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Sample records for factor receptor coexpression

  1. Coexpression of neurotrophic growth factors and their receptors in human facial motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Brackmann, D E; Hitselberger, W E; Linthicum, F H; Lim, D J

    1999-09-01

    Neuronal development and maintenance of facial motor neurons is believed to be regulated by neurotrophic growth factors. Using celloidin-embedded sections, we evaluated immunoreactivity of 11 neurotrophic factors and their receptors in facial nuclei of human brain stems (4 normal cases, and 1 from a patient with facial palsy and synkinesis). In the normal subjects, positive immunoreactivity of the growth factor neurotrophin-4 and acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) was observed in facial motor neurons, as was positive immunoreactivity against ret, the receptor shared by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and neurturin. Immunoreactivity was moderate for the receptor trkB and strong for trkC. In the case of partial facial palsy, surviving cells failed to show immunoreactivity against neurotrophins. However, immunoreactivity of aFGF was up-regulated in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells in this patient. Results suggest that these trophic growth factors and their receptors may protect facial neurons from secondary degeneration and promote regrowth of the facial nerve after axotomy or injury. PMID:10527284

  2. Transforming growth factor-betas and their signaling receptors are coexpressed in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    di Mola, F F; Friess, H; Scheuren, A; Di Sebastiano, P; Graber, H; Egger, B; Zimmermann, A; Korc, M; Büchler, M W

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate mechanisms that contribute to tissue repair and tissue remodeling in Crohn's disease (CD). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-betas) are involved in different chronic inflammatory disorders. They function by binding to two receptors, type I (TbetaR-I) subtype ALK5 and type II (TbetaR-II), which are concomitantly required for signal transduction. METHODS: Tissues were obtained from 18 patients with CD (10 female patients, 8 male patients, median age 38.7 years [range 16 to 58 years]) undergoing surgery because of CD-related complications. Tissue samples of 18 healthy organ donors (10 female subjects, 8 male subjects, median age 50.3 years [range 15 to 65 years]) served as controls. The expression and localization of TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, TbetaR-IALK5, TbetaR-II, and TbetaR-III were studied by Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: On Northern blot analysis, 94% of the CD samples exhibited enhanced TGF-beta1, TGF-beta3, and TbetaR-II mRNA expression compared with controls. TGF-beta2 was increased in 72%, TbetaR-IALK5 in 72%, and TbetaR-III in 82% of the patients with CD. On in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analysis, TGF-beta1, TbetaR-IALK5, and TbetaR-II were seen to be colocalized in the lamina propria cells and in the lymphocytes closest to the luminal surface, but also in the remaining epithelial cells, and in fibroblasts of CD tissue samples. CONCLUSIONS: The concomitant overexpression of TGF-betas and their signaling receptors in CD points to a potential role of these regulatory molecules in the pathophysiology of CD. Activation of TGF-beta-mediated pathways might promote the repair of mucosal injury by enhancing the process of reepithelization, but might also contribute to extracellular matrix generation and subsequently to intramural fibrosis and intestinal obstruction. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:9923802

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor coexpression modulates susceptibility to Herceptin in HER2/neu overexpressing breast cancer cells via specific erbB-receptor interaction and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Diermeier, Simone; Horvath, Gabor; Knuechel-Clarke, Ruth; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand; Szoellosi, Janos; Brockhoff, Gero . E-mail: Gero.Brockhoff@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2005-04-01

    Background: Growth factors and Herceptin specifically and differentially modulate cell proliferation of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of action on erbB-receptor level is incompletely understood. We evaluated Herceptin's capacity to modulate erbB-receptor activation and interaction on the cell surface level and thereby potentially impair cell proliferation of HER2/neu (c-erbB2) overexpressing breast cancer cells, both in the presence and absence of relevant growth factors. Methods: BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), Heregulin, and with Herceptin in different combinations. Kinetics of cell proliferation were evaluated flow cytometrically based on BrdU-labeling. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, ELISAs and phosphorylation site specific Western Blotting was performed to investigate erbB-receptor interaction and activation. Results: EGF induced EGFR/EGFR and EGFR/c-erbB2 interactions correlate with stimulation of cell proliferation in BT474 cells. Both homo- and heterodimerization are considerably less pronounced in SK-BR-3 cells and heterointeraction is additionally reduced by EGF treatment, causing inhibition of cell proliferation. Heregulin stimulates cell proliferation extensively in both cell lines. Herceptin drives BT474 cells more efficiently into quiescence than it does with SK-BR-3 cells and thereby blocks cell cycle progress. In SK-BR-3 Herceptin treatment causes c-erbB2 phosphorylation of Y877 and Y1248, EGF induces Y877 and Y1112 phosphorylation. The Y1112 phosphorylation site, activated by EGF in SK-BR-3 cell, is bypassed in BT474. In addition the inhibitory capacity of Herceptin on BT474 and SK-BR-3 cell proliferation depends on the presence and absence of growth factors to a various extent. Conclusion: The growth inhibitory effect of Herceptin on c-erbB2 overexpressing breast cancer cells is considerably modulated by EGFR coexpression and consequently EGFR/c-erbB2 homo- and

  4. Localization and distribution of neurons that co-express xeroderma pigmentosum-A and epidermal growth factor receptor within Rosenthal's canal.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, O'neil W

    2015-10-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum-A (XPA) is a C4-type zinc-finger scaffolding protein that regulates the removal of bulky-helix distorting DNA damage products from the genome. Phosphorylation of serine residues within the XPA protein is associated with improved protection of genomic DNA and cell death resistance. Therefore, kinase signaling is one important mechanism for regulating the protective function of XPA. Previous experiments have shown that spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) may mobilize XPA as a general stress response to chemical and physical ototoxicants. Therapeutic optimization of XPA via kinase signaling could serve as a means to improve DNA repair capacity within neurons following injury. The kinase signaling activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown in tumor cell lines to increase the repair of DNA damage products that are primarily repaired by XPA. Such observations suggest that EGFR may regulate the protective function of XPA. However, it is not known whether SGNs in particular or neurons in general could co-express XPA and EGFR. In the current study gene and protein expression of XPA and EGFR were determined from cochlear homogenates. Immunofluorescence assays were then employed to localize neurons expressing both EGFR and XPA within the ganglion. This work was then confirmed with double-immunohistochemistry. Rosenthal's canal served as the reference space in these experiments and design-based stereology was employed in first-order stereology quantification of immunoreactive neurons. The results confirmed that a population of SGNs that constitutively express XPA may also express the EGFR. These results provide the basis for future experiments designed to therapeutically manipulate the EGFR in order to regulate XPA activity and restore gene function in neurons following DNA damage. PMID:26493720

  5. Co-expression of Dsb proteins enables soluble expression of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against human type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Wen; Wang, Xiao-Hua; Yao, Yan-Bing

    2014-12-01

    Type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against human IGF-1R forms inclusion body when expressed in periplasmic space of E. coli routinely. Here, we described that co-expression of appropriate disulfide bonds (Dsb) proteins known to catalyze the formation and isomerization of Dsb can markedly recover the soluble expression of target scFv in E. coli. A 50 % recovery in solubility of the scFv was observed upon co-expression of DsbC alone, and a maximum solubility (80 %) was obtained when DsbA and DsbC were co-expressed in combination. Furthermore, the soluble scFv present full antigen-binding activity with IGF-1R, suggesting its correct folding. This study also suggested that the selection of Dsb proteins should be tested case-by-case if the approach of co-expression of Dsb system is adopted to address the problem of insoluble expression of proteins carrying Dsb. PMID:25256416

  6. Modeling the Effects of HER/ErbB1-3 Coexpression on Receptor Dimerization and Biological Response

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2006-06-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER/ErbB) system comprises the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1) and three other homologues viz. HERs2-4. This receptor system plays a critical role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Over-expression of these receptors can be associated with poor prognosis in cancers of the epithelium. It is believed that the dimerization pattern among members of the HER family may play a key role in controlling downstream signaling and the eventual biological response. Here, we examine the effect of co-expressing varying levels of HERs1-3 on the receptor dimerization patterns using mathematical modeling. The model integrates biochemical reactions such as ligand binding, receptor dimerization and phosphorylation with biophysical trafficking reactions to predict the concentrations of activated receptors in various cellular compartments. Our results indicate that co-expression of EGFR with HER2 or HER3 biases signaling to the cell surface and retards signal down-regulation. In addition, simultaneous co-expression of HERs1-3 leads to preferential formation of HER2-HER3 heterodimers, which are known to be potent inducers of cell growth and transformation. We further examined the effect of receptor dimerization patterns on cell phenotype using a simple phenomenological model. Results indicate that co-expression of HER2 and HER3 at low to moderate levels may enable cells to match the phenotype of a high HER2 expresser.

  7. Modeling the effects of HER/ErbB1-3 co-expression on receptor dimerization and biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2006-06-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER/ErbB) system comprises the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1) and three other homologues viz. HER2-4. This receptor system plays a critical role in cell proliferation and differentiation and receptor over-expression can be associated with poor prognosis in cancers of the epithelium. Here, we examine the effect of co-expressing varying levels of HER1-3 on the receptor dimerization patterns using a detailed kinetic model for ErbB heterodimerization and trafficking. Our results indicate that co-expression of EGFR with HER2 or HER3 biases signaling to the cell surface and retards signal down-regulation. In addition, simultaneous co-expression of HER1-3 leads to preferential formation of HER2-HER3 heterodimers, which are known to be potent inducers of cell growth and transformation. Analysis of the parameter dependencies in the model reveals that measurements of HER3 phosphorylation and HER2 internalization ratio may prove to be especially useful for the estimation of critical model parameters. Further, we examined the effect of receptor dimerization patterns on cell phenotype using a simple phenomenological model. Results indicate that co-expression of EGFR with HER2 and HER3 at low to moderate levels may enable cells to match the phenotype of a high HER2 expresser.

  8. Coexpressed D1- and D2-Like Dopamine Receptors Antagonistically Modulate Acetylcholine Release in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew T.; Maher, Kathryn N.; Wani, Khursheed A.; Betts, Katherine E.; Chase, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine acts through two classes of G protein-coupled receptor (D1-like and D2-like) to modulate neuron activity in the brain. While subtypes of D1- and D2-like receptors are coexpressed in many neurons of the mammalian brain, it is unclear how signaling by these coexpressed receptors interacts to modulate the activity of the neuron in which they are expressed. D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors are also coexpressed in the cholinergic ventral-cord motor neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. To begin to understand how coexpressed dopamine receptors interact to modulate neuron activity, we performed a genetic screen in C. elegans and isolated mutants defective in dopamine response. These mutants were also defective in behaviors mediated by endogenous dopamine signaling, including basal slowing and swimming-induced paralysis. We used transgene rescue experiments to show that defects in these dopamine-specific behaviors were caused by abnormal signaling in the cholinergic motor neurons. To investigate the interaction between the D1- and D2-like receptors specifically in these cholinergic motor neurons, we measured the sensitivity of dopamine-signaling mutants and transgenic animals to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. We found that D2 signaling inhibited acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons while D1 signaling stimulated release from these same cells. Thus, coexpressed D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors act antagonistically in vivo to modulate acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons of C. elegans. PMID:21515580

  9. Genome-wide coexpression of steroid receptors in the mouse brain: Identifying signaling pathways and functionally coordinated regions

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Weert, Lisa T. C. M.; Mol, Isabel M.; Sips, Hetty C. M.; van den Heuvel, José K.; Datson, Nicole A.; Visser, Jenny A.; Meijer, Onno C.

    2016-01-01

    Steroid receptors are pleiotropic transcription factors that coordinate adaptation to different physiological states. An important target organ is the brain, but even though their effects are well studied in specific regions, brain-wide steroid receptor targets and mediators remain largely unknown due to the complexity of the brain. Here, we tested the idea that novel aspects of steroid action can be identified through spatial correlation of steroid receptors with genome-wide mRNA expression across different regions in the mouse brain. First, we observed significant coexpression of six nuclear receptors (NRs) [androgen receptor (Ar), estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1), estrogen receptor beta (Esr2), glucocorticoid receptor (Gr), mineralocorticoid receptor (Mr), and progesterone receptor (Pgr)] with sets of steroid target genes that were identified in single brain regions. These coexpression relationships were also present in distinct other brain regions, suggestive of as yet unidentified coordinate regulation of brain regions by, for example, glucocorticoids and estrogens. Second, coexpression of a set of 62 known NR coregulators and the six steroid receptors in 12 nonoverlapping mouse brain regions revealed selective downstream pathways, such as Pak6 as a mediator for the effects of Ar and Gr on dopaminergic transmission. Third, Magel2 and Irs4 were identified and validated as strongly responsive targets to the estrogen diethylstilbestrol in the mouse hypothalamus. The brain- and genome-wide correlations of mRNA expression levels of six steroid receptors that we provide constitute a rich resource for further predictions and understanding of brain modulation by steroid hormones. PMID:26811448

  10. Genome-wide coexpression of steroid receptors in the mouse brain: Identifying signaling pathways and functionally coordinated regions.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Ahmed; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Weert, Lisa T C M; Mol, Isabel M; Sips, Hetty C M; van den Heuvel, José K; Datson, Nicole A; Visser, Jenny A; Reinders, Marcel J T; Meijer, Onno C

    2016-03-01

    Steroid receptors are pleiotropic transcription factors that coordinate adaptation to different physiological states. An important target organ is the brain, but even though their effects are well studied in specific regions, brain-wide steroid receptor targets and mediators remain largely unknown due to the complexity of the brain. Here, we tested the idea that novel aspects of steroid action can be identified through spatial correlation of steroid receptors with genome-wide mRNA expression across different regions in the mouse brain. First, we observed significant coexpression of six nuclear receptors (NRs) [androgen receptor (Ar), estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1), estrogen receptor beta (Esr2), glucocorticoid receptor (Gr), mineralocorticoid receptor (Mr), and progesterone receptor (Pgr)] with sets of steroid target genes that were identified in single brain regions. These coexpression relationships were also present in distinct other brain regions, suggestive of as yet unidentified coordinate regulation of brain regions by, for example, glucocorticoids and estrogens. Second, coexpression of a set of 62 known NR coregulators and the six steroid receptors in 12 nonoverlapping mouse brain regions revealed selective downstream pathways, such as Pak6 as a mediator for the effects of Ar and Gr on dopaminergic transmission. Third, Magel2 and Irs4 were identified and validated as strongly responsive targets to the estrogen diethylstilbestrol in the mouse hypothalamus. The brain- and genome-wide correlations of mRNA expression levels of six steroid receptors that we provide constitute a rich resource for further predictions and understanding of brain modulation by steroid hormones. PMID:26811448

  11. Nuclear Receptor Coactivators Are Coexpressed with Steroid Receptors and Regulated by Estradiol in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tognoni, Christina M.; Chadwick, Joseph G.; Ackeifi, Courtney A.; Tetel, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims The steroid hormones, including estradiol (E) and progesterone, act in the brain to regulate female reproductive behavior and physiology. These hormones mediate many of their biological effects by binding to their respective intracellular receptors. The receptors for estrogens (ER) and progestins (PR) interact with nuclear receptor coactivators to initiate transcription of steroid-responsive genes. Work from our laboratory and others reveals that nuclear receptor coactivators, including steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and SRC-2, function in brain to modulate ER-mediated induction of the PR gene and hormone-dependent behaviors. In order for steroid receptors and coactivators to function together, both must be expressed in the same cells. Methods Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to determine if E-induced PR cells also express SRC-1 or SRC-2 in reproductively relevant brain regions of the female mouse. Results The majority of E-induced PR cells in the medial preoptic area (61%), ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (63%) and arcuate nucleus (76%) coexpressed both SRC-1 and SRC-2. A smaller proportion of PR cells expressed either SRC-1 or SRC-2, while a few PR cells expressed neither coactivator. In addition, compared to control animals, 17β-estradiol benzoate (EB) treatment increased SRC-1 levels in the arcuate nucleus, but not the medial preoptic area or the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. EB did not alter SRC-2 expression in any of the three brain regions analyzed. Conclusions Taken together, the present findings identify a population of cells in which steroid receptors and nuclear receptor coactivators may interact to modulate steroid sensitivity in brain and regulate hormone-dependent behaviors in female mice. Given that cell culture studies reveal that SRC-1 and SRC-2 can mediate distinct steroid-signaling pathways, the present findings suggest that steroids can produce a variety of complex responses in these

  12. Co-Expression of GRK2 Reveals a Novel Conformational State of the µ-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nickolls, Sarah A.; Humphreys, Sian; Clark, Mellissa; McMurray, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Agonists at the µ-opioid receptor are known to produce potent analgesic responses in the clinical setting, therefore, an increased understanding of the molecular interactions of ligands at this receptor could lead to improved analgesics. As historically morphine has been shown to be a poor recruiter of β-arrestin in recombinant cell systems and this can be overcome by the co-expression of GRK2, we investigated the effects of GRK2 co-expression, in a recombinant µ-opioid receptor cell line, on ligand affinity and intrinsic activity in both β-arrestin recruitment and [35S]GTPγS binding assays. We also investigated the effect of receptor depletion in the β-arrestin assay. GRK2 co-expression increased both agonist Emax and potency in the β-arrestin assay. The increase in agonist potency could not be reversed using receptor depletion, supporting that the effects were due to a novel receptor conformation not system amplification. We also observed a small but significant effect on agonist KL values. Potency values in the [35S]GTPγS assay were unchanged; however, inverse agonist activity became evident with GRK2 co-expression. We conclude that this is direct evidence that the µ-opioid receptor is an allosteric protein and the co-expression of signalling molecules elicits changes in its conformation and thus ligand affinity. This has implications when describing how ligands interact with the receptor and how efficacy is determined. PMID:24376730

  13. Evolution of spatially coexpressed families of type-2 vomeronasal receptors in rodents.

    PubMed

    Francia, Simona; Silvotti, Lucia; Ghirardi, Filippo; Catzeflis, François; Percudani, Riccardo; Tirindelli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is an olfactory structure for the detection of pheromones. VNO neurons express three groups of unrelated G-protein-coupled receptors. Type-2 vomeronasal receptors (V2Rs) are specifically localized in the basal neurons of the VNO and are believed to sense protein pheromones eliciting specific reproductive behaviors. In murine species, V2Rs are organized into four families. Family-ABD V2Rs are expressed monogenically and coexpress with family-C V2Rs of either subfamily C1 (V2RC1) or subfamily C2 (V2RC2), according to a coordinate temporal diagram. Neurons expressing the phylogenetically ancient V2RC1 coexpress family-BD V2Rs or a specific group of subfamily-A V2Rs (V2RA8-10), whereas a second neuronal subset (V2RC2-positive) coexpresses a recently expanded group of five subfamily-A V2Rs (V2RA1-5) along with vomeronasal-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules (H2-Mv). Through database mining and Sanger sequencing, we have analyzed the onset, diversification, and expansion of the V2R-families throughout the phylogeny of Rodentia. Our results suggest that the separation of V2RC1 and V2RC2 occurred in a Cricetidae ancestor in coincidence with the evolution of the H2-Mv genes; this phylogenetic event did not correspond with the origin of the coexpressing V2RA1-5 genes, which dates back to an ancestral myomorphan lineage. Interestingly, the evolution of receptors within the V2RA1-5 group may be implicated in the origin and diversification of some of the V2R putative cognate ligands, the exocrine secreting peptides. The establishment of V2RC2, which probably reflects the complex expansion and diversification of family-A V2Rs, generated receptors that have probably acquired a more subtle functional specificity. PMID:25539725

  14. Evolution of Spatially Coexpressed Families of Type-2 Vomeronasal Receptors in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Simona; Silvotti, Lucia; Ghirardi, Filippo; Catzeflis, François; Percudani, Riccardo; Tirindelli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is an olfactory structure for the detection of pheromones. VNO neurons express three groups of unrelated G-protein-coupled receptors. Type-2 vomeronasal receptors (V2Rs) are specifically localized in the basal neurons of the VNO and are believed to sense protein pheromones eliciting specific reproductive behaviors. In murine species, V2Rs are organized into four families. Family-ABD V2Rs are expressed monogenically and coexpress with family-C V2Rs of either subfamily C1 (V2RC1) or subfamily C2 (V2RC2), according to a coordinate temporal diagram. Neurons expressing the phylogenetically ancient V2RC1 coexpress family-BD V2Rs or a specific group of subfamily-A V2Rs (V2RA8-10), whereas a second neuronal subset (V2RC2-positive) coexpresses a recently expanded group of five subfamily-A V2Rs (V2RA1-5) along with vomeronasal-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules (H2-Mv). Through database mining and Sanger sequencing, we have analyzed the onset, diversification, and expansion of the V2R-families throughout the phylogeny of Rodentia. Our results suggest that the separation of V2RC1 and V2RC2 occurred in a Cricetidae ancestor in coincidence with the evolution of the H2-Mv genes; this phylogenetic event did not correspond with the origin of the coexpressing V2RA1-5 genes, which dates back to an ancestral myomorphan lineage. Interestingly, the evolution of receptors within the V2RA1-5 group may be implicated in the origin and diversification of some of the V2R putative cognate ligands, the exocrine secreting peptides. The establishment of V2RC2, which probably reflects the complex expansion and diversification of family-A V2Rs, generated receptors that have probably acquired a more subtle functional specificity. PMID:25539725

  15. Co-expression of non-selective cation channels of the transient receptor potential canonical family in central aminergic neurones.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A; Korotkova, Tatiana M; Scherer, Annette; Brown, Ritchie E; Haas, Helmut L

    2003-06-01

    The mammalian transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) group of channels is a family of Ca2+-permeable cation channels that are activated following receptor-mediated stimulation of different isoforms of phospholipase C. In vitro TRPC proteins can form hetero- or homo-oligomeric channels. We performed single-cell RT-PCR analysis to reveal the co-expression of seven TRPC channels in identified rat aminergic neurones. All serotonergic neurones of the dorsal raphe (DR), the majority of histaminergic (tuberomamillary nucleus; TMN) and dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), as well as some GABAergic neurones from the VTA, expressed at least one variant of TRPC channels. No TRPC channel expression was found in the locus coeruleus. In raphe neurones TRPC6 and TRPC5 mRNAs occurred most frequently. In VTA and TMN co-expression of TRPC4 with TRPC5 and TRPC6 with TRPC7 was not found in individual neurones (in contrast to the whole-brain regions). Their co-expression in non-neuronal cells could not be excluded. The neonatal TRPC3 subunit was rarely seen. In DR, but not in the other nuclei studied, the expression of orexin receptors correlated with the expression of TRPC channels. We conclude that several TRPC channel populations exist in individual neurones and that their subunit co-expression pattern is region and cell-type specific. PMID:12787073

  16. Transient Co-Expression of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Suppressors for Increased in Planta Expression of a Recombinant Anthrax Receptor Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arzola, Lucas; Chen, Junxing; Rattanaporn, Kittipong; Maclean, James M.; McDonald, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Potential epidemics of infectious diseases and the constant threat of bioterrorism demand rapid, scalable, and cost-efficient manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Molecular farming of tobacco plants provides an alternative for the recombinant production of therapeutics. We have developed a transient production platform that uses Agrobacterium infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana plants to express a novel anthrax receptor decoy protein (immunoadhesin), CMG2-Fc. This chimeric fusion protein, designed to protect against the deadly anthrax toxins, is composed of the von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of human capillary morphogenesis 2 (CMG2), an effective anthrax toxin receptor, and the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). We evaluated, in N. benthamiana intact plants and detached leaves, the expression of CMG2-Fc under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter, and the co-expression of CMG2-Fc with nine different viral suppressors of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS): p1, p10, p19, p21, p24, p25, p38, 2b, and HCPro. Overall, transient CMG2-Fc expression was higher on intact plants than detached leaves. Maximum expression was observed with p1 co-expression at 3.5 days post-infiltration (DPI), with a level of 0.56 g CMG2-Fc per kg of leaf fresh weight and 1.5% of the total soluble protein, a ten-fold increase in expression when compared to absence of suppression. Co-expression with the p25 PTGS suppressor also significantly increased the CMG2-Fc expression level after just 3.5 DPI. PMID:21954339

  17. Serotonin-2C and -2A Receptor Co-expression on Cells in the Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nocjar, Christine; Alex, Katherine D; Sonneborn, Alex; Abbas, Atheir I; Roth, Bryan L; Pehek, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Neural function within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) regulates normal cognition, attention and impulse control, implicating neuroregulatory abnormalities within this region in mental dysfunction related to schizophrenia, depression and drug abuse. Both serotonin -2A (5-HT2A) and -2C (5-HT2C) receptors are known to be important in neuropsychiatric drug action and are distributed throughout the mPFC. However, their interactive role in serotonergic cortical regulation is poorly understood. While the main signal transduction mechanism for both receptors is stimulation of phosphoinositide production, they can have opposite effects downstream. 5-HT2A versus 5-HT2C receptor activation oppositely regulates behavior and can oppositely affect neurochemical release within the mPFC. These distinct receptor effects could be caused by their differential cellular distribution within the cortex and/or other areas. It is known that both receptors are located on GABAergic and pyramidal cells within the mPFC, but it is not clear whether they are expressed on the same or different cells. The present work employed immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy to examine this in layers V-VI of the prelimbic mPFC. The majority of GABA cells in the deep prelimbic mPFC expressed 5-HT2C receptor immunoreactivity. Furthermore, most cells expressing 5-HT2C receptor immunoreactivity notably co-expressed 5-HT2A receptors. However, 27% of 5-HT2C receptor immunoreactive cells were not GABAergic, indicating that a population of prelimbic pyramidal projection cells could express the 5-HT2C receptor. Indeed, some cells with 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptor co-labeling had a pyramidal shape and were expressed in the typical layered fashion of pyramidal cells. This indirectly demonstrates that 5-HT2C and 5-HT2A receptors may be commonly co-expressed on GABAergic cells within the deep layers of the prelimbic mPFC and perhaps co-localized on a small population of local pyramidal projection cells. Thus a

  18. Coexpression of Nuclear Receptors and Histone Methylation Modifying Genes in the Testis: Implications for Endocrine Disruptor Modes of Action

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Alison M.; Carter, Kim W.; Anderson, Denise; Wise, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Endocrine disruptor chemicals elicit adverse health effects by perturbing nuclear receptor signalling systems. It has been speculated that these compounds may also perturb epigenetic mechanisms and thus contribute to the early origin of adult onset disease. We hypothesised that histone methylation may be a component of the epigenome that is susceptible to perturbation. We used coexpression analysis of publicly available data to investigate the combinatorial actions of nuclear receptors and genes involved in histone methylation in normal testis and when faced with endocrine disruptor compounds. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression patterns of a set of genes were profiled across testis tissue in human, rat and mouse, plus control and exposed samples from four toxicity experiments in the rat. Our results indicate that histone methylation events are a more general component of nuclear receptor mediated transcriptional regulation in the testis than previously appreciated. Coexpression patterns support the role of a gatekeeper mechanism involving the histone methylation modifiers Kdm1, Prdm2, and Ehmt1 and indicate that this mechanism is a common determinant of transcriptional integrity for genes critical to diverse physiological endpoints relevant to endocrine disruption. Coexpression patterns following exposure to vinclozolin and dibutyl phthalate suggest that coactivity of the demethylase Kdm1 in particular warrants further investigation in relation to endocrine disruptor mode of action. Conclusions/Significance This study provides proof of concept that a bioinformatics approach that profiles genes related to a specific hypothesis across multiple biological settings can provide powerful insight into coregulatory activity that would be difficult to discern at an individual experiment level or by traditional differential expression analysis methods. PMID:22496781

  19. Co-Expression of Wild-Type P2X7R with Gln460Arg Variant Alters Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Metzger, Michael W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stadler, Herbert; Acuña, Matías; Liberman, Ana C.; Senin, Sergio A.; Gerez, Juan; Hoijman, Esteban; Refojo, Damian; Mitkovski, Mišo; Panhuysen, Markus; Stühmer, Walter; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is a member of the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels. A single-nucleotide polymorphism leading to a glutamine (Gln) by arginine (Arg) substitution at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been associated with mood disorders. No change in function (loss or gain) has been described for this SNP so far. Here we show that although the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function, co-expression of wild-type P2X7R with P2X7R-Gln460Arg impairs receptor function with respect to calcium influx, channel currents and intracellular signaling in vitro. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation and FRET studies show that the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant physically interacts with P2X7R-WT. Specific silencing of either the normal or polymorphic variant rescues the heterozygous loss of function phenotype and restores normal function. The described loss of function due to co-expression, unique for mutations in the P2RX7 gene so far, explains the mechanism by which the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant affects the normal function of the channel and may represent a mechanism of action for other mutations. PMID:26986975

  20. Progression of Lung Cancer Is Associated with Increased Dysfunction of T Cells Defined by Coexpression of Multiple Inhibitory Receptors.

    PubMed

    Thommen, Daniela S; Schreiner, Jens; Müller, Philipp; Herzig, Petra; Roller, Andreas; Belousov, Anton; Umana, Pablo; Pisa, Pavel; Klein, Christian; Bacac, Marina; Fischer, Ozana S; Moersig, Wolfgang; Savic Prince, Spasenija; Levitsky, Victor; Karanikas, Vaios; Lardinois, Didier; Zippelius, Alfred

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional T cells present in malignant lesions are characterized by a sustained and highly diverse expression of inhibitory receptors, also referred to as immune checkpoints. Yet, their relative functional significance in different cancer types remains incompletely understood. In this study, we provide a comprehensive characterization of the diversity and expression patterns of inhibitory receptors on tumor-infiltrating T cells from patients with non-small cell lung cancer. In spite of the large heterogeneity observed in the amount of PD-1, Tim-3, CTLA-4, LAG-3, and BTLA expressed on intratumoral CD8(+) T cells from 32 patients, a clear correlation was established between increased expression of these inhibitory coreceptors and progression of the disease. Notably, the latter was accompanied by a progressively impaired capacity of T cells to respond to polyclonal activation. Coexpression of several inhibitory receptors was gradually acquired, with early PD-1 and late LAG-3/BTLA expression. PD-1 blockade was able to restore T-cell function only in a subset of patients. A high percentage of PD-1(hi) T cells was correlated with poor restoration of T-cell function upon PD-1 blockade. Of note, PD-1(hi) expression marked a particularly dysfunctional T-cell subset characterized by coexpression of multiple inhibitory receptors and thus may assist in identifying patients likely to respond to inhibitory receptor-specific antibodies. Overall, these data may provide a framework for future personalized T-cell-based therapies aiming at restoration of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte effector functions. PMID:26253731

  1. Interaction of co-expressed mu- and delta-opioid receptors in transfected rat pituitary GH(3) cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, N A; Prather, P L

    2001-04-01

    mu- and delta-Opioid agonists interact in a synergistic manner to produce analgesia in several animal models. Additionally, receptor binding studies using membranes derived from brain tissue indicate that interactions between mu- and delta-opioid receptors might be responsible for the observation of multiple opioid receptor subtypes. To examine potential interactions between mu- and delta-opioid receptors, we examined receptor binding and functional characteristics of mu-, delta-, or both mu- and delta-opioid receptors stably transfected in rat pituitary GH(3) cells (GH(3)MOR, GH(3)DOR, and GH(3)MORDOR, respectively). Saturation and competition binding experiments revealed that coexpression of mu- and delta-opioid receptors resulted in the appearance of multiple affinity states for mu- but not delta-opioid receptors. Additionally, coadministration of selective mu- and delta-opioid agonists in GH(3)MORDOR cells resulted in a synergistic competition with [(3)H][D-Pen(2,5)]enkephalin (DPDPE) for delta-opioid receptors. Finally, when equally effective concentrations of [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin (DAMGO) and two different delta-opioid agonists (DPDPE or 2-methyl-4a alpha-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,5,12,12a alpha-octahydroquinolino-[2,3,3-g]-isoquinoline; TAN67) were coadministered in GH(3)MORDOR cells, a synergistic inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity was observed. These results strongly suggest that cotransfection of mu- and delta-opioid receptors alters the binding and functional characteristics of the receptors. Therefore, we propose that the simultaneous exposure of GH(3)MORDOR cells to selective mu- and delta-opioid agonists produces an interaction between receptors resulting in enhanced receptor binding. This effect is translated into an augmented ability of these agonists to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. Similar interactions occurring in neurons that express both mu- and delta-opioid receptors could explain observations of multiple

  2. Co-Expression of Two Subtypes of Melatonin Receptor on Rat M1-Type Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wen-Long; Chen, Wei-Yi; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei; Weng, Shi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are involved in circadian and other non-image forming visual responses. An open question is whether the activity of these neurons may also be under the regulation mediated by the neurohormone melatonin. In the present work, by double-staining immunohistochemical technique, we studied the expression of MT1 and MT2, two known subtypes of mammalian melatonin receptors, in rat ipRGCs. A single subset of retinal ganglion cells labeled by the specific antibody against melanopsin exhibited the morphology typical of M1-type ipRGCs. Immunoreactivity for both MT1 and MT2 receptors was clearly seen in the cytoplasm of all labeled ipRGCs, indicating that these two receptors were co-expressed in each of these neurons. Furthermore, labeling for both the receptors were found in neonatal M1 cells as early as the day of birth. It is therefore highly plausible that retinal melatonin may directly modulate the activity of ipRGCs, thus regulating non-image forming visual functions. PMID:25714375

  3. Unique Responses are Observed in Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 and Vanilloid 1 (TRPA1 and TRPV1) Co-Expressing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sadofsky, Laura R.; Sreekrishna, Koti T.; Lin, Yakang; Schinaman, Renee; Gorka, Kate; Mantri, Yogita; Haught, John Christian; Huggins, Thomas G.; Isfort, Robert J.; Bascom, Charles C.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are implicated in modulation of cough and nociception. In vivo, TRPA1 and TRPV1 are often co-expressed in neurons and TRPA1V1 hetero-tetramer formation is noted in cells co-transfected with the respective expression plasmids. In order to understand the impact of TRP receptor interaction on activity, we created stable cell lines expressing the TRPA1, TRPV1 and co-expressing the TRPA1 and TRPV1 (TRPA1V1) receptors. Among the 600 compounds screened against these receptors, we observed a number of compounds that activated the TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPA1V1 receptors; compounds that activated TRPA1 and TRPA1V1; compounds that activated TRPV1 and TRPA1V1; compounds in which TRPA1V1 response was modulated by either TRPA1 or TRPV1; and compounds that activated only TRPV1 or TRPA1 or TRPA1V1; and one compound that activated TRPA1 and TRPV1, but not TRPA1V1. These results suggest that co-expression of TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptors imparts unique activation profiles different from that of cells expressing only TRPA1 or TRPV1. PMID:24921186

  4. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production. PMID:26820137

  5. Improved expression of recombinant human factor IX by co-expression of GGCX, VKOR and furin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Jonebring, Anna; Hagström, Jonas; Nyström, Ann-Christin; Lövgren, Ann

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant human FIX concentrates (rhFIX) are essential in the treatment and prevention of bleeding in the bleeding disorder haemophilia B. However, due to the complex nature of FIX production yields are low which leads to high treatment costs. Here we report the production of rhFIX with substantially higher yield by co-expressing human FIX with GGCX (γ-glutamyl carboxylase), VKOR (vitamin K epoxide reductase) and furin (paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Our results show that controlled co-expression of GGCX with FIX is critical to obtain high rhFIX titre, and, that co-expression of VKOR further increased the yield of active rhFIX. Furin co-expression improved processing of the leader peptide of rhFIX but had a minor effect on yield of active rhFIX. The optimal expression level of GGCX was surprisingly low and required unusual engineering of expression vector elements. For VKOR and furin the control of expression was less critical and could be achieved by standard vector element. Using our expression vectors an rhFIX-producing clone with an expression level of up to 30 mg/L of active rhFIX was obtained. In addition an efficient single step purification method was developed to obtain pure and active rhFIX with up to 94% yield. PMID:24567122

  6. Evidence for limited D1 and D2 receptor coexpression and colocalization within the dorsal striatum of the neonatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Biezonski, Dominik K; Trifilieff, Pierre; Meszaros, Jozsef; Javitch, Jonathan A; Kellendonk, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    The striatum is the major input nucleus of the basal ganglia involved in reward processing, goal-directed behaviors, habit learning, and motor control. The striatum projects to the basal ganglia output nuclei via the "direct" and "indirect" pathways, which can be distinguished by their projection fields and their opposing effects on behavior. In adult animals, the functional opposition is modulated by the differential actions of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors (D1R, D2R), the expression of which is largely separated between these pathways. To determine whether a similar degree of separation exists earlier in development, we used dual-label immunohistochemistry to map dorsal-striatal D1R and D2R expression at the promoter level in postnatal day 0 (PD0) Drd1a-tdTomato/Drd2-GFP BAC transgenic mice, and at the receptor level by costaining for native D1R and D2R in wildtype (WT) PD0 animals. To assess for potential molecular interactions between D1R and D2R we also employed a recently developed proximity-ligation assay (PLA). Limited coexpression and colocalization of the D1R and D2R proteins was found in clusters of neurons endemic to the "patch" compartment as identified by costaining with tyrosine hydroxylase, but not outside these clusters. Moreover, in contrast to our recent findings where we failed to detect a D1R-D2R PLA signal in the adult striatum, in PD0 striatum we did identify a clear PLA signal for this pair of receptors. This colocalization at close proximity points to a possible role for D1R/D2R-mediated crosstalk in early striatal ontogeny. PMID:25556545

  7. Drosophila 5-HT2 serotonin receptor: coexpression with fushi-tarazu during segmentation.

    PubMed Central

    Colas, J F; Launay, J M; Kellermann, O; Rosay, P; Maroteaux, L

    1995-01-01

    Serotonin, first described as a neurotransmitter in invertebrates, has been investigated mostly for its functions in the mature central nervous system of higher vertebrates. Serotonin receptor diversity has been described in the mammalian brain and in insects. We report the isolation of a cDNA coding for a Drosophila melanogaster serotonin receptor that displays a sequence, a gene organization, and pharmacological properties typical of the mammalian 5-HT2 serotonin receptor subtype. Its mRNA can be detected in the adult fly; moreover, a high level of expression occurs at 3 hr of Drosophila embryogenesis. This early embryonic expression is surprisingly organized in a seven-stripe pattern that appears at the cellular blastoderm stage. In addition, this pattern is in phase with that of the even-parasegment-expressed pair-rule gene fushi-tarazu and is similarly modified by mutations affecting segmentation genes. Simultaneously with this pair-rule expression, the complete machinery of serotonin synthesis is present and leads to a peak of ligand concomitant with a peak of 5-HT2-specific receptor sites in blastoderm embryos. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777527

  8. Sulfation of the FLAG epitope is affected by co-expression of G protein-coupled receptors in a mammalian cell model.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Morag Rose; Grimsey, Natasha Lillia; Glass, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important therapeutic targets and therefore extensively studied. Like most transmembrane proteins, there has been considerable difficulty in developing reliable specific antibodies for them. To overcome this, epitope tags are often used to facilitate antibody recognition in studies on fundamental receptor signalling and trafficking. In our study of cannabinoid CB1/dopamine D2 interactions we sought to generate HEK293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged D2 for use in antibody-based assays of GPCR localisation and trafficking activity, however observed that stable FLAG-hD2 expression was particularly challenging to maintain. In contrast, when expressed in cell lines expressing hCB1 robust and stable FLAG-hD2 expression was observed. We hypothesised that co-expression of CB1 might stabilise surface FLAG-hD2 expression, and therefore investigated this further. Here, we describe the observation that co-expression of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors in HEK293 decreases the sulfation of a FLAG epitope appended at the N-terminus of the dopamine D2 receptor. Sulfation alters epitope recognition by some anti-FLAG antibodies, leading to the detection of fewer receptors, even though expression is maintained. This demonstrates that cannabinoid receptor expression modifies posttranslational processing of the FLAG-hD2 receptor, and importantly, has wider implications for the utilisation and interpretation of receptor studies involving epitope tags. PMID:27273047

  9. Sulfation of the FLAG epitope is affected by co-expression of G protein-coupled receptors in a mammalian cell model

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Morag Rose; Grimsey, Natasha Lillia; Glass, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important therapeutic targets and therefore extensively studied. Like most transmembrane proteins, there has been considerable difficulty in developing reliable specific antibodies for them. To overcome this, epitope tags are often used to facilitate antibody recognition in studies on fundamental receptor signalling and trafficking. In our study of cannabinoid CB1/dopamine D2 interactions we sought to generate HEK293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged D2 for use in antibody-based assays of GPCR localisation and trafficking activity, however observed that stable FLAG-hD2 expression was particularly challenging to maintain. In contrast, when expressed in cell lines expressing hCB1 robust and stable FLAG-hD2 expression was observed. We hypothesised that co-expression of CB1 might stabilise surface FLAG-hD2 expression, and therefore investigated this further. Here, we describe the observation that co-expression of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors in HEK293 decreases the sulfation of a FLAG epitope appended at the N-terminus of the dopamine D2 receptor. Sulfation alters epitope recognition by some anti-FLAG antibodies, leading to the detection of fewer receptors, even though expression is maintained. This demonstrates that cannabinoid receptor expression modifies posttranslational processing of the FLAG-hD2 receptor, and importantly, has wider implications for the utilisation and interpretation of receptor studies involving epitope tags. PMID:27273047

  10. Coexpression of heparanase activity, cathepsin L, tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, and MMP-9 in proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; De Hertogh, Gert; Mohammad, Ghulam; Alam, Kaiser; Mousa, Ahmed; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Heparanase cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, activity that is implicated in angiogenesis. Proteolytic cleavage of proheparanase by cathepsin L leads to the formation of catalytically active heparanase. We investigated the expression levels of heparanase enzymatic activity and correlated these with the levels of cathepsin L, the angiogenic factors tissue factor (TF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and the angiostatic factor tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Methods Vitreous samples from 25 patients with PDR and 20 nondiabetic patients and epiretinal membranes from 12 patients with PDR were studied with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Results We observed a significant increase in the expression of heparanase activity in vitreous samples from patients with PDR compared to the nondiabetic controls (p=0.027). Significant positive correlations were found between the levels of heparanase activity and the levels of cathepsin L (r=0.51; p=0.001), TF (r=0.6; p<0.0001), and TFPI (r=0.49; p=0.001). The expression levels of cathepsin L (p=0.019), TF (p<0.0001), TFPI (p<0.0001), and MMP-9 (p=0.029) were significantly higher in the vitreous samples with detected heparanase activity compared to the vitreous samples with undetected heparanase activity. Western blot analysis demonstrated proteolytic cleavage of TFPI in the vitreous samples from patients with PDR. In the epiretinal membranes, cathepsin L, TF, and TFPI were expressed in vascular endothelial cells and CD45-expressing leukocytes. Significant positive correlations were detected between the number of blood vessels that expressed CD31 and the number of blood vessels that expressed TF (r=0.9; p<0.0001) and TFPI (r=0.81; p=0.001). Conclusions The coexpression of these angiogenesis regulatory factors suggests cross-talk between these factors and pathogenesis of PDR

  11. Buprenorphine-elicited alteration of adenylate cyclase activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells coexpressing κ-, μ-opioid and nociceptin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Chen; Ho, Ing-Kang; Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine, a maintenance drug for heroin addicts, exerts its pharmacological function via κ- (KOP), μ-opioid (MOP) and nociceptin/opioid receptor-like 1 (NOP) receptors. Previously, we investigated its effects in an in vitro model expressing human MOP and NOP receptors individually or simultaneously (MOP, NOP, and MOP+NOP) in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Here, we expanded this cell model by expressing human KOP, MOP and NOP receptors individually or simultaneously (KOP, KOP+MOP, KOP+NOP and KOP+MOP+NOP). Radioligand binding with tritium-labelled diprenorphine confirmed the expression of KOP receptors. Immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry indicated that the expressed KOP, MOP and NOP receptors are N-linked glycoproteins and colocalized in cytoplasmic compartments. Acute application of the opioid receptor agonists— U-69593, DAMGO and nociceptin— inhibited adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in cells expressing KOP, MOP and NOP receptors respectively. Buprenorphine, when applied acutely, inhibited AC activity to ~90% in cells expressing KOP+MOP+NOP receptors. Chronic exposure to buprenorphine induced concentration-dependent AC superactivation in cells expressing KOP+NOP receptors, and the level of this superactivation was even higher in KOP+MOP+NOP-expressing cells. Our study demonstrated that MOP receptor could enhance AC regulation in the presence of coexpressed KOP and NOP receptors, and NOP receptor is essential for concentration-dependent AC superactivation elicited by chronic buprenorphine exposure. PMID:26153065

  12. Buprenorphine-elicited alteration of adenylate cyclase activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells coexpressing κ-, μ-opioid and nociceptin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Chen; Ho, Ing-Kang; Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Buprenorphine, a maintenance drug for heroin addicts, exerts its pharmacological function via κ- (KOP), μ-opioid (MOP) and nociceptin/opioid receptor-like 1 (NOP) receptors. Previously, we investigated its effects in an in vitro model expressing human MOP and NOP receptors individually or simultaneously (MOP, NOP, and MOP+NOP) in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Here, we expanded this cell model by expressing human KOP, MOP and NOP receptors individually or simultaneously (KOP, KOP+MOP, KOP+NOP and KOP+MOP+NOP). Radioligand binding with tritium-labelled diprenorphine confirmed the expression of KOP receptors. Immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry indicated that the expressed KOP, MOP and NOP receptors are N-linked glycoproteins and colocalized in cytoplasmic compartments. Acute application of the opioid receptor agonists- U-69593, DAMGO and nociceptin- inhibited adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in cells expressing KOP, MOP and NOP receptors respectively. Buprenorphine, when applied acutely, inhibited AC activity to ~90% in cells expressing KOP+MOP+NOP receptors. Chronic exposure to buprenorphine induced concentration-dependent AC superactivation in cells expressing KOP+NOP receptors, and the level of this superactivation was even higher in KOP+MOP+NOP-expressing cells. Our study demonstrated that MOP receptor could enhance AC regulation in the presence of coexpressed KOP and NOP receptors, and NOP receptor is essential for concentration-dependent AC superactivation elicited by chronic buprenorphine exposure. PMID:26153065

  13. Change in desensitization of cat muscle acetylcholine receptor caused by coexpression of Torpedo acetylcholine receptor subunits in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sumikawa, K; Miledi, R

    1989-01-01

    Cat muscle acetylcholine receptors (AcChoR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes desensitized more slowly than Torpedo electric organ AcChoRs, also expressed in oocytes. To examine the bases for the different degrees of desensitization, cat-Torpedo AcChoR hybrids were formed by injecting oocytes with cat denervated muscle mRNA mixed with a large excess of cloned Torpedo AcChoR subunit mRNAs. Hybrid AcChoRs formed by coinjection of cat muscle mRNA with the Torpedo beta or delta subunit mRNAs desensitized as slowly as cat AcChoR. In contrast, the hybrid AcChoRs expressed by coinjection with the Torpedo gamma subunit mRNA desensitized much more rapidly than cat AcChoR. The AcChoRs expressed in oocytes injected with cat muscle mRNA together with the Torpedo beta, gamma, and delta subunit mRNAs desensitized as rapidly as Torpedo AcChoR, indicating that the cat alpha subunit does not play an important role in determining the slow rate of desensitization. It is concluded that the difference in the rates of desensitization of cat and Torpedo AcChoRs is determined mainly by differences in their respective gamma subunits. Images PMID:2536157

  14. Coexpression of type I and type II human macrophage scavenger receptors in macrophages of various organs and foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Naito, M.; Suzuki, H.; Mori, T.; Matsumoto, A.; Kodama, T.; Takahashi, K.

    1992-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors are trimeric membrane glycoproteins implicated in the pathologic deposition of cholesterol in arterial walls during atherogenesis. Two types of cDNAs for functional human receptors have been cloned, but their physiologic roles remain obscure. To study the expression of these receptors, the authors generated antibodies against scavenger receptor type-specific synthetic peptide. Immunohistochemical examination using these antibodies and other anti-human receptor antibodies shows that type I and type II receptor proteins can be detected in foam cells in various stages of atherosclerosis, most evidently in fatty streaks. Co-expression of the two types of receptor protein was also detected in macrophages of various organs. Both types of the protein were detected on the surface and the membrane of endosomes in macrophages. These results indicate that both type I and type II scavenger receptors are expressed and functionally active in physiologic and pathologic conditions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519666

  15. Transcription factor-pathway co-expression analysis reveals cooperation between SP1 and ESR1 on dysregulating cell cycle arrest in non-hyperdiploid multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xujun; Yan, Zhenyu; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Li, Yingxiang; Gkotzamanidou, Maria; Amin, Samir B; Shah, Parantu K; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer of plasma B-cells and remains incurable. Two major subtypes of myeloma, hyperdiploid (HMM) and non-hyperdiploid myeloma (NHMM), have distinct chromosomal alterations and different survival outcomes. Transcription factors (TrFs) have been implicated in myeloma oncogenesis but their dysregulation in myeloma subtypes are less studied. Here we develop a TrF-pathway co-expression analysis to identify altered co-expression between two sample types. We apply the method to the two myeloma subtypes and the cell cycle arrest pathway, which is significantly differentially expressed between the two subtypes. We find that TrFs MYC, NF-κB and HOXA9 have significantly lower co-expression with cell cycle arrest in HMM, co-occurring with their over-activation in HMM. In contrast, TrFs ESR1, SP1 and E2F1 have significantly lower co-expression with cell cycle arrest in NHMM. SP1 ChIP targets are enriched by cell cycle arrest genes. These results motivate a cooperation model of ESR1 and SP1 in regulating cell cycle arrest, and a hypothesis that their over-activation in NHMM disrupts proper regulation of cell cycle arrest. Co-targeting ESR1 and SP1 shows a synergistic effect on inhibiting myeloma proliferation in NHMM cell lines. Therefore, studying TrF-pathway co-expression dysregulation in human cancers facilitates forming novel hypotheses towards clinical utility. PMID:23925045

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor family in lung cancer and premalignancy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wilbur A; Veve, Robert; Hirsch, Fred R; Helfrich, Barbara A; Bunn, Paul A

    2002-02-01

    Lung cancer, like many other epithelial malignancies, is thought to be the outcome of genetic and epigenetic changes that result in a constellation of phenotypic abnormalities in bronchial epithelium. These include morphologic epithelial dysplasia, angiogenesis, increased proliferative rate, and changes in expression of cell surface proteins, particularly overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family proteins. The EFGR family is a group of four structurally similar tyrosine kinases (EGFR, HER2/neu, ErbB-3, and ErbB-4) that dimerize on binding with a number of ligands, including EGF and transforming growth factor alpha. Epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression is pronounced in virtually all squamous carcinomas and is also found in > or = 65% of large cell and adenocarcinomas. It is not expressed in situ by small cell lung carcinoma. Overexpression of EGFR is one of the earliest and most consistent abnormalities in bronchial epithelium of high-risk smokers. It is present at the stage of basal cell hyperplasia and persists through squamous metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. Recent studies of the effect of inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases suggest that patterns of coexpression of multiple members of the EGFR family could be important in determining response. Intermediate endpoints of such trials could include monitoring of phosphorylation levels in signal transduction molecules downstream of the receptor dimers. These trials represent a new targeted approach to lung cancer treatment and chemoprevention that will require greater attention to molecular endpoints than required in past trials. PMID:11894009

  17. Oppositely imprinted genes H19 and insulin-like growth factor 2 are coexpressed in human androgenetic trophoblast.

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, G L; Stewart, C L; Chaponot, M L; Pomponio, R J

    1993-01-01

    Human uniparental gestations such as gynogenetic ovarian teratomas and androgenetic complete hydatidiform moles provide a model to evaluate the integrity of parent-specific gene expression--i.e., imprinting--in the absence of a complementary parental genetic contribution. We studied expression, in these tissues, of the oppositely imprinted genes H19, which is an embryonic nontranslated RNA, and insulin-like growth factor type 2 (IGF2). Normal gestations only express H19 from the maternal allele and express IGF2 from the paternal allele, whereas neither is expressed from the maternal genome of gynogenetic gestations, and both are expressed from the paternal genome of androgenetic gestations. Coexpression of H19 and IGF2 in the androgenetic tissues was in a single population of cells, mononuclear trophoblast--the same cell type expressing these genes in biparental placentas. These results demonstrate that a biparental genome may be required for expression of the reciprocal IGF2/H19 imprint. Alternatively, biparental expression may be a normal feature of some imprinted genes in specific cell types. Additional experiments with other imprinted genes will clarify whether this reflects global failure of the imprinting process or a change specific to the IGF2/H19 locus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7692725

  18. Hippocampal GABAergic interneurons coexpressing alpha7-nicotinic receptors and connexin-36 are able to improve neuronal viability under oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Voytenko, L P; Lushnikova, I V; Savotchenko, A V; Isaeva, E V; Skok, M V; Lykhmus, O Yu; Patseva, M A; Skibo, G G

    2015-08-01

    The hippocampal interneurons are very diverse by chemical profiles and rather inconsistent by sensitivity to CI. Some hippocampal GABAergic interneurons survive certain time after ischemia while ischemia-sensitive interneurons and pyramidal neurons are damaged. GABAergic signaling, nicotinic receptors expressing α7-subunit (α7nAChRs(+)) and connexin-36 (Cx36(+), electrotonic gapjunctions protein) contradictory modulate post-ischemic environment. We hypothesized that hippocampal ischemia-resistant GABAergic interneurons coexpressing glutamate decarboxylase-67 isoform (GAD67(+)), α7nAChRs(+), Cx36(+) are able to enhance neuronal viability. To check this hypothesis the histochemical and electrophysiological investigations have been performed using rat hippocampal organotypic culture in the condition of 30-min oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Post-OGD reoxygenation (4h) revealed in CA1 pyramidal layer numerous damaged cells, decreased population spike amplitude and increased pair-pulse depression. In these conditions GAD67(+) interneurons displayed the OGD-resistance and significant increase of GABA synthesis/metabolism (GAD67-immunofluorescence, mitochondrial activity). The α7nAChRs(+) and Cx36(+) co-localizations were revealed in resistant GAD67(+) interneurons. Under OGD: GABAA-receptors (GABAARs) blockade increased cell damage and exacerbated the pair-pulse depression in CA1 pyramidal layer; α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels separate blockades sufficiently decreased cell damage while interneuronal GAD67-immunofluorescence and mitochondrial activity were similar to the control. Thus, hippocampal GABAergic interneurons co-expressing α7nAChRs and Cx36 remained resistant certain time after OGD and were able to modulate CA1 neuron survival through GABAARs, α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels activity. The enhancements of the neuronal viability together with GABA synthesis/metabolism normalization suggest cooperative neuroprotective mechanism that could be used for increase in

  19. Upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor 4 in oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Kenichi; Gotoh, Akito; Eguchi, Takanori; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the expression profile of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, which comprises EGFR/ErbB1, HER2/ErbB2, HER3/ErbB3 and HER4/ErbB4 in oral leukoplakia (LP). The expression of four epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family genes and their ligands were measured in LP tissues from 14 patients and compared with levels in 10 patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and normal oral mucosa (NOM) from 14 healthy donors by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Synchronous mRNA coexpression of ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 was detected in LP lesions. Out of the receptors, only ErbB4 mRNA and protein was more highly expressed in LP compared with NOM tissues. These were strongly expressed by epithelial keratinocytes in LP lesions, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Regarding the ligands, the mRNA of Neuregulin2 and 4 were more highly expressed in OLP compared with NOM tissues. Therefore, enhanced ErbB4 on the keratinocytes and synchronous modulation of EGFR family genes may contribute to the pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of LP. PMID:23492901

  20. The Co-Expression Pattern of Odorant Binding Proteins and Olfactory Receptors Identify Distinct Trichoid Sensilla on the Antenna of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Schultze, Anna; Pregitzer, Pablo; Walter, Marika F.; Woods, Daniel F.; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Breer, Heinz; Krieger, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The initial steps of odorant recognition in the insect olfactory system involve odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs). While large families of OBPs have been identified in the malaria vector A. gambiae, little is known about their expression pattern in the numerous sensory hairs of the female antenna. We applied whole mount fluorescence in Situ hybridization (WM-FISH) and fluorescence immunohistochemistry (WM-FIHC) to investigate the sensilla co-expression of eight A. gambiae OBPs (AgOBPs), most notably AgOBP1 and AgOBP4, which all have abundant transcripts in female antenna. WM-FISH analysis of female antennae using AgOBP-specific probes revealed marked differences in the number of cells expressing each various AgOBPs. Testing combinations of AgOBP probes in two-color WM-FISH resulted in distinct cellular labeling patterns, indicating a combinatorial expression of AgOBPs and revealing distinct AgOBP requirements for various functional sensilla types. WM-FIHC with antisera to AgOBP1 and AgOBP4 confirmed expression of the respective proteins by support cells and demonstrated a location of OBPs within sensilla trichodea. Based on the finding that AgOBP1 and AgOBP4 as well as the receptor type AgOR2 are involved in the recognition of indole, experiments were performed to explore if the AgOBP-types and AgOR2 are co-expressed in distinct olfactory sensilla. Applying two-color WM-FISH with AgOBP-specific probes and probes specific for AgOR2 revealed a close association of support cells bearing transcripts for AgOBP1 and AgOBP4 and neurons with a transcript for the receptor AgOR2. Moreover, combined WM-FISH/-FIHC approaches using an AgOR2-specific riboprobe and AgOBP-specific antisera revealed the expression of the “ligand-matched” AgOBP1, AgOBP4 and AgOR2 to single trichoid hairs. This result substantiates the notion that a specific response to indole is mediated by an interplay of the proteins. PMID:23861970

  1. Immunocytochemical evidence for co-expression of Type III IP3 receptor with signaling components of bitter taste transduction

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Tod R; Stone, Leslie M; Margolskee, Robert F; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2001-01-01

    Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli into electrical signals that lead to the sense of taste. An important second messenger in taste transduction is IP3, which is involved in both bitter and sweet transduction pathways. Several components of the bitter transduction pathway have been identified, including the T2R/TRB taste receptors, phospholipase C β2, and the G protein subunits α-gustducin, β3, and γ13. However, the identity of the IP3 receptor subtype in this pathway is not known. In the present study we used immunocytochemistry on rodent taste tissue to identify the IP3 receptors expressed in taste cells and to examine taste bud expression patterns for IP3R3. Results Antibodies against Type I, II, and III IP3 receptors were tested on sections of rat and mouse circumvallate papillae. Robust cytoplasmic labeling for the Type III IP3 receptor (IP3R3) was found in a large subset of taste cells in both species. In contrast, little or no immunoreactivity was seen with antibodies against the Type I or Type II IP3 receptors. To investigate the potential role of IP3R3 in bitter taste transduction, we used double-label immunocytochemistry to determine whether IP3R3 is expressed in the same subset of cells expressing other bitter signaling components. IP3R3 immunoreactive taste cells were also immunoreactive for PLCβ2 and γ13. Alpha-gustducin immunoreactivity was present in a subset of IP3R3, PLCβ2, and γ13 positive cells. Conclusions IP3R3 is the dominant form of the IP3 receptor expressed in taste cells and our data suggest it plays an important role in bitter taste transduction. PMID:11346454

  2. ATAR, a novel tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, signals through TRAF2 and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H; Solovyev, I; Colombero, A; Elliott, R; Kelley, M; Boyle, W J

    1997-05-23

    Members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family signal largely through interactions with death domain proteins and TRAF proteins. Here we report the identification of a novel TNFR family member ATAR. Human and mouse ATAR contain 283 and 276 amino acids, respectively, making them the shortest known members of the TNFR superfamily. The receptor is expressed mainly in spleen, thymus, bone marrow, lung, and small intestine. The intracellular domains of human and mouse ATAR share only 25% identity, yet both interact with TRAF5 and TRAF2. This TRAF interaction domain resides at the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Like most other TRAF-interacting receptors, overexpression of ATAR activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Co-expression of ATAR with TRAF5, but not TRAF2, results in synergistic activation of NF-kappaB, suggesting potentially different roles for TRAF2 and TRAF5 in post-receptor signaling. PMID:9153189

  3. Confirmation of warfarin resistance of naturally occurring VKORC1 variants by coexpression with coagulation factor IX and in silico protein modelling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background VKORC1 has been identified some years ago as the gene encoding vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) – the target protein for coumarin derivates like warfarin or phenprocoumon. Resistance against warfarin and other coumarin-type anticoagulants has been frequently reported over the last 50 years in rodents due to problems in pest control as well as in thrombophilic patients showing variable response to anticoagulant treatment. Many different mutations have already been detected in the VKORC1 gene leading to warfarin resistance in rats, mice and in humans. Since the conventional in vitro dithiothreitol (DTT)-driven VKOR enzymatic assay often did not reflect the in vivo status concerning warfarin resistance, we recently developed a cell culture-based method for coexpression of VKORC1 with coagulation factor IX and subsequent measurement of secreted FIX in order to test warfarin inhibition in wild-type and mutated VKORC1. Results In the present study, we coexpressed wild-type factor IX with 12 different VKORC1 variants which were previously detected in warfarin resistant rats and mice. The results show that amino acid substitutions in VKORC1 maintain VKOR activity and are associated with warfarin resistance. When we projected in silico the amino acid substitutions onto the published three-dimensional model of the bacterial VKOR enzyme, the predicted effects matched well the catalytic mechanism proposed for the bacterial enzyme. Conclusions The established cell-based system for coexpression of VKORC1 and factor IX uses FIX activity as an indicator of carboxylation efficiency. This system reflects the warfarin resistance status of VKORC1 mutations from anticoagulant resistant rodents more closely than the traditional DTT-driven enzyme assay. All mutations studied were also predicted to be involved in the reaction mechanism. PMID:24491178

  4. Evolution of neoplastic development in the liver of transgenic mice co-expressing c-myc and transforming growth factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Santoni-Rugiu, E.; Nagy, P.; Jensen, M. R.; Factor, V. M.; Thorgeirsson, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that co-expression of c-myc and transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha as transgenes in mouse liver results in major enhancement of neoplastic development in this organ as compared with expression of either of these transgenes alone. In this report we describe in detail the progression from liver cell dysplasia to hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) occurring in the liver of c-myc/TGF-alpha and c-myc transgenic mice. Despite morphological similarities in the sequence of events between the two transgenic lines, the dramatic acceleration, extent, and severity of hepatic lesions in c-myc/TGF-alpha mice clearly demonstrated the synergistic effects of this transgenic combination. Although c-myc/TGF-alpha and c-myc females displayed longer latency and lower tumor incidence, the pathological changes were the same as those seen in the male mice, including the formation of HCCs, which are absent in TGF-alpha single-transgenic females. Tumors in single- and double-transgenic mice showed induction of the endogenous c-myc and TGF-alpha and, most frequently, unchanged or decreased epidermal growth factor receptor, further indicating the collaborative role of c-myc and TGF-alpha in providing a selective growth advantage to tumor cells independently of the epidermal growth factor receptor levels. To identify possible tumor precursors, we focused particularly on the dysplastic changes preceding and accompanying the appearance of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in the double-transgenic mice. Early on, these changes were characterized by the appearance of large dysplastic hepatocytes, mostly pericentrally, expressing high levels of TGF-alpha and uPA, as well as TGF-beta 1, particularly in apoptotic cells. After a short period of replication and expansion into the liver parenchyma, as well as penetration into the central veins, these cells underwent apoptotic cell death while preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions were forming. The peritumorous tissues also

  5. Co-expression of ovine LPS receptor CD14 with Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin receptor LFA-1 or Mac-1 does not enhance leukotoxin-induced cytotoxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leukotoxin (Lkt) and LPS are the major virulence determinants of Mannheimia haemolytica that contribute to the pathogenesis of bovine and ovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. We have previously identified bovine and ovine CD18 as the functional receptor for Lkt. LPS complexes with Lkt resulting in incre...

  6. Thymic expression of a T-cell receptor targeting a tumor-associated antigen coexpressed in the thymus induces T-ALL

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yongzhi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Garber, Haven R.; Samsel, Leigh; Wang, Ziyao; McCoy, J. Philip; Burkett, Sandra; Wu, Xiaolin; Aplan, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    T-cell receptors (TCRs) and chimeric antigen receptors recognizing tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) can now be engineered to be expressed on a wide array of immune effectors. Engineered receptors targeting TAAs have most commonly been expressed on mature T cells, however, some have postulated that receptor expression on immune progenitors could yield T cells with enhanced potency. We generated mice (survivin-TCR-transgenic [Sur-TCR-Tg]) expressing a TCR recognizing the immunodominant epitope (Sur20-28) of murine survivin during early stages of thymopoiesis. Spontaneous T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) occurred in 100% of Sur-TCR-Tg mice derived from 3 separate founders. The leukemias expressed the Sur-TCR and signaled in response to the Sur20-28 peptide. In preleukemic mice, we observed increased cycling of double-negative thymocytes expressing the Sur-TCR and increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells, consistent with TCR signaling induced by survivin expression in the murine thymus. β2M−/− Sur-TCR-Tg mice, which cannot effectively present survivin peptides on class I major histocompatibility complex, had significantly diminished rates of leukemia. We conclude that TCR signaling during the early stages of thymopoiesis mediates an oncogenic signal, and therefore expression of signaling receptors on developing thymocytes with specificity for TAAs expressed in the thymus could pose a risk for neoplasia, independent of insertional mutagenesis. PMID:25814528

  7. Co-expression of the protease furin in Nicotiana benthamiana leads to efficient processing of latent transforming growth factor-β1 into a biologically active protein.

    PubMed

    Wilbers, Ruud H P; Westerhof, Lotte B; van Raaij, Debbie R; van Adrichem, Marloes; Prakasa, Andreas D; Lozano-Torres, Jose L; Bakker, Jaap; Smant, Geert; Schots, Arjen

    2016-08-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is a signalling molecule that plays a key role in developmental and immunological processes in mammals. Three TGF-β isoforms exist in humans, and each isoform has unique therapeutic potential. Plants offer a platform for the production of recombinant proteins, which is cheap and easy to scale up and has a low risk of contamination with human pathogens. TGF-β3 has been produced in plants before using a chloroplast expression system. However, this strategy requires chemical refolding to obtain a biologically active protein. In this study, we investigated the possibility to transiently express active human TGF-β1 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We successfully expressed mature TGF-β1 in the absence of the latency-associated peptide (LAP) using different strategies, but the obtained proteins were inactive. Upon expression of LAP-TGF-β1, we were able to show that processing of the latent complex by a furin-like protease does not occur in planta. The use of a chitinase signal peptide enhanced the expression and secretion of LAP-TGF-β1, and co-expression of human furin enabled the proteolytic processing of latent TGF-β1. Engineering the plant post-translational machinery by co-expressing human furin also enhanced the accumulation of biologically active TGF-β1. This engineering step is quite remarkable, as furin requires multiple processing steps and correct localization within the secretory pathway to become active. Our data demonstrate that plants can be a suitable platform for the production of complex proteins that rely on specific proteolytic processing. PMID:26834022

  8. Functional interaction between mutations in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor in severe congenital neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alister C; Gits, Judith; Majeed, Fidel; Aprikyan, Andrew A; Lewis, Rowena S; O'Sullivan, Lynda A; Freedman, Melvin; Shigdar, Sarah; Touw, Ivo P; Dale, David C; Dror, Yigal

    2008-08-01

    Most severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) cases possess constitutive neutrophil elastase mutations; a smaller cohort has acquired mutations truncating the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R). We have described a case with constitutive extracellular G-CSF-R mutation hyporesponsive to ligand. Here we report two independent acquired G-CSF-R truncation mutations and a novel constitutive neutrophil elastase mutation in this patient. Co-expression of a truncated receptor chain restored STAT5 signalling responses of the extracellular G-CSF-R mutant, while constitutively-active STAT5 enhanced its proliferative capacity. These data add to our knowledge of SCN and further highlight the importance of STAT5 in mediating proliferative responses to G-CSF. PMID:18513286

  9. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: a zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C K; D'Souza, U M; Eisch, A J; Yajima, S; Lammers, C H; Yang, Y; Lee, S H; Kim, Y M; Nestler, E J; Mouradian, M M

    2001-06-19

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in brain with a specific regional distribution including olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and frontal cortex. Many of these brain regions also express abundant levels of various dopamine receptors. In vivo, DRRF itself can be regulated by manipulations of dopaminergic transmission. Mice treated with drugs that increase extracellular striatal dopamine levels (cocaine), block dopamine receptors (haloperidol), or destroy dopamine terminals (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) show significant alterations in DRRF mRNA. The latter observations provide a basis for dopamine receptor regulation after these manipulations. We conclude that DRRF is important for modulating dopaminergic transmission in the brain. PMID:11390978

  10. “Related to ABA-Insensitive3(ABI3)/Viviparous1 and AtABI5 transcription factor co-expression in cotton enhances drought stress adaptation”

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amandeep; Gampala, Srinivas S. L.; Ritchie, Glen L.; Payton, Paxton; Burke, John J.; Rock, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Drought tolerance is an important trait being pursued by the agbiotech industry. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a stress hormone that mediates a multitude of processes in growth and development, water use efficiency (WUE), and gene expression during seed development and in response to environmental stresses. Arabidopsis B3-domain transcription factor Related to ABA-Insensitive3 (ABI3)/Viviparous1 (namely, AtRAV2) and basic leucine zipper (bZIPs) AtABI5 or AtABF3 transactivated ABA- inducible promoter: GUS reporter expression in a maize mesophyll protoplast transient assay and showed synergies in reporter transactivation when co-expressed. Transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) expressing AtRAV1/2 and/or AtABI5 showed resistance to imposed drought stress under field and greenhouse conditions and exhibited improved photosynthetic and WUEs associated with absorption through larger root system and greater leaf area. We observed synergy for root biomass accumulation in the greenhouse, intrinsic WUE in the field, and drought tolerance in stacked AtRAV and AtABI5 double-transgenic cotton. We assessed AtABI5 and AtRAV1/2 involvement in drought stress adaptations though reactive oxygen species scavenging and osmotic adjustment by marker gene expression in cotton. Deficit irrigation-grown AtRAV1/2 and AtABI5 transgenics had “less stressed” molecular and physiological phenotypes under drought, likely due to improved photoassimilation and root and shoot sink strengths and enhanced expression of endogenous GhRAV and genes for antioxidant and osmolyte biosynthesis. Over-expression of bZIP and RAV TFs could impact sustainable cotton agriculture and potentially other crops under limited irrigation conditions. PMID:24483851

  11. Related to ABA-Insensitive3(ABI3)/Viviparous1 and AtABI5 transcription factor coexpression in cotton enhances drought stress adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amandeep; Gampala, Srinivas S L; Ritchie, Glen L; Payton, Paxton; Burke, John J; Rock, Christopher D

    2014-06-01

    Drought tolerance is an important trait being pursued by the agbiotech industry. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a stress hormone that mediates a multitude of processes in growth and development, water use efficiency (WUE) and gene expression during seed development and in response to environmental stresses. Arabidopsis B3-domain transcription factor Related to ABA-Insensitive3 (ABI3)/Viviparous1 (namely AtRAV2) and basic leucine zipper (bZIPs) AtABI5 or AtABF3 transactivated ABA-inducible promoter:GUS reporter expression in a maize mesophyll protoplast transient assay and showed synergies in reporter transactivation when coexpressed. Transgenic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) expressing AtRAV1/2 and/or AtABI5 showed resistance to imposed drought stress under field and greenhouse conditions and exhibited improved photosynthesis and WUEs associated with absorption through larger root system and greater leaf area. We observed synergy for root biomass accumulation in the greenhouse, intrinsic WUE in the field and drought tolerance in stacked AtRAV and AtABI5 double-transgenic cotton. We assessed AtABI5 and AtRAV1/2 involvement in drought stress adaptations through reactive oxygen species scavenging and osmotic adjustment by marker gene expression in cotton. Deficit irrigation-grown AtRAV1/2 and AtABI5 transgenics had 'less-stressed' molecular and physiological phenotypes under drought, likely due to improved photoassimilation and root and shoot sink strengths and enhanced expression of endogenous GhRAV and genes for antioxidant and osmolyte biosynthesis. Overexpression of bZIP and RAV TFs could impact sustainable cotton agriculture and potentially other crops under limited irrigation conditions. PMID:24483851

  12. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E5 transforming protein specifically binds and activates the beta-type receptor for the platelet-derived growth factor but not other related tyrosine kinase-containing receptors to induce cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Li, W; Wang, L M; Heidaran, M A; Aaronson, S; Shinn, R; Schlegel, R; Pierce, J H

    1994-01-01

    The 44-amino-acid E5 protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1 is a highly hydrophobic protein which appears to transform cells through the activation of growth factor receptors. To investigate the specificity of E5-growth factor receptor interactions required for mitogenic signaling, we utilized a nontumorigenic, murine myeloid cell line (32D) which is strictly dependent on interleukin-3 (IL-3) for sustained proliferation in culture. This IL-3 dependence can be functionally substituted by the expression of a variety of surrogate growth factor receptors and the addition of the corresponding ligand. Several receptor cDNAs for the alpha- and beta-type platelet-derived growth factor receptors [alpha PDGFR and beta PDGFR], the epidermal growth factor receptor, and the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor) were transfected into 32D cells constitutively expressing the E5 protein to test for IL-3-independent growth. Only beta PDGFR was capable of abrogating the IL-3 dependence of 32D cells. The proliferative signal induced by the coexpression of beta PDGFR and E5 was accompanied by stable complex formation between these proteins, constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. The lack of cooperative interaction between E5 and the epidermal growth factor receptor, the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and the highly related alpha PDGFR was paralleled by the inability of E5 to bind to these receptors and failure to increase receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, these data indicate that the ability of E5 to induce sustained proliferation and transformation of 32D cells is a direct consequence of specific interaction between the E5 protein and the beta PDGFR signaling complex and the subsequent stimulation of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Images PMID:8207816

  13. Potent antitumor effect of neurotensin receptor-targeted oncolytic adenovirus co-expressing decorin and Wnt antagonist in an orthotopic pancreatic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Na, Youjin; Choi, Joung-Woo; Kasala, Dayananda; Hong, JinWoo; Oh, Eonju; Li, Yan; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-12-28

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive, malignant, and notoriously difficult to cure using conventional cancer therapies. These conventional therapies have significant limitations due to excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) of pancreatic cancer and poor cancer specificity. The excess ECM prevents infiltration of drugs into the inner layer of the solid tumor. Therefore, novel treatment modalities that can specifically target the tumor and degrade the ECM are required for effective therapy. In the present study, we used ECM-degrading and Wnt signal-disrupting oncolytic adenovirus (oAd/DCN/LRP) to achieve a desirable therapeutic outcome against pancreatic cancer. In addition, to overcome the limitations in systemic delivery of oncolytic Ad (oAd) and to specifically target pancreatic cancer, neurotensin peptide (NT)-conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG) was chemically crosslinked to the surface of Ad, generating a systemically injectable hybrid system, oAd/DCN/LRP-PEG-NT. We tested the targeting and therapeutic efficacy of oAd/DCN/LRP-PEG-NT toward neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR)-overexpressing pancreatic cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. The oAd/DCN/LRP-PEG-NT elicited increased NTR-selective cancer cell killing and transduction efficiency when compared with a cognate control lacking NT (oAd/DCN/LRP-PEG). Furthermore, systemic administration of oAd/DCN/LRP-PEG-NT significantly decreased induction of innate and adaptive immune responses against Ad, and blood retention time was markedly prolonged by PEGylation. Moreover, NTR-targeting oAd elicited greater in vivo tumor growth suppression when compared with naked oAd and 9.5 × 10(6)-fold increased tumor-to-liver ratio. This significantly enhanced antitumor effect of oAd/DCN/LRP-PEG-NT was mediated by active viral replication and viral spreading, which was facilitated by ECM degradation and inhibition of Wnt signaling-related factors (Wnt, β-catenin, and/or vimentin) in the tumor tissues. Taken together, these

  14. Functional Analysis and Characterization of Differential Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Lang; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Differential coexpression analysis is emerging as a complement to conventional differential gene expression analysis. The identified differential coexpression links can be assembled into a differential coexpression network (DCEN) in response to environmental stresses or genetic changes. Differential coexpression analyses have been successfully used to identify condition-specific modules; however, the structural properties and biological significance of general DCENs have not been well investigated. Here, we analyzed two independent Saccharomyces cerevisiae DCENs constructed from large-scale time-course gene expression profiles in response to different situations. Topological analyses show that DCENs are tree-like networks possessing scale-free characteristics, but not small-world. Functional analyses indicate that differentially coexpressed gene pairs in DCEN tend to link different biological processes, achieving complementary or synergistic effects. Furthermore, the gene pairs lacking common transcription factors are sensitive to perturbation and hence lead to differential coexpression. Based on these observations, we integrated transcriptional regulatory information into DCEN and identified transcription factors that might cause differential coexpression by gain or loss of activation in response to different situations. Collectively, our results not only uncover the unique structural characteristics of DCEN but also provide new insights into interpretation of DCEN to reveal its biological significance and infer the underlying gene regulatory dynamics. PMID:26282208

  15. Induction of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptors following Focal Ischemia in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pál, Gabriella; Lovas, Gábor; Dobolyi, Arpád

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. TGF-βs bind to type I (TGF-βRI) and II receptors (TGF-βRII), which are transmembrane kinase receptors, and an accessory type III receptor (TGF-βRIII). TGF-β may utilize another type I receptor, activin-like kinase receptor (Alk1). TGF-β is neuroprotective in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model of stroke. Recently, we reported the expression pattern of TGF-β1-3 after MCAO. To establish how TGF-βs exert their actions following MCAO, the present study describes the induction of TGF-βRI, RII, RIII and Alk1 at 24 h, 72 h and 1 mo after transient 1 h MCAO as well as following 24 h permanent MCAO using in situ hybridization histochemistry. In intact brain, only TGF-βRI had significant expression: neurons in cortical layer IV contained TGF-βRI. At 24 h after the occlusion, no TGF-β receptors showed induction. At 72 h following MCAO, all four types of TGF-β receptors were induced in the infarct area, while TGF-βRI and RII also appeared in the penumbra. Most cells with elevated TGF-βRI mRNA levels were microglia. TGF-βRII co-localized with both microglial and endothelial markers while TGF-βRIII and Alk1 were present predominantly in endothels. All four TGF-β receptors were induced within the lesion 1 mo after the occlusion. In particular, TGF-βRIII was further induced as compared to 72 h after MCAO. At this time point, TGF-βRIII signal was predominantly not associated with blood vessels suggesting its microglial location. These data suggest that TGF-β receptors are induced after MCAO in a timely and spatially regulated fashion. TGF-β receptor expression is preceded by increased TGF-β expression. TGF-βRI and RII are likely to be co-expressed in microglial cells while Alk1, TGF-βRII, and RIII in endothels within the infarct where TGF-β1 may be their ligand. At later time points, TGF-βRIII may also appear in glial cells to potentially

  16. Detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptors Flt-1 and KDR in canine mastocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzi, Laura; Willmann, Michael; Sonneck, Karoline; Gleixner, Karoline V; Florian, Stefan; Kondo, Rudin; Mayerhofer, Matthias; Vales, Anja; Gruze, Alexander; Pickl, Winfried F; Thalhammer, Johann G; Valent, Peter

    2007-02-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a major regulator of angiogenesis and a potential autocrine growth factor for neoplastic cells in various malignancies. In the present study, we have investigated expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors in canine mastocytomas and the canine mastocytoma cell line C2. As assessed by immunostaining of tissue sections and cytospin slides, primary neoplastic mast cells (MC) and C2 cells were found to express the VEGF protein. In Northern blot and RT-PCR experiments, C2 cells expressed VEGF mRNA in a constitutive manner. VEGF mRNA expression in C2 cells was counteracted by LY294002 and rapamycin, suggesting involvement of the PI3-kinase/mTOR pathway. Moreover, C2 cells were found to express VEGF receptor-1 (Flt-1) and VEGF receptor-2 (KDR). However, recombinant VEGF failed to promote (3)H-thymidine uptake in C2 cells, and a neutralizing anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab) failed to downregulate spontaneous proliferation in these cells. In addition, rapamycin decreased the expression of VEGF in C2 cells at the mRNA and protein level without suppressing their proliferation. Together, canine mastocytoma cells express VEGF as well as VEGF receptors. However, despite co-expression of VEGF and its receptors, VEGF is not utilized as an autocrine growth regulator by canine mastocytoma cells. PMID:17196258

  17. Coexpression of wild-type and variant oestrogen receptor mRNAs in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Castles, C. G.; Klotz, D. M.; Fuqua, S. A.; Hill, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    Wild-type as well as variant oestrogen receptor (ER) mRNAs with exon 5 and 7 deleted were identified in a panel of human breast tumour cell lines by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction followed by dideoxynucleotide sequence analysis, and then quantitated by ribonuclease protection analysis. All cell lines categorised as ER+ by ligand-binding analysis expressed both wild-type and variant ER transcripts. Most cell lines classified as ER- did not express any ER transcript. However, three ER- cell lines (BT-20, MDA-MB-330 and T47Dco) expressed both wild-type and variant transcripts. A differential pattern of expression of wild type to variant was seen in both ER+ and ER- cell lines, however this pattern was not paralleled by differences in ligand-binding activity. Breast tumour cell lines previously classified as ER- expressed significantly lower levels of ER transcripts than did their ER+ counterparts. In view of these findings, as well as earlier reports that the exon 5 deletion ER variant encodes a dominant-positive receptor, it seems clear that some cell lines are misclassified as ER-, and express both wild-type and variant ER mRNAs, and that the overexpression of this variant may account, in part, for their oestrogen-independent phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7734323

  18. Binding of the Ah receptor to receptor binding factors in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R T; Ruh, T S; Ruh, M F

    1993-03-01

    Dioxin induces biological responses through interaction with a specific intracellular receptor, the Ah receptor, and the subsequent interaction of the Ah receptor with chromatin. We report the binding of the Ah receptor, partially purified from rabbit liver, to receptor binding factors in chromatin. Rabbit liver chromatin proteins (CP) were isolated by adsorption of chromatin to hydroxylapatite followed by sequential extraction with 1-8 M GdnHCl. To assay for receptor binding a portion of each CP fraction was reconstituted to rabbit double-stranded DNA using a reverse gradient dialysis of 7.5 to 0 M GdnHCl. These reconstituted nucleoacidic proteins were then examined for binding to [3H]-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([3H]TCDD)-receptor complexes by the streptomycin filter assay. Prior to the binding assay, [3H]TCDD-receptor complexes were partially purified by step elution from DEAE-cellulose columns. CP fractions 2, 5, and 7 were found to bind to the Ah receptor with high affinity. Scatchard analysis yielded Kd values in the nanomolar range. Competition with 2-fold excess unlabeled TCDD-receptor complexes was demonstrated, and binding was reduced markedly when the receptor was prepared in the presence of 10 mM molybdate. Such chromatin receptor binding factors (RBFs) may participate in the interaction of receptor with specific DNA sequences resulting in modulation of specific gene expression. PMID:8384852

  19. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  20. Selenoprotein W controls epidermal growth factor receptor surface expression, activation and degradation via receptor ubiquitination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) is the founding member of the ErbB family of growth factor receptors that modulate a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways controlling growth, proliferation and differentiation. Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a diet-regulated, highly conserved...

  1. Bioinformatics analysis of the target gene of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 in bladder cancer and associated molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    AI, XING; JIA, ZHUO-MIN; WANG, JUAN; DI, GUI-PING; ZHANG, XU; SUN, FENGLING; ZANG, TONG; LIAO, XIUMEI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) activation via overexpression or mutation of the FGFR3 target gene in bladder cancer (BC). The transcription profile data GSE41035, which included 18 BC samples, containing 3 independent FGFR3 short hairpin (sh)RNA, and 6 control samples, containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) shRNA, were obtained from the National Center of Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus database. The Limma package with multiple testing correction was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between FGFR3 knockdown and control samples. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis were conducted in order to investigate the DEGs at the functional level. In addition, differential co-expression analysis was employed to construct a gene co-expression network. A total of 196 DEGs were acquired, of which 101 were downregulated and 95 were upregulated. In addition, a gene signature was identified linking FGFR3 signaling with de novo sterol biosynthesis and metabolism using GO and pathway enrichment analysis. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that the genes NME2, CCNB1 and H2AFZ were significantly associated with BC, as determined by the protein-protein interaction network of DEGs and co-expressed genes. In conclusion, the present study revealed the involvement of FGFR3 in the regulation of sterol biosynthesis and metabolism in the maintenance of BC; in addition, the present study provided a novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of FGFR3 in BC. These results may therefore contribute to the theoretical guidance into the detection and therapy of BC. PMID:26171066

  2. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  3. Implications of epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced egf receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Lund, K; Wiley, H S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the role of receptor aggregation in EGF binding, we construct a mathematical model describing receptor dimerization (and higher levels of aggregation) that permits an analysis of the influence of receptor aggregation on ligand binding. We answer two questions: (a) Can Scatchard plots of EGF binding data be analyzed productively in terms of two noninteracting receptor populations with different affinities if EGF induced receptor aggregation occurs? No. If two affinities characterize aggregated and monomeric EGF receptors, we show that the Scatchard plot should have curvature characteristic of positively cooperative binding, the opposite of that observed. Thus, the interpretation that the high affinity population represents aggregated receptors and the low affinity population nonaggregated receptors is wrong. If the two populations are interpreted without reference to receptor aggregation, an important determinant of Scatchard plot shape is ignored. (b) Can a model for EGF receptor aggregation and EGF binding be consistent with the "negative curvature" (i.e., curvature characteristic of negatively cooperative binding) observed in most Scatchard plots of EGF binding data? Yes. In addition, the restrictions on the model parameters required to obtain negatively curved Scatchard plots provide new information about binding and aggregation. In particular, EGF binding to aggregated receptors must be negatively cooperative, i.e., binding to a receptor in a dimer (or higher oligomer) having one receptor already bound occurs with lower affinity than the initial binding event. A third question we consider is whether the model we present can be used to detect the presence of mechanisms other than receptor aggregation that are contributing to Scatchard plot curvature. For the membrane and cell binding data we analyzed, the best least squares fits of the model to each of the four data sets deviate systematically from the data, indicating that additional factors are

  4. Co-expression of pregnane X receptor and ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 in peripheral blood: A prospective indicator for drug resistance prediction in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    KONG, QINGNUAN; HAN, ZENGLEI; ZUO, XIAOLI; WEI, HONGJUN; HUANG, WEIQING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression profiling of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1; also known as MDR1 or P-gp), present in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and cancerous tissues of cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Furthermore, the study aimed to assess the feasibility of predicting drug resistance through the medium of PBMCs. Of the subjects included in the study, 37 were histopathologically diagnosed with NSCLC and 17 were control patients without cancer. ThinPrep liquid-based smears with cytosine were applied in the examination of the PBMCs and proved quite effective in preserving the morphology and surface antigens of the lymphocytes. Measurements of expression levels in the PBMCs and cancerous tissues were obtained by immunohistochemical means. The results showed that, with the exception of the selective PXR expression in the normal lung tissues, the two types of proteins existed extensively throughout the PBMCs, normal tissues and tumors. Among the cancer patients, prior to chemotherapy, a significant rise in ABCB1 expression could be observed in the PBMCs, together with a similar rise in ABCB1 and PXR expression in the tumor specimens. Marked upregulation of the two proteins was detected in the PBMCs following 1 cycle of first-line chemotherapy. ABCB1 expression, correlated with PXR, persisted mostly in the PBMCs and tissue samples. When bound to and activated by ligands, PXR translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of the cells. PXR subsequently binds to its DNA response elements as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor. A PXR translocation of moderate or low differentiation was identified in 3 cases of adenocarcinoma, which were co-expressing the two genes in the PBMCs prior to chemotherapy. During follow-up visits, tumor recurrence was observed within 3 months in 5 cases, which were characterized by PXR translocation. These findings

  5. The biology of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Penuel, E; Sliwkowski, M X

    1999-09-01

    Our understanding of the normal signaling mechanisms and functions of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and other members of the HER family, namely epidermal growth factor receptor, HER3, and HER4, is growing rapidly. Activation of these receptors results in a diverse array of signals through the formation of homodimeric and heterodimeric receptor complexes; HER2 is the preferred dimerization partner for the other HERs. These oligomeric receptor complexes activate distinct signaling pathways, such as the Ras-MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways. These, in turn, affect various cellular processes. Recent gene deletion experiments in mice point to an important role for HER2 in cardiac and neural development, and evidence from other studies indicates that HER2 is involved in normal breast growth and development. Thus, HER2 is a key component of a complex signaling network that plays a critical role in the regulation of tissue development, growth, and differentiation. PMID:11122793

  6. Co-expression of the transcription factors CEH-14 and TTX-1 regulates AFD neuron-specific genes gcy-8 and gcy-18 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kagoshima, Hiroshi; Kohara, Yuji

    2015-03-15

    A wide variety of cells are generated by the expression of characteristic sets of genes, primarily those regulated by cell-specific transcription. To elucidate the mechanism regulating cell-specific gene expression in a highly specialized cell, AFD thermosensory neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans, we analyzed the promoter sequences of guanylyl cyclase genes, gcy-8 and gcy-18, exclusively expressed in AFD. In this study, we showed that AFD-specific expression of gcy-8 and gcy-18 requires the co-expression of homeodomain proteins, CEH-14/LHX3 and TTX-1/OTX1. We observed that mutation of ttx-1 or ceh-14 caused a reduction in the expression of gcy-8 and gcy-18 and that the expression was completely lost in double mutants. This synergy effect was also observed with other AFD marker genes, such as ntc-1, nlp-21and cng-3. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed direct interaction of CEH-14 and TTX-1 proteins with gcy-8 and gcy-18 promoters in vitro. The binding sites of CEH-14 and TTX-1 proteins were confirmed to be essential for AFD-specific expression of gcy-8 and gcy-18 in vivo. We also demonstrated that forced expression of CEH-14 and TTX-1 in AWB chemosensory neurons induced ectopic expression of gcy-8 and gcy-18 reporters in this neuron. Finally, we showed that the regulation of gcy-8 and gcy-18 expression by ceh-14 and ttx-1 is evolutionally conserved in five Caenorhabditis species. Taken together, ceh-14 and ttx-1 expression determines the fate of AFD as terminal selector genes at the final step of cell specification. PMID:25614239

  7. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  8. Cutaneous adverse reactions specific to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, I; Voiculescu, VM; Bacalbasa, N; Prie, BE; Cojocaru, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Classical antineoplastic therapy is encumbered by extensively studied adverse reactions, most often of systemic nature. The emergence of new generations of anticancer treatments, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, besides improving the response to treatment and the survival rate, is accompanied by the occurrence of new specific side effects, incompletely studied. These side effects are most often cutaneous (hand foot syndrome, acneiform reactions), and in some cases are extremely severe, requiring dose reduction or drug discontinuation. The prevention of the cutaneous adverse effects and their treatment require a close collaboration between the oncologist and the dermatologist. The occurrence of some of these skin adverse effects may be a favorable prognostic factor for the response to the cancer treatment and the overall survival. Abbreviations: EGFR = epidermal growth factor receptors; EGFRI = epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors PMID:26361513

  9. Involvement of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) in expression of human melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R).

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hirofumi; Moro, Osamu

    2002-09-20

    Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of human melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) promoter indicated that an E-box (CANNTG) is present immediately upstream of the transcriptional initiation site. The presence of the CATGTG motif suggests that MC1R gene expression may be regulated by a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine-zipper (bHLH-LZ) type transcription factor. The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), which belongs to the family of bHLH-LZ type transcription factors, regulates the transcription of melanogenesis-related enzyme genes such as the tyrosinase and TRP-1 genes. We investigated whether MITF regulates human MC1R gene expression through the same transcriptional mechanism as tyrosinase and TRP-1 genes in melanocytes. For this purpose, the effect of co-expression of cDNA encoding MITF on MC1R promoter activity in NIH/3T3 cells was studied. MC1R promoter activity was induced to the extent of approximately 5-fold in the presence of MITF. In addition, electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that nuclear extracts of human SK-Mel-2 cells contain a protein that binds specifically to the MC1R promoter region containing the CATGTG motif. These results suggested that MITF regulates not only the expression of enzymes involved in melanin synthesis, but also the expression of a receptor which plays an essential role in melanocyte functions. PMID:12204775

  10. Differential expression of hormonal and growth factor receptors in salivary duct carcinomas: biologic significance and potential role in therapeutic stratification of patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle D; Roberts, Dianna; Blumenschein, George R; Temam, Stephane; Kies, Merrill S; Rosenthal, David I; Weber, Randal S; El-Naggar, Adel K

    2007-11-01

    Salivary duct carcinoma (SDC), a rare malignancy, manifests remarkable morphologic and biologic resemblance to high-grade mammary ductal carcinoma. We contend that, similar to mammary ductal carcinoma, hormones and growth factors may play a role in SDCs. Our aim was to determine the incidence and clinical significance of the expression of several hormone and growth factor receptors and evaluate their potential in therapeutic stratification of SDC patients in the largest cohort studied to date. Eighty-four archived tumor tissue blocks were analyzed immunohistochemically for expression of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta), androgen receptor (AR), and proline, glutamic acid, and leucine-rich protein-1 and growth factor receptors HER-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor. The results were correlated with available pathologic, demographic, and clinical data from 59 of 84 cases. Proline, glutamic acid, and leucine-rich protein-1, ERbeta, and AR were expressed individually in 94% (71/76), 73% (57/80), and 67% (56/84) of SDCs, respectively, and coexpressed in 45% (34/75). AR was expressed significantly more often in SDCs of men than in SDCs of women [79% (35/57) vs. 33% (9/27), P<0.001]. Epidermal growth factor receptor and HER-2 were overexpressed individually in 48% (40/83) and 25% (21/84), respectively, and co-overexpressed in 12% (10/83). Survival decreased significantly in patients with lymph node metastasis (P=0.002) and positive surgical margins (P=0.006). Lack of ERbeta expression correlated with increased local and regional recurrence (P=0.05 and P=0.002, respectively). Together, these results indicate that (a) ERbeta down-regulation is associated with adverse clinical features, (b) lymph node and surgical margin status are significant survival factors, and (c) the differential expression of these hormones and growth factor receptors may assist in triaging patients with SDC for novel therapies. PMID:18059220

  11. Modulation of the NMDA Receptor Through Secreted Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Waldo; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a critical determinant in the formation and development of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). The excitatory current is produced and regulated by several ionotropic receptors, including those that respond to glutamate. These channels are in turn regulated through several secreted factors that function as synaptic organizers. Specifically, Wnt, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) particularly regulate the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glutamatergic channel. These factors likely regulate early embryonic development and directly control key proteins in the function of important glutamatergic channels. Here, we review the secreted molecules that participate in synaptic organization and discuss the cell signaling behind of this fine regulation. Additionally, we discuss how these factors are dysregulated in some neuropathologies associated with glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the CNS. PMID:25429903

  12. Vascular growth factors and receptors in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Böhling, T.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Persico, M. G.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas are highly vascular central nervous system tumors of controversial origin. Of interest in their pathogenesis are mechanisms regulating endothelial cell growth. The endothelial cell mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis, and together with its two receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-1(FLT1) and VEGFR-2(KDR), is up-regulated during the malignant progression of gliomas. We have analyzed the expression of VEGF and its receptors, the related placental growth factor (PlGF) and the endothelial receptors FLT4 and Tie by in situ hybridization in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in all of the hemangiopericytomas studied and highly expressed in the stromal cells of hemangioblastomas. In addition, some hemangioblastoma tumor cells expressed high levels of PlGF. Significantly elevated levels of Tie mRNA, Tie protein, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 but not FLT4 mRNAs were observed in the endothelia of both tumor types. In hemangioblastomas, however, the receptors were also highly expressed by a subpopulation of stromal cells. Consistent results were obtained for a human hemangioblastoma cell line in culture. Up-regulation of the endothelial growth factors and receptors may result in autocrine or paracrine stimulation of endothelial cells and their precursors involved in the genesis of these two vascular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774132

  13. Dominant-negative effect of truncated mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor species in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kreiling, Jodi L; Montgomery, Michelle A; Wheeler, Joseph R; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Connelly, Christopher M; Zavorka, Megan E; Allison, Jenna L; Macdonald, Richard G

    2012-08-01

    Oligomerization of the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) is important for optimal ligand binding and internalization. M6P/IGF2R is a tumor suppressor gene that exhibits loss of heterozygosity and is mutated in several cancers. We tested the potential dominant-negative effects of two cancer-associated mutations that truncate M6P/IGF2R in ectodomain repeats 9 and 14. Our hypothesis was that co-expression of the truncated receptors with the wild-type/endogenous full-length M6P/IGF2R would interfere with M6P/IGF2R function by heterodimer interference. Immunoprecipitation confirmed formation of heterodimeric complexes between full-length M6P/IGF2Rs and the truncated receptors, termed Rep9F and Rep14F. Remarkably, increasing expression of either Rep9F or Rep14F provoked decreased levels of full-length M6P/IGF2Rs in both cell lysates and plasma membranes, indicating a dominant-negative effect on receptor availability. Loss of full-length M6P/IGF2R was not due to increased proteasomal or lysosomal degradation, but instead arose from increased proteolytic cleavage of cell-surface M6P/IGF2Rs, resulting in ectodomain release, by a mechanism that was inhibited by metal ion chelators. These data suggest that M6P/IGF2R truncation mutants may contribute to the cancer phenotype by decreasing the availability of full-length M6P/IGF2Rs to perform tumor-suppressive functions such as binding/internalization of receptor ligands such as insulin-like growth factor II. PMID:22681933

  14. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  15. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason R.; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant, therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry. Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored immunohistochemistry and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot or in vitro flow cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immuno-staining, with implications for use in non-invasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  16. Visualization of growth factor receptor sites in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Araujo, D.; Nair, N.P.; Chabot, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    It is now known that various growth factors may also act in the central nervous system. Among them, it has recently been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) may possess trophic effects in the mammalian brain. We report here on the respective autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 125/I)EGF and (/sup 125/I)IGF-I receptor binding sites in the rat brain, both during ontogeny and in adulthood. It appears that (/sup 125/I)EGF sites are mostly found in the rat forebrain during brain development. On the other hand, (/sup 125/I)IGF-I sites are more widely distributed both during ontogeny and in adulthood. These results reveal the plasticity of the expression of EGF and IGF-I receptor sites in the mammalian brain. This could be relevant for the respective role of these two growth factors in the development and maintenance of neuronal function.

  17. The ontogeny of epidermal growth factor receptors during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E.D.; Meek, J.

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the role(s) of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in vivo during murine development, we have examined the /sup 125/I-EGF binding characteristics of EGF-receptors in membrane preparations of tissues from the 12th day of gestation to parturition. Using autoradiography, the earliest time that we could detect EGF-receptors was on trophoblast cells cultured for 3 days as blastocyst outgrowths. Trophoblast eventually forms a large portion of the placenta, where EGF-receptors have long been recognized. We measured the number and affinity of EGF-receptors on tissues dissected from conceptuses from the 12th day of gestation in order to identify a stage when tissues may be most sensitive to EGF. Whereas the number of EGF receptors increases during gestation for all tissues examined, the affinity of the receptors declines for carcass and placenta and remains relatively unchanged for brain and liver. This suggests that EGF may function differently throughout development. Our hypothesis is that EGF (or its embryonic equivalent) initially stimulates proliferation in embryonic cells and then stimulates differentiation as the tissues mature. In the adult, its main role could be to stimulate tissue repair after damage.

  18. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor receptors, developmental corruption and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; O'Sullivan, Hazel; Smyth, Elizabeth; McDermott, Ray; Viterbo, Antonella

    2013-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) are a family of ligands that bind to four different types of cell surface receptor entitled, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. These receptors differ in their ligand binding affinity and tissue distribution. The prototypical receptor structure is that of an extracellular region comprising three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, a hydrophobic transmembrane segment and a split intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Alternative gene splicing affecting the extracellular third Ig loop also creates different receptor isoforms entitled FGFRIIIb and FGFRIIIc. Somatic fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutations are implicated in different types of cancer and germline FGFR mutations occur in developmental syndromes particularly those in which craniosynostosis is a feature. The mutations found in both conditions are often identical. Many somatic FGFR mutations in cancer are gain-of-function mutations of established preclinical oncogenic potential. Gene amplification can also occur with 19-22% of squamous cell lung cancers for example having amplification of FGFR1. Ontologic comparators can be informative such as aberrant spermatogenesis being implicated in both spermatocytic seminomas and Apert syndrome. The former arises from somatic FGFR3 mutations and Apert syndrome arises from germline FGFR2 mutations. Finally, therapeutics directed at inhibiting the FGF/FGFR interaction are a promising subject for clinical trials. PMID:23880303

  20. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling networks in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Frank B.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    As tumours evolve, the daughter cells of the initiating cell often become molecularly heterogeneous and develop different functional properties and therapeutic vulnerabilities. In glioblastoma (GBM), a lethal form of brain cancer, the heterogeneous expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) poses a substantial challenge for the effective use of EGFR-targeted therapies. Understanding the mechanisms that cause EGFR heterogeneity in GBM should provide better insights into how they, and possibly other amplified receptor tyrosine kinases, affect cellular signalling, metabolism and drug resistance. PMID:25855404

  1. Drosophila Vps4 promotes Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of its role in receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Legent, Kevin; Liu, Hui Hua; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking of signaling receptors is an important mechanism for limiting signal duration. Components of the Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT), which target ubiquitylated receptors to intra-lumenal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies, are thought to terminate signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and direct it for lysosomal degradation. In a genetic screen for mutations that affect Drosophila eye development, we identified an allele of Vacuolar protein sorting 4 (Vps4), which encodes an AAA ATPase that interacts with the ESCRT-III complex to drive the final step of ILV formation. Photoreceptors are largely absent from Vps4 mutant clones in the eye disc, and even when cell death is genetically prevented, the mutant R8 photoreceptors that develop fail to recruit surrounding cells to differentiate as R1-R7 photoreceptors. This recruitment requires EGFR signaling, suggesting that loss of Vps4 disrupts the EGFR pathway. In imaginal disc cells mutant for Vps4, EGFR and other receptors accumulate in endosomes and EGFR target genes are not expressed; epistasis experiments place the function of Vps4 at the level of the receptor. Surprisingly, Vps4 is required for EGFR signaling even in the absence of Shibire, the Dynamin that internalizes EGFR from the plasma membrane. In ovarian follicle cells, in contrast, Vps4 does not affect EGFR signaling, although it is still essential for receptor degradation. Taken together, these findings indicate that Vps4 can promote EGFR activity through an endocytosis-independent mechanism. PMID:25790850

  2. Investigating the Combinatory Effects of Biological Networks on Gene Co-expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Lee, Sunjae; Mardinoglu, Adil; Hua, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Co-expressed genes often share similar functions, and gene co-expression networks have been widely used in studying the functionality of gene modules. Previous analysis indicated that genes are more likely to be co-expressed if they are either regulated by the same transcription factors, forming protein complexes or sharing similar topological properties in protein-protein interaction networks. Here, we reconstructed transcriptional regulatory and protein-protein networks for Saccharomyces cerevisiae using well-established databases, and we evaluated their co-expression activities using publically available gene expression data. Based on our network-dependent analysis, we found that genes that were co-regulated in the transcription regulatory networks and shared similar neighbors in the protein-protein networks were more likely to be co-expressed. Moreover, their biological functions were closely related. PMID:27445830

  3. Putative cold acclimation pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana identified by a combined analysis of mRNA co-expression patterns, promoter motifs and transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Chawade, Aakash; Bräutigam, Marcus; Lindlöf, Angelica; Olsson, Olof; Olsson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Background With the advent of microarray technology, it has become feasible to identify virtually all genes in an organism that are induced by developmental or environmental changes. However, relying solely on gene expression data may be of limited value if the aim is to infer the underlying genetic networks. Development of computational methods to combine microarray data with other information sources is therefore necessary. Here we describe one such method. Results By means of our method, previously published Arabidopsis microarray data from cold acclimated plants at six different time points, promoter motif sequence data extracted from ~24,000 Arabidopsis promoters and known transcription factor binding sites were combined to construct a putative genetic regulatory interaction network. The inferred network includes both previously characterised and hitherto un-described regulatory interactions between transcription factor (TF) genes and genes that encode other TFs or other proteins. Part of the obtained transcription factor regulatory network is presented here. More detailed information is available in the additional files. Conclusion The rule-based method described here can be used to infer genetic networks by combining data from microarrays, promoter sequences and known promoter binding sites. This method should in principle be applicable to any biological system. We tested the method on the cold acclimation process in Arabidopsis and could identify a more complex putative genetic regulatory network than previously described. However, it should be noted that information on specific binding sites for individual TFs were in most cases not available. Thus, gene targets for the entire TF gene families were predicted. In addition, the networks were built solely by a bioinformatics approach and experimental verifications will be necessary for their final validation. On the other hand, since our method highlights putative novel interactions, more directed experiments

  4. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Hauger, R.L.; Catt, K.J.; Aguilera, G.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution and properties of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) were analyzed in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys. Binding of (/sup 125/I)tyrosine-labeled ovine CRF to frontal cortex and amygdala membrane-rich fractions was saturable, specific, and time- and temperature-dependent, reaching equilibrium in 30 min at 23/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated one class of high-affinity sites with a K/sub d/ of 1 nM and a concentration of 125 fmol/mg. As in the rat pituitary and brain, CRF receptors in monkey cerebral cortex and amygdala were coupled to adenylate cyclase. Autoradiographic analysis of specific CRF binding in brain sections revealed that the receptors were widely distributed in the cerebral cortex and limbic system. Receptor density was highest in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary and throughout the cerebral cortex, specifically in the prefrontal, frontal, orbital, cingulate, insular, and temporal areas, and in the cerebellar cortex. A low binding density was present in the superior colliculus, locus coeruleus, substantia gelatinosa, preoptic area, septal area, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These data demonstrate that receptors for CRF are present within the primate brain at areas related to the central control of visceral function and behavior, suggesting that brain CRF may serve as a neurotransmitter in the coordination of endocrine and neural mechanisms involved in the response to stress.

  5. Purification of the endogenous glucocorticoid receptor stabilizing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Meshinchi, S.; Stancato, L.F.; Pratt, W.B. ); Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W. )

    1991-09-03

    A ubiquitous, low molecular weight, heat-stable component of cytosol stabilizes the glucocorticoid receptor in its untransformed state in association with hsp90. This heat-stable factor mimics molybdate in its effects on receptor function, and it has the heat stability, charge, and chelation properties of a metal oxyanion. In this paper, the authors describe the further purification of the endogenous factor from rat liver cytosol by anion-exchange HPCL (Ion-110) after prepurification by molecular sieving, cation absorption, and charcoal absorption. Elution of the factor with an isocratic gradient of ammonium bicarbonate results in recovery of all of the bioactivity in a single peak which coelutes with inorganic phosphate and contains all of the endogenous molybdenum. The bioactivity can be separated from inorganic phosphate by chromatography of the partially purified endogenous factor on a metal-chelating column of Chelex-100. The chelating procedure results in complete loss of bioactivity with recovery of 98% of the inorganic phosphate in both the column drop-through and a subsequent 1 M NaCl wash. These observations support the proposal that an endogenous metal can stabilize the binding of hsp90 to the receptor but it is likely that other cytosolic components that are not present in the immunopurified complex must contribute to the stability of the soluble protein-protein complex in cytosol.

  6. ATTED-II in 2016: A Plant Coexpression Database Towards Lineage-Specific Coexpression

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yuichi; Okamura, Yasunobu; Tadaka, Shu; Kinoshita, Kengo; Obayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    ATTED-II (http://atted.jp) is a coexpression database for plant species with parallel views of multiple coexpression data sets and network analysis tools. The user can efficiently find functional gene relationships and design experiments to identify gene functions by reverse genetics and general molecular biology techniques. Here, we report updates to ATTED-II (version 8.0), including new and updated coexpression data and analysis tools. ATTED-II now includes eight microarray- and six RNA sequencing-based coexpression data sets for seven dicot species (Arabidopsis, field mustard, soybean, barrel medick, poplar, tomato and grape) and two monocot species (rice and maize). Stand-alone coexpression analyses tend to have low reliability. Therefore, examining evolutionarily conserved coexpression is a more effective approach from the viewpoints of reliability and evolutionary importance. In contrast, the reliability of species-specific coexpression data remains poor. Our assessment scores for individual coexpression data sets indicated that the quality of the new coexpression data sets in ATTED-II is higher than for any previous coexpression data set. In addition, five species (Arabidopsis, soybean, tomato, rice and maize) in ATTED-II are now supported by both microarray- and RNA sequencing-based coexpression data, which has increased the reliability. Consequently, ATTED-II can now provide lineage-specific coexpression information. As an example of the use of ATTED-II to explore lineage-specific coexpression, we demonstrate monocot- and dicot-specific coexpression of cell wall genes. With the expanded coexpression data for multilevel evaluation, ATTED-II provides new opportunities to investigate lineage-specific evolution in plants. PMID:26546318

  7. Nerve growth factor binding domain of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Welcher, A.A.; Bitler, C.M.; Radeke, M.J.; Shooter, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A structural analysis of the rat low-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor was undertaken to define the NGF binding domain. Mutant NGF receptor DNA constructs were expressed in mouse fibroblasts or COS cells, and the ability of the mutant receptors to bind NGF was assayed. In the first mutant, all but 16 amino acid residues of the intracellular domain of the receptor were removed. This receptor bound NGF with a K{sub d} comparable to that of the wild-type receptor. A second mutant contained only the four cysteine-rich sequences from the extracellular portion of the protein. This mutant was expressed in COS cells and the resultant protein was a secreted soluble form of the receptor that was able to bind NGF. Two N-terminal deletions, in which either the first cystein-rich sequence or the first and part of the second cystein-rich sequences were removed, bound NGF. However, a mutant lacking all four cysteine-rich sequences was unable to bind NGF. These results show that the four cysteine-rich sequences of the NGF receptor contain the NGF binding domain.

  8. A natural kinase-deficient variant of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, L Y; Edenson, S P; Yu, Y L; Senderowicz, L; Turck, C W

    1996-08-01

    A fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant missing 37 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal tyrosine kinase catalytic domain was discovered in human lung fibroblasts and several other human cell lines. The receptor variant binds specifically to acidic fibroblast growth factor but has no tyrosine kinase activity. It was found that cellular transfectants expressing the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant are mitogenically inactive and ligand binding to the receptor causes neither receptor autophosphorylation nor phospholipase C-gamma transphosphorylation. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant therefore represents an inactive receptor for acidic fibroblast growth factor. Since both kinase and kinase-deficient receptor forms are expressed in cells, it is conceivable that the kinase-deficient receptor plays an important role in regulating cellular responses elicited by acidic fibroblast growth factor stimulation. PMID:8756477

  9. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by alanine mutagenesis. Substitution of either F152 or K155 with alanine was found to specifically inhibit cytokine interaction with LIFR without affecting binding to CNTFR alpha or gp130. The resulting variants behaved as partial agonists with varying degrees of residual bioactivity in different cell-based assays. Simultaneous alanine substitution of both F152 and K155 totally abolished biological activity. Combining these mutations with amino acid substitutions in the D-helix, which enhance binding affinity for the CNTFR alpha, gave rise to a potent competitive CNTF receptor antagonist. This protein constitutes a new tool for studies of CNTF function in normal physiology and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 PMID:8799186

  10. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  11. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  12. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression. PMID:25639875

  13. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor -2 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Colbert, Laronna S.; Fuller, Miles; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations over the last decade have established the essential role of growth factors and their receptors during angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) family in mammals contains three members, VEGFR-1 (Flt-1), VEGFR-2 (KDR/Flk-1) and VEGFR-3 (Flt-4), which are transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors that regulate the formation of blood and lymphatic vessels. In the early 1990s, the above VEGFR were structurally characterized by cDNA cloning. Among these three receptors, VEGFR-2 is generally recognized to have a principal role in mediating VEGF-induced responses. VEGFR-2 is considered as the earliest marker for endothelial cell development. Importantly, VEGFR-2 directly regulates tumor angiogenesis. Therefore, several inhibitors of VEGFR-2 have been developed and many of them are now in clinical trials. In addition to targeting endothelial cells, the VEGF/VEGFR-2 system works as an essential autocrine/paracrine process for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies mark the continuous and increased interest in this related, but distinct, function of VEGF/VEGFR-2 in cancer cells: the autocrine/paracrine loop. Several mechanisms regulate VEGFR-2 levels and modulate its role in tumor angiogenesis and physiologic functions, i.e.: cellular localization/trafficking, regulation of cis-elements of promoter, epigenetic regulation and signaling from Notch, cytokines/growth factors and estrogen, etc. In this review, we will focus on updated information regarding VEGFR-2 research with respect to the molecular mechanisms of VEGFR-2 regulation in human breast cancer. Investigations in the activation, function, and regulation of VEGFR-2 in breast cancer will allow the development of new pharmacological strategies aimed at directly targeting cancer cell proliferation and survival. PMID:20462514

  14. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8105469

  15. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352

  16. ALCOdb: Gene Coexpression Database for Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuichi; Okamura, Yasunobu; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo; Obayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the era of energy and food shortage, microalgae have gained much attention as promising sources of biofuels and food ingredients. However, only a small fraction of microalgal genes have been functionally characterized. Here, we have developed the Algae Gene Coexpression database (ALCOdb; http://alcodb.jp), which provides gene coexpression information to survey gene modules for a function of interest. ALCOdb currently supports two model algae: the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. Users can retrieve coexpression information for genes of interest through three unique data pages: (i) Coexpressed Gene List; (ii) Gene Information; and (iii) Coexpressed Gene Network. In addition to the basal coexpression information, ALCOdb also provides several advanced functionalities such as an expression profile viewer and a differentially expressed gene search tool. Using these user interfaces, we demonstrated that our gene coexpression data have the potential to detect functionally related genes and are useful in extrapolating the biological roles of uncharacterized genes. ALCOdb will facilitate molecular and biochemical studies of microalgal biological phenomena, such as lipid metabolism and organelle development, and promote the evolutionary understanding of plant cellular systems. PMID:26644461

  17. ALCOdb: Gene Coexpression Database for Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yuichi; Okamura, Yasunobu; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo; Obayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the era of energy and food shortage, microalgae have gained much attention as promising sources of biofuels and food ingredients. However, only a small fraction of microalgal genes have been functionally characterized. Here, we have developed the Algae Gene Coexpression database (ALCOdb; http://alcodb.jp), which provides gene coexpression information to survey gene modules for a function of interest. ALCOdb currently supports two model algae: the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. Users can retrieve coexpression information for genes of interest through three unique data pages: (i) Coexpressed Gene List; (ii) Gene Information; and (iii) Coexpressed Gene Network. In addition to the basal coexpression information, ALCOdb also provides several advanced functionalities such as an expression profile viewer and a differentially expressed gene search tool. Using these user interfaces, we demonstrated that our gene coexpression data have the potential to detect functionally related genes and are useful in extrapolating the biological roles of uncharacterized genes. ALCOdb will facilitate molecular and biochemical studies of microalgal biological phenomena, such as lipid metabolism and organelle development, and promote the evolutionary understanding of plant cellular systems. PMID:26644461

  18. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  19. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  20. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, David E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  1. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, David E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  2. Simultaneous suppression of epidermal growth factor receptor and c-erbB-2 reverses aneuploidy and malignant phenotype of a human ovarian carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Pack, Svetlana D; Alper, Ozgül M; Stromberg, Kurt; Augustus, Meena; Ozdemirli, Metin; Miermont, Anne M; Klus, Greg; Rusin, Marek; Slack, Rebecca; Hacker, Neville F; Ried, Thomas; Szallasi, Zoltan; Alper, Ozge

    2004-02-01

    Coexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-erbB-2 in 47-68% of ovarian cancer cells indicate their strong association with tumor formation. We examined the effects of simultaneous antisense- or immunosuppression of EGFR and c-erbB-2 expression on the invasive phenotype, aneuploidy, and genotype of cultured human ovarian carcinoma cells (NIH:OVCAR-8). We report here that suppression of both EGFR and c-erbB-2 results in regression of aneuploidy and genomic imbalances in NIH:OVCAR-8 cells, restores a more normal phenotype, and results in a more normal gene expression profile. Combined with cytogenetic analysis, our data demonstrate that the regression of aneuploidy is due to the selective apoptosis of double antisense transfected cells with highly abnormal karyotype. PMID:14871800

  3. 5-HT(1A) receptors transactivate the platelet-derived growth factor receptor type beta in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of ligand, certain growth factor receptors can be activated via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation in a process termed transactivation. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can transactivate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors in smooth muscle cells, but it is not known if similar pathways occur in neuronal cells. Here we show that 5-HT can transiently increase the phosphorylation of PDGFβ receptors through 5-HT(1A) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. 5-HT also transactivates PDGFβ receptors in primary cortical neurons. This transactivation pathway is pertussis-toxin sensitive and Src tyrosine kinase-dependent. This pathway is also dependent on phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium signaling. Several studies involving PDGFβ receptor transactivation by GPCRs have also demonstrated a PDGFβ receptor-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Yet in SH-SY5Y cells, 5-HT treatment causes a PDGFβ receptor-independent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This crosstalk between 5-HT and PDGFβ receptors identifies a potentially important signaling link between the serotonergic system and growth factor signaling in neurons. PMID:23006663

  4. Human type II receptor for bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs): extension of the two-kinase receptor model to the BMPs.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, F; Ventura, F; Doody, J; Massagué, J

    1995-01-01

    Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are universal regulators of animal development. We report the identification and cloning of the BMP type II receptor (BMPR-II), a missing component of this receptor system in vertebrates. BMPR-II is a transmembrane serine/threonine kinase that binds BMP-2 and BMP-7 in association with multiple type I receptors, including BMPR-IA/Brk1, BMPR-IB, and ActR-I, which is also an activin type I receptor. Cloning of BMPR-II resulted from a strong interaction of its cytoplasmic domain with diverse transforming growth factor beta family type I receptor cytoplasmic domains in a yeast two-hybrid system. In mammalian cells, however, the interaction of BMPR-II is restricted to BMP type I receptors and is ligand dependent. BMPR-II binds BMP-2 and -7 on its own, but binding is enhanced by coexpression of type I BMP receptors. BMP-2 and BMP-7 can induce a transcriptional response when added to cells coexpressing ActR-I and BMPR-II but not to cells expressing either receptor alone. The kinase activity of both receptors is essential for signaling. Thus, despite their ability to bind to type I and II receptors receptors separately, BMPs appear to require the cooperation of these two receptors for optimal binding and for signal transduction. The combinatorial nature of these receptors and their capacity to crosstalk with the activin receptor system may underlie the multifunctional nature of their ligands. PMID:7791754

  5. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, p53, Bcl2, vascular endothelial growth factor, cyclooxygenase-2, cyclin D1, human epidermal receptor-2 and Ki-67: Association with clinicopathological profiles and outcomes in gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Azam, Saud; Sinha, Rupal; Batra, Ullas; Mehta, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study observed the expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p53, Bcl2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2), cyclin D1, human epidermal receptor-2 (HER-2) and Ki-67 in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) and their association with clinicopathological profiles and disease outcomes. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive samples of cholecystectomy/biopsies from GB bed (archived formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of different stages of GBC) were included, and patient details related to their demographic profile, investigations, tumor profile, treatment, and follow-up were recorded. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study the expression levels. Results: Overexpression of EGFR, p53, Bcl2, VEGF, cox-2, cyclin D1 and HER-2 was observed as 74%, 44%, 8%, 34%, 66%, 64%, and 4%, respectively. Association of Bcl2 overexpression in mucinous morphology (40%, P = 0.045), cox-2 overexpression in early stage (I/II) tumors (87.5%, P = 0.028) and VEGF overexpression in alive patients (47.1%, P = 0.044) was observed. Co-expression of EGFR and p53 were statistically significant (P = 0.033). Ki-67 labeling index was significantly higher in patients in age group <40 years (P = 0.027), and poorly differentiated tumors (P = 0.023). Advanced disease and poorly differentiated tumors showed a significantly poor median survival (P < 0.05). Conclusion: EGFR, cox-2 and cyclin D1 were largely overexpressed. Advanced tumor stages and poorly differentiated tumors are predictors of poor survival. PMID:25225463

  6. Time ordering of gene coexpression.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiaoyan; Müller, Hans-Georg

    2006-10-01

    Temporal microarray gene expression profiles allow characterization of gene function through time dynamics of gene coexpression within the same genetic pathway. In this paper, we define and estimate a global time shift characteristic for each gene via least squares, inferred from pairwise curve alignments. These time shift characteristics of individual genes reflect a time ordering that is derived from ob- served temporal gene expression profiles. Once these time shift characteristics are obtained for each gene, they can be entered into further analyses, such as clustering. We illustrate the proposed methodology using Drosophila embryonic development and yeast cell-cycle gene expression profiles, as well as simulations. Feasibility is demonstrated through the successful recovery of time ordering. Estimated time shifts for Drosophila maternal and zygotic genes provide excellent discrimination between these two categories and confirm known genetic pathways through the time order of gene expression. The application to yeast cell-cycle data establishes a natural time order of genes that is in line with cell-cycle phases. The method does not require periodicity of gene expression profiles. Asymptotic justifications are also provided. PMID:16495429

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in lung cancer: status 2012.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Fred R; Jänne, Pasi A; Eberhardt, Wilfried E; Cappuzzo, Federico; Thatcher, Nick; Pirker, Robert; Choy, Hak; Kim, Edward S; Paz-Ares, Luis; Gandara, David R; Wu, Yi-Long; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Shepherd, Frances A; Mok, Tony S

    2013-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths. Most patients present with advanced-stage disease, and the prognosis is generally poor. However, with the understanding of lung cancer biology, and development of molecular targeted agents, there have been improvements in treatment outcomes for selected subsets of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have demonstrated significantly improved tumor responses and progression-free survival in subsets of patients with advanced NSCLC, particularly those with tumors harboring activating EGFR mutations. Testing for EGFR mutations is a standard procedure for identification of patients who will benefit from first-line EGFR TKIs. For patients with advanced NSCLC and no activating EGFR mutations (EGFR wild-type) or no other driving oncogenes such as ALK-gene rearrangement, chemotherapy is still the standard of care. A new generation of EGFR TKIs, targeting multiple receptors and with irreversible bindings to the receptors, are in clinical trials and have shown encouraging effects. Research on primary and acquired resistant mechanisms to EGFR TKIs are ongoing. Monoclonal antibodies (e.g. cetuximab), in combination with chemotherapy, have demonstrated improved outcomes, particularly for subsets of NSCLC patients, but further validations are needed. Novel monoclonal antibodies are combined with chemotherapy, and randomized comparative studies are ongoing. This review summarizes the current status of EGFR inhibitors in NSCLC in 2012 and some of the major challenges we are facing. PMID:23370315

  8. Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody cetuximab inhibits EGFR/HER-2 heterodimerization and activation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipa; Bassi, Rajiv; Hooper, Andrea; Prewett, Marie; Hicklin, Daniel J; Kang, Xiaoqiang

    2009-01-01

    Human carcinomas frequently express one or more members of the epidermal growth factor receptor family. Two family members, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-erbB2/neu (HER2), homodimerize or heterodimerize upon activation with ligand and trigger potent mechanisms of cellular proliferation, differentiation and migration. In this study, we examined the effect of the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody Erbitux (cetuximab) on human tumor cells expressing both EGFR and HER2. Investigation of the effect of cetuximab on the activation of EGFR-EGFR, EGFR-HER2 and HER2-HER2 homodimers and heterodimers was conducted using the NCI-N87 human gastric carcinoma cell line. Treatment of NCI-N87 cells with cetuximab completely inhibited formation of EGFR-EGFR homodimers and EGFR-HER2 heterodimers. Activation of HER2-HER2 homodimers was not appreciably stimulated by exogenous ligand and was not inhibited by cetuximab treatment. Furthermore, cetuximab inhibited EGF-induced EGFR and HER2 phosphorylation in CAL27, NCI-H226 and NCI-N87 cells. The activation of downstream signaling molecules such as AKT, MAPK and STAT-3 were also inhibited by cetuximab in these cells. To examine the effect of cetuximab on the growth of tumors in vivo, athymic mice bearing established NCI-N87 or CAL27 xenografts were treated with cetuximab (1 mg, i.p., q3d). The growth of NCI-N87 and CAL27 tumors was significantly inhibited with cetuximab therapy compared to the control groups (p<0.0001 in both cases). In the CAL27 xenograft model, tumor growth inhibition by cetuximab treatment was similar to that by cetuximab and trastuzumab combination treatment. Immunohistological analysis of cetuximab-treated tumors showed a decrease in EGFR-HER2 signaling and reduced tumor cell proliferation. These results suggest that cetuximab may be useful in the treatment of carcinomas co-expressing EGFR and HER2. PMID:19082474

  9. Coregulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) Levels and Locations: Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Overexpression Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-03-01

    Elevated expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is know to alter cell signalilng and behavioral responses implicated in tumor progression. However, multiple diverse mechanisms may be involved in these overall effects, including signaling by HER2 itself, modulation of signalilng by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and modification of trafficking dynamics for both EGFR and HER2. Continued....

  10. Structural and Functional Properties of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lennartsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) are members of the type III class of PTK receptors, which are characterized by five Ig-like domains extracellularly and a split kinase domain intracellularly. The receptors are activated by ligand-induced dimerization, leading to autophosphorylation on specific tyrosine residues. Thereby the kinase activities of the receptors are activated and docking sites for downstream SH2 domain signal transduction molecules are created; activation of these pathways promotes cell growth, survival, and migration. These receptors mediate important signals during the embryonal development, and control tissue homeostasis in the adult. Their overactivity is seen in malignancies and other diseases involving excessive cell proliferation, such as atherosclerosis and fibrotic diseases. In cancer, mutations of PDGF and SCF receptors—including gene fusions, point mutations, and amplifications—drive subpopulations of certain malignancies, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, hypereosinophilic syndrome, glioblastoma, acute myeloid leukemia, mastocytosis, and melanoma. PMID:23906712

  11. Coexpression of periostin and EGFR in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and their prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei; Wang, Wei; Ji, Chu-shu; Niu, Jun-yang; Lv, Ya-jing; Zhou, Hang-cheng; Hu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background Both periostin (PN) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can predict the prognosis of several carcinomas alone. However, coexpression of PN and EGFR in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) still remains unknown. We aimed to clarify their relationship with clinicopathological factors and prognostic significance of their coexpression in ESCC. Patients and methods In this single-center retrospective study, immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expression of PN and EGFR in ESCC and paracarcinomatous tissues of 83 patients. The quantitative expression levels of PN and EGFR were examined in two ESCC and tumor-adjacent tissues. The levels of PN and EGFR expression were correlated with clinicopathological parameters by the χ2 or Kruskal–Wallis method. Spearman’s rank correlation test was performed to determine the relationship between PN and EGFR expression levels. Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to detect the prognostic factors of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The high expression of PN protein in ESCC tissues was significantly associated with tumor length (P=0.044), differentiation grade (P=0.003), venous invasion (P=0.010), invasion depth (P=0.007), lymphatic metastasis (P=0.000), and tumor stage (P=0.000). The high expression of EGFR protein in ESCC tissues was only significantly related to lymphatic metastasis (P=0.000), invasion depth (P=0.022), and tumor stage (P=0.000). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that high expression of PN was closely correlated to reduced OS (P=0.000) and DFS (P=0.000), which was consistent with EGFR expression. Cox regression analysis identified PN and EGFR as independent poor prognostic factors of OS and DFS in the ESCC patients (P<0.05). Moreover, the risk of death for the ESCC patients with low expression of two biomarkers and high expression of single biomarker was 0.243 times (P=0.000) and 0.503 times (P=0.030), respectively, than that for

  12. Pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors as emerging players in cancer precision medicine.

    PubMed

    De Mattia, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Roncato, Rossana; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Great research effort has been focused on elucidating the contribution of host genetic variability on pharmacological outcomes in cancer. Nuclear receptors have emerged as mediators between environmental stimuli and drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors have been reported to regulate transcription of genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Altered nuclear receptor expression has been shown to affect the metabolism and pharmacological profile of traditional chemotherapeutics and targeted agents. Accordingly, polymorphic variants in these genes have been studied as pharmacogenetic markers of outcome variability. This review summarizes the state of knowledge about the roles played by pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor expression and genetics as predictive markers of anticancer drug toxicity and efficacy, which can improve cancer precision medicine. PMID:27561454

  13. Results With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Terms of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor, and Human Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Curcio, Lisa D.; Khanijou, Rajesh K.; Eisner, Martin E.; Kakkis, Jane L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Mesa, Albert V.; Macedo, Jorge C.; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To report our results with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in terms of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) status. Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and June 2009, 209 women with early-stage breast carcinomas were treated with APBI using multicatheter, MammoSite, or Contura brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5-7 days. Three patient groups were defined by receptor status: Group 1: ER or PR (+) and HER-2/neu (-) (n = 180), Group 2: ER and PR (-) and HER-2/neu (+) (n = 10), and Group 3: ER, PR, and HER-2/neu (-) (triple negative breast cancer, n = 19). Median follow-up was 22 months. Results: Group 3 patients had significantly higher Scarff-Bloom-Richardson scores (p < 0.001). The 3-year ipsilateral breast tumor control rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 99%, 100%, and 100%, respectively (p = 0.15). Group 3 patients tended to experience relapse in distant sites earlier than did non-Group 3 patients. The 3-year relapse-free survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 81%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 3-year cause-specific and overall survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 89%, respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Triple negative breast cancer patients typically have high-grade tumors with significantly worse relapse-free, cause-specific, and overall survival. Longer follow-up will help to determine whether these patients also have a higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor relapse.

  14. Kinetic Characterization of an Intestinal Trefoil Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Zhang; Lin, Wang; Yong, Sun; Guang-ping, Liang; Dan, Wu; Shang-jun, Lv; Wei, Wu; Xi, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether intestinal epithelial cells have a receptor for intestinal trefoil factor and characterize receptor-ligand binding kinetics. Methods Radioligand binding assays were performed to characterize the binding kinetics between [125I]-labeled ITF and IEC-6, HT-29, Caco2 and HaCaT cells. The Kd, Bmax and other kinetic variables describing the interaction between ITF and its potential receptors were determined. Results Radioligand binding assays performed at 4°C showed that the Kd value for the association between [125I]-ITF and IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells were 1.99±0.12×10−9 M, 3.89±0.42×10−9 M, and 2.04±0.17×10−9 M, respectively. Bmax values were 1.17±0.04×1011, 3.97±0.29×1011, and 2.03±0.08×1011 sites/cell, respectively. The Ki values for the interaction between IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells and non-labeled ITF were 20.98±0.57 nM, 36.87±3.35 nM, and 21.38±0.93 nM, respectively, and the IC50 values were 25.21±0.39 nM, 40.68±0.27 nM, and 23.61±0.25 nM, respectively. Radioligand binding kinetic results showed the association rate constants (k+1) for IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells were 0.22±0.04 min−1, 0.29±0.04 min−1, and 0.26±0.05 min−1, respectively, and the dissociation rate constants (k-1) were 0.06±0.02 min−1, 0.03±0.01 min−1, and 0.04±0.01 min−1, respectively. For the HaCaT cells, the Kd was 4.86±0.28×10−8 M and Bmax was 5.81±0.15×108 sites/cell, the very low specific binding between [125I]-ITF and these cells made it impossible to calculate binding kinetic parameters. Conclusions An ITF-specific receptor appears to be present on the three types of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco-2), and there may be no ITF receptor on epidermal cells. PMID:24086361

  15. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Prostate Cancer Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kharmate, Geetanjali; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Caradec, Josselin; Chin, Mei Yieng; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes proteins and microRNAs have gained much attention as diagnostic tools and biomarker potential in various malignancies including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the role of exosomes and membrane-associated receptors, particularly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as mediators of cell proliferation and invasion in PCa progression remains unexplored. EGFR is frequently overexpressed and has been associated with aggressive forms of PCa. While PCa cells and tissues express EGFR, it is unknown whether exosomes derived from PCa cells or PCa patient serum contains EGFR. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize EGFR in exosomes derived from PCa cells, LNCaP xenograft and PCa patient serum. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media of different PCa cell lines; LNCaP xenograft serum as well as patient plasma/serum by differential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. Exosomes were confirmed by electron microscopy, expression of exosomal markers and NanoSight™ analysis. EGFR expression was determined by western blot analysis and ELISA. This study demonstrates that exosomes may easily be derived from PCa cell lines, serum obtained from PCa xenograft bearing mice and clinical samples derived from PCa patients. Presence of exosomal EGFR in PCa patient exosomes may present a novel approach for measuring of the disease state. Our work will allow to build on this finding for future understanding of PCa exosomes and their potential role in PCa progression and as minimal invasive biomarkers for PCa. PMID:27152724

  17. Role of the fibroblast growth factor receptor axis in cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ang, Celina

    2015-07-01

    Advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly lethal disease with limited therapeutic options beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy. Molecular profiling of CCA has provided insights into the pathogenesis of this disease and identified potential therapeutic targets. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) axis is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis. Aberrations in FGFR activity have been implicated in the development and progression of CCA and other malignancies, which has generated significant interest in exploring FGFR's therapeutic potential. FGFR2 fusion events are present in up to 17% of intrahepatic CCAs and appear to predict sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors even after progression on chemotherapy. These observations have led to a clinical trial evaluating FGFR inhibition in patients with CCA enriched for FGFR alterations. This review summarizes current knowledge about the role of the FGFR pathway in cholangiocarcinogenesis and ongoing work in developing FGFR-directed therapies as an antineoplastic strategy for CCA. PMID:25678238

  18. Biology of FGFRL1, the fifth fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Trueb, Beat

    2011-03-01

    FGFRL1 (fibroblast growth factor receptor like 1) is the most recently discovered member of the FGFR family. It contains three extracellular Ig-like domains similar to the classical FGFRs, but it lacks the protein tyrosine kinase domain and instead contains a short intracellular tail with a peculiar histidine-rich motif. The gene for FGFRL1 is found in all metazoans from sea anemone to mammals. FGFRL1 binds to FGF ligands and heparin with high affinity. It exerts a negative effect on cell proliferation, but a positive effect on cell differentiation. Mice with a targeted deletion of the Fgfrl1 gene die perinatally due to alterations in their diaphragm. These mice also show bilateral kidney agenesis, suggesting an essential role for Fgfrl1 in kidney development. A human patient with a frameshift mutation exhibits craniosynostosis, arguing for an additional role of FGFRL1 during bone formation. FGFRL1 contributes to the complexity of the FGF signaling system. PMID:21080029

  19. Interdependent epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sylwia; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signalling regulates diverse cellular functions, promoting cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell growth and survival. EGFR signalling is critical during embryogenesis, in particular in epithelial development, and disruption of the EGFR gene results in epithelial immaturity and perinatal death. EGFR signalling also functions during wound healing responses through accelerating wound re-epithelialisation, inducing cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. Upregulation of EGFR signalling is often observed in carcinomas and has been shown to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore aberrant EGFR signalling is a common target for anticancer therapies. Various reports indicate that EGFR signalling primarily occurs at the plasma membrane and EGFR degradation following endocytosis greatly attenuates signalling. Other studies argue that EGFR internalisation is essential for complete activation of downstream signalling cascades and that endosomes can serve as signalling platforms. The aim of this review is to discuss current understanding of intersection between EGFR signalling and trafficking. PMID:24681003

  20. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  1. Hepatic Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Attenuates Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Expression.

    PubMed

    Girer, Nathaniel G; Murray, Iain A; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-07-15

    The Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in many physiological processes. Several studies indicate that AHR is also involved in energy homeostasis. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an important regulator of the fasting and feeding responses. When administered to various genetic and diet-induced mouse models of obesity, FGF21 can attenuate obesity-associated morbidities. Here, we explore the role of AHR in hepatic Fgf21 expression through the use of a conditional, hepatocyte-targeted AHR knock-out mouse model (Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx)). Compared with the congenic parental strain (Ahr(Fx/Fx)), non-fasted Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx) mice exhibit a 4-fold increase in hepatic Fgf21 expression, as well as elevated expression of the FGF21-target gene Igfbp1 Furthermore, in vivo agonist activation of AHR reduces hepatic Fgf21 expression during a fast. The Fgf21 promoter contains several putative dioxin response elements (DREs). Using EMSA, we demonstrate that the AHR-ARNT heterodimer binds to a specific DRE that overlaps binding sequences for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), and cAMP response element-binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH). In addition, we reveal that agonist-activated AHR impairs PPARα-, ChREBP-, and CREBH-mediated promoter activity in Hepa-1 cells. Accordingly, agonist treatment in Hepa-1 cells ablates potent ER stress-driven Fgf21 expression, and pre-treatment with AHR antagonist blocks this effect. Finally, we show that pre-treatment of primary human hepatocytes with AHR agonist diminishes PPARα-, glucose-, and ER stress-driven induction of FGF21 expression, indicating the effect is not mouse-specific. Together, our data show that AHR contributes to hepatic energy homeostasis, partly through the regulation of FGF21 expression and signaling. PMID:27226639

  2. Neurotrophic factors and their receptors in human sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors may play key roles in pathophysiological mechanisms of human neuropathies. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is trophic to small-diameter sensory fibers and regulates nociception. This review focuses on sensory dysfunction and the potential of neurotrophic treatments. Genetic neuropathy. Mutations of the NGF high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase A (Trk A) have been found in congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis; these are likely to be partial loss-of-function mutations, as axon-reflex vasodilatation and sweating can be elicited albeit reduced, suggesting rhNGF could restore nociception in some patients. Leprous neuropathy. Decreased NGF in leprosy skin may explain cutaneous hypoalgesia even with inflammation and rhNGF may restore sensation, as spared nerve fibers show Trk A-staining. Diabetic neuropathy. NGF is depleted in early human diabetic neuropathy skin, in correlation with dysfunction of nociceptor fibers. We proposed rhNGF prophylaxis may prevent diabetic foot ulceration. Clinical trials have been disappointed, probably related to difficulty delivering adequate doses and need for multiple trophic factors. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are both produced by basal keratinocytes and neurotrophin (NT-3) by suprabasal keratinocytes: relative mRNA expression was significantly lower in early diabetic neuropathy skin compared to controls, for NGF (P < 0.02), BDNF (P < 0.05), NT-3 (P < 0.05), GDNF (< 0.02), but not NT4/5, Trk A or p75 neurotrophin receptor (all P > 0.05). Posttranslational modifications of mature and pro-NGF may also affect bioactivity and immunoreactivity. A 53 kD band that could correspond to a prepro-NGF-like molecule was reduced in diabetic skin. Traumatic neuropathy and pain. While NGF levels are acutely reduced in injured nerve trunks, neuropathic patients with chronic skin hyperalgesia and allodynia show marked local increases of NGF levels; here anti-NGF agents may provide analgesia

  3. Motif discovery in promoters of genes co-localized and co-expressed during myeloid cells differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Coppe, Alessandro; Ferrari, Francesco; Bisognin, Andrea; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Ferrari, Sergio; Bicciato, Silvio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Genes co-expressed may be under similar promoter-based and/or position-based regulation. Although data on expression, position and function of human genes are available, their true integration still represents a challenge for computational biology, hampering the identification of regulatory mechanisms. We carried out an integrative analysis of genomic position, functional annotation and promoters of genes expressed in myeloid cells. Promoter analysis was conducted by a novel multi-step method for discovering putative regulatory elements, i.e. over-represented motifs, in a selected set of promoters, as compared with a background model. The combination of transcriptional, structural and functional data allowed the identification of sets of promoters pertaining to groups of genes co-expressed and co-localized in regions of the human genome. The application of motif discovery to 26 groups of genes co-expressed in myeloid cells differentiation and co-localized in the genome showed that there are more over-represented motifs in promoters of co-expressed and co-localized genes than in promoters of simply co-expressed genes (CEG). Motifs, which are similar to the binding sequences of known transcription factors, non-uniformly distributed along promoter sequences and/or occurring in highly co-expressed subset of genes were identified. Co-expressed and co-localized gene sets were grouped in two co-expressed genomic meta-regions, putatively representing functional domains of a high-level expression regulation. PMID:19059999

  4. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB-mediated phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Coats, S R; Love, H D; Pledger, W J

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates the proliferation of Balb/c-3T3 fibroblasts through binding and subsequent activation of PDGF receptors. Activation of the PDGF receptors has been proposed to involve receptor dimerization. PDGF-AB has been shown to bind PDGF alpha and beta receptor subunits to form PDGF alpha beta and alpha alpha receptor dimers. In this paper we demonstrate that, following the down-regulation of PDGF alpha receptors, the binding of PDGF-AB to beta receptors occurred at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. PDGF-AB stimulated the phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptor monomers in cells depleted of PDGF alpha receptors by prior exposure to PDGF-AA. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8297345

  5. Spectral tuning by opsin coexpression in retinal regions that view different parts of the visual field

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Brian E.; Loew, Ellis R.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Carleton, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Vision frequently mediates critical behaviours, and photoreceptors must respond to the light available to accomplish these tasks. Most photoreceptors are thought to contain a single visual pigment, an opsin protein bound to a chromophore, which together determine spectral sensitivity. Mechanisms of spectral tuning include altering the opsin, changing the chromophore and incorporating pre-receptor filtering. A few exceptions to the use of a single visual pigment have been documented in which a single mature photoreceptor coexpresses opsins that form spectrally distinct visual pigments, and in these exceptions the functional significance of coexpression is unclear. Here we document for the first time photoreceptors coexpressing spectrally distinct opsin genes in a manner that tunes sensitivity to the light environment. Photoreceptors of the cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra, mix different pairs of opsins in retinal regions that view distinct backgrounds. The mixing of visual pigments increases absorbance of the corresponding background, potentially aiding the detection of dark objects. Thus, opsin coexpression may be a novel mechanism of spectral tuning that could be useful for detecting prey, predators and mates. However, our calculations show that coexpression of some opsins can hinder colour discrimination, creating a trade-off between visual functions. PMID:25377457

  6. Spectral tuning by opsin coexpression in retinal regions that view different parts of the visual field.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian E; Loew, Ellis R; Cronin, Thomas W; Carleton, Karen L

    2014-12-22

    Vision frequently mediates critical behaviours, and photoreceptors must respond to the light available to accomplish these tasks. Most photoreceptors are thought to contain a single visual pigment, an opsin protein bound to a chromophore, which together determine spectral sensitivity. Mechanisms of spectral tuning include altering the opsin, changing the chromophore and incorporating pre-receptor filtering. A few exceptions to the use of a single visual pigment have been documented in which a single mature photoreceptor coexpresses opsins that form spectrally distinct visual pigments, and in these exceptions the functional significance of coexpression is unclear. Here we document for the first time photoreceptors coexpressing spectrally distinct opsin genes in a manner that tunes sensitivity to the light environment. Photoreceptors of the cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra, mix different pairs of opsins in retinal regions that view distinct backgrounds. The mixing of visual pigments increases absorbance of the corresponding background, potentially aiding the detection of dark objects. Thus, opsin coexpression may be a novel mechanism of spectral tuning that could be useful for detecting prey, predators and mates. However, our calculations show that coexpression of some opsins can hinder colour discrimination, creating a trade-off between visual functions. PMID:25377457

  7. Involvement of Toll-like receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in epithelial expression of airway remodeling factors.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tetsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E; Suh, Lydia A; Carter, Roderick G; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti-TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti-TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α-dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  8. Involvement of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Epithelial Expression of Airway Remodeling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick G.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti–TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2–dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti–TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α–dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  9. The Shc-related adaptor protein, Sck, forms a complex with the vascular-endothelial-growth-factor receptor KDR in transfected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, A J; Lopez-Dee, J; Knight, E L; Feramisco, J R; Prigent, S A

    2000-01-01

    Despite much progress in recent years, the precise signalling events triggered by the vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (VEGF) receptors, fms-like tyrosine kinase (Flt1) and kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR), are incompletely defined. Results obtained when Flt1 and KDR are individually expressed in fibroblasts or porcine aortic endothelial cells have not been entirely consistent with those observed in other endothelial cells expressing both receptors endogenously. It has also been difficult to demonstrate VEGF-induced phosphorylation of Flt1, which has led to speculation that KDR may be the more important receptor for the mitogenic action of VEGF on endothelial cells. In an attempt to identify physiologically important effectors which bind to KDR, we have screened a yeast two-hybrid mouse embryo library with the cytoplasmic domain of KDR. Here we describe the identification of the adaptor protein, Shc-like protein (Sck), as a binding partner for KDR. We demonstrate that this interaction requires phosphorylation of KDR, and identify the binding site for the Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain as tyrosine-1175 of KDR. We have also shown that the SH2 domain of Sck, but not that of Src-homology collagen protein (Shc), can precipitate phosphorylated KDR from VEGF-stimulated porcine aortic endothelial cells expressing KDR, and that an N-terminally truncated Sck protein can associate with KDR, in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion, when co-expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the two-hybrid assay, both Shc and Sck SH2 domains can associate with the related receptor Flt1. PMID:10749680

  10. Targeting the opioid growth factor: opioid growth factor receptor axis for treatment of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Donahue, Renee; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2013-05-01

    The opioid growth factor (OGF) - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) axis is a biological pathway that is present in human ovarian cancer cells and tissues. OGF, chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is an endogenous opioid peptide that interfaces with OGFr to delay cells moving through the cell cycle by upregulation of cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinase pathways. OGF inhibitory activity is dose dependent, receptor mediated, reversible, protein and RNA dependent, but not related to apoptosis or necrosis. The OGF-OGFr axis can be targeted for treatment of human ovarian cancer by (i) administration of exogenous OGF, (ii) genetic manipulation to over-express OGFr and (iii) use of low dosages of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, which stimulates production of OGF and OGFr for subsequent interaction following blockade of the receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis may be a feasible target for treatment of cancer of the ovary (i) in a prophylactic fashion, (ii) following cytoreduction or (iii) in conjunction with standard chemotherapy for additive effectiveness. In summary, preclinical data support the transition of these novel therapies for treatment of human ovarian cancer from the bench to bedside to provide additional targets for treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:23856908

  11. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  12. Functional co-operation between the subunits in heterodimeric platelet-derived growth factor receptor complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Emaduddin, M; Ekman, S; Rönnstrand, L; Heldin, C H

    1999-01-01

    To determine the importance of the phosphorylation capacity of receptor kinase as well as the ability to serve as docking sites for SH2-domain-containing signal transduction molecules, we established pig aortic endothelial cell lines stably expressing kinase-active platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) alpha-receptors together with kinase-inactive beta-receptors, and vice versa. After stimulation with PDGF-AB, heterodimeric receptor complexes were formed in which the kinase-inactive receptor was phosphorylated by the kinase-active receptor, although less efficiently than in heterodimers of wild-type receptors. The kinase-active receptor was only minimally phosphorylated. Thus the phosphorylation within the receptor dimer occurred in trans between the components. Analyses of the abilities of heterodimeric receptor complexes of one kinase-active and one kinase-inactive receptor to mediate mitogenicity, chemotaxis and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase revealed less efficient effects than those of heterodimers of wild-type receptors. Importantly, however, the fact that signalling capacities were retained illustrates a functional co-operation between the two receptor molecules in the dimer, where one receptor provides a functional kinase and the other acts as a substrate and provides docking sites for downstream signalling molecules. PMID:10417313

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7) inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saghir; Yousif, Mariam HM; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Al-Farsi, Omama; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor appears to be an important central transduction mechanism in mediating diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] via its Mas receptor can prevent the development of hyperglycaemia-induced cardiovascular complications. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1-7) can inhibit hyperglycaemia-induced EGF receptor transactivation and its classical signalling via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1-7) or AG1478, a selective EGF receptor inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). KEY RESULTS Diabetes significantly enhanced phosphorylation of EGF receptor at tyrosine residues Y992, Y1068, Y1086, Y1148, as well as ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in the mesenteric vasculature bed whereas these changes were significantly attenuated upon Ang-(1–7) or AG1478 treatment. In VSMCs grown in conditions of high glucose (25 mM), an Src-dependent elevation in EGF receptor phosphorylation was observed. Ang-(1-7) inhibited both Ang II- and glucose-induced transactivation of EGF receptor. The inhibition of high glucose-mediated Src-dependant transactivation of EGF receptor by Ang-(1-7) could be prevented by a selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results show for the first time that Ang-(1-7) inhibits EGF receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor/Src-dependent pathway and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. PMID:21806601

  14. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a cellular binding site for amphoterin. Mediation of neurite outgrowth and co-expression of rage and amphoterin in the developing nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hori, O; Brett, J; Slattery, T; Cao, R; Zhang, J; Chen, J X; Nagashima, M; Lundh, E R; Vijay, S; Nitecki, D

    1995-10-27

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a newly-identified member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, mediates interactions of advanced glycation end product (AGE)-modified proteins with endothelium and other cell types. Survey of normal tissues demonstrated RAGE expression in situations in which accumulation of AGEs would be unexpected, leading to the hypothesis that under physiologic circumstances, RAGE might mediate interaction with ligands distinct from AGEs. Sequential chromatography of bovine lung extract identified polypeptides with M(r) values of approximately 12,000 (p12) and approximately 23,000 (p23) which bound RAGE. NH2-terminal and internal protein sequence data for p23 matched that reported previously for amphoterin. Amphoterin purified from rat brain or recombinant rat amphoterin bound to purified sRAGE in a saturable and dose-dependent manner, blocked by anti-RAGE IgG or a soluble form of RAGE (sRAGE). Cultured embryonic rat neurons, which express RAGE, displayed dose-dependent binding of 125I-amphoterin which was prevented by blockade of RAGE using antibody to the receptor or excess soluble receptor (sRAGE). A functional correlate of RAGE-amphoterin interaction was inhibition by anti-RAGE F(ab')2 and sRAGE of neurite formation by cortical neurons specifically on amphoterin-coated substrates. Consistent with a potential role for RAGE-amphoterin interaction in development, amphoterin and RAGE mRNA/antigen were co-localized in developing rat brain. These data indicate that RAGE has physiologically relevant ligands distinct from AGEs which are likely, via their interaction with the receptor, to participate in physiologic processes outside of the context of diabetes and accumulation of AGEs. PMID:7592757

  15. A sauvagine/corticotropin-releasing factor receptor expressed in heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, T; Pearse, R V; Lin, C R; Rosenfeld, M G

    1995-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mediates many critical aspects of the physiological response to stress. These effects are elicited by binding to specific high-affinity receptors, which are coupled to guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor (Gs)-response pathways. Recently, a gene encoding a receptor for CRF, expressed in pituitary and the central nervous system (PC-CRF receptor), was isolated and characterized. Here we report the identification and characterization of a second, distinct CRF receptor that is expressed primarily in heart and skeletal muscle and exhibits a specific ligand preference and antagonist sensitivity compared with the PC-CRF receptor. We refer to this second receptor as the heart/muscle (HM)-CRF receptor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7755719

  16. Molecular Docking and Interactions of Pueraria Tuberosa with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Asthana, S; Agarwal, T; Singothu, S; Samal, A; Banerjee, I; Pal, K; Pramanik, K; Ray, S S

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa is known for its therapeutic potentials in cardiovascular disorders, but its effect in angiogenesis has not been studied so far. In this study, a computational approach has been applied to elucidate the role of the phytochemicals in inhibition of angiogenesis through modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, major factors responsible for angiogenesis. Metabolite structures retrieved from PubChem and KNApSAcK - 3D databases, were docked using AutoDock4.2 tool. Hydrogen bond and molecular docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and toxicity predictions were carried out using UCSF Chimera, LigPlot(+) and PreADMET server, respectively. From the docking analysis, it was observed that puerarone and tuberostan had significant binding affinity for the intracellular kinase domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 respectively. It is important to mention that both the phytochemicals shared similar interaction profile as that of standard inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Also, both puerarone and tuberostan interacted with Lys861/Lys868 (adenosine 5'-triphosphate binding site of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-2), thus providing a clue that they may enforce their inhibitory effect by blocking the adenosine 5'-triphosphate binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Moreover, these molecules exhibited good drug-likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties without any carcinogenic and toxic effects. The interaction pattern of the puerarone and tuberostan may provide a hint for a novel drug design for vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors with better specificity to treat angiogenic disorders. PMID:26664060

  17. Molecular Docking and Interactions of Pueraria Tuberosa with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, S.; Agarwal, T.; Singothu, S.; Samal, A.; Banerjee, I.; Pal, K.; Pramanik, K.; Ray, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa is known for its therapeutic potentials in cardiovascular disorders, but its effect in angiogenesis has not been studied so far. In this study, a computational approach has been applied to elucidate the role of the phytochemicals in inhibition of angiogenesis through modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, major factors responsible for angiogenesis. Metabolite structures retrieved from PubChem and KNApSAcK – 3D databases, were docked using AutoDock4.2 tool. Hydrogen bond and molecular docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and toxicity predictions were carried out using UCSF Chimera, LigPlot+ and PreADMET server, respectively. From the docking analysis, it was observed that puerarone and tuberostan had significant binding affinity for the intracellular kinase domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 respectively. It is important to mention that both the phytochemicals shared similar interaction profile as that of standard inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Also, both puerarone and tuberostan interacted with Lys861/Lys868 (adenosine 5’-triphosphate binding site of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-2), thus providing a clue that they may enforce their inhibitory effect by blocking the adenosine 5’-triphosphate binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Moreover, these molecules exhibited good drug-likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties without any carcinogenic and toxic effects. The interaction pattern of the puerarone and tuberostan may provide a hint for a novel drug design for vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors with better specificity to treat angiogenic disorders. PMID:26664060

  18. Engineered ubiquitin ligase PTB-U-box targets insulin/insulin-like growth factor receptor for degradation and coordinately inhibits cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Daixing; Zhang, Jing; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is a promising target for cancer therapy with antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) which have been actively tested clinically. Evidences have demonstrated that insulin receptor (IR), which is implicated in tumorigenesis, conveys resistance to IGF-1R targeted therapy. This provided the compelling rationale for co-targeting IGF-1R and IR. Herein we have developed an approach to simultaneously down-regulate IGF-1R and IR in protein levels. By generating and screening several engineered ubiquitin ligases, we have identified that, PTB-U-box, which is composed of an IGF-1R/IR-binding domain and a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, binds activated IGF-1R/IR and targets their ubiquitination and degradation. When ectopically expressed in HepG2 and HeLa cells, PTB-U-box inhibits cell proliferation and invasion, increases chemo-sensitivity, as well as interrupts glucose metabolism. Finally, intratumoral injection of adenovirus carrying PTB-U-box dramatically retards the growth of HepG2 xenograft. Therefore, well-designed engineered ubiquitin ligase represents an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of the cancers with co-expressed IGF-1R/IR. PMID:24970814

  19. Mice with conditional inactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 signaling in oligodendrocytes have normal myelin but display dramatic hyperactivity when combined with Cnp1 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Y; Shoemaker, W J; Furusho, M; Bryant, M; Rosenbluth, J; Pfeiffer, S E; Oh, L; Rasband, M; Lappe-Siefke, C; Yu, K; Ornitz, D M; Nave, K-A; Bansal, R

    2006-11-22

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfr) comprise a widely expressed family of developmental regulators implicated in oligodendrocyte (OL) maturation of the CNS. Fgfr2 is expressed by OLs in myelinated fiber tracks. In vitro, Fgfr2 is highly upregulated during OL terminal differentiation, and its activation leads to enhanced growth of OL processes and the formation of myelin-like membranes. To investigate the in vivo function of Fgfr2 signaling by myelinating glial cells, we inactivated the floxed Fgfr2 gene in mice that coexpress Cre recombinase (cre) as a knock-in gene into the OL-specific 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (Cnp1) locus. Surprisingly, no obvious defects were detected in brain development of these conditional mutants, including the number of OLs, the onset and extent of myelination, the ultrastructure of myelin, and the expression level of myelin proteins. However, unexpectedly, a subset of these conditional Fgfr2 knock-out mice that are homozygous for cre and therefore are also Cnp1 null, displayed a dramatic hyperactive behavior starting at approximately 2 weeks of age. This hyperactivity was abolished by treatment with dopamine receptor antagonists or catecholamine biosynthesis inhibitors, suggesting that the symptoms involve a dysregulation of the dopaminergic system. Although the molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, this novel mouse model of hyperactivity demonstrates the potential involvement of OLs in neuropsychiatric disorders, as well as the nonpredictable role of genetic interactions in the behavioral phenotype of mice. PMID:17122059

  20. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors induce calcium mobilization through cross-talk with Gq-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2010-09-10

    The cross-talk between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and muscarinic receptors was investigated by measuring evoked transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration. HEK293 cells stably expressing human CRF type 1 (hCRF(1)) and type 2(a) (hCRF(2(a))) receptors were stimulated with the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol and shortly after by a CRF agonist. Unexpectedly, this second response was enhanced when compared to stimulating naive cells either with carbachol or CRF agonist only. Priming with 100 microM carbachol increased the maximal CRF agonist response and shifted its concentration-response curve to the left to attain almost the same potency as for stimulating the production of the natural second messenger cyclic AMP. Yet, priming did not affect CRF agonist-stimulated cyclic AMP production itself. Carbachol priming was not restricted to recombinant CRF receptors only since endogenously expressed beta(2)-adrenoceptors also started to produce a robust calcium signal. Without priming no such signal was observed. Similar findings were made in the human retinoblastoma cell line Y79 for endogenously expressed CRF(1) receptors and the type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptors but not for the CRF(2(a)) receptors. This differentiation between CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors was further supported by use of selective agonists and antagonists. The results suggest that stimulating a Gq-coupled receptor shortly before stimulating a Gs-coupled receptor may result in a parallel signaling event on top of the classical cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:20594969

  1. Agonist-independent desensitization and internalization of the human platelet-activating factor receptor by coumermycin-gyrase B-induced dimerization.

    PubMed

    Perron, Amelie; Chen, Zhang-Guo; Gingras, Denis; Dupre, Denis J; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2003-07-25

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid with potent and diverse physiological actions, particularly as a mediator of inflammation. We have reported previously that mutant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) affect the functional properties of coexpressed wild-type human PAF receptor (hPAFR) (Le Gouill, C., Parent, J. L., Caron, C. A., Gaudreau, R., Volkov, L., Rola-Pleszczynski, M., and Stankova, J. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 12548-12554). Increasing evidence suggests that dimerization of GPCRs may play an important role in the regulation of their biological activity. Additional data have also suggested that dimerization may be important in the subsequent internalization of the delta-opioid receptor. To investigate the specific role of dimerization in the internalization process of GPCRs, we generated a fusion protein of hPAFR and bacterial DNA gyrase B (GyrB), dimerized through the addition of coumermycin. We found that dimerization potentiates PAF-induced internalization of hPAFR-GyrB in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing c-Myc-hPAFR-GyrB. Coumermycin-driven dimerization was also sufficient to induce an agonist-independent sequestration process in an arrestin- and clathrin-independent manner. Moreover, the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine and GF109203X blocked the coumermycin-induced desensitization of hPAFR-GyrB, suggesting the implication of protein kinase C in the molecular mechanism mediating the agonist-independent desensitization of the receptor. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel mechanism of GPCR desensitization and internalization triggered by dimerization. PMID:12756251

  2. Expression of the fructose receptor BmGr9 and its involvement in the promotion of feeding, suggested by its co-expression with neuropeptide F1 in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Mang, Dingze; Shu, Min; Tanaka, Shiho; Nagata, Shinji; Takada, Tomoyuki; Endo, Haruka; Kikuta, Shingo; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Iwabuchi, Kikuo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-08-01

    Insect gustatory receptors (Grs) are members of a large family of proteins with seven transmembrane domains that provide insects with the ability to detect chemical signals critical for feeding, mating, and oviposition. To date, 69 Bombyx mori Grs (BmGrs) genes have been identified via genome studies. BmGr9 has been shown to respond specifically to fructose and to function as a ligand-gated ion channel selectively activated by fructose. However, the sites where this Gr are expressed remain unclear. We demonstrated using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR that BmGr9 is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), as well as oral sensory organs. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-BmGr9 antiserum to show that BmGr9 is expressed in cells of the oral sensory organs, including the maxillary galea, maxillary palps, labrum, and labium, as well as in putative neurosecretory cells of the CNS. Furthermore, double immunohistochemical analysis showed that most BmGr9-expressing cells co-localized with putative neuropeptide F1-expressing cells in the brain, suggesting that BmGr9 is involved in the promotion of feeding behaviors. In addition, a portion of BmGr9-expressing cells in the brain co-localized with cells expressing BmGr6, a molecule of the sugar receptor clade, suggesting that sugars other than fructose are involved in the regulation of feeding behaviors in B. mori larvae. PMID:27288056

  3. Human corpus luteum: presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and binding characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.R.; Khan-Dawood, F.S.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors are present in many reproductive tissues but have not been demonstrated in the human corpus luteum. To determine the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and its binding characteristics, we carried out studies on the plasma cell membrane fraction of seven human corpora lutea (days 16 to 25) of the menstrual cycle. Specific epidermal growth factor receptors were present in human corpus luteum. Insulin, nerve growth factor, and human chorionic gonadotropin did not competitively displace epidermal growth factor binding. The optimal conditions for corpus luteum-epidermal growth factor receptor binding were found to be incubation for 2 hours at 4 degrees C with 500 micrograms plasma membrane protein and 140 femtomol /sup 125/I-epidermal growth factor per incubate. The number (mean +/- SEM) of epidermal growth factor binding sites was 12.34 +/- 2.99 X 10(-19) mol/micrograms protein; the dissociation constant was 2.26 +/- 0.56 X 10(-9) mol/L; the association constant was 0.59 +/- 0.12 X 10(9) L/mol. In two regressing corpora lutea obtained on days 2 and 3 of the menstrual cycle, there was no detectable specific epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity. Similarly no epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity could be detected in ovarian stromal tissue. Our findings demonstrate that specific receptors for epidermal growth factor are present in the human corpus luteum. The physiologic significance of epidermal growth factor receptors in human corpus luteum is unknown, but epidermal growth factor may be involved in intragonadal regulation of luteal function.

  4. Adverse Reaction to Cetuximab, an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Štulhofer Buzina, Daška; Martinac, Ivana; Ledić Drvar, Daniela; Čeović, Romana; Bilić, Ivan; Marinović, Branka

    2016-04-01

    Dear Editor, Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a new strategy in treatment of a variety of solid tumors, such as colorectal carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and pancreatic cancer (1). Cetuximab is a chimeric human-murine monoclonal antibody against EGFR. Cutaneous side effects are the most common adverse reactions occurring during epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRI) therapy. Papulopustular rash (acne like rash) develop with 80-86% patients receiving cetuximab, while xerosis, eczema, fissures, teleangiectasiae, hyperpigmentations, and nail and hair changes occur less frequently (2). The mechanism underlying these skin changes has not been established and understood. It seems EGFRI alter cell growth and differentiation, leading to impaired stratum corneum and cell apoptosis (3-5). An abdominoperineal resection of the rectal adenocarcinoma (Dukes C) was performed on a 43-year-old female patient. Following surgery, adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy was applied. After two years, the patient suffered a metastatic relapse. Abdominal lymphadenopathy was detected on multi-slice computer tomography (MSCT) images, with an increased value of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tumor marker (maximal value 57 ng/mL). Hematological and biochemical tests were within normal limits, so first-line chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and a 5-fluorouracil (FOLFOX4) protocol was introduced. A wild type of the KRAS gene was confirmed in tumor tissue (diagnostic prerequisite for the introduction of EGFRI) and cetuximab (250 mg per m2 of body surface) was added to the treatment protocol. The patient responded well to the treatment with confirmed partial regression of the tumor formations. Three months after the patient started using cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, the patient presented with a papulopustular eruption in the seborrhoeic areas (Figure 1) and eczematoid reactions on the extremities

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in metastatic anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jane E; Ohinata, Aki; Silva, Ninoska N; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Eng, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) anal cancer is relatively rare. With limited data, cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil has traditionally been utilized in the first-line setting. Treatment beyond front-line cisplatin progression is not well defined. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly overexpressed in SCCA anal cancer and EGFR inhibition may represent a potential treatment target for this population in need. Our case series evaluated metastatic SCCA anal cancer patients who received an EGFR monoclonal antibody as second-line or third-line therapy. Data collected consisted of demographics, previous treatment, metastatic disease sites, localized therapy received, regimen received, first radiographic result, progression-free survival, and overall survival. A total of 17 patients were included, with most (76%) patients receiving an EGFR monoclonal antibody in the second-line setting. Common regimens identified combined cetuximab or panitumumab with a fluoropyrimidine plus platinum (35%), carboplatin plus paclitaxel (29%), or cisplatin plus vinorelbine (18%). Thirty-five percent of patients achieved a response and 24% had stable disease. The overall median progression-free survival and overall survival were 7.3 and 24.7 months, respectively. Compared with our large retrospective study in the front-line metastatic anal cancer setting, our study suggests that anti-EGFR therapy in combination with certain chemotherapy derived additional benefit in the refractory setting. In the metastatic setting, there is a need to discover effective therapies. We present a diverse metastatic SCCA anal cancer patient population who received cetuximab or panitumumab with chemotherapy in the second-line or third-line setting. Our case series strengthens the concept of EGFR inhibition in metastatic SCCA anal cancer. PMID:27272412

  6. A third distinct tumor necrosis factor receptor of orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Loparev, V N; Parsons, J M; Knight, J C; Panus, J F; Ray, C A; Buller, R M; Pickup, D J; Esposito, J J

    1998-03-31

    Cowpox virus Brighton red strain (CPV) contains a gene, crmD, which encodes a 320-aa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) of 44% and 22% identity, respectively, to the CPV TNFR-like proteins, cytokine response modifiers (crm) CrmB and CrmC. The crmD gene was interrupted in three other cowpox strains examined and absent in various other orthopoxviruses; however, four strains of ectromelia virus (ECT) examined contained an intact crmD (97% identity to CPV crmD) and lacked cognates of crmB and crmC. The protein, CrmD, contains a transport signal; a 151-aa cysteine-rich region with 21 cysteines that align with human TNFRII ligand-binding region cysteines; and C-terminal region sequences that are highly diverged from cellular TNFR C-terminal region sequences involved in signal transduction. Bacterial maltose-binding proteins containing the CPV or ECT CrmD cysteine-rich region bound TNF and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTalpha) and blocked their in vitro cytolytic activity. Secreted viral CrmD bound TNF and LTalpha and was detectable after the early stage of replication, using nonreducing conditions, as 60- to 70-kDa predominant and 90- to 250-kDa minor disulfide-linked complexes that were able to be reduced to a 46-kDa form and deglycosylated to a 38-kDa protein. Cells infected with CPV produced extremely low amounts of CrmD compared with ECT. Possessing up to three TNFRs, including CrmD, which is secreted as disulfide-linked complexes in varied amounts by CPV and ECT, likely enhances the dynamics of the immune modulating mechanisms of orthopoxviruses. PMID:9520445

  7. Assessment of epidermal growth factor receptor status in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui-Jun; Ogawa, Mikako; Magata, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Masahiko; Ohmomo, Yoshiro; Namba, Hiroki; Sakahara, Harumi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Our previous study showed that a newly designed tracer radioiodinated 6-(3-morpholinopropoxy)-7-ethoxy-4-(3’-iodophenoxy)quinazoline ([125I]PYK) is promising for the evaluation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) status and prediction of gefitinib treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. EGFR is over-expressed and mutated also in glioblastoma. In the present study, the expressions and mutation of EGFR were tested with [125I] PYK in glioblastoma in vitro and in vivo to determine whether this could be used to predict the sensitivity of glioblastoma to gefitinib treatment. Methods: Glioblastoma cell lines with different expression of EGFR were tested. Growth inhibition of cell lines by gefitinib was assessed by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. Uptake levels of [125I]PYK were evaluated in cell lines in vitro. Tumor targeting of [125I]PYK was examined by a biodistribution study and imaging by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Results: High concentrations of gefitinib were needed to suppress EGFR-mediated proliferation. The uptake of [125I] PYK in cell lines in vitro was low, and showed no correlation with EGFR expression or mutation status. Biodistribution study and SPECT imaging with [125I]PYK for xenografts showed no [125I]PYK uptake. Conclusion: The results showed prediction of gefitinib effectiveness was difficult in glioblastoma by [125I]PYK, which might be due to the complicated expression of EGFR status in glioblastoma. Thus, new tracers for sites downstream of the mutant EGFR should be investigated in further studies.

  8. DEPENDENCE OF PPAR LIGAND-INDUCED MAPK SIGNALING ON EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TRANSACTIVATION HEPARIN-BINDING EGF CLEAVAGE MEDIATES ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that function as ligand-activated transcription factors regulating lipid metabolism and homeostasis. In addition to their ability to regulate PPAR-mediated gene transcription, PPARalpha and gamma li...

  9. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  10. Cloning of a factor required for activity of the Ah (dioxin) receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.C.; Reyes, H.; Chu, Fongfong; Sander, F.; Conley, L.H.; Brooks, B.A.; Hankinson, O. )

    1991-05-17

    The aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor binds various environmental pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines, and polychlorinated aromatic compounds (dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls), and mediates the carcinogenic effects of these agents. The complementary DNA and part of the gene for an 87-kilodalton human protein that is necessary for Ah receptor function have been cloned. The protein is not the ligand-binding subunit of the receptor but is a factor that is required for the ligand-binding subunit to translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus after binding ligand. The requirement for this factor distinguishes the Ah receptor from the glucocorticoid receptor, to which the Ah receptor has been presumed to be similar. Two portions of the 87-kilodalton protein share sequence similarities with two Drosophila proteins, Per and Sim. Another segment of the protein shows conformity to the consensus sequence for the basic helix-loop-helix motif found in proteins that bind DNA as homodimers or heterodimers.

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in Brazilian lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Carlos E.; Ciol, Heloísa; Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Benine, Lucimara C.; Silva, Luciana H.; Ojopi, Elida B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer and has recently emerged as an important target for molecular therapeutics. The KRAS oncogene also plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a population of Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: A total of 207 specimens from Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer were analyzed for activating epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS somatic mutations, and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics (including age, gender, ethnicity, smoking habits, and histological subtype) were examined. RESULTS: We identified 63 cases (30.4%) with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and 30 cases (14.6%) with KRAS mutations. The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor mutation we detected was a deletion in exon 19 (60.3%, 38 patients), followed by an L858R amino acid substitution in exon 21 (27%, 17 patients). The most common types of KRAS mutations were found in codon 12. There were no significant differences in epidermal growth factor receptor or KRAS mutations by gender or primary versus metastatic lung cancer. There was a higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in the non-Asian patients. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were more prevalent in adenocarcinomas than in non-adenocarcinoma histological types. Being a non-smoker was significantly associated with the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations, but the prevalence of KRAS mutations was significantly associated with smoking. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to examine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a Brazilian population sample with non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:22666783

  12. Lipo-chitooligosaccharidic nodulation factors and their perception by plant receptors.

    PubMed

    Fliegmann, Judith; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2015-10-01

    Lipo-chitooligosaccharides produced by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are signaling molecules involved in the establishment of an important agronomical and ecological symbiosis with plants. These compounds, known as Nod factors, are biologically active on plant roots at very low concentrations indicating that they are perceived by specific receptors. This article summarizes the main strategies developed for the syntheses of bioactive Nod factors and their derivatives in order to better understand their mode of perception. Different Nod factor receptors and LCO-binding proteins identified by genetic or biochemical approaches are also presented, indicating perception mechanisms that seem to be more complicated than expected, probably involving multi-component receptor complexes. PMID:26233756

  13. Genes Frequently Coexpressed with Hoxc8 Provide Insight into the Discovery of Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Ruthala; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Min, Hyehyun; Yoon, Heejei; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2016-05-31

    Identifying Hoxc8 target genes is at the crux of understanding the Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks underlying its roles during development. However, identification of these genes remains difficult due to intrinsic factors of Hoxc8, such as low DNA binding specificity, context-dependent regulation, and unknown cofactors. Therefore, as an alternative, the present study attempted to test whether the roles of Hoxc8 could be inferred by simply analyzing genes frequently coexpressed with Hoxc8, and whether these genes include putative target genes. Using archived gene expression datasets in which Hoxc8 was differentially expressed, we identified a total of 567 genes that were positively coexpressed with Hoxc8 in at least four out of eight datasets. Among these, 23 genes were coexpressed in six datasets. Gene sets associated with extracellular matrix and cell adhesion were most significantly enriched, followed by gene sets for skeletal system development, morphogenesis, cell motility, and transcriptional regulation. In particular, transcriptional regulators, including paralogs of Hoxc8, known Hox co-factors, and transcriptional remodeling factors were enriched. We randomly selected Adam19, Ptpn13, Prkd1, Tgfbi, and Aldh1a3, and validated their coexpression in mouse embryonic tissues and cell lines following TGF-β2 treatment or ectopic Hoxc8 expression. Except for Aldh1a3, all genes showed concordant expression with that of Hoxc8, suggesting that the coexpressed genes might include direct or indirect target genes. Collectively, we suggest that the coexpressed genes provide a resource for constructing Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks. PMID:27025388

  14. Genes Frequently Coexpressed with Hoxc8 Provide Insight into the Discovery of Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Ruthala; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Min, Hyehyun; Yoon, Heejei; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Identifying Hoxc8 target genes is at the crux of understanding the Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks underlying its roles during development. However, identification of these genes remains difficult due to intrinsic factors of Hoxc8, such as low DNA binding specificity, context-dependent regulation, and unknown cofactors. Therefore, as an alternative, the present study attempted to test whether the roles of Hoxc8 could be inferred by simply analyzing genes frequently coexpressed with Hoxc8, and whether these genes include putative target genes. Using archived gene expression datasets in which Hoxc8 was differentially expressed, we identified a total of 567 genes that were positively coexpressed with Hoxc8 in at least four out of eight datasets. Among these, 23 genes were coexpressed in six datasets. Gene sets associated with extracellular matrix and cell adhesion were most significantly enriched, followed by gene sets for skeletal system development, morphogenesis, cell motility, and transcriptional regulation. In particular, transcriptional regulators, including paralogs of Hoxc8, known Hox co-factors, and transcriptional remodeling factors were enriched. We randomly selected Adam19, Ptpn13, Prkd1, Tgfbi, and Aldh1a3, and validated their coexpression in mouse embryonic tissues and cell lines following TGF-β2 treatment or ectopic Hoxc8 expression. Except for Aldh1a3, all genes showed concordant expression with that of Hoxc8, suggesting that the coexpressed genes might include direct or indirect target genes. Collectively, we suggest that the coexpressed genes provide a resource for constructing Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks. PMID:27025388

  15. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  16. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  17. Tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) regulation of development, function, and homeostasis of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew C.; Lee, JangEun; Choi, Yongwon

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an adaptor protein that mediates a wide array of protein-protein interactions via its TRAF domain and a RING finger domain that possesses non-conventional E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. First identified nearly two decades ago as a mediator of IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-mediated activation of NFκB, TRAF6 has since been identified as an actor downstream of multiple receptor families with immunoregulatory functions, including members of the TNFR superfamily, the toll-like receptor (TLR) family, tumor growth factorreceptors (TGFβR), and T cell receptor (TCR). In addition to NFκB, TRAF6 may also direct activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathways. In the context of the immune system, TRAF6-mediated signals have proven critical for the development, homeostasis, and/or activation of B cells, T cells, and myeloid cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, and osteoclasts, as well as for organogenesis of thymic and secondary lymphoid tissues. In multiple cellular contexts, TRAF6 function is essential not only for proper activation of the immune system, but also for maintaining immune tolerance, and more recent works have begun to identify mechanisms of contextual specificity for TRAF6, involving both regulatory protein interactions, and messenger RNA regulation by microRNAs. PMID:26085208

  18. Interaction of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated p85 with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, P; Margolis, B; Skolnik, E Y; Lammers, R; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1992-01-01

    One of the immediate cellular responses to stimulation by various growth factors is the activation of a phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase. We recently cloned the 85-kDa subunit of PI 3-kinase (p85) from a lambda gt11 expression library, using the tyrosine-phosphorylated carboxy terminus of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor as a probe (E. Y. Skolnik, B. Margolis, M. Mohammadi, E. Lowenstein, R. Fischer, A. Drepps, A. Ullrich, and J. Schlessinger, Cell 65:83-90, 1991). In this study, we have examined the association of p85 with EGF and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors and the tyrosine phosphorylation of p85 in 3T3 (HER14) cells in response to EGF and PDGF treatment. Treatment of cells with EGF or PDGF markedly increased the amount of p85 associated with EGF and PDGF receptors. Binding assays with glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins demonstrated that either Src homology region 2 (SH2) domain of p85 is sufficient for binding to EGF and PDGF receptors and that receptor tyrosine autophosphorylation is required for binding. Binding of a GST fusion protein expressing the N-terminal SH2 domain of p85 (GST-N-SH2) to EGF and PDGF receptors was half-maximally inhibited by 2 and 24 mM phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr), respectively, suggesting that the N-SH2 domain interacts more stably with PDGF receptors than with EGF receptors. The amount of receptor-p85 complex detected in HER14 cells treated with EGF or PDGF. Growth factor treatment also increased the amount of p85 found in anti-PDGF-treated HER14 cells, suggesting that the vast majority of p85 in the anti-P-Tyr fraction is receptor associated but not phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Only upon transient overexpression of p85 and PDGF receptor did p85 become tyrosine phosphorylated. These are consistent with the hypothesis that p85 functions as an adaptor molecule that targets PI 3-kinase to activated growth factor receptors. Images PMID:1372091

  19. Ligand-dependent serum response factor activation by the human CC chemokine receptors CCR2a and CCR2b is mediated by G proteins of the Gq family.

    PubMed

    Vatter, Petra; Schuhholz, Julia; Koenig, Carolin; Pfreimer, Mariana; Moepps, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Expression of the human CCR2 receptors, CCR2a and CCR2b, in mammalian cells results in ligand-dependent changes in the activity of multiple cellular signal transduction pathways, mediated in most cases by pertussis toxin-sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gi/o subfamily. In addition, CCR2a and CCR2b receptors have been shown to couple to Gq family members, triggering the canonical activation of phospholipase Cβ isoenzymes. Activation of pertussis toxin-insensitive Gq proteins by cell-surface receptors is not only coupled to activation of phospholipase isoenzymes but also to Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which in turn mediate activation of the Rho GTPases. Activated Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular functions, including the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and gene transcription, such as the transcription factor serum response factor. These findings prompted us to investigate whether CCR2a and/or CCR2b stimulate serum response factor activity. The results presented herein demonstrate that stimulation of human CCR2a- or CCR2b-expressing COS-7 cells caused a vigorous induction of serum response factor activity. This effect was specifically mediated by Gq and/or G14, as well as Rho A and/or a closely related Rho GTPase. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect of CCR2a and CCR2b and Gαq was sensitive to coexpression of the Gαq-interacting leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The findings of the work indicate a role for Gαq and/or Gα14 and in CCR2a/CCR2b-stimulated Rho A GTPase-mediated serum response factor activation and introduce a noncanonical pathway activated by CCR2 receptors by coupling to Gq proteins. PMID:26823487

  20. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Samkoe, Kimberley S; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Gunn, Jason R; Wells, Wendy A; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-12-15

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant; therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects, but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry (IHC). Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying EGFR expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored IHC and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot analysis or in vitro flow-cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immunostaining, with implications for use in noninvasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  1. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in bladder cancer and their relationship to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, J. K.; Cook, S.; Chambers, P.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in neoplastic and non-neoplastic bladder tissue using a standard radioimmunoassay technique. Tumour samples had much higher TGF-alpha levels compared with EGF and TGF-alpha levels in malignant tissue were significantly higher than in benign bladder samples. There was, in addition, a difference in mean EGF levels from 'normal' bladder samples from non-tumour bearing areas of bladder in patients with bladder cancer compared with 'normal' bladder tissue obtained at the time of organ retrieval surgery. Levels of EGF and TGF-alpha did not correlate with levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) as determined by a radioligand binding method but levels of TGF-alpha > 10 ng gm-1 of tumour tissue did correlate with EGFR positivity defined using immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that TGF-alpha is the likely ligand for EGFR in bladder tumours. PMID:8605103

  2. Characterization of insulin-like growth factor I and epidermal growth factor receptors in meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, M.; Tokunaga, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Shigematsu, K.; Niwa, M.; Mori, K. )

    1989-10-01

    Receptors for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were localized and characterized in eight samples of human meningioma (four fibrous, two meningothelial, and two angioblastic types), using quantitative autoradiographic techniques. Effects of both growth factors on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in the cultured meningioma cells were examined. High numbers of specific binding sites for both IGF-I and EGF were homogeneously present in tissue sections derived from fibrous and meningothelial types of meningiomas, whereas binding sites for these growth factors were not detectable in adjacent leptomeninges. While relatively large numbers of IGF-I binding sites were located in the wall of the intratumoral vasculature, the number of binding sites in the stromal component was lower in angioblastic-type meningiomas, including a low number of EGF binding sites detected only in the stromal portion. Scatchard analysis revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites for both IGF-I and EGF in the meningiomas examined (dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.6 to 2.9 nM, and the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) = 16 to 80 fmol/mg for IGF-I; and Kd = 0.6 to 4.0 nM, Bmax = 3 to 39 fmol/mg for EGF). Both growth factors increased the synthesis of DNA, in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation. The combination of IGF-I and EGF synergistically stimulated the synthesis of DNA, and the effects seen with 10% fetal bovine serum could be reproduced at a concentration of 10(-10) M. These observations can be interpreted to mean that both IGF-I and EGF may be involved in the growth modulation of meningiomas, possibly through paracrine or autocrine mechanisms.

  3. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor signaling in the central nervous system: new molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Richard L; Risbrough, Victoria; Brauns, Olaf; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2006-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related urocortin peptides mediate behavioral, cognitive, autonomic, neuroendocrine and immunologic responses to aversive stimuli by activating CRF(1) or CRF(2) receptors in the central nervous system and anterior pituitary. Markers of hyperactive central CRF systems, including CRF hypersecretion and abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, have been identified in subpopulations of patients with anxiety, stress and depressive disorders. Because CRF receptors are rapidly desensitized in the presence of high agonist concentrations, CRF hypersecretion alone may be insufficient to account for the enhanced CRF neurotransmission observed in these patients. Concomitant dysregulation of mechanisms stringently controlling magnitude and duration of CRF receptor signaling also may contribute to this phenomenon. While it is well established that the CRF(1) receptor mediates many anxiety- and depression-like behaviors as well as HPA axis stress responses, CRF(2) receptor functions are not well understood at present. One hypothesis holds that CRF(1) receptor activation initiates fear and anxiety-like responses, while CRF(2) receptor activation re-establishes homeostasis by counteracting the aversive effects of CRF(1) receptor signaling. An alternative hypothesis posits that CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors contribute to opposite defensive modes, with CRF(1) receptors mediating active defensive responses triggered by escapable stressors, and CRF(2) receptors mediating anxiety- and depression-like responses induced by inescapable, uncontrollable stressors. CRF(1) receptor antagonists are being developed as novel treatments for affective and stress disorders. If it is confirmed that the CRF(2) receptor contributes importantly to anxiety and depression, the development of small molecule CRF(2) receptor antagonists would be therapeutically useful. PMID:16918397

  4. Gene Expression of Growth Factors and Growth Factor Receptors for Potential Targeted Therapy of Canine Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    IIDA, Gentoku; ASANO, Kazushi; SEKI, Mamiko; SAKAI, Manabu; KUTARA, Kenji; ISHIGAKI, Kumiko; KAGAWA, Yumiko; YOSHIDA, Orie; TESHIMA, Kenji; EDAMURA, Kazuya; WATARI, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors of primary hepatic masses, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and nodular hyperplasia (NH), in dogs. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the expression of 18 genes in 18 HCCs, 10 NHs, 11 surrounding non-cancerous liver tissues and 4 healthy control liver tissues. Platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B), transforming growth factor-α, epidermal growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor were found to be differentially expressed in HCC compared with NH and the surrounding non-cancerous and healthy control liver tissues. PDGF-B is suggested to have the potential to become a valuable ancillary target for the treatment of canine HCC. PMID:24189579

  5. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  6. Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Recent Progress, Challenges and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Both G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor-tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate large signaling networks, control multiple cell functions and are implicated in many diseases including various cancers. Both of them are also the top therapeutic targets for disease treatment. The discovery of the cross-talk between GPCRs and RTKs connects these two vast signaling networks and complicates the already complicated signaling networks that regulate cell signaling and function. In this review, we focus on the transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a subfamily of RTKs, by GPCRs. Since the first report of EGFR transactivation by GPCR, significant progress has been made including the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the transactivation. Here, we first provide a basic picture for GPCR, EGFR and EGFR transactivation by GPCR. We then discuss the progress made in the last five years and finally provided our view of the future challenge and future researches needed to overcome these challenges. PMID:26771606

  7. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  8. Receptor-purified, Bolton-Hunter radioiodinated, recombinant, human epidermal growth factor: An improved radioligand for receptor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kermode, J.C.; Tritton, T.R. )

    1990-01-01

    We report an assessment of the applicability of the Bolton-Hunter method to the radioiodination of epidermal growth factor (EGF). Recombinant human EGF (hEGF) could be radioiodinated successfully by this method, whereas murine EGF could not. Bolton-Hunter {sup 125}I-labeled hEGF was compared with commercial 125I-labeled hEGF prepared by the chloramine-T radioiodination method. Neither radioligand was sufficiently pure for a detailed characterization of the purportedly heterogeneous pattern of binding of EGF to its receptors. A procedure based on receptor adsorption was thus developed for repurification of the Bolton-Hunter 125I-labeled hEGF. This provided a much purer radioligand suitable for detailed studies of receptor-binding heterogeneity.

  9. Human transcriptional interactome of chromatin contribute to gene co-expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcriptional interactome of chromatin is one of the important mechanisms in gene transcription regulation. By chromatin conformation capture and 3D FISH experiments, several chromatin interactions cases among sequence-distant genes or even inter-chromatin genes were reported. However, on genomics level, there is still little evidence to support these mechanisms. Recently based on Hi-C experiment, a genome-wide picture of chromatin interactions in human cells was presented. It provides a useful material for analysing whether the mechanism of transcriptional interactome is common. Results The main work here is to demonstrate whether the effects of transcriptional interactome on gene co-expression exist on genomic level. While controlling the effects of transcription factors control similarities (TCS), we tested the correlation between Hi-C interaction and the mutual ranks of gene co-expression rates (provided by COXPRESdb) of intra-chromatin gene pairs. We used 6,084 genes with both TF annotation and co-expression information, and matched them into 273,458 pairs with similar Hi-C interaction ranks in different cell types. The results illustrate that co-expression is strongly associated with chromatin interaction. Further analysis using GO annotation reveals potential correlation between gene function similarity, Hi-C interaction and their co-expression. Conclusions According to the results in this research, the intra-chromatin interactome may have relation to gene function and associate with co-expression. This study provides evidence for illustrating the effect of transcriptional interactome on transcription regulation. PMID:21156067

  10. Dopamine D1 and corticotrophin-releasing hormone type-2α receptors assemble into functionally interacting complexes in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuenzalida, J; Galaz, P; Araya, K A; Slater, P G; Blanco, E H; Campusano, J M; Ciruela, F; Gysling, K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dopamine and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH; also known as corticotrophin-releasing factor) are key neurotransmitters in the interaction between stress and addiction. Repeated treatment with cocaine potentiates glutamatergic transmission in the rat basolateral amygdala/cortex pathway through a synergistic action of D1-like dopamine receptors and CRH type-2α receptors (CRF2α receptors). We hypothesized that this observed synergism could be instrumented by heteromers containing the dopamine D1 receptor and CRF2α receptor. Experimental Approach D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization was demonstrated in HEK293T cells using co-immunoprecipitation, BRET and FRET assays, and by using the heteromer mobilization strategy. The ability of D1 receptors to signal through calcium, when singly expressed or co-expressed with CRF2α receptors, was evaluated by the calcium mobilization assay. Key Results D1/CRF2α receptor heteromers were observed in HEK293T cells. When singly expressed, D1 receptors were mostly located at the cell surface whereas CRF2α receptors accumulated intracellularly. Interestingly, co-expression of both receptors promoted D1 receptor intracellular and CRF2α receptor cell surface targeting. The heteromerization of D1/CRF2α receptors maintained the signalling through cAMP of both receptors but switched D1 receptor signalling properties, as the heteromeric D1 receptor was able to mobilize intracellular calcium upon stimulation with a D1 receptor agonist. Conclusions and Implications D1 and CRF2α receptors are capable of heterodimerization in living cells. D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization might account, at least in part, for the complex physiological interactions established between dopamine and CRH in normal and pathological conditions such as addiction, representing a new potential pharmacological target. PMID:25073922

  11. Altered (/sup 125/I)epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Nanney, L.B.; Stoscheck, C.M.; Magid, M.; King, L.E. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    Stimulation of growth and differentiation of human epidermis by epidermal growth factor (EGF) is mediated by its binding to specific receptors. Whether EGF receptors primarily mediate cell division or differentiation in hyperproliferative disease such as psoriasis vulgaris is unclear. To study the pathogenesis of psoriasis, 4-mm2 punch biopsy specimens of normal, uninvolved, and involved psoriatic skin were assayed for EGF receptors by autoradiographic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical methods. Using autoradiographic and immunohistochemical methods, basal keratinocytes were found to contain the greatest number of EGF binding sites and immunoreactive receptors as compared to the upper layers of the epidermis in both normal epidermis and psoriatic skin. No EGF receptor differences between normal and psoriatic epidermis were observed in this layer. In the upper layers of the epidermis, a 2-fold increase in EGF binding capacity was observed in psoriatic skin as compared with normal thin or thick skin. Biochemical methods indicated that (/sup 125/I)EGF binding was increased in psoriatic epidermis as compared with similar thickness normal epidermis when measured on a protein basis. Epidermal growth factor was shown to increase phosphorylation of the EGF receptor in skin. EGF receptors retained in the nonmitotic stratum spinosum and parakeratotic stratum corneum may reflect the incomplete, abnormal differentiation that occurs in active psoriatic lesions. Alternatively, retained EGF receptors may play a direct role in inhibiting cellular differentiation in the suprabasal layers.

  12. Regulation of cell surface receptors for different hematopoietic growth factors on myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, J; Sachs, L

    1986-01-01

    There are clones of myeloid leukemic cells which are different from normal myeloid cells in that they have become independent of hematopoietic growth factor for cell viability and growth. The ability of these clones to bind three types of hematopoietic growth factors (MGI-1GM = GM-CSF, IL-3 = multi-CSF and MGI-1M = M-CSF = CSF-1) was measured using the method of quantitative absorption at 1 degree C and low pH elution of cell-bound biological activity. Results of binding to normal myeloid and lymphoid cells were similar to those obtained by radioreceptor assays. The results indicate that the number of receptors on different clones of these leukemic cells varied from 0 to 1,300 per cell. The receptors have a high binding affinity. Receptors for different growth factors can be independently expressed in different clones. There was no relationship between expression of receptors for these growth factors and the phenotype of the leukemic cells regarding their ability to be induced to differentiate. The number of receptors on the leukemic cells was lower than on normal mature macrophages. Myeloid leukemic cells induced to differentiate by normal myeloid cell differentiation factor MGI-2 (= DF), or by low doses of actinomycin D or cytosine arabinoside, showed an up-regulation of the number of MGI-1GM and IL-3 receptors. Induction of differentiation of leukemic cells by MGI-2 also induced production and secretion of the growth factor MGI-1GM, and this induced MGI-1GM saturated the up-regulated MGI-1GM receptors. It is suggested that up-regulation of these receptors during differentiation is required for the functioning of differentiated cells. PMID:3023059

  13. Binding of neurotrophin-3 to its neuronal receptors and interactions with nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tébar, A; Dechant, G; Götz, R; Barde, Y A

    1992-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) has low-affinity (Kd = 8 x 10(-10) M), as well as high-affinity receptors (Kd = 1.8 x 10(-11) M) on embryonic chick sensory neurons, the latter in surprisingly high numbers. Like the structurally related proteins nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), NT-3 also binds to the low-affinity NGF receptor, a molecule that we suggest to designate low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (LANR). NT-3 dissociates from the LANR much more rapidly than BDNF, and more slowly than NGF. The binding of labelled NT-3 to the LANR can be reduced by half using a concentration of BDNF corresponding to the Kd of BDNF to the LANR. In contrast, the binding of NT-3 to its high-affinity neuronal receptors can only be prevented by BDNF or NGF when used at concentrations several thousand-fold higher than those corresponding to their Kd to their high-affinity neuronal receptors. Thus, specific high-affinity NT-3 receptors exist on sensory neurons that can readily discriminate between three structurally related ligands. These findings, including the remarkable property of the LANR to bind three related ligands with similar affinity, but different rate constants, are discussed. PMID:1547788

  14. Roles of tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and TRAF5 in immune cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Joanne M.; Yi, Zuoan; Buchta, Claire M.; Poovassery, Jayakumar; Stunz, Laura L.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary A large and diverse group of receptors utilizes the family of cytoplasmic signaling proteins known as tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factors (TRAFs). In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest and exploration of the roles played by TRAF3 and TRAF5 in cellular regulation, particularly in cells of the immune system, the cell types of focus in this review. This work has revealed that TRAF3 and TRAF5 can play diverse roles for different receptors even in the same cell type, as well as distinct roles in different cell types. Evidence indicates that TRAF3 and TRAF5 play important roles beyond the TNFR-superfamily (SF) and viral mimics of its members, mediating certain innate immune receptor and cytokine receptor signals, and most recently, signals delivered by the T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling complex. Additionally, much research has demonstrated the importance of TRAF3-mediated cellular regulation via its cytoplasmic interactions with additional signaling proteins. In particular, we discuss below evidence for the participation by TRAF3 in a number of the regulatory post-translational modifications involving ubiquitin that are important in various signaling pathways. PMID:22017431

  15. A Null Model for Pearson Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Andrea; Jurman, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gene coexpression networks inferred by correlation from high-throughput profiling such as microarray data represent simple but effective structures for discovering and interpreting linear gene relationships. In recent years, several approaches have been proposed to tackle the problem of deciding when the resulting correlation values are statistically significant. This is most crucial when the number of samples is small, yielding a non-negligible chance that even high correlation values are due to random effects. Here we introduce a novel hard thresholding solution based on the assumption that a coexpression network inferred by randomly generated data is expected to be empty. The threshold is theoretically derived by means of an analytic approach and, as a deterministic independent null model, it depends only on the dimensions of the starting data matrix, with assumptions on the skewness of the data distribution compatible with the structure of gene expression levels data. We show, on synthetic and array datasets, that the proposed threshold is effective in eliminating all false positive links, with an offsetting cost in terms of false negative detected edges. PMID:26030917

  16. Kit receptor dimerization is driven by bivalent binding of stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, M A; Pinchasi, D; Zhou, M; Lax, I; Schlessinger, J

    1997-03-01

    Most growth factors and cytokines activate their receptors by inducing dimerization upon binding. We have studied binding of the dimeric cytokine stem cell factor (SCF) to the extracellular domain of its receptor Kit, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase similar to the receptors for platelet-derived growth factor and colony-stimulating factor-1. Calorimetric studies show that one SCF dimer binds simultaneously to two molecules of the Kit extracellular domain. Gel filtration and other methods show that this results in Kit dimerization. It has been proposed that SCF-induced Kit dimerization proceeds via a conformational change that exposes a key receptor dimerization site in the fourth of the five immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in Kit. We show that a form of Kit containing just the first three Ig domains (Kit-123) binds to SCF with precisely the same thermodynamic parameters as does Kit-12345. Analytical ultracentrifugation, light scattering, and gel filtration show that Kit-123 dimerizes upon SCF binding in a manner indistinguishable from that seen with Kit-12345. These data argue that the fourth Ig-like domain of Kit is not required for SCF-induced receptor dimerization and provide additional support for a model in which bivalent binding of the SCF dimer provides the driving force for Kit dimerization. PMID:9045650

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor type-2 receptor and corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein coexist in rat ventral tegmental area nerve terminals originated in the lateral hypothalamic area.

    PubMed

    Slater, Paula G; Noches, Veronica; Gysling, Katia

    2016-01-01

    There is significant functional evidence showing that corticotropin-releasing factor type-2 receptor (CRF2R) and corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein (CRF-BP) regulate glutamatergic synapses onto ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons. It has been shown that CRF requires CRF-BP to potentiate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in dopaminergic neurons through CRF2R, and that increases glutamate release in cocaine-treated rats through the activation of CRF2R only by agonists with high affinity to CRF-BP. Furthermore, this CRF-mediated increase in VTA glutamate is responsible for stress-induced relapse to cocaine-seeking behaviour. However, there is a lack of anatomical evidence to explain the mechanisms of CRF actions in VTA. Thus, it was studied whether CRF2R and CRF-BP are expressed in VTA nerve terminals, using a synaptosomal preparation devoid of postsynaptic elements. The current results show that both proteins are co-expressed in glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic VTA synaptosomes. A main glutamatergic input to the VTA that has been associated to addictive behaviour is originated in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). Thus, this study was focused in the LHA-VTA input using orexin as a marker of this input. The results show that CRF2R and CRF-BP mRNA and protein are expressed in the LHA, and that both proteins are present in orexin-positive VTA synaptosomes. The results showing that CRF2R and CRF-BP are expressed in the LHA-VTA input give anatomical support to suggest that this input plays a role in stress-induced relapse to cocaine-seeking behaviour. PMID:26503565

  18. Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor are ligands for the carbohydrate-receptor Siglec-5

    PubMed Central

    Pegon, Julie N.; Kurdi, Mohamad; Casari, Caterina; Odouard, Soline; Denis, Cécile V.; Christophe, Olivier D.; Lenting, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) circulate in plasma in a tight non-covalent complex, being critical to hemostasis. Although structurally unrelated, both share the presence of sialylated glycan-structures, making them potential ligands for sialic-acid-binding-immunoglobulin-like-lectins (Siglecs). Design and Methods We explored the potential interaction between FVIII/VWF and Siglec-5, a receptor expressed in macrophages using various experimental approaches, including binding experiments with purified proteins and cell-binding studies with Siglec-5 expressing cells. Finally, Siglec-5 was overexpressed in mice via hydrodynamic gene transfer. Results In different systems using purified proteins, saturable, dose-dependent and reversible interactions between a soluble Siglec-5 fragment and both hemostatic proteins were found. Sialidase treatment of VWF resulted in a complete lack of Siglec-5 binding. In contrast, sialidase treatment left interactions between FVIII and Siglec-5 unaffected. FVIII and VWF also bound to cellsurface exposed Siglec-5, as was visualized by classical immunostaining as well as by Duolinkproximity ligation assays. Co-localization of FVIII and VWF with early endosomal markers further suggested that binding to Siglec-5 is followed by endocytosis of the proteins. Finally, overexpression of human Siglec-5 in murine hepatocytes following hydrodynamic gene transfer resulted in a significant decrease in plasma levels of FVIII and VWF in these mice. Conclusions Our data indicate that FVIII and VWF may act as a ligand for Siglec-5, and that Siglec-5 may contribute to the regulation of plasma levels of the FVIII/VWF complex. PMID:22733016

  19. Novel structural co-expression analysis linking the NPM1-associated ribosomal biogenesis network to chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lawrence WC; Lin, Xihong; Yung, Godwin; Lui, Thomas; Chiu, Ya Ming; Wang, Fengfeng; Tsui, Nancy BY; Cho, William CS; Yip, SP; Siu, Parco M.; Wong, SC Cesar; Yung, Benjamin YM

    2015-01-01

    Co-expression analysis reveals useful dysregulation patterns of gene cooperativeness for understanding cancer biology and identifying new targets for treatment. We developed a structural strategy to identify co-expressed gene networks that are important for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This strategy compared the distributions of expressional correlations between CML and normal states, and it identified a data-driven threshold to classify strongly co-expressed networks that had the best coherence with CML. Using this strategy, we found a transcriptome-wide reduction of co-expression connectivity in CML, reflecting potentially loosened molecular regulation. Conversely, when we focused on nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) associated networks, NPM1 established more co-expression linkages with BCR-ABL pathways and ribosomal protein networks in CML than normal. This finding implicates a new role of NPM1 in conveying tumorigenic signals from the BCR-ABL oncoprotein to ribosome biogenesis, affecting cellular growth. Transcription factors may be regulators of the differential co-expression patterns between CML and normal. PMID:26205693

  20. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) in Cancers: Overexpression and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Nida; Iqbal, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family having tyrosine kinase activity. Dimerization of the receptor results in the autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues within the cytoplasmic domain of the receptors and initiates a variety of signaling pathways leading to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Amplification or overexpression of HER2 occurs in approximately 15–30% of breast cancers and 10–30% of gastric/gastroesophageal cancers and serves as a prognostic and predictive biomarker. HER2 overexpression has also been seen in other cancers like ovary, endometrium, bladder, lung, colon, and head and neck. The introduction of HER2 directed therapies has dramatically influenced the outcome of patients with HER2 positive breast and gastric/gastroesophageal cancers; however, the results have been proved disappointing in other HER2 overexpressing cancers. This review discusses the role of HER2 in various cancers and therapeutic modalities available targeting HER2. PMID:25276427

  1. 14-3-3 proteins interact with the insulin-like growth factor receptor but not the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, R W; Dey, B R; Lopaczynski, W; Nissley, S P

    1997-01-01

    We have used a yeast two-hybrid system to identify proteins which bind to the cytosolic portion of the type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGFIR) but not the insulin receptor (IR). This analysis identified 14-3-3beta and zeta proteins. 14-3-3beta also binds to the IGFIR but not the IR in vitro and 14-3-3-IGFIR complexes are present in insect cells overexpressing the IGFIR cytoplasmic domain. 14-3-3 proteins are substrates of the IGFIR in the yeast system and in vitro. The interaction of 14-3-3 with the IGFIR requires receptor-kinase activity and maps to the C-terminus of the receptor, but does not depend on tyrosine residues in this or the juxtamembrane regions. Instead, the binding maps to serine residue 1283 and requires phosphorylation of this residue. 14-3-3 proteins are phosphoserine-binding proteins which have been shown to interact directly with components of the mitogenic and apoptotic signalling pathways, suggesting that they participate in growth regulation. Our findings suggest that 14-3-3 proteins may play a role in IGFIR signal transduction and may contribute to the differences in IGF and IR signalling capabilities. PMID:9581554

  2. Functional alterations of type I insulin-like growth factor receptor in placenta of diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hauguel-de Mouzon, S; Louizeau, M; Girard, J

    1992-01-01

    The presence of type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptors on placental membranes led to the hypothesis that these receptors might play a critical role in the rapid growth of this organ. Diabetes induces feto-placental overgrowth, but it is not known whether it modifies IGF-I receptor activity in fetal and/or placental tissues. To answer this question, we have partially purified and characterized placental receptors from normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In normal rats, binding of 125I-IGF-I to a 140 kDa protein corresponding to the alpha subunit of the receptor was observed in cross-linking experiments performed under reducing conditions. Stimulation by IGF-I induces the autophosphorylation of a 105 kDa phosphoprotein representing the beta subunit of the receptor. In rats made hyperglycaemic and insulinopenic by streptozotocin injection on day 1 of pregnancy, placental IGF-I receptor-binding parameters were not different from controls on day 20 of pregnancy. In contrast, the autophosphorylation and kinase activity of IGF-I receptors of diabetic rats were increased 2-3-fold in the basal state and after IGF-I stimulation. The present study indicates that the rat placental IGF-I receptor possesses structural characteristics similar to that reported for fetal-rat muscle, and suggests that the high-molecular-mass beta subunit could represent a type of receptor specifically expressed during prenatal development. In addition, it clearly demonstrates that diabetes induces functional alterations in IGF-I receptor kinase activity that may play a major role in the placental overgrowth in diabetic pregnancy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:1445271

  3. alpha1B-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization induced by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Avila, M Teresa; Flores-Jasso, C Fabián; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induced alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation in Rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing these adrenoceptors. This effect of TGF-beta was rapid, reaching a maximum within 30 min and decreasing thereafter, and concentration-dependent (EC(50) 0.3 pM). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, and the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine, Ro 318220 and bisindolylmaleimide, blocked the effect of this growth factor. alpha(1B)-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation was associated with desensitization, as indicated by a reduction in the adrenergic-mediated production of [(3)H]inositol phosphates. Phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors by TGF-beta was also observed in Cos-1 cells transfected with the receptor. Co-transfection of the dominant-negative mutant of the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Deltap85) inhibited the phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors induced by TGF-beta. Our results indicate that activation of TGF-beta receptors induces alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. The data suggest that phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C play key roles in this effect of TGF-beta. PMID:12234252

  4. alpha1B-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization induced by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Romero-Avila, M Teresa; Flores-Jasso, C Fabián; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2002-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induced alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation in Rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing these adrenoceptors. This effect of TGF-beta was rapid, reaching a maximum within 30 min and decreasing thereafter, and concentration-dependent (EC(50) 0.3 pM). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, and the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine, Ro 318220 and bisindolylmaleimide, blocked the effect of this growth factor. alpha(1B)-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation was associated with desensitization, as indicated by a reduction in the adrenergic-mediated production of [(3)H]inositol phosphates. Phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors by TGF-beta was also observed in Cos-1 cells transfected with the receptor. Co-transfection of the dominant-negative mutant of the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Deltap85) inhibited the phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors induced by TGF-beta. Our results indicate that activation of TGF-beta receptors induces alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. The data suggest that phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C play key roles in this effect of TGF-beta. PMID:12234252

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta and transforming growth factor beta-receptor expression in human meningioma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. D.; Federspiel, C. F.; Gold, L. I.; Moses, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) family in mammals includes three closely related peptides that influence proliferation and numerous physiologic processes in most mesenchymal cells. In this study, Northern blots, immunohistochemistry, TGF beta radioreceptor assays, TGF beta receptor affinity labeling and [3H] thymidine incorporation were used to evaluate whether primary cell cultures of human meningiomas synthesize the three TGF beta isoforms, bear TGF beta receptors, and respond to TGF beta. Transcripts for TGF beta 1 and 2 were detected in the three cases analyzed. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 immunoreactivity was detected in three of six cases, and TGF beta 2 and 3 immunoreactivity were detected in each case analyzed. Media conditioned by cells cultured from six meningiomas also contained latent TGF beta-like activity. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor cross-linking studies identified TGF beta binding sites corresponding to the type 1, type 2, and type 3 receptors on meningioma cells. Treatment with active TGF beta 1 produced a statistically significant reduction in [3H] thymidine incorporation after stimulation with 10% fetal calf serum and epidermal growth factor in all six cases studied. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1325741

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptors in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Veale, D.; Ashcroft, T.; Marsh, C.; Gibson, G. J.; Harris, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is homologous to the oncogene erb-beta and is the receptor for a class of tumour growth factors (TGF-alpha). The clinical correlations with its expression were studied in 77 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). They were stained for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) by means of an indirect immunoperoxidase technique using a monoclonal antibody against the receptor. Normal lung tissue and normal bronchus were stained for comparison. Cancer tissue showed significantly increased staining compared to normal lung (P less than 0.05). Staining for EGFr in 40 squamous carcinomas was significantly stronger than in 37 specimens of other types of NSCLC (P less than 0.05), and staining in stage three NSCLC was stronger than in stage 1 and 2 (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that the presence of a high intensity of staining for EGF receptor is associated with spread of human non-small cell lung cancer and this receptor may be a suitable target for therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3038157

  7. Growth-stimulatory monoclonal antibodies against human insulin-like growth factor I receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiong, L; Kasuya, J; Li, S L; Kato, J; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y

    1992-06-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against purified human placental insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors were prepared and characterized. Three IgG mAbs were specific for the human IGF-I receptor and displayed negligible crossreactivity with the human insulin receptor. They stimulated 125I-labeled IGF-I (125I-IGF-I) or 125I-IGF-II binding to purified human placental IGF-I receptors and to IGF-I receptors expressed in NIH 3T3 cells in contrast to the well-studied mAb alpha IR-3, which inhibits 125I-IGF-I or 125I-IGF-II binding to both forms of IGF-I receptors. The mAbs introduced in this study stimulated DNA synthesis in NIH 3T3 cells expressing human IGF-I receptors approximately 1.5-fold above the basal level and the IGF-I- or IGF-II-stimulated level. In contrast, alpha IR-3 inhibited both basal and IGF-I or IGF-II-stimulated DNA synthesis by approximately 30%. Inhibition of IGF-II-stimulated DNA synthesis by alpha IR-3 was as potent as its inhibition of IGF-I-stimulated DNA synthesis, although IGF-II binding to the IGF-I receptors was not inhibited by IGF-II as potently as was IGF-I. With the purified IGF-I receptors, both inhibitory and stimulatory mAbs were shown to activate autophosphorylation of the IGF-I receptor beta subunit and to induce microaggregation of the receptors. These results suggest that conformational changes resulting from receptor dimerization in the presence of either type of mAb may affect the signal-transducing function of the IGF-I receptor differently. These additional mAbs and alpha IR-3 immunoprecipitated nearly 90% of IGF-I binding activity from Triton X-100-solubilized human placental membranes, indicating that IGF-I receptor reactive with these mAbs is the major form of the IGF-I receptor in human placenta. PMID:1319060

  8. Differential co-expression analysis of venous thromboembolism based on gene expression profile data

    PubMed Central

    MING, ZHIBING; DING, WENBIN; YUAN, RUIFAN; JIN, JIE; LI, XIAOQIANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to screen differentially co-expressed genes and the involved transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) in venous thromboembolism (VTE). Microarray data of GSE19151 were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, including 70 patients with VTE and 63 healthy controls. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using R software. Differential co-expression analysis was performed using R, followed by screening of modules using Cytoscape. Functional annotation was performed using Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. Moreover, Fisher test was used to screen key TFs and miRNAs for the modules. PCA revealed the disease and healthy samples could not be distinguished at the gene expression level. A total of 4,796 upregulated differentially co-expressed genes (e.g. zinc finger protein 264, electron-transfer-flavoprotein, beta polypeptide and Janus kinase 2) and 3,629 downregulated differentially co-expressed genes (e.g. adenylate cyclase 7 and single-stranded DNA binding protein 2) were identified, which were further mined to obtain 17 and eight modules separately. Functional annotation revealed that the largest upregulated module was primarily associated with acetylation and the largest downregulated module was mainly involved in mitochondrion. Moreover, 48 TFs and 62 miRNA families were screened for the 17 upregulated modules, such as E2F transcription factor 4, miR-30 and miR-135 regulating the largest module. Conversely, 35 TFs and 18 miRNA families were identified for the 8 downregulated modules, including mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12 and miR-23 regulating the largest module. Differentially co-expressed genes regulated by TFs and miRNAs may jointly contribute to the abnormal acetylation and mitochondrion presentation in the progression of VTE. PMID:27284300

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the hepatocyte growth factor gene by the nuclear receptors chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor and estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J G; Bell, A; Liu, Y; Zarnegar, R

    1997-02-14

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a multifunctional cytokine that controls the growth and differentiation of various tissues. Previously, we described the existence of a negative cis-acting regulatory element(s) within the -1- to -0.7-kilobase pair (kb) portion of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse HGF promoter. In the present study, we show that the repressor element is located at position -872 to -860 base pairs and comprises an imperfect estrogen-responsive element 5'-AGGTCAGAAAGACCA-3'. We demonstrate that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF), a nuclear orphan receptor belonging to the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily, through binding to this site effectively silences the transcriptional activity of the HGF promoter. We show that estrogen receptor, on the other hand, relieves the repressive action of COUP-TF, resulting in the induction of the HGF promoter. Using mice transgenic for either 2.7 or 0.7 kb of the HGF promoter region linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, we found that injection of estradiol stimulates HGF promoter activity in tissues such as the mammary gland and ovary of mice harboring 2.7 but not 0.7 kb of the mouse HGF promoter region. Potential involvement of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors in the regulation of HGF gene expression is also discussed. PMID:9020096

  10. Deregulation of Flk-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in fibroblast growth factor receptor-1-deficient vascular stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Peetra; Rolny, Charlotte; Jakobsson, Lars; Wikner, Charlotte; Wu, Yan; Hicklin, Daniel J; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2004-03-15

    We have employed embryoid bodies derived from murine embryonal stem cells to study effects on vascular development induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and FGF receptor-1, in comparison to the established angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and its receptor VEGF receptor-2. Exogenous FGF-2 promoted formation of morphologically distinct, long slender vessels in the embryoid bodies, whereas VEGF-A-treated bodies displayed a compact plexus of capillaries. FGF-2 stimulation of embryonal stem cells under conditions where VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 function was blocked, led to formation of endothelial cell clusters, which failed to develop into vessels. FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies responded to VEGF-A by establishment of the characteristic vascular plexus, but FGF-2 had no effect on vascular development in the absence of FGFR-1. The FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies displayed considerably increased basal level of vessel formation, detected by immunohistochemical staining for platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)/CD31. This basal vascularization was blocked by neutralizing antibodies against VEGFR-2 or VEGF-A and biochemical analyses indicated changes in regulation of VEGFR-2 in the absence of FGFR-1 expression. We conclude that VEGF-A/VEGFR-2-dependent vessel formation occurs in the absence of FGF-2/FGFR-1, which, however, serve to modulate vascular development. PMID:15020678

  11. USP17 is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jakub; de la Vega, Michelle; Fletcher, Sarah J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Greene, Michelle K.; Smyth, Andrew W.; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra; Johnston, James A.; Scott, Christopher J.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Burrows, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is required for cell proliferation and motility. More recently we reported that USP17 deubiquitinates RCE1 isoform 2 and thus regulates the processing of ‘CaaX’ motif proteins. Here we now show that USP17 expression is induced by epidermal growth factor and that USP17 expression is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor. In addition, we show that USP17 is required for the endocytosis of transferrin, an archetypal substrate for clathrin mediated endocytosis, and that USP17 depletion impedes plasma membrane recruitment of the machinery required for clathrin mediated endocytosis. Thus, our data reveal that USP17 is necessary for epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin endocytosis via clathrin coated pits, indicate this is mediated via the regulation of the recruitment of the components of the endocytosis machinery and suggest USP17 may play a general role in receptor endocytosis. PMID:25026282

  12. Characterization of PXK as a Protein Involved in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Trafficking ▿

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Takako; Gao, Jing; Cantley, Lewis C.; Hirata, Masato

    2010-01-01

    The phox homology (PX) domain is a phosphoinositide-binding module that typically binds phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Out of 47 mammalian proteins containing PX domains, more than 30 are denoted sorting nexins and several of these have been implicated in internalization of cell surface proteins to the endosome, where phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate is concentrated. Here we investigated a multimodular protein termed PXK, composed of a PX domain, a protein kinase-like domain, and a WASP homology 2 domain. We show that the PX domain of PXK localizes this protein to the endosomal membrane via binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. PXK expression in COS7 cells accelerated the ligand-induced internalization and degradation of epidermal growth factor receptors by a mechanism requiring phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding but not involving the WASP homology 2 domain. Conversely, depletion of PXK using RNA interference decreased the rate of epidermal growth factor receptor internalization and degradation. Ubiquitination of epidermal growth factor receptor by the ligand stimulation was enhanced in PXK-expressing cells. These results indicate that PXK plays a critical role in epidermal growth factor receptor trafficking through modulating ligand-induced ubiquitination of the receptor. PMID:20086096

  13. DIRECT MODULATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT α BY GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, George B.; Howe, Alan K.; Nickl, Christian K.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Deming, Paula B.

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates processes such as cell proliferation and migration following activation of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), yet the signaling mechanisms that link PKA with growth factor receptors remain largely undefined. Here we report that RTKs can directly modulate the function of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA-C) through post-translational modification. In vitro kinase assays revealed that both the epidermal growth factor and platelet derived growth factor receptors (EGFR and PDGFR, respectively) tyrosine phosphorylate PKA-C. Mass spectrometry identified tyrosine 330 (Y330) as a receptor-mediated phosphorylation site and mutation of Y330 to phenylalanine (Y330F) all but abolished the RTK-mediated phosphorylation of PKA-C in vitro. Y330 resides within a conserved region at the C-terminal tail of PKA-C that allosterically regulates enzymatic activity. Therefore, the effect of phosphorylation at Y330 on the activity of PKA-C was investigated. The Km for a peptide substrate was markedly decreased when PKA-C subunits were tyrosine phosphorylated by the receptors as compared to un-phosphorylated controls. Importantly, tyrosine-phosphorylated PKA-C subunits were detected in cells stimulated with EGF, PDGF and FGF2 and in fibroblasts undergoing PDGF-mediated chemotaxis. These results demonstrate a direct, functional interaction between RTKs and PKA-C and identify tyrosine phosphorylation as a novel mechansim for regulating PKA activity. PMID:21866565

  14. Cortical neurons express nerve growth factor receptors in advanced age and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mufson, E J; Kordower, J H

    1992-01-01

    Using a monoclonal antibody directed against the primate nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor, we examined the expression of NGF receptors within neuronal perikarya of normal adult human cerebral cortex (27-98 years old) and individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD). This expression of cortical NGF receptors was compared with that seen in other neurological diseases and normal human development as well as in young and aged nonhuman primates. NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were not observed in young adults (less than 50 years old) and were observed only infrequently in non-demented elderly individuals (50-80 years old). In contrast, numerous NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were seen in AD patients of all ages and in one 98-year-old nondemented patient. In advanced age and AD, numerous NGF receptor-positive neurons were located within laminae II-VI of temporal association cortices whereas only a few were seen in the subicular complex, entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdaloid complex. These perikarya appeared healthy, with bipolar, fusiform, or multipolar morphologies and extended varicose dendritic arbors. These neurons failed to express neurofibrillary tangle-bearing material. In contrast to AD, NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were not observed in Parkinson disease, Pick disease, or Shy-Drager syndrome. The NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons seen in advanced age and AD were similar in morphology to those observed in human fetal cortex. No NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were observed in young or aged nonhuman primates. These findings suggest that neurons within the human cerebral cortex exhibit plasticity in their expression of NGF receptors in AD and extreme advanced aging. Images PMID:1309947

  15. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) transcription factor regulates megakaryocytic polyploidization

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; T. Papoutsakis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    Summary We propose that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a novel transcriptional regulator of megakaryopoietic polyploidization. Functional evidence was obtained that AHR impacts in vivo megakaryocytic differentiation and maturation; compared to wild-type mice, AHR-null mice had lower platelet counts, fewer numbers of newly synthesized platelets, increased bleeding times and lower-ploidy megakaryocytes (Mks). AHR mRNA increased 3·6-fold during ex vivo megakaryocytic differentiation, but reduced or remained constant during parallel isogenic granulocytic or erythroid differentiation. We interrogated the role of AHR in megakaryopoiesis using a validated Mk model of megakaryopoiesis, the human megakaryoblastic leukaemia CHRF cell line. Upon CHRF Mk differentiation, AHR mRNA and protein levels increased, AHR protein shifted from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and AHR binding to its consensus DNA binding sequence increased. Protein and mRNA levels of the AHR transcriptional target HES1 also increased. Mk differentiation of CHRF cells where AHR or HES1 was knocked-down using RNAi resulted in lower ploidy distributions and cells that were incapable of reaching ploidy classes ≥16n. AHR knockdown also resulted in increased DNA synthesis of lower ploidy cells, without impacting apoptosis. Together, these data support a role for AHR in Mk polyploidization and in vivo platelet function, and warrant further detailed investigations. PMID:21226706

  16. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D.; Lahvic, Jamie L.; Ranheim, Erik A.; Zon, Leonard I.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5−/− AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis. PMID:26905203

  17. GATA Factor-G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Circuit Suppresses Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Wu, Tongyu; Johnson, Kirby D; Lahvic, Jamie L; Ranheim, Erik A; Zon, Leonard I; Bresnick, Emery H

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) originate from hemogenic endothelium within the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region of the mammalian embryo. The relationship between genetic circuits controlling stem cell genesis and multi-potency is not understood. A Gata2 cis element (+9.5) enhances Gata2 expression in the AGM and induces the endothelial to HSC transition. We demonstrated that GATA-2 rescued hematopoiesis in +9.5(-/-) AGMs. As G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets for FDA-approved drugs, we analyzed the GPCR gene ensemble to identify GATA-2-regulated GPCRs. Of the 20 GATA-2-activated GPCR genes, four were GATA-1-activated, and only Gpr65 expression resembled Gata2. Contrasting with the paradigm in which GATA-2-activated genes promote hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell genesis/function, our mouse and zebrafish studies indicated that GPR65 suppressed hematopoiesis. GPR65 established repressive chromatin at the +9.5 site, restricted occupancy by the activator Scl/TAL1, and repressed Gata2 transcription. Thus, a Gata2 cis element creates a GATA-2-GPCR circuit that limits positive regulators that promote hematopoiesis. PMID:26905203

  18. N-Glycosylation as determinant of epidermal growth factor receptor conformation in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kaszuba, Karol; Grzybek, Michał; Orłowski, Adam; Danne, Reinis; Róg, Tomasz; Simons, Kai; Coskun, Ünal; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) regulates several critical cellular processes and is an important target for cancer therapy. In lieu of a crystallographic structure of the complete receptor, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have recently shown that they can excel in studies of the full-length receptor. Here we present atomistic MD simulations of the monomeric N-glycosylated human EGFR in biomimetic lipid bilayers that are, in parallel, also used for the reconstitution of full-length receptors. This combination enabled us to experimentally validate our simulations, using ligand binding assays and antibodies to monitor the conformational properties of the receptor reconstituted into membranes. We find that N-glycosylation is a critical determinant of EGFR conformation, and specifically the orientation of the EGFR ectodomain relative to the membrane. In the absence of a structure for full-length, posttranslationally modified membrane receptors, our approach offers new means to structurally define and experimentally validate functional properties of cell surface receptors in biomimetic membrane environments. PMID:25805821

  19. Transforming Growth Factor {beta} Can Stimulate Smad1 Phosphorylation Independently of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, Katharine H; Lin, Xia; Yu, Paul B; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2009-04-10

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily ligands control a diverse set of cellular processes by activating type I and type II serine-threonine receptor kinases. Canonical TGFbeta signaling is mediated via the TbetaRI/ALK5 type I receptor that phosphorylates Smad2 and Smad3 in their SXS motif to facilitate their activation and subsequent role in transcriptional regulation. Canonical bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling is mediated via the ALK1/2/3/6 type I receptors that phosphorylate Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 in their SXS motif. However, studies in endothelial cells have shown that TGFbeta can also lead to the phosphorylation of Smad1, dependent on ALK1 receptor activity. Here we present data showing that TGFbeta can significantly induce Smad1 phosphorylation in several non-endothelial cell lineages. Additionally, by using chemical inhibitors specific for the TGFbeta/activin/nodal (ALK4/5/7) and BMP (ALK1/2/3/6) type I receptors, we show that in some cell types TGFbeta induces Smad1 phosphorylation independently of the BMP type I receptors. Thus, TGFbeta-mediated Smad1 phosphorylation appears to occur via different receptor complexes in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:19224917

  20. Molecular cloning and expression of an additional epidermal growth factor receptor-related gene.

    PubMed Central

    Plowman, G D; Whitney, G S; Neubauer, M G; Green, J M; McDonald, V L; Todaro, G J; Shoyab, M

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and amphiregulin are structurally and functionally related growth regulatory proteins. These secreted polypeptides all bind to the 170-kDa cell-surface EGF receptor, activating its intrinsic kinase activity. However, amphiregulin exhibits different activities than EGF and TGF-alpha in a number of biological assays. Amphiregulin only partially competes with EGF for binding EGF receptor, and amphiregulin does not induce anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney cells (NRK) in the presence of TGF-beta. Amphiregulin also appears to abrogate the stimulatory effect of TGF-alpha on the growth of several aggressive epithelial carcinomas that overexpress EGF receptor. These findings suggest that amphiregulin may interact with a separate receptor in certain cell types. Here we report the cloning of another member of the human EGF receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which we have named "HER3/ERRB3." The cDNA was isolated from a human carcinoma cell line, and its 6-kilobase transcript was identified in various human tissues. We have generated peptide-specific antisera that recognizes the 160-kDa HER3 protein when transiently expressed in COS cells. These reagents will allow us to determine whether HER3 binds amphiregulin or other growth regulatory proteins and what role HER3 protein plays in the regulation of cell growth. Images PMID:2164210

  1. ErbB2 resembles an autoinhibited invertebrate epidermal growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2009-09-25

    The orphan receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB2 (also known as HER2 or Neu) transforms cells when overexpressed, and it is an important therapeutic target in human cancer. Structural studies have suggested that the oncogenic (and ligand-independent) signalling properties of ErbB2 result from the absence of a key intramolecular 'tether' in the extracellular region that autoinhibits other human ErbB receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Although ErbB2 is unique among the four human ErbB receptors, here we show that it is the closest structural relative of the single EGF receptor family member in Drosophila melanogaster (dEGFR). Genetic and biochemical data show that dEGFR is tightly regulated by growth factor ligands, yet a crystal structure shows that it, too, lacks the intramolecular tether seen in human EGFR, ErbB3 and ErbB4. Instead, a distinct set of autoinhibitory interdomain interactions hold unliganded dEGFR in an inactive state. All of these interactions are maintained (and even extended) in ErbB2, arguing against the suggestion that ErbB2 lacks autoinhibition. We therefore suggest that normal and pathogenic ErbB2 signalling may be regulated by ligands in the same way as dEGFR. Our findings have important implications for ErbB2 regulation in human cancer, and for developing therapeutic approaches that target novel aspects of this orphan receptor.

  2. Developmentally Regulated Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Receptor Gene in the Periphery and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C. R.; Martinez, Humberto J.; Black, Ira B.; Chao, Moses V.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates development and maintenance of function of peripheral sympathetic and sensory neurons. A potential role for the trophic factor in brain has been detected only recently. The ability of a cell to respond to NGF is due, in part, to expression of specific receptors on the cell surface. To study tissue-specific expression of the NGF receptor gene, we have used sensitive cRNA probes for detection of NGF receptor mRNA. Our studies indicate that the receptor gene is selectively and specifically expressed in sympathetic (superior cervical) and sensory (dorsal root) ganglia in the periphery, and by the septum-basal forebrain centrally, in the neonatal rat in vivo. Moreover, examination of tissues from neonatal and adult rats reveals a marked reduction in steady-state NGF receptor mRNA levels in sensory ganglia. In contrast, a 2- to 4-fold increase was observed in the basal forebrain and in the sympathetic ganglia over the same time period. Our observations suggest that NGF receptor mRNA expression is developmentally regulated in specific areas of the nervous system in a differential fashion.

  3. A fibronectin scaffold approach to bispecific inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor-I receptor

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, Stuart L; Engle, Linda J; Chao, Ginger; Zhu, Rong-Rong; Cao, Carolyn; Lin, Zheng; Yamniuk, Aaron; Hosbach, Jennifer; Brown, Jennifer; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Gokemeijer, Jochem; Morin, Paul; Morse, Brent; Carvajal, Irvith M; Fabrizio, David; Wright, Martin C; Das Gupta, Ruchira; Gosselin, Michael; Cataldo, Daniel; Ryseck, Rolf P; Doyle, Michael L; Wong, Tai W; Camphausen, Raymond T; Cload, Sharon T; Marsh, H Nicholas; Gottardis, Marco M

    2011-01-01

    Engineered domains of human fibronectin (Adnectins™) were used to generate a bispecific Adnectin targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), two transmembrane receptors that mediate proliferative and survival cell signaling in cancer. Single-domain Adnectins that specifically bind EGFR or IGF-IR were generated using mRNA display with a library containing as many as 1013 Adnectin variants. mRNA display was also used to optimize lead Adnectin affinities, resulting in clones that inhibited EGFR phosphorylation at 7 to 38 nM compared to 2.6 µM for the parental clone. Individual optimized Adnectins specific for blocking either EGFR or IGF-IR signaling were engineered into a single protein (EI-Tandem Adnectin). The EI-Tandems inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR and IGF-IR, induced receptor degradation and inhibited down-stream cell signaling and proliferation of human cancer cell lines (A431, H292, BxPC3 and RH41) with IC50 values ranging from 0.1 to 113 nM. Although Adnectins bound to EGFR at a site distinct from those of anti-EGFR antibodies cetuximab, panitumumab and nimotuzumab, like the antibodies, the anti-EGFR Adnectins blocked the binding of EGF to EGFR. PEGylated EI-Tandem inhibited the growth of both EGFR and IGF-IR driven human tumor xenografts, induced degradation of EGFR and reduced EGFR phosphorylation in tumors. These results demonstrate efficient engineering of bispecific Adnectins with high potency and desired specificity. The bispecificity may improve biological activity compared to monospecific biologics as tumor growth is driven by multiple growth factors. Our results illustrate a technological advancement for constructing multi-specific biologics in cancer therapy. PMID:21099371

  4. Regulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking by Src and Eps8

    PubMed Central

    Auciello, Giulio; Cunningham, Debbie L.; Tatar, Tulin; Heath, John K.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) mediate a wide spectrum of cellular responses that are crucial for development and wound healing. However, aberrant FGFR activity leads to cancer. Activated growth factor receptors undergo stimulated endocytosis, but can continue to signal along the endocytic pathway. Endocytic trafficking controls the duration and intensity of signalling, and growth factor receptor signalling can lead to modifications of trafficking pathways. We have developed live-cell imaging methods for studying FGFR dynamics to investigate mechanisms that coordinate the interplay between receptor trafficking and signal transduction. Activated FGFR enters the cell following recruitment to pre-formed clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). However, FGFR activation stimulates clathrin-mediated endocytosis; FGF treatment increases the number of CCPs, including those undergoing endocytosis, and this effect is mediated by Src and its phosphorylation target Eps8. Eps8 interacts with the clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery and depletion of Eps8 inhibits FGFR trafficking and immediate Erk signalling. Once internalized, FGFR passes through peripheral early endosomes en route to recycling and degredative compartments, through an Src- and Eps8-dependent mechanism. Thus Eps8 functions as a key coordinator in the interplay between FGFR signalling and trafficking. This work provides the first detailed mechanistic analysis of growth factor receptor clustering at the cell surface through signal transduction and endocytic trafficking. As we have characterised the Src target Eps8 as a key regulator of FGFR signalling and trafficking, and identified the early endocytic system as the site of Eps8-mediated effects, this work provides novel mechanistic insight into the reciprocal regulation of growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking. PMID:23203811

  5. The prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA expression in primary ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J. M.; Langdon, S. P.; Simpson, B. J.; Stewart, M.; Katsaros, D.; Sismondi, P.; Love, S.; Scott, W. N.; Williams, A. R.; Lessells, A. M.; Macleod, K. G.; Smyth, J. F.; Miller, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of mRNA for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, EGF and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) was determined in 76 malignant, six borderline and 15 benign primary ovarian tumours using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and related to clinical and pathological parameters. Of the malignant tumours, 70% (53/76) expressed EGF receptor mRNA, 31% (23/75) expressed EGF mRNA and 35% (26/75) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA. For the borderline tumours, four of six (67%) expressed EGF receptor mRNA, 1/6 (17%) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA and none expressed EGF mRNA. Finally, 33% (5/15) of the benign tumours expressed EGF receptor mRNA, whereas 40% (6/15) expressed EGF mRNA and 7% (1/15) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA. The presence of the EGF receptor in malignant tumours was associated with that of TGF-alpha (P = 0.0015) but not with EGF (P = 1.00), whereas there was no relationship between the presence of EGF and TGF-alpha (P = 1.00). EGF receptor mRNA expression was significantly and positively associated with serous histology (P = 0.006) but not with stage or grade. Neither EGF nor TGF-alpha showed any link with histological subtype or stage. The survival of patients with malignant tumours possessing EGF receptor mRNA was significantly reduced compared with that of patients whose tumours were negative (P = 0.030 for all malignant tumours; P = 0.007 for malignant epithelial tumours only). In contrast, neither the expression of TGF-alpha nor EGF was related to survival. These data suggest that the presence of EGF receptor mRNA is associated with poor prognosis in primary ovarian cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8562334

  6. Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlins, Scott A.; Bollinger, Nikki; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2005-08-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca2+o). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca2+]o, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca2+o. Further, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G-protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca2+o-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca2+o. This is consistent with the known expression of TGFa by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR mediated response to increased Ca2+o in Rat-1 fibroblasts, and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

  7. Human microvascular endothelial cells express receptors for platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.G.; Kim, Insoon; Calabresi, P.; Frackelton, A.R. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Endothelial cells have been widely thought to be unresponsive to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, a major growth factor released from stimulated platelets at the sites of vascular insults) and devoid of PDGF receptors. Nevertheless, in examining the growth-factor responses of microvascular endothelial cells isolated from human omental adipose tissue, the authors were surprised to detect PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180-kDa glycoprotein, subsequently identified as the cellular receptor for PDGF by specific immunoprecipitation. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF binding to human microvascular endothelial cells revealed 30,000 PDGF receptors per cell with a K{sub d} of 0.14 nM. Normal cellular consequences of receptor activation were also observed, including tyrosine phosphorylation of a 42-kDa protein and serine phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Furthermore, PDGF was mitogenic for these cells. Microvascular endothelial cells play a central role in neovascularization required for wound healing and solid tumor growth. Thus, the discovery of functional PFDG receptors on human microvascular endothelial cells suggests a direct role for PDGF in this process.

  8. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  9. KL/KIT co-expression in mouse fetal oocytes.

    PubMed

    Doneda, Luisa; Klinger, Francesca-Gioia; Larizza, Lidia; De Felici, Massimo

    2002-12-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor, KIT, and its ligand, KL are important regulators of germ cell development. The aim of this study was to examine in detail the expression of the genes encoding these proteins (White and Steel, respectively) during the fetal period (14.5-18.5 days post coitum, dpc) and the two weeks after birth in mouse ovaries using the highly sensitive in situ reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (in situ RT-PCR). KL and KIT mRNAs were not detected in 14.5-15.5 dpc ovaries but, between 16.5 and 17.5 dpc, most of the oocytes in the outer regions of the ovaries positively stained for both mRNAs. The majority of the co-expressing oocytes were identified at the zygotene/pachytene stage of meiotic prophase I. At 18.5 dpc, positive staining for KL mRNA was present only in the somatic cells in the outer regions of the ovaries. At birth, faint KL mRNA-labelled somatic cells were mainly found in the central region of the ovaries and, by P7-14, a higher level of expression was detected in the follicle cells of one- and two-layered growing follicles. Between 17.5 dpc and birth, most of the oocytes expressed KIT mRNA and, from P7 onward, there was a considerable accumulation of transcripts in the growing oocytes. The results of in situ RT-PCR were confirmed by RT-PCR on purified populations of oocytes, and at protein level by means of immunohistochemistry. The co-expression of KL and KIT in a fraction of fetal oocytes suggests that the KL/KIT system, besides the well known paracrine functions on germ cells, may exert a novel autocrine role during the mid-stage of the oocyte meiotic prophase. The possibility that this autocrine loop plays a role in sustaining the survival of fetal oocytes in this stage is supported by the finding that the addition to the culture medium of anti-KL or anti-KIT antibodies led to a significant increase in oocyte apoptosis in the absence of exogenous KL. PMID:12533025

  10. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor causes acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancer cells with the wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Katsuaki; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy often provides a dramatic response in lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations. In addition, moderate clinical efficacy of the EGFR-TKI, erlotinib, has been shown in lung cancer patients with the wild-type EGFR. Numerous molecular mechanisms that cause acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations; however, few have been reported in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR. We used H358 lung adenocarcinoma cells lacking EGFR mutations that showed modest sensitivity to erlotinib. The H358 cells acquired resistance to erlotinib via chronic exposure to the drug. The H358 erlotinib-resistant (ER) cells do not have a secondary EGFR mutation, neither MET gene amplification nor PTEN downregulation; these have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations. From comprehensive screening of receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation, we observed increased phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) in H358ER cells compared with parental H358 cells. H358ER cells responded to combined therapy with erlotinib and NVP-AEW541, an IGF1R-TKI. Our results indicate that IGF1R activation is a molecular mechanism that confers acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR. PMID:24458568

  11. Prostaglandin E2 regulates angiogenesis via activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Federica; Solito, Raffaella; Morbidelli, Lucia; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2008-01-25

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) behaves as a mitogen in epithelial tumor cells as well as in many other cell types. We investigated the actions of PGE(2) on microvascular endothelial cells (capillary venular endothelial cells) with the purpose of delineating the signaling pathway leading to the acquisition of the angiogenic phenotype and to new vessel formation. PGE(2) (100 nM) produced activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR-1), as measured by its phosphorylation, but not of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. PGE(2) stimulated the EP3 subtype receptor, as deduced by abrogation of EP3 Galpha(i) subunit activity through pertussis toxin. Consistent with this result, in human umbilical venular endothelial cells missing the EP3 receptor, PGE(2) did not phosphorylate FGFR-1. Upon binding to its receptor, PGE(2) initiated an autocrine/paracrine signaling cascade involving the intracellular activation of c-Src, activation of matrix metalloproteinase (predominantly MMP2), which in turn caused the mobilization of membrane-anchored fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). In fact, in cells unable to release FGF-2 the transfection with both FGFR-1 and EP3 did not result in FGFR-1 phosphorylation in response to PGE(2). Relevance for the FGF2-FGFR-1 system was highlighted by confocal analysis, showing receptor internalization after cell exposure to the prostanoid. ERK1/2 appeared to be the distal signal involved, its phosphorylation being sensitive to either cSrc inhibitor or FGFR-1 blocker. Finally, PGE(2) stimulated cell migration and capillary formation in aortic rings, which were severely reduced by inhibitors of signaling molecules or by receptor antagonist. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the involvement of FGFR-1 through FGF2 in eliciting PGE(2) angiogenic responses. This signaling pattern is similar to the autocrine-paracrine mechanism which operates in endothelial cells to support neovascular growth. PMID:18042549

  12. Cross talk among tyrosine kinase receptors in PC12 cells: desensitization of mitogenic epidermal growth factor receptors by the neurotrophic factors, nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mothe, I; Ballotti, R; Tartare, S; Kowalski-Chauvel, A; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to PC12 cells. We show that NGF and bFGF rapidly induce a reduction in 125I-EGF binding to PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This decrease amounts to 50% for NGF and 35% for bFGF. Both factors appear to act through a protein kinase C(PKC)-independent pathway, because their effect persists in PKC-downregulated PC12 cells. Scatchard analysis indicates that NGF and bFGF decrease the number of high affinity EGF binding sites. In addition to their effect on EGF binding, NGF and bFGF activate in intact PC12 cells one or several serine/threonine kinases leading to EGF receptor threonine phosphorylation. Using an in vitro phosphorylation system, we show that NGF- or bFGF-activated extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) is able to phosphorylate a kinase-deficient EGF receptor. Phosphoamino acid analysis indicates that this phosphorylation occurs mainly on threonine residues. Furthermore, two comparable phosphopeptides are observed in the EGF receptor, phosphorylated either in vivo after NGF treatment or in a cell-free system by NGF-activated ERK1. Finally, a good correlation was found between the time courses of ERK1 activation and 125I-EGF binding inhibition after NGF or bFGF treatment. In conclusion, in PC12 cells the NGF- and bFGF-stimulated ERK1 appears to be involved in the induction of the threonine phosphorylation of the EGF receptor and the decrease in the number of high affinity EGF binding sites. Images PMID:8400459

  13. Evaluation of Gene Association Methods for Coexpression Network Construction and Biological Knowledge Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sapna; Nie, Jeff; Chen, Huann-Sheng; Ma, Hao; Stewart, Ron; Li, Xiang; Lu, Meng-Zhu; Taylor, William M.; Wei, Hairong

    2012-01-01

    Background Constructing coexpression networks and performing network analysis using large-scale gene expression data sets is an effective way to uncover new biological knowledge; however, the methods used for gene association in constructing these coexpression networks have not been thoroughly evaluated. Since different methods lead to structurally different coexpression networks and provide different information, selecting the optimal gene association method is critical. Methods and Results In this study, we compared eight gene association methods – Spearman rank correlation, Weighted Rank Correlation, Kendall, Hoeffding's D measure, Theil-Sen, Rank Theil-Sen, Distance Covariance, and Pearson – and focused on their true knowledge discovery rates in associating pathway genes and construction coordination networks of regulatory genes. We also examined the behaviors of different methods to microarray data with different properties, and whether the biological processes affect the efficiency of different methods. Conclusions We found that the Spearman, Hoeffding and Kendall methods are effective in identifying coexpressed pathway genes, whereas the Theil-sen, Rank Theil-Sen, Spearman, and Weighted Rank methods perform well in identifying coordinated transcription factors that control the same biological processes and traits. Surprisingly, the widely used Pearson method is generally less efficient, and so is the Distance Covariance method that can find gene pairs of multiple relationships. Some analyses we did clearly show Pearson and Distance Covariance methods have distinct behaviors as compared to all other six methods. The efficiencies of different methods vary with the data properties to some degree and are largely contingent upon the biological processes, which necessitates the pre-analysis to identify the best performing method for gene association and coexpression network construction. PMID:23226279

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Acts Primarily via Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor α to Promote Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pennock, Steven; Haddock, Luis J.; Mukai, Shizuo; Kazlauskas, Andrius

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a nonneovascular blinding disease and the leading cause for failure in surgical repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. Once formed, PVR is difficult to treat. Hence, there is an acute interest in developing approaches to prevent PVR. Of the many growth factors and cytokines that accumulate in vitreous as PVR develops, neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A has recently been found to prevent PVR in at least one animal model. The goal of this study was to test if Food and Drug Administration–approved agents could protect the eye from PVR in multiple animal models and to further investigate the underlying mechanisms. Neutralizing VEGF with aflibercept (VEGF Trap-Eye) safely and effectively protected rabbits from PVR in multiple models of disease. Furthermore, aflibercept reduced the bioactivity of both experimental and clinical PVR vitreous. Finally, although VEGF could promote some PVR-associated cellular responses via VEGF receptors expressed on the retinal pigment epithelial cells that drive this disease, VEGF's major contribution to vitreal bioactivity occurred via platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Thus, VEGF promotes PVR by a noncanonical ability to engage platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. These findings indicate that VEGF contributes to nonangiogenic diseases and that anti–VEGF-based therapies may be effective on a wider spectrum of diseases than previously appreciated. PMID:25261788

  15. Cytoplasmic domains determine signal specificity, cellular routing characteristics and influence ligand binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Dull, T J; Honegger, A M; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1989-01-01

    The cell surface receptors for insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both employ a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity to fulfil their distinct biological roles. To identify the structural domains responsible for various receptor activities, we have generated chimeric receptor polypeptides consisting of major EGF and insulin receptor structural domains and examined their biochemical properties and cellular signalling activities. The EGF-insulin receptor hybrids are properly synthesized and transported to the cell surface, where they form binding competent structures that are defined by the origin of their extracellular domains. While their ligand binding affinities are altered, we find that these chimeric receptors are fully functional in transmitting signals across the plasma membrane and into the cell. Thus, EGF receptor and insulin receptor cytoplasmic domain signalling capabilities are independent of their new heterotetrameric or monomeric environments respectively. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains carry the structural determinants that define kinase specificity, mitogenic and transforming potential, and receptor routing. Images PMID:2583088

  16. Platelet-Activating Factor-Receptor and Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P; Konger, Raymond L.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    First described in 1972 by Benveniste and colleagues, platelet-activating factor (PAF) remains one of the potent phospholipid known to date. The role of PAF produced enzymatically in mediating diverse biological and pathophysiological processes including inflammatory and allergic diseases and cancers in response to various stimuli has been extensively studied. However, little is known about the role of non-enzymatically-generated PAF-like lipids produced in response to pro-oxidative stressors, particularly in modulating the host immune responses to tumor immunity, which is the focus of this review.

  17. Transcription factor assembly on the nicotinic receptor beta4 subunit gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Michael D; Brüschweiler-Li, Lei; Mou, Zhongming; Gardner, Paul D

    2008-04-16

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in a plethora of fundamental biological processes ranging from muscle contraction to formation of memories. The receptors are pentameric proteins whose subunits are encoded by distinct genes. Subunit composition of a mature nicotinic receptor is governed in part by the transcriptional regulation of each subunit gene. Here, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we report the interaction of the transcription factors Sp1, Sp3, c-Jun and Sox10 with the beta4 subunit gene promoter in neuronal-like cell lines and rodent brain tissue. Our results corroborate previous in-vitro data demonstrating that these transcription factors interact with the beta4 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that Sp1, Sp3, c-Jun and Sox10 regulate expression of the beta4 subunit gene in the mammalian brain. PMID:18382288

  18. Module Based Differential Coexpression Analysis Method for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lin; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Xia, Jun-Feng; Huang, De-Shuang

    2015-01-01

    More and more studies have shown that many complex diseases are contributed jointly by alterations of numerous genes. Genes often coordinate together as a functional biological pathway or network and are highly correlated. Differential coexpression analysis, as a more comprehensive technique to the differential expression analysis, was raised to research gene regulatory networks and biological pathways of phenotypic changes through measuring gene correlation changes between disease and normal conditions. In this paper, we propose a gene differential coexpression analysis algorithm in the level of gene sets and apply the algorithm to a publicly available type 2 diabetes (T2D) expression dataset. Firstly, we calculate coexpression biweight midcorrelation coefficients between all gene pairs. Then, we select informative correlation pairs using the “differential coexpression threshold” strategy. Finally, we identify the differential coexpression gene modules using maximum clique concept and k-clique algorithm. We apply the proposed differential coexpression analysis method on simulated data and T2D data. Two differential coexpression gene modules about T2D were detected, which should be useful for exploring the biological function of the related genes. PMID:26339648

  19. The Interaction between the Drosophila Secreted Protein Argos and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibits Dimerization of the Receptor and Binding of Secreted Spitz to the Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming-hao; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Ito, Mikiko; Okano, Hideyuki

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila Argos (Aos), a secreted protein with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, has been shown to inhibit the activation of the Drosophila EGF receptor (DER). However, it has not been determined whether Aos binds directly to DER or whether regulation of the DER activation occurs through some other mechanism. Using DER-expressing cells (DER/S2) and a recombinant DER extracellular domain-Fc fusion protein (DER-Fc), we have shown that Aos binds directly to the extracellular domain of DER with its carboxyl-terminal region, including the EGF-like domain. Furthermore, Aos can block the binding of secreted Spitz (sSpi), a transforming growth factor α-like ligand of DER, to the extracellular domain of DER. We observed that sSpi stimulates the dimerization of both the soluble DER extracellular domain (sDER) and the intact DER in the DER/S2 cells and that Aos can block the sSpi-induced dimerization of both sDER and intact DER. Moreover, we have shown that, by directly interacting with DER, Aos and SpiAos (a chimeric protein that is composed of the N-terminal region of Spi and the C-terminal region of Aos) inhibit the dimerization and phosphorylation of DER that are induced by DER's overexpression in the absence of sSpi. These results indicate that Aos exerts its inhibitory function through dual molecular mechanisms: by blocking both the receptor dimerization and the binding of activating ligand to the receptor. This is the first description of this novel inhibitory mechanism for receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:10688656

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of Candidate PET Radioligands for Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type-1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, Nicholas J.; Li, Yu-Wen; Chin, Frederick T.; Dischino, Douglas D.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Deskus, Jeffrey A.; Mattson, Ronald J.; Imaizumo, Masao; Pieschl, Rick; Molski, Thaddeus F.; Fujita, Masahiro; Dulac, Heidi; Zaczek, Robert; Bronson, Joanne J.; Macor, John E.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A radioligand for measuring the density of corticotrophin-releasing factor subtype-1 receptors (CRF1 receptors) in living animal and human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) would be a useful tool for neuropsychiatric investigations and the development of drugs intended to interact with this target. This study was aimed at discovery of such a radioligand from a group of CRF1 receptor ligands based on a core 3-(phenylamino)pyrazin-2(1H)-one scaffold. Methods CRF1 receptor ligands were selected for development as possible PET radioligands based on their binding potency at CRF receptors (displacement of [125I]CRF from rat cortical membranes), measured lipophilicity, autoradiographic binding profile in rat and rhesus monkey brain sections, rat biodistribution, and suitability for radiolabeling with carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Two identified candidates (BMS-721313 and BMS-732098) were labeled with fluorine-18. A third candidate (BMS-709460) was labeled with carbon-11 and all three radioligands were evaluated in PET experiments in rhesus monkey. CRF1 receptor density (Bmax) was assessed in rhesus brain cortical and cerebellum membranes with the CRF receptor ligand, [3H]BMS-728300. Results The three ligands selected for development showed high binding affinity (IC50 values, 0.3–8 nM) at CRF1 receptors and moderate lipophilicity (LogD, 2.8–4.4). [3H]BMS-728300 and the two 18F-labeled ligands showed region-specific binding in rat and rhesus monkey brain autoradiography, namely higher binding density in the frontal and limbic cortex, and cerebellum than in thalamus and brainstem. CRF1 receptor Bmax in rhesus brain was found to be 50–120 fmol/mg protein across cortical regions and cerebellum. PET experiments in rhesus monkey showed that the radioligands [18F]BMS-721313, [18F]BMS-732098 and [11C]BMS-709460 gave acceptably high brain radioactivity uptake but no indication of the specific binding as seen in vitro. Conclusions Candidate CRF1 receptor

  1. Genetics Home Reference: tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): definition, semiology, prognosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and place relative to other periodic joint diseases. Joint Bone Spine. 2004 Jul;71(4):284-90. Review. Citation on PubMed Pettersson T, Kantonen J, Matikainen S, ...

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  3. MECHANISMS OF ZN-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MECHANISMS OF Zn-INDUCED SIGNAL INITIATION THROUGH THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR (EGFR)
    James M. Samet*, Lee M. Graves? and Weidong Wu?. *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and ?Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North C...

  4. KRÜPPEL-LIKE FACTOR 9 AND REGULATION OF ENDOMETRIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR-ALPHA SIGNALING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endometrial cancer risk is linked to aberrant estrogen receptor-alpha (ER alpha) signaling caused by increased ER alpha activation due to hyper-estrogenic environments or mutations in growth-regulatory factors. We had shown that ER alpha signaling is attenuated by the Sp1-related transcription facto...

  5. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean P; Hastings, Jordan F; Han, Jeremy Z R; Croucher, David R

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27597943

  6. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean P.; Hastings, Jordan F.; Han, Jeremy Z. R.; Croucher, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27597943

  7. Hydrodynamic properties of solubilized atrial natriuretic factor receptor from bovine adrenal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Meloche, S.; Ong, H.; De Lean, A.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously reported the pharmacological characterization of specific receptors for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in bovine adrenal cortex. In this study they report the physicochemical characteristics of this receptor solubilized with the nonionic detergent octyl glucoside. /sup 125/I-ANF binding activity was assayed by a PEG precipitation technique. Analysis of competitive binding curves with the soluble receptor preparation revealed the presence of high-affinity binding sites with a K/sub d/ of 40 pM and a density of 400 fmol/mg protein. The hydrodynamic properties of the solubilized receptor prelabeled with /sup 125/I-ANF were then determined. The receptor-detergent complex eluted as a major peak with a stokes radius of 51.3 A as determined by gel filtration on Superose-6. The sedimentation coefficient, S/sub 20 w/, of the complex was 6.19 S as determined by ultracentrifugation on a 5-20% sucrose gradient. From these data, the molecular weight of the ANF receptor-octyl glucoside complex was estimated to be 133,000 assuming a partial specific volume of 0.730 ml/g. This value is in agreement with the values that they have previously reported by SDS-gel electrophoresis.

  8. A holistic approach combining factor analysis, positive matrix factorization, and chemical mass balance applied to receptor modeling.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, N; Pushpavanam, S; Anu, N

    2013-12-01

    Rapid urbanization and population growth resulted in severe deterioration of air quality in most of the major cities in India. Therefore, it is essential to ascertain the contribution of various sources of air pollution to enable us to determine effective control policies. The present work focuses on the holistic approach of combining factor analysis (FA), positive matrix factorization (PMF), and chemical mass balance (CMB) for receptor modeling in order to identify the sources and their contributions in air quality studies. Insight from the emission inventory was used to remove subjectivity in source identification. Each approach has its own limitations. Factor analysis can identify qualitatively a minimal set of important factors which can account for the variations in the measured data. This step uses information from emission inventory to qualitatively match source profiles with factor loadings. This signifies the identification of dominant sources through factors. PMF gives source profiles and source contributions from the entire receptor data matrix. The data from FA is applied for rank reduction in PMF. Whenever multiple solutions exist, emission inventory identifies source profiles uniquely, so that they have a physical relevance. CMB identifies the source contributions obtained from FA and PMF. The novel approach proposed here overcomes the limitations of the individual methods in a synergistic way. The adopted methodology is found valid for a synthetic data and also the data of field study. PMID:23832184

  9. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence cytosensor for quantitative evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanjuan; Zhang, Shaolian; Wen, Qingqing; Huang, Hongxing; Yang, Peihui

    2015-06-30

    A sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy for evaluating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression level on cell surfaces was designed by integrating the specific recognition of EGFR expressed on MCF-7 cell surfaces with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-funtionalized CdS quantum dots (CdSQDs)-capped magnetic bead (MB) probe. The high sensitivity of ECL probe of EGF-funtionalized CdSQD-capped-MB was used for competitive recognition with EGFR expressed on cell surfaces with recombinant EGFR protein. The changes of ECL intensity depended on both the cell number and the expression level of EGFR receptor on cell surfaces. A wide linear response to cells ranging from 80 to 4×10(6)cellsmL(-1) with a detection limit of 40cellsmL(-1) was obtained. The EGF-cytosensor was used to evaluate EGFR expression levels on MCF-7 cells, and the average number of EGFR receptor on single MCF-7 cells was 1.35×10(5) with the relative standard deviation of 4.3%. This strategy was further used for in-situ and real-time evaluating EGFR receptor expressed on cell surfaces in response to drugs stimulation at different concentration and incubation time. The proposed method provided potential applications in the detection of receptors on cancer cells and anticancer drugs screening. PMID:26041531

  10. Autoradiographic localization of epidermal growth factor receptors to all major uterine cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.H.; Mukku, V.R.; Verner, G.; Kirkland, J.L.; Stancel, G.M.

    1988-03-01

    We have recently studied the structure and function of the uterine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, its hormonal regulation, and its possible role in estrogen-induced uterine DNA synthesis. Since the uterus is composed of multiple cell types, we sought, in the work reported here, to localize EGF binding in this organ by autoradiography. Prior to the actual autoradiography, we performed a companion series of experiments to insure that EGF binding to uterine tissue in situ represented a true receptor interaction. Uteri from immature female rats were incubated in vitro with 125I-EGF at 25 degrees C. Tissue binding was maximal within 120 min and remained constant for at least an additional 120 min. This binding of labeled EGF was largely abolished by excess unlabeled EGF but not by other growth factors, indicating that binding was to specific receptors. The binding of 125I-EGF was saturable and reached a plateau at 4-8 nM; specific binding was half-maximal at 1-2 nM EGF. In situ cross-linking studies revealed that 125I-EGF was bound predominantly to a 170,000 MW EGF receptor similar to that seen in isolated uterine membranes. Incubation of uteri with 125I-EGF followed by autoradiography revealed binding to epithelial cells, stroma, and myometrium. These results provide evidence for the presence of specific EGF receptors in all major uterine cell types of the immature rat.

  11. Uptake and Intracellular Transport of Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor: Evidence for Free and Cytoskeleton-anchored Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Citores, Lucía; Wesche, Jørgen; Kolpakova, Elona; Olsnes, Sjur

    1999-01-01

    Endocytic uptake and intracellular transport of acidic FGF was studied in cells transfected with FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4). Acidification of the cytosol to block endocytic uptake from coated pits did not inhibit endocytosis of the growth factor in COS cells transfected with FGFR4, indicating that it is to a large extent taken up by an alternative endocytic pathway. Fractionation of the cells demonstrated that part of the growth factor receptor was present in a low-density, caveolin-containing fraction, but we were unable to demonstrate binding to caveolin in immunoprecipitation studies. Upon treatment of the cells with acidic FGF, the activated receptor, together with the growth factor, moved to a juxtanuclear compartment, which was identified as the recycling endosome compartment. When the cells were lysed with Triton X-100, 3-([3-chloramidopropyl]dimethylammonio)-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate, or 2-octyl glucoside, almost all surface-exposed and endocytosed FGFR4 was solubilized, but only a minor fraction of the total FGFR4 in the cells was found in the soluble fraction. The data indicate that the major part of FGFR4 is anchored to detergent-insoluble structures, presumably cytoskeletal elements associated with the recycling endosome compartment. PMID:10564275

  12. Coexpressed RIG-I agonist enhances humoral immune response to influenza virus DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luke, Jeremy M; Simon, Gregory G; Söderholm, Jonas; Errett, John S; August, J Thomas; Gale, Michael; Hodgson, Clague P; Williams, James A

    2011-02-01

    Increasing levels of plasmid vector-mediated activation of innate immune signaling pathways is an approach to improve DNA vaccine-induced adaptive immunity for infectious disease and cancer applications. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a critical cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) pattern receptor required for innate immune activation in response to viral infection. Activation of RIG-I leads to type I interferon (IFN) and inflammatory cytokine production through interferon promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1)-mediated activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB signaling. DNA vaccines coexpressing antigen and an expressed RNA (eRNA) RIG-I agonist were made, and the effect of RIG-I activation on antigen-specific immune responses to the encoded antigen was determined. Plasmid vector backbones expressing various RIG-I ligands from RNA polymerase III promoters were screened in a cell culture assay for RIG-I agonist activity, and optimized, potent RIG-I ligands were developed. One of these, eRNA41H, combines (i) eRNA11a, an immunostimulatory dsRNA expressed by convergent transcription, with (ii) adenovirus VA RNAI. eRNA41H was integrated into the backbone of DNA vaccine vectors expressing H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA). The resultant eRNA vectors potently induced type 1 IFN production in cell culture through RIG-I activation and combined high-level HA antigen expression with RNA-mediated type I IFN activation in a single plasmid vector. The eRNA vectors induced increased HA-specific serum antibody binding avidity after naked DNA intramuscular prime and boost delivery in mice. This demonstrates that DNA vaccine potency may be augmented by the incorporation of RIG-I-activating immunostimulatory RNA into the vector backbone. PMID:21106745

  13. A candidate targeting molecule of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor for gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hirokazu; Endo, Takao; Carbone, David P; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Advances in molecular research in cancer have brought new therapeutic strategies into clinical usage. One new group of targets is tyrosine kinase receptors, which can be treated by several strategies, including small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Aberrant activation of growth factors/receptors and their signal pathways are required for malignant transformation and progression in gastrointestinal (GI) carcinomas. The concept of targeting specific carcinogenic receptors has been validated by successful clinical application of many new drugs. Type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGF-IR) signaling potently stimulates tumor progression and cellular differentiation, and is a promising new molecular target in human malignancies. In this review, we focus on this promising therapeutic target, IGF-IR. The IGF/IGF-IR axis is an important modifier of tumor cell proliferation, survival, growth, and treatment sensitivity in many malignant diseases, including human GI cancers. Preclinical studies demonstrated that downregulation of IGF-IR signals reversed the neoplastic phenotype and sensitized cells to anticancer treatments. These results were mainly obtained through our strategy of adenoviruses expressing dominant negative IGF-IR (IGF-IR/dn) against gastrointestinal cancers, including esophagus, stomach, colon, and pancreas. We also summarize a variety of strategies to interrupt the IGFs/IGF-IR axis and their preclinical experiences. Several mAbs and TKIs targeting IGF-IR have entered clinical trials, and early results have suggested that these agents have generally acceptable safety profiles as single agents. We summarize the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy and discuss the merits/demerits of dual targeting of IGF-IR and other growth factor receptors, including Her2 and the insulin receptor, as well as other alternatives and possible drug combinations. Thus, IGF-IR might be a candidate for a molecular

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF II) receptor from rat brain is of lower apparent molecular weight than the IGF II receptor from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    McElduff, A.; Poronnik, P.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    The binding subunits of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF I) receptors from rat brain are of lower molecular weight than the corresponding receptor in rat liver, possibly due to variations in sialic acid content. We have compared the IGF II receptor from rat brain and rat liver. The brain receptor is of smaller apparent mol wt (about 10 K) on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This size difference is independent of ligand binding as it persists in iodinated and specifically immunoprecipitated receptors. From studies of wheat germ agglutinin binding and the effect of neuraminidase on receptor mobility, we conclude that this difference is not simply due to variations in sialic acid content. Treatment with endoglycosidase F results in reduction in the molecular size of both liver and brain receptors and after this treatment the aglycoreceptors are of similar size. We conclude that in rat brain tissue the IGF II receptor like the binding subunits of the insulin and IGF I receptors is of lower molecular size than the corresponding receptors in rat liver. This difference is due to differences in N-linked glycosylation.

  15. Stimulation of proliferation of a human osteosarcoma cell line by exogenous acidic fibroblast growth factor requires both activation of receptor tyrosine kinase and growth factor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedłocha, A; Falnes, P O; Rapak, A; Muñoz, R; Klingenberg, O; Olsnes, S

    1996-01-01

    U2OS Dr1 cells, originating from a human osteosarcoma, are resistant to the intracellular action of diphtheria toxin but contain toxin receptors on their surfaces. These cells do not have detectable amounts of fibroblast growth factor receptors. When these cells were transfected with fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, the addition of acidic fibroblast growth factor to the medium induced tyrosine phosphorylation, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. A considerable fraction of the cell-associated growth factor was found in the nuclear fraction. When the growth factor was fused to the diphtheria toxin A fragment, it was still bound to the growth factor receptor and induced tyrosine phosphorylation but did not induce DNA synthesis or cell proliferation, nor was any fusion protein recovered in the nuclear fraction. On the other hand, when the fusion protein was associated with the diphtheria toxin B fragment to allow translocation to the cytosol by the toxin pathway, the fusion protein was targeted to the nucleus and stimulated both DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. In untransfected cells containing toxin receptors but not fibroblast growth factor receptors, the fusion protein was translocated to the cytosol and targeted to the nucleus, but in this case, it stimulated only DNA synthesis. These data indicate that the following two signals are required to stimulate cell proliferation in transfected U2OS Dr1 cells: the tyrosine kinase signal from the activated fibroblast growth factor receptor and translocation of the growth factor into the cell. PMID:8524304

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor and glioblastoma multiforme: molecular basis for a new approach.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Sereno, María; González-Barón, Manuel; Perona, Rosario

    2008-02-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumours. Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the cornerstone of actual treatment. In spite of large therapeutic efforts, overall survival is still poor. New molecular data allow a new molecular classification for high-grade gliomas and open a therapeutic window for targeted therapy. Molecular diagnostic tools may provide a basis for receptor-based therapies and enough information to personalise future treatments. In this regard, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target that will play a critical role in the management of glioma patients. This review summarises basic and preclinical data that support future use of therapies against EGFR. PMID:18258505

  17. Umbilical cord blood regulatory T-cell expansion and functional effects of tumor necrosis factor receptor family members OX40 and 4-1BB expressed on artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Harker-Murray, Paul; Porter, Stephen B.; Merkel, Sarah C.; Londer, Aryel; Taylor, Dawn K.; Bina, Megan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Rubinstein, Pablo; Van Rooijen, Nico; Golovina, Tatiana N.; Suhoski, Megan M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; June, Carl H.; Riley, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we showed that human umbilical cord blood (UCB) regulatory T cells (Tregs) could be expanded approximately 100-fold using anti-CD3/28 monoclonal antibody (mAb)–coated beads to provide T-cell receptor and costimulatory signals. Because Treg numbers from a single UCB unit are limited, we explored the use of cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) preloaded with anti-CD3/28 mAbs to achieve higher levels of Treg expansion. Compared with beads, aAPCs had similar expansion properties while significantly increasing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) secretion and the potency of Treg suppressor function. aAPCs modified to coexpress OX40L or 4-1BBL expanded UCB Tregs to a significantly greater extent than bead- or nonmodified aAPC cultures, reaching mean expansion levels exceeding 1250-fold. Despite the high expansion and in contrast to studies using other Treg sources, neither OX40 nor 4-1BB signaling of UCB Tregs reduced in vitro suppression. UCB Tregs expanded with 4-1BBL expressing aAPCs had decreased levels of proapoptotic bim. UCB Tregs expanded with nonmodified or modified aAPCs versus beads resulted in higher survival associated with increased Treg persistence in a xeno-geneic graft-versus-host disease lethality model. These data offer a novel approach for UCB Treg expansion using aAPCs, including those coexpressing OX40L or 4-1BBL. PMID:18645038

  18. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Sarbottam; Shrestha, Sandesh K.; Binder, Brad; Stewart, C. Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs). Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs. PMID:25566309

  19. Coexpression analysis of human genes across many microarray data sets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Homin K; Hsu, Amy K; Sajdak, Jon; Qin, Jie; Pavlidis, Paul

    2004-06-01

    We present a large-scale analysis of mRNA coexpression based on 60 large human data sets containing a total of 3924 microarrays. We sought pairs of genes that were reliably coexpressed (based on the correlation of their expression profiles) in multiple data sets, establishing a high-confidence network of 8805 genes connected by 220,649 "coexpression links" that are observed in at least three data sets. Confirmed positive correlations between genes were much more common than confirmed negative correlations. We show that confirmation of coexpression in multiple data sets is correlated with functional relatedness, and show how cluster analysis of the network can reveal functionally coherent groups of genes. Our findings demonstrate how the large body of accumulated microarray data can be exploited to increase the reliability of inferences about gene function. PMID:15173114

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2: Its Contribution to Acute Cellular Rejection and Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and one of the two receptors that orchestrate the complex biological functions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF, also designed TNF-α). Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that TNFR2 plays an important role in renal disorders associated with acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma but its exact role in these settings is still not completely understood. This papers reviews the factors that may mediate TNFR2 induction in acute cellular rejection and clear cell renal carcinoma and its contribution to these conditions and discusses its therapeutic implications. A greater understanding of the function of TNFR2 may lead to the development of new anti-TNF drugs. PMID:24350291

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor in normal human tissues.

    PubMed

    Damjanov, I; Mildner, B; Knowles, B B

    1986-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope of the external domain of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor was used to localize this protein in selected normal human tissues. Two patterns of reactivity were recognized: strong linear or granular cell surface staining, and granular cytoplasmic staining. In one tissue, the endometrium, a change in the reaction pattern associated with changes in hormonal stimulation was observed. In some tissues such as epididymis and skin, the antibody showed surface reactivity with cells considered to represent part of the proliferating cell compartment, whereas in liver, pancreas, and prostate, all cells were reactive with the antibody, though the predominant reactivity was localized in the cytoplasm. The differential distribution of the epidermal growth factor receptor to specific cell types and cellular compartments may signify adaptations that permit growth factor responsiveness in a milieu of available ligand. PMID:3534450

  2. Characterization of a receptor for human monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8

    SciTech Connect

    Grob, P.M.; David, E.; Warren, T.C.; DeLeon, R.P.; Farina, P.R.; Homon, C.A. )

    1990-05-15

    Monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8 (MDNCF/IL-8) is an 8,000-dalton protein produced by monocytes which exhibits activity as a chemoattractant for neutrophils with maximal activity achieved at a concentration of 50 ng/ml. This polypeptide has been iodinated by chloramine-T methodology (350 Ci/mM), and specific receptors for MDNCF/IL-8 have been detected on human neutrophils, U937 cells, THP-1 cells, and dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells. The binding of MDNCF/IL-8 to human neutrophils is not inhibited by interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. In addition, chemoattractants such as C5a, fMet-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, and platelet-activating factor fail to inhibit binding, suggesting that MDNCF/IL-8 utilizes a unique receptor. The receptor for MDNCF/IL-8 is apparently glycosylated since ligand binding is inhibited by the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin with a binding specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and neuraminic acid. Steady state binding experiments indicate Kd values of 4 and 0.5 nM and receptor numbers of 75,000 and 7,400 for human neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells, respectively. 125I-MDNCF/IL-8 bound to human neutrophils is rapidly internalized and subsequently released from cells as trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity. Affinity labeling experiments suggest that the human neutrophil MDNCF/IL-8 receptor exhibits a mass of approximately 58,000 daltons.

  3. The Role of Endogenous Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands in Mediating Corneal Epithelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joanne L.; Phelps, Eric D.; Doll, Mark A.; Schaal, Shlomit; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To provide a comprehensive study of the biological role and therapeutic potential of six endogenous epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands in corneal epithelial homeostasis. Methods. Kinetic analysis and dose response curves were performed by using in vitro and in vivo wound-healing assays. Biochemical assays were used to determine receptor expression and activity. Human tears were collected and quantitatively analyzed by multianalyte profiling for endogenous EGFR ligands. Results. Epidermal growth factor receptor ligands improved wound closure and activated EGFR, but betacellulin (BTC) was the most efficacious promoter of wound healing in vitro. In contrast, only epidermal growth factor (EGF) promoted wound healing in vivo. Human tears from 25 healthy individuals showed EGFR ligands at these average concentrations: EGF at 2053 ± 312.4 pg/mL, BTC at 207 ± 39.4 pg/mL, heparin-binding EGF at 44 ± 5.8 pg/mL, amphiregulin at 509 ± 28.8 pg/mL, transforming growth factor-α at 84 ± 19 pg/mL, and epiregulin at 52 ± 15 pg/mL. Conclusions. Under unwounded conditions, only EGF was present at concentrations near the ligand's Kd for the receptor, indicating it is the primary mediator of corneal epithelial homeostasis. Other ligands were present but at concentrations 11- to 7500-fold less their Kd, preventing significant ligand binding. Further, the high levels of EGF and its predicted binding preclude receptor occupancy by exogenous ligand and can explain the discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo data. Therefore, therapeutic use of EGFR ligands may be unpredictable and impractical. PMID:24722692

  4. Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlins, Scott A.; Bolllinger, Nikki; Creim, Jeffrey; Rodland, Karin D. . E-mail: Karin.rodland@pnl.gov

    2005-08-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub o}, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}. Furthermore, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}. This is consistent with the known expression of TGF{alpha} by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR-mediated response to increased Ca {sub o} {sup 2+} in Rat-1 fibroblasts and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

  5. Attribution to Heterogeneous Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Subtypes Based on Hormone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Receptor Expression in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Boyoung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Sung, Ho Kyung; Ahn, Choonghyun; Hwang, Yunji; Jang, Jieun; Lee, Juyeon; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Park, Sohee; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Kang, Daehee; Park, Sue K

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a heterogeneous risk assessment of breast cancer based on the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) calculating the risks and population-based attributable fractions (PAFs) for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors.Using matched case-control study design from the Seoul Breast Cancer Study and the national prevalence of exposure, the risks and PAFs for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors were estimated for total breast cancers and subtypes.The attribution to modifiable factors was different for each subtype (luminal A, PAF = 61.4% [95% confidence interval, CI = 54.3%-69.8%]; luminal B, 21.4% [95% CI = 18.6-24.9%]; HER2-overexpression, 59.4% [95% CI = 47.8%-74.3%], and triple negative tumors [TNs], 27.1% [95% CI = 22.9%-32.4%)], and the attribution to the modifiable factors for the luminal A and HER2-overexpression subtypes was higher than that of the luminal B and TN subtypes (P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). The contribution of modifiable reproductive factors to luminal A type in premenopausal women was higher than that of the other subtypes (18.2% for luminal A; 3.1%, 8.1%, and -3.1% for luminal B, HER2-overexpression, and TN subtypes, respectively; P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). Physical activity had the highest impact preventing 32.6% of luminal A, 14.5% of luminal B, 38.0% of HER2-overexpression, and 26.9% of TN subtypes (P heterogeneity = 0.014). Total reproductive factors were also heterogeneously attributed to each breast cancer subtype (luminal A, 65.4%; luminal B, 24.1%; HER2-overexpression, 57.9%, and TN subtypes, -3.1%; P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001).Each pathological subtype of breast cancer by HRs and HER2 status may be associated with heterogeneous risk factors and their attributable risk, suggesting a different etiology. The luminal B and TN subtypes seemed to be less preventable despite intervention for alleged risk factors, even though physical activity had a high preventable

  6. Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won-Min; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gene co-expression network analysis has been shown effective in identifying functional co-expressed gene modules associated with complex human diseases. However, existing techniques to construct co-expression networks require some critical prior information such as predefined number of clusters, numerical thresholds for defining co-expression/interaction, or do not naturally reproduce the hallmarks of complex systems such as the scale-free degree distribution of small-worldness. Previously, a graph filtering technique called Planar Maximally Filtered Graph (PMFG) has been applied to many real-world data sets such as financial stock prices and gene expression to extract meaningful and relevant interactions. However, PMFG is not suitable for large-scale genomic data due to several drawbacks, such as the high computation complexity O(|V|3), the presence of false-positives due to the maximal planarity constraint, and the inadequacy of the clustering framework. Here, we developed a new co-expression network analysis framework called Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (MEGENA) by: i) introducing quality control of co-expression similarities, ii) parallelizing embedded network construction, and iii) developing a novel clustering technique to identify multi-scale clustering structures in Planar Filtered Networks (PFNs). We applied MEGENA to a series of simulated data and the gene expression data in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). MEGENA showed improved performance over well-established clustering methods and co-expression network construction approaches. MEGENA revealed not only meaningful multi-scale organizations of co-expressed gene clusters but also novel targets in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26618778

  7. The role of mutations and overexpression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q Y; Zhao, Y; Zhang, R

    2015-12-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the seventh most common cancer worldwide. Throughout the last decade, several studies demonstrated that the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling is altered in a significant proportion of patients with BC. FGF receptor (FGFR) 3 may thus serve as a promising biomarker for BC. Mutations of this gene are prevalent in BC (e.g., found in 74% of non-invasive papillary tumours), suggesting that FGFR3 status is an important event in BC. The aim of this review was to overview the outcomes of different mutations in FGFR3 receptor in the context of BC. We first described FGFR3 receptor and continue with mutations of FGFR3 gene, including activating mutations and overexpression of this gene. Finally, we addressed the clinical relevance of mutated FGFR3 gene. PMID:26542242

  8. The Anti-angiogenic Peptide, Loop 6, Binds Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Cecilia A.; Roy, Roopali; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Jiang; Panigrahy, Dipak; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Moses, Marsha A.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), the endogenous inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, have been shown to possess biological functions that are independent of their ability to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases. We have previously shown that the C-terminal domain of TIMP-2 and, in particular, Loop 6 inhibit capillary endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. To elucidate the mechanism by which Loop 6 inhibits angiogenesis, we sought to determine whether its biological effects were the result of a known TIMP-2 protein-protein interaction or of a receptor-mediated event. In this study, we identify insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor as a binding partner of Loop 6/TIMP-2 and characterize this interaction on the endothelial cell surface and the consequences of this interaction on downstream receptor signaling. PMID:20940305

  9. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering. PMID:23954806

  10. Both epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor receptors are dispensable for structural intestinal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Raphael C.; Diaz-Miron, Jose L.; Choi, Pamela M.; Sommovilla, Joshua; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Warner, Brad W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intestinal adaptation structurally represents increases in crypt depth and villus height in response to small bowel resection (SBR). Previously, we found that neither epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nor insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) function was individually required for normal adaptation. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of disrupting both EGFR and IGF1R expression on resection-induced adaptation. Methods Intestinal-specific EGFR and IGF1R double knockout mice (EGFR/IGF1R-IKO) (n=6) and wild-type (WT) control mice (n=7) underwent 50% proximal SBR. On postoperative day (POD) 7, structural adaptation was scored by measuring crypt depth and villus height. Rates of crypt cell proliferation, apoptosis, and submucosal capillary density were also compared. Results After 50% SBR, normal adaptation occurred in both WT and EGFR/IGF1R-IKO. Rates of proliferation and apoptosis were no different between the two groups. The angiogenic response was less in the EGFR/IGF1R-IKO compared to WT mice. Conclusion Disrupted expression of EGFR and IGF1R in the intestinal epithelial cells does not affect resection-induced structural adaptation but attenuates angiogenesis after SBR. These findings suggest that villus growth is driven by receptors and pathways that occur outside the epithelial cell component, while angiogenic responses may be influenced by epithelial-endothelial crosstalk. PMID:25818318