subsequent genetic validation, we have identified d4E-BP, which encodes a translation inhibitor, as a relevant dFOXO target gene. Conclusion Our results show that dFOXO is a crucial mediator of insulin signaling in Drosophila, mediating the reduction in cell number in insulin-signaling mutants. We propose that in response to cellular stresses, such as nutrient deprivation or increased levels of reactive oxygen species, dFOXO is activated and inhibits growth through the action of target genes such as d4E-BP. PMID:12908874

  12. Osmotic Stress, not Aldose Reductase Activity, Directly induces Growth Factors and MAPK Signaling changes during Sugar Cataract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Xing, Kuiyi; Randazzo, James; Blessing, Karen; Lou, Marjorie F.; Kador, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    In sugar cataract formation in rats, aldose reductase (AR) actitvity is not only linked to lenticular sorbitol (diabetic) or galactitol (galactosemic) formation but also to signal transduction changes, cytotoxic signals and activation of apoptosis. Using both in vitro and in vivo techniques, the interrelationship between AR activity, polyol (sorbitol and galactitol) formation, osmotic stress, growth factor induction, and cell signaling changes have been investigated. For in vitro studies, lenses from Sprague Dawley rats were cultured for up to 48 hrs in TC-199-bicarbonate media containing either 30 mM fructose (control), or 30 mM glucose or galctose with/without the aldose reductase inhibitors AL1576 or tolrestat, the sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDI) CP-470,711, or 15 mM mannitol (osmotic-compensated media). For in vivo studies, lenses were obtained from streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats fed diet with/without the ARIs AL1576 or tolrestat for 10 weeks. As expected, lenses cultured in high glucose / galactose media or from untreated diabetic rats all showed a decrease in the GSH pool that was lessened by ARI treatment. Lenses either from diabetic rats or from glucose/galactose culture conditions showed increased expression of basic-FGF, TGF-β, and increased signaling through P-Akt, P-ERK1/2 and P-SAPK/JNK which were also normalized by ARIs to the expression levels observed in non-diabetic controls. Culturing rat lenses in osomotically compensated media containing 30 mM glucose or galactose did not lead to increased growth factor expression or altered signaling. These studies indicate that it is the biophysical response of the lens to osmotic stress that results in an increased intralenticular production of basic-FGF and TGF-β and the altered cytotoxic signaling that is observed during sugar cataract formation. PMID:22710095

  13. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grants, Jennifer M; Ying, Lisa T L; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator's dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals. PMID:26715664

  14. The chemokine-like factor 1 induces asthmatic pathological change by activating nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Li, Guang-yan; Wang, Zhen-zhen; Ji, Hai-jie; Wang, Dong-mei; Hu, Jin-feng; Yuan, Yu-he; Liu, Gang; Chen, Nai-hong

    2014-05-01

    CKLF1, which exhibits chemotactic activities on a wide spectrum of leukocytes, is up-regulated during the progress of asthma. It plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease. Here, we report that CKLF1 has the capability to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway leading to the pathological change in the lung. The HEK293-CCR4 cell line, which expressed CCR4 stably, was established and screened. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the expression of NF-κB in HEK293-CCR4 and A549 cells following the C27 (10μg/ml) added in each well at different times. These results showed that C27 (10μg/ml) time-dependently induced the accumulation of NF-κB in the nucleus of HEK293-CCR4 and A549 cells. In addition, CKLF1 plasmid (100μg) injection and electroporation led to the asthmatic change in the lung in mice as shown by HE and PAS staining. Furthermore, it was confirmed that CKLF1 significantly up-regulated the p-IκB expression, decreased the IκB expression, and suppressed the NF-κB expression in the cytoplasm of pulmonary tissue in vivo study. Intriguingly, an enhanced nuclear accumulation of NF-κB was observed in the lung of pCDI-CKLF1 electroporated mice, compared to that in the sham group. Therefore, the NF-κB signaling pathway was involved in the asthmatic change induced by CKLF1, among which CCR4 might play a crucial role. PMID:24583145

  15. Complexity in Interpretation of Embryonic Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Response to Transforming Growth FactorSignaling

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shaheen

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved and fundamental process that governs morphogenesis in development and may also contribute to cancer metastasis. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) is a potent inducer of EMT in various developmental and tumor systems. The analysis of TGF-β signal transduction pathways is now considered a critically important area of biology, since many defects occur in these pathways in embryonic development. The complexity of TGF-β signal transduction networks is overwhelming due to the large numbers of interacting constituents, complicated feedforward, feedback and crosstalk circuitry mechanisms that they involve in addition to the cellular kinetics and enzymatics that contribute to cell signaling. As a result of this complexity, apparently simple but highly important questions remain unanswered, that is, how do epithelial cells respond to such TGF-β signals? System biology and cellular kinetics play a crucial role in cellular function; omissions of such a critical contributor may lead to inaccurate understanding of embryonic EMT. In this review, we identify and explain why certain conditions need to be considered for a true representation of TGF-β signaling in vivo to better understand the controlled, yet delicate mechanism of embryonic EMT. PMID:17587819

  16. Structural Insights into the Inhibition of Wnt Signaling by Cancer Antigen 5T4/Wnt-Activated Inhibitory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Malinauskas, Tomas; Harlos, Karl; Jones, E. Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The tumor antigen 5T4/WAIF1 (Wnt-activated inhibitory factor 1; also known as Trophoblast glycoprotein TPBG) is a cell surface protein targeted in multiple cancer immunotherapy clinical trials. Recently, it has been shown that 5T4/WAIF1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a signaling system central to many developmental and pathological processes. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is controlled by multiple inhibitors and activators. Here, we report crystal structures for the extracellular domain of 5T4/WAIF1 at 1.8 Å resolution. They reveal a highly glycosylated, rigid core, comprising eight leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), which serves as a platform to present evolutionarily conserved surface residues in the N-terminal LRR1. Structural and cell-based analyses, coupled with previously reported in vivo data, suggest that Tyr325 plus the LRR1 surface centered on a second exposed aromatic residue, Phe97, are essential for inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These results provide a structural basis for the development of 5T4/WAIF1-targeted therapies that preserve or block 5T4/WAIF1-mediated inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24582434

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling regulates the segregation of artery and vein via ERK activity during vascular development

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hee; Schmitt, Christopher E.; Woolls, Melissa J.; Holland, Melinda B.; Kim, Jun-Dae; Jin, Suk-Won

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► VEGF-A signaling regulates the segregation of axial vessels. ► VEGF-A signaling is mediated by PKC and ERK in this process. ► Ectopic activation of ERK is sufficient to rescue defects in vessel segregation. -- Abstract: Segregation of two axial vessels, the dorsal aorta and caudal vein, is one of the earliest patterning events occur during development of vasculature. Despite the importance of this process and recent advances in our understanding on vascular patterning during development, molecular mechanisms that coordinate the segregation of axial vessels remain largely elusive. In this report, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor-A (Vegf-A) signaling regulates the segregation of dorsal aorta and axial vein during development. Inhibition of Vegf-A pathway components including ligand Vegf-A and its cognate receptor Kdrl, caused failure in segregation of axial vessels in zebrafish embryos. Similarly, chemical inhibition of Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (Map2k1)/Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (Erk) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3 K), which are downstream effectors of Vegf-A signaling pathway, led to the fusion of two axial vessels. Moreover, we find that restoring Erk activity by over-expression of constitutively active MEK in embryos with a reduced level of Vegf-A signaling can rescue the defects in axial vessel segregation. Taken together, our data show that segregation of axial vessels requires the function of Vegf-A signaling, and Erk may function as the major downstream effector in this process.

  18. Growth factors mediated cell signalling in prostate cancer progression: Implications in discovery of anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Negi, Arvind; Rana, Anil; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality amongst world's population, in which prostate cancer is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. Globally, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in the developed world and is increasing at alarming rates in the developing countries. Prostate cancer is mostly a very sluggish progressing disease, caused by the overproduction of steroidal hormones like dihydrotestosterone or due to over-expression of enzymes such as 5-α-reductase. Various studies have revealed that growth factors play a crucial role in the progression of prostate cancer as they act either by directly elevating the level of steroidal hormones or upregulating enzyme efficacy by the active feedback mechanism. Presently, treatment options for prostate cancer include radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy. If treatment is done with prevailing traditional chemotherapy; it leads to resistance and development of androgen-independent prostate cancer that further complicates the situation with no cure option left. The current review article is an attempt to cover and establish an understanding of some major signalling pathways intervened through survival factors (IGF-1R), growth factors (TGF-α, EGF), Wnt, Hedgehog, interleukin, cytokinins and death factor receptor which are frequently dysregulated in prostate cancer. This will enable the researchers to design and develop better therapeutic strategies targeting growth factors and their cross talks mediated prostate cancer cell signalling. PMID:26297992

  19. Quercetin 3-O-glucoside suppresses epidermal growth factor-induced migration by inhibiting EGFR signaling in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Han, Song-I; Yun, Jeong-Hun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most dangerous cancers and is associated with a grave prognosis. Despite increased knowledge of the complex signaling networks responsible for progression of pancreatic cancer, many challenging therapies have fallen short of expectations. In this study, we examined the anti-migratory effect of quercetin 3-O-glucoside in epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration by inhibiting EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling in several human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Treatment with quercetin, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, and quercetin 7-O-glucoside differentially suppressed epidermal growth factor-induced migration activity of human pancreatic cancer cells. In particular, quercetin 3-O-glucoside strongly inhibited the infiltration activity of pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, quercetin 3-O-glucoside exerted the anti-migratory effect even at a relatively low dose compared with other forms of quercetin. The anti-tumor effects of quercetin 3-O-glucoside were mediated by selectively inhibiting the EGFR-mediated FAK, AKT, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Combinatorial treatment with quercetin 3-O-glucoside plus gemcitabine showed the synergistic anti-migratory effect on epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. These results suggest that quercetin 3-O-glucoside has potential for anti-metastatic therapy in human pancreatic cancer. PMID:26109002

  20. Granulin epithelin precursor: a bone morphogenic protein 2-inducible growth factor that activates Erk1/2 signaling and JunB transcription factor in chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jian Q.; Guo, Feng-Jin; Jiang, Bai-Chun; Zhang, Yan; Frenkel, Sally; Wang, Da-Wei; Tang, Wei; Xie, Yixia; Liu, Chuan-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Granulin epithelin precursor (GEP) has been implicated in development, tissue regeneration, tumorigenesis, and inflammation. Herein we report that GEP stimulates chondrocyte differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and endochondral ossification ex vivo, and GEP-knockdown mice display skeleton defects. Similar to bone morphogenic protein (BMP) 2, application of the recombinant GEP accelerates rabbit cartilage repair in vivo. GEP is a key downstream molecule of BMP2, and it is required for BMP2-mediated chondrocyte differentiation. We also show that GEP activates chondrocyte differentiation through Erk1/2 signaling and that JunB transcription factor is one of key downstream molecules of GEP in chondrocyte differentiation. Collectively, these findings reveal a novel critical role of GEP growth factor in chondrocyte differentiation and the molecular events both in vivo and in vitro.—Feng, J. Q., Guo, F.-J., Jiang, B.-C., Zhang, Y., Frenkel, S., Wang, D.-W., Tang, W., Xie, Y., Liu, C.-J. Granulin epithelin precursor: a bone morphogenic protein 2-inducible growth factor that activates Erk1/2 signaling and JunB transcription factor in chondrogenesis. PMID:20124436

  1. MULTIPLE TRANSCRIPTION-FACTOR GENES ARE EARLY TARGETS OF PHYTOCHROME A SIGNALING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phytochrome family of sensory photoreceptors directs adaptational changes in gene expression in response to environmental light signals. Using oligonucleotide microarrays to measure expression profiles in wild-type and phytochrome A (phyA) null-mutant Arabidopsis seedlings, we have shown that 10...

  2. Na/H Exchange Regulatory Factor 1, a Novel AKT-associating Protein, Regulates Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Signaling through a B-Raf–Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Yang, Yanmei

    2008-01-01

    Na/H exchange regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a scaffolding protein that regulates signaling and trafficking of several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R). GPCRs activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 through different mechanisms. Here, we characterized NHERF1 regulation of PTH1R-stimulated ERK1/2. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation by a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent, but protein kinase C-, cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate-, and Rap1-independent pathway in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the PTH1R and engineered to express NHERF1 under the control of tetracycline. NHERF1 blocked PTH-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation downstream of PKA. This suggested that NHERF1 inhibitory effects on ERK1/2 occur at a postreceptor locus. Forskolin activated ERK1/2, and this effect was blocked by NHERF1. NHERF1 interacted with AKT and inhibited ERK1/2 activation by decreasing the stimulatory effect of 14-3-3 binding to B-Raf, while increasing the inhibitory influence of AKT negative regulation on ERK1/2 activation. This novel regulatory mechanism provides a new model by which cytoplasmic adapter proteins modulate ERK1/2 activation through a receptor-independent mechanism involving B-Raf. PMID:18272783

  3. Coordinate post-transcriptional repression of Dpp-dependent transcription factors attenuates signal range during development

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Fay G.; Harris, Robin E.; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Ashe, Hilary L.

    2015-01-01

    Precise control of the range of signalling molecule action is crucial for correct cell fate patterning during development. For example, Drosophila ovarian germline stem cells (GSCs) are maintained by exquisitely short-range BMP signalling from the niche. In the absence of BMP signalling, one GSC daughter differentiates into a cystoblast (CB) and this fate is stabilised by Brain tumour (Brat) and Pumilio (Pum)-mediated post-transcriptional repression of mRNAs, including that encoding the Dpp transducer, Mad. However, the identity of other repressed mRNAs and the mechanism of post-transcriptional repression are currently unknown. Here, we identify the Medea and schnurri mRNAs, which encode transcriptional regulators required for activation and/or repression of Dpp target genes, as additional Pum-Brat targets, suggesting that tripartite repression of the transducers is deployed to desensitise the CB to Dpp. In addition, we show that repression by Pum-Brat requires recruitment of the CCR4 and Pop2 deadenylases, with knockdown of deadenylases in vivo giving rise to ectopic GSCs. Consistent with this, Pum-Brat repression leads to poly(A) tail shortening and mRNA degradation in tissue culture cells, and we detect a reduced number of Mad and shn transcripts in the CB relative to the GSC based on single molecule mRNA quantitation. Finally, we show generality of the mechanism by demonstrating that Brat also attenuates pMad and Dpp signalling range in the early embryo. Together our data serve as a platform for understanding how post-transcriptional repression restricts interpretation of BMPs and other cell signals in order to allow robust cell fate patterning during development. PMID:26293305

  4. Inhibition of myocardin-related transcription factor/serum response factor signaling decreases lung fibrosis and promotes mesenchymal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Thomas H; Ajayi, Iyabode O; Subbotina, Natalya; Dodi, Amos E; Rodansky, Eva S; Chibucos, Lauren N; Kim, Kevin K; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G; White, Eric S; Zhou, Yong; Higgins, Peter D R; Larsen, Scott D; Neubig, Richard R; Horowitz, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    Myofibroblasts are crucial to the pathogenesis of tissue fibrosis. Their formation of stress fibers results in the release of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a transcriptional coactivator of serum response factor (SRF). MRTF-A (Mkl1)-deficient mice are protected from lung fibrosis. We hypothesized that the SRF/MRTF pathway inhibitor CCG-203971 would modulate myofibroblast function in vitro and limit lung fibrosis in vivo. Normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lung fibroblasts were treated with/without CCG-203971 (N-[4-chlorophenyl]-1-[3-(2-furanyl)benzoyl]-3-piperidine carboxamide) and/or Fas-activating antibody in the presence/absence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and apoptosis was assessed. In vivo studies examined the effect of therapeutically administered CCG-203971 on lung fibrosis in two distinct murine models of fibrosis induced by bleomycin or targeted type II alveolar epithelial injury. In vitro, CCG-203971 prevented nuclear localization of MRTF-A; increased the apoptotic susceptibility of normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis fibroblasts; blocked TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation; and inhibited TGF-β1-induced expression of fibronectin, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. TGF-β1 did not protect fibroblasts or myofibroblasts from apoptosis in the presence of CCG-203971. In vivo, CCG-203971 significantly reduced lung collagen content in both murine models while decreasing alveolar plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and promoting myofibroblast apoptosis. These data support a central role of the SRF/MRTF pathway in the pathobiology of lung fibrosis and suggest that its inhibition can help resolve lung fibrosis by promoting fibroblast apoptosis. PMID:25681733

  5. Inhibition of Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor/Serum Response Factor Signaling Decreases Lung Fibrosis and Promotes Mesenchymal Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sisson, Thomas H.; Ajayi, Iyabode O.; Subbotina, Natalya; Dodi, Amos E.; Rodansky, Eva S.; Chibucos, Lauren N.; Kim, Kevin K.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; White, Eric S.; Zhou, Yong; Higgins, Peter D.R.; Larsen, Scott D.; Neubig, Richard R.; Horowitz, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are crucial to the pathogenesis of tissue fibrosis. Their formation of stress fibers results in the release of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a transcriptional coactivator of serum response factor (SRF). MRTF-A (Mkl1)-deficient mice are protected from lung fibrosis. We hypothesized that the SRF/MRTF pathway inhibitor CCG-203971 would modulate myofibroblast function in vitro and limit lung fibrosis in vivo. Normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lung fibroblasts were treated with/without CCG-203971 (N-[4-chlorophenyl]-1-[3-(2-furanyl)benzoyl]-3-piperidine carboxamide) and/or Fas-activating antibody in the presence/absence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and apoptosis was assessed. In vivo studies examined the effect of therapeutically administered CCG-203971 on lung fibrosis in two distinct murine models of fibrosis induced by bleomycin or targeted type II alveolar epithelial injury. In vitro, CCG-203971 prevented nuclear localization of MRTF-A; increased the apoptotic susceptibility of normal and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis fibroblasts; blocked TGF-β1–induced myofibroblast differentiation; and inhibited TGF-β1–induced expression of fibronectin, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. TGF-β1 did not protect fibroblasts or myofibroblasts from apoptosis in the presence of CCG-203971. In vivo, CCG-203971 significantly reduced lung collagen content in both murine models while decreasing alveolar plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and promoting myofibroblast apoptosis. These data support a central role of the SRF/MRTF pathway in the pathobiology of lung fibrosis and suggest that its inhibition can help resolve lung fibrosis by promoting fibroblast apoptosis. PMID:25681733

  6. Intracrine prostaglandin E(2) signalling regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression through retinoic acid receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Jiménez, María I Arenas; Manzano, Victoria Moreno; Lucio-Cazaña, Francisco J

    2012-12-01

    We have previously found in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells that hypoxia- and all-trans retinoic acid-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation is accompanied by retinoic acid receptor-β up-regulation. Here we first investigated whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression is dependent on retinoic acid receptor-β and our results confirmed it since (i) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents hypoxia, hypoxia-mimetic agent desferrioxamine, all-trans retinoic acid and interleukin-1β increased retinoic acid receptor-β expression, (ii) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation was prevented by retinoic acid receptor-β antagonist LE-135 or siRNA retinoic acid receptor-β and (iii) there was direct binding of retinoic acid receptor-β to the retinoic acid response element in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α promoter upon treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2). Since intracellular prostaglandin E(2) mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation in normoxia in HK-2 cells, we next investigated and confirmed, its role in the up-regulation of retinoic acid receptor-β in normoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents all-trans retinoic acid, interleukin-1β and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2) by inhibiting cyclooxygenases, prostaglandin influx transporter or EP receptors. Interestingly, the hypoxia-induced increase in retinoic acid receptor-β expression and accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was also blocked by the inhibitors tested. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that retinoic acid receptor-β signalling is involved in the control of the expression of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in both normoxia and hypoxia and that retinoic acid receptor-β expression is found to be strictly regulated by intracellular prostaglandin E(2). Given the relevance of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in the kidney in terms of tumorigenesis, progressive renal failure, production

  7. Working With LGBT Baby Boomers and Older Adults: Factors That Signal a Welcoming Service Environment.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Catherine F; Moone, Rajean P; Olson, Andrea M

    2015-01-01

    Many providers recognize the importance of creating culturally competent services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Although multiple resources list steps to make professional practices more LGBT-welcoming, these resources provide no empirical data to support their recommendations. LGBT older adults (N = 327) were asked to describe what signals that a provider is LGBT-welcoming. Six of the top 10 signals related to provider behavior and suggest the importance of staff training; the balance included display of signage and rainbow flags, use of inclusive language on forms and the presence of LGBT-identified staff. Results provide evidence-based recommendations for working with LGBT older adults. PMID:26193473

  8. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells. PMID:27458535

  9. Weighted calibration with reduced number of signals by weighing factor modelling: application to the identification of explosives by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Beatriz; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N; Camões, M Filomena G F C; Salgueiro, Pedro A S

    2013-12-01

    The linear weighted regression model (LW) can be used to calibrate analytical instrumentation in a range of quantities (e.g. concentration or mass) wider than possible by the linear unweighted regression model, LuW (i.e. the least squares regression model), since this model can be applied when signals are not equally precise through the calibration range. If precision of signals varies within the calibration range, the regression line should be defined taking into account that more precise signals are more reliable and should count more to define regression parameters. Nevertheless, the LW requires the determination of the variation of signals precision through the calibration range. Typically, this information is collected experimentally for each calibration, requiring a large number of replicate collection of signals of calibrators. This work proposes reducing the number of signals needed to perform LW calibrations by developing models of weighing factors robust to daily variations of instrument sensibility. These models were applied to the determination of the ionic composition of the water soluble fraction of explosives. The adequacy of the developed models was tested through the analysis of control standards, certified reference materials and the ion balance of anions and cations in aqueous extracts of explosives, considering the measurement uncertainty estimated by detailed metrological models. The high success rate of the comparisons between estimated and known quantity values of reference solutions, considering results uncertainty, proves the validity of developed metrological models. The relative expanded measurement uncertainty of single determinations ranged from 1.93% to 35.7% for calibrations performed along 4 months. PMID:24267095

  10. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L.; Tomas, Juan M.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  11. Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Klebsiella pneumoniae Factors Implicated in Blocking Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Anna; Lery, Leticia; Regueiro, Verónica; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Martínez, Verónica; Moranta, David; Llobet, Enrique; González-Nicolau, Mar; Insua, Jose L; Tomas, Juan M; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tournebize, Régis; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an etiologic agent of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. It has been shown that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by reduced early inflammatory response. Recently our group has shown that K. pneumoniae dampens the activation of inflammatory responses by antagonizing the activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway. Our results revealed that K. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharide (CPS) was necessary but not sufficient to attenuate inflammation. To identify additional Klebsiella factors required to dampen inflammation, we standardized and applied a high-throughput gain-of-function screen to examine a Klebsiella transposon mutant library. We identified 114 mutants that triggered the activation of NF-κB. Two gene ontology categories accounted for half of the loci identified in the screening: metabolism and transport genes (32% of the mutants) and envelope-related genes (17%). Characterization of the mutants revealed that the lack of the enterobactin siderophore was linked to a reduced CPS expression, which in turn underlined the NF-κB activation induced by the mutant. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-polysaccharide and the pullulanase (PulA) type 2 secretion system (T2SS) are required for full effectiveness of the immune evasion. Importantly, these factors do not play a redundant role. The fact that LPS O-polysaccharide and T2SS mutant-induced responses were dependent on TLR2-TLR4-MyD88 activation suggested that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA perturbed Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recognition of K. pneumoniae. Finally, we demonstrate that LPS O-polysaccharide and pulA mutants are attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. We propose that LPS O-polysaccharide and PulA T2SS could be new targets for the design of new antimicrobials. Increasing TLR-governed defense responses might provide also selective alternatives for the management of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:25971969

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signals through SHP2 to regulate primary mouse myoblast proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ju; Reed, Sarah A.; Johnson, Sally E.

    2009-08-01

    Niche localized HGF plays an integral role in G{sub 0} exit and the return to mitotic activity of adult skeletal muscle satellite cells. HGF actions are regulated by MET initiated intracellular signaling events that include recruitment of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The importance of SHP2 in HGF-mediated signaling was examined in myoblasts and primary cultures of satellite cells. Myoblasts stably expressing SHP2 (23A2-SHP2) demonstrate increased proliferation rates by comparison to controls or myoblasts expressing a phosphatase-deficient SHP2 (23A2-SHP2DN). By comparison to 23A2 myoblasts, treatment of 23A2-SHP2 cells with HGF does not further increase proliferation rates and 23A2-SHP2DN myoblasts are unresponsive to HGF. Importantly, the effects of SHP2 are independent of downstream ERK1/2 activity as inclusion of PD98059 does not blunt the HGF-induced proliferative response. SHP2 function was further evaluated in primary satellite cell cultures. Ectopic expression of SHP2 in satellite cells tends to decrease proliferation rates and siSHP2 causes an increase the percentage of dividing myogenic cells. Interestingly, treatment of satellite cells with high concentrations of HGF (50 ng/ml) inhibits proliferation, which can be overcome by knockdown of SHP2. From these results, we conclude that HGF signals through SHP2 in myoblasts and satellite cells to directly alter proliferation rates.

  13. Unbiased quantitative proteomics of lipid rafts reveals high specificity for signaling factors

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Leonard J.; de Hoog, Carmen L.; Mann, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Membrane lipids were once thought to be homogenously distributed in the 2D surface of a membrane, but the lipid raft theory suggests that cholesterol and sphingolipids partition away from other membrane lipids. Lipid raft theory further implicates these cholesterol-rich domains in many processes such as signaling and vesicle traffic. However, direct characterization of rafts has been difficult, because they cannot be isolated in pure form. In the first functional proteomic analysis of rafts, we use quantitative high-resolution MS to specifically detect proteins depleted from rafts by cholesterol-disrupting drugs, resulting in a set of 241 authentic lipid raft components. We detect a large proportion of signaling molecules, highly enriched versus total membranes and detergent-resistant fractions, which thus far biochemically defined rafts. Our results provide the first large-scale and unbiased evidence, to our knowledge, for the connection of rafts with signaling and place limits on the fraction of plasma membrane composed by rafts. PMID:12724530

  14. The scaffolding and signaling functions of a localization factor impact polar development

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Patrick D.; Quardokus, Ellen M.; Lawler, Melanie L.; Guo, Xiaoyun; Klein, David; Chen, Joseph C.; Arnold, Randy J.; Brun, Yves V.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In the differentiating alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, organelle synthesis at cell poles is critical to forming different progeny after cell division. Coordination of polar organelle synthesis, including pili and holdfast, and flagellum ejection, is mediated in part by the scaffolding protein PodJ. At the time of cell division, PodJ undergoes regulated processing to a short form that persists at the flagellar pole of swarmer cells. This study analyzes how PodJ’s role in structural and signaling protein localization impacts organelle synthesis. A PodJ mutant with an internal deletion exhibits reduced sensitivity to pili-tropic phage ΦCbK, resulting from reduced pilA gene expression, which can be linked to altered signaling protein localization. The phage sensitivity defect of a ΔpodJ mutant can be partially suppressed by ectopic pilA expression. Induction of PodJ processing, by manipulation of podJ itself or controlled perP expression, resulted in decreased pilus biogenesis and, when coupled with a podJ mutation that reduced pilA expression, led to complete loss of phage sensitivity. As a whole, the results show that PodJ’s scaffolding role for structural and signaling proteins both contribute to flagellar pole organelle development. PMID:22512778

  15. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Signaling is Necessary for Epidermal Growth Factor Mediated Proliferation of SVZ Neural Precursors in vitro Following Neonatal Hypoxia–Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, Dhivyaa; Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Min, Jungsoo; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the importance of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor co-signaling for rat neural precursor (NP) cell proliferation and self-renewal in the context of a developmental brain injury that is associated with cerebral palsy. Consistent with previous studies, we found that there is an increase in the in vitro growth of subventricular zone NPs isolated acutely after cerebral hypoxia–ischemia; however, when cultured in medium that is insufficient to stimulate the IGF type 1 receptor, neurosphere formation and the proliferative capacity of those NPs was severely curtailed. This reduced growth capacity could not be attributed simply to failure to survive. The growth and self-renewal of the NPs could be restored by addition of both IGF-I and IGF-II. Since the size of the neurosphere is predominantly due to cell proliferation we hypothesized that the IGFs were regulating progression through the cell cycle. Analyses of cell cycle progression revealed that IGF-1R activation together with EGFR co-signaling decreased the percentage of cells in G1 and enhanced cell progression into S and G2. This was accompanied by increases in expression of cyclin D1, phosphorylated histone 3, and phosphorylated Rb. Based on these data, we conclude that coordinate signaling between the EGF receptor and the IGF type 1 receptor is necessary for the normal proliferation of NPs as well as for their reactive expansion after injury. These data indicate that manipulations that maintain or amplify IGF signaling in the brain during recovery from developmental brain injuries will enhance the production of new brain cells to improve neurological function in children who are at risk for developing cerebral palsy. PMID:24904523

  16. Tissue factor induces VEGF expression via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Sang, Aimin; Zhu, Manhui; Zhang, Guowei; Guan, Huaijin; Ji, Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential signal mechanism of tissue factor (TF) in the regulation of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. Methods An in vitro RPE cell chemical hypoxia model was established by adding cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in the culture medium. The irritative concentration of CoCl2 was determined with a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay kit. VEGF production in ARPE-19 cells was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting. The Wnt signaling pathway–associated molecules, including phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β), GSK3β, p-β-catenin and β-catenin, were detected with western blotting. pEGFP-N3-hTF was constructed and verified with digestion of the restriction enzyme and sequencing analysis. Human TF overexpression and silencing plasmids were transfected into the ARPE-19 cells to clarify the causal relationship between TF and VEGF expression. The Transwell coculture system of ARPE-19 cells and RF/6A rhesus macaque choroid–retinal endothelial cells was performed to evaluate cell invasion and tube formation ability. Results Our anoxic model of ARPE-19 cells showed that TF expression was upregulated in accordance with variations in hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) and VEGF levels. Silencing and overexpression of TF decreased and increased VEGF expression, respectively. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played an important role in this effect. Results from the ARPE-19 cell and RF/6A cell coculture system showed that the enhancement of TF expression in the ARPE-19 cells led to significantly faster invasion and stronger tube-forming ability of the RF/6A cells, while siRNA-mediated TF silencing caused the opposite effects. Pharmacological disruption of Wnt signaling IWR-1-endo inhibited the effects compared to the TF-overexpressing group

  17. Requirement of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor or Epidermal Growth Factor for Pre-Implantation Embryogenesis via JAK/STAT3 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsung-Hsein; Huang, Chun-Chia; Chen, Chung-I; Huang, Lii-Sheng; Lee, Maw-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) plays a key role in the survivability of mouse embryos during pre-implantation. In this study, we verified the role of LIF by detecting gene expression in morula stage embryos through DNA microarray. Our results showed that LIF knockdown affected expression of 369 genes. After LIF supplementation, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) is most affected by LIF expression. To observe the correlation between LIF and EGF, the LIF knockdown embryos were supplemented with various growth factors, including LIF, EGF, GM-CSF, TGF, and IGF II. Only LIF and EGF caused the rate of blastocyst development to recover significantly from 52% of control to 83% and 93%, respectively. All of the variables, including the diameter of blastocysts, the number of blastomeres, and cells in ICM and TE, were almost restored. Moreover, EGF knockdown also impaired blastocyst development, which was reversed by LIF or EGF supplementation. The treatment with various signaling suppressors revealed that both EGF and LIF promoted embryonic development through the JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway. These data suggest that the EGF and LIF can be compensatory to each other during early embryonic development, and at least one of them is necessary for sustaining the normal development of pre-implantation embryos. PMID:27096934

  18. Cross-talk between Smad and p38 MAPK signalling in transforming growth factor {beta} signal transduction in human glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dziembowska, Magdalena; Danilkiewicz, Malgorzata; Wesolowska, Aleksandra; Zupanska, Agata; Chouaib, Salem; Kaminska, Bozena . E-mail: bozenakk@nencki.gov.pl

    2007-03-23

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-{beta}) is a multifunctional cytokine involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Malignant tumour cells often do not respond to TGF-{beta} by growth inhibition, but retain responsiveness to cytokine in regulating extracellular matrix deposition, cell adhesion, and migration. We demonstrated that TGF-{beta}1 does not affect viability or proliferation of human glioblastoma T98G, but increases transcriptional responses exemplified by induction of MMP-9 expression. TGF-{beta} receptors were functional in T98G glioblastoma cells leading to SMAD3/SMAD4 nuclear translocation and activation of SMAD-dependent promoter. In parallel, a selective activation of p38 MAPK, and phosphorylation of its substrates: ATF2 and c-Jun proteins were followed by a transient activation of AP-1 transcription factor. Surprisingly, an inhibition of p38 MAPK with a specific inhibitor, SB202190, abolished TGF-inducible activation of Smad-dependent promoter and decreased Smad2 phosphorylation. It suggests an unexpected interaction between Smad and p38 MAPK pathways in TGF-{beta}1-induced signalling.

  19. Interferon regulatory factor subcellular localization is determined by a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the DNA-binding domain and interaction with cytoplasmic retention factors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joe F.; Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Horvath, Curt M.

    2000-01-01

    The transduction of type I interferon signals to the nucleus relies on activation of a protein complex, ISGF3, involving two signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, STAT1 and STAT2, and the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF) protein, p48/ISGF3γ. The STAT subunits are cytoplasmically localized in unstimulated cells and rapidly translocate to the nucleus of IFN-stimulated cells, but the p48/ISGF3γ protein is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, regardless of IFN stimulation. Here, we demonstrate that p48 is efficiently and constitutively targeted to the nucleus. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of green fluorescent protein-p48 fragments indicates that p48 contains a bipartite nuclear retention signal within its amino-terminal DNA-binding domain. This signal is preserved in two other IRF proteins involved in immune responses, ICSBP and IRF4. Mutations to clustered basic residues within amino acids 50–100 of p48 or IRF4 disrupt their nuclear accumulation, and DNA-binding ability is not required for nuclear targeting. This is the only example of a nuclear localization signal for any ISGF3 component and assigns a second function to the IRF DNA-binding domain. We also demonstrate that the nuclear distribution of p48 is dramatically altered by coexpression of the STAT2 protein, indicating that STAT2 forms a cytoplasmic complex with p48, overriding the intrinsic p48 nuclear targeting. Retention by STAT2 may serve to regulate the activity of free p48 and/or guarantee that cytoplasmic pools of preassociated STAT2:p48 are available for rapid activation of the IFN response. These findings suggest that analogous mechanisms may exist for regulating the distribution of other IRF proteins. PMID:10860992

  20. Development of a Multicolor Bioluminescence Imaging Platform to Simultaneously Investigate Transcription Factor NF-κB Signaling and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Knol-Blankevoort, Vicky T; Mezzanotte, Laura; Rabelink, Martijn J W E; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Kaijzel, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a novel multicolor bioluminescent imaging platform that enables us to simultaneously investigate transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling and apoptosis. We genetically modified the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 to express green, red, and blue light-emitting luciferases to monitor cell number and viability, NF-κB promoter activity, and to enable specific cell sorting and detection, respectively. Z-DEVD-animoluciferin, the pro-luciferin substrate, was used to determine apoptotic caspase 3/7 activity. We used this multicolored cell line for the in vitro evaluation of natural compounds and in vivo optical imaging of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-induced NF-κB activation (Mezzanotte et al., PLoS One 9:e85550, 2014). PMID:27424911

  1. Pin1 down-regulates transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling by inducing degradation of Smad proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ayako; Koinuma, Daizo; Miyazawa, Keiji; Uchida, Takafumi; Saitoh, Masao; Kawabata, Masahiro; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Akiyama, Hirotada; Abe, Masahiro; Miyazono, Kohei; Matsumoto, Toshio; Imamura, Takeshi

    2009-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is crucial in numerous cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. TGF-beta signaling is transduced by intracellular Smad proteins that are regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) prevents TGF-beta and bone morphogenetic protein signaling by interacting with Smads and inducing their ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Here we identified Pin1, a peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase, as a novel protein binding Smads. Pin1 interacted with Smad2 and Smad3 but not Smad4; this interaction was enhanced by the phosphorylation of (S/T)P motifs in the Smad linker region. (S/T)P motif phosphorylation also enhanced the interaction of Smad2/3 with Smurf2. Pin1 reduced Smad2/3 protein levels in a manner dependent on its peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity. Knockdown of Pin1 increased the protein levels of endogenous Smad2/3. In addition, Pin1 both enhanced the interaction of Smurf2 with Smads and enhanced Smad ubiquitination. Pin1 inhibited TGF-beta-induced transcription and gene expression, suggesting that Pin1 negatively regulates TGF-beta signaling by down-regulating Smad2/3 protein levels via induction of Smurf2-mediated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. PMID:19122240

  2. RNA helicase HEL-1 promotes longevity by specifically activating DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mihwa; Seo, Keunhee; Hwang, Wooseon; Koo, Hee Jung; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Seong; Han, Seong Kyu; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Yoontae; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V.

    2015-01-01

    The homeostatic maintenance of the genomic DNA is crucial for regulating aging processes. However, the role of RNA homeostasis in aging processes remains unknown. RNA helicases are a large family of enzymes that regulate the biogenesis and homeostasis of RNA. However, the functional significance of RNA helicases in aging has not been explored. Here, we report that a large fraction of RNA helicases regulate the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. In particular, we show that a DEAD-box RNA helicase, helicase 1 (HEL-1), promotes longevity by specifically activating the DAF-16/forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor signaling pathway. We find that HEL-1 is required for the longevity conferred by reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) and is sufficient for extending lifespan. We further show that the expression of HEL-1 in the intestine and neurons contributes to longevity. HEL-1 enhances the induction of a large fraction of DAF-16 target genes. Thus, the RNA helicase HEL-1 appears to promote longevity in response to decreased IIS as a transcription coregulator of DAF-16. Because HEL-1 and IIS are evolutionarily well conserved, a similar mechanism for longevity regulation via an RNA helicase-dependent regulation of FOXO signaling may operate in mammals, including humans. PMID:26195740

  3. RNA helicase HEL-1 promotes longevity by specifically activating DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mihwa; Seo, Keunhee; Hwang, Wooseon; Koo, Hee Jung; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Seong; Han, Seong Kyu; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Yoontae; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2015-08-01

    The homeostatic maintenance of the genomic DNA is crucial for regulating aging processes. However, the role of RNA homeostasis in aging processes remains unknown. RNA helicases are a large family of enzymes that regulate the biogenesis and homeostasis of RNA. However, the functional significance of RNA helicases in aging has not been explored. Here, we report that a large fraction of RNA helicases regulate the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans. In particular, we show that a DEAD-box RNA helicase, helicase 1 (HEL-1), promotes longevity by specifically activating the DAF-16/forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor signaling pathway. We find that HEL-1 is required for the longevity conferred by reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) and is sufficient for extending lifespan. We further show that the expression of HEL-1 in the intestine and neurons contributes to longevity. HEL-1 enhances the induction of a large fraction of DAF-16 target genes. Thus, the RNA helicase HEL-1 appears to promote longevity in response to decreased IIS as a transcription coregulator of DAF-16. Because HEL-1 and IIS are evolutionarily well conserved, a similar mechanism for longevity regulation via an RNA helicase-dependent regulation of FOXO signaling may operate in mammals, including humans. PMID:26195740

  4. Control of phenotypic plasticity of smooth muscle cells by bone morphogenetic protein signaling through the myocardin-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Lagna, Giorgio; Ku, Manching M; Nguyen, Peter H; Neuman, Nicole A; Davis, Brandi N; Hata, Akiko

    2007-12-21

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), unlike other muscle cells, do not terminally differentiate. In response to injury, VSMCs change phenotype, proliferate, and migrate as part of the repair process. Dysregulation of this plasticity program contributes to the pathogenesis of several vascular disorders, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, and hypertension. The discovery of mutations in the gene encoding BMPRII, the type II subunit of the receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) provided an indication that BMP signaling may affect the homeostasis of VSMCs and their phenotype modulation. Here we report that BMP signaling potently induces SMC-specific genes in pluripotent cells and prevents dedifferentiation of arterial SMCs. The BMP-induced phenotype switch requires intact RhoA/ROCK signaling but is not blocked by inhibitors of the TGFbeta and PI3K/Akt pathways. Furthermore, nuclear localization and recruitment of the myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) to a smooth muscle alpha-actin promoter is observed in response to BMP treatment. Thus, BMP signaling modulates VSMC phenotype via cross-talk with the RhoA/MRTFs pathway, and may contribute to the development of the pathological characteristics observed in patients with PAH and other obliterative vascular diseases. PMID:17947237

  5. Structural insights of homotypic interaction domains in the ligand-receptor signal transduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-01-01

    Several members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily that these members activate caspase-8 from death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in TNF ligand-receptor signal transduction have been identified. In the extrinsic pathway, apoptotic signal transduction is induced in death domain (DD) superfamily; it consists of a hexahelical bundle that contains 80 amino acids. The DD superfamily includes about 100 members that belong to four subfamilies: death domain (DD), caspase recruitment domain (CARD), pyrin domain (PYD), and death effector domain (DED). This superfamily contains key building blocks: with these blocks, multimeric complexes are formed through homotypic interactions. Furthermore, each DD-binding event occurs exclusively. The DD superfamily regulates the balance between death and survival of cells. In this study, the structures, functions, and unique features of DD superfamily members are compared with their complexes. By elucidating structural insights of DD superfamily members, we investigate the interaction mechanisms of DD domains; these domains are involved in TNF ligand-receptor signaling. These DD superfamily members play a pivotal role in the development of more specific treatments of cancer. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 159-166] PMID:26615973

  6. Trigger factor binds to ribosome–signal-recognition particle (SRP) complexes and is excluded by binding of the SRP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Buskiewicz, Iwona; Deuerling, Elke; Gu, Shan-Qing; Jöckel, Johannes; Rodnina, Marina V.; Bukau, Bernd; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) and signal recognition particle (SRP) bind to the bacterial ribosome and are both crosslinked to protein L23 at the peptide exit, where they interact with emerging nascent peptide chains. It is unclear whether TF and SRP exclude one another from their ribosomal binding site(s). Here we show that SRP and TF can bind simultaneously to ribosomes or ribosome nascent-chain complexes exposing a SRP-specific signal sequence. Based on changes of the crosslinking pattern and on results obtained by fluorescence measurements using fluorescence-labeled SRP, TF binding induces structural changes in the ribosome–SRP complex. Furthermore, we show that binding of the SRP receptor, FtsY, to ribosome-bound SRP excludes TF from the ribosome. These results suggest that TF and SRP sample nascent chains on the ribosome in a nonexclusive fashion. The decision for ribosome nascent-chain complexes exposing a signal sequence to enter SRP-dependent membrane targeting seems to be determined by the binding of SRP, which is stabilized by signal sequence recognition, and promoted by the exclusion of TF due to the binding of the SRP receptor to ribosome-bound SRP. PMID:15148364

  7. MADS-box transcription factor AGL21 regulates lateral root development and responds to multiple external and physiological signals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Miao, Zi-Qing; Qi, Guo-Feng; Wu, Jie; Cai, Xiao-Teng; Mao, Jie-Li; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2014-11-01

    Plant root system morphology is dramatically influenced by various environmental cues. The adaptation of root system architecture to environmental constraints, which mostly depends on the formation and growth of lateral roots, is an important agronomic trait. Lateral root development is regulated by the external signals coordinating closely with intrinsic signaling pathways. MADS-box transcription factors are known key regulators of the transition to flowering and flower development. However, their functions in root development are still poorly understood. Here we report that AGL21, an AGL17-clade MADS-box gene, plays a crucial role in lateral root development. AGL21 was highly expressed in root, particularly in the root central cylinder and lateral root primordia. AGL21 overexpression plants produced more and longer lateral roots while agl21 mutants showed impaired lateral root development, especially under nitrogen-deficient conditions. AGL21 was induced by many plant hormones and environmental stresses, suggesting a function of this gene in root system plasticity in response to various signals. Furthermore, AGL21 was found positively regulating auxin accumulation in lateral root primordia and lateral roots by enhancing local auxin biosynthesis, thus stimulating lateral root initiation and growth. We propose that AGL21 may be involved in various environmental and physiological signals-mediated lateral root development and growth. PMID:25122697

  8. MADS-Box Transcription Factor AGL21 Regulates Lateral Root Development and Responds to Multiple External and Physiological Signals

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Miao, Zi-Qing; Qi, Guo-Feng; Wu, Jie; Cai, Xiao-Teng; Mao, Jie-Li; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Plant root system morphology is dramatically influenced by various environmental cues. The adaptation of root system architecture to environmental constraints, which mostly depends on the formation and growth of lateral roots, is an important agronomic trait. Lateral root development is regulated by the external signals coordinating closely with intrinsic signaling pathways. MADS-box transcription factors are known key regulators of the transition to flowering and flower development. However, their functions in root development are still poorly understood. Here we report that AGL21, an AGL17-clade MADS-box gene, plays a crucial role in lateral root development. AGL21 was highly expressed in root, particularly in the root central cylinder and lateral root primordia. AGL21 overexpression plants produced more and longer lateral roots while agl21 mutants showed impaired lateral root development, especially under nitrogen-deficient conditions. AGL21 was induced by many plant hormones and environmental stresses, suggesting a function of this gene in root system plasticity in response to various signals. Furthermore, AGL21 was found positively regulating auxin accumulation in lateral root primordia and lateral roots by enhancing local auxin biosynthesis, thus stimulating lateral root initiation and growth. We propose that AGL21 may be involved in various environmental and physiological signals-mediated lateral root development and growth. PMID:25122697

  9. Purification and Properties of Myxococcus xanthus C-Factor, an Intercellular Signaling Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung K.; Kaiser, Dale

    1990-05-01

    C-factor, a Myxococcus xanthus protein that restores the developmental defects of a class of nonautonomous mutants resulting from mutation of the csgA gene, has been purified approximately 1000-fold from starved wild-type cells. The monomeric form of C-factor is a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 17 kDa that can be solubilized by detergent from membrane components. Characterization by gel filtration and denaturing gel electrophoresis suggests that biologically active C-factor is a dimer composed of two 17-kDa monomers. Antibodies against a form of the M. xanthus csgA gene product overexpressed in Escherichia coli react with purified C-factor.

  10. Absence of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signaling and neutrophil development in CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D E; Zhang, P; Wang, N D; Hetherington, C J; Darlington, G J; Tenen, D G

    1997-01-21

    Transcription factors are master regulatory switches of differentiation, including the development of specific hematopoietic lineages from stem cells. Here we show that mice with targeted disruption of the CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha gene (C/EBP alpha) demonstrate a selective block in differentiation of neutrophils. Mature neutrophils and eosinophils are not observed in the blood or fetal liver of mutant animals, while other hematopoietic lineages, including monocytes, are not affected. Instead, most of the white cells in the peripheral blood of mutant mice had the appearance of myeloid blasts. We also observed a selective loss of expression of a critical gene target of CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. As a result, multipotential myeloid progenitors from the mutant fetal liver are unable to respond to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signaling, although they are capable of forming granulocyte-macrophage and macrophage colonies in methylcellulose in response to other growth factors. Finally, we demonstrate that the lack of granulocyte development results from a defect intrinsic to the hematopoietic system; transplanted fetal liver from mutant mice can reconstitute lymphoid but not neutrophilic cells in irradiated recipients. These studies suggest a model by which transcription factors can direct the differentiation of multipotential precursors through activation of expression of a specific growth factor receptor, allowing proliferation and differentiation in response to a specific extracellular signal. In addition, the c/ebp alpha -/- mice may be useful in understanding the mechanisms involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, in which a block in differentiation of myeloid precursors is a key feature of the disease. PMID:9012825

  11. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  12. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Signaling Represses Testicular Steroidogenesis through Cross-Talk with Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nur77

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunsook; Song, Chin-Hee; Park, Jae-Il; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Keesook

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor- β1 (TGF-β1) has been reported to inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH) mediated-steroidogenesis in testicular Leydig cells. However, the mechanism by which TGF-β1 controls the steroidogenesis in Leydig cells is not well understood. Here, we investigated the possibility that TGF-β1 represses steroidogenesis through cross-talk with the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77. Nur77, which is induced by LH/cAMP signaling, is one of major transcription factors that regulate the expression of steroidogenic genes in Leydig cells. TGF-β1 signaling inhibited cAMP-induced testosterone production and the expression of steroidogenic genes such as P450c17, StAR and 3β-HSD in mouse Leydig cells. Further, TGF-β1/ALK5 signaling repressed cAMP-induced and Nur77-activated promoter activity of steroidogenic genes. In addition, TGF-β1/ALK5-activated Smad3 repressed Nur77 transactivation of steroidogenic gene promoters by interfering with Nur77 binding to DNA. In primary Leydig cells isolated from Tgfbr2flox/flox Cyp17iCre mice, TGF-β1-mediated repression of cAMP-induced steroidogenic gene expression was significantly less than that in primary Leydig cells from Tgfbr2flox/flox mice. Taken together, these results suggest that TGF-β1/ALK5/Smad3 signaling represses the expression of steroidogenic genes via the suppression of Nur77 transactivation in testicular Leydig cells. These findings may provide a molecular mechanism involved in the TGF-β1-mediated repression of testicular steroidogenesis. PMID:25140527

  13. Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} Signaling in Normal Lung Epithelial Cells Confers Resistance to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Anna; Zagurovskaya, Marianna; Gupta, Seema; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Mansoor M. . E-mail: mmahmed@geisinger.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To address the functional role of radiation-induced transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) signaling in a normal epithelial background, we selected a spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell line derived from the normal lung tissue of a dominant-negative mutant of the TGF-{beta} RII ({delta}RII) transgenic mouse that conditionally expressed {delta}RII under the control of the metallothionein promoter (MT-1), and assessed this cell line's response to radiation. Methods and Materials: A spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell culture (SILECC) was established and all analyses were performed within 50 passages. Colony-forming and terminal transferase dUPT nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to assess clonogenic inhibition and apoptosis, respectively. Western-blot analysis was performed to assess the kinetics of p21, bax, and RII proteins. Transforming growth factor-{beta}-responsive promoter activity was measured using dual-luciferase reporter assay. Results: Exposure to ZnSO{sub 4} inhibited TGF-{beta} signaling induced either by recombinant TGF-{beta}1 or ionizing radiation. The SILECC, treated with either ZnSO{sub 4} or neutralizing antibody against TGF-{beta}, showed a significant increase in radio-resistance compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, the expression of {delta}RII inhibited the radiation-induced up-regulation of the TGF-{beta} effector gene p21{sup waf1/cip1}. Conclusions: Our findings imply that inhibition of radiation-induced TGF-{beta} signaling via abrogation of the RII function enhances the radio-resistance of normal lung epithelial cells, and this can be directly attributed to the loss of TGF-{beta} signaling function.

  14. Cucurbitacin I Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy via Inhibition of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2) and TGF- β/Smads Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hara; Park, Kye Won; Park, Woo Jin; Yang, Seung Yul; Yang, Dong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbitacin I is a naturally occurring triterpenoid derived from Cucurbitaceae family plants that exhibits a number of potentially useful pharmacological and biological activities. However, the therapeutic impact of cucurbitacin I on the heart has not heretofore been reported. To evaluate the functional role of cucurbitacin I in an in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy, phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated cardiomyocytes were treated with a sub-cytotoxic concentration of the compound, and the effects on cell size and mRNA expression levels of ANF and β-MHC were investigated. Consequently, PE-induced cell enlargement and upregulation of ANF and β-MHC were significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cardiomyocytes with cucurbitacin I. Notably, cucurbitacin I also impaired connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and MAPK signaling, pro-hypertrophic factors, as well as TGF-β/Smad signaling, the important contributing factors to fibrosis. The protective impact of cucurbitacin I was significantly blunted in CTGF-silenced or TGF-β1-silenced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, indicating that the compound exerts its beneficial actions through CTGF. Taken together, these findings signify that cucurbitacin I protects the heart against cardiac hypertrophy via inhibition of CTGF/MAPK, and TGF- β/Smad-facilitated events. Accordingly, the present study provides new insights into the defensive capacity of cucurbitacin I against cardiac hypertrophy, and further suggesting cucurbitacin I’s utility as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of heart diseases. PMID:26296085

  15. A GDI (AGS3) and a GEF (GIV) regulate autophagy by balancing G protein activity and growth factor signals

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Ear, Jason; Farquhar, Marilyn G.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is the major catabolic process responsible for the removal of aggregated proteins and damaged organelles. Autophagy is regulated by both G proteins and growth factors, but the underlying mechanism of how they are coordinated during initiation and reversal of autophagy is unknown. Using protein–protein interaction assays, G protein enzymology, and morphological analysis, we demonstrate here that Gα-interacting, vesicle-associated protein (GIV, a. k. a. Girdin), a nonreceptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Gαi3, plays a key role in regulating autophagy and that dynamic interplay between Gαi3, activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3, its guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor), and GIV determines whether autophagy is promoted or inhibited. We found that AGS3 directly binds light chain 3 (LC3), recruits Gαi3 to LC3-positive membranes upon starvation, and promotes autophagy by inhibiting the G protein. Upon growth factor stimulation, GIV disrupts the Gαi3–AGS3 complex, releases Gαi3 from LC3-positive membranes, enhances anti-autophagic signaling pathways, and inhibits autophagy by activating the G protein. These results provide mechanistic insights into how reversible modulation of Gαi3 activity by AGS3 and GIV maintains the delicate equilibrium between promotion and inhibition of autophagy. PMID:21209316

  16. Involvement of PI3K and MAPK Signaling in bcl-2-induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Iervolino, Angela; Zupi, Gabriella; Del Bufalo, Donatella

    2005-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that bcl-2 overexpression in tumor cells exposed to hypoxia increases the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene through the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). In this article, we demonstrate that exposure of bcl-2 overexpressing melanoma cells to hypoxia induced phosphorylation of AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 proteins. On the contrary, no modulation of these pathways by bcl-2 was observed under normoxic conditions. When HIF-1α expression was reduced by RNA interference, AKT and ERK1/2 phosphorylation were still induced by bcl-2. Pharmacological inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways reduced the induction of VEGF and HIF-1 in response to bcl-2 overexpression in hypoxia. No differences were observed between control and bcl-2-overexpressing cells in normoxia, in terms of VEGF protein secretion and in response to PI3K and MAPK inhibitors. We also demonstrated that RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of bcl-2 expression resulted in a decrease in the ERK1/2 phosphorylation and VEGF secretion only in bcl-2-overexpressing cell exposed to hypoxia but not in control cells. In conclusion, our results indicate, for the first time, that bcl-2 synergizes with hypoxia to promote expression of angiogenesis factors in melanoma cells through both PI3K- and MAPK-dependent pathways. PMID:15987743

  17. Cucurbitacin I Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy via Inhibition of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2) and TGF- β/Smads Signalings.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Moon Hee; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Hara; Park, Kye Won; Park, Woo Jin; Yang, Seung Yul; Yang, Dong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbitacin I is a naturally occurring triterpenoid derived from Cucurbitaceae family plants that exhibits a number of potentially useful pharmacological and biological activities. However, the therapeutic impact of cucurbitacin I on the heart has not heretofore been reported. To evaluate the functional role of cucurbitacin I in an in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy, phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated cardiomyocytes were treated with a sub-cytotoxic concentration of the compound, and the effects on cell size and mRNA expression levels of ANF and β-MHC were investigated. Consequently, PE-induced cell enlargement and upregulation of ANF and β-MHC were significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cardiomyocytes with cucurbitacin I. Notably, cucurbitacin I also impaired connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and MAPK signaling, pro-hypertrophic factors, as well as TGF-β/Smad signaling, the important contributing factors to fibrosis. The protective impact of cucurbitacin I was significantly blunted in CTGF-silenced or TGF-β1-silenced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, indicating that the compound exerts its beneficial actions through CTGF. Taken together, these findings signify that cucurbitacin I protects the heart against cardiac hypertrophy via inhibition of CTGF/MAPK, and TGF- β/Smad-facilitated events. Accordingly, the present study provides new insights into the defensive capacity of cucurbitacin I against cardiac hypertrophy, and further suggesting cucurbitacin I's utility as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of heart diseases. PMID:26296085

  18. Plumbagin Ameliorates CCl4-Induced Hepatic Fibrosis in Rats via the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si; Chen, Yi; Chen, Bi; Cai, Yi-jing; Zou, Zhuo-lin; Wang, Jin-guo; Lin, Zhuo; Wang, Xiao-dong; Fu, Li-yun; Hu, Yao-ren; Chen, Yong-ping; Chen, Da-zhi

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its signaling molecules, EGFreceptor (EGFR) and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3), have been considered to play a role in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Plumbagin (PL) is an extracted component from the plant and has been used to treat different kinds of cancer. However, its role in regulation of EGFR and STAT3 during liver fibrosis has not been investigated. In this study, the effects of PL on the regulation of EGFR and STAT3 were investigated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced liver fibrosis and hepatic stellate cells (HSC-T6). PL significantly attenuated liver injury and fibrosis in CCl4 treated rats. At concentrations of 2 to 6 μM, PL did not induce significant cytotoxicity of HSC-T6 cells. Moreover, PL reduced phosphorylation of EGFR and STAT3 in both fibrotic liver and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) treated HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, PL reduced the expression of α-SMA, EGFR, and STAT3 in both fibrotic liver and HB-EGF treated HSC-T6 cells. In conclusion, plumbagin could ameliorate the development of hepatic fibrosis through its downregulation of EGFR and STAT3 in the liver, especially in hepatic stellate cells. PMID:26550019

  19. Three important components in the regeneration of the cavernous nerve: brain-derived neurotrophic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Yang; Jin, Xun-Bo; Lue, Tom F

    2011-03-01

    Retroperitoneal operations, such as radical prostatectomy, often damage the cavernous nerve, resulting in a high incidence of erectile dysfunction. Although improved nerve-sparing techniques have reduced the incidence of nerve injury, and the administration of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors has revolutionized the treatment of erectile dysfunction, this problem remains a considerable challenge. In recent years, scientists have focused on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the treatment of cavernous nerve injury in rat models. Results showed that both compounds were capable of enhancing the regeneration of the cavernous nerve and that activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway played a major role in the process. PMID:21170078

  20. Fructose Protects Murine Hepatocytes from Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis by Modulating JNK Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Tobias; Köhler, Ulrike A.; Choukèr, Alexander; Werner, Sabine; Weiland, Timo; Wendel, Albrecht

    2012-01-01

    Fructose-induced hepatic ATP depletion prevents TNF-induced apoptosis, whereas it contrarily enhances CD95-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. By contrast, transformed liver cells are not protected against TNF due to metabolic alterations, allowing selective tumor targeting. We analyzed the molecular mechanisms by which fructose modulates cytokine-induced apoptosis. A release of adenosine after fructose-induced ATP depletion, followed by a cAMP response, was demonstrated. Likewise, cAMP and adenosine mimicked per se the modulation by fructose of CD95- and TNF-induced apoptosis. The effects of fructose on cytokine-induced apoptosis were sensitive to inhibition of protein kinase A. Fructose prevented the pro-apoptotic, sustained phase of TNF-induced JNK signaling and thereby blocked bid-mediated activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in a PKA-dependent manner. We explain the dichotomal effects of fructose on CD95- and TNF-induced cell death by the selective requirement of JNK signaling for the latter. These findings provide a mechanistic rationale for the protection of hepatocytes from TNF-induced cell death by pharmacological doses of fructose. PMID:22086922

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling affects both angiogenesis and osteogenesis during the development of scleral ossicles.

    PubMed

    Jabalee, James; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A

    2015-10-01

    Intramembranous ossification is a complex multi-step process which relies on extensive interactions among bone cells and surrounding tissues. The embryonic vasculature is essential in regulating endochondral ossification; however, its role during intramembranous ossification remains poorly understood, and in vivo studies are lacking. Previous research from our lab on the development of the intramembranous scleral ossicles has demonstrated an intriguing pattern of vascular development in which the areas of future osteogenesis remain avascular until after bone induction has occurred. Such avascular zones are located directly beneath each of the conjunctival papillae, epithelial structures which provide osteogenic signals to the underlying mesenchyme. Here we provide a high-resolution map of the developing vasculature from the time of ossicle induction to mineralization using a novel technique. We show that vegfa is expressed by the papillae and nearby mesenchymal tissue throughout HH 34-37, when vascular growth is taking place, and is down-regulated thereafter. Localized inhibition of Vegf results in expansion of the avascular zone surrounding the implanted papilla and mispatterning of the scleral ossicles. These results demonstrate that Vegf signaling could provide important insights into the complex relationship between bone and vasculature during intramembranous bone development. PMID:26210172

  2. Regulation of biomechanical signals by NF-κB transcription factors in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Anghelina, Mirela; Sjostrom, Danen; Perera, Priyangi; Nam, Jin; Knobloch, Thomas; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Physical therapies and exercise are beneficial not only for physiological recovery in inflamed or injured joints, but also for promoting a homeostatic equilibrium in healthy joints. Human joints provide the pivot points and physiological hinges essential for ambulation and movement to the body, and it is this mobility that in return promotes the health of the joints. But how mobilization regulates the joint microenvironment at the molecular level has remained enigmatic for many years. Recent advances in joint biomechanics and molecular approaches have facilitated an enriched understanding of how joints operate. Consequently, the mechanisms active during joint inflammation that lead to arthritic conditions, both in vivo in animal models, and in vitro at cell and tissue levels, have become increasingly detailed and defined. These efforts have produced mounting evidences supporting the premise that biomechanical signals play a fundamental role in both the etiopathogenesis of arthritic diseases and in the physiological restoration of joints. This report aims to summarize current peer-reviewed literature and available experimental data to explain how the signals generated by mechanical forces/joint mobilization generate beneficial effects on inflamed articular cartilage, and to propose the basis for using appropriate physical therapies for the optimal benefit to the patient suffering from joint associated injuries. PMID:18836228

  3. Final Scientific/Technical report for "ABI8: Prototype of a novel signaling factor"

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Ruth R.

    2013-02-21

    The Arabidopsis thaliana ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE8 locus encodes a highly conserved plant-specific protein that mediates abscisic acid (ABA) and sugar responses essential for growth. Although initial database comparisons revealed no domains of predictable function, it has recently been re-annotated as a member of the Glycosyltransferase family A. However, this function has not been demonstrated experimentally and no specific substrates have been identified. Mutations affecting ABI8 are near-lethal due to pleiotropic yet specific effects including altered ABA signaling, sugar transport, cell wall synthesis, root meristem maintenance, vascular patterning, and male sterility. Because the predicted sequence initially provided no clues, we used a guilt by association strategy to address function of this protein by determining its subcellular localization and identifying interacting proteins. Our studies showed that ABI8 is localized to the endomembrane system and may interact with proteins implicated in Golgi trafficking, lignification, and stress signaling. We found that the root meristem arrest reflects decreased auxin accumulation and resulting decreases in regulators required for meristem identity, all of which can be rescued by added glucose. Further studies showed that this glucose-dependence reflects reduced glucose uptake as well as the decreased expression of sugar-mobilizing enzymes. This work suggests that ABI8 may regulate trafficking of membrane proteins such as auxin transporters and cellulose synthase, but this hypothesis has not yet been tested. The altered gene expression is likely to be a secondary or later effect of this pleiotropic mutation.

  4. Melatonin Signaling and Its Modulation of PfNF-YB Transcription Factor Expression in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Wânia Rezende; Holder, Anthony A.; Garcia, Célia R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most severe tropical infectious diseases. More than 220 million people around the world have a clinical malaria infection and about one million die because of Plasmodium annually. This parasitic pathogen replicates efficiently in its human host making it difficult to eradicate. It is transmitted by mosquito vectors and so far mosquito control programs have not effectively eliminated this transmission. Because of malaria’s enormous health and economic impact and the need to develop new control and eventual elimination strategies, a big research effort has been made to better understand the biology of this parasite and its interactions with its vertebrate host. Determination of the genome sequence and organization, the elucidation of the role of key proteins, and cell signaling studies have helped to develop an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that provide the parasite’s versatility. The parasite can sense its environment and adapt to benefit its survival, indeed this is essential for it to complete its life cycle. For many years we have studied how the Plasmodium parasite is able to sense melatonin. In this review we discuss the melatonin signaling pathway and its role in the control of Plasmodium replication and development. PMID:23839089

  5. The effects of milking frequency on insulin-like growth factor I signaling within the mammary gland of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Murney, R; Stelwagen, K; Wheeler, T T; Margerison, J K; Singh, K

    2015-08-01

    In dairy cows, short-term changes in milking frequency (MF) in early lactation have been shown to produce both an immediate and a long-term effect on milk yield. The effect of MF on milk yield is controlled locally within mammary glands and could be a function of changes in either number or activity of secretory mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signaling is one candidate factor that could mediate these effects, as it can be controlled locally within mammary glands. Both MEC number and activity can be affected by IGF-I signaling by activating the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 pathways. To investigate the relationship between MF and IGF-I signaling, udder halves of 17 dairy cows were milked either 4 times a day (4×) or once a day (1×) for 14 d in early lactation. On d 14, between 3 and 5 h following milking, mammary biopsies were obtained from 10 cows from both udder halves, and changes in the expression of genes associated with IGF-I signaling and the activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways were measured. The mRNA abundance of IGF type I receptor, IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3, and IGFBP-5 were lower following 4× milking relative to 1× milking. However, the mRNA abundance of IGF-I was not affected by MF. Both IGFBP3 and IGFBP5 are thought to inhibit IGF-I; therefore, decreases in their mRNA abundance may serve to stimulate the IGF-I signal in the 4×-milked mammary gland. The activation of PI3K/Akt pathway was lower in response to 4× milking relative to 1×, and the activation of the ERK1/2 was unaffected by MF, suggesting that they do not mediate the effects of MF. PMID:26074231

  6. Primary Megakaryocytes Reveal a Role for Transcription Factor Nf-E2 in Integrin αiibβ3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shiraga, Masamichi; Ritchie, Alec; Aidoudi, Sallouha; Baron, Veronique; Wilcox, David; White, Gilbert; Ybarrondo, Belen; Murphy, George; Leavitt, Andrew; Shattil, Sanford

    1999-01-01

    Platelet integrin αIIbβ3 responds to intracellular signals by binding fibrinogen and triggering cytoskeletal reorganization, but the mechanisms of αIIbβ3 signaling remain poorly understood. To better understand this process, we established conditions to study αIIbβ3 signaling in primary murine megakaryocytes. Unlike platelets, these platelet precursors are amenable to genetic manipulation. Cytokine-stimulated bone marrow cultures produced three arbitrary populations of αIIbβ3-expressing cells with increasing size and DNA ploidy: small progenitors, intermediate-size young megakaryocytes, and large mature megakaryocytes. A majority of the large megakaryocytes bound fibrinogen in response to agonists, while almost none of the smaller cells did. Fibrinogen binding to large megakaryocytes was inhibited by Sindbis virus-mediated expression of isolated β3 integrin cytoplasmic tails. Strikingly, large megakaryocytes from mice deficient in the transcription factor NF-E2 failed to bind fibrinogen in response to agonists, despite normal surface expression of αIIbβ3. Furthermore, while megakaryocytes from wild-type mice spread on immobilized fibrinogen and exhibited filopodia, lamellipodia and Rho-dependent focal adhesions and stress fibers, NF-E2–deficient megakaryocytes adhered poorly. These studies establish that agonist-induced activation of αIIbβ3 is controlled by NF-E2–regulated signaling pathways that mature late in megakaryocyte development and converge at the β3 cytoplasmic tail. Megakaryocytes provide a physiologically relevant and tractable system for analysis of bidirectional αIIbβ3 signaling. PMID:10613901

  7. The role of heritable and dietary factors in the sexual signal of a Hispaniolan Anolis lizard, Anolis distichus.

    PubMed

    Ng, Julienne; Kelly, Audrey L; MacGuigan, Daniel J; Glor, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of sexual signals is astounding, and divergence in these traits is believed to be associated with the early stages of speciation. An increasing number of studies also suggest a role for natural selection in driving signal divergence for effective transmission in heterogeneous environments. Both speciation and adaptive divergence, however, are contingent on the sexual signal being heritable, yet this often remains assumed and untested. It is particularly critical that the heritability of carotenoid-based sexual signals is investigated because such traits may instead be phenotypically plastic indicators of an individual's quality that exhibit no or little heritable variation. We present the first study to investigate the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the striking diversity of dewlap color and pattern in Anolis lizards. Using a breeding experiment with Anolis distichus populations exhibiting different dewlap phenotypes, we raise F1 offspring in a common garden experiment to assess whether dewlap color is inherited. We follow this with carotenoid supplementation to investigate the influence of dietary pigments to dewlap color variation. We find significant differences in several aspects of dewlap color and pattern to persist to the F1 generation (fathers: N = 19; F1 males: N = 50; P < 0.01) with no change in dewlap phenotype with carotenoid supplementation (N = 52; P > 0.05). These results strongly support that genetic differences underlie dewlap color variation, thereby satisfying a key requirement of natural selection. Our findings provide an important stepping-stone to understanding the evolution of an incredibly diverse signal important for sexual selection and species recognition. PMID:24078680

  8. TGF-β Signaling Cooperates with AT Motif-Binding Factor-1 for Repression of the α-Fetoprotein Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Ikeno, Souichi; Miura, Yutaka; Nakabayashi, Hidekazu; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Dong, Jin-Tang; Tamaoki, Taiki; Nakano, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is known to be highly produced in fetal liver despite its barely detectable level in normal adult liver. On the other hand, hepatocellular carcinoma often shows high expression of AFP. Thus, AFP seems to be an oncogenic marker. In our present study, we investigated how TGF-β signaling cooperates with AT motif-binding factor-1 (ATBF1) to inhibit AFP transcription. Indeed, the expression of AFP mRNA in HuH-7 cells was negatively regulated by TGF-β signaling. To further understand how TGF-β suppresses the transcription of the AFP gene, we analyzed the activity of the AFP promoter in the presence of TGF-β. We found that the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 suppressed AFP transcription through two ATBF1 binding elements (AT-motifs). Using a heterologous reporter system, both AT-motifs were required for transcriptional repression upon TGF-β stimulation. Furthermore, Smads were found to interact with ATBF1 at both its N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Since the N-terminal (ATBF1N) and C-terminal regions of ATBF1 (ATBF1C) lack the ability of DNA binding, both truncated mutants rescued the cooperative inhibitory action by the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings indicate that TGF-β signaling can act in concert with ATBF1 to suppress the activity of the AFP promoter through direct interaction of ATBF1 with Smads. PMID:25105025

  9. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Signaling in Adult Cardiomyocytes Increases Contractility and Results in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cilvik, Sarah N.; Wang, Joy I.; Lavine, Kory J.; Uchida, Keita; Castro, Angela; Gierasch, Carolyn M.; Weinheimer, Carla J.; House, Stacey L.; Kovacs, Attila; Nichols, Colin G.; Ornitz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors are highly conserved signaling molecules that have been implicated in postnatal cardiac remodeling. However, it is not known whether cardiomyocyte-expressed FGF receptors are necessary or sufficient for ventricular remodeling in the adult heart. To determine whether cardiomyocytes were competent to respond to an activated FGF receptor, and to determine if this signal would result in the development of hypertrophy, we engineered a doxycycline (DOX)-inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific, constitutively active FGF receptor mouse model (αMHC-rtTA, TRE-caFgfr1-myc). Echocardiographic and hemodynamic analysis indicated that acute expression of caFGFR1 rapidly and directly increased cardiac contractility, while chronic expression resulted in significant hypertrophy with preservation of systolic function. Subsequent histologic analysis showed increased cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and regions of myocyte disarray and fibrosis, classic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Analysis of downstream pathways revealed a lack of clear activation of classical FGF-mediated signaling pathways, but did demonstrate a reduction in Serca2 expression and troponin I phosphorylation. Isolated ventricular myocytes showed enhanced contractility and reduced relaxation, an effect that was partially reversed by inhibition of actin-myosin interactions. We conclude that adult cardiomyocytes are competent to transduce FGF signaling and that FGF signaling is sufficient to promote increased cardiomyocyte contractility in vitro and in vivo through enhanced intrinsic actin-myosin interactions. Long-term, FGFR overexpression results in HCM with a dynamic outflow tract obstruction, and may serve as a unique model of HCM. PMID:24349409

  10. Delphinidin, a dietary anthocyanidin, inhibits platelet-derived growth factor ligand/receptor (PDGF/PDGFR) signaling.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Sylvie; Beaulieu, Edith; Labbé, David; Bédard, Valérie; Moghrabi, Albert; Barrette, Stéphane; Gingras, Denis; Béliveau, Richard

    2008-05-01

    Most cancers are dependent on the growth of tumor blood vessels and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis may thus provide an efficient strategy to retard or block tumor growth. Recently, tumor vascular targeting has expanded to include not only endothelial cells (ECs) but also smooth muscle cells (SMCs), which contribute to a mature and functional vasculature. We have reported previously that delphinidin, a major biologically active constituent of berries, inhibits the vascular endothelial growth factor-induced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and blocks angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we show that delphinidin also inhibits activation of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB receptor-beta [platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-beta)] in SMC and that this inhibition may contribute to its antitumor effect. The inhibitory effect of delphinidin on PDGFR-beta was very rapid and led to the inhibition of PDGF-BB-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 signaling and of the chemotactic motility of SMC, as well as the differentiation and stabilization of EC and SMC into capillary-like tubular structures in a three-dimensional coculture system. Using an anthocyan-rich extract of berries, we show that berry extracts were able to suppress the synergistic induction of vessel formation by basic fibroblast growth factor-2 and PDGF-BB in the mouse Matrigel plug assay. Oral administration of the berry extract also significantly retarded tumor growth in a lung carcinoma xenograft model. Taken together, these results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiangiogenic activity of delphinidin that will be helpful for the development of dietary-based chemopreventive strategies. PMID:18339683

  11. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified.

  12. Xanthomonas campestris overcomes Arabidopsis stomatal innate immunity through a DSF cell-to-cell signal-regulated virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S; Vojnov, Adrián A

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen-induced stomatal closure is part of the plant innate immune response. Phytopathogens using stomata as a way of entry into the leaf must avoid the stomatal response of the host. In this article, we describe a factor secreted by the bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) capable of interfering with stomatal closure induced by bacteria or abscisic acid (ABA). We found that living Xcc, as well as ethyl acetate extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, are capable of reverting stomatal closure induced by bacteria, lipopolysaccharide, or ABA. Xcc ethyl acetate extracts also complemented the infectivity of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) mutants deficient in the production of the coronatine toxin, which is required to overcome stomatal defense. By contrast, the rpfF and rpfC mutant strains of Xcc, which are unable to respectively synthesize or perceive a diffusible molecule involved in bacterial cell-to-cell signaling, were incapable of reverting stomatal closure, indicating that suppression of stomatal response by Xcc requires an intact rpf/diffusible signal factor system. In addition, we found that guard cell-specific Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase3 (MPK3) antisense mutants were unresponsive to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide in promotion of stomatal closure, and also more sensitive to Pst coronatine-deficient mutants, showing that MPK3 is required for stomatal immune response. Additionally, we found that, unlike in wild-type Arabidopsis, ABA-induced stomatal closure in MPK3 antisense mutants is not affected by Xcc or by extracts from Xcc culture supernatants, suggesting that the Xcc factor might target some signaling component in the same pathway as MPK3. PMID:19091877

  13. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB77 Modulates Auxin Signal Transduction[W

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ryoung; Burch, Adrien Y.; Huppert, Kari A.; Tiwari, Shiv B.; Murphy, Angus S.; Guilfoyle, Tom J.; Schachtman, Daniel P.

    2007-01-01

    Auxin is a key plant hormone that regulates plant development, apical dominance, and growth-related tropisms, such as phototropism and gravitropism. In this study, we report a new Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor, MYB77, that is involved in auxin response. In MYB77 knockout plants, we found that auxin-responsive gene expression was greatly attenuated. Lateral root density in the MYB77 knockout was lower than the wild type at low concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and also under low nutrient conditions. MYB77 interacts with auxin response factors (ARFs) in vitro through the C terminus (domains III and IV) of ARFs and the activation domain of MYB77. A synergistic genetic interaction was demonstrated between MYB77 and ARF7 that resulted in a strong reduction in lateral root numbers. Experiments with protoplasts confirmed that the coexpression of MYB77 and an ARF C terminus enhance reporter gene expression. R2R3 MYB transcription factors have not been previously implicated in regulating the expression of auxin-inducible genes. Also it was previously unknown that ARFs interact with proteins other than those in the Aux/IAA family via conserved domains. The interaction between MYB77 and ARFs defines a new type of combinatorial transcriptional control in plants. This newly defined transcription factor interaction is part of the plant cells' repertoire for modulating response to auxin, thereby controlling lateral root growth and development under changing environmental conditions. PMID:17675404

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-II is produced by, signals to and is an important survival factor for the mature podocyte in man and mouse.

    PubMed

    Hale, L J; Welsh, G I; Perks, C M; Hurcombe, J A; Moore, S; Hers, I; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Murphy, A J; Jeansson, M; Holly, J M; Hardouin, S N; Coward, R J

    2013-05-01

    Podocytes are crucial for preventing the passage of albumin into the urine and, when lost, are associated with the development of albuminuria, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Podocytes have limited capacity to regenerate, therefore pro-survival mechanisms are critically important. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a potent survival and growth factor; however, its major function is thought to be in prenatal development, when circulating levels are high. IGF-II has only previously been reported to continue to be expressed in discrete regions of the brain into adulthood in rodents, with systemic levels being undetectable. Using conditionally immortalized human and ex vivo adult mouse cells of the glomerulus, we demonstrated the podocyte to be the major glomerular source and target of IGF-II; it signals to this cell via the IGF-I receptor via the PI3 kinase and MAPK pathways. Functionally, a reduction in IGF signalling causes podocyte cell death in vitro and glomerular disease in vivo in an aged IGF-II transgenic mouse that produces approximately 60% of IGF-II due to a lack of the P2 promoter of this gene. Collectively, this work reveals the fundamental importance of IGF-II in the mature podocyte for glomerular health across mammalian species. PMID:23299523

  15. Growth differentiation factor 11 signals through the transforming growth factor-beta receptor ALK5 to regionalize the anterior-posterior axis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Olov; Reissmann, Eva; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2006-08-01

    Growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) contributes to regionalize the mouse embryo along its anterior-posterior axis by regulating the expression of Hox genes. The identity of the receptors that mediate GDF11 signalling during embryogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that GDF11 can interact with type I receptors ALK4, ALK5 and ALK7, but predominantly uses ALK4 and ALK5 to activate a Smad3-dependent reporter gene. Alk5 mutant embryos showed malformations in anterior-posterior patterning, including the lack of expression of the posterior determinant Hoxc10, that resemble defects found in Gdf11-null mutants. A heterozygous mutation in Alk5, but not in Alk4 or Alk7, potentiated Gdf11(-/-)-like phenotypes in vertebral, kidney and palate development in an Acvr2b(-/-) background, indicating a genetic interaction between the two receptor genes. Thus, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptor ALK5, which until now has only been associated with the biological functions of TGF-beta1 to TGF-beta3 proteins, mediates GDF11 signalling during embryogenesis. PMID:16845371

  16. Sulforaphane attenuates hepatic fibrosis via NF-E2-related factor 2-mediated inhibition of transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang Joo; Kim, Joon-Young; Min, Ae-Kyung; Park, Keun-Gyu; Harris, Robert A; Kim, Han-Jong; Lee, In-Kyu

    2012-02-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a dietary isothiocyanate that exerts chemopreventive effects via NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated induction of antioxidant/phase II enzymes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). This work was undertaken to evaluate the effects of SFN on hepatic fibrosis and profibrotic transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad signaling, which are closely associated with oxidative stress. SFN suppressed TGF-β-enhanced expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker of hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation, and profibrogenic genes such as type I collagen, fibronectin, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in hTERT, an immortalized human HSC line. SFN inhibited TGF-β-stimulated activity of a PAI-1 promoter construct and (CAGA)(9) MLP-Luc, an artificial Smad3/4-specific reporter, in addition to reducing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad3. Nrf2 overexpression was sufficient to inhibit the TGF-β/Smad signaling and PAI-1 expression. Conversely, knockdown of Nrf2, but not inhibition of HO-1 or NQO1 activity, significantly abolished the inhibitory effect of SFN on (CAGA)(9) MLP-Luc activity. However, inhibition of NQO1 activity reversed repression of TGF-β-stimulated expression of type I collagen by SFN, suggesting the involvement of antioxidant activity of SFN in the suppression of Smad-independent fibrogenic gene expression. Finally, SFN treatment attenuated the development and progression of early stage hepatic fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation in mice, accompanied by reduced expression of type I collagen and α-SMA. Collectively, these results show that SFN elicits an antifibrotic effect on hepatic fibrosis through Nrf2-mediated inhibition of the TGF-β/Smad signaling and subsequent suppression of HSC activation and fibrogenic gene expression. PMID:22155056

  17. Chronic Tumor Necrosis Factor Alters T Cell Responses by Attenuating T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Andrew P.; Liblau, Roland S.; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Congia, Mauro; Laudanna, Carlo; Schreiber, Robert D.; Probert, Lesley; Kollias, George; McDevitt, Hugh O.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated injections of adult mice with recombinant murine TNF prolong the survival of NZB/W F1 mice, and suppress type I insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. To determine whether repeated TNF injections suppress T cell function in adult mice, we studied the responses of influenza hemagglutinin-specific T cells derived from T cell receptor (HNT-TCR) transgenic mice. Treatment of adult mice with murine TNF for 3 wk suppressed a broad range of T cell responses, including proliferation and cytokine production. Furthermore, T cell responses of HNT-TCR transgenic mice also expressing the human TNF-globin transgene were markedly reduced compared to HNT-TCR single transgenic littermates, indicating that sustained p55 TNF-R signaling is sufficient to suppress T cell function in vivo. Using a model of chronic TNF exposure in vitro, we demonstrate that (a) chronic TNF effects are dose and time dependent, (b) TNF suppresses the responses of both Th1 and Th2 T helper subsets, (c) the suppressive effects of endogenous TNF produced in T cell cultures could be reversed with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to TNF, and (d) prolonged TNF exposure attenuates T cell receptor signaling. The finding that anti-TNF treatment in vivo enhances T cell proliferative responses and cytokine production provides evidence for a novel regulatory effect of TNF on T cells in healthy laboratory mice. These effects are more pronounced in chronic inflammatory disease. In addition, our data provide a mechanism through which prolonged TNF exposure suppresses disease in animal models of autoimmunity. PMID:9151895

  18. Functional analysis of cotton orthologs of GA signal transduction factors GID1 and SLR1.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Lorenzo; Kitamura, Jun; Abdel-mageed, Haggag; Lee, Joohyun; Sun, Yan; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Matsuoka, Makoto; Allen, Randy D

    2008-09-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA) is both necessary and sufficient to promote fiber elongation in cultured fertilized ovules of the upland cotton variety Coker 312. This is likely due to the temporal and spatial regulation of GA biosynthesis, perception, and subsequent signal transduction that leads to alterations in gene expression and morphology. Our results indicate that the initiation of fiber elongation by the application of GA to cultured ovules corresponds with increased expression of genes that encode xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin (EXP) that are involved in promoting cell elongation. To gain a better understanding of the GA signaling components in cotton, that lead to such changes in gene expression, two GA receptor genes (GhGID1a and GhGID1b) and two DELLA protein genes (GhSLR1a and GhSLR1b) that are orthologous to the rice GA receptor (GID1) and the rice DELLA gene (SLR1), respectively, were characterized. Similar to the GA biosynthetic genes, expression of GhGID1a and GhGID1b is under the negative regulation by GA while GA positively regulates GhSLR1a. Recombinant GST-GhGID1s showed GA-binding activity in vitro that was augmented in the presence of GhSLR1a, GhSLR1b, or rice SLR1, indicating complex formation between the receptors and repressor proteins. This was further supported by the GA-dependent interaction of these proteins in yeast cells. Ectopic expression of the GhGID1a in the rice gid1-3 mutant plants rescued the GA-insensitive dwarf phenotype, which demonstrates that it is a functional GA receptor. Furthermore, ectopic expression of GhSLR1b in wild type Arabidopsis led to reduced growth and upregulated expression of DELLA-responsive genes. PMID:18506581

  19. Transforming growth factorsignaling: emerging stem cell target in metastatic breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Antoinette R.; Alexe, Gabriela; Reiss, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In most human breast cancers, lowering of TGFβ receptor- or Smad gene expression combined with increased levels of TGFβs in the tumor microenvironment is sufficient to abrogate TGFβs tumor suppressive effects and to induce a mesenchymal, motile and invasive phenotype. In genetic mouse models, TGFβ signaling suppresses de novo mammary cancer formation but promotes metastasis of tumors that have broken through TGFβ tumor suppression. In mouse models of “triple-negative” or basal-like breast cancer, treatment with TGFβ neutralizing anti-bodies or receptor kinase inhibitors strongly inhibits development of lung- and bone metastases. These TGFβ antagonists do not significantly affect tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis. Rather, they de-repress anti-tumor immunity, inhibit angiogenesis and reverse the mesenchymal, motile, invasive phenotype characteristic of basal-like and HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Patterns of TGFβ target genes upregulation in human breast cancers suggest that TGFβ may drive tumor progression in estrogen-independent cancer, while it mediates a suppressive host cell response in estrogen-dependent luminal cancers. In addition, TGFβ appears to play a key role in maintaining the mammary epithelial (cancer) stem cell pool, in part by inducing a mesenchymal phenotype, while differentiated, estrogen receptor-positive, luminal cells are unresponsive to TGFβ because the TGFBR2 receptor gene is transcriptionally silent. These same cells respond to estrogen by downregulating TGFβ, while antiestrogens act by upregulating TGFβ. This model predicts that inhibiting TGFβ signaling should drive the differentiation of mammary stem cells into ductal cells. Consequently, TGFβ antagonists may convert basal-like or HER2-positive cancers to a more epithelioid, non-proliferating (and, perhaps, non-metastatic) phenotype. Conversely, these agents might antagonize the therapeutic effects of anti-estrogens in estrogen-dependent luminal cancers. These

  20. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  1. Proneural transcription factors regulate different steps of cortical neuron migration through Rnd-mediated inhibition of RhoA signaling.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Heng, Julian; Azzarelli, Roberta; Riou, Philippe; Castro, Diogo; Lebel-Potter, Mélanie; Parras, Carlos; Bell, Donald M; Ridley, Anne J; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2011-03-24

    Little is known of the intracellular machinery that controls the motility of newborn neurons. We have previously shown that the proneural protein Neurog2 promotes the migration of nascent cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the atypical Rho GTPase Rnd2. Here, we show that another proneural factor, Ascl1, promotes neuronal migration in the cortex through direct regulation of a second Rnd family member, Rnd3. Both Rnd2 and Rnd3 promote neuronal migration by inhibiting RhoA signaling, but they control distinct steps of the migratory process, multipolar to bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate, respectively. Interestingly, these divergent functions directly result from the distinct subcellular distributions of the two Rnd proteins. Because Rnd proteins also regulate progenitor divisions and neurite outgrowth, we propose that proneural factors, through spatiotemporal regulation of Rnd proteins, integrate the process of neuronal migration with other events in the neurogenic program. PMID:21435554

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor signalling via Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J; Fraser, F W; Riley, C; Ahmed, N; McCulloch, D R; Ward, A C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer remains a major cause of cancer mortality in women, with only limited understanding of disease aetiology at the molecular level. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a key regulator of both normal and emergency haematopoiesis, and is used clinically to aid haematopoietic recovery following ablative therapies for a variety of solid tumours including ovarian cancer. Methods: The expression of G-CSF and its receptor, G-CSFR, was examined in primary ovarian cancer samples and a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF treatment on proliferation, migration and survival were determined. Results: G-CSFR was predominantly expressed in high-grade serous ovarian epithelial tumour samples and a subset of ovarian cancer cell lines. Stimulation of G-CSFR-expressing ovarian epithelial cancer cells with G-CSF led to increased migration and survival, including against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. The effects of G-CSF were mediated by signalling via the downstream JAK2/STAT3 pathway. Conclusion: This study suggests that G-CSF has the potential to impact on ovarian cancer pathogenesis, and that G-CSFR expression status should be considered in determining appropriate therapy. PMID:24220695

  3. Redox Signaling by the RNA Polymerase III TFIIB-Related Factor Brf2

    PubMed Central

    Gouge, Jerome; Satia, Karishma; Guthertz, Nicolas; Widya, Marcella; Thompson, Andrew James; Cousin, Pascal; Dergai, Oleksandr; Hernandez, Nouria; Vannini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Summary TFIIB-related factor 2 (Brf2) is a member of the family of TFIIB-like core transcription factors. Brf2 recruits RNA polymerase (Pol) III to type III gene-external promoters, including the U6 spliceosomal RNA and selenocysteine tRNA genes. Found only in vertebrates, Brf2 has been linked to tumorigenesis but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We have solved crystal structures of a human Brf2-TBP complex bound to natural promoters, obtaining a detailed view of the molecular interactions occurring at Brf2-dependent Pol III promoters and highlighting the general structural and functional conservation of human Pol II and Pol III pre-initiation complexes. Surprisingly, our structural and functional studies unravel a Brf2 redox-sensing module capable of specifically regulating Pol III transcriptional output in living cells. Furthermore, we establish Brf2 as a central redox-sensing transcription factor involved in the oxidative stress pathway and provide a mechanistic model for Brf2 genetic activation in lung and breast cancer. PMID:26638071

  4. Redox Signaling by the RNA Polymerase III TFIIB-Related Factor Brf2.

    PubMed

    Gouge, Jerome; Satia, Karishma; Guthertz, Nicolas; Widya, Marcella; Thompson, Andrew James; Cousin, Pascal; Dergai, Oleksandr; Hernandez, Nouria; Vannini, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    TFIIB-related factor 2 (Brf2) is a member of the family of TFIIB-like core transcription factors. Brf2 recruits RNA polymerase (Pol) III to type III gene-external promoters, including the U6 spliceosomal RNA and selenocysteine tRNA genes. Found only in vertebrates, Brf2 has been linked to tumorigenesis but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We have solved crystal structures of a human Brf2-TBP complex bound to natural promoters, obtaining a detailed view of the molecular interactions occurring at Brf2-dependent Pol III promoters and highlighting the general structural and functional conservation of human Pol II and Pol III pre-initiation complexes. Surprisingly, our structural and functional studies unravel a Brf2 redox-sensing module capable of specifically regulating Pol III transcriptional output in living cells. Furthermore, we establish Brf2 as a central redox-sensing transcription factor involved in the oxidative stress pathway and provide a mechanistic model for Brf2 genetic activation in lung and breast cancer. PMID:26638071

  5. Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor OSG-1 Confers Functional Aging via Dysregulated Rho Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhibing; Sesti, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Rho signaling regulates a variety of biological processes, but whether it is implicated in aging remains an open question. Here we show that a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of the Dbl family, OSG-1, confers functional aging by dysregulating Rho GTPases activities in C. elegans. Thus, gene reporter analysis revealed widespread OSG-1 expression in muscle and neurons. Loss of OSG-1 gene function was not associated with developmental defects. In contrast, suppression of OSG-1 lessened loss of function (chemotaxis) in ASE sensory neurons subjected to conditions of oxidative stress generated during natural aging, by oxidative challenges, or by genetic mutations. RNAi analysis showed that OSG-1 was specific toward activation of RHO-1 GTPase signaling. RNAi further implicated actin-binding proteins ARX-3 and ARX-5, thus the actin cytoskeleton, as one of the targets of OSG-1/RHO-1 signaling. Taken together these data suggest that OSG-1 is recruited under conditions of oxidative stress, a hallmark of aging, and contributes to promote loss of neuronal function by affecting the actin cytoskeleton via altered RHO-1 activity. PMID:25527286

  6. Protein kinase A modulates transforming growth factorsignaling through a direct interaction with Smad4 protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huibin; Li, Gangyong; Wu, Jing-Jiang; Wang, Lidong; Uhler, Michael; Simeone, Diane M

    2013-03-22

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling normally functions to regulate embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. It is increasingly recognized that TGFβ signaling is regulated by cross-talk with other signaling pathways. We previously reported that TGFβ activates protein kinase A (PKA) independent of cAMP through an interaction of an activated Smad3-Smad4 complex and the regulatory subunit of the PKA holoenzyme (PKA-R). Here we define the interaction domains of Smad4 and PKA-R and the functional consequences of this interaction. Using a series of Smad4 and PKA-R truncation mutants, we identified amino acids 290-300 of the Smad4 linker region as critical for the specific interaction of Smad4 and PKA-R. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the B cAMP binding domain of PKA-R was sufficient for interaction with Smad4. Targeting of B domain regions conserved among all PKA-R isoforms and exposed on the molecular surface demonstrated that amino acids 281-285 and 320-329 were required for complex formation with Smad4. Interactions of these specific regions of Smad4 and PKA-R were necessary for TGFβ-mediated increases in PKA activity, CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) phosphorylation, induction of p21, and growth inhibition. Moreover, this Smad4-PKA interaction was required for TGFβ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition, invasion of pancreatic tumor cells, and regulation of tumor growth in vivo. PMID:23362281

  7. Conserved roles of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 signaling in the regulation of inner cell mass development in bovine blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Akizawa, Hiroki; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Odagiri, Haruka; Kohri, Nanami; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Nagano, Masashi; Takahashi, Masashi; Kawahara, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    A common process during preimplantation mammalian development is blastocyst formation, which utilizes signaling through fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), yet the mechanisms through which FGFR2 signaling affect preimplantation development in bovine embryos remain incompletely understood. Here, we used RNA-interference to investigate the in vitro development, the frequency of blastomere apoptosis, and the mRNA expression of developmental marker genes in FGF receptor 2-knockdown (FGFR2-KD) bovine embryos. A reduction in FGFR2 mRNA did not affect preimplantation development or the frequency of apoptotic blastomeres, but did enhanced proliferation of the inner cell mass in blastocysts (P < 0.05)-which differs from the phenotype reported for bovine embryos using a pharmacological approach (treatment with the pan-FGFR blocker PD173074), but agrees with previous results obtained using mouse embryos. Moreover, the expression of an epiblast marker gene, NANOG, and a primitive endoderm marker gene, GATA6, remained unchanged, whereas the expression of another primitive endoderm marker gene, HNF4A, was significantly reduced in FGFR2-KD embryos. Therefore, FGFR2 signaling appears to be associated with the regulation of inner cell mass development and proliferation during blastocyst formation in cattle. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 516-525, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27060901

  8. Antagonism of Stem Cell Factor/c-kit Signaling Attenuates Neonatal Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karen C; Torres, Eneida; Hehre, Dorothy; Wu, Shu; Suguihara, Cleide; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that c-kit positive cells are present in the remodeled pulmonary vasculature bed of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether stem cell factor (SCF)/ c-kit regulated pathways potentiate pulmonary vascular remodeling is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that attenuated c-kit signaling would decrease chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling by decreasing pulmonary vascular cell mitogenesis. Methods Neonatal FVB/NJ mice treated with non-immune IgG (PL), or c-kit neutralizing antibody (ACK2) as well as c-kit mutant mice (WBB6F1- Kit W− v/ +) and their congenic controls, were exposed to normoxia (FiO2=0.21) or hypoxia (FiO2=0.12) for two weeks. Following this exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling were evaluated. Results As compared to chronically hypoxic controls, c-kit mutant mice had decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular remodeling and proliferation. Consistent with these findings, administration of ACK2 to neonatal mice with chronic hypoxia-induced PH decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling. This attenuation in PH was accompanied by decreased extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Conclusion SCF/c-kit signaling may potentiate chronic hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling by modulating ERK activation. Inhibition of c-kit activity may be a potential strategy to alleviate PH. PMID:26705118

  9. Fibroblast growth factor signaling and inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer and their role in squamous cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of targeted agents primarily applicable to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of adenocarcinoma histology, there is a heightened unmet need in the squamous cell carcinoma population. Targeting the angiogenic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling pathway is among the strategies being explored in squamous NSCLC; these efforts are supported by growth-promoting effects of FGF signaling in preclinical studies (including interactions with other pathways) and observations suggesting that FGF/FGFR-related aberrations may be more common in squamous versus adenocarcinoma and other histologies. A number of different anti-FGF/FGFR approaches have shown promise in preclinical studies. Clinical trials of two multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors are restricting enrollment to patients with squamous NSCLC: a phase I/II trial of nintedanib added to first-line gemcitabine/cisplatin and a phase II trial of ponatinib for previously treated advanced disease, with the latter requiring not only squamous disease but also a confirmed FGFR kinase amplification or mutation. There are several ongoing clinical trials of multitargeted agents in general NSCLC populations, including but not limited to patients with squamous disease. Other FGF/FGFR-targeted agents are in earlier clinical development. While results are awaited from these clinical investigations in squamous NSCLC and other disease settings, additional research is needed to elucidate the role of FGF/FGFR signaling in the biology of NSCLC of different histologies. PMID:24711160

  10. Linewidth Enhancement Factor and Amplification of Angle-Modulated Optical Signals in Injection-Locked Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Taraprasad; Bhattacharyya, Prosenjit

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear analysis of the effect of linewidth enhancement factor (LEF) on the amplification of angle-modulated optical signals in injection-locked mid-infrared (IR) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). A higher value of LEF tends to conserve the output angle modulation index of the amplified mid-IR signal particularly in the low-modulation frequency region. Further, a higher value of signal injection ratio produces a wider bandwidth of the locked QCL amplifier. The LEF introduces asymmetry in the lockband (LB) of the injection-locked QCL and this asymmetry increases with the increase in the value of LEF. Typically ratio of calculated lower-side LB to upper-side LB for an injection power level of - 20 dB and a LEF of unity is 1.67. The electron relaxation time in the uppermost subband lasing level in a three-level system has a profound effect on the LB asymmetry in a QCL.

  11. Connective tissue growth factor differentially binds to members of the cystine knot superfamily and potentiates platelet-derived growth factor-B signaling in rabbit corneal fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Liya; Chung, Pei-Yu; Sriram, Sriniwas; Rahman, Masmudur M; Song, Wen-Yuan; Scott, Edward W; Petersen, Bryon E; Schultz, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the binding of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) to cystine knot-containing ligands and how this impacts platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B signaling. METHODS: The binding strengths of CTGF to cystine knot-containing growth factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, PDGF-B, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were compared using the LexA-based yeast two-hybrid system. EYG48 reporter strain that carried a wild-type LEU2 gene under the control of LexA operators and a lacZ reporter plasmid (p80p-lacZ) containing eight high affinity LexA binding sites were used in the yeast two-hybrid analysis. Interactions between CTGF and the tested growth factors were evaluated based on growth of transformed yeast cells on selective media and colorimetric detection in a liquid β-galactosidase activity assay. Dissociation constants of CTGF to VEGF-A isoform 165 or PDGF-BB homo-dimer were measured in surface plasma resonance (SPR) analysis. CTGF regulation in PDGF-B presentation to the PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) was also quantitatively assessed by the SPR analysis. Combinational effects of CTGF protein and PDGF-BB on activation of PDGFRβ and downstream signaling molecules ERK1/2 and AKT were assessed in rabbit corneal fibroblast cells by Western analysis. RESULTS: In the LexA-based yeast two-hybrid system, cystine knot motifs of tested growth factors were fused to the activation domain of the transcriptional factor GAL4 while CTGF was fused to the DNA binding domain of the bacterial repressor protein LexA. Yeast co-transformants containing corresponding fusion proteins for CTGF and all four tested cystine knot motifs survived on selective medium containing galactose and raffinose but lacking histidine, tryptophan, and uracil. In liquid β-galactosidase assays, CTGF expressing cells that were co-transformed with the cystine knot of VEGF-A had the highest activity, at 29.88 ± 0.91 fold above controls

  12. Potentiation of growth factor signaling by insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in breast epithelial cells requires sphingosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Janet L; Lin, Mike Z; McGowan, Eileen M; Baxter, Robert C

    2009-09-18

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1, but not SphK2, expression. Similarly, IGFR1 phosphorylation and DNA synthesis stimulated by LR3-IGF-I (an IGF-I analog not bound by IGFBP-3), were enhanced by IGFBP-3, and this was blocked by SphK1 silencing. SphK1 expression and activity were stimulated by IGFBP-3 approximately 2-fold over 24 h. Silencing of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) or S1P3, but not S1P2, abolished the effect of IGFBP-3 on EGF-stimulated EGFR activation. The effects of IGFBP-3 could be reproduced with exogenous S1P or medium conditioned by cells treated with IGFBP-3, and this was also blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P3. These data indicate that potentiation of growth factor signaling by IGFBP-3 in MCF-10A cells requires SphK1 activity and S1P1/S1P3, suggesting that S1P, the product of SphK activity and ligand for S1P1 and S1P3, is the "missing link" mediating IGF and EGFR transactivation and cell growth stimulation by IGFBP-3. PMID:19633297

  13. Co-activation of nuclear factor-κB and myocardin/serum response factor conveys the hypertrophy signal of high insulin levels in cardiac myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Geng, Yong-Jian; Bolli, Roberto; Rokosh, Gregg; Ferdinandy, Peter; Patterson, Cam; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2014-07-11

    Hyperinsulinemia contributes to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in patients with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Here, high circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α may synergize with insulin in signaling inflammation and cardiac hypertrophy. We tested whether high insulin affects activation of TNF-α-induced NF-κB and myocardin/serum response factor (SRF) to convey hypertrophy signaling in cardiac myoblasts. In canine cardiac myoblasts, treatment with high insulin (10(-8) to 10(-7) m) for 0-24 h increased insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 phosphorylation at Ser-307, decreased protein levels of chaperone-associated ubiquitin (Ub) E3 ligase C terminus of heat shock protein 70-interacting protein (CHIP), increased SRF activity, as well as β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myocardin expressions. Here siRNAs to myocardin or NF-κB, as well as CHIP overexpression prevented (while siRNA-mediated CHIP disruption potentiated) high insulin-induced SR element (SRE) activation and β-MHC expression. Insulin markedly potentiated TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation. Compared with insulin alone, insulin+TNF-α increased SRF/SRE binding and β-MHC expression, which was reversed by the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and by NF-κB silencing. In the hearts of db/db diabetic mice, in which Akt phosphorylation was decreased, p38MAPK, Akt1, and IRS-1 phosphorylation at Ser-307 were increased, together with myocardin expression as well as SRE and NF-κB activities. In response to high insulin, cardiac myoblasts increase the expression or the promyogenic transcription factors myocardin/SRF in a CHIP-dependent manner. Insulin potentiates TNF-α in inducing NF-κB and SRF/SRE activities. In hyperinsulinemic states, myocardin may act as a nuclear effector of insulin, promoting cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24855642

  14. TRAF6 inhibits proangiogenic signals in endothelial cells and regulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Sarah; Datta, Dipak; Flaxenburg, Jesse A.; Pal, Soumitro; Briscoe, David M.

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-receptor associated factors (TRAFs) function in the angiogenesis response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 regulates basal and inducible expression of VEGF in endothelial cells (EC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 is an endogenous inhibitor of EC proliferation and migration in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 inhibits VEGF expression in part via its ability to regulate Src signaling. -- Abstract: TNF-family molecules induce the expression Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in endothelial cells (EC) and elicit signaling responses that result in angiogenesis. However, the role of TNF-receptor associated factors (TRAFs) as upstream regulators of VEGF expression or as mediators of angiogenesis is not known. In this study, HUVEC were cotransfected with a full-length VEGF promoter-luciferase construct and siRNAs to TRAF 1, -2, -3, -5, -6, and promoter activity was measured. Paradoxically, rather than inhibiting VEGF expression, we found that knockdown of TRAF6 resulted in a 4-6-fold increase in basal VEGF promoter activity compared to control siRNA-transfected EC (P < 0.0001). In addition, knockdown of TRAF 1, -2, -3 or -5 resulted in a slight increase or no change in VEGF promoter activation. Using [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assays as well as the in vitro wound healing assay, we also found that basal rates of EC proliferation and migration were increased following TRAF6 knockdown; and this response was inhibited by the addition of a blocking anti-VEGF antibody into cell cultures. Using a limited protein array to gain insight into TRAF6-dependent intermediary signaling responses, we observed that TRAF6 knockdown resulted in an increase in the activity of Src family kinases. In addition, we found that treatment with AZD-0530, a pharmacological Src inhibitor, reduced the regulatory effect of TRAF6 knockdown on VEGF promoter activity. Collectively, these findings define a novel pro-angiogenic signaling

  15. Radiation induced nuclear factor kappa-B signaling cascade study in mammalian cells by improved detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern, not only for tumor radiotherapy but also for new regimes of space missions. Ionizing radiation modulates several signaling pathways resulting in transcription factor activation. NF-kappaB is one of the important transcription factors that respond to changes in the environment of a mammalian cell and plays a key role in many biological processes relevant to radiation response, such as apoptosis, inflammation and carcinogenesis. From medical and biological point of view it is important to understand radiation induced NF-kappaB signaling cascade. For studying NF-kappaB signaling, green fluorescent proteins EGFP and d2EGFP were used previously (Advances in Space Research, 36: 1673-1679, 2005). The current study aims to improve reporter assays by the use of a destabilized variant of red fluorescent protein tdTomato (DD-tdTomato) which gives high fluorescence signals and a better signal/noise ratio for NF-kappaB activation. The reporter system HEK-pNFkappaB-DD-tdTomato-C8 is a dual reporter system which can provide both discrete and cumulative signals after exposure to ionizing radiation (X-rays, heavy ions). In the presence of Shield-1, the fluorescent protein DD-tdTomato is not degraded but accumulated inside the cell which helps to quantify the fold induction of NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression. The minimum dose required to activate NF-kappaB is 6 Gy but accumulated signals data shows that NF-kappaB is activated after 3 Gy in the presence of Shield-1. Average dose and number of heavy ions’ hits per nucleus necessary to double the NF

  16. Zinc Finger Homeodomain Factor Zfhx3 Is Essential for Mammary Lactogenic Differentiation by Maintaining Prolactin Signaling Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Ma, Gui; Zhang, Xiaolin; He, Yuan; Li, Mei; Han, Xueying; Fu, Liya; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Nagy, Tamas; Zhao, Qiang; Fu, Li; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2016-06-10

    The zinc finger homeobox 3 (ZFHX3, also named ATBF1 for AT motif binding factor 1) is a transcription factor that suppresses prostatic carcinogenesis and induces neuronal differentiation. It also interacts with estrogen receptor α to inhibit cell proliferation and regulate pubertal mammary gland development in mice. In the present study, we examined whether and how Zfhx3 regulates lactogenic differentiation in mouse mammary glands. At different stages of mammary gland development, Zfhx3 protein was expressed at varying levels, with the highest level at lactation. In the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cell line, an in vitro model of lactogenesis, knockdown of Zfhx3 attenuated prolactin-induced β-casein expression and morphological changes, indicators of lactogenic differentiation. In mouse mammary tissue, knock-out of Zfhx3 interrupted lactogenesis, resulting in underdeveloped glands with much smaller and fewer alveoli, reduced β-casein expression, accumulation of large cytoplasmic lipid droplets in luminal cells after parturition, and failure in lactation. Mechanistically, Zfhx3 maintained the expression of Prlr (prolactin receptor) and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity, whereas knockdown and knock-out of Zfhx3 in HC11 cells and mammary tissues, respectively, decreased Prlr expression, Stat5 phosphorylation, and the expression of Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 target genes. These findings indicate that Zfhx3 plays an essential role in proper lactogenic development in mammary glands, at least in part by maintaining Prlr expression and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity. PMID:27129249

  17. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yunguang; Zheng Siyuan; Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Carbone, David P.; Zhao Zhongming; Lu Bo

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  18. An algorithm for the management of hypertension in the setting of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling inhibition.

    PubMed

    Copur, M Sitki; Obermiller, Angela

    2011-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling is considered to be one of the key factors involved in tumor-associated angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis has significantly improved anticancer therapy making it one of the cornerstones of treatment for various solid tumors. Several antiangiogenesis inhibitory compounds (eg, bevacizumab, sunitinib, sorafenib) are now widely used in the treatment of patients with colorectal, non-small-cell lung, advanced renal cell, hepatocellular, and breast cancer. One of the most commonly observed side effects of inhibition of VEGF signaling is hypertension, which is dose-dependent and varies in incidence among the different angiogenesis inhibitor drugs. Poorly controlled hypertension not only can lead to cardiovascular events, renal disease, and stroke, but may also necessitate discontinuation of anticancer therapy, thereby potentially limiting overall clinical benefit. In contrast, hypertension induced by VEGF inhibitors has been shown to represent an important pharmacodynamic biomarker of oncologic response. For the practicing oncologist, knowledge and optimal management of this toxicity is essential. Because of the lack of controlled studies on this topic, no clear recommendations are available. In this article, we review the available preclinical and clinical data on the pathogenesis and management of hypertension resulting from anti-VEGF inhibitor therapy and propose a treatment algorithm that our group has now implemented for daily clinical practice. PMID:21855035

  19. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces fibrosis in rat meningeal mesothelial cells via the p38 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xue-Jing; Guo, Yan; Yang, Hai-Jie; Feng, Zhi-Wei; Li, Tong; Xu, Yu-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Leptomeningeal fibrosis is important in the pathogenesis of communicating hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage; however, the underlying mechanisms of leptomeningeal fibrosis remain largely unclear. In the present study, primary meningeal mesothelial cells (MMCs) were used as a cell model to investigate the effect of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1) on leptomeningeal fibrosis. Firstly, primary MMCs were isolated from rat brains and characterized by immunofluorescene, staining positive for keratin and vimentin, but negative for factor VIII. Upon TGF‑β1 treatment, MMCs were induced to express connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), an indicator of fibrosis, in a dose‑dependent manner. Furthermore, p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was significantly activated by TGF‑β1. However, in the presence of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, TGF‑β1‑induced CTGF expression was markedly suppressed. Together, these data suggest that TGF‑β1 could induce fibrosis of MMCs via the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, providing a novel potential target for intervention in TGF‑β1‑induced leptomeningeal fibrosis. PMID:27314440

  20. Illumination Effects on the Capacitance Spectra and Signal Quality Factor of Al/InSe/C Microwave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasrawi, A. F.

    2013-06-01

    Amorphous indium selenide thin films have been used in the design of a microwave-sensitive Schottky barrier. The illumination effects on the capacitance spectra, on the signal quality factor, and on the capacitance ( C)-voltage ( V) characteristics of the Al/InSe/C device are investigated. Particular shifts in the amplitude and in the resonance peaks of the capacitance spectra which were studied in the frequency range of 10.0 kHz to 3.0 GHz are observed. While the photoexcitation of these devices increased the capacity level by ˜1.6 times the original magnitude, the dark quality factor, which was 2.2 × 106 at 3.0 GHz, fell to 1.2 × 106 when subjected to luminance of 14.7 klux. Analysis of the C- V curves recorded at signal power ranging from wireless local area network (LAN) levels to the maximum output power of third generation (3G) mobiles reflected high tunability of capacitance upon increasing the voltage or power. The tunability of the biased capacitance was much more pronounced in the light than in the dark. The obtained characteristics of the Al/InSe/C sensors indicate their usability in radio and microwave technology.

  1. Pyocyanin, a virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, alters root development through reactive oxygen species and ethylene signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Castro, Randy; Pelagio-Flores, Ramón; Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Campos-García, Jesús; López-Bucio, José

    2014-04-01

    Pyocyanin acts as a virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a plant and animal pathogen. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pyocyanin on growth and development of Arabidopsis seedlings. Root inoculation with P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain inhibited primary root growth in wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis seedlings. In contrast, single lasI- and double rhlI-/lasI- mutants of P. aeruginosa defective in pyocyanin production showed decreased root growth inhibition concomitant with an increased phytostimulation. Treatment with pyocyanin modulates root system architecture, inhibiting primary root growth and promoting lateral root and root hair formation without affecting meristem viability or causing cell death. These effects correlated with altered proportions of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide in root tips and with an inhibition of cell division and elongation. Mutant analyses showed that pyocyanin modulation of root growth was likely independent of auxin, cytokinin, and abscisic acid but required ethylene signaling because the Arabidopsis etr1-1, ein2-1, and ein3-1 ethylene-related mutants were less sensitive to pyocyanin-induced root stoppage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) distribution. Our findings suggest that pyocyanin is an important factor modulating the interplay between ROS production and root system architecture by an ethylene-dependent signaling. PMID:24224532

  2. Nuclear factor kappa B-inducing kinase and Ikappa B kinase-alpha signal skeletal muscle cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Canicio, J; Ruiz-Lozano, P; Carrasco, M; Palacin, M; Chien, K; Zorzano, A; Kaliman, P

    2001-06-01

    Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB)-inducing kinase (NIK), IkappaB kinase (IKK)-alpha and -beta, and IkappaBalpha are common elements that signal NF-kappaB activation in response to diverse stimuli. In this study, we analyzed the role of this pathway during insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)-induced myoblast differentiation. L6E9 myoblasts differentiated with IGF-II showed an induction of NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity that correlated in time with the activation of IKKalpha, IKKbeta, and NIK. Moreover, the activation of IKKalpha, IKKbeta, and NIK by IGF-II was dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, a key regulator of myogenesis. Adenoviral transduction with the IkappaBalpha(S32A/S36A) mutant severely impaired both IGF-II-dependent NF-kappaB activation and myoblast differentiation, indicating that phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha at Ser-32 and Ser-36 is an essential myogenic step. Adenoviral transfer of wild-type or kinase-deficient forms of IKKalpha or IKKbeta revealed that IKKalpha is required for IGF-II-dependent myoblast differentiation, whereas IKKbeta is not essential for this process. Finally, overexpression of kinase-proficient wild-type NIK showed that the activation of NIK is sufficient to generate signals that trigger myogenin expression and multinucleated myotube formation in the absence of IGF-II. PMID:11279241

  3. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells. PMID:27601530

  4. Increased Melatonin Signaling Is a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Nagorny, Cecilia L F; Singh, Pratibha; Bennet, Hedvig; Yu, Qian; Alenkvist, Ida; Isomaa, Bo; Östman, Bjarne; Söderström, Johan; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Martikainen, Silja; Räikkönen, Katri; Forsén, Tom; Hakaste, Liisa; Almgren, Peter; Storm, Petter; Asplund, Olof; Shcherbina, Liliya; Fex, Malin; Fadista, João; Tengholm, Anders; Wierup, Nils; Groop, Leif; Mulder, Hindrik

    2016-06-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a global pandemic. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified >100 genetic variants associated with the disease, including a common variant in the melatonin receptor 1 b gene (MTNR1B). Here, we demonstrate increased MTNR1B expression in human islets from risk G-allele carriers, which likely leads to a reduction in insulin release, increasing T2D risk. Accordingly, in insulin-secreting cells, melatonin reduced cAMP levels, and MTNR1B overexpression exaggerated the inhibition of insulin release exerted by melatonin. Conversely, mice with a disruption of the receptor secreted more insulin. Melatonin treatment in a human recall-by-genotype study reduced insulin secretion and raised glucose levels more extensively in risk G-allele carriers. Thus, our data support a model where enhanced melatonin signaling in islets reduces insulin secretion, leading to hyperglycemia and greater future risk of T2D. The findings also imply that melatonin physiologically serves to inhibit nocturnal insulin release. PMID:27185156

  5. Escin Chemosensitizes Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells and Inhibits the Nuclear Factor-kappaB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rimmon, A.; Vexler, A.; Berkovich, L.; Earon, G.; Ron, I.; Lev-Ari, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is an urgent need to develop new treatment strategies and drugs for pancreatic cancer that is highly resistant to radio-chemotherapy. Aesculus hippocastanum (the horse chestnut) known in Chinese medicine as a plant with anti-inflammatory, antiedema, antianalgesic, and antipyretic activities. The main active compound of this plant is Escin (C54H84O23). Objective. To evaluate the effect of Escin alone and combined with chemotherapy on pancreatic cancer cell survival and to unravel mechanism(s) of Escin anticancer activity. Methods. Cell survival was measured by XTT colorimetric assay. Synergistic effect of combined therapy was determined by CalcuSyn software. Cell cycle and induction of apoptosis were evaluated by FACS analysis. Expression of NF-κB-related proteins (p65, IκBα, and p-IκBα) and cyclin D was evaluated by western blot analysis. Results. Escin decreased the survival of pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 = 10–20 M. Escin combined with gemcitabine showed only additive effect, while its combination with cisplatin resulted in a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect in Panc-1 cells. High concentrations of Escin induced apoptosis and decreased NF-κB-related proteins and cyclin D expression. Conclusions. Escin decreased pancreatic cancer cell survival, induced apoptosis, and downregulated NF-κB signaling pathway. Moreover, Escin sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. Further translational research is required. PMID:24282639

  6. Escin Chemosensitizes Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells and Inhibits the Nuclear Factor-kappaB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rimmon, A; Vexler, A; Berkovich, L; Earon, G; Ron, I; Lev-Ari, S

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is an urgent need to develop new treatment strategies and drugs for pancreatic cancer that is highly resistant to radio-chemotherapy. Aesculus hippocastanum (the horse chestnut) known in Chinese medicine as a plant with anti-inflammatory, antiedema, antianalgesic, and antipyretic activities. The main active compound of this plant is Escin (C54H84O23). Objective. To evaluate the effect of Escin alone and combined with chemotherapy on pancreatic cancer cell survival and to unravel mechanism(s) of Escin anticancer activity. Methods. Cell survival was measured by XTT colorimetric assay. Synergistic effect of combined therapy was determined by CalcuSyn software. Cell cycle and induction of apoptosis were evaluated by FACS analysis. Expression of NF- κ B-related proteins (p65, I κ Bα, and p-I κ Bα) and cyclin D was evaluated by western blot analysis. Results. Escin decreased the survival of pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 = 10-20 M. Escin combined with gemcitabine showed only additive effect, while its combination with cisplatin resulted in a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect in Panc-1 cells. High concentrations of Escin induced apoptosis and decreased NF- κ B-related proteins and cyclin D expression. Conclusions. Escin decreased pancreatic cancer cell survival, induced apoptosis, and downregulated NF- κ B signaling pathway. Moreover, Escin sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. Further translational research is required. PMID:24282639

  7. Characterization of a baculovirus nuclear localization signal domain in the late expression factor 3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Victoria; Yu Mei; Carstens, Eric B.

    2009-03-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) single-stranded DNA binding protein LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein that is required to transport the helicase protein P143 into the nucleus of infected cells where they function to replicate viral DNA. The N-terminal 56 amino acid region of LEF-3 is required for nuclear transport. In this report, we analyzed the effect of site-specific mutagenesis of LEF-3 on its intracellular distribution. Fluorescence microscopy of expression plasmid-transfected cells demonstrated that the residues 28 to 32 formed the core nuclear localization signal, but other adjacent positively-charged residues augmented these sequences. Comparison with other group I Alphabaculoviruses suggested that this core region functionally duplicated residues including 18 and 19. This was demonstrated by the loss of nuclear localization when the equivalent residues (18 to 20) in Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) LEF-3 were mutated. The AcMNPV LEF-3 nuclear localization domain was also shown to drive nuclear transport in mammalian cells indicating that the protein nuclear import systems in insect and mammalian cells are conserved. We also demonstrated by mutagenesis that two conserved cysteine residues located at 82 and 106 were not essential for nuclear localization or for interaction with P143. However, by using a modified construct of P143 that localized on its own to the nucleus, we demonstrated that a functional nuclear localization domain on LEF-3 was required for interaction between LEF-3 and P143.

  8. The Bacterial Transcription Termination Factor Rho Coordinates Mg(2+) Homeostasis with Translational Signals.

    PubMed

    Kriner, Michelle A; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial protein Rho triggers transcription termination at the ends of many operons and when transcription and translation become uncoupled. In addition to these genome wide activities, Rho implements regulation of specific genes by dictating whether RNA polymerase terminates transcription within the 5' leader region or continues into the downstream coding region. Here, we report that the Mg(2+) channel gene corA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, which was previously thought to be constitutively expressed, is regulated by a Rho-dependent terminator located within its 5' leader region. We demonstrate that the unusually long and highly conserved corA leader mRNA can adopt two mutually exclusive conformations that determine whether or not Rho interacts with a Rho utilization site on the nascent RNA and thereby prevents transcription of the corA coding region. The RNA conformation that promotes Rho-dependent termination is favored by efficient translation of corL, a short open reading frame located within the corA leader. Thus, corA transcription is inversely coupled to corL translation. This mechanism resembles those governing expression of Salmonella's other two Mg(2+) transport genes, suggesting that Rho links Mg(2+) uptake to translational signals. PMID:26523680

  9. Fish TRIM8 exerts antiviral roles through regulation of the proinflammatory factors and interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Ying; Yang, Min; Zhou, Linli; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-07-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM)-containing proteins usually exert important regulatory roles during multiple biological processes. TRIM8 has been demonstrated to be a RING domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase which plays critical roles in inflammation and cancer. In this study, a TRIM8 homolog from grouper, Epinephelus coioides (EcTRIM8) was cloned, and its effects on fish virus replication were investigated. The full-length EcTRIM8 cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 568 amino acids with 92% identity to TRIM8 homolog from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). Sequence alignment analysis indicated that EcTRIM8 contained conserved RING finger, B-box and coiled-coil domain. Expression patterns analysis showed that EcTRIM8 was predominant in kidney, gill, fin, liver, spleen and brain. After challenging with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or polyinosin-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), the EcTRIM8 transcript was significantly increased at the early stage of injection. Under fluorescence microscopy, we observed different distribution patterns of EcTRIM8 in grouper spleen (GS) cells, including punctate fluorescence evenly situated throughout the cytoplasm and bright aggregates. The ectopic expression of EcTRIM8 in vitro significantly inhibited the replication of SGIV and red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), evidenced by the obvious reduction in the severity of cytopathic effect (CPE) and the significant decrease in viral gene transcription and protein synthesis. Moreover, the transcription of the proinflammatory factors and interferon related immune factors were differently regulated by EcTRIM8 during SGIV or RGNNV infection. In addition, overexpression of EcTRIM8 significantly increased the transcription of interferon regulator factor 3 (IRF3) and IRF7, and enhanced IRF3 or IRF7 induced interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activity. Together, our results firstly demonstrated that fish TRIM8 could exert antiviral function through the

  10. Kaiso depletion attenuates transforming growth factorsignaling and metastatic activity of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bassey-Archibong, B I; Kwiecien, J M; Milosavljevic, S B; Hallett, R M; Rayner, L G A; Erb, M J; Crawford-Brown, C J; Stephenson, K B; Bédard, P-A; Hassell, J A; Daniel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent a subset of breast tumors that are highly aggressive and metastatic, and are responsible for a disproportionate number of breast cancer-related deaths. Several studies have postulated a role for the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program in the increased aggressiveness and metastatic propensity of TNBCs. Although EMT is essential for early vertebrate development and wound healing, it is frequently co-opted by cancer cells during tumorigenesis. One prominent signaling pathway involved in EMT is the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway. In this study, we report that the novel POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso is highly expressed in TNBCs and correlates with a shorter metastasis-free survival. Notably, Kaiso expression is induced by the TGFβ pathway and silencing Kaiso expression in the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (hereafter MDA-231) and Hs578T, attenuated the expression of several EMT-associated proteins (Vimentin, Slug and ZEB1), abrogated TGFβ signaling and TGFβ-dependent EMT. Moreover, Kaiso depletion attenuated the metastasis of TNBC cells (MDA-231 and Hs578T) in a mouse model. Although high Kaiso and high TGFβR1 expression is associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients, overexpression of a kinase-active TGFβR1 in the Kaiso-depleted cells was insufficient to restore the metastatic potential of these cells, suggesting that Kaiso is a key downstream component of TGFβ-mediated pro-metastatic responses. Collectively, these findings suggest a critical role for Kaiso in TGFβ signaling and the metastasis of TNBCs. PMID:26999717

  11. Does OsPHR2, central Pi-signaling regulator, regulate some unknown factors crucial for plant growth?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiming

    2010-01-01

    OsPHR2, the homolog of AtPHR1, is a central Pi-signaling regulator. The Pi-signaling pathway downstream of AtPHR1, similarly of OsPHR2,1,2 involves a noncoding RNA which targets mimicry of miR399. miRNA399 mediates cleavage of PHO2.3,4 The regulating pathway downstream of OsPHR2 is negatively regulated by the Pi-signaling responsive gene OsSPX1.5,6 Overexpression of AtPHR1 and OsPHR2 leads to an increased concentration of Pi in the shoot tissues with leaf toxic symptom and growth retardation similar as the phenotype of pho2 mutant, especially under Pi abundant conditions.2,6,7 It has been known that the low affinity Pi transporter OsPT2 mainly contributes to the shoot Pi accumulation mediated by OsPHR2, and overexpression of OsPT2 results in shoot Pi accumulation and leaf toxic symptom and growth retardation under Pi abundant conditions.6 Two curious questions are emerging from the reported results: How Os SPX1 functions on the negative regulation of the pathway and what mechanism of the growth retardation mediated by OsPHR2. For the second question, our favored hypothesis is that the growth inhibition mediated by overexpression of OsPHR2 is caused by toxic physiological effects due to excessive Pi accumulation in shoots (Pi toxicity). In fact, the toxic symptoms become diminished with decreased Pi levels in growth medium. However, the plant growth retardation mediated by overexpression of OsPHR2 may be caused by some unknown genetic factor(s) regulated by OsPHR2. PMID:20404569

  12. Kaiso depletion attenuates transforming growth factorsignaling and metastatic activity of triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassey-Archibong, B I; Kwiecien, J M; Milosavljevic, S B; Hallett, R M; Rayner, L G A; Erb, M J; Crawford-Brown, C J; Stephenson, K B; Bédard, P-A; Hassell, J A; Daniel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent a subset of breast tumors that are highly aggressive and metastatic, and are responsible for a disproportionate number of breast cancer-related deaths. Several studies have postulated a role for the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program in the increased aggressiveness and metastatic propensity of TNBCs. Although EMT is essential for early vertebrate development and wound healing, it is frequently co-opted by cancer cells during tumorigenesis. One prominent signaling pathway involved in EMT is the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway. In this study, we report that the novel POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso is highly expressed in TNBCs and correlates with a shorter metastasis-free survival. Notably, Kaiso expression is induced by the TGFβ pathway and silencing Kaiso expression in the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (hereafter MDA-231) and Hs578T, attenuated the expression of several EMT-associated proteins (Vimentin, Slug and ZEB1), abrogated TGFβ signaling and TGFβ-dependent EMT. Moreover, Kaiso depletion attenuated the metastasis of TNBC cells (MDA-231 and Hs578T) in a mouse model. Although high Kaiso and high TGFβR1 expression is associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients, overexpression of a kinase-active TGFβR1 in the Kaiso-depleted cells was insufficient to restore the metastatic potential of these cells, suggesting that Kaiso is a key downstream component of TGFβ-mediated pro-metastatic responses. Collectively, these findings suggest a critical role for Kaiso in TGFβ signaling and the metastasis of TNBCs. PMID:26999717

  13. Global analysis of WRKY transcription factor superfamily in Setaria identifies potential candidates involved in abiotic stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Bonthala, Venkata S.; Khandelwal, Rohit; Jaishankar, Jananee; Shweta, Shweta; Nawaz, Kashif; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are major players in stress signaling and constitute an integral part of signaling networks. Among the major TFs, WRKY proteins play pivotal roles in regulation of transcriptional reprogramming associated with stress responses. In view of this, genome- and transcriptome-wide identification of WRKY TF family was performed in the C4model plants, Setaria italica (SiWRKY) and S. viridis (SvWRKY), respectively. The study identified 105 SiWRKY and 44 SvWRKY proteins that were computationally analyzed for their physicochemical properties. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis classified these proteins into three major groups, namely I, II, and III with majority of WRKY proteins belonging to group II (53 SiWRKY and 23 SvWRKY), followed by group III (39 SiWRKY and 11 SvWRKY) and group I (10 SiWRKY and 6 SvWRKY). Group II proteins were further classified into 5 subgroups (IIa to IIe) based on their phylogeny. Domain analysis showed the presence of WRKY motif and zinc finger-like structures in these proteins along with additional domains in a few proteins. All SiWRKY genes were physically mapped on the S. italica genome and their duplication analysis revealed that 10 and 8 gene pairs underwent tandem and segmental duplications, respectively. Comparative mapping of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes in related C4 panicoid genomes demonstrated the orthologous relationships between these genomes. In silico expression analysis of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes showed their differential expression patterns in different tissues and stress conditions. Expression profiling of candidate SiWRKY genes in response to stress (dehydration and salinity) and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, salicylic acid, and methyl jasmonate) suggested the putative involvement of SiWRKY066 and SiWRKY082 in stress and hormone signaling. These genes could be potential candidates for further characterization to delineate their functional roles in abiotic stress signaling. PMID:26635818

  14. Global analysis of WRKY transcription factor superfamily in Setaria identifies potential candidates involved in abiotic stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Bonthala, Venkata S; Khandelwal, Rohit; Jaishankar, Jananee; Shweta, Shweta; Nawaz, Kashif; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are major players in stress signaling and constitute an integral part of signaling networks. Among the major TFs, WRKY proteins play pivotal roles in regulation of transcriptional reprogramming associated with stress responses. In view of this, genome- and transcriptome-wide identification of WRKY TF family was performed in the C4model plants, Setaria italica (SiWRKY) and S. viridis (SvWRKY), respectively. The study identified 105 SiWRKY and 44 SvWRKY proteins that were computationally analyzed for their physicochemical properties. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis classified these proteins into three major groups, namely I, II, and III with majority of WRKY proteins belonging to group II (53 SiWRKY and 23 SvWRKY), followed by group III (39 SiWRKY and 11 SvWRKY) and group I (10 SiWRKY and 6 SvWRKY). Group II proteins were further classified into 5 subgroups (IIa to IIe) based on their phylogeny. Domain analysis showed the presence of WRKY motif and zinc finger-like structures in these proteins along with additional domains in a few proteins. All SiWRKY genes were physically mapped on the S. italica genome and their duplication analysis revealed that 10 and 8 gene pairs underwent tandem and segmental duplications, respectively. Comparative mapping of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes in related C4 panicoid genomes demonstrated the orthologous relationships between these genomes. In silico expression analysis of SiWRKY and SvWRKY genes showed their differential expression patterns in different tissues and stress conditions. Expression profiling of candidate SiWRKY genes in response to stress (dehydration and salinity) and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, salicylic acid, and methyl jasmonate) suggested the putative involvement of SiWRKY066 and SiWRKY082 in stress and hormone signaling. These genes could be potential candidates for further characterization to delineate their functional roles in abiotic stress signaling. PMID:26635818

  15. The bHLH Transcription Factor NeuroD Governs Photoreceptor Genesis and Regeneration Through Delta-Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Scott M.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Saade, Carole J.; Thomas, Jennifer L.; Thummel, Ryan; Fadool, James M.; Hitchcock, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor genesis in the retina requires precise regulation of progenitor cell competence, cell cycle exit, and differentiation, although information around the mechanisms that govern these events currently is lacking. In zebrafish, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor NeuroD governs photoreceptor genesis, but the signaling pathways through which NeuroD functions are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify these pathways, and during photoreceptor genesis, Notch signaling was investigated as the putative mediator of NeuroD function. Methods In embryos, genetic mosaic analysis was used to determine if NeuroD functions is cell- or non–cell-autonomous. Morpholino-induced NeuroD knockdown, CRISPR/Cas9 mutation, and pharmacologic and transgenic approaches were used, followed by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), to identify mechanisms through which NeuroD functions. In adults, following photoreceptor ablation and NeuroD knockdown, similar methods as above were used to identify NeuroD function during photoreceptor regeneration. Results In embryos, NeuroD function is non–cell-autonomous, NeuroD knockdown increases Notch pathway gene expression, Notch inhibition rescues the NeuroD knockdown-induced deficiency in cell cycle exit but not photoreceptor maturation, and Notch activation and CRISPR/Cas9 mutation of neurod recapitulate NeuroD knockdown. In adults, NeuroD knockdown prevents cell cycle exit and photoreceptor regeneration and increases Notch pathway gene expression, and Notch inhibition rescues this phenotype. Conclusions These data demonstrate that during embryonic development, NeuroD governs photoreceptor genesis via non–cell-autonomous mechanisms and that, during photoreceptor development and regeneration, Notch signaling is a mechanistic link between NeuroD and cell cycle exit. In contrast, during embryonic development, NeuroD governs photoreceptor maturation via mechanisms

  16. Hemodynamic scaling of fMRI-BOLD signal: validation of low-frequency spectral amplitude as a scalability factor.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Bharat B; Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Rypma, Bart

    2007-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (fMRI-BOLD) signal representing neural activity may be optimized by discriminating MR signal components related to neural activity and those related to intrinsic properties of the cortical vasculature. The objective of this study was to reduce the hemodynamic change independent of neural activity to obtain a scaled fMRI-BOLD response using two factors, namely, low-frequency spectral amplitude (LFSA) and breath-hold amplitude (BHA). Ten subjects (age range, 22-38 years) were scanned during four task conditions: (a) rest while breathing room air, (b) bilateral finger tapping while breathing room air, (c) rest during a partial inspirational breath-hold, and (d) rest during moderate hypercapnia (breathing 5% CO2, 20% O2 and 75% N2). In all subjects who breathed 5% CO2, regions with significant BOLD response during breath-hold correlated significantly with the percent signal increase during 5% CO2 inhalation. Finger-tapping-induced responses in the motor cortex were diminished to a similar extent after scaling using either LFSA or BHA. Inter- and intrasubject variation in the amplitude of the BOLD signal response reduced after hemodynamic scaling using LFSA or BHA. The results validated the hemodynamic amplitude scaling using LFSA with the earlier established BHA. LFSA free from motor-task contamination can be used to calibrate the fMRI-BOLD response in lieu of BHA or hypercapnia to minimize intra- and intersubject variation arising from vascular anatomy and vasodilative capacity. PMID:17482411

  17. New role for Kruppel-like factor 14 as a transcriptional activator involved in the generation of signaling lipids.

    PubMed

    de Assuncao, Thiago M; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A; Huebert, Robert C; Urrutia, Raul A; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-05-30

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  18. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  19. Role of Heparan Sulfate 2-O-Sulfotransferase in Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation, Invasion, and Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Brent W.; Datta, Sumana

    2011-01-01

    Heparan-sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are required for maximal growth factor signaling in prostate cancer progression. The degree of sulfate modification on the covalently attached heparan sulfate (HS) chains is one of the determining factors of growth factor-HSPG interactions. Sulfate groups are transferred to HS chains via a series of O-sulfotransferases. In the present study, we demonstrate that Heparan sulfate 2-O-sulfotransferase (2OST) is essential for maximal proliferation and invasion of prostate cancer cells in the LNCaP-C4-2B model. We also show that a decrease in invasion due to 2OST siRNA is associated with an increase in actin and E-cadherin accumulation at the cell surface. 2OST expression correlates with increasing metastatic potential in this model. We demonstrate that 2OST expression is upregulated by the stress-inducible transcription factors HIF1α, ATF2, and NFκB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis suggests that HIF1α and ATF2 act directly on the 2OST promoter, while NFκB acts indirectly. PMID:22135748

  20. Knockdown of phosphodiesterase 4D inhibits nasopharyngeal carcinoma proliferation via the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    XU, TING; WU, SIHAI; YUAN, YUAN; YAN, GUOXIN; XIAO, DAJIANG

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) is a subtype of metallohydrolases, and it has been reported that PDE4D functions as a proliferation promoting factor in certain types of cancer, including head and neck cancer. The present study first investigated the function of PDE4D in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Western blot analysis was applied to detect PDE4D expression in NPC samples and cells. A lentiviral infection technique was used to stabilize the knockdown of PDE4D, which was subsequently examined in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that PDE4D was overexpressed in the NPC tissues and cells. Knockdown of PDE4D inhibited the growth of CNE2 and 5–8F, inducing cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase in CNE2. These effects could be reversed by epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. Furthermore, knockdown of PDE4D significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and AKT. The results were further validated in an NPC xenograft in nude mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that PDE4D may function as a proliferation promoting factor in NPC, by affecting the EGFR/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Therefore, the targeting of PDE4D may be a rational strategy in the treatment of NPC. PMID:25289091

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling mediates aldosterone-induced profibrotic responses in kidney.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Lili; Yang, Min; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Minmin; Niu, Jianying; Qiao, Zhongdong; Gu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Aldosterone has been recognized as a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Studies have indicated that enhanced activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with the development and progression of renal fibrosis. But if EGFR is involved in aldosterone-induced renal fibrosis is less investigated. In the present study, we examined the effect of erlotinib, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity, on the progression of aldosterone-induced renal profibrotic responses in a murine model underwent uninephrectomy. Erlotinib-treated rats exhibited relieved structural lesion comparing with rats treated with aldosterone alone, as characterized by glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial cell proliferation and expansion. Also, erlotinib inhibited the expression of TGF-β, α-SMA and mesangial matrix proteins such as collagen Ⅳ and fibronectin. In cultured mesangial cells, inhibition of EGFR also abrogated aldosterone-induced expression of extracellular matrix proteins, cell proliferation and migration. We also demonstrated that aldosterone induced the phosphorylation of EGFR through generation of ROS. And the activation of EGFR resulted in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, leading to the activation of profibrotic pathways. Taken together, we concluded that aldosterone-mediated tissue fibrosis relies on ROS induced EGFR/ERK activation, highlighting EGFR as a potential therapeutic target for modulating renal fibrosis. PMID:27317889

  2. Nerve growth factor signaling following unilateral pelvic ganglionectomy in the rat ventral prostate is age dependent.

    PubMed

    Podlasek, Carol A; Ghosh, Rudrani; Onur Cakir, Omer; Bond, Christopher; McKenna, Kevin E; McVary, Kevin T

    2013-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a serious health concern and is an underlying cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in many men. In affected men, LUTS/BPH is believed to result from benign proliferation of the prostate resulting in bladder outlet obstruction. Postnatal growth of the prostate is controlled via growth factor and endocrine mechanisms. However, little attention had been given to the function of the autonomic nervous system in prostate growth and differentiation. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a prostatic mitogen that has a trophic role in autonomic sensory end organ interaction. In this study, we examine how the autonomic nervous system influences prostate growth as a function of age by quantifying NGF in the rat ventral prostate (VP) after pelvic ganglionectomy. Unilateral pelvic ganglionectomy was performed on postnatal days 30 (P30), 60 and 120 Sprague-Dawley rats in comparison to sham controls (n=39). Semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis for NGF were performed on denervated, intact (contralateral side) and sham control VP 7 days after surgery. Ngf RNA expression was significantly increased in the denervated and intact hyperplastic VP. Western blotting showed age-dependent increases in NGF protein at P60 in the contralateral intact VP. NGF was localized in the nerves, basal cells and columnar epithelium of the prostatic ducts. Denervation causes age-dependent increases in NGF in the VP, which is a potential mechanism by which the autonomic nervous system may regulate prostate growth and lead to BPH/LUTS. PMID:23872662

  3. Loss of ADAM17-Mediated Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling in Intestinal Cells Attenuates Mucosal Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongjia; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Xiao, Weidong; Ralls, Matthew W.; Stoeck, Alex; Wilson, Carole L.; Raines, Elaine W.

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is commonly used clinically to sustain patients; however, TPN is associated with profound mucosal atrophy, which may adversely affect clinical outcomes. Using a mouse TPN model, removing enteral nutrition leads to decreased crypt proliferation, increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis and increased mucosal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression that ultimately produces mucosal atrophy. Upregulation of TNF-α signaling plays a central role in mediating TPN-induced mucosal atrophy without intact epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Currently, the mechanism and the tissue-specific contributions of TNF-α signaling to TPN-induced mucosal atrophy remain unclear. ADAM17 is an ectodomain sheddase that can modulate the signaling activity of several cytokine/growth factor receptor families, including the TNF-α/TNF receptor and ErbB ligand/EGFR pathways. Using TPN-treated IEC-specific ADAM17-deficient mice, the present study demonstrates that a loss of soluble TNF-α signaling from IECs attenuates TPN-induced mucosal atrophy. Importantly, this response remains dependent on the maintenance of functional EGFR signaling in IECs. TNF-α blockade in wild-type mice receiving TPN confirmed that soluble TNF-α signaling is responsible for downregulation of EGFR signaling in IECs. These results demonstrate that ADAM17-mediated TNF-α signaling from IECs has a significant role in the development of the proinflammatory state and mucosal atrophy observed in TPN-treated mice. PMID:26283731

  4. Mechanisms of hepatocyte growth factor-mediated signaling in differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Yu; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Lu, Chong; Liu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Xiao-Chen

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} A hypothesis that the differentiation of PDEC is through MAPKs or PI3K/AKT pathways. {yields} Determ