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Sample records for factor receptor interaction

  1. Molecular Docking and Interactions of Pueraria Tuberosa with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, S.; Agarwal, T.; Singothu, S.; Samal, A.; Banerjee, I.; Pal, K.; Pramanik, K.; Ray, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa is known for its therapeutic potentials in cardiovascular disorders, but its effect in angiogenesis has not been studied so far. In this study, a computational approach has been applied to elucidate the role of the phytochemicals in inhibition of angiogenesis through modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, major factors responsible for angiogenesis. Metabolite structures retrieved from PubChem and KNApSAcK – 3D databases, were docked using AutoDock4.2 tool. Hydrogen bond and molecular docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and toxicity predictions were carried out using UCSF Chimera, LigPlot+ and PreADMET server, respectively. From the docking analysis, it was observed that puerarone and tuberostan had significant binding affinity for the intracellular kinase domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 respectively. It is important to mention that both the phytochemicals shared similar interaction profile as that of standard inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Also, both puerarone and tuberostan interacted with Lys861/Lys868 (adenosine 5’-triphosphate binding site of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-2), thus providing a clue that they may enforce their inhibitory effect by blocking the adenosine 5’-triphosphate binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Moreover, these molecules exhibited good drug-likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties without any carcinogenic and toxic effects. The interaction pattern of the puerarone and tuberostan may provide a hint for a novel drug design for vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors with better specificity to treat angiogenic disorders. PMID:26664060

  2. Molecular Docking and Interactions of Pueraria Tuberosa with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Asthana, S; Agarwal, T; Singothu, S; Samal, A; Banerjee, I; Pal, K; Pramanik, K; Ray, S S

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa is known for its therapeutic potentials in cardiovascular disorders, but its effect in angiogenesis has not been studied so far. In this study, a computational approach has been applied to elucidate the role of the phytochemicals in inhibition of angiogenesis through modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, major factors responsible for angiogenesis. Metabolite structures retrieved from PubChem and KNApSAcK - 3D databases, were docked using AutoDock4.2 tool. Hydrogen bond and molecular docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and toxicity predictions were carried out using UCSF Chimera, LigPlot(+) and PreADMET server, respectively. From the docking analysis, it was observed that puerarone and tuberostan had significant binding affinity for the intracellular kinase domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 respectively. It is important to mention that both the phytochemicals shared similar interaction profile as that of standard inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Also, both puerarone and tuberostan interacted with Lys861/Lys868 (adenosine 5'-triphosphate binding site of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-2), thus providing a clue that they may enforce their inhibitory effect by blocking the adenosine 5'-triphosphate binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Moreover, these molecules exhibited good drug-likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties without any carcinogenic and toxic effects. The interaction pattern of the puerarone and tuberostan may provide a hint for a novel drug design for vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors with better specificity to treat angiogenic disorders. PMID:26664060

  3. Novel Bioluminescent Binding Assays for Ligand–Receptor Interaction Studies of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed novel bioluminescent binding assays for several protein/peptide hormones to study their interactions with receptors using the so far brightest NanoLuc reporter. To validate the novel bioluminescent binding assay using a variety of protein/peptide hormones, in the present work we applied it to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family using the prototype member FGF2 as an example. A fully active recombinant FGF2 retaining a unique exposed cysteine (Cys) residue was chemically conjugated with an engineered NanoLuc carrying a unique exposed Cys residue at the C-terminus via formation of an intermolecular disulfide linkage. The NanoLuc-conjugated FGF2 (FGF2-Luc) retained high binding affinity to the overexpressed FGFR1 and the endogenous FGF receptor with the calculated dissociation constants of 161 ± 21 pM (n = 3) and 25 ± 4 pM (n = 3), respectively. In competition binding assays using FGF2-Luc as a tracer, receptor-binding potencies of wild-type or mutant FGF2s were accurately quantified. Thus, FGF2-Luc represents a novel non-radioactive tracer for the quantitative measurement of ligand–receptor interactions in the FGF family. These data suggest that the novel bioluminescent binding assay can be applied to a variety of protein/peptide hormones for ligand–receptor interaction studies. PMID:27414797

  4. Novel Bioluminescent Binding Assays for Ligand-Receptor Interaction Studies of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family.

    PubMed

    Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed novel bioluminescent binding assays for several protein/peptide hormones to study their interactions with receptors using the so far brightest NanoLuc reporter. To validate the novel bioluminescent binding assay using a variety of protein/peptide hormones, in the present work we applied it to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family using the prototype member FGF2 as an example. A fully active recombinant FGF2 retaining a unique exposed cysteine (Cys) residue was chemically conjugated with an engineered NanoLuc carrying a unique exposed Cys residue at the C-terminus via formation of an intermolecular disulfide linkage. The NanoLuc-conjugated FGF2 (FGF2-Luc) retained high binding affinity to the overexpressed FGFR1 and the endogenous FGF receptor with the calculated dissociation constants of 161 ± 21 pM (n = 3) and 25 ± 4 pM (n = 3), respectively. In competition binding assays using FGF2-Luc as a tracer, receptor-binding potencies of wild-type or mutant FGF2s were accurately quantified. Thus, FGF2-Luc represents a novel non-radioactive tracer for the quantitative measurement of ligand-receptor interactions in the FGF family. These data suggest that the novel bioluminescent binding assay can be applied to a variety of protein/peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies. PMID:27414797

  5. Interaction of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated p85 with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, P; Margolis, B; Skolnik, E Y; Lammers, R; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1992-01-01

    One of the immediate cellular responses to stimulation by various growth factors is the activation of a phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase. We recently cloned the 85-kDa subunit of PI 3-kinase (p85) from a lambda gt11 expression library, using the tyrosine-phosphorylated carboxy terminus of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor as a probe (E. Y. Skolnik, B. Margolis, M. Mohammadi, E. Lowenstein, R. Fischer, A. Drepps, A. Ullrich, and J. Schlessinger, Cell 65:83-90, 1991). In this study, we have examined the association of p85 with EGF and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors and the tyrosine phosphorylation of p85 in 3T3 (HER14) cells in response to EGF and PDGF treatment. Treatment of cells with EGF or PDGF markedly increased the amount of p85 associated with EGF and PDGF receptors. Binding assays with glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins demonstrated that either Src homology region 2 (SH2) domain of p85 is sufficient for binding to EGF and PDGF receptors and that receptor tyrosine autophosphorylation is required for binding. Binding of a GST fusion protein expressing the N-terminal SH2 domain of p85 (GST-N-SH2) to EGF and PDGF receptors was half-maximally inhibited by 2 and 24 mM phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr), respectively, suggesting that the N-SH2 domain interacts more stably with PDGF receptors than with EGF receptors. The amount of receptor-p85 complex detected in HER14 cells treated with EGF or PDGF. Growth factor treatment also increased the amount of p85 found in anti-PDGF-treated HER14 cells, suggesting that the vast majority of p85 in the anti-P-Tyr fraction is receptor associated but not phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Only upon transient overexpression of p85 and PDGF receptor did p85 become tyrosine phosphorylated. These are consistent with the hypothesis that p85 functions as an adaptor molecule that targets PI 3-kinase to activated growth factor receptors. Images PMID:1372091

  6. 14-3-3 proteins interact with the insulin-like growth factor receptor but not the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, R W; Dey, B R; Lopaczynski, W; Nissley, S P

    1997-01-01

    We have used a yeast two-hybrid system to identify proteins which bind to the cytosolic portion of the type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGFIR) but not the insulin receptor (IR). This analysis identified 14-3-3beta and zeta proteins. 14-3-3beta also binds to the IGFIR but not the IR in vitro and 14-3-3-IGFIR complexes are present in insect cells overexpressing the IGFIR cytoplasmic domain. 14-3-3 proteins are substrates of the IGFIR in the yeast system and in vitro. The interaction of 14-3-3 with the IGFIR requires receptor-kinase activity and maps to the C-terminus of the receptor, but does not depend on tyrosine residues in this or the juxtamembrane regions. Instead, the binding maps to serine residue 1283 and requires phosphorylation of this residue. 14-3-3 proteins are phosphoserine-binding proteins which have been shown to interact directly with components of the mitogenic and apoptotic signalling pathways, suggesting that they participate in growth regulation. Our findings suggest that 14-3-3 proteins may play a role in IGFIR signal transduction and may contribute to the differences in IGF and IR signalling capabilities. PMID:9581554

  7. Connective-tissue growth factor modulates WNT signalling and interacts with the WNT receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Sara; Latinkic, Branko; Itasaki, Nobue; Krumlauf, Robb; Smith, J C

    2004-05-01

    Connective-tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a member of the CCN family of secreted proteins. CCN family members contain four characteristic domains and exhibit multiple activities: they associate with the extracellular matrix, they can mediate cell adhesion, cell migration and chemotaxis, and they can modulate the activities of peptide growth factors. Many of the effects of CTGF are thought to be mediated by binding to integrins, whereas others may be because of its recently identified ability to interact with BMP4 and TGF beta. We demonstrate, using Xenopus embryos, that CTGF also regulates signalling through the Wnt pathway, in accord with its ability to bind to the Wnt co-receptor LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). This interaction is likely to occur through the C-terminal (CT) domain of CTGF, which is distinct from the BMP- and TGF beta-interacting domain. Our results define new activities of CTGF and add to the variety of routes through which cells regulate growth factor activity in development, disease and tissue homeostasis. PMID:15105373

  8. Two domains of the epidermal growth factor receptor are involved in cytoskeletal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wei; Wu Jing; Ge Gaoxiang; Lin Qishui

    2008-06-13

    Epidermal growth factor receptor can interact directly with F-actin through an actin-binding domain. In the present study, a mutant EGFR, lacking a previously identified actin-binding domain (ABD 1), was still able to bind elements of the cytoskeleton. A second EGFR actin-binding domain (ABD 2) was identified in the region of the receptor that includes Tyr-1148 by a yeast two-hybrid assay. GST fusion proteins comprising ABD 1 or ABD 2 bound actin in vitro and competed for actin-binding with the full-length EGFR. EGFR binding to actin was also studied in intact cells using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The localization of the EGFR/actin-binding complex changed after EGF stimulation. Fusion proteins containing mutations in ABD1 or ABD2 did not display a FRET signal. The results lead to the conclusion that the interaction between ABD1 and ABD2 and actin during EGF-induced signal transduction, and thus between EGFR and actin, are important in cell activation.

  9. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuxin; Singleton, David; Guo, Chun; Gardner, Amanda; Pakala, Suresh; Kumar, Rakesh; Jensen, Elwood; Zhang, Jinsong; Khan, Sohaib

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy. PMID:23874500

  10. Direct interaction of avermectin with epidermal growth factor receptor mediates the penetration resistance in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Ping; Wang, Pan; Sun, Ying-Jian; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of avermectins (AVMs) for managing parasitic and agricultural pests, the resistance of worms and insects to AVMs has emerged as a serious threat to human health and agriculture worldwide. The reduced penetration of AVMs is one of the main reasons for the development of the resistance to the chemicals. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we use the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster as the model organism to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of penetration resistance to AVMs. We clearly show that the chitin layer is thickened and the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is overexpressed in the AVM-resistant larvae epidermis. We reveal that the activation of the transcription factor Relish by the over-activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/AKT/ERK pathway induces the overexpression of the chitin synthases DmeCHS1/2 and P-gp in the resistant larvae. Interestingly, we discover for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that AVM directly interacts with EGFR and leads to the activation of the EGFR/AKT/ERK pathway, which activates the transcription factor Relish and induces the overexpression of DmeCHS1/2 and P-gp. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of penetration resistance to drugs. PMID:27249340

  11. Thermodynamic characterization of the interaction between TRAF2 and tumor necrosis factor receptor peptides by isothermal titration calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hong; Wu, Hao

    2000-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily can induce diverse biological effects, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The major signal transducers for TNFRs are the family of TNF receptor associated factors (TRAFs). The direct interaction between TRAFs and the intracellular tails of TNFRs is the first step of this signal relay process. Structural studies have revealed a trimeric nature of TRAF2 and a symmetrical mode of receptor binding, suggesting the involvement of trivalent TNFR2-receptor interaction in the signal transduction. In this study, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we report thermodynamic characterization of the interaction between TRAF2 and monomeric peptide sequences from TNFR members, including TNFR2, CD40, CD30, Ox40, and 4-1BB, and the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-transforming protein, latent infection membrane protein-1 (LMP1). The dissociation constants of the interaction were shown to range between 40 μM and 1.9 mM, which are substantially weaker than most protein–peptide interactions. The interaction is entirely driven by exothermic enthalpy, consistent with the abundance of polar contacts. The enthalpy of the interaction has a significant temperature dependence (ΔCp = −245 cal/mol⋅K). The unfavorable entropy in the interaction and the comparison with structural energetics calculations suggest the involvement of conformational rearrangement in the interaction. The low affinity of TRAF2 to monomeric receptor peptides further supports the importance of avidity contribution in TRAF2 recruitment by these receptors upon ligand-induced trimerization or higher order oligomerization. PMID:10908665

  12. The Interaction between the Drosophila Secreted Protein Argos and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibits Dimerization of the Receptor and Binding of Secreted Spitz to the Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ming-hao; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Ito, Mikiko; Okano, Hideyuki

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila Argos (Aos), a secreted protein with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, has been shown to inhibit the activation of the Drosophila EGF receptor (DER). However, it has not been determined whether Aos binds directly to DER or whether regulation of the DER activation occurs through some other mechanism. Using DER-expressing cells (DER/S2) and a recombinant DER extracellular domain-Fc fusion protein (DER-Fc), we have shown that Aos binds directly to the extracellular domain of DER with its carboxyl-terminal region, including the EGF-like domain. Furthermore, Aos can block the binding of secreted Spitz (sSpi), a transforming growth factor α-like ligand of DER, to the extracellular domain of DER. We observed that sSpi stimulates the dimerization of both the soluble DER extracellular domain (sDER) and the intact DER in the DER/S2 cells and that Aos can block the sSpi-induced dimerization of both sDER and intact DER. Moreover, we have shown that, by directly interacting with DER, Aos and SpiAos (a chimeric protein that is composed of the N-terminal region of Spi and the C-terminal region of Aos) inhibit the dimerization and phosphorylation of DER that are induced by DER's overexpression in the absence of sSpi. These results indicate that Aos exerts its inhibitory function through dual molecular mechanisms: by blocking both the receptor dimerization and the binding of activating ligand to the receptor. This is the first description of this novel inhibitory mechanism for receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:10688656

  13. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-CXCR4 Receptor Interactions: EVIDENCE FOR PARTIAL ALLOSTERIC AGONISM IN COMPARISON WITH CXCL12 CHEMOKINE.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Deepa; Gröning, Sabine; Schmitz, Corinna; Zierow, Swen; Drucker, Natalie; Bakou, Maria; Kohl, Kristian; Mertens, André; Lue, Hongqi; Weber, Christian; Xiao, Annie; Luker, Gary; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite; Lolis, Elias; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2016-07-22

    An emerging number of non-chemokine mediators are found to bind to classical chemokine receptors and to elicit critical biological responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine that exhibits chemokine-like activities through non-cognate interactions with the chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, in addition to activating the type II receptor CD74. Activation of the MIF-CXCR2 and -CXCR4 axes promotes leukocyte recruitment, mediating the exacerbating role of MIF in atherosclerosis and contributing to the wealth of other MIF biological activities. Although the structural basis of the MIF-CXCR2 interaction has been well studied and was found to engage a pseudo-ELR and an N-like loop motif, nothing is known about the regions of CXCR4 and MIF that are involved in binding to each other. Using a genetic strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that expresses a functional CXCR4 receptor, site-specific mutagenesis, hybrid CXCR3/CXCR4 receptors, pharmacological reagents, peptide array analysis, chemotaxis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism, we provide novel molecular information about the structural elements that govern the interaction between MIF and CXCR4. The data identify similarities with classical chemokine-receptor interactions but also provide evidence for a partial allosteric agonist compared with CXCL12 that is possible due to the two binding sites of CXCR4. PMID:27226569

  14. Direct interaction of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor with leukemia-associated RhoGEF

    PubMed Central

    Taya, Shinichiro; Inagaki, Naoyuki; Sengiku, Hiroaki; Makino, Hiroshi; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Urakawa, Itaru; Nagao, Kenji; Kataoka, Shiro; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2001-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 plays crucial roles in growth control and rearrangements of the cytoskeleton. IGF-1 binds to the IGF-1 receptor and thereby induces the autophosphorylation of this receptor at its tyrosine residues. The phosphorylation of the IGF-1 receptor is thought to initiate a cascade of events. Although various signaling molecules have been identified, they appear to interact with the tyrosine-phosphorylated IGF-1 receptor. Here, we identified leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) (LARG), which contains the PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ), regulator of G protein signaling (RGS), Dbl homology, and pleckstrin homology domains, as a nonphosphorylated IGF-1 receptor-interacting molecule. LARG formed a complex with the IGF-1 receptor in vivo, and the PDZ domain of LARG interacted directly with the COOH-terminal domain of IGF-1 receptor in vitro. LARG had an exchange activity for Rho in vitro and induced the formation of stress fibers in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. When MDCKII epithelial cells were treated with IGF-1, Rho and its effector Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase) were activated and actin stress fibers were enhanced. Furthermore, the IGF-1–induced Rho-kinase activation and the enhancement of stress fibers were inhibited by ectopic expression of the PDZ and RGS domains of LARG. Taken together, these results indicate that IGF-1 activates the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway via a LARG/IGF-1 receptor complex and thereby regulates cytoskeletal rearrangements. PMID:11724822

  15. Modeling of growth factor-receptor systems: from molecular-level protein interaction networks to whole-body compartment models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Florence T.H.; Stefanini, Marianne O.; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2010-01-01

    Most physiological processes are subjected to molecular regulation by growth factors, which are secreted proteins that activate chemical signal transduction pathways through binding of specific cell-surface receptors. One particular growth factor system involved in the in vivo regulation of blood vessel growth is called the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) system. Computational and numerical techniques are well-suited to handle the molecular complexity (the number of binding partners involved, including ligands, receptors, and inert binding sites) and multi-scale nature (intra-tissue vs. inter-tissue transport and local vs. systemic effects within an organism) involved in modeling growth factor system interactions and effects. This paper introduces a variety of in silico models that seek to recapitulate different aspects of VEGF system biology at various spatial and temporal scales: molecular-level kinetic models focus on VEGF ligand-receptor interactions at and near the endothelial cell surface; meso-scale single-tissue 3D models can simulate the effects of multi-cellular tissue architecture on the spatial variation in VEGF ligand production and receptor activation; compartmental modeling allows efficient prediction of average interstitial VEGF concentrations and cell-surface VEGF signaling intensities across multiple large tissue volumes, permitting the investigation of whole-body inter-tissue transport (e.g., vascular permeability and lymphatic drainage). The given examples will demonstrate the utility of computational models in aiding both basic science and clinical research on VEGF systems biology. PMID:19897104

  16. Binding of neurotrophin-3 to its neuronal receptors and interactions with nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tébar, A; Dechant, G; Götz, R; Barde, Y A

    1992-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) has low-affinity (Kd = 8 x 10(-10) M), as well as high-affinity receptors (Kd = 1.8 x 10(-11) M) on embryonic chick sensory neurons, the latter in surprisingly high numbers. Like the structurally related proteins nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), NT-3 also binds to the low-affinity NGF receptor, a molecule that we suggest to designate low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (LANR). NT-3 dissociates from the LANR much more rapidly than BDNF, and more slowly than NGF. The binding of labelled NT-3 to the LANR can be reduced by half using a concentration of BDNF corresponding to the Kd of BDNF to the LANR. In contrast, the binding of NT-3 to its high-affinity neuronal receptors can only be prevented by BDNF or NGF when used at concentrations several thousand-fold higher than those corresponding to their Kd to their high-affinity neuronal receptors. Thus, specific high-affinity NT-3 receptors exist on sensory neurons that can readily discriminate between three structurally related ligands. These findings, including the remarkable property of the LANR to bind three related ligands with similar affinity, but different rate constants, are discussed. PMID:1547788

  17. Functional interaction between mutations in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor in severe congenital neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alister C; Gits, Judith; Majeed, Fidel; Aprikyan, Andrew A; Lewis, Rowena S; O'Sullivan, Lynda A; Freedman, Melvin; Shigdar, Sarah; Touw, Ivo P; Dale, David C; Dror, Yigal

    2008-08-01

    Most severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) cases possess constitutive neutrophil elastase mutations; a smaller cohort has acquired mutations truncating the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R). We have described a case with constitutive extracellular G-CSF-R mutation hyporesponsive to ligand. Here we report two independent acquired G-CSF-R truncation mutations and a novel constitutive neutrophil elastase mutation in this patient. Co-expression of a truncated receptor chain restored STAT5 signalling responses of the extracellular G-CSF-R mutant, while constitutively-active STAT5 enhanced its proliferative capacity. These data add to our knowledge of SCN and further highlight the importance of STAT5 in mediating proliferative responses to G-CSF. PMID:18513286

  18. Membrane contacts between endosomes and ER provide sites for PTP1B-epidermal growth factor receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Eden, Emily R; White, Ian J; Tsapara, Anna; Futter, Clare E

    2010-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a critical determinator of cell fate. Signalling from this receptor tyrosine kinase is spatially regulated by progression through the endocytic pathway, governing receptor half-life and accessibility to signalling proteins and phosphatases. Endocytosis of EGFR is required for interaction with the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B (ref. 1), which localizes to the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), raising the question of how PTP1B comes into contact with endosomal EGFR. We show that EGFR-PTP1B interaction occurs by means of direct membrane contacts between the perimeter membrane of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and the ER. The population of EGFR interacting with PTP1B is the same population that undergo ESCRT-mediated (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) sorting within MVBs, and PTP1B activity promotes the sequestration of EGFR on to MVB internal vesicles. Membrane contacts between endosomes and the ER form in both the presence and absence of stimulation by EGF. Thus membrane contacts between endosomes and the ER may represent a global mechanism for direct interaction between proteins on these two organelles. PMID:20118922

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor coexpression modulates susceptibility to Herceptin in HER2/neu overexpressing breast cancer cells via specific erbB-receptor interaction and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Diermeier, Simone; Horvath, Gabor; Knuechel-Clarke, Ruth; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand; Szoellosi, Janos; Brockhoff, Gero . E-mail: Gero.Brockhoff@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2005-04-01

    Background: Growth factors and Herceptin specifically and differentially modulate cell proliferation of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of action on erbB-receptor level is incompletely understood. We evaluated Herceptin's capacity to modulate erbB-receptor activation and interaction on the cell surface level and thereby potentially impair cell proliferation of HER2/neu (c-erbB2) overexpressing breast cancer cells, both in the presence and absence of relevant growth factors. Methods: BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), Heregulin, and with Herceptin in different combinations. Kinetics of cell proliferation were evaluated flow cytometrically based on BrdU-labeling. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, ELISAs and phosphorylation site specific Western Blotting was performed to investigate erbB-receptor interaction and activation. Results: EGF induced EGFR/EGFR and EGFR/c-erbB2 interactions correlate with stimulation of cell proliferation in BT474 cells. Both homo- and heterodimerization are considerably less pronounced in SK-BR-3 cells and heterointeraction is additionally reduced by EGF treatment, causing inhibition of cell proliferation. Heregulin stimulates cell proliferation extensively in both cell lines. Herceptin drives BT474 cells more efficiently into quiescence than it does with SK-BR-3 cells and thereby blocks cell cycle progress. In SK-BR-3 Herceptin treatment causes c-erbB2 phosphorylation of Y877 and Y1248, EGF induces Y877 and Y1112 phosphorylation. The Y1112 phosphorylation site, activated by EGF in SK-BR-3 cell, is bypassed in BT474. In addition the inhibitory capacity of Herceptin on BT474 and SK-BR-3 cell proliferation depends on the presence and absence of growth factors to a various extent. Conclusion: The growth inhibitory effect of Herceptin on c-erbB2 overexpressing breast cancer cells is considerably modulated by EGFR coexpression and consequently EGFR/c-erbB2 homo- and

  20. Structural insights of homotypic interaction domains in the ligand-receptor signal transduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-01-01

    Several members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily that these members activate caspase-8 from death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in TNF ligand-receptor signal transduction have been identified. In the extrinsic pathway, apoptotic signal transduction is induced in death domain (DD) superfamily; it consists of a hexahelical bundle that contains 80 amino acids. The DD superfamily includes about 100 members that belong to four subfamilies: death domain (DD), caspase recruitment domain (CARD), pyrin domain (PYD), and death effector domain (DED). This superfamily contains key building blocks: with these blocks, multimeric complexes are formed through homotypic interactions. Furthermore, each DD-binding event occurs exclusively. The DD superfamily regulates the balance between death and survival of cells. In this study, the structures, functions, and unique features of DD superfamily members are compared with their complexes. By elucidating structural insights of DD superfamily members, we investigate the interaction mechanisms of DD domains; these domains are involved in TNF ligand-receptor signaling. These DD superfamily members play a pivotal role in the development of more specific treatments of cancer. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 159-166] PMID:26615973

  1. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  2. Nucleosome eviction and multiple co-factor binding predict estrogen-receptor-alpha-associated long-range interactions

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; Wang, Xiaowo; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    Many enhancers regulate their target genes via long-distance interactions. High-throughput experiments like ChIA-PET have been developed to map such largely cell-type-specific interactions between cis-regulatory elements genome-widely. In this study, we integrated multiple types of data in order to reveal the general hidden patterns embedded in the ChIA-PET data. We found characteristic distance features related to promoter–promoter, enhancer–enhancer and insulator–insulator interactions. Although a protein may have many binding sites along the genome, our hypothesis is that those sites that share certain open chromatin structure can accommodate relatively larger protein complex consisting of specific regulatory and ‘bridging’ factors, and may be more likely to form robust long-range deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) loops. This hypothesis was validated in the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) ChIA-PET data. An efficient classifier was built to predict ERα-associated long-range interactions solely from the related ChIP-seq data, hence linking distal ERα-dependent enhancers to their target genes. We further applied the classifier to generate additional novel interactions, which were undetected in the original ChIA-PET paper but were validated by other independent experiments. Our work provides a new insight into the long-range chromatin interactions through deeper and integrative ChIA-PET data analysis and demonstrates DNA looping predictability from ordinary ChIP-seq data. PMID:24782518

  3. p35 Regulates the CRM1-Dependent Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Nuclear Hormone Receptor Coregulator-Interacting Factor 1 (NIF-1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Su; Fu, Wing-Yu; Chien, Winnie W. Y.; Li, Zhen; Fu, Amy K. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase, which plays critical roles in a wide spectrum of neuronal functions including neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity. Cdk5 activity is controlled by its specific activators: p35 or p39. While knockout studies reveal that Cdk5/p35 is critical for neuronal migration during early brain development, functions of Cdk5/p35 have been unraveled through the identification of the interacting proteins of p35, most of which are Cdk5/p35 substrates. However, it remains unclear whether p35 can regulate neuronal functions independent of Cdk5 activity. Here, we report that a nuclear protein, nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC)-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1), is a new interacting partner of p35. Interestingly, p35 regulates the functions of NIF-1 independent of Cdk5 activity. NIF-1 was initially discovered as a transcriptional regulator that enhances the transcriptional activity of nuclear hormone receptors. Our results show that p35 interacts with NIF-1 and regulates its nucleocytoplasmic trafficking via the nuclear export pathway. Furthermore, we identified a nuclear export signal on p35; mutation of this site or blockade of the CRM1/exportin-dependent nuclear export pathway resulted in the nuclear accumulation of p35. Intriguingly, blocking the nuclear export of p35 attenuated the nuclear accumulation of NIF-1. These findings reveal a new p35-dependent mechanism in transcriptional regulation that involves the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription regulators. PMID:25329792

  4. Cooperative interaction of hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha ) and Ets-1 in the transcriptional activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (Flk-1).

    PubMed

    Elvert, Gerd; Kappel, Andreas; Heidenreich, Regina; Englmeier, Ursula; Lanz, Stephan; Acker, Till; Rauter, Manuel; Plate, Karl; Sieweke, Michael; Breier, Georg; Flamme, Ingo

    2003-02-28

    Interactions between Ets family members and a variety of other transcription factors serve important functions during development and differentiation processes, e.g. in the hematopoietic system. Here we show that the endothelial basic helix-loop-helix PAS domain transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha) (but not its close relative HIF-1alpha), cooperates with Ets-1 in activating transcription of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-2) gene (Flk-1). The receptor tyrosine kinase Flk-1 is indispensable for angiogenesis, and its expression is closely regulated during development. Consistent with the hypothesis that HIF-2alpha controls the expression of Flk-1 in vivo, we show here that HIF-2alpha and Flk-1 are co-regulated in postnatal mouse brain capillaries. A tandem HIF-2alpha/Ets binding site was identified within the Flk-1 promoter that acted as a strong enhancer element. Based on the analysis of transgenic mouse embryos, these motifs are essential for endothelial cell-specific reporter gene expression. A single HIF-2alpha/Ets element conferred strong cooperative induction by HIF-2alpha and Ets-1 when fused to a heterologous promoter and was most active in endothelial cells. The physical interaction of HIF-2alpha with Ets-1 was demonstrated and localized to the HIF-2alpha carboxyl terminus and the autoinhibitory exon VII domain of Ets-1, respectively. The deletion of the DNA binding and carboxyl-terminal transactivation domains of HIF-2alpha, respectively, created dominant negative mutants that suppressed transactivation by the wild type protein and failed to synergize with Ets-1. These results suggest that the interaction between HIF-2alpha and endothelial Ets factors is required for the full transcriptional activation of Flk-1 in endothelial cells and may therefore represent a future target for the manipulation of angiogenesis. PMID:12464608

  5. Interactions between Environmental Factors and Melatonin Receptor Type 1A Polymorphism in Relation to Oral Cancer Susceptibility and Clinicopathologic Development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Lin, Yung-Wei; Lee, Liang-Ming; Chang, Junn-Liang; Weng, Wei-Chun; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the combined effect of melatonin receptor type 1A (MTNR1A) gene polymorphisms and exposure to environmental carcinogens on the susceptibility and clinicopathological characteristics of oral cancer. Methodology and Principal Findings Three polymorphisms of the MTNR1A gene from 618 patients with oral cancer and 560 non-cancer controls were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The CTA haplotype of the studied MTNR1A polymorphisms (rs2119882, rs13140012, rs6553010) was related to a higher risk of oral cancer. Moreover, MTNR1A gene polymorphisms exhibited synergistic effects of environmental factors (betel quid and tobacco use) on the susceptibility of oral cancer. Finally, oral-cancer patients with betel quid-chewing habit who had T/T allele of MTNR1A rs13140012 were at higher risk for developing an advanced clinical stage and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion These results support gene-environment interactions of MTNR1A polymorphisms with smoking and betel quid-chewing habits possibly altering oral-cancer susceptibility and metastasis. PMID:25806809

  6. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor interacts with estrogen receptor, binds to estrogen response elements and half-sites, and inhibits estrogen-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Klinge, C M; Silver, B F; Driscoll, M D; Sathya, G; Bambara, R A; Hilf, R

    1997-12-12

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor (COUP-TF) was identified as a low abundance protein in bovine uterus that co-purified with estrogen receptor (ER) in a ligand-independent manner and was separated from the ER by its lower retention on estrogen response element (ERE)-Sepharose. In gel mobility shift assays, COUP-TF bound as an apparent dimer to ERE and ERE half-sites. COUP-TF bound to an ERE half-site with high affinity, Kd = 1.24 nM. In contrast, ER did not bind a single ERE half-site. None of the class II nuclear receptors analyzed, i.e. retinoic acid receptor, retinoid X receptor, thyroid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, or vitamin D receptor, were constituents of the COUP-TF.DNA binding complex detected in gel mobility shift assays. Direct interaction of COUP-TF with ER was indicated by GST "pull-down" and co-immunoprecipitation assays. The nature of the ER ligand influenced COUP-TF-ERE half-site binding. When ER was liganded by the antiestrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), COUP-TF-half-site interaction decreased. Conversely, COUP-TF transcribed and translated in vitro enhanced the ERE binding of purified estradiol (E2)-liganded ER but not 4-OHT-liganded ER. Co-transfection of ER-expressing MCF-7 human breast cancer cells with an expression vector for COUP-TFI resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of E2-induced expression of a luciferase reporter gene under the control of three tandem copies of EREc38. The ability of COUP-TF to bind specifically to EREs and half-sites, to interact with ER, and to inhibit E2-induced gene expression suggests COUP-TF regulates ER action by both direct DNA binding competition and through protein-protein interactions. PMID:9395481

  7. Interactions between N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor and GluA2 contribute to effects of glucocorticoid hormones on AMPA receptor function in the rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui; Cassé, Frédéric; Zhou, Ming; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Joels, Marian; Martin, Stéphane; Krugers, Harm J

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones, via activation of their receptors, promote memory consolidation, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined how corticosterone regulates AMPA receptor (AMPAR) availability in the synapse, which is important for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Peptides which specifically block the interaction between N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF) and the AMPAR-subunit GluA2 prevented the increase in synaptic transmission and surface expression of AMPARs known to occur after corticosterone application to hippocampal neurons. Combining a live imaging Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) approach with the use of the pH-sensitive GFP-AMPAR tagging revealed that this NSF/GluA2 interaction was also essential for the increase of the mobile fraction and reduction of the diffusion of AMPARs after treating hippocampal neurons with corticosterone. We conclude that the interaction between NSF and GluA2 contributes to the effects of corticosterone on AMPAR function. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26766634

  8. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways. PMID:27357749

  9. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y.; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways. PMID:27357749

  10. Differential effects of carboxy-terminal sequence deletions on platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling activities and interactions with cellular substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, K; Millauer, B; Kostka, G; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1992-01-01

    Chimeric receptors composed of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) extracellular domain fused to wild-type and truncated platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R) intracellular sequences were stably expressed in NIH 3T3 cells devoid of endogenous EGF-Rs. This experimental system allowed us to investigate the biological activity of PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain mutants in PDGF-R-responsive NIH 3T3 cells by activating PDGF-specific signaling pathways with EGF. Deletion of 74 carboxy-terminal amino acids severely impaired the ability of the PDGF-R cytoplasmic domain to associate with cellular substrates in vitro. This deletion also inhibited receptor and substrate phosphorylation, reduced the receptor's mitogenic activity, and completely abolished its oncogenic signaling potential. Surprisingly, removal of only six additional amino acids, including Tyr-989, restored substantial receptor and substrate phosphorylation capacity as well as transforming potential and yielded a receptor with wild-type levels of ligand-induced mitogenic activity. However, the ability of this chimera to bind phospholipase C gamma was severely impaired in comparison with the ability of the wild-type receptor, while the association with other cellular proteins was not affected. Further deletion of 35 residues, including Tyr-977, nearly abolished all PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain biological signaling activities. None of the three C-terminal truncations completely abolished the mitogenic potential of the receptors or had any influence on ligand binding or receptor down regulation. Together, these data implicate the 80 C-terminal-most residues of the PDGF-R, and possibly Tyr-989, in phospholipase C gamma binding, while receptor sequences upstream from Asp-988 appear to be essential for specific interactions with other cellular polypeptides such as ras GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Thus, the mutants described here allow the separation of distinct PDGF

  11. Modulation of transcriptional activation and coactivator interaction by a splicing variation in the F domain of nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha1.

    PubMed

    Sladek, F M; Ruse, M D; Nepomuceno, L; Huang, S M; Stallcup, M R

    1999-10-01

    Transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, often exist in various forms that are generated by highly conserved splicing events. Whereas the functional significance of these splicing variants is often not known, it is known that nuclear receptors activate transcription through interaction with coactivators. The parameters, other than ligands, that might modulate those interactions, however, are not well characterized, nor is the role of splicing variants. In this study, transient transfection, yeast two-hybrid, and GST pulldown assays are used to show not only that nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha1 (HNF4alpha1, NR2A1) interacts with GRIP1, and other coactivators, in the absence of ligand but also that the uncommonly large F domain in the C terminus of the receptor inhibits that interaction. In vitro, the F domain was found to obscure an AF-2-independent binding site for GRIP1 that did not map to nuclear receptor boxes II or III. The results also show that a natural splicing variant containing a 10-amino-acid insert in the middle of the F domain (HNF4alpha2) abrogates that inhibition in vivo and in vitro. A series of protease digestion assays indicates that there may be structural differences between HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha2 in the F domain as well as in the ligand binding domain (LBD). The data also suggest that there is a direct physical contact between the F domain and the LBD of HNF4alpha1 and -alpha2 and that that contact is different in the HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha2 isoforms. Finally, we propose a model in which the F domain of HNF4alpha1 acts as a negative regulatory region for transactivation and in which the alpha2 insert ameliorates the negative effect of the F domain. A conserved repressor sequence in the F domains of HNF4alpha1 and -alpha2 suggests that this model may be relevant to other nuclear receptors as well. PMID:10490591

  12. Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) expression is a determinant factor in adipose tissue inflammation and adipocyte-macrophage interaction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew; Tao, Huan; Metrione, Michael; Hajri, Tahar

    2014-01-17

    Obesity is associated with adipose tissue remodeling, characterized by adipocyte hypertrophy and macrophage infiltration. Previously, we have shown that very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is virtually absent in preadipocytes but is strongly induced during adipogenesis and actively participates in adipocyte hypertrophy. In this study, we investigated the role of VLDLR in adipose tissue inflammation and adipocyte-macrophage interactions in wild type and VLDLR-deficient mice fed a high fat diet. The results show that VLDLR deficiency reduced high fat diet-induced inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in adipose tissue in conjunction with reduced macrophage infiltration, especially those expressing pro-inflammatory markers. In adipocyte culture, VLDLR deficiency prevented adipocyte hypertrophy and strongly reduced VLDL-induced ER stress and inflammation. Likewise, cultures of primary peritoneal macrophages show that VLDLR deficiency reduced lipid accumulation and inflammation but did not alter chemotactic response of macrophages to adipocyte signals. Moreover, VLDLR deficiency tempered the synergistic inflammatory interactions between adipocytes and macrophages in a co-culture system. Collectively, these results show that VLDLR contributes to adipose tissue inflammation and mediates VLDL-induced lipid accumulation and induction of inflammation and ER stress in adipocytes and macrophages. PMID:24293365

  13. Taci Is a Traf-Interacting Receptor for Tall-1, a Tumor Necrosis Factor Family Member Involved in B Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xing-Zhong; Treanor, James; Senaldi, Giorgio; Khare, Sanjay D.; Boone, Tom; Kelley, Michael; Theill, Lars E.; Colombero, Anne; Solovyev, Irina; Lee, Frances; McCabe, Susan; Elliott, Robin; Miner, Kent; Hawkins, Nessa; Guo, Jane; Stolina, Marina; Yu, Gang; Wang, Judy; Delaney, John; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Boyle, William J.; Hsu, Hailing

    2000-01-01

    We and others recently reported tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and apoptosis ligand–related leukocyte-expressed ligand 1 (TALL-1) as a novel member of the TNF ligand family that is functionally involved in B cell proliferation. Transgenic mice overexpressing TALL-1 have severe B cell hyperplasia and lupus-like autoimmune disease. Here, we describe expression cloning of a cell surface receptor for TALL-1 from a human Burkitt's lymphoma RAJI cell library. The cloned receptor is identical to the previously reported TNF receptor (TNFR) homologue transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand (CAML) interactor (TACI). Murine TACI was subsequently isolated from the mouse B lymphoma A20 cells. Human and murine TACI share 54% identity overall. Human TACI exhibits high binding affinities to both human and murine TALL-1. Soluble TACI extracellular domain protein specifically blocks TALL-1–mediated B cell proliferation without affecting CD40- or lipopolysaccharide-mediated B cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, when injected into mice, soluble TACI inhibits antibody production to both T cell–dependent and –independent antigens. By yeast two-hybrid screening of a B cell library with TACI intracellular domain, we identified that, like many other TNFR family members, TACI intracellular domain interacts with TNFR-associated factor (TRAF)2, 5, and 6. Correspondingly, TACI activation in a B cell line results in nuclear factor κB and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation. The identification and characterization of the receptor for TALL-1 provides useful information for the development of a treatment for B cell–mediated autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:10880535

  14. Monomeric ß-amyloid interacts with type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors to provide energy supply to neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Maria L.; Tomasello, Marianna F.; Pandini, Giuseppe; Caraci, Filippo; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Busceti, Carla; Di Pietro, Paola; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Attanasio, Francesco; Chiechio, Santina; Bagnoli, Silvia; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Vigneri, Riccardo; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Copani, Agata

    2015-01-01

    ß-amyloid (Aß1−42) is produced by proteolytic cleavage of the transmembrane type-1 protein, amyloid precursor protein. Under pathological conditions, Aß1−42self-aggregates into oligomers, which cause synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss, and are considered the culprit of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, Aß1−42 is mainly monomeric at physiological concentrations, and the precise role of monomeric Aß1−42 in neuronal function is largely unknown. We report that the monomer of Aß1−42 activates type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors and enhances glucose uptake in neurons and peripheral cells by promoting the translocation of the Glut3 glucose transporter from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In neurons, activity-dependent glucose uptake was blunted after blocking endogenous Aß production, and re-established in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid Aß. APP-null neurons failed to enhance depolarization-stimulated glucose uptake unless exogenous monomeric Aß1−42 was added. These data suggest that Aß1−42 monomers were critical for maintaining neuronal glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, exogenous Aß1−42 monomers were able to rescue the low levels of glucose consumption observed in brain slices from AD mutant mice. PMID:26300732

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 interacts with the thyroid hormone receptor α1 and modulates the thyroid hormone-response in osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jia; Ma, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xin; Chen, Hong; Huang, Bing-Ren

    2012-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6) is a member of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein family, which has both Insulin-like growth factor-dependent and independent effects on cell growth. In previous studies, we have shown that recombinant IGFBP-6 could be translocated into the cell nucleus. But the effect in the nucleus of IGFBP-6 is not clear. In the present study, we use multiple methodologies including Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, co-immunoprecipitation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer to demonstrate that IGFBP-6 can directly interact with thyroid hormone receptor alpha 1 (TRα1) in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the DNA-binding domains and Ligand-binding domains of TRα1 and N-terminal domains and C-terminal domains of IGFBP-6 are involved in the interaction. This interaction also can block the formation of TR: retinoid X receptor heterodimers. Furthermore, immunofluorescence co-localization studies show IGFBP-6 and TRα1 could co-localize in the nucleus of the cells. Reporter gene experiment shows that IGFBP-6 negatively regulates the growth hormone promoter activity induced by ligand activated TRα1. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR demonstrates that IGFBP-6 could inhibit the osteocalcin mRNA transcription induced by Triiodothyronine (3,3',5-Triiodo-L-thyronine, T3) in osteoblastic cells. Finally, alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly decreased in osteoblastic cells when the cells were transfected with IGFBP-6 in the presence of T3. In conclusion, these studies provide evidence that overexpression of IGFBP-6 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation regulated by TR in the present of T3. PMID:21997736

  16. Nuclear Receptor-Like Structure and Interaction of Congenital Heart Disease-Associated Factors GATA4 and NKX2-5

    PubMed Central

    Tölli, Marja; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Darwich, Rami; Komati, Hiba; Nemer, Mona; Ruskoaho, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Aims Transcription factor GATA4 is a dosage sensitive regulator of heart development and alterations in its level or activity lead to congenital heart disease (CHD). GATA4 has also been implicated in cardiac regeneration and repair. GATA4 action involves combinatorial interaction with other cofactors such as NKX2-5, another critical cardiac regulator whose mutations also cause CHD. Despite its critical importance to the heart and its evolutionary conservation across species, the structural basis of the GATA4-NKX2-5 interaction remains incompletely understood. Methods and Results A homology model was constructed and used to identify surface amino acids important for the interaction of GATA4 and NKX2-5. These residues were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis, and the mutant proteins were characterized for their ability to bind DNA and to physically and functionally interact with NKX2-5. The studies identify 5 highly conserved amino acids in the second zinc finger (N272, R283, Q274, K299) and its C-terminal extension (R319) that are critical for physical and functional interaction with the third alpha helix of NKX2-5 homeodomain. Integration of the experimental data with computational modeling suggests that the structural arrangement of the zinc finger-homeodomain resembles the architecture of the conserved DNA binding domain of nuclear receptors. Conclusions The results provide novel insight into the structural basis for protein-protein interactions between two important classes of transcription factors. The model proposed will help to elucidate the molecular basis for disease causing mutations in GATA4 and NKX2-5 and may be relevant to other members of the GATA and NK classes of transcription factors. PMID:26642209

  17. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Modulates MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and β-Catenin Functional Interactions to Enhance Synapse Formation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihui; Eagleson, Kathie L; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    MET, a pleiotropic receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in autism risk, influences multiple neurodevelopmental processes. There is a knowledge gap, however, in the molecular mechanism through which MET mediates developmental events related to disorder risk. In the neocortex, MET is expressed transiently during periods of peak dendritic outgrowth and synaptogenesis, with expression enriched at developing synapses, consistent with demonstrated roles in dendritic morphogenesis, modulation of spine volume, and excitatory synapse development. In a recent coimmunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry screen, β-catenin was identified as part of the MET interactome in developing neocortical synaptosomes. Here, we investigated the influence of the MET/β-catenin complex in mouse neocortical synaptogenesis. Western blot analysis confirms that MET and β-catenin coimmunoprecipitate, but N-cadherin is not associated with the MET complex. Following stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), β-catenin is phosphorylated at tyrosine(142) (Y142) and dissociates from MET, accompanied by an increase in β-catenin/N-cadherin and MET/synapsin 1 protein complexes. In neocortical neurons in vitro, proximity ligation assays confirmed the close proximity of these proteins. Moreover, in neurons transfected with synaptophysin-GFP, HGF stimulation increases the density of synaptophysin/bassoon (a presynaptic marker) and synaptophysin/PSD-95 (a postsynaptic marker) clusters. Mutation of β-catenin at Y142 disrupts the dissociation of the MET/β-catenin complex and prevents the increase in clusters in response to HGF. The data demonstrate a new mechanism for the modulation of synapse formation, whereby MET activation induces an alignment of presynaptic and postsynaptic elements that are necessary for assembly and formation of functional synapses by subsets of neocortical neurons that express MET/β-catenin complex. PMID:27595133

  18. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Modulates MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and β-Catenin Functional Interactions to Enhance Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Eagleson, Kathie L.

    2016-01-01

    MET, a pleiotropic receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in autism risk, influences multiple neurodevelopmental processes. There is a knowledge gap, however, in the molecular mechanism through which MET mediates developmental events related to disorder risk. In the neocortex, MET is expressed transiently during periods of peak dendritic outgrowth and synaptogenesis, with expression enriched at developing synapses, consistent with demonstrated roles in dendritic morphogenesis, modulation of spine volume, and excitatory synapse development. In a recent coimmunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry screen, β-catenin was identified as part of the MET interactome in developing neocortical synaptosomes. Here, we investigated the influence of the MET/β-catenin complex in mouse neocortical synaptogenesis. Western blot analysis confirms that MET and β-catenin coimmunoprecipitate, but N-cadherin is not associated with the MET complex. Following stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), β-catenin is phosphorylated at tyrosine142 (Y142) and dissociates from MET, accompanied by an increase in β-catenin/N-cadherin and MET/synapsin 1 protein complexes. In neocortical neurons in vitro, proximity ligation assays confirmed the close proximity of these proteins. Moreover, in neurons transfected with synaptophysin-GFP, HGF stimulation increases the density of synaptophysin/bassoon (a presynaptic marker) and synaptophysin/PSD-95 (a postsynaptic marker) clusters. Mutation of β-catenin at Y142 disrupts the dissociation of the MET/β-catenin complex and prevents the increase in clusters in response to HGF. The data demonstrate a new mechanism for the modulation of synapse formation, whereby MET activation induces an alignment of presynaptic and postsynaptic elements that are necessary for assembly and formation of functional synapses by subsets of neocortical neurons that express MET/β-catenin complex. PMID:27595133

  19. GPCR heteromers and their allosteric receptor-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, K; Borroto-Escuela, D O; Marcellino, D; Romero-Fernandez, W; Frankowska, M; Guidolin, D; Filip, M; Ferraro, L; Woods, A S; Tarakanov, A; Ciruela, F; Agnati, L F; Tanganelli, S

    2012-01-01

    The concept of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions and evidence for their existences were introduced in the beginning of the 1980's, suggesting the existence of receptor heterodimerization. The discovery of GPCR heteromers and the receptor mosaic (higher order oligomers, more than two) has been related to the parallel development and application of a variety of resonance energy transfer techniques such as bioluminescence (BRET), fluorescence (FRET) and sequential energy transfer (SRET). The assembly of interacting GPCRs, heterodimers and receptor mosaic leads to changes in the agonist recognition, signaling, and trafficking of participating receptors via allosteric mechanisms, sometimes involving the appearance of cooperativity. The receptor interface in the GPCR heteromers is beginning to be characterized and the key role of electrostatic epitope-epitope interactions for the formation of the receptor heteromers will be discussed. Furthermore, a "guide-and-clasp" manner of receptor-receptor interactions has been proposed where the "adhesive guides" may be the triplet homologies. These interactions probably represent a general molecular mechanism for receptor-receptor interactions. It is proposed that changes in GPCR function (moonlighting) may develop through the intracellular loops and C-terminii of the GPCR heteromers as a result of dynamic allosteric interactions between different types of G proteins and other receptor interacting proteins in these domains of the receptors. The evidence for the existence of receptor heteromers opens up a new field for a better understanding of neurophysiology and neuropathology. Furthermore, novel therapeutic approaches could be possible based on the use of heteromers as targets for drug development based on their unique pharmacology. PMID:22335512

  20. Adenosine receptor interactions and anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Bruns, R F; Katims, J J; Annau, Z; Snyder, S H; Daly, J W

    1983-12-01

    [3H]-N6-cyclohexyladenosine and [3H]-1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine label the A1 subtype of adenosine receptor in brain membranes. The affinities of methylxanthines in competing for A1 adenosine receptors parallel their potencies as locomotor stimulants. The adenosine agonist N6-(phenylisopropyl) adenosine is a potent locomotor depressant. Both diazepam and N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine cause locomotor stimulation in a narrow range of subdepressant doses. Combined stimulant doses of the two agents depress motor activity, as do larger doses of either one, given separately. Evidence supporting and against the hypothesis that some of the actions of benzodiazepines are mediated via the adenosine system is reviewed. A number of compounds interact with both systems, probably because of physico-chemical similarities between adenosine and diazepam. It is concluded that of the four classic actions of benzodiazepines, the sedative and muscle relaxant (but not anxiolytic or anticonvulsant) actions could possibly be mediated by adenosine. PMID:6199685

  1. C1q-tumour necrosis factor-related protein 8 (CTRP8) is a novel interaction partner of relaxin receptor RXFP1 in human brain cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Glogowska, Aleksandra; Kunanuvat, Usakorn; Stetefeld, Jörg; Patel, Trushar R; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Krcek, Jerry; Weber, Ekkehard; Wong, G William; Del Bigio, Marc R; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Klonisch, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    We report a novel ligand-receptor system composed of the leucine-rich G-protein-coupled relaxin receptor, RXFP1, and the C1q-tumour necrosis factor-related protein 8 (CTRP8) in human primary brain cancer, a tumour entity devoid of the classical RXFP1 ligands, RLN1-3. In structural homology studies and computational docking experiments we delineated the N-terminal region of the globular C1q region of CTRP8 and the leucine-rich repeat units 7 and 8 of RXFP1 to mediate this new ligand-receptor interaction. CTRP8 secreted from HEK293T cells, recombinant human (rh) CTRP8, and short synthetic peptides derived from the C1q globular domain of human CTRP8 caused the activation of RXFP1 as determined by elevated intracellular cAMP levels and the induction of a marked pro-migratory phenotype in established glioblastoma (GB) cell lines and primary cells from GB patients. Employing a small competitor peptide, we were able to disrupt the CTRP8-RXFP1-induced increased GB motility. The CTRP8-RXFP1-mediated migration in GB cells involves the activation of PI3K and specific protein kinase C pathways and the increased production/secretion of the potent lysosomal protease cathepsin B (cathB), a known prognostic marker of GB. Specific inhibition of CTRP8-induced cathB activity effectively blocked the ability of primary GB to invade laminin matrices. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed the direct interaction of human CTRP8 with RXFP1. Our results support a therapeutic approach in GB aimed at targeting multiple steps of the CTRP8-RXFP1 signalling pathway by a combined inhibitor and peptide-based strategy to block GB dissemination within the brain. PMID:24014093

  2. Role of estrogen receptor ligand and estrogen response element sequence on interaction with chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF).

    PubMed

    Klinge, C M

    1999-11-01

    Estrogen-responsive genes are regulated by altering the balance of estrogen receptor (ER) interaction with transcription activators and inhibitors. Here we examined the role of ER ligand on ER interaction with the Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor (COUP-TF) orphan nuclear receptor. COUP-TF binding to half-site estrogen response elements (EREs) was increased by the addition of estradiol (E2) -liganded ER (E2-ER), but not by ER liganded with the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT-ER) or tamoxifen aziridine (TAz-ER). ER did not bind to single half-sites. Conversely, COUP-TF enhanced the ERE binding of purified E2-ER, but did not affect TAz-ER-ERE binding. In contrast, only antiestrogens enhanced direct interaction between ER and COUP-TF as assessed by GST pull-down assays. Identical results were obtained using either purified bovine or recombinant human ERalpha. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that ER and COUP-TF interact in extracts from MCF-7 and ERalpha-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells. Here we document that ER ligand impacts COUP-TF-ER interaction. COUP-TF interaction is mediated by the DNA binding and ligand-binding domains of ER. We suggest that changes in ER conformation induced by DNA binding reduce ER-COUP-TF interaction. Transient transfection of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells with a COUP-TFI expression vector repressed E2-induced luciferase reporter gene expression from single or multiple tandem copies of a consensus ERE. COUP-TFI stimulated 4-OHT-induced luciferase activity from a minimal ERE. Alone, COUP-TFI increased transcription from ERE half-sites or a single ERE in a sequence-dependent manner. These data provide evidence that the ERE sequence and its immediate flanking regions influence whether COUP-TF enhances, inhibits, or has no effect on ER ligand-induced ERE reporter gene expression and that COUP-TFI activates gene transcription from ERE half-sites. We suggest that COUP-TFI plays a role in mitigating estrogen

  3. Differential ligand-dependent interactions between the AF-2 activating domain of nuclear receptors and the putative transcriptional intermediary factors mSUG1 and TIF1.

    PubMed Central

    vom Baur, E; Zechel, C; Heery, D; Heine, M J; Garnier, J M; Vivat, V; Le Douarin, B; Gronemeyer, H; Chambon, P; Losson, R

    1996-01-01

    Using a yeast two-hybrid system we report the isolation of a novel mouse protein, mSUG1, that interacts with retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) both in yeast cells and in vitro in a ligand- and AF-2 activating domain (AF-2 AD)-dependent manner and show that it is a structural and functional homologue of the essential yeast protein SUG1. mSUG1 also efficiently interacts with other nuclear receptors, including oestrogen (ER), thyroid hormone (TR), Vitamin D3 (VDR) and retinoid X (RXR) receptors. By comparing the interaction properties of these receptors with mSUG1 and TIF1, we demonstrate that: (i) RXR alpha efficiently interacts with TIF1, but not with mSUG1, whereas TR alpha interacts much more efficiently with mSUG1 than with TIF1, and RAR alpha, VDR and ER efficiently interact with mSUG1 and TIF1; (ii) the amphipathic alpha-helix core of the AF-2 AD is differentially involved in interactions of RAR alpha with mSUG1 and TIF1; (iii) the AF-2 AD cores of RAR alpha and ER are similarly involved in their interaction with TIF1, but not with mSUG1. Thus, the interaction interfaces between the different receptors and either mSUG1 or TIF1 may vary depending on the nature of the receptor and the putative mediator of its AF-2 function. We discuss the possibility that mSUG1 and TIF1 may mediate the transcriptional activity of the AF-2 of nuclear receptors through different mechanisms. Images PMID:8598193

  4. Inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 interaction leads to decreased survival in human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Beierle, Elizabeth A; Ma, Xiaojie; Stewart, Jerry E; Megison, Michael; Cance, William G; Kurenova, Elena V

    2014-03-01

    Neuroblastoma continues to be a devastating childhood solid tumor and is responsible for over 15% of all childhood cancer-related deaths. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) are protein tyrosine kinases that are overexpressed in a number of human cancers, including neuroblastoma. These two kinases can directly interact and provide survival signals to cancer cells. In this study, we utilized siRNA to VEGFR-3 to demonstrate the biologic importance of this kinase in neuroblastoma cell survival. We also used confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation to show that FAK and VEGFR-3 bind in neuroblastoma. Finally, employing a 12-amino-acid peptide (AV3) specific to VEGFR-3, we showed that the colocalization between FAK and VEGFR-3 could be disrupted, and that disruption resulted in decreased neuroblastoma cell survival. These studies provide insight to the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction in neuroblastoma and demonstrate its importance in this tumor type. Focusing upon the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction may provide a novel therapeutic target for the development of new strategies for treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:23065847

  5. Oral epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: comparative pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Solange; Zimmermann, Stefan; Adjei, Alex A

    2014-09-01

    The development of orally active small molecule inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has led to new treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with activating mutations of the EGFR gene show sensitivity to, and clinical benefit from, treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKls). First generation reversible ATP-competitive EGFR-TKls, gefitinib and erlotinib, are effective as first, second-line or maintenance therapy. Despite initial benefit, most patients develop resistance within a year, 50-60% of cases being related to the appearance of a T790M gatekeeper mutation. Newer, irreversible EGFR-TKls - afatinib and dacomitinib - covalently bind to and inhibit multiple receptors in the ErbB family (EGFR, HER2 and HER4). These agents have been mainly evaluated for first-line treatment but also in the setting of acquired resistance to first-generation EGFR-TKls. Afatinib is the first ErbB family blocker approved for patients with NSCLC with activating EGFR mutations; dacomitinib is in late stage clinical development. Mutant-selective EGFR inhibitors (AZD9291, CO-1686, HM61713) that specifically target the T790M resistance mutation are in early development. The EGFR-TKIs differ in their spectrum of target kinases, reversibility of binding to EGFR receptor, pharmacokinetics and potential for drug-drug interactions, as discussed in this review. For the clinician, these differences are relevant in the setting of polymedicated patients with NSCLC, as well as from the perspective of innovative anticancer drug combination strategies. PMID:25027951

  6. Characterization of osteoprotegerin binding to glycosaminoglycans by surface plasmon resonance: Role in the interactions with receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and RANK

    SciTech Connect

    Theoleyre, S.; Kwan Tat, S.; Vusio, P.; Blanchard, F.; Gallagher, J.; Ricard-Blum, S.; Fortun, Y.; Padrines, M.; Redini, F.; Heymann, D. . E-mail: dominique.heymann@univ-nantes.fr

    2006-08-25

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a decoy receptor for receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL), a key inducer of osteoclastogenesis via its receptor RANK. We previously showed that RANK, RANKL, and OPG are able to form a tertiary complex and that OPG must be also considered as a direct effector of osteoclast functions. As OPG contains a heparin-binding domain, the present study investigated the interactions between OPG and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) by surface plasmon resonance and their involvement in the OPG functions. Kinetic data demonstrated that OPG binds to heparin with a high-affinity (K {sub D}: 0.28 nM) and that the pre-incubation of OPG with heparin inhibits in a dose-dependent manner the OPG binding to the complex RANK-RANKL. GAGs from different structure/origin (heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate) exert similar activity on OPG binding. The contribution of the sulfation pattern and the size of the oligosaccharide were determined in this inhibitory mechanism. The results demonstrated that sulfation is essential in the OPG-blocking function of GAGs since a totally desulfated heparin loses its capacity to bind and to block OPG binding to RANKL. Moreover, a decasaccharide is the minimal structure that totally inhibits the OPG binding to the complex RANK-RANKL. Western blot analysis performed in 293 cells surexpressing RANKL revealed that the pre-incubation of OPG with these GAGs strongly inhibits the OPG-induced decrease of membrane RANKL half-life. These data support an essential function of the related glycosaminoglycans heparin and heparan sulfate in the activity of the triad RANK-RANKL-OPG.

  7. Binding of the Ah receptor to receptor binding factors in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R T; Ruh, T S; Ruh, M F

    1993-03-01

    Dioxin induces biological responses through interaction with a specific intracellular receptor, the Ah receptor, and the subsequent interaction of the Ah receptor with chromatin. We report the binding of the Ah receptor, partially purified from rabbit liver, to receptor binding factors in chromatin. Rabbit liver chromatin proteins (CP) were isolated by adsorption of chromatin to hydroxylapatite followed by sequential extraction with 1-8 M GdnHCl. To assay for receptor binding a portion of each CP fraction was reconstituted to rabbit double-stranded DNA using a reverse gradient dialysis of 7.5 to 0 M GdnHCl. These reconstituted nucleoacidic proteins were then examined for binding to [3H]-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([3H]TCDD)-receptor complexes by the streptomycin filter assay. Prior to the binding assay, [3H]TCDD-receptor complexes were partially purified by step elution from DEAE-cellulose columns. CP fractions 2, 5, and 7 were found to bind to the Ah receptor with high affinity. Scatchard analysis yielded Kd values in the nanomolar range. Competition with 2-fold excess unlabeled TCDD-receptor complexes was demonstrated, and binding was reduced markedly when the receptor was prepared in the presence of 10 mM molybdate. Such chromatin receptor binding factors (RBFs) may participate in the interaction of receptor with specific DNA sequences resulting in modulation of specific gene expression. PMID:8384852

  8. Development of Nano-Liposomal Formulations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors and their Pharmacological Interactions on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Brian J.

    A rapidly expanding understanding of molecular derangements in cancer cell function has led to the development of selective, targeted chemotherapeutic agents. Growth factor signal transduction networks are frequently activated in an aberrant fashion, particularly through the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). This has spurred an intensive effort to develop receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKI) that are targeted to specific receptors, or receptor subfamilies. Chapter 1 reviews the pharmacology, preclinical, and clinical aspects of RTKIs that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR inhibitors demonstrate significant success at inhibiting phosphorylation-based signaling pathways that promote cancer cell proliferation. Additionally RTKIs have physicochemical and structural characteristics that enable them to function as inhibitors of multi-drug resistance transport proteins. Thus EGFR inhibitors and other RTKIs have both on-target and off-target activities that could be beneficial in cancer therapy. However, these agents exert a number of side effects, some of which arise from their hydrophobic nature and large in vivo volume of distribution. Side effects of the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib include skin rash, severe myelotoxicity when combined with certain chemotherapeutic agents, and impairment of the blood brain barrier to xenobiotics. Weighing the preclinical and clinical observations with the EGFR inhibitors, we developed the primary overall hypothesis of this research: that drug-carrier formulations of RTKIs such as the EGFR inhibitors could be developed based on nanoparticulate liposomal carriers. Theoretically, this carrier strategy would ameliorate toxicity and improve the biodistribution and tumor selectivity of these agents. We hypothesized specifically that liposomal formulations could shift the biodistribution of EGFR inhibitors such as gefitinib away from skin, bone marrow, and the blood brain barrier, and toward solid tumors

  9. Differential Interactions of Specific Nuclear Factor I Isoforms with the Glucocorticoid Receptor and STAT5 in the Cooperative Regulation of WAP Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S.; Wyszomierski, Shannon L.; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2001-01-01

    The distal region (−830 to −720 bp) of the rat whey acidic protein (WAP) gene contains a composite response element (CoRE), which has been demonstrated previously to confer mammary gland-specific and hormonally regulated WAP gene expression. Point mutations in the binding sites for specific transcription factors present within this CoRE have demonstrated the importance of both nuclear factor I (NFI) and STAT5 as well as cooperative interactions with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the regulation of WAP gene expression in the mammary gland of transgenic mice. This study reports the characterization of NFI gene expression during mammary gland development and the identification and cloning of specific NFI isoforms (NFI-A4, NFI-B2, and NFI-X1) from the mouse mammary gland during lactation. Some but not all of these NFI isoforms synergistically activate WAP gene transcription in cooperation with GR and STAT5, as determined using transient cotransfection assays in JEG-3 cells. On both the WAP CoRE and the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat promoter, the NFI-B isoform preferentially activated gene transcription in cooperation with STAT5A and GR. In contrast, the NFI-A isoform suppressed GR and STAT cooperativity at the WAP CoRE. Finally, unlike their interaction with the NFI consensus binding site in the adenovirus promoter, the DNA-binding specificities of the three NFI isoforms to the palindromic NFI site in the WAP CoRE were not identical, which may partially explain the failure of the NFI-A isoform to cooperate with GR and STAT5A. PMID:11564870

  10. Direct interaction between surface β1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibits EGFR activation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wenqing; Weng, Shuqiang; Zhang, Si; Wu, Weibing; Dong, Ling; Shen, Xizhong; Zhang, Songwen; Gu, Jianxin; Xue, Ruyi

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •β1,4GT1 interacts with EGFR both in vitro and in vivo. •β1,4GT1 co-localizes with EGFR on the cell surface. •β1,4GT1 inhibits {sup 125}I-EGF binding to EGFR. •β1,4GT1 inhibits EGF induced EGFR dimerization and phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Our previous studies showed that cell surface β1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 (β1,4GT1) negatively regulated cell survival through inhibition and modulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) SMMC-7721 cells. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that β1,4-galactosyltransferase 1 (β1,4GT1) interacted with EGFR in vitro by GST pull-down analysis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that β1,4GT1 bound to EGFR in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation and determined the co-localization of β1,4GT1 and EGFR on the cell surface via confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis. Finally, using {sup 125}I-EGF binding experiments and Western blot analysis, we found that overexpression of β1,4GT1 inhibited {sup 125}I-EGF binding to EGFR, and consequently reduced the levels of EGFR dimerization and phosphorylation. In contrast, RNAi-mediated knockdown of β1,4GT1 increased the levels of EGFR dimerization and phosphorylation. These data suggest that cell surface β1,4GT1 interacts with EGFR and inhibits EGFR activation.

  11. Combinatorial and Computational Approaches to Identify Interactions of Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (M-CSF) and Its Receptor c-FMS.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Lior; Shirian, Jason; Zur, Yuval; Levaot, Noam; Shifman, Julia M; Papo, Niv

    2015-10-23

    The molecular interactions between macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the tyrosine kinase receptor c-FMS play a key role in the immune response, bone metabolism, and the development of some cancers. Because no x-ray structure is available for the human M-CSF · c-FMS complex, the binding epitope for this complex is largely unknown. Our goal was to identify the residues that are essential for binding of the human M-CSF to c-FMS. For this purpose, we used a yeast surface display (YSD) approach. We expressed a combinatorial library of monomeric M-CSF (M-CSFM) single mutants and screened this library to isolate variants with reduced affinity for c-FMS using FACS. Sequencing yielded a number of single M-CSFM variants with mutations both in the direct binding interface and distant from the binding site. In addition, we used computational modeling to map the identified mutations onto the M-CSFM structure and to classify the mutations into three groups as follows: those that significantly decrease protein stability; those that destroy favorable intermolecular interactions; and those that decrease affinity through allosteric effects. To validate the YSD and computational data, M-CSFM and three variants were produced as soluble proteins; their affinity and structure were analyzed; and very good correlations with both YSD data and computational predictions were obtained. By identifying the M-CSFM residues critical for M-CSF · c-FMS interactions, we have laid down the basis for a deeper understanding of the M-CSF · c-FMS signaling mechanism and for the development of target-specific therapeutic agents with the ability to sterically occlude the M-CSF·c-FMS binding interface. PMID:26359491

  12. Promoted Interaction of Nuclear Factor-κB With Demethylated Purinergic P2X3 Receptor Gene Contributes to Neuropathic Pain in Rats With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Hong; Hu, Ji; Zhou, You-Lang; Qin, Xin; Song, Zhen-Yuan; Yang, Pan-Pan; Hu, Shufen; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-12-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes produced by mechanisms that as yet are incompletely defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the regulation of purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3R) plasticity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats with painful diabetes. Here, we showed that hindpaw pain hypersensitivity in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats was attenuated by treatment with purinergic receptor antagonist suramin or A-317491. The expression and function of P2X3Rs was markedly enhanced in hindpaw-innervated DRG neurons in diabetic rats. The CpG (cytosine guanine dinucleotide) island in the p2x3r gene promoter region was significantly demethylated, and the expression of DNA methyltransferase 3b was remarkably downregulated in DRGs in diabetic rats. The binding ability of p65 (an active form of NF-κB) with the p2x3r gene promoter region and p65 expression were enhanced significantly in diabetes. The inhibition of p65 signaling using the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate or recombinant lentiviral vectors designated as lentiviral vector-p65 small interfering RNA remarkably suppressed P2X3R activities and attenuated diabetic pain hypersensitivity. Insulin treatment significantly attenuated pain hypersensitivity and suppressed the expression of p65 and P2X3Rs. Our findings suggest that the p2x3r gene promoter DNA demethylation and enhanced interaction with p65 contributes to P2X3R sensitization and diabetic pain hypersensitivity. PMID:26130762

  13. The granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) interacts with retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in the regulation of myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chee, Lynette C Y; Hendy, Jean; Purton, Louise E; McArthur, Grant A

    2013-02-01

    The key roles of RARs and G-CSFR in the regulation of granulopoiesis have been well-documented. In this study, we sought to investigate the interaction between G-CSFR and RARs in myeloid differentiation of adult mice through conditional deletion of RARα or RARγ on a G-CSFR(-/-) background and by pharmacological intervention of WT and G-CSFR(-/-) mice with a pan-RAR inverse agonist, NRX194310. Our findings show that residual granulopoiesis still persists in mice doubly null for G-CSFR and RARα or RARγ, confirming that RARs and G-CSFR are dispensable in maintaining residual granulopoiesis. Moreover, an increase in mature myeloid cells was seen in the conditional RARγ(Δ/Δ) mice and WT mice treated with NRX194310, likely mediated through increased G-CSF production. However, with the loss of G-CSFR, this expansion in granulopoiesis was attenuated, supporting the hypothesis that G-CSFR signaling interacts with RARs in the regulation of myeloid differentiation. PMID:23136256

  14. Development of Nano-Liposomal Formulations of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors and their Pharmacological Interactions on Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trummer, Brian J.

    A rapidly expanding understanding of molecular derangements in cancer cell function has led to the development of selective, targeted chemotherapeutic agents. Growth factor signal transduction networks are frequently activated in an aberrant fashion, particularly through the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). This has spurred an intensive effort to develop receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKI) that are targeted to specific receptors, or receptor subfamilies. Chapter 1 reviews the pharmacology, preclinical, and clinical aspects of RTKIs that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR inhibitors demonstrate significant success at inhibiting phosphorylation-based signaling pathways that promote cancer cell proliferation. Additionally RTKIs have physicochemical and structural characteristics that enable them to function as inhibitors of multi-drug resistance transport proteins. Thus EGFR inhibitors and other RTKIs have both on-target and off-target activities that could be beneficial in cancer therapy. However, these agents exert a number of side effects, some of which arise from their hydrophobic nature and large in vivo volume of distribution. Side effects of the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib include skin rash, severe myelotoxicity when combined with certain chemotherapeutic agents, and impairment of the blood brain barrier to xenobiotics. Weighing the preclinical and clinical observations with the EGFR inhibitors, we developed the primary overall hypothesis of this research: that drug-carrier formulations of RTKIs such as the EGFR inhibitors could be developed based on nanoparticulate liposomal carriers. Theoretically, this carrier strategy would ameliorate toxicity and improve the biodistribution and tumor selectivity of these agents. We hypothesized specifically that liposomal formulations could shift the biodistribution of EGFR inhibitors such as gefitinib away from skin, bone marrow, and the blood brain barrier, and toward solid tumors

  15. Systematic prediction of human membrane receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanjun; Dhiman, Harpreet K.; Bhola, Neil; Budyak, Ivan; Kar, Siddhartha; Man, David; Dutta, Arpana; Tirupula, Kalyan; Carr, Brian I.; Grandis, Jennifer; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane receptor-activated signal transduction pathways are integral to cellular functions and disease mechanisms in humans. Identification of the full set of proteins interacting with membrane receptors by high throughput experimental means is difficult because methods to directly identify protein interactions are largely not applicable to membrane proteins. Unlike prior approaches that attempted to predict the global human interactome we used a computational strategy that only focused on discovering the interacting partners of human membrane receptors leading to improved results for these proteins. We predict specific interactions based on statistical integration of biological data containing highly informative direct and indirect evidences together with feedback from experts. The predicted membrane receptor interactome provides a system-wide view, and generates new biological hypotheses regarding interactions between membrane receptors and other proteins. We have experimentally validated a number of these interactions. The results suggest that a framework of systematically integrating computational predictions, global analyses, biological experimentation and expert feedback is a feasible strategy to study the human membrane receptor interactome. PMID:19798668

  16. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  17. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  18. Interaction between insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and alphaVbeta3 integrin linked signaling pathways: cellular responses to changes in multiple signaling inputs.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, D R; Maile, L A

    2005-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins that mediate cell attachment to extracellular matrix, migration, division, and inhibition of apoptosis. Because growth factors are also important for these processes, there has been interest in cooperative signaling between growth factor receptors and integrins. IGF-I is an important growth factor for vascular cells. One integrin, alphaVbeta3, that is expressed in smooth muscle cells modulates IGF-I actions. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 is required for IGF-I to stimulate cell migration and division. Src homology 2 containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) is a tyrosine phosphatase whose recruitment to signaling molecules is stimulated by growth factors including IGF-I. If alphaVbeta3 ligand occupancy is inhibited, there is no recruitment of SHP-2 to alphaVbeta3 and its transfer to downstream signaling molecules is blocked. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of the beta3-subunit, resulting in recruitment of SHP-2. This transfer is mediated by an insulin receptor substrate-1-related protein termed DOK-1. Subsequently, SHP-2 is transferred to another transmembrane protein, SHPS-1. This transfer requires IGF-I receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of SHPS-1, which contains two YXXL motifs that mediate SHP-2 binding. The transfer of SHP-2 to SHPS-1 is also required for recruitment of Shc to SHPS-1. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 results in sustained Shc phosphorylation and enhanced Shc recruitment. Shc activation results in induction of MAPK. Inhibition of the Shc/SHPS-1 complex formation results in failure to achieve sustained MAPK activation and an attenuated mitogenic response. Thus, within the vessel wall, a mechanism exists whereby ligand occupancy of the alphaVbeta3 integrin is required for assembly of a multicomponent membrane signaling complex that is necessary for cells to respond optimally to IGF-I. PMID:15528274

  19. Structural insights into the interaction of human S100B and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2): Effects on FGFR1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arun A; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Li, Hongchun; Yang, Lee-Wei; Yu, Chin

    2013-12-01

    S100B is a calcium sensing protein belonging to the S100 protein family with intracellular and extracellular roles. It is one of the EF hand homodimeric proteins, which is known to interact with various protein targets to regulate varied biological functions. Extracellular S100B has been recently reported to interact with FGF2 in a RAGE-independent manner. However, the recognition mechanism of S100B-FGF2 interaction at the molecular level remains unclear. In this study, the critical residues on S100B-FGF2 interface were mapped by combined information derived from NMR spectroscopy and site directed mutagenesis experiments. Utilizing NMR titration data, we generated the structural models of S100B-FGF2 complex from the computational docking program, HADDOCK which were further proved stable during 15ns unrestrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies indicated S100B interaction with FGF2 is an entropically favored process implying dominant role of hydrophobic contacts at the protein-protein interface. Residue level information of S100B interaction with FGF2 was useful to understand the varied target recognition ability of S100B and further explained its role in effecting extracellular signaling diversity. Mechanistic insights into the S100B-FGF2 complex interface and cell-based assay studies involving mutants led us to conclude the novel role of S100B in FGF2 mediated FGFR1 receptor inactivation. PMID:24063890

  20. Smad7 Protein Interacts with Receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads) to Inhibit Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaohua; Liao, Hongwei; Cheng, Minzhang; Shi, Xiaojing; Lin, Xia; Feng, Xin-Hua; Chen, Ye-Guang

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β is a pleiotropic cytokine that regulates a wide range of cellular actions and pathophysiological processes. TGF-β signaling is spatiotemporally fine-tuned. As a key negative regulator of TGF-β signaling, Smad7 exerts its inhibitory effects by blocking receptor activity, inducing receptor degradation or interfering with Smad-DNA binding. However, the functions and the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of Smad7 in TGF-β signaling are still not fully understood. In this study we report a novel mechanism whereby Smad7 antagonizes TGF-β signaling at the Smad level. Smad7 oligomerized with R-Smad proteins upon TGF-β signaling and directly inhibited R-Smad activity, as assessed by Gal4-luciferase reporter assays. Mechanistically, Smad7 competes with Smad4 to associate with R-Smads and recruits the E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4L to activated R-Smads, leading to their polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Similar to the R-Smad-Smad4 oligomerization, the interaction between R-Smads and Smad7 is mediated by their mad homology 2 (MH2) domains. A positive-charged basic region including the L3/β8 loop-strand module and adjacent amino acids in the MH2 domain of Smad7 is essential for the interaction. These results shed new light on the regulation of TGF-β signaling by Smad7. PMID:26555259

  1. Cell surface interaction of annexin A2 and galectin-3 modulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in Her-2 negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Praveenkumar; Bargale, Anil; Patil, Basavraj R; Mohan, Rajashekar; Dinesh, U S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Gai, Pramod B; Patil, Vidya S; Amsavardani, T S

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression and activation of tyrosine kinase receptors like EGFR and Src regulate the progression and metastasis of Her-2 negative breast cancer. Recently we have reported the role of cell membrane interaction of phospholipid-binding protein annexin A2 (AnxA2) and EGFR in regulating cellular signaling in the activation of angiogenesis, matrix degradation, invasion, and cancer metastasis. Beta-galactoside-specific animal lectin galectin-3 is an apoptosis inhibitor, and cell surface-associated extracellular galectin-3 also has a role in cell migration, cancer progression, and metastasis. Similar expression pattern and membrane co-localization of these two proteins made us to hypothesize in the current study that galectin-3 and AnxA2 interaction is critical for Her-2 negative breast cancer progression. By various experimental analyses, we confirm that glycosylated AnxA2 at the membrane surface interacts with galectin-3. N-linked glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin treatment convincingly blocked AnxA2 membrane translocation and its association with galectin-3. To analyze whether this interaction has any functional relevance, we tried to dissociate this interaction with purified plant lectin from chickpea (Cicer arietinum agglutinin). This highly specific 30 kDa plant lectin could dissociate AnxA2 from endogenous lectin galectin-3 interaction at the cell surface. This dissociation could down-regulate Bcl-2 family proteins, cell proliferation, and migration simultaneously triggering cell apoptosis. Targeting this interaction of membrane surface glycoprotein and its animal lectin in Her-2 negative breast cancer may be of therapeutic value. PMID:26438086

  2. High-Content Positional Biosensor Screening Assay for Compounds to Prevent or Disrupt Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Intermediary Factor 2 Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yun; Shun, Tong Ying; Strock, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The androgen receptor–transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (AR-TIF2) positional protein–protein interaction (PPI) biosensor assay described herein combines physiologically relevant cell-based assays with the specificity of binding assays by incorporating structural information of AR and TIF2 functional domains along with intracellular targeting sequences and fluorescent reporters. Expression of the AR-red fluorescent protein (RFP) “prey” and TIF2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) “bait” components of the biosensor was directed by recombinant adenovirus constructs that expressed the ligand binding and activation function 2 surface domains of AR fused to RFP with nuclear localization and nuclear export sequences, and three α-helical LXXLL motifs from TIF2 fused to GFP and an HIV Rev nucleolar targeting sequence. In unstimulated cells, AR-RFP was localized predominantly to the cytoplasm and TIF2-GFP was localized to nucleoli. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment induced AR-RFP translocation into the nucleus where the PPIs between AR and TIF2 resulted in the colocalization of both biosensors within the nucleolus. We adapted the translocation enhanced image analysis module to quantify the colocalization of the AR-RFP and TIF2-GFP biosensors in images acquired on the ImageXpress platform. DHT induced a concentration-dependent AR-TIF2 colocalization and produced a characteristic condensed punctate AR-RFP PPI nucleolar distribution pattern. The heat-shock protein 90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) and antiandrogens flutamide and bicalutamide inhibited DHT-induced AR-TIF2 PPI formation with 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50s) of 88.5±12.5 nM, 7.6±2.4 μM, and 1.6±0.4 μM, respectively. Images of the AR-RFP distribution phenotype allowed us to distinguish between 17-AAG and flutamide, which prevented AR translocation, and bicalutamide, which blocked AR-TIF2 PPIs. We screened the Library of Pharmacologically Active

  3. EPA’s Exposure Factors Interactive Resource for Scenarios Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Exposure Factors Interactive Resource for Scenarios Tool (ExpoFIRST) is to allow users to draw on data found in the 2011 EFH to develop user-defined scenarios based on route of exposure, medium, receptor(s), timeframe, and dose metric for a contaminant of conce...

  4. Probing receptor-ligand interactions by sedimentation equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philo, John S.

    1997-05-01

    While sedimentation equilibrium is most commonly used to characterize the molecular weight and state of association of single proteins, this technique is also a very powerful tool for probing the interactions between two or more different proteins, and can characterize both the binding stoichiometry and the equilibrium constants. To resolve the complex binding interactions that can occur in such systems, it is crucial to globally fit data from many experiments to a common binding model, including samples made with different mixing ratios and a wide range of total concentration. It is often also essential to constrain the parameters during fitting so that the fits correctly reproduce the molar ratio of proteins used in making each sample. We have applied this methodology to probe mechanisms of receptor activation for a number of hematopoietic receptors and their cognate ligands, using receptor extracellular domains expressed as soluble proteins. Such data can potentially help in the design of improved or new protein therapeutics, as well as in efforts to create small- molecular mimetics of protein hormones through structure- based drug design. Sedimentation equilibrium has shown that stem cell factor, erythropoietin, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor can each dimerize their respective receptors in solution, but the mechanism of ligand-induced receptor dimerization for these three systems are strikingly different.

  5. Receptor-ligand interactions: Advanced biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Guryanov, Ivan; Fiorucci, Stefano; Tennikova, Tatiana

    2016-11-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions (RLIs) are at the base of all biological events occurring in living cells. The understanding of interactions between complementary macromolecules in biological systems represents a high-priority research area in bionanotechnology to design the artificial systems mimicking natural processes. This review summarizes and analyzes RLIs in some cutting-edge biomedical fields, in particular, for the preparation of novel stationary phases to separate complex biological mixtures in medical diagnostics, for the design of ultrasensitive biosensors for identification of biomarkers of various diseases at early stages, as well as in the development of innovative biomaterials and approaches for regenerative medicine. All these biotechnological fields are closely related, because their success depends on a proper choice, combination and spatial disposition of the single components of ligand-receptor pairs on the surface of appropriately designed support. PMID:27524092

  6. A nuclear factor for interleukin-6 expression (NF-IL6) and the glucocorticoid receptor synergistically activate transcription of the rat alpha 1-acid glycoprotein gene via direct protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Y; Isshiki, H; Kishimoto, T; Akira, S

    1993-01-01

    The acute-phase reaction is accompanied by an increase in a variety of serum proteins, named acute-phase proteins. The synthesis of these proteins is synergistically controlled by glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Recently, we have cloned nuclear factor-IL-6 (NF-IL6), a transcription factor that activates the IL-6 gene, and have demonstrated its involvement in the expression of acute-phase-protein genes. We report here an analysis of the molecular mechanisms by which inflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoid act synergistically to activate expression of the rat alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene. We found that NF-IL6 and ligand-activated rat glucocorticoid receptor acted synergistically to transactivate the AGP gene and that maximal transcriptional activation of the AGP gene required expression of both intact NF-IL6 and rat glucocorticoid receptor. Surprisingly, however, transcriptional synergism was still observed even when one of the two factors lacked either its DNA-binding or transcriptional-activation function. We present evidence for a direct protein-protein interaction between these two distinct transcription factors and propose that this may be responsible for the synergistic activation of the rat AGP gene. Images PMID:8441418

  7. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  8. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: a zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C K; D'Souza, U M; Eisch, A J; Yajima, S; Lammers, C H; Yang, Y; Lee, S H; Kim, Y M; Nestler, E J; Mouradian, M M

    2001-06-19

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in brain with a specific regional distribution including olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and frontal cortex. Many of these brain regions also express abundant levels of various dopamine receptors. In vivo, DRRF itself can be regulated by manipulations of dopaminergic transmission. Mice treated with drugs that increase extracellular striatal dopamine levels (cocaine), block dopamine receptors (haloperidol), or destroy dopamine terminals (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) show significant alterations in DRRF mRNA. The latter observations provide a basis for dopamine receptor regulation after these manipulations. We conclude that DRRF is important for modulating dopaminergic transmission in the brain. PMID:11390978

  9. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Secreted Hookworm Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) that Interacts with the Human MIF Receptor CD74

    SciTech Connect

    Cho,Y.; Jones, B.; Vermeire, J.; Leng, L.; DiFedele, L.; Harrison, L.; Xiong, H.; Kwong, Y.; Chen, Y.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Hookworms, parasitic nematodes that infect nearly one billion people worldwide, are a major cause of anemia and malnutrition. We hypothesize that hookworms actively manipulate the host immune response through the production of specific molecules designed to facilitate infection by larval stages and adult worm survival within the intestine. A full-length cDNA encoding a secreted orthologue of the human cytokine, Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) has been cloned from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum. Elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structure of recombinant AceMIF (rAceMIF) revealed an overall structural homology with significant differences in the tautomerase sites of the human and hookworm proteins. The relative bioactivities of human and hookworm MIF proteins were compared using in vitro assays of tautomerase activity, macrophage migration, and binding to MIF receptor CD74. The activity of rAceMIF was not inhibited by the ligand ISO-1, which was previously determined to be an inhibitor of the catalytic site of human MIF. These data define unique immunological, structural, and functional characteristics of AceMIF, thereby establishing the potential for selectively inhibiting the hookworm cytokine as a means of reducing parasite survival and disease pathogenesis.

  10. Pharmacological actions of Y-24180, a new specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF): II. Interactions with PAF and benzodiazepine receptors.

    PubMed

    Takehara, S; Mikashima, H; Muramoto, Y; Terasawa, M; Setoguchi, M; Tahara, T

    1990-12-01

    The inhibitory effect of Y-24180, 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-[2-(4-isobutylphenyl)ethyl]-6,9-dimethyl-6H-t hieno [3,2-f][1,2,4]triazolo [4,3-a][1,4]diazepine, on platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet aggregation and the specific binding of 3H-PAF to platelets was compared with other thienodiazepine derivatives, WEB 2086 and etizolam. Y-24180 inhibited PAF-induced rabbit platelet aggregation in vitro (IC50 3.84 nM), but had little effect on adenosine diphosphate- or arachidonic acid-induced aggregation. WEB 2086 and etizolam also showed an inhibitory effect of PAF-induced aggregation (IC50 values are 456 and 6730 nM, respectively). In PAF-induced human platelet aggregation, Y-24180 (IC50 0.84 nM) was more potent than WEB 2086 (IC50 4.21 nM) and etizolam (IC50 998 nM). Y-24180, WEB 2086 and etizolam displaced 3H-PAF binding from the washed-platelets of rabbits with an IC50 value of 3.50, 9.35 and 29.5 nM, respectively. In rabbits, pretreatment with Y-24180 and WEB 2086 antagonized PAF-induced platelet aggregation dose-dependently. The significant inhibitory effect of Y-24180 (1 mg/kg, p.o.) lasted 72 hr after a single dose oral administration. WEB 2086 (10 mg/kg, p.o.) also antagonized the ex vivo response induced by PAF 1 hr after administration, but no significant effect was observed 3 hr after administration. Y-24180 displaced 3H-diazepam binding from the synaptosomal membranes of rat cerebral cortex with a Ki value of 3.68 microM. The affinity of Y-24180 for benzodiazepine(BZP) receptors was lower than those of WEB 2086 and etizolam and was about 1000 times lower than that for PAF receptors in platelets. PMID:1965554

  11. Functional specificity of two hormone response elements present on the human apoA-II promoter that bind retinoid X receptor alpha/thyroid receptor beta heterodimers for retinoids and thyroids: synergistic interactions between thyroid receptor beta and upstream stimulatory factor 2a.

    PubMed Central

    Hatzivassiliou, Eudoxia; Koukos, George; Ribeiro, Agnes; Zannis, Vassilis; Kardassis, Dimitris

    2003-01-01

    DNA binding and mutagenesis in vitro established that the -67/-55 region of the apoA-II (apolipoprotein A-II) promoter contains a thyroid HRE (hormone response element), which strongly binds RXRalpha (retinoid X receptor alpha)/T(3)Rbeta (thyroid receptor beta) heterodimers and weakly T(3)Rbeta homodimers, but does not bind other homo- or heterodimers of RXRalpha or orphan nuclear receptors. Transactivation was abolished by point mutations in the thyroid HRE. In co-transfection experiments of HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells, the -911/+29 human apoA-II promoter was transactivated strongly by RXRalpha/T(3)Rbeta heterodimers in the presence of RA (9- cis retinoic acid) or T(3) (tri-iodothyronine). Homopolymeric promoters containing either three copies of the -73/-40 (element AIIAB) or four copies of the -738/-712 (element AIIJ) apoA-II promoter could be transactivated by RXRalpha/T(3)Rbeta heterodimers in COS-7 cells only in the presence of T(3) or RA respectively. RXRalpha/T(3)Rbeta heterodimers and USF2a (upstream stimulatory factor 2a) synergistically transactivated the -911/+29 apoA-II promoter in the presence of T(3). USF2a also enhanced the activity of a GAL4-T(3)Rbeta fusion protein in the presence of T(3) and suppressed the activity of a GAL4-RXRalpha fusion protein in the presence of RA. These findings suggest a functional specificity of the two HREs of the apoA-II promoter for retinoids and thyroids, which is modulated by synergistic or antagonistic interactions between RXRalpha/T(3)Rbeta heterodimers and the ubiquitous transcription factor USF2a. PMID:12959642

  12. Amphipathic Benzenes Are Designed Inhibitors of the Estrogen Receptor α/Steroid Receptor Coactivator Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Moore, Terry W.; Collins, Margaret L.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2008-01-01

    We report here on the design, synthesis and evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between a steroid receptor coactivator and estrogen receptor α. These inhibitors are based upon an amphipathic benzene scaffold whose hydrophobic face mimics the leucine-rich α-helical consensus sequence on the steroid receptor coactivators that interacts with a shallow groove on estrogen receptor α. Several of these molecules are among the most potent inhibitors of this interaction described to date, and they are active at low micromolar concentrations in both in vitro models of estrogen receptor action and in cell-based assays of estrogen receptor-mediated coactivator interaction and transcription. PMID:18484708

  13. Lung-Derived Factors Mediate Breast Cancer Cell Migration through CD44 Receptor-Ligand Interactions in a Novel Ex Vivo System for Analysis of Organ-Specific Soluble Proteins12

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jenny E; Xia, Ying; Chin-Yee, Benjamin; Goodale, David; Croker, Alysha K; Allan, Alison L

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer preferentially metastasizes to lung, lymph node, liver, bone, and brain. However, it is unclear whether properties of cancer cells, properties of organ microenvironments, or a combination of both is responsible for this observed organ tropism. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells exhibit distinctive migration/growth patterns in organ microenvironments that mirror common clinical sites of breast cancer metastasis and that receptor-ligand interactions between breast cancer cells and soluble organ-derived factors mediate this behavior. Using an ex vivo model system composed of organ-conditioned media (CM), human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, SUM149, and SUM159) displayed cell line-specific and organ-specific patterns of migration/proliferation that corresponded to their in vivo metastatic behavior. Notably, exposure to lung-CM increased migration of all cell lines and increased proliferation in two of four lines (P < .05). Several cluster of differentiation (CD) 44 ligands including osteopontin (OPN) and L-selectin (SELL) were identified in lung-CM by protein arrays. Immunodepletion of SELL decreased migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas depletion of OPN decreased both migration and proliferation. Pretreatment of cells with a CD44-blocking antibody abrogated migration effects (P < .05). “Stemlike” breast cancer cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase and CD44 (ALDHhiCD44+) responded in a distinct chemotactic manner toward organ-CM, preferentially migrating toward lung-CM through CD44 receptor-ligand interactions (P < .05). In contrast, organ-specific changes in migration were not observed for ALDHlowCD44- cells. Our data suggest that interactions between CD44+ breast cancer cells and soluble factors present in the lung microenvironment may play an important role in determining organotropic metastatic behavior. PMID:24709425

  14. Fibroblast growth factor receptors, developmental corruption and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; O'Sullivan, Hazel; Smyth, Elizabeth; McDermott, Ray; Viterbo, Antonella

    2013-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) are a family of ligands that bind to four different types of cell surface receptor entitled, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. These receptors differ in their ligand binding affinity and tissue distribution. The prototypical receptor structure is that of an extracellular region comprising three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, a hydrophobic transmembrane segment and a split intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Alternative gene splicing affecting the extracellular third Ig loop also creates different receptor isoforms entitled FGFRIIIb and FGFRIIIc. Somatic fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutations are implicated in different types of cancer and germline FGFR mutations occur in developmental syndromes particularly those in which craniosynostosis is a feature. The mutations found in both conditions are often identical. Many somatic FGFR mutations in cancer are gain-of-function mutations of established preclinical oncogenic potential. Gene amplification can also occur with 19-22% of squamous cell lung cancers for example having amplification of FGFR1. Ontologic comparators can be informative such as aberrant spermatogenesis being implicated in both spermatocytic seminomas and Apert syndrome. The former arises from somatic FGFR3 mutations and Apert syndrome arises from germline FGFR2 mutations. Finally, therapeutics directed at inhibiting the FGF/FGFR interaction are a promising subject for clinical trials. PMID:23880303

  15. CONTAMINANT INTERACTIONS WITH STEROID RECEPTORS: EVIDENCE FOR RECEPTOR BINDING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid receptors are important determinants of endocrine disrupter consequences. As the most frequently proposed mechanism of endocrine-disrupting contaminant (EDC) action, steroid receptors are not only targets of natural steroids but are also commonly sites of nonsteroidal com...

  16. The extracellular glycoprotein SPARC interacts with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and -BB and inhibits the binding of PDGF to its receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Raines, E.W.; Lane, T.F.; Iruela-Arispe, M.L.; Ross, R.; Sage, E.H. )

    1992-02-15

    Interactions among growth factors, cells, and extracellular matrix are critical to the regulation of directed cell migration and proliferation associated with development wound healing, and pathologic processes. Here the authors report the association of PDGF-AB and -BB, but not PDGF-AA, with the extracellular glycoprotein SPARC. Complexes of SPARC and {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF-BB or -AB were specifically immunoprecipitated by anti-SPARC immunoglobulins. {sup 125}I-PDGF-BB and -AB also bound specifically to SPARC that was immobilized on microtiter wells or bound to nitrocellulose after transfer from SDS/polyacrylamide gels. The binding of PDGF-BB to SPARC was pH-dependent; significant binding was detectable only above pH 6.6. Enhanced expression of both PDGF-B chain and SPARC was seen in advanced lesions of atherosclerosis. They suggest that the coordinate expression of SPARC and PDGF-B-containing dimers following vascular injury may regulate the activity of specific dimeric forms of PDGF in vivo.

  17. Drosophila Vps4 promotes Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of its role in receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Legent, Kevin; Liu, Hui Hua; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking of signaling receptors is an important mechanism for limiting signal duration. Components of the Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT), which target ubiquitylated receptors to intra-lumenal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies, are thought to terminate signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and direct it for lysosomal degradation. In a genetic screen for mutations that affect Drosophila eye development, we identified an allele of Vacuolar protein sorting 4 (Vps4), which encodes an AAA ATPase that interacts with the ESCRT-III complex to drive the final step of ILV formation. Photoreceptors are largely absent from Vps4 mutant clones in the eye disc, and even when cell death is genetically prevented, the mutant R8 photoreceptors that develop fail to recruit surrounding cells to differentiate as R1-R7 photoreceptors. This recruitment requires EGFR signaling, suggesting that loss of Vps4 disrupts the EGFR pathway. In imaginal disc cells mutant for Vps4, EGFR and other receptors accumulate in endosomes and EGFR target genes are not expressed; epistasis experiments place the function of Vps4 at the level of the receptor. Surprisingly, Vps4 is required for EGFR signaling even in the absence of Shibire, the Dynamin that internalizes EGFR from the plasma membrane. In ovarian follicle cells, in contrast, Vps4 does not affect EGFR signaling, although it is still essential for receptor degradation. Taken together, these findings indicate that Vps4 can promote EGFR activity through an endocytosis-independent mechanism. PMID:25790850

  18. [Interactions between dopamine receptor and NMDA/type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Ying; Wei, Ting-Jia; Weng, Jing-Jin; Qin, Jiang-Yuan; Huang, Xi; Su, Ji-Ping

    2016-04-25

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the major inhibitory and excitatory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Co-expression of the receptors in the synapse may lead to functional influence between receptors, namely receptor interaction. The interactions between GABAAR and NMDAR can be either positive or negative. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two receptors remain poorly understood, and potential mechanisms include (1) through a second messenger; (2) by receptors trafficking; (3) by direct interaction; (4) by a third receptor-mediation. Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the brain, and its receptors, dopamine receptors (DR) can activate multiple signaling pathways. Earlier studies on the interaction between DR and GABAAR/NMDAR have shown some underlying mechanisms, suggesting that DR could mediate the interaction between GABAAR and NMDAR. This paper summarized some recent progresses in the studies of the interaction between DR and NMDAR/GABAAR, providing a further understanding on the interaction between NMDAR and GABAAR mediated by DR. PMID:27108906

  19. Dnmt1/Transcription Factor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hervouet, Eric; Vallette, François M.; Cartron, Pierre-François

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation inheritance is the process of copying, via the DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1), the pre-existing methylation patterns onto the new DNA strand during DNA replication. Experiments of chromatin immunoprecipitation, measurement of maintenance methyltransferase activity, proximity ligation in situ assays (P-LISA, Duolink/Olink), and transcription factor arrays demonstrate that Dnmt1 interacts with transcription factors to promote site-specific DNA methylation inheritance, while the Dnmt1-PCNA-UHRF1 complex promotes the DNA methylation inheritance without site preference. We also show that the Dnmt1-PCNA-UHRF1 and Dnmt1/transcription factor complexes methylate DNA by acting as a single player or in cooperation. Thus, our data establish that the copying of the pre-existing methylation pattern is governed by the orchestration of the untargeted and the targeted mechanisms of DNA methylation inheritance, which are themselves dictated by the partners of Dnmt1. PMID:21779454

  20. Role of iso-receptors in receptor-receptor interactions with a focus on dopamine iso-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Agnati, Luigi F; Guidolin, Diego; Cervetto, Chiara; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular and intracellular communication processes consist of signals and recognition/decoding apparatuses of these signals. In humans, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest family of cell surface receptors. More than 30 years ago, it has been proposed that GPCR could form dimers or higher-order oligomers (receptor mosaics [RMs] at the plasma membrane level and receptor-receptor interactions [RRIs] have been proposed as a new integrative mechanism for chemical signals impinging on cell plasma membranes). The basic phenomena involved in RRIs are allostery and cooperativity of membrane receptors, and the present paper provides basic information concerning their relevance for the integrative functions of RMs. In this context, the possible role of iso-receptor RM is discussed (with a special focus on dopamine receptor subtypes and on some of the RMs they form with other dopamine iso-receptors), and it is proposed that two types of cooperativity, namely, homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity, could allow distinguishing two types of functionally different RMs. From a general point of view, the presence of iso-receptors and their topological organization within RMs allow the use of a reduced number of signals for the intercellular communication processes, since the target cells can recognize and decode the same signal in different ways. This theoretical aspect is further analyzed here by means of an analogy with artificial information systems. Thus, it is suggested that the 'multiplexer' and 'demultiplexer' concepts could, at least in part, model the role of RMs formed by iso-receptors in the information handling by the cell. PMID:26418645

  1. Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Structure, Signaling, Ligands, Functions, and Interactions with Opioid Systems.

    PubMed

    Toll, Lawrence; Bruchas, Michael R; Calo', Girolamo; Cox, Brian M; Zaveri, Nurulain T

    2016-04-01

    The NOP receptor (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide receptor) is the most recently discovered member of the opioid receptor family and, together with its endogenous ligand, N/OFQ, make up the fourth members of the opioid receptor and opioid peptide family. Because of its more recent discovery, an understanding of the cellular and behavioral actions induced by NOP receptor activation are less well developed than for the other members of the opioid receptor family. All of these factors are important because NOP receptor activation has a clear modulatory role on mu opioid receptor-mediated actions and thereby affects opioid analgesia, tolerance development, and reward. In addition to opioid modulatory actions, NOP receptor activation has important effects on motor function and other physiologic processes. This review discusses how NOP pharmacology intersects, contrasts, and interacts with the mu opioid receptor in terms of tertiary structure and mechanism of receptor activation; location of receptors in the central nervous system; mechanisms of desensitization and downregulation; cellular actions; intracellular signal transduction pathways; and behavioral actions with respect to analgesia, tolerance, dependence, and reward. This is followed by a discussion of the agonists and antagonists that have most contributed to our current knowledge. Because NOP receptors are highly expressed in brain and spinal cord and NOP receptor activation sometimes synergizes with mu receptor-mediated actions and sometimes opposes them, an understanding of NOP receptor pharmacology in the context of these interactions with the opioid receptors will be crucial to the development of novel therapeutics that engage the NOP receptor. PMID:26956246

  2. Studying Haloanisoles Interaction with Olfactory Receptors.

    PubMed

    Silva Teixeira, Carla S; Silva Ferreira, António C; Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A

    2016-07-20

    In this paper, computational means were used to explain and predict the interaction of several odorant molecules, including three haloanisoles, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), with three olfactory receptors (ORs): OR1A1, OR1A2, and OR3A1. As the X-ray structure of these ORs is not known, the three-dimensional structure of each OR was modeled by homology modeling. The structures of these ORs were stabilized by molecular dynamic simulations and the complexes of the odorant molecules with each ORs were generated by molecular docking. The theoretical results have shown that each OR has distinct but well-defined binding regions for each type of odorant molecules (aldehydes and alcohols). In OR3A1, the aldehydes bind in the bottom region of the binding pocket nearby Ser257 and Thr249. In the paralogues OR1A1 and OR1A2, the aldehydes tend to interact in the top region of the binding pocket and close to a positively charged lysine. On the other hand, the alcohols interact in the bottom region of the active site and close to a negatively charged aspartate. These results indicate that when aldehydes and alcohols odorants compete in these two ORs, the aldehydes can block the access of the alcohols odorants to their specific binding site. This observation goes in line with the experimental data that reveals that when the odorant is an aldehyde, a lower quantity of ligand is needed to cause 50% of the maximum response (lower EC50), when compared with the alcohols. The theoretical results have also allowed to explain the differences in the activity of (S)-(-)-citronellol in the wild-type and mutated OR1A1. The theoretical results show that Asn109 has a preponderant role in this matter, since when it is mutated, it leads to a conformational rearrangement of the binding pocket that prevents the interaction of (S)-(-)-citronellol with Asp111 that was shown to be important for the OR activation. The good agreement between

  3. Interaction of factor XIII subunits.

    PubMed

    Katona, Eva; Pénzes, Krisztina; Csapó, Andrea; Fazakas, Ferenc; Udvardy, Miklós L; Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Orosz, Zsuzsanna Z; Muszbek, László

    2014-03-13

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a heterotetramer consisting of 2 catalytic A subunits (FXIII-A2) and 2 protective/inhibitory B subunits (FXIII-B2). FXIII-B, a mosaic protein consisting of 10 sushi domains, significantly prolongs the lifespan of catalytic subunits in the circulation and prevents their slow progressive activation in plasmatic conditions. In this study, the biochemistry of the interaction between the 2 FXIII subunits was investigated. Using a surface plasmon resonance technique and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding assay, the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for the interaction was established in the range of 10(-10) M. Based on the measured Kd, it was calculated that in plasma approximately 1% of FXIII-A2 should be in free form. This value was confirmed experimentally by measuring FXIII-A2 in plasma samples immunodepleted of FXIII-A2B2. Free plasma FXIII-A2 is functionally active, and when activated by thrombin and Ca(2+), it can cross-link fibrin. In cerebrospinal fluid and tears with much lower FXIII subunit concentrations, >80% of FXIII-A2 existed in free form. A monoclonal anti-FXIII-B antibody that prevented the interaction between the 2 subunits reacted with the recombinant combined first and second sushi domains of FXIII-B, and its epitope was localized to the peptide spanning positions 96 to 103 in the second sushi domain. PMID:24408323

  4. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by alanine mutagenesis. Substitution of either F152 or K155 with alanine was found to specifically inhibit cytokine interaction with LIFR without affecting binding to CNTFR alpha or gp130. The resulting variants behaved as partial agonists with varying degrees of residual bioactivity in different cell-based assays. Simultaneous alanine substitution of both F152 and K155 totally abolished biological activity. Combining these mutations with amino acid substitutions in the D-helix, which enhance binding affinity for the CNTFR alpha, gave rise to a potent competitive CNTF receptor antagonist. This protein constitutes a new tool for studies of CNTF function in normal physiology and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 PMID:8799186

  5. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  6. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  7. ATAR, a novel tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, signals through TRAF2 and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H; Solovyev, I; Colombero, A; Elliott, R; Kelley, M; Boyle, W J

    1997-05-23

    Members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family signal largely through interactions with death domain proteins and TRAF proteins. Here we report the identification of a novel TNFR family member ATAR. Human and mouse ATAR contain 283 and 276 amino acids, respectively, making them the shortest known members of the TNFR superfamily. The receptor is expressed mainly in spleen, thymus, bone marrow, lung, and small intestine. The intracellular domains of human and mouse ATAR share only 25% identity, yet both interact with TRAF5 and TRAF2. This TRAF interaction domain resides at the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Like most other TRAF-interacting receptors, overexpression of ATAR activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Co-expression of ATAR with TRAF5, but not TRAF2, results in synergistic activation of NF-kappaB, suggesting potentially different roles for TRAF2 and TRAF5 in post-receptor signaling. PMID:9153189

  8. Differences between disease-associated endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) isoforms in cellular expression, interactions with tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1) and regulation by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, N; Low, W Y; Onipinla, A; Mein, C; Caulfield, M; Munroe, P B; Chernajovsky, Y

    2015-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) processes peptides for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation and promotes cytokine receptor ectodomain shedding. These known functions of ERAP1 may explain its genetic association with several autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this study, we identified four novel alternatively spliced variants of ERAP1 mRNA, designated as ΔExon-11, ΔExon-13, ΔExon-14 and ΔExon-15. We also observed a rapid and differential modulation of ERAP1 mRNA levels and spliced variants in different cell types pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We have studied three full-length allelic forms of ERAP1 (R127-K528, P127-K528, P127-R528) and one spliced variant (ΔExon-11) and assessed their interactions with tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1) in transfected cells. We observed variation in cellular expression of different ERAP1 isoforms, with R127-K528 being expressed at a much lower level. Furthermore, the cellular expression of full-length P127-K528 and ΔExon-11 spliced variant was enhanced significantly when co-transfected with TNF-R1. Isoforms P127-K528, P127-R528 and ΔExon-11 spliced variant associated with TNF-R1, and this interaction occurred in a region within the first 10 exons of ERAP1. Supernatant-derived vesicles from transfected cells contained the full-length and ectodomain form of soluble TNF-R1, as well as carrying the full-length ERAP1 isoforms. We observed marginal differences between TNF-R1 ectodomain levels when co-expressed with individual ERAP1 isoforms, and treatment of transfected cells with tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 exerted variable effects on TNF-R1 ectodomain cleavage. Our data suggest that ERAP1 isoforms may exhibit differential biological properties and inflammatory mediators could play critical roles in modulating ERAP1 expression, leading to altered functional activities of this enzyme. PMID:25545008

  9. M10, a caspase cleavage product of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, interacts with Smad2 and demonstrates antifibrotic properties in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Atanelishvili, Ilia; Shirai, Yuichiro; Akter, Tanjina; Buckner, Taylor; Noguchi, Atsushi; Silver, Richard M; Bogatkevich, Galina S

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor receptor, also known as cellular mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-MET, MET), is an important antifibrotic molecule that protects various tissues, including lung, from injury and fibrosis. The intracellular cytoplasmic tail of MET contains a caspase-3 recognition motif "DEVD-T" that on cleavage by caspase-3 generates a 10-amino acid peptide, TRPASFWETS, designated as "M10". M10 contains at its N-terminus the uncharged amino acid proline (P) directly after a cationic amino acid arginine (R) which favors the transport of the peptide through membranes. M10, when added to cell culture medium, remains in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells for up to 24 hours. M10 effectively decreases collagen in both scleroderma and TGFβ-stimulated normal lung and skin fibroblasts. M10 interacts with the Mad Homology 2 domain of Smad2 and inhibits TGFβ-induced Smad2 phosphorylation, suggesting that the antifibrotic effects of M10 are mediated in part by counteracting Smad-dependent fibrogenic pathways. In the bleomycin murine model of pulmonary fibrosis, M10 noticeably reduced lung inflammation and fibrosis. Ashcroft fibrosis scores and lung collagen content were significantly lower in bleomycin-treated mice receiving M10 as compared with bleomycin-treated mice receiving scrambled peptide. We conclude that M10 peptide interacts with Smad2 and demonstrates strong antifibrotic effects in vitro and in vivo in an animal model of lung fibrosis and should be considered as a potential therapeutic agent for systemic sclerosis and other fibrosing diseases. PMID:26772959

  10. Modulation of opioid receptor function by protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Alfaras-Melainis, Konstantinos; Gomes, Ivone; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Zachariou, Venetia; Devi, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Opioid receptors, MORP, DORP and KORP, belong to the family A of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR), and have been found to modulate a large number of physiological functions, including mood, stress, appetite, nociception and immune responses. Exogenously applied opioid alkaloids produce analgesia, hedonia and addiction. Addiction is linked to alterations in function and responsiveness of all three opioid receptors in the brain. Over the last few years, a large number of studies identified protein-protein interactions that play an essential role in opioid receptor function and responsiveness. Here, we summarize interactions shown to affect receptor biogenesis and trafficking, as well as those affecting signal transduction events following receptor activation. This article also examines protein interactions modulating the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, events that play a major role in opiate analgesia. Like several other GPCRs, opioid receptors may form homo or heterodimers. The last part of this review summarizes recent knowledge on proteins known to affect opioid receptor dimerization. PMID:19273296

  11. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  12. Receptor interactions through phosphorylation and methylation pathways in bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, D A; Koshland, D E

    1988-01-01

    The effects of messages initiated by one receptor on the covalent modification of a second receptor were studied by use of a technique for rapidly separating the receptors. Methylation of the bacterial-chemotactic serine receptor increases as a result of aspartate binding to the aspartate receptor. The aspartate-induced methylation on the serine receptor is absent in a strain that lacks cheA and cheW genes and is not the result of physical interaction, such as the formation of heterodimers between the aspartate and serine receptors, or of alterations in the affinity of the serine receptor for the methyltransferase and the methylesterase. Serine-induced methylation of the serine receptor did not require cheA and cheW. A model is presented in which the receptor methylation level depends on the combination of (i) a ligand-induced conformational change on the receptor substrate of the methylation enzymes and (ii) an indirect cytoplasmic signal that operates through the methylesterase. PMID:2847160

  13. Autoantibodies interacting with purified native thyrotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Young, J; Jolivet, A; Orgiazzi, J; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-11-01

    Native thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from membrane extracts of stably transfected L cells. An ELISA test was devised to study anti-TSHR autoantibodies directly. Comparison of native TSHR with bacterially expressed, denatured TSHR showed that the latter was not recognized by the autoantibodies, suggesting that they bind to conformational epitopes only present on the native receptor. The use of deglycosylated TSHR and of purified receptor ectodomain (alpha-subunit) showed that the autoantibodies recognized only the protein backbone moiety of the receptor and that their epitopes were localized entirely in its ectodomain. Autoantibodies were detected in 45 of 48 subjects with untreated Graves' disease and in 26 of 47 healthy volunteers. The affinity for the receptor was similar in the two groups (Kd = 0.25-1 x 10-10 M) and the autoantibodies belonged to the IgG class in all cases. Although the concentration of autoantibodies was higher in Graves' disease patients (3.50 +/- 0.36 mg.L-1) than in control subjects (1.76 +/- 0.21) (mean +/- SEM), there was an overlap between the groups. Receptor-stimulating autoantibodies (TSAb) were studied by measuring cAMP synthesis in stably transfected HEK 293 cells. Their characteristics (recognition of alpha-subunit, of deglycosylated TSHR, nonrecognition of bacterially expressed denatured receptor) were similar to those of the antibodies detected by the ELISA test. TSAb were only found in individuals with Graves' disease. The ELISA test measures total anti-TSHR antibodies, whereas the test using adenylate cyclase stimulation measures antibodies that recognize specific epitopes involved in receptor activation. Our observations thus disprove the hypothesis according to which Graves' disease is related to the appearance of anti-TSHR antibodies not present in normal subjects. Actually, anti-TSHR antibodies exist in many euthyroid subjects, in some cases even at concentrations higher than those

  14. Interaction of ethanol with opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhananov, R.Y.; Bujov, Y.V.; Maiskii, A.I.

    1986-04-01

    The authors study the action of ethanol on membrane-bound opiate receptors. Ethanol at 37/sup 0/C was shown to produce dose-dependent inhibition of binding of /sup 3/H-naloxone with opiate receptors. ID/sub 50/ under these conditions was 462 mM. Temperature-dependent inhibition of ligand-receptor binding suggests that ethanol does not compete for the stereospecific binding site of /sup 3/H-naloxone. Analysis of the inhibitory action of ethanol on /sup 3/H-naloxone binding in animals at different stages of experimental alcoholism revealed no differences between the control and experimental animals after 3.5 and 10 months of voluntary alcoholization.

  15. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) regulation of development, function, and homeostasis of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew C.; Lee, JangEun; Choi, Yongwon

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an adaptor protein that mediates a wide array of protein-protein interactions via its TRAF domain and a RING finger domain that possesses non-conventional E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. First identified nearly two decades ago as a mediator of IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-mediated activation of NFκB, TRAF6 has since been identified as an actor downstream of multiple receptor families with immunoregulatory functions, including members of the TNFR superfamily, the toll-like receptor (TLR) family, tumor growth factorreceptors (TGFβR), and T cell receptor (TCR). In addition to NFκB, TRAF6 may also direct activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathways. In the context of the immune system, TRAF6-mediated signals have proven critical for the development, homeostasis, and/or activation of B cells, T cells, and myeloid cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, and osteoclasts, as well as for organogenesis of thymic and secondary lymphoid tissues. In multiple cellular contexts, TRAF6 function is essential not only for proper activation of the immune system, but also for maintaining immune tolerance, and more recent works have begun to identify mechanisms of contextual specificity for TRAF6, involving both regulatory protein interactions, and messenger RNA regulation by microRNAs. PMID:26085208

  17. Selenoprotein W controls epidermal growth factor receptor surface expression, activation and degradation via receptor ubiquitination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) is the founding member of the ErbB family of growth factor receptors that modulate a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways controlling growth, proliferation and differentiation. Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a diet-regulated, highly conserved...

  18. Dopamine D1 and corticotrophin-releasing hormone type-2α receptors assemble into functionally interacting complexes in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuenzalida, J; Galaz, P; Araya, K A; Slater, P G; Blanco, E H; Campusano, J M; Ciruela, F; Gysling, K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dopamine and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH; also known as corticotrophin-releasing factor) are key neurotransmitters in the interaction between stress and addiction. Repeated treatment with cocaine potentiates glutamatergic transmission in the rat basolateral amygdala/cortex pathway through a synergistic action of D1-like dopamine receptors and CRH type-2α receptors (CRF2α receptors). We hypothesized that this observed synergism could be instrumented by heteromers containing the dopamine D1 receptor and CRF2α receptor. Experimental Approach D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization was demonstrated in HEK293T cells using co-immunoprecipitation, BRET and FRET assays, and by using the heteromer mobilization strategy. The ability of D1 receptors to signal through calcium, when singly expressed or co-expressed with CRF2α receptors, was evaluated by the calcium mobilization assay. Key Results D1/CRF2α receptor heteromers were observed in HEK293T cells. When singly expressed, D1 receptors were mostly located at the cell surface whereas CRF2α receptors accumulated intracellularly. Interestingly, co-expression of both receptors promoted D1 receptor intracellular and CRF2α receptor cell surface targeting. The heteromerization of D1/CRF2α receptors maintained the signalling through cAMP of both receptors but switched D1 receptor signalling properties, as the heteromeric D1 receptor was able to mobilize intracellular calcium upon stimulation with a D1 receptor agonist. Conclusions and Implications D1 and CRF2α receptors are capable of heterodimerization in living cells. D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization might account, at least in part, for the complex physiological interactions established between dopamine and CRH in normal and pathological conditions such as addiction, representing a new potential pharmacological target. PMID:25073922

  19. Kinetic Characterization of an Intestinal Trefoil Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Zhang; Lin, Wang; Yong, Sun; Guang-ping, Liang; Dan, Wu; Shang-jun, Lv; Wei, Wu; Xi, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether intestinal epithelial cells have a receptor for intestinal trefoil factor and characterize receptor-ligand binding kinetics. Methods Radioligand binding assays were performed to characterize the binding kinetics between [125I]-labeled ITF and IEC-6, HT-29, Caco2 and HaCaT cells. The Kd, Bmax and other kinetic variables describing the interaction between ITF and its potential receptors were determined. Results Radioligand binding assays performed at 4°C showed that the Kd value for the association between [125I]-ITF and IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells were 1.99±0.12×10−9 M, 3.89±0.42×10−9 M, and 2.04±0.17×10−9 M, respectively. Bmax values were 1.17±0.04×1011, 3.97±0.29×1011, and 2.03±0.08×1011 sites/cell, respectively. The Ki values for the interaction between IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells and non-labeled ITF were 20.98±0.57 nM, 36.87±3.35 nM, and 21.38±0.93 nM, respectively, and the IC50 values were 25.21±0.39 nM, 40.68±0.27 nM, and 23.61±0.25 nM, respectively. Radioligand binding kinetic results showed the association rate constants (k+1) for IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells were 0.22±0.04 min−1, 0.29±0.04 min−1, and 0.26±0.05 min−1, respectively, and the dissociation rate constants (k-1) were 0.06±0.02 min−1, 0.03±0.01 min−1, and 0.04±0.01 min−1, respectively. For the HaCaT cells, the Kd was 4.86±0.28×10−8 M and Bmax was 5.81±0.15×108 sites/cell, the very low specific binding between [125I]-ITF and these cells made it impossible to calculate binding kinetic parameters. Conclusions An ITF-specific receptor appears to be present on the three types of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco-2), and there may be no ITF receptor on epidermal cells. PMID:24086361

  20. Interaction of ion channels and receptors with PDZ domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Kornau, H C; Seeburg, P H; Kennedy, M B

    1997-06-01

    The complex anatomy of neurons demands a high degree of functional organization. Therefore, membrane receptors and ion channels are often localized to selected subcellular sites and coupled to specific signal transduction machineries. PDZ domains have come into focus as protein interaction modules that mediate the binding of a class of submembraneous proteins to membrane receptors and ion channels and thus subserve these organizational aspects. The structures of two PDZ domains have been resolved, which has led to a structural understanding of the specificity of interactions of various PDZ domains with their respective partners. The functional implications of PDZ domain interactions are now being addressed in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9232802

  1. Catecholamime Interactions with the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipp, Robert Carl

    The cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ ion channel found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), an intracellular membranous Ca2+ storage system. It is well known that a destabilization of RyR2 can lead to a Ca2+ flux out of the SR, which results in an overload of intracellular Ca2+; this can also lead to arrhythmias and heart failure. The catecholamines play a large role in the regulation of RyR2; stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor on the cell membrane can lead to a hyperphosphorylation of RyR2, making it more leaky to Ca2+. We have previously shown that strong electron donors will inhibit RyR2. It is hypothesized that the catecholamines, sharing a similar structure with other proven inhibitors of RyR2, will also inhibit RyR2. Here we confirm this hypothesis and show for the first time that the catecholamines, isoproterenol and epinephrine, act as strong electron donors and inhibit RyR2 activity at the single channel level. This data suggests that the catecholamines can influence RyR2 activity at two levels. This offers promising insight into the potential development of a new class of drugs to treat heart failure and arrhythmia; ones that can both prevent the hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 by blocking the beta-adrenergic receptor, but can also directly inhibit the release of Ca2+ from RyR2.

  2. The Proto-oncogene SET Interacts with Muscarinic Receptors and Attenuates Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Violaine; Guidry, Jessie; Gettys, Thomas W.; Tobin, Andrew B.; Lanier, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate cell responses to extra-cellular stimuli and likely function in the context of a larger signal transduction complex. Utilizing the third intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor in glutathione S-transfer-ase pulldown assays from rat brain lysates coupled with high sensitivity detection methods and subsequent functional studies, we report the identification of SET as a regulator of muscarinic receptor signaling. SET is a putative oncogene reported to inhibit protein phosphatase 2A and regulate gene transcription. SET binds the carboxyl region of the M3-muscarinic receptor i3 loop, and endogenous SET co-immunoprecipitates with intact M3 muscarinic receptor expressed in cells. Small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous SET in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the M3 muscarinic receptor augmented receptor-mediated mobilization of intracellular calcium by ∼35% with no change in agonist EC50, indicating that interaction of SET with the M3 muscarinic receptor reduces its signaling capacity. SET knockdown had no effect on the mobilization of intracellular calcium by the P2-purinergic receptor, ionomycin, or a direct activator of phospholipase C, indicating a specific regulation of M3 muscarinic receptor signaling. These data provide expanded functionality for SET and a previously unrecognized mechanism for regulation of GPCR signaling capacity. PMID:17065150

  3. Implications of epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced egf receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Lund, K; Wiley, H S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the role of receptor aggregation in EGF binding, we construct a mathematical model describing receptor dimerization (and higher levels of aggregation) that permits an analysis of the influence of receptor aggregation on ligand binding. We answer two questions: (a) Can Scatchard plots of EGF binding data be analyzed productively in terms of two noninteracting receptor populations with different affinities if EGF induced receptor aggregation occurs? No. If two affinities characterize aggregated and monomeric EGF receptors, we show that the Scatchard plot should have curvature characteristic of positively cooperative binding, the opposite of that observed. Thus, the interpretation that the high affinity population represents aggregated receptors and the low affinity population nonaggregated receptors is wrong. If the two populations are interpreted without reference to receptor aggregation, an important determinant of Scatchard plot shape is ignored. (b) Can a model for EGF receptor aggregation and EGF binding be consistent with the "negative curvature" (i.e., curvature characteristic of negatively cooperative binding) observed in most Scatchard plots of EGF binding data? Yes. In addition, the restrictions on the model parameters required to obtain negatively curved Scatchard plots provide new information about binding and aggregation. In particular, EGF binding to aggregated receptors must be negatively cooperative, i.e., binding to a receptor in a dimer (or higher oligomer) having one receptor already bound occurs with lower affinity than the initial binding event. A third question we consider is whether the model we present can be used to detect the presence of mechanisms other than receptor aggregation that are contributing to Scatchard plot curvature. For the membrane and cell binding data we analyzed, the best least squares fits of the model to each of the four data sets deviate systematically from the data, indicating that additional factors are

  4. Mineralocorticoid receptor interaction with SP1 generates a new response element for pathophysiologically relevant gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Meinel, Sandra; Ruhs, Stefanie; Schumann, Katja; Strätz, Nicole; Trenkmann, Kay; Schreier, Barbara; Grosse, Ivo; Keilwagen, Jens; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-induced transcription factor belonging to the steroid receptor family and involved in water-electrolyte homeostasis, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and fibrosis in the renocardiovascular system. The MR shares a common hormone-response-element with the glucocorticoid receptor but nevertheless elicits MR-specific effects including enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression via unknown mechanisms. The EGFR is a receptor tyrosine kinase that leads to activation of MAP kinases, but that can also function as a signal transducer for other signaling pathways. In the present study, we mechanistically investigate the interaction between a newly discovered MR- but not glucocorticoid receptor- responsive-element (=MRE1) of the EGFR promoter, specificity protein 1 (SP1) and MR to gain general insights into MR-specificity. Biological relevance of the interaction for EGFR expression and consequently for different signaling pathways in general is demonstrated in human, rat and murine vascular smooth muscle cells and cells of EGFR knockout mice. A genome-wide promoter search for identical binding regions followed by quantitative PCR validation suggests that the identified MR-SP1–MRE1 interaction might be applicable to other genes. Overall, a novel principle of MR-specific gene expression is explored that applies to the pathophysiologically relevant expression of the EGFR and potentially also to other genes. PMID:23821666

  5. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  6. GGA3 Interacts with a G Protein-Coupled Receptor and Modulates Its Cell Surface Export.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maoxiang; Davis, Jason E; Li, Chunman; Gao, Jie; Huang, Wei; Lambert, Nevin A; Terry, Alvin V; Wu, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms governing the anterograde trafficking of nascent G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are poorly understood. Here, we have studied the regulation of cell surface transport of α2-adrenergic receptors (α2-ARs) by GGA3 (Golgi-localized, γ-adaptin ear domain homology, ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3), a multidomain clathrin adaptor protein that sorts cargo proteins at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome/lysosome pathway. By using an inducible system, we demonstrated that GGA3 knockdown significantly inhibited the cell surface expression of newly synthesized α2B-AR without altering overall receptor synthesis and internalization. The receptors were arrested in the TGN. Furthermore, GGA3 knockdown attenuated α2B-AR-mediated signaling, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation and cyclic AMP (cAMP) inhibition. More interestingly, GGA3 physically interacted with α2B-AR, and the interaction sites were identified as the triple Arg motif in the third intracellular loop of the receptor and the acidic motif EDWE in the VHS domain of GGA3. In contrast, α2A-AR did not interact with GGA3 and its cell surface export and signaling were not affected by GGA3 knockdown. These data reveal a novel function of GGA3 in export trafficking of a GPCR that is mediated via a specific interaction with the receptor. PMID:26811329

  7. Interaction of receptor-activity-modifying protein1 with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Thomas H; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Schwerdtfeger, Kerstin; Kleinert, Peter; Troxler, Heinz; Kelm, Jens M; Ittner, Lars M; Fischer, Jan A; Born, Walter

    2007-08-01

    Receptor-activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 is an accessory protein of the G protein-coupled calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). The CLR/RAMP1 heterodimer defines a receptor for the potent vasodilatory calcitonin gene-related peptide. A wider tissue distribution of RAMP1, as compared to that of the CLR, is consistent with additional biological functions. Here, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid experiments identified beta-tubulin as a novel RAMP1-interacting protein. GST pull-down experiments indicated interactions between the N- and C-terminal domains of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the interaction between the N-terminal region of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Interestingly, alpha-tubulin was co-extracted with beta-tubulin in pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation of RAMP1 coprecipitated alpha- and beta-tubulin. Confocal microscopy indicated colocalization of RAMP1 and tubulin predominantly in axon-like processes of neuronal differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion, the findings point to biological roles of RAMP1 beyond its established interaction with G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:17493758

  8. Targeting the opioid growth factor: opioid growth factor receptor axis for treatment of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Donahue, Renee; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2013-05-01

    The opioid growth factor (OGF) - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) axis is a biological pathway that is present in human ovarian cancer cells and tissues. OGF, chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is an endogenous opioid peptide that interfaces with OGFr to delay cells moving through the cell cycle by upregulation of cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinase pathways. OGF inhibitory activity is dose dependent, receptor mediated, reversible, protein and RNA dependent, but not related to apoptosis or necrosis. The OGF-OGFr axis can be targeted for treatment of human ovarian cancer by (i) administration of exogenous OGF, (ii) genetic manipulation to over-express OGFr and (iii) use of low dosages of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, which stimulates production of OGF and OGFr for subsequent interaction following blockade of the receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis may be a feasible target for treatment of cancer of the ovary (i) in a prophylactic fashion, (ii) following cytoreduction or (iii) in conjunction with standard chemotherapy for additive effectiveness. In summary, preclinical data support the transition of these novel therapies for treatment of human ovarian cancer from the bench to bedside to provide additional targets for treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:23856908

  9. The biology of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Penuel, E; Sliwkowski, M X

    1999-09-01

    Our understanding of the normal signaling mechanisms and functions of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and other members of the HER family, namely epidermal growth factor receptor, HER3, and HER4, is growing rapidly. Activation of these receptors results in a diverse array of signals through the formation of homodimeric and heterodimeric receptor complexes; HER2 is the preferred dimerization partner for the other HERs. These oligomeric receptor complexes activate distinct signaling pathways, such as the Ras-MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways. These, in turn, affect various cellular processes. Recent gene deletion experiments in mice point to an important role for HER2 in cardiac and neural development, and evidence from other studies indicates that HER2 is involved in normal breast growth and development. Thus, HER2 is a key component of a complex signaling network that plays a critical role in the regulation of tissue development, growth, and differentiation. PMID:11122793

  10. Substituted methcathinones differ in transporter and receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Eshleman, Amy J; Wolfrum, Katherine M; Hatfield, Meagan G; Johnson, Robert A; Murphy, Kevin V; Janowsky, Aaron

    2013-06-15

    The use of synthetic methcathinones, components of "bath salts," is a world-wide health concern. These compounds, structurally similar to methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cause tachycardia, hallucinations and psychosis. We hypothesized that these potentially neurotoxic and abused compounds display differences in their transporter and receptor interactions as compared to amphetamine counterparts. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone and naphyrone had high affinity for radioligand binding sites on recombinant human dopamine (hDAT), serotonin (hSERT) and norepinephrine (hNET) transporters, potently inhibited [³H]neurotransmitter uptake, and, like cocaine, did not induce transporter-mediated release. Butylone was a lower affinity uptake inhibitor. In contrast, 4-fluoromethcathinone, mephedrone and methylone had higher inhibitory potency at uptake compared to binding and generally induced release of preloaded [³H]neurotransmitter from hDAT, hSERT and hNET (highest potency at hNET), and thus are transporter substrates, similar to METH and MDMA. At hNET, 4-fluoromethcathinone was a more efficacious releaser than METH. These substituted methcathinones had low uptake inhibitory potency and low efficacy at inducing release via human vesicular monoamine transporters (hVMAT2). These compounds were low potency (1) h5-HT(1A) receptor partial agonists, (2) h5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists, (3) weak h5-HT(2C) receptor antagonists. This is the first report on aspects of substituted methcathinone efficacies at serotonin (5-HT) receptors and in superfusion release assays. Additionally, the drugs had no affinity for dopamine receptors, and high-nanomolar to mid-micromolar affinity for hSigma1 receptors. Thus, direct interactions with hVMAT2 and serotonin, dopamine, and hSigma1 receptors may not explain psychoactive effects. The primary mechanisms of action may be as inhibitors or substrates of DAT, SERT and NET. PMID:23583454

  11. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs. PMID:27108066

  12. Substituted methcathinones differ in transporter and receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Eshleman, Amy J; Wolfrum, Katherine M; Hatfield, Meagan G; Johnson, Robert A; Murphy, Kevin V; Janowsky, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The use of synthetic methcathinones, components of “bath salts,” is a world-wide health concern. These compounds, structurally similar to methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cause tachycardia, hallucinations and psychosis. We hypothesized that these potentially neurotoxic and abused compounds display differences in their transporter and receptor interactions as compared to amphetamine counterparts. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone and naphyrone had high affinity for radioligand binding sites on recombinant human dopamine (hDAT), serotonin (hSERT) and norepinephrine (hNET) transporters, potently inhibited [3H]neurotransmitter uptake, and, like cocaine, did not induce transporter-mediated release. Butylone was a lower affinity uptake inhibitor. In contrast, 4-fluoromethcathinone, mephedrone and methylone had higher inhibitory potency at uptake compared to binding and generally induced release of preloaded [3H]neurotransmitter from hDAT, hSERT and hNET (highest potency at hNET), and thus are transporter substrates, similar to METH and MDMA. At hNET, 4-fluoromethcathinone was a more efficacious releaser than METH. These substituted methcathinones had low uptake inhibitory potency and low efficacy at inducing release via human vesicular monoamine transporters (hVMAT2). These compounds were low potency 1) h5-HT1A receptor partial agonists, 2) h5-HT2A receptor antagonists, 3) weak h5-HT2C receptor antagonists. This is the first report on aspects of substituted methcathinone efficacies at serotonin (5-HT) receptors and in superfusion release assays. Additionally, the drugs had no affinity for dopamine receptors, and high- mid-micromolar affinity for hSigma1 receptors. Thus, direct interactions with hVMAT2 and serotonin, dopamine, and hSigma1 receptors may not explain psychoactive effects. The primary mechanisms of action may be as inhibitors or substrates of DAT, SERT and NET. PMID:23583454

  13. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  14. Modelling the interaction of steroid receptors with endocrine disrupting chemicals

    PubMed Central

    D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Salvi, Erika; Fossa, Paola; Milanesi, Luciano; Rovida, Ermanna

    2005-01-01

    Background The organic polychlorinated compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane with its metabolites and polychlorinated biphenyls are a class of highly persistent environmental contaminants. They have been recognized to have detrimental health effects both on wildlife and humans acting as endocrine disrupters due to their ability of mimicking the action of the steroid hormones, and thus interfering with hormone response. There are several experimental evidences that they bind and activate human steroid receptors. However, despite the growing concern about the toxicological activity of endocrine disrupters, molecular data of the interaction of these compounds with biological targets are still lacking. Results We have used a flexible docking approach to characterize the molecular interaction of seven endocrine disrupting chemicals with estrogen, progesterone and androgen receptors in the ligand-binding domain. All ligands docked in the buried hydrophobic cavity corresponding to the hormone steroid pocket. The interaction was characterized by multiple hydrophobic contacts involving a different number of residues facing the binding pocket, depending on ligands orientation. The EDC ligands did not display a unique binding mode, probably due to their lipophilicity and flexibility, which conferred them a great adaptability into the hydrophobic and large binding pocket of steroid receptors. Conclusion Our results are in agreement with toxicological data on binding and allow to describe a pattern of interactions for a group of ECD to steroid receptors suggesting the requirement of a hydrophobic cavity to accommodate these chlorine carrying compounds. Although the affinity is lower than for hormones, their action can be brought about by a possible synergistic effect. PMID:16351736

  15. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  16. Transcription factor assembly on the nicotinic receptor beta4 subunit gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Michael D; Brüschweiler-Li, Lei; Mou, Zhongming; Gardner, Paul D

    2008-04-16

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in a plethora of fundamental biological processes ranging from muscle contraction to formation of memories. The receptors are pentameric proteins whose subunits are encoded by distinct genes. Subunit composition of a mature nicotinic receptor is governed in part by the transcriptional regulation of each subunit gene. Here, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we report the interaction of the transcription factors Sp1, Sp3, c-Jun and Sox10 with the beta4 subunit gene promoter in neuronal-like cell lines and rodent brain tissue. Our results corroborate previous in-vitro data demonstrating that these transcription factors interact with the beta4 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that Sp1, Sp3, c-Jun and Sox10 regulate expression of the beta4 subunit gene in the mammalian brain. PMID:18382288

  17. Analysis of Edg-Like LPA Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Balazs; Pazmany, Tamas; Matyus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid derivative lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) serves as a signalling molecule through the activation of LPA receptors, which belong to the G-protein-coupled receptors. From a pharmacological point of view, the ('EDG-like') LPA1-3 receptors have attracted much attention, therefore we have also been focusing in our study on these subtypes. The LPA1receptors are widely expressed in the human body; interestingly, LPA1 might have a role in the pathomechanism of obesity. In order to recognize key structural features of the molecular interactions of human LPA1with its agonists, we built up the 3D structure of the LPA1 through homology modeling. Next, LPA1 agonists and antagonists were docked into the model. The mode of binding and the interactions between ligands and key amino acids (R3.28 and Q3.29) were consistent with mutagenesis assays and previously published models, indicating that this model is able to discriminate high-affinity compounds and may be useful for the development of novel agonists of LPA1. Homology models were also constructed for LPA2 and LPA3. All available agonists with published EC50 values, antagonists with IC50 values and compounds with Ki values for either of LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 were collected from the ChEMBL database and were docked into the corresponding model.Ourmodels for the LPA1-3 receptors can discriminate high-affinity compounds identified in silico HTS studies and may be useful for the development of novel agonistsof LPA receptors. With a better understanding of the differences between LPA1-3 receptors new, selective agonists and antagonist could be designed, which could be used in the therapy of various diseases with a better side-effect profile. PMID:25686617

  18. Amiloride interacts with renal. cap alpha. - and. beta. -adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M.J.; Mullen, M.D.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have used radioligand binding techniques to assess whether amiloride and certain analogues of amiloride (ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil) can bind to adrenergic receptors in the kidney. They found that amiloride could compete for (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine (..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors), (/sup 3/H)prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors), and (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol (..beta..-adrenergic receptors) binding in rat renal cortical membranes with inhibitor constants of 13.6 /plus minus/ 5.7, 24.4 /plus minus/ 7.4, and 8.36 /plus minus/ 13.5 ..mu..M, respectively. Ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil were from 2- to 25-fold more potent than amiloride in competing for radioligand binding sites in studies with these membranes. In addition, amiloride and the two analogues competed for (/sup 3/H)prazosin sites on intact Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and amiloride blocked epinephrine-stimulated prostaglandin E/sub 2/ production in these cells. They conclude that amiloride competes for binding to several classes of renal adrenergic receptors with a rank order of potency of ..cap alpha../sub 2/ > ..cap alpha../sub 1/ > ..beta... Binding to, and antagonism of, adrenergic receptors occurs at concentrations of amiloride that are lower than previously observed nonspecific interactions of this agent.

  19. [The Cytoskelrtal Protein Zvxin Interacts with the Hedgehog Receptor Patched].

    PubMed

    Martynova, N U; Ermolina, L V; Eroshkin, F M; Zarayskiy, A G

    2015-01-01

    Earlier, we demonstrated Zyxin influence upon Hedgehog (Hh)-signaling pathway during early patterning of the central neural system (CNS) anlage of the Xenopus laevis embryo. Now we show that Zyxin can physically interact with the transmembrane receptor of Hh, Patched2 (Ptc2). Binding of Hh by this receptor activates signaling pathway, which regulates many events, including numerous types of cell differentiation during the embryonic development. In particular, patterning of the CNS anlage. The ability of Zyxin to interact with Ptc2 have been confirmed by immunoprecipitation experiments, in which we tested mutual binding affinity of Zyxin and Ptc2, as well as mutual affinity of their deletion mutants. As a result, we have established that in Xenopus levis, Zyxin binding to Ptc2 is due to the interaction of Zyxin 2nd LIM-domain (530-590 aa) with the under-membrane region of the cytoplasmic C-terminus of Ptc2 (1159-1412 aa). We have also demonstrated that similar interaction is valid for the homologous regions of the human Zyxin and human Hh receptor, Ptc1. The data obtained allow to hypothesize existence of evolutionary conserved mechanism that modulates Hh-signaling and based on the interaction of Zyxin with Ptc. PMID:27125030

  20. The D3 dopamine receptor: From structural interactions to function.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Savoia, Paola; Bono, Federica; Tallarico, Paola; Missale, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Novel structural and functional aspects of the dopamine (DA) D3 receptors (D3R) have been recently described. D3R expressed in dopaminergic neurons have been classically considered to play the role of autoreceptors inhibiting, as the D2R, DA release. However, evidence for D3R-mediated neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on DA neurons suggests their involvement in preventing pathological alterations leading to neurodegeneration. On the other hand, given its localization and functional role at postsynaptic striatal levels, the D3R may also be involved in the pathogenesis of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. Functional interactions of D3R with other receptor systems are crucial for the modulation of several physiological events. On this line, the discovery that the D3R can form heteromers with other receptors has opened the possibility of uncover novel molecular mechanisms of brain functions and dysfunctions. This paper summarizes the functional and physical interactions of D3R with other receptors both at pre-synaptic sites, where it is co-expressed with the D2R and nicotinic receptors, and at post-synaptic sites where it interacts with the DA D1 receptors (D1R). The biochemical and functional properties of the D1R-D3R heteromer will be especially discussed. Both D1R and D3R have been in fact implicated in several disorders, including schizophrenia and motor dysfunctions. Therefore, the D1R-D3R heteromer may represent a potential drug target for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:25532864

  1. Involvement of Toll-like receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in epithelial expression of airway remodeling factors.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tetsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E; Suh, Lydia A; Carter, Roderick G; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti-TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti-TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α-dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  2. Involvement of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Epithelial Expression of Airway Remodeling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick G.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti–TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2–dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti–TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α–dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  3. The Anti-angiogenic Peptide, Loop 6, Binds Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Cecilia A.; Roy, Roopali; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Jiang; Panigrahy, Dipak; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Moses, Marsha A.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), the endogenous inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, have been shown to possess biological functions that are independent of their ability to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases. We have previously shown that the C-terminal domain of TIMP-2 and, in particular, Loop 6 inhibit capillary endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. To elucidate the mechanism by which Loop 6 inhibits angiogenesis, we sought to determine whether its biological effects were the result of a known TIMP-2 protein-protein interaction or of a receptor-mediated event. In this study, we identify insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor as a binding partner of Loop 6/TIMP-2 and characterize this interaction on the endothelial cell surface and the consequences of this interaction on downstream receptor signaling. PMID:20940305

  4. Cutaneous adverse reactions specific to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, I; Voiculescu, VM; Bacalbasa, N; Prie, BE; Cojocaru, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Classical antineoplastic therapy is encumbered by extensively studied adverse reactions, most often of systemic nature. The emergence of new generations of anticancer treatments, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, besides improving the response to treatment and the survival rate, is accompanied by the occurrence of new specific side effects, incompletely studied. These side effects are most often cutaneous (hand foot syndrome, acneiform reactions), and in some cases are extremely severe, requiring dose reduction or drug discontinuation. The prevention of the cutaneous adverse effects and their treatment require a close collaboration between the oncologist and the dermatologist. The occurrence of some of these skin adverse effects may be a favorable prognostic factor for the response to the cancer treatment and the overall survival. Abbreviations: EGFR = epidermal growth factor receptors; EGFRI = epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors PMID:26361513

  5. Functional interaction of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 with aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J. . E-mail: brown@mshri.on.ca

    2006-07-28

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with p160 coactivators. We demonstrate here that NcoA4, a nuclear receptor coactivator, interacts with and amplifies AhR action. NcoA4-AhR and NcoA4-ARNT interactions were demonstrated by immunoprecipitation in T47D breast cancer and COS cells and was independent of ligand. Overexpression of NcoA4 enhanced AhR transcriptional activity 3.2-fold in the presence of dioxin, whereas overexpression of a splice variant, NcoA4{beta}, as well as a variant lacking the C-terminal region enhanced AhR transcriptional activity by only 1.6-fold. Enhanced AhR signaling by NcoA4 was independent of the LXXLL and FXXLF motifs or of the activation domain. NcoA4 protein localized to cytoplasm in the absence of dioxin and in both the cytoplasm and nucleus following dioxin treatment. NcoA4-facilitation of AhR activity was abolished by overexpression of androgen receptor, suggesting a potential competition of AhR and androgen receptor for NcoA4. These findings thus demonstrate a functional interaction between NcoA4 and AhR that may alter AhR activity to affect disease development and progression.

  6. ErbB2 resembles an autoinhibited invertebrate epidermal growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2009-09-25

    The orphan receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB2 (also known as HER2 or Neu) transforms cells when overexpressed, and it is an important therapeutic target in human cancer. Structural studies have suggested that the oncogenic (and ligand-independent) signalling properties of ErbB2 result from the absence of a key intramolecular 'tether' in the extracellular region that autoinhibits other human ErbB receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Although ErbB2 is unique among the four human ErbB receptors, here we show that it is the closest structural relative of the single EGF receptor family member in Drosophila melanogaster (dEGFR). Genetic and biochemical data show that dEGFR is tightly regulated by growth factor ligands, yet a crystal structure shows that it, too, lacks the intramolecular tether seen in human EGFR, ErbB3 and ErbB4. Instead, a distinct set of autoinhibitory interdomain interactions hold unliganded dEGFR in an inactive state. All of these interactions are maintained (and even extended) in ErbB2, arguing against the suggestion that ErbB2 lacks autoinhibition. We therefore suggest that normal and pathogenic ErbB2 signalling may be regulated by ligands in the same way as dEGFR. Our findings have important implications for ErbB2 regulation in human cancer, and for developing therapeutic approaches that target novel aspects of this orphan receptor.

  7. Roles of tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and TRAF5 in immune cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Joanne M.; Yi, Zuoan; Buchta, Claire M.; Poovassery, Jayakumar; Stunz, Laura L.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary A large and diverse group of receptors utilizes the family of cytoplasmic signaling proteins known as tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factors (TRAFs). In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest and exploration of the roles played by TRAF3 and TRAF5 in cellular regulation, particularly in cells of the immune system, the cell types of focus in this review. This work has revealed that TRAF3 and TRAF5 can play diverse roles for different receptors even in the same cell type, as well as distinct roles in different cell types. Evidence indicates that TRAF3 and TRAF5 play important roles beyond the TNFR-superfamily (SF) and viral mimics of its members, mediating certain innate immune receptor and cytokine receptor signals, and most recently, signals delivered by the T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling complex. Additionally, much research has demonstrated the importance of TRAF3-mediated cellular regulation via its cytoplasmic interactions with additional signaling proteins. In particular, we discuss below evidence for the participation by TRAF3 in a number of the regulatory post-translational modifications involving ubiquitin that are important in various signaling pathways. PMID:22017431

  8. Imaging receptors and their interactions: Implications for psychiatry

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, J.D.; Wolkin, A.; Barouche, F.; Rotrosen, J.; Angrist, B. . Dept. of Psychiatry); Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Dewey, S.L.; Volkow, N.D.; MacGregor, R.; Schlyer, D.J.; Bendriem, B. )

    1989-01-01

    In the past ten years various receptor ligands for dopaminergic systems have been labeled and their regional distribution and time course imaged using positron emission tomography (PET). Labeled compounds have been developed to probe the opiate, benzodiazepine and serotonin receptors among others. The interest in evaluating dopamine receptors in the human brain has clearly been related to the known anti-psychotic effect of dopamine antagonists. In the present report, we shall summarize some of our recent findings on the dopamine (DA) system which bear on the psychiatric issues of the objective determination and monitoring of adequate neuroleptic dose; whether neuroleptic non-response is due to a failure of drug delivery; and preliminary data on the cholinergic system and its putative interaction with the DA system. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Modulation of the NMDA Receptor Through Secreted Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Waldo; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a critical determinant in the formation and development of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). The excitatory current is produced and regulated by several ionotropic receptors, including those that respond to glutamate. These channels are in turn regulated through several secreted factors that function as synaptic organizers. Specifically, Wnt, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) particularly regulate the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glutamatergic channel. These factors likely regulate early embryonic development and directly control key proteins in the function of important glutamatergic channels. Here, we review the secreted molecules that participate in synaptic organization and discuss the cell signaling behind of this fine regulation. Additionally, we discuss how these factors are dysregulated in some neuropathologies associated with glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the CNS. PMID:25429903

  10. Envelope-receptor interactions in Nipah virus pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benhur

    2007-04-01

    Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses are members of the newly defined Henipavirus genus of the Paramyxoviridae. Nipah virus (NiV) is an emergent paramyxovirus that causes fatal encephalitis in up to 70% of infected patients, and there is increasing evidence of human-to-human transmission. NiV is designated a priority pathogen in the NIAID Biodefense Research Agenda, and could be a devastating agent of agrobioterrorism if used against the pig farming industry. Endothelial syncytium is a pathognomonic feature of NiV infections, and is mediated by the fusion (F) and attachment (G) envelope glycoproteins. This review summarizes what is known about the pathophysiology of NiV infections, and documents the identification of the NiV receptor. EphrinB2, the NiV and HeV receptor, is expressed on endothelial cells and neurons, consistent with the known cellular tropism for NiV. We discuss how the identification of the henipahvirus receptor sheds light on the pathobiology of NiV infection, and how it will spur the rational development of effective therapeutics. In addition, ephrinB3, a related protein, can serve as an alternative receptor, and we suggest that differential usage of ephrinB2 versus B3 may explain the variant pathogenic profiles observed between NiV and HeV. Thus, identifying the NiV receptors opens the door for a more comprehensive analysis of the envelope-receptor interactions in NiV pathobiology. Finally, we also describe how galectin-1 (an innate immune defense lectin) can interact with specific N-glycans on the Nipah envelope fusion protein, underscoring the potential role that innate immune defense mechanisms may play against emerging pathogens. PMID:17470911

  11. Interaction of a radiolabeled agonist with cardiac muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, T.K.; Meeker, R.B.; Martin, M.W.

    1983-12-01

    The interaction of a radiolabeled muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist, (methyl-/sup 3/H)oxotremorine acetate ((/sup 3/H)OXO), with a washed membrane preparation derived from rat heart, has been studied. In binding assays at 4 degrees C, the rate constants for association and dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO were 2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 and 5 X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, Saturation binding isotherms indicated that binding was to a single population of sites with a Kd of approximately 300 pM. The density of (/sup 3/H)OXO binding sites (90-100 fmol/mg of protein) was approximately 75% of that determined for the radiolabeled receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate. Both muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO with high affinity and Hill slopes of approximately one. Guanine nucleotides completely inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO. This effect was on the maximum binding (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)OXO with no change occurring in the Kd; the order of potency for five nucleotides was guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio-triphosphate) greater than 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate greater than GTP greater than or equal to guanosine/diphosphate greater than GMP. The (/sup 3/H)OXO-induced interaction of muscarinic receptors with a guanine nucleotide binding protein was stable to solubilization. That is, membrane receptors that were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)OXO could be solubilized with digitonin, and the addition of guanine nucleotides to the soluble, (/sup 3/H)OXO-labeled complex resulted in dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO from the receptor. Pretreatment of membranes with relatively low concentrations of N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)OXO binding by 85% with no change in the Kd of (/sup 3/H)OXO, and with no effect on (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding.

  12. Modeling multivalent ligand-receptor interactions with steric constraints on configurations of cell surface receptor aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Monine, Michael; Posner, Richard; Savage, Paul; Faeder, James; Hlavacek, William S

    2008-01-01

    Signal transduction generally involves multivalent protein-protein interactions, which can produce various protein complexes and post-translational modifications. The reaction networks that characterize these interactions tend to be so large as to challenge conventional simulation procedures. To address this challenge, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method has been developed that can take advantage of a model specification in terms of reaction rules for molecular interactions. A set of rules implicitly defines the reactions that can occur as a result of the interactions represented by the rules. With the rule-based KMC method, explicit generation of the underlying chemical reaction network implied by rules is avoided. Here, we apply and extend this method to characterize the interactions of a trivalent ligand with a bivalent cell-surface receptor. This system is also studied experimentally. We consider the following kinetic models: an equivalent-site model, an extension of this model, which takes into account steric constraints on the configurations of receptor aggregates, and finally, a model that accounts for cyclic receptor aggregates. Simulation results for the equivalent-site model are consistent with an equilibrium continuum model. Using these models, we investigate the effects of steric constraints and the formation of cyclic aggregates on the kinetics and equilibria of small and large aggregate formation and the percolation phase transition that occurs in this system.

  13. Human TAFII55 Interacts with the Vitamin D3 and Thyroid Hormone Receptors and with Derivatives of the Retinoid X Receptor That Have Altered Transactivation Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Anne-Claire; Mengus, Gabrielle; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Wurtz, Jean-Marie; Davidson, Irwin

    1999-01-01

    We have identified novel interactions between the human (h)TATA-binding protein-associated factor TAFII55 and the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of the nuclear receptors for vitamin D3 (VDR) and thyroid hormone (TRα). Following expression in Cos cells, hTAFII55 interacts with the VDR and TRα LBDs in a ligand-independent manner whereas no interactions with the retinoid X receptors (RXRs) or with other receptors were observed. Deletion mapping indicates that hTAFII55 interacts with a 40-amino-acid region spanning α-helices H3 to H5 of the VDR and TRα LBDs but not with the equivalent highly related region of RXRγ. TAFII55 also interacts with chimeric receptors in which the H3-to-H5 region of RXRγ has been replaced with that of the VDR or TRα. Furthermore, replacement of two single amino acids of the RXRγ LBD with their VDR counterparts allows the RXRγ LBD to interact with hTAFII55 while the corresponding double substitution allows a much stronger interaction. In transfection experiments, the single mutated RXRγ LBDs activate transcription to fivefold higher levels than wild-type RXRγ while the double mutation activates transcription to a level comparable to that observed with the VDR. There is therefore a correlation between the ability of the modified RXRs to interact with hTAFII55 and transactivation. These results strongly suggest that the TAFII55 interactions with the modified RXR LBDs modulate transcriptional activation. PMID:10409738

  14. Characterization of an interaction between insulin receptor substrate 1 and the insulin receptor by using the two-hybrid system.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, T J; Craparo, A; Gustafson, T A

    1994-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is a major substrate of the insulin receptor and has been implicated in insulin signaling. Although IRS-1 is thought to interact with the insulin receptor, the nature of the interaction has not been defined. In this study, we used the two-hybrid assay of protein-protein interaction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the interaction between human IRS-1 and the insulin receptor. We demonstrate that IRS-1 forms a specific complex with the cytoplasmic domain of the insulin receptor when both are expressed as hybrid proteins in yeast cells. We show that the interaction is strictly dependent upon receptor tyrosine kinase activity, since IRS-1 shows no interaction with a kinase-inactive receptor hybrid containing a mutated ATP-binding site. Furthermore, mutation of receptor tyrosine 960 to phenylalanine eliminates IRS-1 interaction in the two-hybrid assay. These data suggest that the interaction between IRS-1 and the receptor is direct and provide evidence that the juxtamembrane domain of the receptor is involved. Furthermore, we show that a 356-amino-acid region encompassed by amino acids 160 through 516 of IRS-1 is sufficient for interaction with the receptor in the two-hybrid assay. Lastly, in agreement with our findings for yeast cells, we show that the insulin receptor is unable to phosphorylate an IRS-1 protein containing a deletion of amino acids 45 to 516 when expressed in COS cells. The two-hybrid assay should provide a facile means by which to pursue a detailed understanding of this interaction. Images PMID:7935368

  15. Vascular growth factors and receptors in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Böhling, T.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Persico, M. G.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas are highly vascular central nervous system tumors of controversial origin. Of interest in their pathogenesis are mechanisms regulating endothelial cell growth. The endothelial cell mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis, and together with its two receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-1(FLT1) and VEGFR-2(KDR), is up-regulated during the malignant progression of gliomas. We have analyzed the expression of VEGF and its receptors, the related placental growth factor (PlGF) and the endothelial receptors FLT4 and Tie by in situ hybridization in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in all of the hemangiopericytomas studied and highly expressed in the stromal cells of hemangioblastomas. In addition, some hemangioblastoma tumor cells expressed high levels of PlGF. Significantly elevated levels of Tie mRNA, Tie protein, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 but not FLT4 mRNAs were observed in the endothelia of both tumor types. In hemangioblastomas, however, the receptors were also highly expressed by a subpopulation of stromal cells. Consistent results were obtained for a human hemangioblastoma cell line in culture. Up-regulation of the endothelial growth factors and receptors may result in autocrine or paracrine stimulation of endothelial cells and their precursors involved in the genesis of these two vascular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774132

  16. Snapin interacts with G-protein coupled receptor PKR2.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Li, Jie; Liu, Hua-die; Liu, Wei; Feng, Yong; Zhou, Xiao-Tao; Li, Jia-Da

    2016-01-15

    Mutations in Prokineticin receptor 2 (PKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome and/or idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, characterized by delayed puberty and infertility. In this study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening by using PKR2 C-terminus (amino acids 333-384) as a bait, and identified Snapin as a novel interaction partner for PKR2. The interaction of Snapin and PKR2 was confirmed in GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We further demonstrated that two α-helix domains in Snapin are required for the interaction. And the interactive motifs of PKR2 were mapped to YFK (343-345) and HWR (351-353), which shared a similar sequence of two aromatic amino acids followed by a basic amino acid. Disruption of Snapin-PKR2 interaction did not affect PKR2 signaling, but increased the ligand-induced degradation, implying a role of Snapin in the trafficking of PKR2. PMID:26687946

  17. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering. PMID:23954806

  18. Sex differences in opioid analgesia and addiction: interactions among opioid receptors and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely used as the pain reliever and also notorious for being addictive drugs. Sex differences in the opioid analgesia and addiction have been reported and investigated in human subjects and animal models. Yet, the molecular mechanism underlying the differences between males and females is still unclear. Here, we reviewed the literature describing the sex differences in analgesic responses and addiction liabilities to clinically relevant opioids. The reported interactions among opioids, estrogens, opioid receptors, and estrogen receptors are also evaluated. We postulate that the sex differences partly originated from the crosstalk among the estrogen and opioid receptors when stimulated by the exogenous opioids, possibly through common secondary messengers and the downstream gene transcriptional regulators. PMID:24010861

  19. DIRECT MODULATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT α BY GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, George B.; Howe, Alan K.; Nickl, Christian K.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Deming, Paula B.

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates processes such as cell proliferation and migration following activation of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), yet the signaling mechanisms that link PKA with growth factor receptors remain largely undefined. Here we report that RTKs can directly modulate the function of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA-C) through post-translational modification. In vitro kinase assays revealed that both the epidermal growth factor and platelet derived growth factor receptors (EGFR and PDGFR, respectively) tyrosine phosphorylate PKA-C. Mass spectrometry identified tyrosine 330 (Y330) as a receptor-mediated phosphorylation site and mutation of Y330 to phenylalanine (Y330F) all but abolished the RTK-mediated phosphorylation of PKA-C in vitro. Y330 resides within a conserved region at the C-terminal tail of PKA-C that allosterically regulates enzymatic activity. Therefore, the effect of phosphorylation at Y330 on the activity of PKA-C was investigated. The Km for a peptide substrate was markedly decreased when PKA-C subunits were tyrosine phosphorylated by the receptors as compared to un-phosphorylated controls. Importantly, tyrosine-phosphorylated PKA-C subunits were detected in cells stimulated with EGF, PDGF and FGF2 and in fibroblasts undergoing PDGF-mediated chemotaxis. These results demonstrate a direct, functional interaction between RTKs and PKA-C and identify tyrosine phosphorylation as a novel mechansim for regulating PKA activity. PMID:21866565

  20. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  1. Interaction of lipids with the neurotensin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan H; Muñoz-García, Juan C; Castro-Dopico, Tomas; Dijkman, Patricia M; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Watts, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Information about lipid-protein interactions for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is scarce. Here, we use electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin-labelled lipids to study lipid interactions with the rat neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1). A fusion protein containing rat NTS1 fully able to bind its ligand neurotensin was reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers at specific lipid:protein molar ratios. The fraction of motionally restricted lipids in the range of 40:1 to 80:1 lipids per receptor suggested an oligomeric state of the protein, and the result was unaffected by increasing the hydrophobic thickness of the lipid bilayer from C-18 to C-20 or C-22 chain length PC membranes. Comparison of the ESR spectra of different spin-labelled lipids allowed direct measurement of lipid binding constants relative to PC (Kr), with spin-labelled phosphatidylethanolamine (PESL), phosphatidylserine (PSSL), stearic acid (SASL), and a spin labelled cholesterol analogue (CSL) Kr values of 1.05±0.05, 1.92±0.08, 5.20±0.51 and 0.91±0.19, respectively. The results contrast with those from rhodopsin, the only other GPCR studied this way, which has no selectivity for the lipids analysed here. Molecular dynamics simulations of NTS1 in bilayers are in agreement with the ESR data, and point to sites in the receptor where PS could interact with higher affinity. Lipid selectivity could be necessary for regulation of ligand binding, oligomerisation and/or G protein activation processes. Our results provide insight into the potential modulatory mechanisms that lipids can exert on GPCRs. PMID:26926422

  2. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason R.; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant, therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry. Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored immunohistochemistry and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot or in vitro flow cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immuno-staining, with implications for use in non-invasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  3. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean P; Hastings, Jordan F; Han, Jeremy Z R; Croucher, David R

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27597943

  4. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean P.; Hastings, Jordan F.; Han, Jeremy Z. R.; Croucher, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27597943

  5. Visualization of growth factor receptor sites in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Araujo, D.; Nair, N.P.; Chabot, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    It is now known that various growth factors may also act in the central nervous system. Among them, it has recently been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) may possess trophic effects in the mammalian brain. We report here on the respective autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 125/I)EGF and (/sup 125/I)IGF-I receptor binding sites in the rat brain, both during ontogeny and in adulthood. It appears that (/sup 125/I)EGF sites are mostly found in the rat forebrain during brain development. On the other hand, (/sup 125/I)IGF-I sites are more widely distributed both during ontogeny and in adulthood. These results reveal the plasticity of the expression of EGF and IGF-I receptor sites in the mammalian brain. This could be relevant for the respective role of these two growth factors in the development and maintenance of neuronal function.

  6. Solubilization of G protein-coupled receptors: a convenient strategy to explore lipid-receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Rao, Bhagyashree D; Jafurulla, Md

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of molecules involved in signal transduction across cell membranes and are major drug targets. Since GPCRs are integral membrane proteins, their structure and function are modulated by membrane lipids. In particular, membrane cholesterol is an important lipid in the context of GPCR function. Solubilization of integral membrane proteins is a process in which the proteins and lipids in native membranes are dissociated in the presence of a suitable amphiphilic detergent. Interestingly, solubilization offers a convenient approach to monitor lipid-receptor interaction as it results in differential extents of lipid solubilization, thereby allowing to assess the role of specific lipids on receptor function. In this review, we highlight how this solubilization strategy is utilized to decipher novel information about the structural stringency of cholesterol necessary for supporting the function of the serotonin(1A) receptor. We envision that insight in GPCR-lipid interaction would result in better understanding of GPCR function in health and disease. PMID:25950962

  7. Alcohol action on a neuronal membrane receptor: evidence for a direct interaction with the receptor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Peoples, R W; Weight, F F

    1994-01-01

    For almost a century, alcohols have been thought to produce their effects by actions on the membrane lipids of central nervous system neurons--the well known "lipid theory" of alcohol action. The rationale for this theory is the correlation of potency with oil/water or membrane/buffer partition coefficient. Although a number of recent studies have shown that alcohols can affect the function of certain neuronal neurotransmitter receptors, there is no evidence that the alcohols interact directly with these membrane proteins. In the present study, we report that inhibition of a neuronal neurotransmitter receptor, an ATP-gated ion channel, by a series of alcohols exhibits a distinct cutoff effect. For alcohols with a molecular volume of < or = 42.2 ml/mol, potency for inhibiting ATP-activated current was correlated with lipid solubility (order of potency: 1-propanol = trifluoroethanol > monochloroethanol > ethanol > methanol). However, despite increased lipid solubility, alcohols with a molecular volume of > or = 46.1 ml/mol (1-butanol, 1-pentanol, trichloroethanol, and dichloroethanol) were without effect on the ATP-activated current. The results suggest that alcohols inhibit the function of this neurotransmitter receptor by interacting with a small hydrophobic pocket on the receptor protein. PMID:8058780

  8. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  9. The ontogeny of epidermal growth factor receptors during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E.D.; Meek, J.

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the role(s) of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in vivo during murine development, we have examined the /sup 125/I-EGF binding characteristics of EGF-receptors in membrane preparations of tissues from the 12th day of gestation to parturition. Using autoradiography, the earliest time that we could detect EGF-receptors was on trophoblast cells cultured for 3 days as blastocyst outgrowths. Trophoblast eventually forms a large portion of the placenta, where EGF-receptors have long been recognized. We measured the number and affinity of EGF-receptors on tissues dissected from conceptuses from the 12th day of gestation in order to identify a stage when tissues may be most sensitive to EGF. Whereas the number of EGF receptors increases during gestation for all tissues examined, the affinity of the receptors declines for carcass and placenta and remains relatively unchanged for brain and liver. This suggests that EGF may function differently throughout development. Our hypothesis is that EGF (or its embryonic equivalent) initially stimulates proliferation in embryonic cells and then stimulates differentiation as the tissues mature. In the adult, its main role could be to stimulate tissue repair after damage.

  10. Global quantitative modeling of chromatin factor interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2014-03-01

    Chromatin is the driver of gene regulation, yet understanding the molecular interactions underlying chromatin factor combinatorial patterns (or the "chromatin codes") remains a fundamental challenge in chromatin biology. Here we developed a global modeling framework that leverages chromatin profiling data to produce a systems-level view of the macromolecular complex of chromatin. Our model ultilizes maximum entropy modeling with regularization-based structure learning to statistically dissect dependencies between chromatin factors and produce an accurate probability distribution of chromatin code. Our unsupervised quantitative model, trained on genome-wide chromatin profiles of 73 histone marks and chromatin proteins from modENCODE, enabled making various data-driven inferences about chromatin profiles and interactions. We provided a highly accurate predictor of chromatin factor pairwise interactions validated by known experimental evidence, and for the first time enabled higher-order interaction prediction. Our predictions can thus help guide future experimental studies. The model can also serve as an inference engine for predicting unknown chromatin profiles--we demonstrated that with this approach we can leverage data from well-characterized cell types to help understand less-studied cell type or conditions. PMID:24675896

  11. Understanding the Effects of Pre-Organization, Rigidity, and Steric Interactions in Synthetic Barbiturate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic barbiturate receptors have been utilized for many applications due to their high binding affinities for complementary guests. Although interest in this class of receptors spans from supramolecular to materials chemistry, the effects of receptor steric bulk and pre-organization on guest binding affinity has not been studied systematically. To investigate the roles that steric bulk and pre-organization play in guest binding, we prepared a series of 12 deconstructed Hamilton receptors with varying degrees of steric bulk and pre-organization. Both diethylbarbital and 3-methyl-7-propylxanthine were investigated as guests for the synthetic receptors. The stoichiometry of guest binding was investigated using Job plots for each host-guest pair, and 1H NMR titrations were performed to measure the guest binding affinities. To complement the solution-state studies, DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory employing the IEF-PCM CHCl3 solvation model were also performed. Calculated guest binding energies correlated well with the experimental findings and provided additional insight into the factors influencing guest binding. Taken together, the results presented highlight the interplay between pre-organization and steric interactions establishing favorable interactions for self-assembled hydrogen-bonded systems. PMID:24377967

  12. Mechanism of dioxin action: receptor-enhancer interactions in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L; Whitlock, J P

    1993-01-01

    We have used a ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction technique to analyze protein-DNA interactions at a dioxin-responsive enhancer upstream of the CYP1A1 gene in intact mouse hepatoma cells. In its inactive state, the enhancer binds few, if any, proteins within the major DNA groove in vivo. Thus, the inactive enhancer is relatively inaccessible to DNA-binding proteins. Exposure of cells to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin leads to the binding of the liganded Ah receptor at six sites within the major DNA groove of the enhancer. The receptor-enhancer interactions occur rapidly and do not require ongoing transcription, consistent with their role in regulating CYP1A1 gene expression. The liganded receptor, which is a heteromer composed of at least two basic helix-loop-helix proteins, is probably the only DNA-binding transcription factor necessary to activate the enhancer in vivo. The small size and irregular distribution of receptor binding sites suggest that chromatin structure imposes substantial steric constraints upon the function of the receptor-enhancer system in intact cells. Images PMID:8382788

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of an additional epidermal growth factor receptor-related gene.

    PubMed Central

    Plowman, G D; Whitney, G S; Neubauer, M G; Green, J M; McDonald, V L; Todaro, G J; Shoyab, M

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and amphiregulin are structurally and functionally related growth regulatory proteins. These secreted polypeptides all bind to the 170-kDa cell-surface EGF receptor, activating its intrinsic kinase activity. However, amphiregulin exhibits different activities than EGF and TGF-alpha in a number of biological assays. Amphiregulin only partially competes with EGF for binding EGF receptor, and amphiregulin does not induce anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney cells (NRK) in the presence of TGF-beta. Amphiregulin also appears to abrogate the stimulatory effect of TGF-alpha on the growth of several aggressive epithelial carcinomas that overexpress EGF receptor. These findings suggest that amphiregulin may interact with a separate receptor in certain cell types. Here we report the cloning of another member of the human EGF receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which we have named "HER3/ERRB3." The cDNA was isolated from a human carcinoma cell line, and its 6-kilobase transcript was identified in various human tissues. We have generated peptide-specific antisera that recognizes the 160-kDa HER3 protein when transiently expressed in COS cells. These reagents will allow us to determine whether HER3 binds amphiregulin or other growth regulatory proteins and what role HER3 protein plays in the regulation of cell growth. Images PMID:2164210

  14. Neurexins Physically and Functionally Interact with GABAA-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Atasoy, Deniz; Araç, Demet; Yang, Xiaofei; Fucillo, Marc V.; Robison, Alfred J.; Ko, Jaewon; Brunger, Axel T.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    Neurexins are presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that form trans-synaptic complexes with postsynaptic neuroligins. When overexpressed in non-neuronal cells, neurexins induce formation of postsynaptic specializations in co-cultured neurons, suggesting that neurexins are synaptogenic. However, we now find that when overexpressed in neurons, neurexins do not increase synapse density, but instead selectively suppressed GABAergic synaptic transmission without decreasing GABAergic synapse numbers. This suppression was mediated by all subtypes of neurexins tested, in a cell-autonomous and neuroligin-independent manner. Strikingly, addition of recombinant neurexin to cultured neurons at sub-micromolar concentrations induced the same suppression of GABAergic synaptic transmission as neurexin overexpression. Moreover, experiments with native brain proteins and with purified recombinant proteins revealed that neurexins directly and stoichiometrically bind to GABAA-receptors, suggesting that they decrease GABAergic synaptic responses by interacting with GABAA-receptors. Our findings suggest that besides their other well-documented interactions, presynaptic neurexins directly act on postsynaptic GABAA-receptors, which may contribute to regulate the excitatory/inhibitory balance in brain. PMID:20471353

  15. Pion form factor from a contact interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Bashir, A.; Cloeet, I. C.; Roberts, C. D.

    2010-06-15

    In a Poincare-covariant vector-boson-exchange theory, the pion possesses components of pseudovector origin, which materially influence its observable properties. For a range of such quantities, we explore the consequences of a momentum-independent interaction, regularized in a symmetry-preserving manner. The contact interaction, while capable of describing pion static properties, produces a form factor whose evolution for Q{sup 2}>0.17 GeV{sup 2} disagrees markedly with experiment and whose asymptotic power-law behavior conflicts strongly with perturbative QCD.

  16. Pion form factor from a contact interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Bashir, A.; Cloet, I. C.; Roberts, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    In a Poincare-covariant vector-boson-exchange theory, the pion possesses components of pseudovector origin, which materially influence its observable properties. For a range of such quantities, we explore the consequences of a momentum-independent interaction, regularized in a symmetry-preserving manner. The contact interaction, while capable of describing pion static properties, produces a form factor whose evolution for Q{sup 2} > 0.17 GeV{sup 2} disagrees markedly with experiment and whose asymptotic power-law behavior conflicts strongly with perturbative QCD.

  17. Insulin receptor substrate-3, interacting with Bcl-3, enhances p50 NF-{kappa}B activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kabuta, Tomohiro; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Cho, Yoshitake; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Chida, Kazuhiro; Asano, Tomoichiro; Wada, Keiji; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2010-04-09

    The insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins are major substrates of both insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I receptor tyrosine kinases. Previously, we reported that IRS-3 is localized to both cytosol and nucleus, and possesses transcriptional activity. In the present study, we identified Bcl-3 as a novel binding protein to IRS-3. Bcl-3 is a nuclear protein, which forms a complex with the homodimer of p50 NF-{kappa}B, leading to enhancement of transcription through p50 NF-{kappa}B. We found that Bcl-3 interacts with the pleckstrin homology domain and the phosphotyrosine binding domain of IRS-3, and that IRS-3 interacts with the ankyrin repeat domain of Bcl-3. In addition, IRS-3 augmented the binding activity of p50 to the NF-{kappa}B DNA binding site, as well as the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B. Lastly, IRS-3 enhanced NF-{kappa}B-dependent anti-apoptotic gene induction and consequently inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced cell death. This series of results proposes a novel function for IRS-3 as a transcriptional regulator in TNF-{alpha} signaling, distinct from its function as a substrate of insulin/IGF receptor kinases.

  18. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling networks in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Frank B.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    As tumours evolve, the daughter cells of the initiating cell often become molecularly heterogeneous and develop different functional properties and therapeutic vulnerabilities. In glioblastoma (GBM), a lethal form of brain cancer, the heterogeneous expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) poses a substantial challenge for the effective use of EGFR-targeted therapies. Understanding the mechanisms that cause EGFR heterogeneity in GBM should provide better insights into how they, and possibly other amplified receptor tyrosine kinases, affect cellular signalling, metabolism and drug resistance. PMID:25855404

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor family in lung cancer and premalignancy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wilbur A; Veve, Robert; Hirsch, Fred R; Helfrich, Barbara A; Bunn, Paul A

    2002-02-01

    Lung cancer, like many other epithelial malignancies, is thought to be the outcome of genetic and epigenetic changes that result in a constellation of phenotypic abnormalities in bronchial epithelium. These include morphologic epithelial dysplasia, angiogenesis, increased proliferative rate, and changes in expression of cell surface proteins, particularly overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family proteins. The EFGR family is a group of four structurally similar tyrosine kinases (EGFR, HER2/neu, ErbB-3, and ErbB-4) that dimerize on binding with a number of ligands, including EGF and transforming growth factor alpha. Epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression is pronounced in virtually all squamous carcinomas and is also found in > or = 65% of large cell and adenocarcinomas. It is not expressed in situ by small cell lung carcinoma. Overexpression of EGFR is one of the earliest and most consistent abnormalities in bronchial epithelium of high-risk smokers. It is present at the stage of basal cell hyperplasia and persists through squamous metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. Recent studies of the effect of inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases suggest that patterns of coexpression of multiple members of the EGFR family could be important in determining response. Intermediate endpoints of such trials could include monitoring of phosphorylation levels in signal transduction molecules downstream of the receptor dimers. These trials represent a new targeted approach to lung cancer treatment and chemoprevention that will require greater attention to molecular endpoints than required in past trials. PMID:11894009

  20. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  1. Alternative Splicing of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor IgIII Loops in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzmann, Klaus; Grunt, Thomas; Heinzle, Christine; Sampl, Sandra; Steinhoff, Heinrich; Reichmann, Nicole; Kleiter, Miriam; Hauck, Marlene; Marian, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the IgIII loop of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) 1–3 produces b- and c-variants of the receptors with distinctly different biological impact based on their distinct ligand-binding spectrum. Tissue-specific expression of these splice variants regulates interactions in embryonic development, tissue maintenance and repair, and cancer. Alterations in FGFR2 splicing are involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition that produces invasive, metastatic features during tumor progression. Recent research has elucidated regulatory factors that determine the splice choice both on the level of exogenous signaling events and on the RNA-protein interaction level. Moreover, methodology has been developed that will enable the in depth analysis of splicing events during tumorigenesis and provide further insight on the role of FGFR 1–3 IIIb and IIIc in the pathophysiology of various malignancies. This paper aims to summarize expression patterns in various tumor types and outlines possibilities for further analysis and application. PMID:22203889

  2. Nuclear receptors modulate the interaction of Sp1 and GC-rich DNA via ternary complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Husmann, M; Dragneva, Y; Romahn, E; Jehnichen, P

    2000-01-01

    Binding sites for transcription factor Sp1 have been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of several genes by hormones or vitamins, and here we show that a GC-rich element contributes to the retinoic acid response of the interleukin 1beta promoter. To explain such observations, it has been proposed that nuclear receptors can interact with Sp1 bound to GC-rich DNA. However, evidence supporting this model has remained indirect. So far, nuclear receptors have not been detected in a complex with Sp1 and GC-rich DNA, and the expected ternary complexes in non-denaturing gels were not seen. In search for these missing links we found that nuclear receptors [retinoic acid receptor (RAR), thyroid hormone receptor (TR), vitamin D(3) receptor, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor and retinoic X receptor] induce an electrophoretic mobility increase of Sp1-GC-rich DNA complexes. Concomitantly, binding of Sp1 to the GC-box is enhanced. It is proposed that nuclear receptors may partially replace Sp1 in homo-oligomers at the GC-box. RARs and Sp1 can also combine into a complex with a retinoic acid-response element. The presence of RAR and Sp1 in complexes with either cognate site was revealed in supershift experiments. The C-terminus of Sp1 interacts with nuclear receptors. Both the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of the receptor are important for complex formation with Sp1 and GC-rich DNA. In spite of similar capacity to form ternary complexes, RAR but not TR up-regulated an Sp1-driven reporter in a ligand-dependent way. Thus additional factors limit the transcriptional response mediated by nuclear receptors and Sp1. PMID:11104684

  3. Internalization and molecular interactions of human CD21 receptor.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Jacques; Cuvillier, Armelle; Glaudet, Florence; Khamlichi, Ahmed Amine

    2007-03-01

    The human CD21 is a receptor for cleavage fragments of the third complement component and for Epstein-Barr virus. Previous mutational studies showed that the cytoplasmic domain of CD21 is absolutely required for internalization of either ligand. With the exception of CD19, CD81, Leu-13 and CD35 that can form a complex with CD21 at the cell surface, no other partner that interacts with the hCD21 transmembrane or the cytoplasmic domain was identified. We investigated the internalization capacity of hCD21 tail mutants in the absence of B cell receptor cross-linking by using stable murine B cell transfectants. We provide evidence that at least two internalization motifs are activated when hCD21 binds a monoclonal antibody. In order to identify the cellular proteins that interact with the hCD21 transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, we combined a mutational mapping with a two-hybrid system approach both in yeast and in mammalian cells. We identified four novel partners that are involved in intracellular trafficking, sorting or cytoskeleton remodeling and we mapped the hCD21 transmembrane and tail subdomains they interact with. We discuss the potential physiological significance of these findings in the context of hCD21 internalization and intracellular trafficking. PMID:17118449

  4. Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor are ligands for the carbohydrate-receptor Siglec-5

    PubMed Central

    Pegon, Julie N.; Kurdi, Mohamad; Casari, Caterina; Odouard, Soline; Denis, Cécile V.; Christophe, Olivier D.; Lenting, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) circulate in plasma in a tight non-covalent complex, being critical to hemostasis. Although structurally unrelated, both share the presence of sialylated glycan-structures, making them potential ligands for sialic-acid-binding-immunoglobulin-like-lectins (Siglecs). Design and Methods We explored the potential interaction between FVIII/VWF and Siglec-5, a receptor expressed in macrophages using various experimental approaches, including binding experiments with purified proteins and cell-binding studies with Siglec-5 expressing cells. Finally, Siglec-5 was overexpressed in mice via hydrodynamic gene transfer. Results In different systems using purified proteins, saturable, dose-dependent and reversible interactions between a soluble Siglec-5 fragment and both hemostatic proteins were found. Sialidase treatment of VWF resulted in a complete lack of Siglec-5 binding. In contrast, sialidase treatment left interactions between FVIII and Siglec-5 unaffected. FVIII and VWF also bound to cellsurface exposed Siglec-5, as was visualized by classical immunostaining as well as by Duolinkproximity ligation assays. Co-localization of FVIII and VWF with early endosomal markers further suggested that binding to Siglec-5 is followed by endocytosis of the proteins. Finally, overexpression of human Siglec-5 in murine hepatocytes following hydrodynamic gene transfer resulted in a significant decrease in plasma levels of FVIII and VWF in these mice. Conclusions Our data indicate that FVIII and VWF may act as a ligand for Siglec-5, and that Siglec-5 may contribute to the regulation of plasma levels of the FVIII/VWF complex. PMID:22733016

  5. Dynamic Interaction of Stargazin-like TARPs with Cycling AMPA Receptors at Synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Susumu; Fukata, Masaki; Nicoll, Roger A.; Bredt, David S.

    2004-03-01

    Activity-dependent plasticity in the brain arises in part from changes in the number of synaptic AMPA receptors. Synaptic trafficking of AMPA receptors is controlled by stargazin and homologous transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs). We found that TARPs were stable at the plasma membrane, whereas AMPA receptors were internalized in a glutamate-regulated manner. Interaction with AMPA receptors involved both extra- and intracellular determinants of TARPs. Upon binding to glutamate, AMPA receptors detached from TARPs. This did not require ion flux or intracellular second messengers. This allosteric mechanism for AMPA receptor dissociation from TARPs may participate in glutamate-mediated internalization of receptors in synaptic plasticity.

  6. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E5 transforming protein specifically binds and activates the beta-type receptor for the platelet-derived growth factor but not other related tyrosine kinase-containing receptors to induce cellular transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Li, W; Wang, L M; Heidaran, M A; Aaronson, S; Shinn, R; Schlegel, R; Pierce, J H

    1994-01-01

    The 44-amino-acid E5 protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1 is a highly hydrophobic protein which appears to transform cells through the activation of growth factor receptors. To investigate the specificity of E5-growth factor receptor interactions required for mitogenic signaling, we utilized a nontumorigenic, murine myeloid cell line (32D) which is strictly dependent on interleukin-3 (IL-3) for sustained proliferation in culture. This IL-3 dependence can be functionally substituted by the expression of a variety of surrogate growth factor receptors and the addition of the corresponding ligand. Several receptor cDNAs for the alpha- and beta-type platelet-derived growth factor receptors [alpha PDGFR and beta PDGFR], the epidermal growth factor receptor, and the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor) were transfected into 32D cells constitutively expressing the E5 protein to test for IL-3-independent growth. Only beta PDGFR was capable of abrogating the IL-3 dependence of 32D cells. The proliferative signal induced by the coexpression of beta PDGFR and E5 was accompanied by stable complex formation between these proteins, constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. The lack of cooperative interaction between E5 and the epidermal growth factor receptor, the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, and the highly related alpha PDGFR was paralleled by the inability of E5 to bind to these receptors and failure to increase receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, these data indicate that the ability of E5 to induce sustained proliferation and transformation of 32D cells is a direct consequence of specific interaction between the E5 protein and the beta PDGFR signaling complex and the subsequent stimulation of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Images PMID:8207816

  7. Proinflammatory cytokine-receptor interaction model improves the predictability of cerebral white matter injury in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bass, W Thomas; Buescher, E Stephen; Hair, Pamela S; White, Larry E; Welch, J Camille; Burke, Bonnie L

    2008-04-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines have been variably linked to development of cerebral white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants. Because soluble receptors tightly control cytokine bioactivity, we modeled cytokine-receptor interaction as a predictor of WMI. Plasma from 100 preterm infants was assayed for cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL-1beta, IL-6) and their soluble receptors (sTNF-RI), sTNF-RII, sIL-1RA, and sIL-6R). Cranial ultrasound (US) results were correlated with cytokine and receptor concentrations individually and with cytokine-receptor interaction models (PROC LOGISTIC; SAS Software). Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to determine the predictability of WMI. Fifty-two infants with normal US exams were compared with 21 infants with evidence of WMI. There was no association between individual cytokine or receptor concentrations and the development of WMI. However, modeling cytokines with their soluble receptors significantly improved the predictability of WMI. We concluded that consideration of cytokine-receptor interaction may be more important than individual cytokine concentrations alone in determining the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of WMI in preterm infants. PMID:18548393

  8. Regulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking by Src and Eps8

    PubMed Central

    Auciello, Giulio; Cunningham, Debbie L.; Tatar, Tulin; Heath, John K.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) mediate a wide spectrum of cellular responses that are crucial for development and wound healing. However, aberrant FGFR activity leads to cancer. Activated growth factor receptors undergo stimulated endocytosis, but can continue to signal along the endocytic pathway. Endocytic trafficking controls the duration and intensity of signalling, and growth factor receptor signalling can lead to modifications of trafficking pathways. We have developed live-cell imaging methods for studying FGFR dynamics to investigate mechanisms that coordinate the interplay between receptor trafficking and signal transduction. Activated FGFR enters the cell following recruitment to pre-formed clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). However, FGFR activation stimulates clathrin-mediated endocytosis; FGF treatment increases the number of CCPs, including those undergoing endocytosis, and this effect is mediated by Src and its phosphorylation target Eps8. Eps8 interacts with the clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery and depletion of Eps8 inhibits FGFR trafficking and immediate Erk signalling. Once internalized, FGFR passes through peripheral early endosomes en route to recycling and degredative compartments, through an Src- and Eps8-dependent mechanism. Thus Eps8 functions as a key coordinator in the interplay between FGFR signalling and trafficking. This work provides the first detailed mechanistic analysis of growth factor receptor clustering at the cell surface through signal transduction and endocytic trafficking. As we have characterised the Src target Eps8 as a key regulator of FGFR signalling and trafficking, and identified the early endocytic system as the site of Eps8-mediated effects, this work provides novel mechanistic insight into the reciprocal regulation of growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking. PMID:23203811

  9. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Hauger, R.L.; Catt, K.J.; Aguilera, G.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution and properties of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) were analyzed in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys. Binding of (/sup 125/I)tyrosine-labeled ovine CRF to frontal cortex and amygdala membrane-rich fractions was saturable, specific, and time- and temperature-dependent, reaching equilibrium in 30 min at 23/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated one class of high-affinity sites with a K/sub d/ of 1 nM and a concentration of 125 fmol/mg. As in the rat pituitary and brain, CRF receptors in monkey cerebral cortex and amygdala were coupled to adenylate cyclase. Autoradiographic analysis of specific CRF binding in brain sections revealed that the receptors were widely distributed in the cerebral cortex and limbic system. Receptor density was highest in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary and throughout the cerebral cortex, specifically in the prefrontal, frontal, orbital, cingulate, insular, and temporal areas, and in the cerebellar cortex. A low binding density was present in the superior colliculus, locus coeruleus, substantia gelatinosa, preoptic area, septal area, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These data demonstrate that receptors for CRF are present within the primate brain at areas related to the central control of visceral function and behavior, suggesting that brain CRF may serve as a neurotransmitter in the coordination of endocrine and neural mechanisms involved in the response to stress.

  10. Human antibody-Fc receptor interactions illuminated by crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M; Burton, Dennis R

    2004-02-01

    Immunoglobulins couple the recognition of invading pathogens with the triggering of potent effector mechanisms for pathogen elimination. Different immunoglobulin classes trigger different effector mechanisms through interaction of immunoglobulin Fc regions with specific Fc receptors (FcRs) on immune cells. Here, we review the structural information that is emerging on three human immunoglobulin classes and their FcRs. New insights are provided, including an understanding of the antibody conformational adjustments that are required to bring effector cell and target cell membranes sufficiently close for efficient killing and signal transduction to occur. The results might also open up new possibilities for the design of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:15040582

  11. Transcription Factor AP1 Potentiates Chromatin Accessibility and Glucocorticoid Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Biddie, Simon C.; John, Sam; Sabo, Pete J.; Thurman, Robert E.; Johnson, Thomas A.; Schiltz, R. Louis; Miranda, Tina B.; Sung, Myong-Hee; Trump, Saskia; Lightman, Stafford L.; Vinson, Charles; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ligand-dependent transcription by the nuclear receptor glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is mediated by interactions with co-regulators. The role of these interactions in determining selective binding of GR to regulatory elements remains unclear. Recent findings indicate a large fraction of genomic GR binding coincides with chromatin that is accessible prior to hormone treatment, suggesting that receptor binding is dictated by proteins that maintain chromatin in an open state. Combining DNaseI accessibility and chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing, we identify the activator protein 1 (AP1) as a major partner for productive GR-chromatin interactions. AP1 is critical for GR-regulated transcription and recruitment to co-occupied regulatory elements, illustrating an extensive AP1-GR interaction network. Importantly, the maintenance of baseline chromatin accessibility facilitates GR recruitment and is dependent on AP1 binding. We propose a model where the basal occupancy of transcription factors act to prime chromatin and direct inducible transcription factors to select regions in the genome. PMID:21726817

  12. Purification of the endogenous glucocorticoid receptor stabilizing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Meshinchi, S.; Stancato, L.F.; Pratt, W.B. ); Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W. )

    1991-09-03

    A ubiquitous, low molecular weight, heat-stable component of cytosol stabilizes the glucocorticoid receptor in its untransformed state in association with hsp90. This heat-stable factor mimics molybdate in its effects on receptor function, and it has the heat stability, charge, and chelation properties of a metal oxyanion. In this paper, the authors describe the further purification of the endogenous factor from rat liver cytosol by anion-exchange HPCL (Ion-110) after prepurification by molecular sieving, cation absorption, and charcoal absorption. Elution of the factor with an isocratic gradient of ammonium bicarbonate results in recovery of all of the bioactivity in a single peak which coelutes with inorganic phosphate and contains all of the endogenous molybdenum. The bioactivity can be separated from inorganic phosphate by chromatography of the partially purified endogenous factor on a metal-chelating column of Chelex-100. The chelating procedure results in complete loss of bioactivity with recovery of 98% of the inorganic phosphate in both the column drop-through and a subsequent 1 M NaCl wash. These observations support the proposal that an endogenous metal can stabilize the binding of hsp90 to the receptor but it is likely that other cytosolic components that are not present in the immunopurified complex must contribute to the stability of the soluble protein-protein complex in cytosol.

  13. Pharmacological Profile of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptors Interacting with G-Proteins and β-Arrestins 2

    PubMed Central

    Malfacini, D.; Ambrosio, C.; Gro’, M. C.; Sbraccia, M.; Trapella, C.; Guerrini, R.; Bonora, M.; Pinton, P.; Costa, T.; Calo’, G.

    2015-01-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) controls several biological functions by selectively activating an opioid like receptor named N/OFQ peptide receptor (NOP). Biased agonism is emerging as an important and therapeutically relevant pharmacological concept in the field of G protein coupled receptors including opioids. To evaluate the relevance of this phenomenon in the NOP receptor, we used a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technology to measure the interactions of the NOP receptor with either G proteins or β-arrestin 2 in the absence and in presence of increasing concentration of ligands. A large panel of receptor ligands was investigated by comparing their ability to promote or block NOP/G protein and NOP/arrestin interactions. In this study we report a systematic analysis of the functional selectivity of NOP receptor ligands. NOP/G protein interactions (investigated in cell membranes) allowed a precise estimation of both ligand potency and efficacy yielding data highly consistent with the known pharmacological profile of this receptor. The same panel of ligands displayed marked differences in the ability to promote NOP/β-arrestin 2 interactions (evaluated in whole cells). In particular, full agonists displayed a general lower potency and for some ligands an inverted rank order of potency was noted. Most partial agonists behaved as pure competitive antagonists of receptor/arrestin interaction. Antagonists displayed similar values of potency for NOP/Gβ1 or NOP/β-arrestin 2 interaction. Using N/OFQ as reference ligand we computed the bias factors of NOP ligands and a number of agonists with greater efficacy at G protein coupling were identified. PMID:26248189

  14. Multiple Interacting Risk Factors: On Methods for Allocating Risk Factor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Price, Bertram; MacNicoll, Michael

    2015-05-01

    A persistent problem in health risk analysis where it is known that a disease may occur as a consequence of multiple risk factors with interactions is allocating the total risk of the disease among the individual risk factors. This problem, referred to here as risk apportionment, arises in various venues, including: (i) public health management, (ii) government programs for compensating injured individuals, and (iii) litigation. Two methods have been described in the risk analysis and epidemiology literature for allocating total risk among individual risk factors. One method uses weights to allocate interactions among the individual risk factors. The other method is based on risk accounting axioms and finding an optimal and unique allocation that satisfies the axioms using a procedure borrowed from game theory. Where relative risk or attributable risk is the risk measure, we find that the game-theory-determined allocation is the same as the allocation where risk factor interactions are apportioned to individual risk factors using equal weights. Therefore, the apportionment problem becomes one of selecting a meaningful set of weights for allocating interactions among the individual risk factors. Equal weights and weights proportional to the risks of the individual risk factors are discussed. PMID:25644783

  15. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  16. Autoradiographic localization of epidermal growth factor receptors to all major uterine cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.H.; Mukku, V.R.; Verner, G.; Kirkland, J.L.; Stancel, G.M.

    1988-03-01

    We have recently studied the structure and function of the uterine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, its hormonal regulation, and its possible role in estrogen-induced uterine DNA synthesis. Since the uterus is composed of multiple cell types, we sought, in the work reported here, to localize EGF binding in this organ by autoradiography. Prior to the actual autoradiography, we performed a companion series of experiments to insure that EGF binding to uterine tissue in situ represented a true receptor interaction. Uteri from immature female rats were incubated in vitro with 125I-EGF at 25 degrees C. Tissue binding was maximal within 120 min and remained constant for at least an additional 120 min. This binding of labeled EGF was largely abolished by excess unlabeled EGF but not by other growth factors, indicating that binding was to specific receptors. The binding of 125I-EGF was saturable and reached a plateau at 4-8 nM; specific binding was half-maximal at 1-2 nM EGF. In situ cross-linking studies revealed that 125I-EGF was bound predominantly to a 170,000 MW EGF receptor similar to that seen in isolated uterine membranes. Incubation of uteri with 125I-EGF followed by autoradiography revealed binding to epithelial cells, stroma, and myometrium. These results provide evidence for the presence of specific EGF receptors in all major uterine cell types of the immature rat.

  17. ADAMTS13 and von Willebrand factor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Catherine B.; Cao, Wenjing; Zheng, X. Long

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review ADAMTS13 is a zinc-containing metalloprotease that cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF). Deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity is accountable for a potentially fatal blood disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Understanding of ADAMTS13–VWF interaction is essential for developing novel treatments to this disorder. Recent findings Despite the proteolytic activity of ADAMTS13 being restricted to the metalloprotease domain, the ancillary proximal C-terminal domains including the disintegrin domain, first TSP-1 repeat, cysteine-rich region, and spacer domain are all required for cleavage of VWF and its analogs. Recent studies have added to our understandings of the role of the specific regions in the disintegrin domain, the cysteine-rich domain, and the spacer domain responsible for its interaction with VWF. Additionally, regulative functions of the distal portion of ADAMTS13 including the TSP-1 2–8 repeats and the CUB domains have been proposed. Finally, fine mapping of anti-ADAMTS13 antibody epitopes have provided further insight into the essential structural elements in ADAMTS13 for VWF binding and the mechanism of autoantibody-mediated TTP. Summary Significant progress has been made in our understandings of the structure–function relationship of ADAMTS13 in the past decade. To further investigate ADAMTS13–VWF interactions for medical applications, these interactions must be studied under physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:26186678

  18. Nerve growth factor binding domain of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Welcher, A.A.; Bitler, C.M.; Radeke, M.J.; Shooter, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A structural analysis of the rat low-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor was undertaken to define the NGF binding domain. Mutant NGF receptor DNA constructs were expressed in mouse fibroblasts or COS cells, and the ability of the mutant receptors to bind NGF was assayed. In the first mutant, all but 16 amino acid residues of the intracellular domain of the receptor were removed. This receptor bound NGF with a K{sub d} comparable to that of the wild-type receptor. A second mutant contained only the four cysteine-rich sequences from the extracellular portion of the protein. This mutant was expressed in COS cells and the resultant protein was a secreted soluble form of the receptor that was able to bind NGF. Two N-terminal deletions, in which either the first cystein-rich sequence or the first and part of the second cystein-rich sequences were removed, bound NGF. However, a mutant lacking all four cysteine-rich sequences was unable to bind NGF. These results show that the four cysteine-rich sequences of the NGF receptor contain the NGF binding domain.

  19. A natural kinase-deficient variant of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, L Y; Edenson, S P; Yu, Y L; Senderowicz, L; Turck, C W

    1996-08-01

    A fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant missing 37 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal tyrosine kinase catalytic domain was discovered in human lung fibroblasts and several other human cell lines. The receptor variant binds specifically to acidic fibroblast growth factor but has no tyrosine kinase activity. It was found that cellular transfectants expressing the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant are mitogenically inactive and ligand binding to the receptor causes neither receptor autophosphorylation nor phospholipase C-gamma transphosphorylation. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant therefore represents an inactive receptor for acidic fibroblast growth factor. Since both kinase and kinase-deficient receptor forms are expressed in cells, it is conceivable that the kinase-deficient receptor plays an important role in regulating cellular responses elicited by acidic fibroblast growth factor stimulation. PMID:8756477

  20. Non-canonical dynamic mechanisms of interaction between the p66Shc protein and Met receptor

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Mélissa; Pomerleau, Véronique; Saucier, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Met receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is known to bind to the three distinct protein isoforms encoded by the ShcA (Shc) gene. Structure–function studies have unveiled critical roles for p52Shc-dependent signalling pathways in Met-regulated biological functions. The molecular basis of the interaction between the Met and p52Shc proteins is well-defined, but not for the longest protein isoform, p66Shc. In the present study, co-immunoprecipitation assays were performed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, transiently co-transfected with Met and p66Shc mutants, in order to define the molecular determinants involved in mediating Met–p66Shc interaction. Our results show that p66Shc interacts constitutively with the receptor Met, and the Grb2 (growth factor receptor-bound protein-2) and Gab1 (Grb2-associated binder-1) adaptor proteins. Although its phosphotyrosine-binding domain (PTB) and Src homology 2 (SH2) domains co-ordinate p66Shc binding to non-activated Met receptor, these phosphotyrosine-binding modules, and its collagen homology domain 2 (CH2) region, exert negative constraints. In contrast, p66Shc interaction with the activated Met depends mainly on the integrity of its PTB domain, and to a lesser extent of its SH2 domain. Even though not required for the recruitment of p66Shc, tyrosine phosphorylation of p66Shc by activated Met enhances these interactions by mechanisms not reliant on the integrity of the Met multisubstrate-binding site. In turn, this increases phosphotyrosine-dependent p66Shc–Grb2–Gab1 complex formation away from the receptor, while blocking Grb2 and Gab1 recruitment to activated Met. In conclusion, we identify, for the first time, a novel non-canonical dynamic mode of interaction between Met and the p66 protein isoform of Shc and its effects on rewiring binding effector complexes according to the activation state of the receptor. PMID:27048591

  1. Non-canonical dynamic mechanisms of interaction between the p66Shc protein and Met receptor.

    PubMed

    Landry, Mélissa; Pomerleau, Véronique; Saucier, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Met receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is known to bind to the three distinct protein isoforms encoded by the ShcA (Shc) gene. Structure-function studies have unveiled critical roles for p52Shc-dependent signalling pathways in Met-regulated biological functions. The molecular basis of the interaction between the Met and p52Shc proteins is well-defined, but not for the longest protein isoform, p66Shc. In the present study, co-immunoprecipitation assays were performed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, transiently co-transfected with Met and p66Shc mutants, in order to define the molecular determinants involved in mediating Met-p66Shc interaction. Our results show that p66Shc interacts constitutively with the receptor Met, and the Grb2 (growth factor receptor-bound protein-2) and Gab1 (Grb2-associated binder-1) adaptor proteins. Although its phosphotyrosine-binding domain (PTB) and Src homology 2 (SH2) domains co-ordinate p66Shc binding to non-activated Met receptor, these phosphotyrosine-binding modules, and its collagen homology domain 2 (CH2) region, exert negative constraints. In contrast, p66Shc interaction with the activated Met depends mainly on the integrity of its PTB domain, and to a lesser extent of its SH2 domain. Even though not required for the recruitment of p66Shc, tyrosine phosphorylation of p66Shc by activated Met enhances these interactions by mechanisms not reliant on the integrity of the Met multisubstrate-binding site. In turn, this increases phosphotyrosine-dependent p66Shc-Grb2-Gab1 complex formation away from the receptor, while blocking Grb2 and Gab1 recruitment to activated Met. In conclusion, we identify, for the first time, a novel non-canonical dynamic mode of interaction between Met and the p66 protein isoform of Shc and its effects on rewiring binding effector complexes according to the activation state of the receptor. PMID:27048591

  2. Computational Modeling of Interacting VEGF and Soluble VEGF Receptor Concentration Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Hashambhoy, Yasmin L.; Chappell, John C.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Bautch, Victoria L.; Mac Gabhann, Feilim

    2011-01-01

    Experimental data indicates that soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 1 (sFlt-1) modulates the guidance cues provided to sprouting blood vessels by VEGF-A. To better delineate the role of sFlt-1 in VEGF signaling, we have developed an experimentally based computational model. This model describes dynamic spatial transport of VEGF, and its binding to receptors Flt-1 and Flk-1, in a mouse embryonic stem cell model of vessel morphogenesis. The model represents the local environment of a single blood vessel. Our simulations predict that blood vessel secretion of sFlt-1 and increased local sFlt-1 sequestration of VEGF results in decreased VEGF–Flk-1 levels on the sprout surface. In addition, the model predicts that sFlt-1 secretion increases the relative gradient of VEGF–Flk-1 along the sprout surface, which could alter endothelial cell perception of directionality cues. We also show that the proximity of neighboring sprouts may alter VEGF gradients, VEGF receptor binding, and the directionality of sprout growth. As sprout distances decrease, the probability that the sprouts will move in divergent directions increases. This model is a useful tool for determining how local sFlt-1 and VEGF gradients contribute to the spatial distribution of VEGF receptor binding, and can be used in conjunction with experimental data to explore how multi-cellular interactions and relationships between local growth factor gradients drive angiogenesis. PMID:22007175

  3. A Simple Technique for the Prediction of Interacting Proteins Reveals a Direct Brn-3a-Androgen Receptor Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Daniel C.; Diss, James K. J.; Budhram-Mahadeo, Vishwanie S.; Latchman, David S.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of multiprotein complexes constitutes a key step in determining the function of any translated gene product. Thus, the elucidation of interacting partners for a protein of interest is of fundamental importance to cell biology. Here we describe a simple methodology for the prediction of novel interactors. We have applied this to the developmental transcription factor Brn-3a to predict and verify a novel interaction between Brn-3a and the androgen receptor (AR). We demonstrate that these transcription factors form complexes within the nucleus of ND7 neuroblastoma cells, while in vitro pull-down assays show direct association. As a functional consequence of the Brn-3a-AR interaction, the factors bind cooperatively to multiple elements within the promoter of the voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.7, leading to a synergistic increase in its expression. Thus, these data define AR as a direct Brn-3a interactor and verify a simple interacting protein prediction methodology that is likely to be useful for many other proteins. PMID:20228055

  4. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  5. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  6. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression. PMID:25639875

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor -2 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Colbert, Laronna S.; Fuller, Miles; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations over the last decade have established the essential role of growth factors and their receptors during angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) family in mammals contains three members, VEGFR-1 (Flt-1), VEGFR-2 (KDR/Flk-1) and VEGFR-3 (Flt-4), which are transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors that regulate the formation of blood and lymphatic vessels. In the early 1990s, the above VEGFR were structurally characterized by cDNA cloning. Among these three receptors, VEGFR-2 is generally recognized to have a principal role in mediating VEGF-induced responses. VEGFR-2 is considered as the earliest marker for endothelial cell development. Importantly, VEGFR-2 directly regulates tumor angiogenesis. Therefore, several inhibitors of VEGFR-2 have been developed and many of them are now in clinical trials. In addition to targeting endothelial cells, the VEGF/VEGFR-2 system works as an essential autocrine/paracrine process for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies mark the continuous and increased interest in this related, but distinct, function of VEGF/VEGFR-2 in cancer cells: the autocrine/paracrine loop. Several mechanisms regulate VEGFR-2 levels and modulate its role in tumor angiogenesis and physiologic functions, i.e.: cellular localization/trafficking, regulation of cis-elements of promoter, epigenetic regulation and signaling from Notch, cytokines/growth factors and estrogen, etc. In this review, we will focus on updated information regarding VEGFR-2 research with respect to the molecular mechanisms of VEGFR-2 regulation in human breast cancer. Investigations in the activation, function, and regulation of VEGFR-2 in breast cancer will allow the development of new pharmacological strategies aimed at directly targeting cancer cell proliferation and survival. PMID:20462514

  8. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  9. Recombinant human betacellulin. Molecular structure, biological activities, and receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Shintani, A; Nakata, M; Shing, Y; Folkman, J; Igarashi, K; Sasada, R

    1994-04-01

    Soluble forms of human betacellulin (BTC) were purified to homogeneity from the conditioned medium of mouse A9 cells transfected with the BTC precursor cDNA. Three types of soluble BTC, designated BTC-1a, BTC-1b and BTC-2, were resolved by cation-exchange and size-exclusion column chromatography. Physicochemical analysis has revealed that BTC-1a represents the glycosylated, intact molecule composed of 80 amino acid residues (Asp32 to Tyr111 of the precursor molecule). BTC-1b appears to be a truncated molecule lacking 12 amino acid residues from the amino terminus of BTC-1a. BTC-2 was found to be a 50-amino acid molecule (Arg62 to Tyr111) that corresponds to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) structural unit. The biological activities of these BTC molecules were essentially identical as judged by their mitogenicity on Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts. BTC and EGF were equipotent in stimulating Balb/c 3T3 cell proliferation and rat mesangial cell Ca2+ mobilization as well as in inhibiting the growth of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. BTC and EGF antagonized each other with similar dose dependence for binding to A431 cells, indicating that these factors bind the same receptor molecules with equivalent avidity. The Kd value of EGF receptor (EGFR) and BTC is 0.5 nM as determined on Balb/c 3T3 cells. In addition, human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-453 cells, which express multiple members of the EGFR family, were found to possess 2.7 x 10(3) BTC binding sites/cell, and the binding was readily quenched by EGF. These results suggest that the primary receptor for BTC is EGFR. PMID:8144591

  10. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8105469

  11. Synthesis and Evaluation of Candidate PET Radioligands for Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type-1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, Nicholas J.; Li, Yu-Wen; Chin, Frederick T.; Dischino, Douglas D.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Deskus, Jeffrey A.; Mattson, Ronald J.; Imaizumo, Masao; Pieschl, Rick; Molski, Thaddeus F.; Fujita, Masahiro; Dulac, Heidi; Zaczek, Robert; Bronson, Joanne J.; Macor, John E.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A radioligand for measuring the density of corticotrophin-releasing factor subtype-1 receptors (CRF1 receptors) in living animal and human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) would be a useful tool for neuropsychiatric investigations and the development of drugs intended to interact with this target. This study was aimed at discovery of such a radioligand from a group of CRF1 receptor ligands based on a core 3-(phenylamino)pyrazin-2(1H)-one scaffold. Methods CRF1 receptor ligands were selected for development as possible PET radioligands based on their binding potency at CRF receptors (displacement of [125I]CRF from rat cortical membranes), measured lipophilicity, autoradiographic binding profile in rat and rhesus monkey brain sections, rat biodistribution, and suitability for radiolabeling with carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Two identified candidates (BMS-721313 and BMS-732098) were labeled with fluorine-18. A third candidate (BMS-709460) was labeled with carbon-11 and all three radioligands were evaluated in PET experiments in rhesus monkey. CRF1 receptor density (Bmax) was assessed in rhesus brain cortical and cerebellum membranes with the CRF receptor ligand, [3H]BMS-728300. Results The three ligands selected for development showed high binding affinity (IC50 values, 0.3–8 nM) at CRF1 receptors and moderate lipophilicity (LogD, 2.8–4.4). [3H]BMS-728300 and the two 18F-labeled ligands showed region-specific binding in rat and rhesus monkey brain autoradiography, namely higher binding density in the frontal and limbic cortex, and cerebellum than in thalamus and brainstem. CRF1 receptor Bmax in rhesus brain was found to be 50–120 fmol/mg protein across cortical regions and cerebellum. PET experiments in rhesus monkey showed that the radioligands [18F]BMS-721313, [18F]BMS-732098 and [11C]BMS-709460 gave acceptably high brain radioactivity uptake but no indication of the specific binding as seen in vitro. Conclusions Candidate CRF1 receptor

  12. Upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor 4 in oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Kenichi; Gotoh, Akito; Eguchi, Takanori; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the expression profile of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, which comprises EGFR/ErbB1, HER2/ErbB2, HER3/ErbB3 and HER4/ErbB4 in oral leukoplakia (LP). The expression of four epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family genes and their ligands were measured in LP tissues from 14 patients and compared with levels in 10 patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and normal oral mucosa (NOM) from 14 healthy donors by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Synchronous mRNA coexpression of ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 was detected in LP lesions. Out of the receptors, only ErbB4 mRNA and protein was more highly expressed in LP compared with NOM tissues. These were strongly expressed by epithelial keratinocytes in LP lesions, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Regarding the ligands, the mRNA of Neuregulin2 and 4 were more highly expressed in OLP compared with NOM tissues. Therefore, enhanced ErbB4 on the keratinocytes and synchronous modulation of EGFR family genes may contribute to the pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of LP. PMID:23492901

  13. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352

  14. Alkylating derivative of oxotremorine interacts irreversibly with the muscarinic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.; Jenden, D.J.; Ringdahl, B.

    1984-03-05

    A 2-chloroethylamine derivative of oxotremorine was studied in pharmacological experiments and muscarinic receptor binding assays. The compound, N-(4-(2-chloroethylmethylamino)-2-butynyl)-2-pyrrolidone (BM 123), forms an aziridinium ion in aqueous solution at neutral pH that stimulates contractions of guinea pig ileum with a potency similar to that of oxotremorine. Following the initial stimulation, there is a long lasting period of lack of sensitivity of the guinea pig ileum to muscarinic agonists. BM 123 also produces muscarinic effects in vivo. When homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex were incubated with BM 123 and assayed subsequently in muscarinic receptor binding assays, a loss of binding capacity for the muscarinic antagonist, (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine ((/sup 3/H)NMS), was noted without a change in affinity. Similar observations were made in (/sup 3/H)1-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)-QNB) binding assays on the forebrains of mice that had been injected with BM 123 24 hr earlier. The loss in receptor capacity for both (/sup 3/H)NMS and (/sup 3/H)-QNB was prevented by atropine treatment. Kinetic studies of the interaction of BM 123 with homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex in vitro showed that the half-time for the loss of (/sup 3/H)-QNB binding sites increased from 10 to 45 min as the concentration of BM 123 decreased from 10 to 1 ..mu..M. In contrast to the aziridinium ion, the parent 2-chloroethylamine compound and the alcoholic hydrolysis product were largely devoid of pharmacological and binding activity.

  15. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, David E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  16. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, David E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  17. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  18. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  19. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein Crip1a modulates CB1 receptor signaling in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Guggenhuber, Stephan; Alpar, Alan; Chen, Rongqing; Schmitz, Nina; Wickert, Melanie; Mattheus, Tobias; Harasta, Anne E; Purrio, Martin; Kaiser, Nadine; Elphick, Maurice R; Monory, Krisztina; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Harkany, Tibor; Lutz, Beat; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 receptor (Cnr1, CB1R) mediates a plethora of physiological functions in the central nervous system as a presynaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release. The recently identified cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a (Cnrip1a, CRIP1a) binds to the C-terminal domain of CB1R, a region known to be important for receptor desensitization and internalization. Evidence that CRIP1a and CB1R interact in vivo has been reported, but the neuroanatomical distribution of CRIP1a is unknown. Moreover, while alterations of hippocampal CRIP1a levels following limbic seizures indicate a role in controlling excessive neuronal activity, the physiological function of CRIP1a in vivo has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the spatial distribution of CRIP1a in the hippocampus and examined CRIP1a as a potential modulator of CB1R signaling. We found that Cnrip1a mRNA is co-expressed with Cnr1 mRNA in pyramidal neurons and interneurons of the hippocampal formation. CRIP1a protein profiles were largely segregated from CB1R profiles in mossy cell terminals but not in hippocampal CA1 region. CB1R activation induced relocalization to close proximity with CRIP1a. Adeno-associated virus-mediated overexpression of CRIP1a specifically in the hippocampus revealed that CRIP1a modulates CB1R activity by enhancing cannabinoid-induced G protein activation. CRIP1a overexpression extended the depression of excitatory currents by cannabinoids in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and diminished the severity of chemically induced acute epileptiform seizures. Collectively, our data indicate that CRIP1a enhances hippocampal CB1R signaling in vivo. PMID:25772509

  20. 5-HT(1A) receptors transactivate the platelet-derived growth factor receptor type beta in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of ligand, certain growth factor receptors can be activated via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation in a process termed transactivation. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can transactivate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors in smooth muscle cells, but it is not known if similar pathways occur in neuronal cells. Here we show that 5-HT can transiently increase the phosphorylation of PDGFβ receptors through 5-HT(1A) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. 5-HT also transactivates PDGFβ receptors in primary cortical neurons. This transactivation pathway is pertussis-toxin sensitive and Src tyrosine kinase-dependent. This pathway is also dependent on phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium signaling. Several studies involving PDGFβ receptor transactivation by GPCRs have also demonstrated a PDGFβ receptor-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Yet in SH-SY5Y cells, 5-HT treatment causes a PDGFβ receptor-independent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This crosstalk between 5-HT and PDGFβ receptors identifies a potentially important signaling link between the serotonergic system and growth factor signaling in neurons. PMID:23006663

  1. Identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3) as a Protein Receptor for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A (BoNT/A)

    PubMed Central

    Jacky, Birgitte P. S.; Garay, Patton E.; Dupuy, Jérôme; Nelson, Jeremy B.; Cai, Brian; Molina, Yanira; Wang, Joanne; Steward, Lance E.; Broide, Ron S.; Francis, Joseph; Aoki, K. Roger; Stevens, Raymond C.; Fernández-Salas, Ester

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) causes transient muscle paralysis by entering motor nerve terminals (MNTs) where it cleaves the SNARE protein Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25206) to yield SNAP25197. Cleavage of SNAP25 results in blockage of synaptic vesicle fusion and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine. The specific uptake of BoNT/A into pre-synaptic nerve terminals is a tightly controlled multistep process, involving a combination of high and low affinity receptors. Interestingly, the C-terminal binding domain region of BoNT/A, HC/A, is homologous to fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), making it a possible ligand for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs). Here we present data supporting the identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3) as a high affinity receptor for BoNT/A in neuronal cells. HC/A binds with high affinity to the two extra-cellular loops of FGFR3 and acts similar to an agonist ligand for FGFR3, resulting in phosphorylation of the receptor. Native ligands for FGFR3; FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 compete for binding to FGFR3 and block BoNT/A cellular uptake. These findings show that FGFR3 plays a pivotal role in the specific uptake of BoNT/A across the cell membrane being part of a larger receptor complex involving ganglioside- and protein-protein interactions. PMID:23696738

  2. Structural activation pathways from dynamic olfactory receptor-odorant interactions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peter C; Singer, Michael S; Crasto, Chiquito J

    2005-11-01

    We have simulated an odor ligand's dynamic behavior in the binding region of an olfactory receptor (OR). Our short timescale computational studies (up to 200 ps) have helped identify unprecedented postdocking ligand behavior of ligands. From in vacuo molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between models of rat OR I7 and 10 aldehyde ligands, we have identified a dissociative pathway along which the ligand exits and enters the OR-binding pocket--a transit event. The ligand's transit through the receptor's binding region may mark the beginning of a signal transduction cascade leading to odor recognition. We have graphically traced the rotameric changes in key OR amino acid side chains during the transit. Our results have helped substantiate or refute previously held notions of amino acid contribution to ligand stability in the binding pocket. Our observations of ligand activity when compared to those of experimental (electroolfactogram response) OR-activation studies provide a view to predicting the stability of ligands in the binding pocket as a precursor to OR activation by the ligand. PMID:16243965

  3. Interactions between methylsulfonyl PCBs and the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, M; Nilsson, S; Lund, B O

    1998-01-01

    Persistent polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) metabolites were studied with respect to their interaction with the human glucocorticoid receptor (GR). 3-Methylsulphonyl-2,5,6,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (3-MeSO2-CB149) was shown to compete with 3H-dexamethasone for binding to the GR, with an IC50 (concentration that inhibits 50%) of approximately 1 microM. Using GRAF cells expressing human GR, glucocorticoid responsive element, and a reporter enzyme, we demonstrated that 3-MeSO2-CB149 functionally acts as an antagonist at the GR (IC50 = 2.7 microM). In accordance with the receptor binding, the antagonism mainly appeared to be of a competitive nature. When studying the competitive binding of 24 methylsulfonyl PCBs (relative to dexamethasone) to GR from mouse liver cytosol, seven compounds had a higher affinity to GR than 3-MeSO2-CB149. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the presence of three chlorine atoms in the ortho-position and chlorine and methyl sulfone groups on either end of the molecule (4 and 4'-position) increased the affinity to GR. The relevance of this finding for human health is not known, but PCB methyl sulfones are ubiquitous pollutants present in mother's milk. The results stress the need for studying endocrine disruptors that affect hormonal systems other than sex and thyroidogenic hormones. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9831536

  4. 16α-hydroxyprogesterone: origin, biosynthesis and receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Karl-Heinz; Swart, Pieter; Africander, Donita; Conradie, Riaan; Louw, Renate; Swart, Amanda C

    2011-04-10

    The metabolism of progesterone (PROG) by cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) results in the formation of both 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHPROG) and 16α-hydroxyprogesterone (16-OHPROG) in humans. Unlike 17-OHPROG, 16-OHPROG is not metabolised further in steroidogenic tissue. While this metabolite can be readily detected in serum and urine, its physiological role remains unclear. This paper reviews the production of 16-OHPROG by human CYP17A1 by providing insight into the catalysis of PROG by CYP17A1 and highlights the role of Ala105 in the 16α-hydroxylation reaction. As 16-OHPROG has been putatively linked to reproductive function, we investigated the interaction of this steroid metabolite with both isoforms of the human progesterone receptor (hPR). We show for the first time that 16-OHPROG can bind to both hPR-A and hPR-B and act as an agonist for both receptors. PMID:21095220

  5. Invited review: Growth-promoting effects of colostrum in calves based on interaction with intestinal cell surface receptors and receptor-like transporters.

    PubMed

    Ontsouka, Edgar C; Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2016-06-01

    The postnatal development and maturation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of neonatal calves is crucial for their survival. Major morphological and functional changes in the calf's GI tract initiated by colostrum bioactive substances promote the establishment of intestinal digestion and absorption of food. It is generally accepted that colostrum intake provokes the maturation of organs and systems in young calves, illustrating the significance of the cow-to-calf connection at birth. These postnatal adaptive changes of the GI tissues in neonatal calves are especially induced by the action of bioactive substances such as insulin-like growth factors, hormones, or cholesterol carriers abundantly present in colostrum. These substances interact with specific cell-surface receptors or receptor-like transporters expressed in the GI wall of neonatal calves to elicit their biological effects. Therefore, the abundance and activity of cell surface receptors and receptor-like transporters binding colostral bioactive substances are a key aspect determining the effects of the cow-to-calf connection at birth. The present review compiles the information describing the effects of colostrum feeding on selected serum metabolic and endocrine traits in neonatal calves. In this context, the current paper discusses specifically the consequences of colostrum feeding on the GI expression and activity of cell-receptors and receptor-like transporters binding growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors, insulin, or cholesterol acceptors in neonatal calves. PMID:26874414

  6. A novel calmodulin-β-PIX interaction and its implication in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Munro, Kim; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, regulates numerous cellular processes, primarily in response to calcium flux. We have identified and characterized a novel interaction between CaM and β-p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor (β-PIX), a putative guanine exchange factor implicated in cell signaling, using affinity pull-down assays, co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization and circular dichroism studies. Fluorescence-based titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent binding mechanism (K(D)≤10μM). Further, we show that CaM participates in a multi-protein complex involving β-PIX and E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl (casitas B-cell lymphoma), which may play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation and downstream signaling. PMID:22588125

  7. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  8. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  9. Progesterone in pregnancy; receptor-ligand interaction and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Szekeres-Bartho, Julia; Halasz, Melinda; Palkovics, Tamas

    2009-12-01

    Progesterone is indispensable in creating a suitable endometrial environment for implantation, and also for the maintenance of pregnancy. Successful pregnancy depends on an appropriate maternal immune response to the fetus. Along with its endocrine effects, progesterone also acts as an "immunosteroid", by contributing to the establishment of a pregnancy protective immune milieu. Progesterone plays a role in uterine homing of NK cells and upregulates HLA-G gene expression, the ligand for NK inhibitory and activating receptors. At high concentrations, progesterone is a potent inducer of Th2-type cytokines as well as of LIF and M-CSF production by T cells. A protein called progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF), by inducing a Th2-dominant cytokine production mediates the immunological effects of progesterone. PIBF binds to a novel type of the IL-4 receptor and signals via the Jak/STAT pathway, to induce a number of genes, that not only affect the immune response, but might also play a role in trophoblast invasiveness. PMID:19880194

  10. Non-canonical signaling mode of the epidermal growth factor receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heng-Huan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its family members are key players in both physiological and pathological settings for which they are well recognized as models for investigating the functions and regulations of other membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and serve as therapeutic targets critical to clinical need and fundamental research. The canonical view of the pivotal functions in the EGFR family has been well documented as being an initiator of signaling amplification cascades from the plasma membrane to different subcellular compartments via receptor endocytic trafficking, intermolecular interaction, and kinase-substrate reaction in a temporalspatial manner. However, several lines of evidence have identified non-canonical roles of the EGFR family, acting as a transcriptional factor and a chromatin regulator in the nucleus to regulate gene expression, DNA replication, and DNA damage repair. Moreover, the EGFR family can even exert its impact outside the host cell through exosomal vesicle secretion. The emerging concept of the non-canonical roles of the EGFR family reveals an astonishing and elaborate scheme on the molecular functions of membrane RTKs, offering new insights into the receptor biology as well as the development of comprehensive therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26693051

  11. Ginseng pharmacology: a new paradigm based on gintonin-lysophosphatidic acid receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Hye; Jung, Seok-Won; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng, is used as a traditional medicine. Despite the long history of the use of ginseng, there is no specific scientific or clinical rationale for ginseng pharmacology besides its application as a general tonic. The ambiguous description of ginseng pharmacology might be due to the absence of a predominant active ingredient that represents ginseng pharmacology. Recent studies show that ginseng abundantly contains lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs), which are phospholipid-derived growth factor with diverse biological functions including those claimed to be exhibited by ginseng. LPAs in ginseng form a complex with ginseng proteins, which can bind and deliver LPA to its cognate receptors with a high affinity. As a first messenger, gintonin produces second messenger Ca2+ via G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Ca2+ is an intracellular mediator of gintonin and initiates a cascade of amplifications for further intercellular communications by activation of Ca2+-dependent kinases, receptors, gliotransmitter, and neurotransmitter release. Ginsenosides, which have been regarded as primary ingredients of ginseng, cannot elicit intracellular [Ca2+]i transients, since they lack specific cell surface receptor. However, ginsenosides exhibit non-specific ion channel and receptor regulations. This is the key characteristic that distinguishes gintonin from ginsenosides. Although the current discourse on ginseng pharmacology is focused on ginsenosides, gintonin can definitely provide a mode of action for ginseng pharmacology that ginsenosides cannot. This review article introduces a novel concept of ginseng ligand-LPA receptor interaction and proposes to establish a paradigm that shifts the focus from ginsenosides to gintonin as a major ingredient representing ginseng pharmacology. PMID:26578955

  12. α(2A) adrenergic receptor promotes amyloidogenesis through disrupting APP-SorLA interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjia; Peng, Yin; Che, Pulin; Gannon, Mary; Liu, Yin; Li, Ling; Bu, Guojun; van Groen, Thomas; Jiao, Kai; Wang, Qin

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides in the brain is the key pathogenic factor driving Alzheimer's disease (AD). Endocytic sorting of amyloid precursor protein (APP) mediated by the vacuolar protein sorting (Vps10) family of receptors plays a decisive role in controlling the outcome of APP proteolytic processing and Aβ generation. Here we report for the first time to our knowledge that this process is regulated by a G protein-coupled receptor, the α(2A) adrenergic receptor (α(2A)AR). Genetic deficiency of the α(2A)AR significantly reduces, whereas stimulation of this receptor enhances, Aβ generation and AD-related pathology. Activation of α(2A)AR signaling disrupts APP interaction with a Vps10 family receptor, sorting-related receptor with A repeat (SorLA), in cells and in the mouse brain. As a consequence, activation of α(2A)AR reduces Golgi localization of APP and concurrently promotes APP distribution in endosomes and cleavage by β secretase. The α(2A)AR is a key component of the brain noradrenergic system. Profound noradrenergic dysfunction occurs consistently in patients at the early stages of AD. α(2A)AR-promoted Aβ generation provides a novel mechanism underlying the connection between noradrenergic dysfunction and AD. Our study also suggests α(2A)AR as a previously unappreciated therapeutic target for AD. Significantly, pharmacological blockade of the α(2A)AR by a clinically used antagonist reduces AD-related pathology and ameliorates cognitive deficits in an AD transgenic model, suggesting that repurposing clinical α(2A)R antagonists would be an effective therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:25404298

  13. α2A adrenergic receptor promotes amyloidogenesis through disrupting APP-SorLA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunjia; Peng, Yin; Che, Pulin; Gannon, Mary; Liu, Yin; Li, Ling; Bu, Guojun; van Groen, Thomas; Jiao, Kai; Wang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides in the brain is the key pathogenic factor driving Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Endocytic sorting of amyloid precursor protein (APP) mediated by the vacuolar protein sorting (Vps10) family of receptors plays a decisive role in controlling the outcome of APP proteolytic processing and Aβ generation. Here we report for the first time to our knowledge that this process is regulated by a G protein-coupled receptor, the α2A adrenergic receptor (α2AAR). Genetic deficiency of the α2AAR significantly reduces, whereas stimulation of this receptor enhances, Aβ generation and AD-related pathology. Activation of α2AAR signaling disrupts APP interaction with a Vps10 family receptor, sorting-related receptor with A repeat (SorLA), in cells and in the mouse brain. As a consequence, activation of α2AAR reduces Golgi localization of APP and concurrently promotes APP distribution in endosomes and cleavage by β secretase. The α2AAR is a key component of the brain noradrenergic system. Profound noradrenergic dysfunction occurs consistently in patients at the early stages of AD. α2AAR-promoted Aβ generation provides a novel mechanism underlying the connection between noradrenergic dysfunction and AD. Our study also suggests α2AAR as a previously unappreciated therapeutic target for AD. Significantly, pharmacological blockade of the α2AAR by a clinically used antagonist reduces AD-related pathology and ameliorates cognitive deficits in an AD transgenic model, suggesting that repurposing clinical α2AR antagonists would be an effective therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:25404298

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in lung cancer: status 2012.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Fred R; Jänne, Pasi A; Eberhardt, Wilfried E; Cappuzzo, Federico; Thatcher, Nick; Pirker, Robert; Choy, Hak; Kim, Edward S; Paz-Ares, Luis; Gandara, David R; Wu, Yi-Long; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Shepherd, Frances A; Mok, Tony S

    2013-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths. Most patients present with advanced-stage disease, and the prognosis is generally poor. However, with the understanding of lung cancer biology, and development of molecular targeted agents, there have been improvements in treatment outcomes for selected subsets of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have demonstrated significantly improved tumor responses and progression-free survival in subsets of patients with advanced NSCLC, particularly those with tumors harboring activating EGFR mutations. Testing for EGFR mutations is a standard procedure for identification of patients who will benefit from first-line EGFR TKIs. For patients with advanced NSCLC and no activating EGFR mutations (EGFR wild-type) or no other driving oncogenes such as ALK-gene rearrangement, chemotherapy is still the standard of care. A new generation of EGFR TKIs, targeting multiple receptors and with irreversible bindings to the receptors, are in clinical trials and have shown encouraging effects. Research on primary and acquired resistant mechanisms to EGFR TKIs are ongoing. Monoclonal antibodies (e.g. cetuximab), in combination with chemotherapy, have demonstrated improved outcomes, particularly for subsets of NSCLC patients, but further validations are needed. Novel monoclonal antibodies are combined with chemotherapy, and randomized comparative studies are ongoing. This review summarizes the current status of EGFR inhibitors in NSCLC in 2012 and some of the major challenges we are facing. PMID:23370315

  15. The signaling phospholipid PIP3 creates a new interaction surface on the nuclear receptor SF-1.

    PubMed

    Blind, Raymond D; Sablin, Elena P; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M; Das, Debanu; Fletterick, Robert J; Ingraham, Holly A

    2014-10-21

    The signaling phosphatidylinositol lipids PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind nuclear receptor 5A family (NR5As), but their regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. Here, the crystal structures of human NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor-1, SF-1) ligand binding domain (LBD) bound to PIP2 and PIP3 show the lipid hydrophobic tails sequestered in the hormone pocket, as predicted. However, unlike classic nuclear receptor hormones, the phosphoinositide head groups are fully solvent-exposed and complete the LBD fold by organizing the receptor architecture at the hormone pocket entrance. The highest affinity phosphoinositide ligand PIP3 stabilizes the coactivator binding groove and increases coactivator peptide recruitment. This receptor-ligand topology defines a previously unidentified regulatory protein-lipid surface on SF-1 with the phosphoinositide head group at its nexus and poised to interact with other proteins. This surface on SF-1 coincides with the predicted binding site of the corepressor DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region on chromosome X), and importantly harbors missense mutations associated with human endocrine disorders. Our data provide the structural basis for this poorly understood cluster of human SF-1 mutations and demonstrates how signaling phosphoinositides function as regulatory ligands for NR5As. PMID:25288771

  16. Antipsychotic-induced alterations in D2 dopamine receptor interacting proteins within the cortex.

    PubMed

    Kabbani, Nadine; Levenson, Robert

    2006-02-27

    Current antipsychotic treatment involves the regulation of D2 dopamine receptor activity in the brain. Here, we examined the effects of chronic haloperidol and clozapine on cortical D2 dopamine receptors and six different dopamine receptor interacting proteins. Using comparative immunoblot analysis, we found that treatment with either haloperidol or clozapine increased D2 dopamine receptors, calcium activator protein for secretion, protein 4.1N, and neuronal calcium sensor-1 expression. Treatment with clozapine increased calmodulin and spinophilin expression, while treatment with haloperidol decreased expression of these two dopamine receptor interacting proteins. Neither antipsychotic drug was found to have an effect on filamin-A expression. These findings underscore a role for cortical D2 dopamine receptor in the mechanism of antipsychotic drug action, and suggest dopamine receptor interacting proteins as novel targets in antipsychotic drug development. PMID:16462601

  17. Activating and deactivating mutations in the receptor interaction site of GDF5 cause symphalangism or brachydactyly type A2.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Petra; Schwappacher, Raphaela; Kjaer, Klaus W; Krakow, Deborah; Lehmann, Katarina; Dawson, Katherine; Stricker, Sigmar; Pohl, Jens; Plöger, Frank; Staub, Eike; Nickel, Joachim; Sebald, Walter; Knaus, Petra; Mundlos, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    Here we describe 2 mutations in growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) that alter receptor-binding affinities. They cause brachydactyly type A2 (L441P) and symphalangism (R438L), conditions previously associated with mutations in the GDF5 receptor bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1b (BMPR1B) and the BMP antagonist NOGGIN, respectively. We expressed the mutant proteins in limb bud micromass culture and treated ATDC5 and C2C12 cells with recombinant GDF5. Our results indicated that the L441P mutant is almost inactive. The R438L mutant, in contrast, showed increased biological activity when compared with WT GDF5. Biosensor interaction analyses revealed loss of binding to BMPR1A and BMPR1B ectodomains for the L441P mutant, whereas the R438L mutant showed normal binding to BMPR1B but increased binding to BMPR1A, the receptor normally activated by BMP2. The binding to NOGGIN was normal for both mutants. Thus, the brachydactyly type A2 phenotype (L441P) is caused by inhibition of the ligand-receptor interaction, whereas the symphalangism phenotype (R438L) is caused by a loss of receptor-binding specificity, resulting in a gain of function by the acquisition of BMP2-like properties. The presented experiments have identified some of the main determinants of GDF5 receptor-binding specificity in vivo and open new prospects for generating antagonists and superagonists of GDF5. PMID:16127465

  18. Coregulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) Levels and Locations: Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Overexpression Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-03-01

    Elevated expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is know to alter cell signalilng and behavioral responses implicated in tumor progression. However, multiple diverse mechanisms may be involved in these overall effects, including signaling by HER2 itself, modulation of signalilng by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and modification of trafficking dynamics for both EGFR and HER2. Continued....

  19. Structural and Functional Properties of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lennartsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) are members of the type III class of PTK receptors, which are characterized by five Ig-like domains extracellularly and a split kinase domain intracellularly. The receptors are activated by ligand-induced dimerization, leading to autophosphorylation on specific tyrosine residues. Thereby the kinase activities of the receptors are activated and docking sites for downstream SH2 domain signal transduction molecules are created; activation of these pathways promotes cell growth, survival, and migration. These receptors mediate important signals during the embryonal development, and control tissue homeostasis in the adult. Their overactivity is seen in malignancies and other diseases involving excessive cell proliferation, such as atherosclerosis and fibrotic diseases. In cancer, mutations of PDGF and SCF receptors—including gene fusions, point mutations, and amplifications—drive subpopulations of certain malignancies, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, hypereosinophilic syndrome, glioblastoma, acute myeloid leukemia, mastocytosis, and melanoma. PMID:23906712

  20. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jeney, Sylvia; Mor, Flavio; Koszali, Roland; Forró, László; Moy, Vincent T.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligand —receptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond with the lifetime increasing 10 fold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements as polystyrene tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from the beads. PMID:20516583

  1. Murine retroviruses activate B cells via interaction with toll-like receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Rassa, John C.; Meyers, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yuanming; Kudaravalli, Rama; Ross, Susan R.

    2002-01-01

    Although most retroviruses require activated cells as their targets for infection, it is not known how this is achieved in vivo. A candidate protein for the activation of B cells by either mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) or murine leukemia virus is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a component of the innate immune system. MMTV caused B cell activation in C3H/HeN mice but not in C3H/HeJ or BALB/c (C.C3H Tlr4lps-d) congenic mice, both of which have a mutant TLR4 gene. This activation was independent of viral gene expression, because it occurred after treatment of MMTV with ultraviolet light or 2,2′-dithiodipyridine and in azidothymidine-treated mice. Nuclear extracts prepared from the lymphocytes of MMTV-injected C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice showed increased nuclear factor κB activity. Additionally, the MMTV- and Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope proteins coimmunoprecipitated with TLR4 when expressed in 293T cells. The MMTV receptor failed to coimmunoprecipitate with TLR4, suggesting that MMTV/TLR4 interaction is independent of virus attachment and fusion. These results identify retroviral proteins that interact with a mammalian toll receptor and show that direct activation by such viruses may initiate in vivo infection pathways. PMID:11854525

  2. The basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain of CIN85 regulate its interaction with c-Cbl and phosphatidic acid during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During EGFR internalization CIN85 bridges EGFR-Cbl complex, endocytic machinery and fusible membrane through the interactions of CIN85 with c-Cbl, endophilins and phosphatidic acid. These protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions are mediated or regulated by the positively charged C-terminal coiled-coil domain of CIN85. However, the details of CIN85-lipid interaction remain unknown. The present study suggested a possible electric interaction between the negative charge of phosphatidic acid and the positive charge of basic amino acids in coiled-coil domain. Results Mutations of the basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain, especially K645, K646, R648 and R650, into neutral amino acid alanine completely blocked the interaction of CIN85 with c-Cbl or phosphatidic acid. However, they did not affect CIN85-endophilin interaction. In addition, CIN85 was found to associate with the internalized EGFR endosomes. It interacted with several ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) component proteins for ESCRT assembly on endosomal membrane. Mutations in the coiled-coil domain (deletion of the coiled-coil domain or point mutations of the basic amino acids) dissociated CIN85 from endosomes. These mutants bound the ESCRT components in cytoplasm to prevent them from assembly on endosomal membrane and inhibited EGFR sorting for degradation. Conclusions As an adaptor protein, CIN85 interacts with variety of partners through several domains. The positive charges of basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain are not only involved in the interaction with phosphatidic acid, but also regulate the interaction of CIN85 with c-Cbl. CIN85 also interacts with ESCRT components for protein sorting in endosomes. These CIN85-protein and CIN85-lipid interactions enable CIN85 to link EGFR-Cbl endocytic complex with fusible membrane during EGFR endocytosis and subsequently to facilitate ESCRT formation on endosomal membrane for EGFR sorting and degradation. PMID

  3. Pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors as emerging players in cancer precision medicine.

    PubMed

    De Mattia, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Roncato, Rossana; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Great research effort has been focused on elucidating the contribution of host genetic variability on pharmacological outcomes in cancer. Nuclear receptors have emerged as mediators between environmental stimuli and drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors have been reported to regulate transcription of genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Altered nuclear receptor expression has been shown to affect the metabolism and pharmacological profile of traditional chemotherapeutics and targeted agents. Accordingly, polymorphic variants in these genes have been studied as pharmacogenetic markers of outcome variability. This review summarizes the state of knowledge about the roles played by pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor expression and genetics as predictive markers of anticancer drug toxicity and efficacy, which can improve cancer precision medicine. PMID:27561454

  4. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    the systems examine here, these effects are independent of both absolute expression level and any system-related alterations in the agonist binding site. We conclude that complex interactions between receptor composition and extrinsic factors may play a significant role in determining strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor partial agonist pharmacology. PMID:15301692

  5. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj; Wang, Hong; Klein, Anders B; Thiriet, Nathalie; Pinborg, Lars H; Muldoon, Pretal P; Wienecke, Jacob; Imad Damaj, M; Kohlmeier, Kristi A; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Thomsen, Morten S

    2016-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with nAChRs in human brain extracts, identifying Lypd6 as a novel regulator of nAChR function. Using protein cross-linking and affinity purification from human temporal cortical extracts, we demonstrate that Lypd6 is a synaptically enriched membrane-bound protein that binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the human brain. Additionally, soluble recombinant Lypd6 protein attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents in rat brain slices and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells, suggesting that binding of Lypd6 is sufficient to inhibit nAChR-mediated intracellular signaling. We further show that perinatal nicotine exposure in rats (4 mg/kg/day through minipumps to dams from embryonic day 7 to post-natal day 21) significantly increases Lypd6 protein levels in the hippocampus in adulthood, which did not occur after exposure to nicotine in adulthood only. Our findings suggest that Lypd6 is a versatile inhibitor of cholinergic signaling in the brain, and that Lypd6 is dysregulated by nicotine exposure during early development. Regulatory proteins of the Lynx family modulate the function of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). We report for the first time that the Lynx protein Lypd6 binds to nAChRs in human brain extracts, and that recombinant Lypd6 decreases nicotine-induced ERK phosphorylation and attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents. Our findings suggest that Lypd6 is a versatile inhibitor of cholinergic signaling in the brain. PMID:27344019

  6. Identification of subunits of acetylcholine receptor that interact with a cholesterol photoaffinity probe

    SciTech Connect

    Middlemas, D.S.; Raftery, M.A.

    1987-03-10

    All four subunits of the acetylcholine receptor in membrane vesicles isolated from Torpedo californica have been labeled with (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl diazoacetate. As this probe incorporates into lipid bilayers analogously to cholesterol, this result indicates that acetylcholine receptor interacts with cholesterol. This investigation also demonstrates that this probe is a useful reagent for studying the interaction of cholesterol with membrane proteins.

  7. Molecular interaction studies of hemostasis: fibrinogen ligand-human platelet receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Imshik; Marchant, Roger E

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between fibrinogen ligands and platelet receptor alpha(IIb)beta(3) were studied under physiological conditions by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two linear peptide sequences in fibrinogen, RGD and HHLGGAKQAGDV, play central roles in the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis by facilitating adhesion and aggregation of platelets. In order to measure the interactions (i.e., debonding force), oligopeptides, GSSSGaaa, where aaa is -RGDSPA or -HHLGGAKQAGDV, were synthesized and grafted on to the surface of AFM probe tips. The interaction forces between a peptide-modified AFM probe tip and platelet surface were determined from pN to nN levels using AFM force measurements. Our results show that the zero kinetic off-rate, K(off)(0), for RGDSPA is significantly smaller than that for HHLGGAKQAGDV, under the consideration of flexible receptor surfaces. From our analysis, the K(off)(0), the single molecular binding energy E(b), and the transition state x(b), were extracted from the data, and estimated to be 1.53s(-1), -2.64x10(-20)J and 1.03A for the RGD-alpha(IIb)beta(3) system, and 47.58s(-1), 2.67x10(-20), 1.09A for the HHLGGAKQAGDV-alpha(IIb)beta(3) system, respectively. PMID:12801687

  8. Calcium-Sensing Receptor: Trafficking, Endocytosis, Recycling, and Importance of Interacting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kausik

    2015-01-01

    The cloning of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) provided a new paradigm in G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in which principal physiological ligand is a cation, namely, extracellular calcium (Ca(o)(2+)). A wealth of information has accumulated in the past two decades about the CaSR's structure and function, its contribution to pathology in disorders of calcium in humans, and CaSR-based therapeutics. The CaSR unlike many other GPCRs must function in the presence of its ligand, thus understanding the mechanisms such as anterograde trafficking and endocytic pathways of this receptor are complex and fallen behind other classical GPCRs. Factors controlling CaSR signaling include various proteins affecting the expression of the CaSR as well as modulation of its trafficking to and from the cell surface. The dimeric cell-surface CaSR links to various heterotrimeric G-proteins (G(q/11), G(i/o), G(12/13), and G(s)) to regulate intracellular second messengers, lipid kinases, various protein kinases, and transcription factors that are part of the machinery enabling the receptor to modulate the functions of the wide variety of cells in which it is expressed. This chapter describes key features of CaSR structure and function and discusses novel mechanisms by which the level of cell-surface receptor expression can be regulated including forward trafficking during biosynthesis, desensitization, internalization and recycling from the cell surface, and degradation. These processes are impacted by its interactions with several proteins in addition to signaling molecules per se (i.e., G-proteins, protein kinases, inositol phosphates, etc.) and include small molecular weight G-proteins (Sar1, Rabs, ARF, P24A, RAMPs, filamin A, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, and caveolin-1). Moreover, CaSR signaling seems compartmentalized in cell-type-specific manner, and caveolin and filamin A likely act as scaffolds that bind signaling components and other key cellular

  9. Structural Insights into mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhubing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yanyan; Li, Chuanchuan; Wang, Xin; He, Feng; Sun, Lina; Jiao, Shi; Shi, Weiyang; Zhou, Zhaocai

    2015-10-30

    In response to viral infection, cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors sense viral RNA and promote oligomerization of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), which then recruits tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) family proteins, including TRAF6, to activate an antiviral response. Currently, the interaction between MAVS and TRAF6 is only partially understood, and atomic details are lacking. Here, we demonstrated that MAVS directly interacts with TRAF6 through its potential TRAF6-binding motif 2 (T6BM2; amino acids 455-460). Further, we solved the crystal structure of MAVS T6BM2 in complex with the TRAF6 TRAF_C domain at 2.95 Å resolution. T6BM2 of MAVS binds to the canonical adaptor-binding groove of the TRAF_C domain. Structure-directed mutational analyses in vitro and in cells revealed that MAVS binding to TRAF6 via T6BM2 instead of T6BM1 is essential but not sufficient for an optimal antiviral response. Particularly, a MAVS mutant Y460E retained its TRAF6-binding ability as predicted but showed significantly impaired signaling activity, highlighting the functional importance of this tyrosine. Moreover, these observations were further confirmed in MAVS(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Collectively, our work provides a structural basis for understanding the MAVS-TRAF6 antiviral response. PMID:26385923

  10. Results With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Terms of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor, and Human Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Curcio, Lisa D.; Khanijou, Rajesh K.; Eisner, Martin E.; Kakkis, Jane L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Mesa, Albert V.; Macedo, Jorge C.; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To report our results with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in terms of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) status. Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and June 2009, 209 women with early-stage breast carcinomas were treated with APBI using multicatheter, MammoSite, or Contura brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5-7 days. Three patient groups were defined by receptor status: Group 1: ER or PR (+) and HER-2/neu (-) (n = 180), Group 2: ER and PR (-) and HER-2/neu (+) (n = 10), and Group 3: ER, PR, and HER-2/neu (-) (triple negative breast cancer, n = 19). Median follow-up was 22 months. Results: Group 3 patients had significantly higher Scarff-Bloom-Richardson scores (p < 0.001). The 3-year ipsilateral breast tumor control rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 99%, 100%, and 100%, respectively (p = 0.15). Group 3 patients tended to experience relapse in distant sites earlier than did non-Group 3 patients. The 3-year relapse-free survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 81%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 3-year cause-specific and overall survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 89%, respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Triple negative breast cancer patients typically have high-grade tumors with significantly worse relapse-free, cause-specific, and overall survival. Longer follow-up will help to determine whether these patients also have a higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor relapse.

  11. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Mandelin, Jami; Pietras, Christina Orsmark; Ezer, Sini; Karisola, Piia; Vendelin, Johanna; Gennäs, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Alenius, Harri; von Mutius, Erika; Doekes, Gert; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; van Hage, Marianne; D'Amato, Mauro; Scheynius, Annika; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility. PMID:23565190

  12. Prothymosin alpha selectively enhances estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by interacting with a repressor of estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, P G; Delage-Mourroux, R; Kraichely, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2000-09-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTalpha) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTalpha interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTalpha, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTalpha increases the magnitude of ERalpha transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERbeta transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTalpha or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTalpha (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTalpha or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTalpha, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTalpha to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain

  13. Regulation of Tenon's Capsule Fibroblast Cell Proliferation by the Opioid Growth Factor and the Opioid Growth Factor Receptor Axis

    PubMed Central

    Klocek, Matthew S.; Sassani, Joseph W.; Donahue, Renee N.; McLaughlin, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Glaucoma filtration surgery often fails because of the fibrotic reaction from Tenon's capsule fibroblasts (TCFs). This study examined whether the interaction of the opioid growth factor (OGF) [Met5]-enkephalin with its receptor (OGFr) is a regulator of TCF proliferation. Methods. The presence of OGF and its receptor (OGFr) was determined in rabbit TCFs (RTCFs) by immunocytochemistry. The kinetics of OGFr were established in receptor binding assays. The ability of OGF to inhibit RTCF proliferation was assessed with dose–response, receptor mediation, and reversibility studies. Dependence on OGF and OGFr was ascertained by antibody neutralization and siRNA studies, respectively. The mechanism of action of the OGF–OGFr axis on survival (apoptosis, necrosis) and DNA synthesis of RTCFs was elucidated. Results. OGF and OGFr were detected in RTCF cells, and specific and saturable binding to OGFr was recorded. Exogenous OGF had a dose-dependent, reversible, and receptor-mediated inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Endogenous OGF was found to be constitutively produced and tonically active in cell replication, with neutralization of this peptide causing acceleration of cell proliferation. The silencing of OGFr by using siRNA technology stimulated cell replication, validating OGFr's integral role. The mechanism of OGF–OGFr action was not related to cell survival, but rather to DNA synthesis—specifically, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory pathway. Knockdown of p16 or p21 eliminated OGF's inhibitory effect on growth. Conclusions. The OGF–OGFr system is a native biological regulator of cell proliferation in RTCFs and may offer a means of improving the success of glaucoma filtration surgery in a safe and nontoxic manner. PMID:20463323

  14. Diversity and Bias through Receptor-Receptor Interactions in GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes. Focus on Examples from Dopamine D2 Receptor Heteromerization.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Tarakanov, Alexander; Romero Fernandez, Wilber; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Filip, Malgorzata; Agnati, Luigi F; Garriga, Pere; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980s and 1990s, it was shown that neurotensin (NT) through selective antagonistic NTR-D2 like receptor interactions increased the diversity of DA signaling by reducing D2R-mediated dopamine signaling over D1R-mediated dopamine signaling. Furthermore, D2R protomer appeared to bias the specificity of the NTR orthosteric binding site toward neuromedin N vs. NT in the heteroreceptor complex. Complex CCK2R-D1R-D2R interactions in possible heteroreceptor complexes were also demonstrated further increasing receptor diversity. In D2R-5-HT2AR heteroreceptor complexes, the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI were recently found to exert a biased agonist action on the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer leading to the development of an active conformational state different from the one produced by 5-HT. Furthermore, as recently demonstrated allosteric A2A-D2R receptor-receptor interaction brought about not only a reduced affinity of the D2R agonist binding site but also a biased modulation of the D2R protomer signaling in A2A-D2R heteroreceptor complexes. A conformational state of the D2R was induced, which moved away from Gi/o signaling and instead favored β-arrestin2-mediated signaling. These examples on allosteric receptor-receptor interactions obtained over several decades serve to illustrate the significant increase in diversity and biased recognition and signaling that develop through such mechanisms. PMID:24860548

  15. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  16. Galectin-3 regulates intracellular trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor through Alix and promotes keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Daniel K.; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Yang, Ri-Yao; Carraway, Kermit L.; Isseroff, Roslyn R.; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling pathways are important in a variety of cellular processes, including cell migration and wound re-epithelialization. Intracellular trafficking of EGFR is critical for maintaining EGFR surface expression. Galectin-3, a member of an animal lectin family, has been implicated in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Through studies of galectin-3-deficient mice and cells isolated from these mice, we demonstrated that absence of galectin-3 impairs keratinocyte migration and skin wound re-epithelialization. We have linked this pro-migratory function to a crucial role of cytosolic galectin-3 in controlling intracellular trafficking and cell surface expression of EGFR after EGF stimulation. Without galectin-3, the surface levels of EGFR are dramatically reduced and the receptor accumulates diffusely in the cytoplasm. This is associated with reduced rates of both endocytosis and recycling of the receptor. We have provided evidence that this novel function of galectin-3 may be mediated through interaction with its binding partner Alix, which is a protein component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Our results suggest that galectin-3 is potentially a critical regulator of a number of important cellular responses through its intracellular control of trafficking of cell surface receptors. PMID:22785133

  17. Receptor binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor are expressed by brown adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Bacay, A.C.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Mantyh, P.W. )

    1988-09-01

    To explore the possibility that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is involved in thermoregulation we used quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate receptor binding assays to identify ANF bindings sites in neonatal rat and sheep brown adipose tissue, respectively. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography were were able to localize high levels of specific binding sites for {sup 125}I-rat ANF in neonatal rat brown adipose tissue. Homogenate binding assays on sheep brown fat demonstrated that the radioligand was binding to the membrane fraction and that the specific binding was not due to a lipophilic interaction between {sup 125}I-rat ANF and brown fat. Specific binding of {sup 125}I-rat ANF to the membranes of brown fat cells was inhibited by unlabeled rat ANF with a Ki of 8.0 x 10(-9) M, but not by unrelated peptides. These studies demonstrate that brown fat cells express high levels of ANF receptor binding sites in neonatal rat and sheep and suggest that ANF may play a role in thermoregulation.

  18. Interaction of progesterone receptor with immobilized adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1977-02-22

    Affinity chromatography has been used to study the binding of ATP to cyto-plasmic progesterone receptors of hen oviduct. A resin which selectively binds the receptor protein was prepared by linking ATP covalently to Sepharose 4B through a 6-carbon bridge of adipic acid dihydrazide. Receptor bound to the affinity resin was recovered in a single peak upon gradient elution with KCl (0.2-1 M) or ATP (0-0.1 M). While affinity chromatography was normally accomplished using the [3H]progesterone receptor complex, the hormone was not necessary for ATP binding under the conditions employed. The chromatography of crude receptor preparations allowed up to 100-fold purification with greater than 80% recovery of the receptor. The semipurified receptor appeared intact when analysed by sucrose gradient centrifugation, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The latter procedure separated the receptor into two components, A and B, both of which were capable of binding ATP. Although a specific biochemical role of ATP in hormone receptor action has not been demonstrated, the present studies support this possibility and, in addition, offer a convenient and reliable step for the purification of progesterone receptors. PMID:836885

  19. Interaction of the guidance molecule Slit with cellular receptors.

    PubMed

    Hohenester, E; Hussain, S; Howitt, J A

    2006-06-01

    Slits are large secreted glycoproteins characterized by an unusual tandem of four LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domains in their N-terminal half. Slit proteins were initially described as repulsive guidance cues in neural development, but it has become clear that they have additional important functions, for instance in the vasculature and immune system. Genetic studies have identified two types of cellular receptors for Slits: Robos (Roundabout) and the HS (heparan sulphate) proteoglycan syndecan. The intracellular signalling cascade downstream of Robo activation is slowly being elucidated, but the mechanism of transmembrane signalling by Robo has remained obscure. No active signalling role for syndecan has yet been demonstrated. Slit-HS interactions may be important for shaping the presumed Slit gradient or presenting Slit at its target cell surface. Recent studies have mapped the binding sites for Robos and HS/heparin to discrete Slit domains. Robos bind to the second LRR domain of Slit, whereas HS/heparin binds with very high affinity to the C-terminal portion of Slit. Slit activity is likely to be modulated by physiological proteolytic cleavage in the region separating the Robo and HS/heparin-binding sites. PMID:16709176

  20. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Prostate Cancer Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kharmate, Geetanjali; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Caradec, Josselin; Chin, Mei Yieng; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes proteins and microRNAs have gained much attention as diagnostic tools and biomarker potential in various malignancies including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the role of exosomes and membrane-associated receptors, particularly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as mediators of cell proliferation and invasion in PCa progression remains unexplored. EGFR is frequently overexpressed and has been associated with aggressive forms of PCa. While PCa cells and tissues express EGFR, it is unknown whether exosomes derived from PCa cells or PCa patient serum contains EGFR. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize EGFR in exosomes derived from PCa cells, LNCaP xenograft and PCa patient serum. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media of different PCa cell lines; LNCaP xenograft serum as well as patient plasma/serum by differential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. Exosomes were confirmed by electron microscopy, expression of exosomal markers and NanoSight™ analysis. EGFR expression was determined by western blot analysis and ELISA. This study demonstrates that exosomes may easily be derived from PCa cell lines, serum obtained from PCa xenograft bearing mice and clinical samples derived from PCa patients. Presence of exosomal EGFR in PCa patient exosomes may present a novel approach for measuring of the disease state. Our work will allow to build on this finding for future understanding of PCa exosomes and their potential role in PCa progression and as minimal invasive biomarkers for PCa. PMID:27152724

  2. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  3. Analysis of corkscrew signaling in the Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor pathway during myogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson Hamlet, M R; Perkins, L A

    2001-01-01

    The Drosophila nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, Corkscrew (Csw), functions positively in multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways, including signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Detailed phenotypic analyses of csw mutations have revealed that Csw activity is required in many of the same developmental processes that require EGFR function. However, it is still unclear where in the signaling hierarchy Csw functions relative to other proteins whose activities are also required downstream of the receptor. To address this issue, genetic interaction experiments were performed to place csw gene activity relative to the EGFR, spitz (spi), rhomboid (rho), daughter of sevenless (DOS), kinase-suppressor of ras (ksr), ras1, D-raf, pointed (pnt), and moleskin. We followed the EGFR-dependent formation of VA2 muscle precursor cells as a sensitive assay for these genetic interaction studies. First, we established that Csw has a positive function during mesoderm development. Second, we found that tissue-specific expression of a gain-of-function csw construct rescues loss-of-function mutations in other positive signaling genes upstream of rolled (rl)/MAPK in the EGFR pathway. Third, we were able to infer levels of EGFR signaling in various mutant backgrounds during myogenesis. This work extends previous studies of Csw during Torso and Sevenless RTK signaling to include an in-depth analysis of the role of Csw in the EGFR signaling pathway. PMID:11729154

  4. Leptin and leptin receptor genotypes and colon cancer: Gene–gene and gene–lifestyle interactions

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Wolff, Roger K.; Herrick, Jennifer; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Leptin may play an important role in colorectal cancer because of its role in energy balance, insulin and inflammation. We evaluated the LEP rs2167270 (19 G > A) and rs7799039 (−2548 G > A) polymorphisms and the leptin receptor, LEPR rs6588147 (located in intron 2), polymorphism with risk of developing colon cancer in a study of 1,567 cases and 1,965 controls. We evaluated the effects of the polymorphisms with body mass index (BMI), recent use of aspirin/NSAIDs and genetic variations in genes related to insulin signaling pathways including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), and insulin- related substrates 1 and 2 (IRS1, IRS2) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). We observed a slight reduction in colon cancer risk with the AA LEP rs2167270 genotype (OR 0.79 95% CI 0.64, 0.98) and although not reaching statistical significance, with the combined GG LEP rs2167270 and GG LEPR rs6588147 (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.49, 1.02) genotypes. BMI did not interact with any of these polymorphisms to alter colon cancer risk. However, recent aspirin/NSAID use significantly interacted with both LEP polymorphisms. Likewise, variants of IGF1 and IRS2 interacted with the LEP rs2167270 polymorphism. VDR polymorphisms interacted with all LEP and LEPR polymorphisms. These data support an association between LEP and colon cancer. They also suggest that the mechanisms linking leptin to colon cancer may be independent of energy balance. PMID:18059035

  5. Interaction of the apolipoprotein E receptors low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and sorLA/LR11.

    PubMed

    Spoelgen, R; Adams, K W; Koker, M; Thomas, A V; Andersen, O M; Hallett, P J; Bercury, K K; Joyner, D F; Deng, M; Stoothoff, W H; Strickland, D K; Willnow, T E; Hyman, B T

    2009-02-18

    In this study, we examined protein-protein interactions between two neuronal receptors, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and sorLA/LR11, and found that these receptors interact, as indicated by three independent lines of evidence: co-immunoprecipitation experiments on mouse brain extracts and mouse neuronal cells, surface plasmon resonance analysis with purified human LRP and sorLA, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) on rat primary cortical neurons. Immunocytochemistry experiments revealed widespread co-localization of LRP and sorLA within perinuclear compartments of rat primary neurons, while FLIM analysis showed that LRP-sorLA interactions take place within a subset of these compartments. PMID:19047013

  6. Comparing ligand interactions with multiple receptors via serial docking.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Miguel X; Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K

    2004-01-01

    Standard uses of ligand-receptor docking typically focus on the association of candidate ligands with a single targeted receptor, but actual applications increasingly require comparisons across multiple receptors. This study demonstrates that comparative docking to multiple receptors can help to select homology models for virtual compound screening and to discover ligands that bind to one set of receptors but not to another, potentially similar, set. A serial docking algorithm is furthermore described that reduces the computational costs of such calculations by testing compounds against a series of receptor structures and discarding a compound as soon as it fails to satisfy specified bind/no bind criteria for each receptor. The algorithm also realizes substantial efficiencies by taking advantage of the fact that a ligand typically binds in similar conformations to similar receptors. Thus, once detailed docking has been used to fit a ligand into the first of a series of similar receptors, much less extensive calculations can be used for the remaining structures. PMID:15554665

  7. Biology of FGFRL1, the fifth fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Trueb, Beat

    2011-03-01

    FGFRL1 (fibroblast growth factor receptor like 1) is the most recently discovered member of the FGFR family. It contains three extracellular Ig-like domains similar to the classical FGFRs, but it lacks the protein tyrosine kinase domain and instead contains a short intracellular tail with a peculiar histidine-rich motif. The gene for FGFRL1 is found in all metazoans from sea anemone to mammals. FGFRL1 binds to FGF ligands and heparin with high affinity. It exerts a negative effect on cell proliferation, but a positive effect on cell differentiation. Mice with a targeted deletion of the Fgfrl1 gene die perinatally due to alterations in their diaphragm. These mice also show bilateral kidney agenesis, suggesting an essential role for Fgfrl1 in kidney development. A human patient with a frameshift mutation exhibits craniosynostosis, arguing for an additional role of FGFRL1 during bone formation. FGFRL1 contributes to the complexity of the FGF signaling system. PMID:21080029

  8. Interdependent epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sylwia; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signalling regulates diverse cellular functions, promoting cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell growth and survival. EGFR signalling is critical during embryogenesis, in particular in epithelial development, and disruption of the EGFR gene results in epithelial immaturity and perinatal death. EGFR signalling also functions during wound healing responses through accelerating wound re-epithelialisation, inducing cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. Upregulation of EGFR signalling is often observed in carcinomas and has been shown to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore aberrant EGFR signalling is a common target for anticancer therapies. Various reports indicate that EGFR signalling primarily occurs at the plasma membrane and EGFR degradation following endocytosis greatly attenuates signalling. Other studies argue that EGFR internalisation is essential for complete activation of downstream signalling cascades and that endosomes can serve as signalling platforms. The aim of this review is to discuss current understanding of intersection between EGFR signalling and trafficking. PMID:24681003

  9. Role of the fibroblast growth factor receptor axis in cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ang, Celina

    2015-07-01

    Advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly lethal disease with limited therapeutic options beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy. Molecular profiling of CCA has provided insights into the pathogenesis of this disease and identified potential therapeutic targets. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) axis is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis. Aberrations in FGFR activity have been implicated in the development and progression of CCA and other malignancies, which has generated significant interest in exploring FGFR's therapeutic potential. FGFR2 fusion events are present in up to 17% of intrahepatic CCAs and appear to predict sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors even after progression on chemotherapy. These observations have led to a clinical trial evaluating FGFR inhibition in patients with CCA enriched for FGFR alterations. This review summarizes current knowledge about the role of the FGFR pathway in cholangiocarcinogenesis and ongoing work in developing FGFR-directed therapies as an antineoplastic strategy for CCA. PMID:25678238

  10. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  11. Hepatic Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Attenuates Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Expression.

    PubMed

    Girer, Nathaniel G; Murray, Iain A; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-07-15

    The Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in many physiological processes. Several studies indicate that AHR is also involved in energy homeostasis. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an important regulator of the fasting and feeding responses. When administered to various genetic and diet-induced mouse models of obesity, FGF21 can attenuate obesity-associated morbidities. Here, we explore the role of AHR in hepatic Fgf21 expression through the use of a conditional, hepatocyte-targeted AHR knock-out mouse model (Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx)). Compared with the congenic parental strain (Ahr(Fx/Fx)), non-fasted Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx) mice exhibit a 4-fold increase in hepatic Fgf21 expression, as well as elevated expression of the FGF21-target gene Igfbp1 Furthermore, in vivo agonist activation of AHR reduces hepatic Fgf21 expression during a fast. The Fgf21 promoter contains several putative dioxin response elements (DREs). Using EMSA, we demonstrate that the AHR-ARNT heterodimer binds to a specific DRE that overlaps binding sequences for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), and cAMP response element-binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH). In addition, we reveal that agonist-activated AHR impairs PPARα-, ChREBP-, and CREBH-mediated promoter activity in Hepa-1 cells. Accordingly, agonist treatment in Hepa-1 cells ablates potent ER stress-driven Fgf21 expression, and pre-treatment with AHR antagonist blocks this effect. Finally, we show that pre-treatment of primary human hepatocytes with AHR agonist diminishes PPARα-, glucose-, and ER stress-driven induction of FGF21 expression, indicating the effect is not mouse-specific. Together, our data show that AHR contributes to hepatic energy homeostasis, partly through the regulation of FGF21 expression and signaling. PMID:27226639

  12. Laminin Receptor Involvement in the Anti-angiogenic Activity of Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor*S⃞♦

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Adrien; Gao-Li, Jacqueline; Franco, Claudio-Areias; Bouceba, Tahar; Huet, Alexis; Li, Zhenlin

    2009-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a multifunctional protein with neurotrophic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory properties. It is also one of the most potent endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis, playing an important role in restricting tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Studies show that PEDF binds to cell surface proteins, but little is known about how it exerts its effects. Recently, research identified phospholipase A2/nutrin/patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 2 as one PEDF receptor. To identify other receptors, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening using PEDF as bait and discovered that the non-integrin 37/67-kDa laminin receptor (LR) is another PEDF receptor. Co-immunoprecipitation, His tag pulldown, and surface plasmon resonance assays confirmed the interaction between PEDF and LR. Using the yeast two-hybrid method, we further restricted the LR-interacting domain on PEDF to a 34-amino acid (aa) peptide (aa 44–77) and the PEDF-interacting domain on LR to a 91-aa fragment (aa 120–210). A 25-mer peptide named P46 (aa 46–70), derived from 34-mer, interacts with LR in surface plasmon resonance assays and binds to endothelial cell (EC) membranes. This peptide induces EC apoptosis and inhibits EC migration, tube-like network formation in vitro, and retinal angiogenesis ex vivo, like PEDF. Our results suggest that LR is a real PEDF receptor that mediates PEDF angiogenesis inhibition. PMID:19224861

  13. Estradiol receptor: phosphorylation on tyrosine in uterus and interaction with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Rotondi, A; Auricchio, F

    1986-01-01

    Estradiol receptor from rat uteri incubated with [32P] orthophosphate has been purified by diethylstilbestrol--Sepharose followed by heparin--Sepharose chromatography. The purified receptor, analyzed by centrifugation through sucrose gradients after incubation with monoclonal antibodies against purified estradiol receptor, appears to be labeled with 32P. The receptor preparation has been further purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and submitted to SDS--poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. A heavily 32P-labeled 68 kd protein and a very lightly 32P-labeled 48 kd protein, probably a proteolytic product of the 68 kd protein, were detected. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the receptor eluted from the immunoaffinity column shows that its 32P-labeling occurs exclusively on tyrosine. This is the first report on phosphorylation on tyrosine of a steroid receptor in tissue. It is consistent with our previous finding that a uterus estradiol receptor-kinase, which confers hormone binding ability to the estradiol receptor, in vitro phosphorylates this receptor exclusively on tyrosine. Calf uterus receptor binds with high specificity and affinity to monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies covalently bound to Sepharose (Kd = 0.28 nM). Dephosphorylation of the receptor by nuclei containing the calf uterus nuclear phosphatase abolishes the interaction with antibodies. These results suggest that also in calf uterus, estradiol receptor is phosphorylated on tyrosine. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies bound to Sepharose have been used to partially purify the estradiol receptor from calf uterus. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2431901

  14. Dual ligand/receptor interactions activate urothelial defenses against uropathogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Mémet, Sylvie; Saban, Ricardo; Kong, Xiangpeng; Aprikian, Pavel; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-01-01

    During urinary tract infection (UTI), the second most common bacterial infection, dynamic interactions take place between uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and host urothelial cells. While significant strides have been made in the identification of the virulence factors of UPEC, our understanding of how the urothelial cells mobilize innate defenses against the invading UPEC remains rudimentary. Here we show that mouse urothelium responds to the adhesion of type 1-fimbriated UPEC by rapidly activating the canonical NF-κB selectively in terminally differentiated, superficial (umbrella) cells. This activation depends on a dual ligand/receptor system, one between FimH adhesin and uroplakin Ia and another between lipopolysaccharide and Toll-like receptor 4. When activated, all the nuclei (up to 11) of a multinucleated umbrella cell are affected, leading to significant amplification of proinflammatory signals. Intermediate and basal cells of the urothelium undergo NF-κB activation only if the umbrella cells are detached or if the UPEC persistently express type 1-fimbriae. Inhibition of NF-κB prevents the urothelium from clearing the intracellular bacterial communities, leading to prolonged bladder colonization by UPEC. Based on these data, we propose a model of dual ligand/receptor system in innate urothelial defenses against UPEC. PMID:26549759

  15. The Fn14 cytoplasmic tail binds tumour-necrosis-factor-receptor-associated factors 1, 2, 3 and 5 and mediates nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sharron A N; Richards, Christine M; Hanscom, Heather N; Feng, Sheau-Line Y; Winkles, Jeffrey A

    2003-01-01

    Fn14 is a growth-factor-inducible immediate-early-response gene encoding a 102-amino-acid type I transmembrane protein. The human Fn14 protein was recently identified as a cell-surface receptor for the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member named TWEAK (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis). In the present paper, we report that the human TWEAK extracellular domain can also bind the murine Fn14 protein. Furthermore, site-specific mutagenesis and directed yeast two-hybrid interaction assays revealed that the TNFR-associated factor (TRAF) 1, 2, 3 and 5 adaptor molecules bind the murine Fn14 cytoplasmic tail at an overlapping, but non-identical, amino acid sequence motif. We also found that TWEAK treatment of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells stimulates inhibitory kappaBalpha phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of a nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) enhancer/luciferase reporter construct. Fn14 overexpression in transiently transfected NIH 3T3 cells also promotes NF-kappaB activation, and this cellular response requires an intact TRAF binding site. These results indicate that Fn14 is a functional TWEAK receptor that can associate with four distinct TRAF family members and stimulate the NF-kappaB transcription factor signalling pathway. PMID:12529173

  16. Signaling through urokinase and urokinase receptor in lung cancer cells requires interactions with beta1 integrins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chi-Hui; Hill, Marla L; Brumwell, Alexis N; Chapman, Harold A; Wei, Ying

    2008-11-15

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is upregulated upon tumor cell invasion and correlates with poor lung cancer survival. Although a cis-interaction with integrins has been ascribed to uPAR, whether this interaction alone is critical to urokinase (uPA)- and uPAR-dependent signaling and tumor promotion is unclear. Here we report the functional consequences of point mutations of uPAR (H249A-D262A) that eliminate beta1 integrin interactions but maintain uPA binding, vitronectin attachment and association with alphaV integrins, caveolin and epidermal growth factor receptor. Disruption of uPAR interactions with beta1 integrins recapitulated previously reported findings with beta1-integrin-derived peptides that attenuated matrix-dependent ERK activation, MMP expression and in vitro migration by human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The uPAR mutant cells acquired enhanced capacity to adhere to vitronectin via uPAR-alphaVbeta5-integrin, rather than through the uPAR-alpha3beta1-integrin complex and they were unable to initiate uPA signaling to activate ERK, Akt or Stat1. In an orthotopic lung cancer model, uPAR mutant cells exhibited reduced tumor size compared with cells expressing wild-type uPAR. Taken together, the results indicate that uPAR-beta1-integrin interactions are essential to signals induced by integrin matrix ligands or uPA that support lung cancer cell invasion in vitro and progression in vivo. PMID:18940913

  17. Hydrodynamic effects and receptor interactions of platelets and their aggregates in linear shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, P; Diamond, S L

    1997-01-01

    We have modeled platelet aggregation in a linear shear flow by accounting for two body collision hydrodynamics, platelet activation and receptor biology. Considering platelets and their aggregates as unequal-sized spheres with DLVO interactions (psi(platelet) = -15 mV, Hamaker constant = 10(-19) J), detailed hydrodynamics provided the flow field around the colliding platelets. Trajectory calculations were performed to obtain the far upstream cross-sectional area and the particle flux through this area provided the collision frequency. Only a fraction of platelets brought together by a shearing fluid flow were held together if successfully bound by fibrinogen cross-bridging GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the platelet surfaces. This fraction was calculated by modeling receptor-mediated aggregation using the formalism of Bell (Bell, G. I. 1979. A theoretical model for adhesion between cells mediated by multivalent ligands. Cell Biophys. 1:133-147) where the forward rate of bond formation dictated aggregation during collision and was estimated from the diffusional limited rate of lateral association of receptors multiplied by an effectiveness factor, eta, to give an apparent rate. For a value of eta = 0.0178, we calculated the overall efficiency (including both receptor binding and hydrodynamics effects) for equal-sized platelets with 50,000 receptors/platelet to be 0.206 for G = 41.9 s(-1), 0.05 for G = 335 s(-1), and 0.0086 for G = 1920 s(-1), values which are in agreement with efficiencies determined from initial platelet singlet consumption rates in flow through a tube. From our analysis, we predict that bond formation proceeds at a rate of approximately 0.1925 bonds/microm2 per ms, which is approximately 50-fold slower than the diffusion limited rate of association. This value of eta is also consistent with a colloidal stability of unactivated platelets at low shear rates. Fibrinogen was calculated to mediate aggregation quite efficiently at low shear rates but not at

  18. Varenicline Interactions at the 5-HT3 Receptor Ligand Binding Site are Revealed by 5-HTBP

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are the site of action of many therapeutic drugs. One of these is the smoking cessation agent varenicline, which has its major therapeutic effects at nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors but also acts at 5-HT3 receptors. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the 5-HT binding protein (5-HTBP) in complex with varenicline, and test the predicted interactions by probing the potency of varenicline in a range of mutant 5-HT3 receptors expressed in HEK293 cells and Xenopus oocytes. The structure reveals a range of interactions between varenicline and 5-HTBP. We identified residues within 5 Å of varenicline and substituted the equivalent residues in the 5-HT3 receptor with Ala or a residue with similar chemical properties. Functional characterization of these mutant 5-HT3 receptors, using a fluorescent membrane potential dye in HEK cells and voltage clamp in oocytes, supports interactions between varenicline and the receptor that are similar to those in 5-HTBP. The structure also revealed C-loop closure that was less than in the 5-HT-bound 5-HTBP, and hydrogen bonding between varenicline and the complementary face of the binding pocket via a water molecule, which are characteristics consistent with partial agonist behavior of varenicline in the 5-HT3 receptor. Together, these data reveal detailed insights into the molecular interaction of varenicline in the 5-HT3 receptor. PMID:25648658

  19. Neurotrophic factors and their receptors in human sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors may play key roles in pathophysiological mechanisms of human neuropathies. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is trophic to small-diameter sensory fibers and regulates nociception. This review focuses on sensory dysfunction and the potential of neurotrophic treatments. Genetic neuropathy. Mutations of the NGF high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase A (Trk A) have been found in congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis; these are likely to be partial loss-of-function mutations, as axon-reflex vasodilatation and sweating can be elicited albeit reduced, suggesting rhNGF could restore nociception in some patients. Leprous neuropathy. Decreased NGF in leprosy skin may explain cutaneous hypoalgesia even with inflammation and rhNGF may restore sensation, as spared nerve fibers show Trk A-staining. Diabetic neuropathy. NGF is depleted in early human diabetic neuropathy skin, in correlation with dysfunction of nociceptor fibers. We proposed rhNGF prophylaxis may prevent diabetic foot ulceration. Clinical trials have been disappointed, probably related to difficulty delivering adequate doses and need for multiple trophic factors. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are both produced by basal keratinocytes and neurotrophin (NT-3) by suprabasal keratinocytes: relative mRNA expression was significantly lower in early diabetic neuropathy skin compared to controls, for NGF (P < 0.02), BDNF (P < 0.05), NT-3 (P < 0.05), GDNF (< 0.02), but not NT4/5, Trk A or p75 neurotrophin receptor (all P > 0.05). Posttranslational modifications of mature and pro-NGF may also affect bioactivity and immunoreactivity. A 53 kD band that could correspond to a prepro-NGF-like molecule was reduced in diabetic skin. Traumatic neuropathy and pain. While NGF levels are acutely reduced in injured nerve trunks, neuropathic patients with chronic skin hyperalgesia and allodynia show marked local increases of NGF levels; here anti-NGF agents may provide analgesia

  20. Molecular determinants and interaction data of cyclic peptide inhibitor with the extracellular domain of TrkB receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chitranshi, Nitin; Gupta, Vivek; Dheer, Yogita; Gupta, Veer; Vander Wall, Roshana; Graham, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    TrkB is a high affinity receptor for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its phosphorylation stimulates activation of several intracellular signalling pathways linked to cellular growth, differentiation and maintenance. Identification of various activators and inhibitors of the TrkB receptor and greater understanding their binding mechanisms is critical to elucidate the biochemical and pharmacological pathways and analyse various protein crystallization studies. The data presented here is related to the research article entitled “Brain Derived neurotrophic factor is involved in the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) signalling” [1]. Cyclotraxin B (CTXB) is a disulphide bridge linked cyclic peptide molecule that interacts with TrkB receptor and inhibits the BDNF/TrkB downstream signalling. This article reports for the first time binding mechanism and interaction parameters of CTXB with the TrkB receptor. The molecular model of CTXB has been generated and it’s docking with TrkB domain carried out to determine the critical residues involved in the protein peptide interaction. PMID:26909388

  1. Interaction of myocardial insulin receptor and IGF receptor signaling in exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Shiojima, Ichiro; Ozasa, Yukako; Yoshida, Masashi; Holzenberger, Martin; Kahn, C Ronald; Walsh, Kenneth; Igarashi, Takashi; Abel, E Dale; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling has recently been implicated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy after long-term endurance training, via mechanisms that may involve energetic stress. Given the potential overlap of insulin and IGF-1 signaling we sought to determine if both signaling pathways could contribute to exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy following shorter-term exercise training. Studies were performed in mice with cardiac-specific IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R) knockout (CIGFRKO), mice with cardiac-specific insulin receptor (IR) knockout (CIRKO), CIGFRKO mice that lacked one IR allele in cardiomyocytes (IGFR−/−IR+/−), and CIRKO mice that lacked one IGF1R allele in cardiomyocytes (IGFR+/−IR−/−). Intravenous administration of IGF-1 or 75 hours of swimming over 4 weeks increased IGF1R tyrosine phosphorylation in the heart in control and CIRKO mice but not in CIGFRKO mice. Intriguingly, IR tyrosine phosphorylation in the heart was also increased following IGF-1 administration or exercise training in control and CIGFRKO mice but not in CIRKO mice. The extent of cardiac hypertrophy following exercise training in CIGFRKO and CIRKO mice was comparable to that in control mice. In contrast, exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy was significantly attenuated in IGFR−/−IR+/− and IGFR+/−IR−/− mice. Thus, IGF-1 and exercise activates both IGF1R and IR in the heart, and IGF1R- and IR-mediated signals may serve redundant roles in the hypertrophic responses of the heart to exercise training. PMID:19744489

  2. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane–solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane–solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor. PMID

  3. Cell Receptor-Basement Membrane Interactions in Health and Disease: A Kidney-Centric View.

    PubMed

    Borza, Corina M; Chen, Xiwu; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2015-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential for tissue development, homeostasis, and response to injury. Basement membranes (BMs) are specialized ECMs that separate epithelial or endothelial cells from stromal components and interact with cells via cellular receptors, including integrins and discoidin domain receptors. Disruption of cell-BM interactions due to either injury or genetic defects in either the ECM components or cellular receptors often lead to irreversible tissue injury and loss of organ function. Animal models that lack specific BM components or receptors either globally or in selective tissues have been used to help with our understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby cell-BM interactions regulate organ function in physiological and pathological conditions. We review recently published works on animal models that explore how cell-BM interactions regulate kidney homeostasis in both health and disease. PMID:26610916

  4. Cell Receptor-Basement Membrane Interactions in Health and Disease: a Kidney-Centric View

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M.; Chen, Xiwu; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2016-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential for tissue development, homeostasis, and response to injury. Basement membranes (BMs) are specialized ECMs that separate epithelial or endothelial cells from stromal components and interact with cells via cellular receptors, including integrins and discoidin domain receptors. Disruption of cell-BM interactions due to either injury or genetic defects in either the ECM components or cellular receptors often lead to irreversible tissue injury and loss of organ function. Animal models that lack specific BM components or receptors either globally or in selective tissues have been used to help with our understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby cell-BM interactions regulate organ function in physiological and pathological conditions. We review recently published work on animal models that explore how cell-BM interactions regulate kidney homeostasis in both health and disease. PMID:26610916

  5. Oxygen Modulates Human Decidual Natural Killer Cell Surface Receptor Expression and Interactions with Trophoblasts1

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Alison E.; Goulwara, Sonu S.; Whitley, Guy S.; Cartwright, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Decidual natural killer (dNK) cells have been shown to both promote and inhibit trophoblast behavior important for decidual remodeling in pregnancy and have a distinct phenotype compared to peripheral blood NK cells. We investigated whether different levels of oxygen tension, mimicking the physiological conditions of the decidua in early pregnancy, altered cell surface receptor expression and activity of dNK cells and their interactions with trophoblast. dNK cells were isolated from terminated first-trimester pregnancies and cultured in oxygen tensions of 3%, 10%, and 21% for 24 h. Cell surface receptor expression was examined by flow cytometry, and the effects of secreted factors in conditioned medium (CM) on the trophoblast cell line SGHPL-4 were assessed in vitro. SGHPL-4 cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 10% were significantly more invasive (P < 0.05) and formed endothelial-like networks to a greater extent (P < 0.05) than SGHPL-4 cells treated with dNK cell CM incubated in oxygen tensions of 3% or 21%. After 24 h, a lower percentage of dNK cells expressed CD56 at 21% oxygen (P < 0.05), and an increased percentage of dNK cells expressed NKG2D at 10% oxygen (P < 0.05) compared to other oxygen tensions, with large patient variation. This study demonstrates dNK cell phenotype and secreted factors are modulated by oxygen tension, which induces changes in trophoblast invasion and endovascular-like differentiation. Alterations in dNK cell surface receptor expression and secreted factors at different oxygen tensions may represent regulation of function within the decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:25232021

  6. Interaction of mechanisms involving epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, adenosine receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors in neurovascular coupling in rat whisker barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Liu, Xiaoguang; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Falck, John R; Harder, David R; Koehler, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine, astrocyte metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have been implicated in neurovascular coupling. Although A2A and A2B receptors mediate cerebral vasodilation to adenosine, the role of each receptor in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to neural activation remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, adenosine can amplify astrocyte calcium, which may increase arachidonic acid metabolites such as EETs. The interaction of these pathways was investigated by determining if combined treatment with antagonists exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the CBF response. During whisker stimulation of anesthetized rats, the increase in cortical CBF was reduced by approximately half after individual administration of A2B, mGluR and EET antagonists and EET synthesis inhibitors. Combining treatment of either a mGluR antagonist, an EET antagonist, or an EET synthesis inhibitor with an A2B receptor antagonist did not produce an additional decrement in the CBF response. Likewise, the CBF response also remained reduced by ~50% when an EET antagonist was combined with an mGluR antagonist or an mGluR antagonist plus an A2B receptor antagonist. In contrast, A2A and A3 receptor antagonists had no effect on the CBF response to whisker stimulation. We conclude that (1) adenosine A2B receptors, rather than A2A or A3 receptors, play a significant role in coupling cortical CBF to neuronal activity, and (2) the adenosine A2B receptor, mGluR, and EETs signaling pathways are not functionally additive, consistent with the possibility of astrocytic mGluR and adenosine A2B receptor linkage to the synthesis and release of vasodilatory EETs. PMID:17519974

  7. Demonstration of a Direct Interaction between β2-Adrenergic Receptor and Insulin Receptor by BRET and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Mandić, Maja; Drinovec, Luka; Glisic, Sanja; Veljkovic, Nevena; Nøhr, Jane; Vrecl, Milka

    2014-01-01

    Glucose metabolism is under the cooperative regulation of both insulin receptor (IR) and β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), which represent the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), respectively. Studies demonstrating cross-talk between these two receptors and their endogenous coexpression have suggested their possible interactions. To evaluate the effect of IR and prospective heteromerization on β2AR properties, we showed that IR coexpression had no effect on the ligand binding properties of β2AR; however, IR reduced β2AR surface expression and accelerated its internalization. Additionally, both receptors displayed a similar distribution pattern with a high degree of colocalization. To test the possible direct interaction between β2AR and IR, we employed quantitative BRET2 saturation and competition assays. Saturation assay data suggested constitutive β2AR and IR homo- and heteromerization. Calculated acceptor/donor (AD50) values as a measure of the relative affinity for homo- and heteromer formation differed among the heteromers that could not be explained by a simple dimer model. In heterologous competition assays, a transient increase in the BRET2 signal with a subsequent hyperbolical decrease was observed, suggesting higher-order heteromer formation. To complement the BRET2 data, we employed the informational spectrum method (ISM), a virtual spectroscopy method to investigate protein-protein interactions. Computational peptide scanning of β2AR and IR identified intracellular domains encompassing residues at the end of the 7th TM domain and C-terminal tail of β2AR and a cytoplasmic part of the IR β chain as prospective interaction domains. ISM further suggested a high probability of heteromer formation and homodimers as basic units engaged in heteromerization. In summary, our data suggest direct interaction and higher-order β2AR:IR oligomer formation, likely comprising heteromers of homodimers. PMID:25401701

  8. Can Specific Protein-Lipid Interactions Stabilize an Active State of the Beta 2 Adrenergic Receptor?

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Herce, Henry D; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2015-10-20

    G-protein-coupled receptors are eukaryotic membrane proteins with broad biological and pharmacological relevance. Like all membrane-embedded proteins, their location and orientation are influenced by lipids, which can also impact protein function via specific interactions. Extensive simulations totaling 0.25 ms reveal a process in which phospholipids from the membrane's cytosolic leaflet enter the empty G-protein binding site of an activated β2 adrenergic receptor and form salt-bridge interactions that inhibit ionic lock formation and prolong active-state residency. Simulations of the receptor embedded in an anionic membrane show increased lipid binding, providing a molecular mechanism for the experimental observation that anionic lipids can enhance receptor activity. Conservation of the arginine component of the ionic lock among Rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors suggests that intracellular lipid ingression between receptor helices H6 and H7 may be a general mechanism for active-state stabilization. PMID:26488656

  9. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB-mediated phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Coats, S R; Love, H D; Pledger, W J

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates the proliferation of Balb/c-3T3 fibroblasts through binding and subsequent activation of PDGF receptors. Activation of the PDGF receptors has been proposed to involve receptor dimerization. PDGF-AB has been shown to bind PDGF alpha and beta receptor subunits to form PDGF alpha beta and alpha alpha receptor dimers. In this paper we demonstrate that, following the down-regulation of PDGF alpha receptors, the binding of PDGF-AB to beta receptors occurred at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. PDGF-AB stimulated the phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptor monomers in cells depleted of PDGF alpha receptors by prior exposure to PDGF-AA. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8297345

  10. Apolipoprotein A-V interaction with members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Lookene, Aivar; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Gliemann, Jørgen; Ryan, Robert O; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2007-03-27

    Apolipoprotein A-V is a potent modulator of plasma triacylglycerol levels. To investigate the molecular basis for this phenomenon we explored the ability of apolipoprotein A-V, in most experiments complexed to disks of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, to interact with two members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and the mosaic type-1 receptor, SorLA. Experiments using surface plasmon resonance showed specific binding of both free and lipid-bound apolipoprotein A-V to both receptors. The binding was calcium dependent and was inhibited by the receptor associated protein, a known ligand for members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. Preincubation with heparin decreased the receptor binding of apolipoprotein A-V, indicating that overlap exists between the recognition sites for these receptors and for heparin. A double mutant, apolipoprotein A-V (Arg210Glu/Lys211Gln), showed decreased binding to heparin and decreased ability to bind the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Association of apolipoprotein A-V with the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein or SorLA resulted in enhanced binding of human chylomicrons to receptor-covered sensor chips. Our results indicate that apolipoprotein A-V may influence plasma lipid homeostasis by enhancing receptor-mediated endocytosis of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. PMID:17326667

  11. The interaction between histamine H1 receptor and μ- opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Tasuku; Sugimoto, Yumi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2016-04-15

    In this study, we examined the interaction between histamine H1 receptor and μ-opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice. Both histamine and morphine caused scratching and simultaneous injection of histamine and morphine had an additive effect. Chlorpheniramine and naloxone inhibited histamine-induced scratching behavior. These two drugs also inhibited morphine-induced scratching behavior. Simultaneous injection of chlorpheniramine and naloxone caused a significant inhibition of histamine-induced scratching compared with separate injections. The same findings were also noted for morphine-induced scratching. These results strongly indicate a close relationship between histamine H1 receptor and μ-opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice. PMID:26948312

  12. Conformational nanobodies reveal tethered epidermal growth factor receptor involved in EGFR/ErbB2 predimers.

    PubMed

    Nevoltris, Damien; Lombard, Benjamin; Dupuis, Elodie; Mathis, Gérard; Chames, Patrick; Baty, Daniel

    2015-02-24

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cell-surface receptor with a single transmembrane domain and tyrosine kinase activity carried by the intracellular domain. This receptor is one of the four members of the ErbB family including ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4. Ligand binding, like EGF binding, induces a conformational rearrangement of the receptor and induces a homo/hetero dimerization essentially with ErbB family receptors that leads to the phosphorylation of the kinase domain, triggering a signaling cascade. EGFR can also form inactive dimers in a ligand-independent way through interactions between cytoplasmic domains. To date, the conformation of EGFR extracellular domain engaged in these inactive dimers remains unclear. In this study, we describe the successful selection and characterization of llama anti-EGFR nanobodies and their use as innovative conformational sensors. We isolated three different specific anti-EGFR clones binding to three distinct epitopes. Interestingly, the binding of all three nanobodies was found highly sensitive to ligand stimulation. Two nanobodies, D10 and E10, can only bind the ligand-free EGFR conformation characterized by an intramolecular tether between domains II and IV, whereas nanobody G10 binds both ligand-free and ligand activated EGFR, with an 8-fold higher affinity for the extended conformation in the presence of ligand. Here we took advantage of these conformational probes to reveal the existence of tethered EGFR in EGFR/ErbB2 predimers. These biosensors represent important tools allowing the determination of EGFR conformations and should help the design of relevant inhibitors. PMID:25603171

  13. Domains of ERRgamma that mediate homodimerization and interaction with factors stimulating DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Hentschke, Moritz; Süsens, Ute; Borgmeyer, Uwe

    2002-08-01

    The estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma/ERR3/NR3B3) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily closely related to the estrogen receptors. To explore the DNA binding characteristics, the protein-DNA interaction was studied in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). In vitro translated ERRgamma binds as a homodimer to direct repeats (DR) without spacing of the nuclear receptor half-site 5'-AGGTCA-3' (DR-0), to extended half-sites, and to the inverted estrogen response element. Using ERRgamma deletion constructs, binding was found to be dependent on the presence of sequences in the ligand binding domain (LBD). A far-Western analysis revealed that ERRgamma forms dimers even in the absence of DNA. Two elements, located in the hinge region and in the LBD, respectively, are necessary for DNA-independent dimerization. DNA binding of bacterial expressed ERRgamma requires additional factors present in the serum and in cellular extracts. Fusion proteins of the germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF/NR6A1) with ERRgamma showed that the characteristic feature to be stimulated by additional factors can be transferred to a heterologous protein. The stimulating activity was further characterized and its target sequence narrowed down to a small element in the hinge region. PMID:12180985

  14. Micro-structured peptide surfaces for the detection of high-affinity peptide-receptor interactions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Anna-Maria; Ji, Bozhi; Hager, Roland; Haas, Sandra; Schweiggl, Simone; Sonnleitner, Alois; Haselgrübler, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Peptide ligands have great potential as selective agents for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic targeting of human cancers. A number of high-throughput assays for screening potential candidate peptides have been developed. Although these screening assays are indispensable for the identification of peptide ligands at a large scale, it is crucial to validate peptide binding and selectivity for targeted receptors in a live-cell context. For testing high-affinity peptide-receptor interactions in the plasma membrane of living cells, we developed cell-resistant, micro-structured glass surfaces with high-density and high-contrast peptide features. Cell adhesion and recruitment of fluorescent receptors to micro-patterned peptides in the live-cell membrane were evaluated by reflection interference contrast (RIC) and total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, respectively. To demonstrate both the specificity and modularity of the assay, co-patterning of fluorescent receptors with three different immobilized micro-structured ligands was shown: first, interaction of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expressed in Jurkat cells with immobilized EGF was detected and quantified. Second, using Jurkat cells, we demonstrated specific interaction of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged β3 integrin with c(RGDfK) peptide. Third, we identified indirect recruitment of GFP-tagged α5 integrin to an 11-mer peptide. In summary, our results show that the developed micro-structured surfaces are a useful tool for the validation and quantification of peptide-receptor interactions in their natural cellular environment. PMID:26210593

  15. Nitric oxide reversibly inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, C; Gómez, C; Martín-Nieto, J; De Frutos, T; Jiménez, A; Villalobo, A

    1997-01-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that NO inhibits the proliferation of different cell types, the mechanisms of its anti-mitotic action are not well understood. In this work we have studied the possible interaction of NO with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), using transfected fibroblasts which overexpress the human EGFR. The NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), 1,1-diethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazine (DEA-NO) and N-¿4-[1-(3-aminopropyl)-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazino]butyl¿propane -1, 3-diamine (DETA-NO) inhibited DNA synthesis of fibroblasts growing in the presence of fetal calf serum, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or EGF plus insulin, as assessed by [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation. Neither 8-bromo-cGMP nor the cGMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast mimicked this effect, suggesting that NO is unlikely to inhibit cell proliferation via a cGMP-dependent pathway. SNAP, DEA-NO and DETA-NO also inhibited the transphosphorylation of the EGFR and its tyrosine kinase activity toward the exogenous substrate poly-l-(Glu-Tyr), as measured in permeabilized cells using [gamma-32P]ATP as phosphate donor. In contrast, 3-[morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride] (SIN-1), a peroxynitrite-forming compound, did not significantly inhibit either DNA synthesis or the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGFR tyrosine kinase was prevented by haemoglobin, an NO scavenger, but not by superoxide dismutase, and was reversed by dithiothreitol. The binding of EGF to its receptor was unaffected by DEA-NO. The inhibitory action of DEA-NO on the EGF-dependent transphosphorylation of the receptor was also demonstrated in intact cells by immunoblot analysis using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Taken together, these results suggest that NO, but not peroxynitrite, inhibits in a reversible manner the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity by S-nitrosylation of the receptor. PMID:9291107

  16. Stacking interaction and its role in kynurenic acid binding to glutamate ionotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Alexander V; Zakharov, Gennady A; Shchegolev, Boris F; Savvateeva-Popova, Elena V

    2012-05-01

    Stacking interaction is known to play an important role in protein folding, enzyme-substrate and ligand-receptor complex formation. It has been shown to make a contribution into the aromatic antagonists binding with glutamate ionotropic receptors (iGluRs), in particular, the complex of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit with the kynurenic acid (KYNA) derivatives. The specificity of KYNA binding to the glutamate receptors subtypes might partially result from the differences in stacking interaction. We have calculated the optimal geometry and binding energy of KYNA dimers with the four types of aromatic amino acid residues in Rattus and Drosophila ionotropic iGluR subunits. All ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed taking into account electron correlations at MP2 and MP4 perturbation theory levels. We have also investigated the potential energy surfaces (PES) of stacking and hydrogen bonds (HBs) within the receptor binding site and calculated the free energy of the ligand-receptor complex formation. The energy of stacking interaction depends both on the size of aromatic moieties and the electrostatic effects. The distribution of charges was shown to determine the geometry of polar aromatic ring dimers. Presumably, stacking interaction is important at the first stage of ligand binding when HBs are weak. The freedom of ligand movements and rotation within receptor site provides the precise tuning of the HBs pattern, while the incorrect stacking binding prohibits the ligand-receptor complex formation. PMID:21833825

  17. PSD-95 Uncouples Dopamine-Glutamate Interaction in the D1/PSD-95/NMDA Receptor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingping; Xu, Tai-Xiang; Hallett, Penelope J.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Grant, Seth G. N.; Isacson, Ole; Yao, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    Classical dopaminergic signaling paradigms and emerging studies on direct physical interactions between the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor and the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor predict a reciprocally facilitating, positive feedback loop. This loop, if not controlled, may cause concomitant overactivation of both D1 and NMDA receptors, triggering neurotoxicity. Endogenous protective mechanisms must exist. Here we show that PSD-95, a prototypical structural and signaling scaffold in the postsynaptic density, inhibits D1-NMDA receptor association and uncouples NMDA receptor-dependent enhancement of D1 signaling. This uncoupling is achieved, at least in part, via a disinhibition mechanism by which PSD-95 abolishes NMDA receptor-dependent inhibition of D1 internalization. Knockdown of PSD-95 immobilizes D1 receptors on the cell surface and escalates NMDA receptor-dependent D1 cAMP signaling in neurons. Thus, in addition to its role in receptor stabilization and synaptic plasticity, PSD-95 acts as a brake on the D1-NMDA receptor complex and dampens the interaction between them. PMID:19261890

  18. Exact solutions to a spatially extended model of kinase-receptor interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Piotr; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Kazmierczak, Bogdan

    2011-10-01

    B and Mast cells are activated by the aggregation of the immune receptors. Motivated by this phenomena we consider a simple spatially extended model of mutual interaction of kinases and membrane receptors. It is assumed that kinase activates membrane receptors and in turn the kinase molecules bound to the active receptors are activated by transphosphorylation. Such a type of interaction implies positive feedback and may lead to bistability. In this study we apply the Steklov eigenproblem theory to analyze the linearized model and find exact solutions in the case of non-uniformly distributed membrane receptors. This approach allows us to determine the critical value of receptor dephosphorylation rate at which cell activation (by arbitrary small perturbation of the inactive state) is possible. We found that cell sensitivity grows with decreasing kinase diffusion and increasing anisotropy of the receptor distribution. Moreover, these two effects are cooperating. We showed that the cell activity can be abruptly triggered by the formation of the receptor aggregate. Since the considered activation mechanism is not based on receptor crosslinking by polyvalent antigens, the proposed model can also explain B cell activation due to receptor aggregation following binding of monovalent antigens presented on the antigen presenting cell.

  19. Characterization of the Staphylococcal enterotoxin A: Vβ receptor interaction using human receptor fragments engineered for high affinity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Postel, S; Sundberg, E J; Kranz, D M

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is a gastrointestinal disorder caused by the consumption of food containing Staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is the most common enterotoxin recovered from food poisoning outbreaks in the USA. In addition to its enteric activity, SEA also acts as a potent superantigen through stimulation of T cells, although less is known about its interactions than the superantigens SEB, SEC and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. To understand more about SEA:receptor interactions, and to develop toxin-detection systems for use in food testing, we engineered various SEA-binding receptor mutants. The extracellular domain of the receptor, a variable region of the beta chain (Vβ22) of the T-cell receptor, was engineered for stability as a soluble protein and for high affinity, using yeast-display technology. The highest affinity mutant was shown to bind SEA with a Kd value of 4 nM. This was a 25 000-fold improvement in affinity compared with the wild-type receptor, which bound to SEA with low affinity (Kd value of 100 µM), similar to other superantigen:Vβ interactions. The SEA:Vβ interface was centered around residues within the complementarity determining region 2 loop. The engineered receptor was specific for SEA, in that it did not bind to two other closely related enterotoxins SEE or SED, providing information on the SEA residues possibly involved in the interaction. The specificity and affinity of these high-affinity Vβ proteins also provide useful agents for the design of more sensitive and specific systems for SEA detection. PMID:24167300

  20. Interactions of trimebutine with guinea-pig opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Roman, F; Pascaud, X; Taylor, J E; Junien, J L

    1987-05-01

    Affinities of trimebutine (TMB) and N-desmethyl trimebutine (NDTMB) for mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor subtypes have been examined using specific 3H-ligands and guinea-pig membrane. TMB and NDTMB showed a relative higher affinity for the mu receptor subtype although they were, respectively, 30- and 48-fold less active than morphine. The receptor selectivity index for mu, delta and kappa were 100:12:14.4 for TMB, 100:32:25 for NDTMB and 100:5:5 for morphine. The sodium shift ratio was 14 for TMB, 10 for NDTMB and 37 for morphine. These data show that (unlike morphine, a pure mu agonist) TMB and NDTMB can be classified as weak opioid agonists and confirm that peripheral opioid receptors mediate their gastrointestinal motility effects. PMID:2886594

  1. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  2. The discovery of novel vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases inhibitors: pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Wang, Zhanli; Zhang, Liangren; Zhang, Jufeng; Huang, Qian

    2007-03-01

    We have applied pharmacophore generation, database searching and docking methodologies to discover new structures for the design of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, the tyrosine kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase inhibitors. The chemical function based pharmacophore models were built for kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase inhibitors from a set of 10 known inhibitors using the algorithm HipHop, which is implemented in the CATALYST software. The highest scoring HipHop model consists of four features: one hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond acceptor, one hydrogen bond donor and one ring aromatic function. Using the algorithm CatShape within CATALYST, the bound conformation of 4-amino-furo [2, 3-d] pyrimidine binding to kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase was used to generate a shape query. A merged shape and hypothesis query that is in an appropriate alignment was then built. The combined shape and hypothesis model was used as a query to search Maybridge database for other potential lead compounds. A total of 39 compounds were retrieved as hits. The hits obtained were docked into kinase insert domain-containing receptor kinase active site. One novel potential lead was proposed based on CATALYST fit value, LigandFit docking scores, and examination of how the hit retain key interactions known to be required for kinase binding. This compound inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated kinase insert domain-containing receptor phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. PMID:17441906

  3. Functional co-operation between the subunits in heterodimeric platelet-derived growth factor receptor complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Emaduddin, M; Ekman, S; Rönnstrand, L; Heldin, C H

    1999-01-01

    To determine the importance of the phosphorylation capacity of receptor kinase as well as the ability to serve as docking sites for SH2-domain-containing signal transduction molecules, we established pig aortic endothelial cell lines stably expressing kinase-active platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) alpha-receptors together with kinase-inactive beta-receptors, and vice versa. After stimulation with PDGF-AB, heterodimeric receptor complexes were formed in which the kinase-inactive receptor was phosphorylated by the kinase-active receptor, although less efficiently than in heterodimers of wild-type receptors. The kinase-active receptor was only minimally phosphorylated. Thus the phosphorylation within the receptor dimer occurred in trans between the components. Analyses of the abilities of heterodimeric receptor complexes of one kinase-active and one kinase-inactive receptor to mediate mitogenicity, chemotaxis and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase revealed less efficient effects than those of heterodimers of wild-type receptors. Importantly, however, the fact that signalling capacities were retained illustrates a functional co-operation between the two receptor molecules in the dimer, where one receptor provides a functional kinase and the other acts as a substrate and provides docking sites for downstream signalling molecules. PMID:10417313

  4. Multimodular biosensors reveal a novel platform for activation of G proteins by growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Krishna K.; Aznar, Nicolas; Laederich, Melanie B.; Ma, Gary S.; Kunkel, Maya T.; Newton, Alexandra C.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Environmental cues are transmitted to the interior of the cell via a complex network of signaling hubs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two such major signaling hubs in eukaryotes. Conventionally, canonical signal transduction via trimeric G proteins is thought to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors. Here we used molecular engineering to develop modular fluorescent biosensors that exploit the remarkable specificity of bimolecular recognition, i.e., of both G proteins and RTKs, and reveal the workings of a novel platform for activation of G proteins by RTKs in single living cells. Comprised of the unique modular makeup of guanidine exchange factor Gα-interacting vesicle-associated protein (GIV)/girdin, a guanidine exchange factor that links G proteins to a variety of RTKs, these biosensors provide direct evidence that RTK–GIV–Gαi ternary complexes are formed in living cells and that Gαi is transactivated within minutes after growth factor stimulation at the plasma membrane. Thus, GIV-derived biosensors provide a versatile strategy for visualizing, monitoring, and manipulating the dynamic association of Gαi with RTKs for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins in cells and illuminate a fundamental signaling event regulated by GIV during diverse cellular processes and pathophysiologic states. PMID:25713130

  5. A role for the perlecan protein core in the activation of the keratinocyte growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, G; Eichstetter, I; Iozzo, R V

    2001-01-01

    Perlecan, a widespread heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycan, is directly involved in the storing of angiogenic growth factors, mostly members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) gene family. We have previously shown that antisense targeting of the perlecan gene causes a reduced growth and responsiveness to FGF7 [also known as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] in human cancer cells, and that the perlecan protein core interacts specifically with FGF7. In the present paper, we have investigated human colon carcinoma cells in which the perlecan gene was disrupted by targeted homologous recombination. After screening over 1000 clones, we obtained two clones heterozygous for the null mutation with no detectable perlecan, indicating that the other allele was non-functioning. The perlecan-deficient cells grew more slowly, did not respond to FGF7 with or without the addition of heparin, and were less tumorigenic than control cells. Paradoxically, the perlecan-deficient cells displayed increased FGF7 surface binding. However, the perlecan protein core was required for functional activation of the KGF receptor and downstream signalling. Because heparin could not substitute for perlecan, the HS chains are not critical for FGF7-mediated signalling in this cell system. These results provide the first genetic evidence that the perlecan protein core is a molecular entity implicated in FGF7 binding and activation of its receptor. PMID:11563979

  6. Receptor interaction profiles of novel psychoactive tryptamines compared with classic hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    Rickli, Anna; Moning, Olivier D; Hoener, Marius C; Liechti, Matthias E

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated interactions between the novel psychoactive tryptamines DiPT, 4-OH-DiPT, 4-OH-MET, 5-MeO-AMT, and 5-MeO-MiPT at monoamine receptors and transporters compared with the classic hallucinogens lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocin, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), and mescaline. We investigated binding affinities at human monoamine receptors and determined functional serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptor activation. Binding at and the inhibition of human monoamine uptake transporters and transporter-mediated monoamine release were also determined. All of the novel tryptamines interacted with 5-HT2A receptors and were partial or full 5-HT2A agonists. Binding affinity to the 5-HT2A receptor was lower for all of the tryptamines, including psilocin and DMT, compared with LSD and correlated with the reported psychoactive doses in humans. Several tryptamines, including psilocin, DMT, DiPT, 4-OH-DiPT, and 4-OH-MET, interacted with the serotonin transporter and partially the norepinephrine transporter, similar to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine but in contrast to LSD and mescaline. LSD but not the tryptamines interacted with adrenergic and dopaminergic receptors. In conclusion, the receptor interaction profiles of the tryptamines predict hallucinogenic effects that are similar to classic serotonergic hallucinogens but also MDMA-like psychoactive properties. PMID:27216487

  7. Functional Interaction Between Na/K-ATPase and NMDA Receptor in Cerebellar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Akkuratov, Evgeny E; Lopacheva, Olga M; Kruusmägi, Markus; Lopachev, Alexandr V; Shah, Zahoor A; Boldyrev, Alexander A; Liu, Lijun

    2015-12-01

    NMDA receptors play a crucial role in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. Activation of NMDA receptors changes intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and K(+), which are subsequently restored by Na/K-ATPase. We used immunochemical and biochemical methods to elucidate the potential mechanisms of interaction between these two proteins. We observed that NMDA receptor and Na/K-ATPase interact with each other and this interaction was shown for both isoforms of α subunit (α1 and α3) of Na/K-ATPase expressed in neurons. Using Western blotting, we showed that long-term exposure of the primary culture of cerebellar neurons to nanomolar concentrations of ouabain (a cardiotonic steroid, a specific ligand of Na/K-ATPase) leads to a decrease in the levels of NMDA receptors which is likely mediated by the α3 subunit of Na/K-ATPase. We also observed a decrease in enzymatic activity of the α1 subunit of Na/K-ATPase caused by NMDA receptor activation. This effect is mediated by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). Thus, Na/K-ATPase and NMDA receptor can interact functionally by forming a macromolecular complex which can be important for restoring ionic balance after neuronal excitation. Furthermore, this interaction suggests that NMDA receptor function can be regulated by endogenous cardiotonic steroids which recently have been found in cerebrospinal fluid or by pharmacological drugs affecting Na/K-ATPase function. PMID:25381029

  8. Effective Factors in Interactions within Japanese EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maftoon, Parviz; Ziafar, Meisam

    2013-01-01

    Classroom interactional patterns depend on some contextual, cultural and local factors in addition to the methodologies employed in the classroom. In order to delineate such factors, the focus of classroom interaction research needs to shift from the observables to the unobservables like teachers' and learners' psychological states and…

  9. Structural development of stapled short helical peptides as vitamin D receptor (VDR)-coactivator interaction inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Takashi; Demizu, Yosuke; Kawamura, Megumi; Yamagata, Nanako; Kurihara, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    We developed several stabilized helical heptapeptides (DPI-01-10) composed of l-leucine residues, an α,α-disubstituted α-amino acid (α-aminoisobutyric acid [Aib] or hydroxymethylserine [Hms]), and a stapled side chain as inhibitors of vitamin D receptor (VDR)-coactivator interactions. The inhibitory activity of these peptides against VDR-coactivator interactions was evaluated using a receptor cofactor assay system, and DPI-08 demonstrated strong activity (IC50: 3.2μM). PMID:25637122

  10. Multiple Signaling Pathways of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor in Protection from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzi, Francesca; Prisco, Marco; Dews, Michael; Salomoni, Paolo; Grassilli, Emanuela; Romano, Gaetano; Calabretta, Bruno; Baserga, Renato

    1999-01-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), activated by its ligands, protects several cell types from a variety of apoptotic injuries. The main signaling pathway for IGF-1R-mediated protection from apoptosis has been previously elucidated and rests on the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/protein kinase B, and the phosphorylation and inactivation of BAD, a member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins. In 32D cells (a murine hemopoietic cell line devoid of insulin receptor substrate 1 [IRS-1]), the IGF-1R activates alternative pathways for protection from apoptosis induced by withdrawal of interleukin-3. One of these pathways leads to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, while a third pathway results in the mitochondrial translocation of Raf and depends on the integrity of a group of serines in the C terminus of the receptor that are known to interact with 14.3.3 proteins. All three pathways, however, result in BAD phosphorylation. The presence of multiple antiapoptotic pathways may explain the remarkable efficacy of the IGF-1R in protecting cells from apoptosis. PMID:10490655

  11. Orexin–Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Heteromers in the Ventral Tegmental Area as Targets for Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A.; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I.

    2015-01-01

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R–OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R–OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R–CRF1R–OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A–CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking. PMID:25926444

  12. Characterization of the interaction between the dopamine D4 receptor, KLHL12 and β-arrestins.

    PubMed

    Skieterska, Kamila; Shen, Ao; Clarisse, Dorien; Rondou, Pieter; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel Oscar; Lintermans, Béatrice; Fuxe, Kjell; Xiang, Yang Kevin; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors involved in regulation of cognition, learning, movement and endocrine signaling. The action of G protein-coupled receptors is highly regulated by multifunctional proteins, such as β-arrestins which can control receptor desensitization, ubiquitination and signaling. Previously, we have reported that β-arrestin 2 interacts with KLHL12, a BTB-Kelch protein which functions as an adaptor in a Cullin3-based E3 ligase complex and promotes ubiquitination of the dopamine D4 receptor. Here, we have investigated the molecular basis of the interaction between KLHL12 and β-arrestins and questioned its functional relevance. Our data demonstrate that β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2 bind constitutively to the most common dopamine D4 receptor polymorphic variants and to KLHL12 and that all three proteins can interact within a single macromolecular complex. Surprisingly, stimulation of the receptor has no influence on the association between these proteins or their cellular distribution. We found that Cullin3 also interacts with both β-arrestins but has no influence on their ubiquitination. Knockout of one of the two β-arrestins hampers neither interaction between the dopamine D4 receptor and KLHL12, nor ubiquitination of the receptor. Finally, our results indicate that p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation, the signaling pathway which is often regulated by β-arrestins is not influenced by KLHL12, but seems to be exclusively mediated by Gαi protein upon dopamine D4 receptor stimulation. PMID:27155323

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7) inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saghir; Yousif, Mariam HM; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Al-Farsi, Omama; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor appears to be an important central transduction mechanism in mediating diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] via its Mas receptor can prevent the development of hyperglycaemia-induced cardiovascular complications. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1-7) can inhibit hyperglycaemia-induced EGF receptor transactivation and its classical signalling via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1-7) or AG1478, a selective EGF receptor inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). KEY RESULTS Diabetes significantly enhanced phosphorylation of EGF receptor at tyrosine residues Y992, Y1068, Y1086, Y1148, as well as ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in the mesenteric vasculature bed whereas these changes were significantly attenuated upon Ang-(1–7) or AG1478 treatment. In VSMCs grown in conditions of high glucose (25 mM), an Src-dependent elevation in EGF receptor phosphorylation was observed. Ang-(1-7) inhibited both Ang II- and glucose-induced transactivation of EGF receptor. The inhibition of high glucose-mediated Src-dependant transactivation of EGF receptor by Ang-(1-7) could be prevented by a selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results show for the first time that Ang-(1-7) inhibits EGF receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor/Src-dependent pathway and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. PMID:21806601

  14. Endocytic Adaptor Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Substrate 15 (Eps15) Is Involved in the Trafficking of Ubiquitinated α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Amy; Man, Heng-Ye

    2014-01-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) play a critical role in mediating fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Alterations in receptor expression, distribution, and trafficking have been shown to underlie synaptic plasticity and higher brain functions, including learning and memory, as well as brain dysfunctions such as drug addiction and psychological disorders. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate AMPAR dynamics. We have shown previously that mammalian AMPARs are subject to posttranslational modification by ubiquitin, with AMPAR ubiquitination enhancing receptor internalization and reducing AMPAR cell surface expression. Here we report a crucial role for epidermal growth factor receptor substrate 15 (Eps15), an endocytic adaptor, in ubiquitination-dependent AMPAR internalization. We find that suppression or overexpression of Eps15 results in changes in AMPAR surface expression. Eps15 interacts with AMPARs, which requires Nedd4-mediated GluA1 ubiquitination and the ubiquitin-interacting motif of Eps15. Importantly, we find that Eps15 plays an important role in AMPAR internalization. Knockdown of Eps15 suppresses the internalization of GluA1 but not the mutant GluA1 that lacks ubiquitination sites, indicating a role of Eps15 for the internalization of ubiquitinated AMPARs. These results reveal a novel molecular mechanism employed specifically for the trafficking of the ubiquitin-modified AMPARs. PMID:25023288

  15. Ghrelin's Orexigenic Effect Is Modulated via a Serotonin 2C Receptor Interaction.

    PubMed

    Schellekens, Harriët; De Francesco, Pablo N; Kandil, Dalia; Theeuwes, Wessel F; McCarthy, Triona; van Oeffelen, Wesley E P A; Perelló, Mario; Giblin, Linda; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the intricate pathways that modulate appetite and subsequent food intake is of particular importance considering the rise in the incidence of obesity across the globe. The serotonergic system, specifically the 5-HT2C receptor, has been shown to be of critical importance in the regulation of appetite and satiety. The GHS-R1a receptor is another key receptor that is well-known for its role in the homeostatic control of food intake and energy balance. We recently showed compelling evidence for an interaction between the GHS-R1a receptor and the 5-HT2C receptor in an in vitro cell line system heterologously expressing both receptors. Here, we investigated this interaction further. First, we show that the GHS-R1a/5-HT2C dimer-induced attenuation of calcium signaling is not due to coupling to GαS, as no increase in cAMP signaling is observed. Next, flow cytometry fluorescence resonance energy transfer (fcFRET) is used to further demonstrate the direct interaction between the GHS-R1a receptor and 5-HT2C receptor. In addition, we demonstrate colocalized expression of the 5-HT2C and GHS-R1a receptor in cultured primary hypothalamic and hippocampal rat neurons, supporting the biological relevance of a physiological interaction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that when 5-HT2C receptor signaling is blocked ghrelin's orexigenic effect is potentiated in vivo. In contrast, the specific 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin, recently approved for the treatment of obesity, attenuates ghrelin-induced food intake. This underscores the biological significance of our in vitro findings of 5-HT2C receptor-mediated attenuation of GHS-R1a receptor activity. Together, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that the GHS-R1a/5-HT2C receptor interaction translates into a biologically significant modulation of ghrelin's orexigenic effect. This data highlights the potential development of a combined GHS-R1a and 5-HT2C receptor treatment strategy in weight management. PMID:25727097

  16. A sauvagine/corticotropin-releasing factor receptor expressed in heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, T; Pearse, R V; Lin, C R; Rosenfeld, M G

    1995-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mediates many critical aspects of the physiological response to stress. These effects are elicited by binding to specific high-affinity receptors, which are coupled to guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor (Gs)-response pathways. Recently, a gene encoding a receptor for CRF, expressed in pituitary and the central nervous system (PC-CRF receptor), was isolated and characterized. Here we report the identification and characterization of a second, distinct CRF receptor that is expressed primarily in heart and skeletal muscle and exhibits a specific ligand preference and antagonist sensitivity compared with the PC-CRF receptor. We refer to this second receptor as the heart/muscle (HM)-CRF receptor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7755719

  17. The human poliovirus receptor. Receptor-virus interaction and parameters of disease specificity.

    PubMed

    Gromeier, M; Lu, H H; Bernhardt, G; Harber, J J; Bibb, J A; Wimmer, E

    1995-05-25

    The host range of poliovirus is determined by the expression of the hPVR, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We characterized hPVR proteins biochemically and found them to be complex-type glycoproteins. The outermost V-like domain of three extracellular domains harbors the PVR function. A panel of single or multiple amino acid exchanges were introduced throughout this domain in order to localize regions involved in virus-receptor interactions. Putative contact amino acids were found to reside in the C'C"D and DE regions. Binding and uptake of poliovirus paralleled virus replication in all mutants tested suggesting that virus binding was affected without abrogating the ability to mediate subsequent events in the infection. Although the primate PVR is essential in conferring susceptibility to poliovirus infection, certain strains can induce neurological disease in rodents. Mouse neurovirulent PV isolates of divergent serotypical origin each provoked a distinctive, characteristic neurological syndrome upon intracerebral infection of wild-type mice. We analyzed clinical and histopathological features of diffuse encephalomyelitis caused by these PV strains and compared the condition with poliomyelitis in mice transgenic for the hPVR. Diffuse PV encephalomyelitis in wild-type mice could be distinguished clinically and histopathologically from hPVR-mediated poliomyelitis in trangenic mice. We localized the determinants of mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a), a derivative of PV1 (Mahoney), in a portion of the viral genome encompassing parts of the capsid protein VP1 as well as the nonstructural protein 2A. Mouse neuropathogenicity could possibly be conferred by reduced particle stability of PV1(LS-a) inasmuch as we found particles to be thermolabile. PMID:7611627

  18. NSAIDs Ibuprofen, Indometacin, and Diclofenac do not interact with Farnesoid X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jurema; Klingler, Franca-Maria; Proschak, Ewgenji; Steinhilber, Dieter; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Merk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a ligand activated transcription factor and acts as cellular sensor for bile acids. In this role, FXR is a highly important liver protector and FXR inhibition by antagonists or knockout has shown several deleterious effects. A recent report characterized non-steroidal anti-rheumatic drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen or diclofenac as FXR antagonists and linked hepatotoxic effects of these drugs with antagonistic activity on FXR. Since this would guide a way to develop safer anti-inflammatory agents by sparing FXR, we intended to further characterize the reported antagonistic activity and intensively investigated ibuprofen, indometacin and diclofenac. However, we conclude that these agents do not interact with FXR and that the reported reduced FXR signaling induced by CDCA in presence of NSAIDs is merely a consequence than a cause of hepatotoxicity. PMID:26424593

  19. Estradiol and tamoxifen interaction at receptor sites at 37 C.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H

    1983-09-01

    Mature rat uterine cytosol was pretreated with dextran-coated charcoal at 0 C for 2 h. This renders the subsequently formed estradiol-receptor complex thermostable at 37 C and also uncovers antiestrogen binding sites, possibly by removing an endogenous ligand. A sharp distinction is found between tamoxifen and estradiol as receptor ligands in pretreated cytosols in that tamoxifen will inhibit estradiol binding, on incubation at 37 C, only if dithiothreitol (DTT) had been included in the pretreatment solution. The presence of tamoxifen as the sole ligand in cytosol pretreated in the presence of DTT does not protect the estradiol receptor from thermal inactivation and following 37 C incubation tamoxifen is found bound exclusively to antiestrogen binding sites. Incubating the cytosol at 37 C with an equimolar mixture of estradiol and tamoxifen results in a very large increase in receptor-bound estradiol. This effect is attributed to the presence of tamoxifen complexed with antiestrogen sites. Tamoxifen in such equimolar ligand mixture binds to antiestrogen sites and is excluded from receptor sites by the estradiol, whose affinity for these sites is much greater than that of tamoxifen. PMID:6191968

  20. Differential modulation of transcriptional activity of oestrogen receptors by direct protein-protein interactions with retinoid receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Song, M R; Lee, S K; Seo, Y W; Choi, H S; Lee, J W; Lee, M O

    1998-01-01

    Control of oestradiol-responsive gene regulation by oestrogen receptors (ERs) may involve complex cross-talk with retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Recently, we have shown that ERalpha directly interacts with RARalpha and RXRalpha through their ligand binding domains (LBDs). In the present work, we extend these results by showing that ERbeta binds similarly to RARalpha and RXRalpha but not to the glucocorticoid receptor, as demonstrated by the yeast two-hybrid tests and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays. These direct interactions were also demonstrated in gel-shift assays, in which the oestrogen response element (ERE) binding by ERalpha was enhanced by the RXRalpha LBD but was abolished by the RARalpha LBD. In addition, we showed that RARalpha and RXRalpha bound the ERE as efficiently as ERalpha, suggesting that competition for DNA binding may affect the transactivation function of the ER. In transient transfection experiments, co-expression of RARalpha or RXRalpha, along with ERalpha or ERbeta, revealed differential modulation of the ERE-dependent transactivation, which was distinct from the results when each receptor alone was co-transfected. Importantly, when the LBD of RARalpha was co-expressed with ERalpha, transactivation of ERalpha on the ERE was repressed as efficiently as when wild-type RARalpha was co-expressed. Furthermore, liganded RARalpha or unliganded RXRalpha enhanced the ERalpha transactivation, suggesting the formation of transcriptionally active heterodimer complexes between the ER and retinoid receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that direct protein-protein interactions may play major roles in the determination of the biological consequences of cross-talk between ERs and RARalpha or RXRalpha. PMID:9841885

  1. Charm form factors in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, M. E.; Navarra, F. S.; Nielsen, M.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-12-28

    We calculate the form factors and the coupling constants in vertices with charm mesons, such as {rho}D*D*, in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the applications of these form factors in heavy ion collisions and in B decays. We then present an introduction to the method of QCD sum rules and describe how to work with the three-point function. We give special attention to the procedure employed to extrapolate results obtained in the deep euclidean region to the poles of the particles, located in the time-like region. Finally we present a table of ready-to-use parametrizations of all the form factors, which are relevant for the processes mentioned in the introduction. We also give the coupling constants.

  2. Kinetic contributions to gating by interactions unique to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Borschel, William F; Cummings, Kirstie A; Tindell, LeeAnn K; Popescu, Gabriela K

    2015-10-30

    Among glutamate-gated channels, NMDA receptors produce currents that subside with unusually slow kinetics, and this feature is essential to the physiology of central excitatory synapses. Relative to the homologous AMPA and kainate receptors, NMDA receptors have additional intersubunit contacts in the ligand binding domain that occur at both conserved and non-conserved sites. We examined GluN1/GluN2A single-channel currents with kinetic analyses and modeling to probe these class-specific intersubunit interactions for their role in glutamate binding and receptor gating. We found that substitutions that eliminate such interactions at non-conserved sites reduced stationary gating, accelerated deactivation, and imparted sensitivity to aniracetam, an AMPA receptor-selective positive modulator. Abolishing unique contacts at conserved sites also reduced stationary gating and accelerated deactivation. These results show that contacts specific to NMDA receptors, which brace the heterodimer interface within the ligand binding domain, stabilize actively gating receptor conformations and result in longer bursts and slower deactivations. They support the view that the strength of the heterodimer interface modulates gating in both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors and that unique interactions at this interface are responsible in part for basic differences between the kinetics of NMDA and non-NMDA currents at glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26370091

  3. Statistical Mechanics Model for the Interaction between the Neurotransmitter γ-Aminobutyric acid and GABAA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sufi; Saxena, Nina C.; Conrad, Kevin A.; Hussain, Arif

    2004-07-01

    Interactions between the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAA receptor ion channels play an important role in the central nervous system. A statistical mechanics model is proposed for the interaction between GABA and GABAA receptors. The model provides good fits to the electrophysiology data as well as an estimation of receptor activation energies, and predicts the temperature dependence consistent with measurements. In addition, the model provides insights into single channel conductance measurements. This model is also applicable to other ligand-gated ion channels with similar pentameric structures.

  4. Allosteric interactions between the antagonist prazosin and amiloride analogs at the human alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A; Mynett, A; Lazareno, S; Birdsall, N J

    2000-03-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that amilorides can interact with a well defined allosteric site on the human alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. In this study, the question was explored as to whether the human alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor also possesses an equivalent allosteric site. The six amilorides examined strongly increased the dissociation rate of the antagonist [(3)H]prazosin from the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. With the parent amiloride, the dissociation data were well fitted by an equation derived from the ternary complex allosteric model, compatible with amiloride acting at a defined allosteric site on the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor. In contrast, the dissociation data for [(3)H]prazosin in the presence of the amiloride analogs were not compatible with the equation derived from a one-allosteric-site model, but could be fitted well by an equation derived from a two-allosteric-site model. However, certain individual parameters could not be resolved. The observed dissociation rate constants increased steeply with increasing amiloride analog concentration, and in some cases the data could be fitted with a logistic equation. The slope factors calculated from such fits were 1.2 to 2.1. It is concluded that the structure-binding relationships of the amilorides at the alpha(1A)- and alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors are different. The interactions of the five amiloride analogs, but not the parent amiloride, with the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor are compatible with the presence of two (but not one) allosteric sites, and is thus more complex than that found for the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. PMID:10692482

  5. Micellar lipid composition affects micelle interaction with class B scavenger receptor extracellular loops.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Gontero, Brigitte; Nowicki, Marion; Margier, Marielle; Masset, Gabriel; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) like cluster determinant 36 (CD36) and SR class B type I (SR-BI) play a debated role in lipid transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. We used surface plasmon resonance to analyze real-time interactions between the extracellular protein loops and various ligands ranging from single lipid molecules to mixed micelles. Micelles mimicking physiological structures were necessary for optimal binding to both the extracellular loop of CD36 (lCD36) and the extracellular loop of SR-BI (lSR-BI). Cholesterol, phospholipid, and fatty acid micellar content significantly modulated micelle binding to and dissociation from the transporters. In particular, high phospholipid micellar concentrations inhibited micelle binding to both receptors (-53.8 and -74.4% binding at 0.32 mM compared with 0.04 mM for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05). The presence of fatty acids was crucial for micelle interactions with both proteins (94.4 and 81.3% binding with oleic acid for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05) and fatty acid type substitution within the micelles was the component that most impacted micelle binding to the transporters. These effects were partly due to subsequent modifications in micellar size and surface electric charge, and could be correlated to micellar vitamin D uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our findings show for the first time that micellar lipid composition and micellar properties are key factors governing micelle interactions with SRs. PMID:25833688

  6. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors induce calcium mobilization through cross-talk with Gq-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2010-09-10

    The cross-talk between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and muscarinic receptors was investigated by measuring evoked transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration. HEK293 cells stably expressing human CRF type 1 (hCRF(1)) and type 2(a) (hCRF(2(a))) receptors were stimulated with the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol and shortly after by a CRF agonist. Unexpectedly, this second response was enhanced when compared to stimulating naive cells either with carbachol or CRF agonist only. Priming with 100 microM carbachol increased the maximal CRF agonist response and shifted its concentration-response curve to the left to attain almost the same potency as for stimulating the production of the natural second messenger cyclic AMP. Yet, priming did not affect CRF agonist-stimulated cyclic AMP production itself. Carbachol priming was not restricted to recombinant CRF receptors only since endogenously expressed beta(2)-adrenoceptors also started to produce a robust calcium signal. Without priming no such signal was observed. Similar findings were made in the human retinoblastoma cell line Y79 for endogenously expressed CRF(1) receptors and the type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptors but not for the CRF(2(a)) receptors. This differentiation between CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors was further supported by use of selective agonists and antagonists. The results suggest that stimulating a Gq-coupled receptor shortly before stimulating a Gs-coupled receptor may result in a parallel signaling event on top of the classical cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:20594969

  7. Structural Variation and Uniformity among Tetraloop-Receptor Interactions and Other Loop-Helix Interactions in RNA Crystal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Chai, Dinggeng; Fraser, Marie E.; Zimmerly, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Tetraloop-receptor interactions are prevalent structural units in RNAs, and include the GAAA/11-nt and GNRA-minor groove interactions. In this study, we have compiled a set of 78 nonredundant loop-helix interactions from X-ray crystal structures, and examined them for the extent of their sequence and structural variation. Of the 78 interactions in the set, only four were classical GAAA/11-nt motifs, while over half (48) were GNRA-minor groove interactions. The GNRA-minor groove interactions were not a homogeneous set, but were divided into five subclasses. The most predominant subclass is characterized by two triple base pair interactions in the minor groove, flanked by two ribose zipper contacts. This geometry may be considered the “standard” GNRA-minor groove interaction, while the other four subclasses are alternative ways to form interfaces between a minor groove and tetraloop. The remaining 26 structures in the set of 78 have loops interacting with mostly idiosyncratic receptors. Among the entire set, a number of sequence-structure correlations can be identified, which may be used as initial hypotheses in predicting three-dimensional structures from primary sequences. Conversely, other sequence patterns are not predictive; for example, GAAA loop sequences and GG/CC receptors bind to each other with three distinct geometries. Finally, we observe an example of structural evolution in group II introns, in which loop-receptor motifs are substituted for each other while maintaining the larger three-dimensional geometry. Overall, the study gives a more complete view of RNA loop-helix interactions that exist in nature. PMID:23152878

  8. Computational Approaches for Decoding Select Odorant-Olfactory Receptor Interactions Using Mini-Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Harini, K.; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) belong to the class A G-Protein Coupled Receptor superfamily of proteins. Unlike G-Protein Coupled Receptors, ORs exhibit a combinatorial response to odors/ligands. ORs display an affinity towards a range of odor molecules rather than binding to a specific set of ligands and conversely a single odorant molecule may bind to a number of olfactory receptors with varying affinities. The diversity in odor recognition is linked to the highly variable transmembrane domains of these receptors. The purpose of this study is to decode the odor-olfactory receptor interactions using in silico docking studies. In this study, a ligand (odor molecules) dataset of 125 molecules was used to carry out in silico docking using the GLIDE docking tool (SCHRODINGER Inc Pvt LTD). Previous studies, with smaller datasets of ligands, have shown that orthologous olfactory receptors respond to similarly-tuned ligands, but are dramatically different in their efficacy and potency. Ligand docking results were applied on homologous pairs (with varying sequence identity) of ORs from human and mouse genomes and ligand binding residues and the ligand profile differed among such related olfactory receptor sequences. This study revealed that homologous sequences with high sequence identity need not bind to the same/ similar ligand with a given affinity. A ligand profile has been obtained for each of the 20 receptors in this analysis which will be useful for expression and mutation studies on these receptors. PMID:26221959

  9. Orphan receptor IL-17RD regulates Toll-like receptor signalling via SEFIR/TIR interactions.

    PubMed

    Mellett, Mark; Atzei, Paola; Bergin, Ronan; Horgan, Alan; Floss, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Callanan, John J; Moynagh, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    Receptor families of the innate immune response engage in 'cross-talk' to tailor optimal immune responses against invading pathogens. However, these responses are subject to multiple levels of regulation to keep in check aberrant inflammatory signals. Here, we describe a role for the orphan receptor interleukin-17 receptor D (IL-17RD) in negatively regulating Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced responses. Deficiency of IL-17RD expression in cells leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory signalling and gene expression in response to TLR stimulation, and Il17rd(-/-) mice are more susceptible to TLR-induced septic shock. We demonstrate that the intracellular Sef/IL-17R (SEFIR) domain of IL-17RD targets TIR adaptor proteins to inhibit TLR downstream signalling thus revealing a paradigm involving cross-regulation of members of the IL-17R and TLR families. PMID:25808990

  10. Function of steroidogenic factor 1 domains in nuclear localization, transactivation, and interaction with transcription factor TFIIB and c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Li, L A; Chiang, E F; Chen, J C; Hsu, N C; Chen, Y J; Chung, B C

    1999-09-01

    Normal endocrine development and function require nuclear hormone receptor SF-1 (steroidogenic factor 1). To understand the molecular mechanism of SF-1 action, we have investigated its domain function by mutagenesis and functional analyses. Our mutant studies show that the putative AF2 (activation function 2) helix located at the C-terminal end is indispensable for gene activation. SF-1 does not have an N-terminal AF1 domain. Instead, it contains a unique FP region, composed of the Ftz-F1 box and the proline cluster, after the zinc finger motif. The FP region interacts with transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) in vitro. This interaction requires residues 178-201 of TFIIB, a domain capable of binding several transcription factors. The FP region also mediates physical interaction with c-Jun, and this interaction greatly enhances SF-1 activity. The putative SF-1 ligand, 25-hydroxycholesterol, has no effects on these bindings. In addition, the Ftz-F1 box contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). Removing the basic residues at either end of the key nuclear localization sequence NLS2.2 abolishes the nuclear transport. Expression of mutants containing only the FP region or lacking the AF2 domain blocks wild-type SF-1 activity in cells. By contrast, the mutant having a truncated nuclear localization signal lacks this dominant negative effect. These results delineate the importance of the FP and AF2 regions in nuclear localization, protein-protein interaction, and transcriptional activation. PMID:10478848

  11. Growth differentiation factor 11 signals through the transforming growth factor-beta receptor ALK5 to regionalize the anterior-posterior axis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Olov; Reissmann, Eva; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2006-08-01

    Growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) contributes to regionalize the mouse embryo along its anterior-posterior axis by regulating the expression of Hox genes. The identity of the receptors that mediate GDF11 signalling during embryogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that GDF11 can interact with type I receptors ALK4, ALK5 and ALK7, but predominantly uses ALK4 and ALK5 to activate a Smad3-dependent reporter gene. Alk5 mutant embryos showed malformations in anterior-posterior patterning, including the lack of expression of the posterior determinant Hoxc10, that resemble defects found in Gdf11-null mutants. A heterozygous mutation in Alk5, but not in Alk4 or Alk7, potentiated Gdf11(-/-)-like phenotypes in vertebral, kidney and palate development in an Acvr2b(-/-) background, indicating a genetic interaction between the two receptor genes. Thus, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) receptor ALK5, which until now has only been associated with the biological functions of TGF-beta1 to TGF-beta3 proteins, mediates GDF11 signalling during embryogenesis. PMID:16845371

  12. Indole-3-carbinol downregulation of telomerase gene expression requires the inhibition of estrogen receptor-alpha and Sp1 transcription factor interactions within the hTERT promoter and mediates the G1 cell cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Marconett, Crystal N.; Sundar, Shyam N.; Tseng, Min; Tin, Antony S.; Tran, Kalvin Q.; Mahuron, Kelly M.; Bjeldanes, Leonard F.; Firestone, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a naturally occurring hydrolysis product of glucobrassicin from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and Brussels sprouts, is an anticancer phytochemical that triggers complementary sets of antiproliferative pathways to induce a cell cycle arrest of estrogen-responsive MCF7 breast cancer cells. I3C strongly downregulated transcript expression of the catalytic subunit of the human telomerase (hTERT) gene, which correlated with the dose-dependent indole-mediated G1 cell cycle arrest without altering the transcript levels of the RNA template (hTR) for telomerase elongation. Exogenous expression of hTERT driven by a constitutive promoter prevented the I3C-induced cell cycle arrest and rescued the I3C inhibition of telomerase enzymatic activity and activation of cellular senescence. Time course studies showed that I3C downregulated expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) and cyclin-dependent kinase-6 transcripts levels (which is regulated through the Sp1 transcription factor) prior to the downregulation of hTERT suggesting a mechanistic link. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that I3C disrupted endogenous interactions of both ERα and Sp1 with an estrogen response element–Sp1 composite element within the hTERT promoter. I3C inhibited 17β-estradiol stimulated hTERT expression and stimulated the production of threonine-phosphorylated Sp1, which inhibits Sp1–DNA interactions. Exogenous expression of both ERα and Sp1, but not either alone, in MCF7 cells blocked the I3C-mediated downregulation of hTERT expression. These results demonstrate that I3C disrupts the combined ERα- and Sp1-driven transcription of hTERT gene expression, which plays a significant role in the I3C-induced cell cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. PMID:21693539

  13. The xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and orphan nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha in the regulation of human steroid-/bile acid-sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Song, Chung S; Oh, Taesung; Ahmed, Mohamed; De La Cruz, Isidro John; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2007-09-01

    The nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are the primary transcription factors coordinating induced expression of the enzymes and proteins directing oxidative, conjugative, and transport phases of endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism, whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha), a regulator of hepatic lipid homeostasis, can modify the PXR/CAR response. Steroid- and bile acid-sulfotransferase (SULT2A1) promotes phase II metabolism through its sulfonating action on certain endobiotics, including steroids and bile acids, and on diverse xenobiotics, including therapeutic drugs. This study describes characterization of a PXR- and CAR-inducible composite element in the human SULT2A1 promoter and its synergistic interaction with HNF4alpha. Inverted and direct repeats of AG(G/T)TCA (IR2 and DR4), both binding to PXR and CAR, define the composite element. Differential recognition of the composite element by PXR and CAR is evident because single-site mutation at either IR2 or DR4 in the natural gene abolished the PXR response, whereas mutations at both repeats were necessary to abrogate completely the CAR response. The composite element conferred xenobiotic response to a heterologous promoter, and the cognate ligands induced PXR and CAR recruitment to the chromatin-associated response region. An HNF4alpha element adjacent to the -30 position enhanced basal promoter activity. Although functioning as a synergizer, the HNF4alpha element was not essential for the PXR/CAR response. An emerging role of SULT2A1 in lipid and caloric homeostasis suggests that illumination on the regulatory interactions driving human SULT2A1 expression may reveal new avenues to control certain metabolic disorders. PMID:17595319

  14. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N–H and O–H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  15. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  16. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy; Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  17. Multiple Receptor-Ligand Interactions Direct Tissue-Resident γδ T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Witherden, Deborah. A.; Ramirez, Kevin; Havran, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in epithelial tissues, such as skin, intestine, and lung, where they function in maintenance of the epithelium and provide a crucial first line defense against environmental and pathogenic insults. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanisms directing their activation and function have remained elusive. Epithelial-resident γδ T cells function through constant communication with neighboring cells, either via direct cell-to-cell contact or cell-to-matrix interactions. These intimate relationships allow γδ T cells to facilitate the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis, tissue repair following injury, inflammation, and protection from malignancy. Recent studies have identified a number of molecules involved in these complex interactions, under both homeostatic conditions, as well as following perturbation of these barrier tissues. These interactions are crucial to the timely production of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins for restoration of homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the mechanisms directing epithelial-T cell crosstalk and the distinct roles played by individual receptor-ligand pairs of cell surface molecules in this process. PMID:25505467

  18. Human corpus luteum: presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and binding characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.R.; Khan-Dawood, F.S.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors are present in many reproductive tissues but have not been demonstrated in the human corpus luteum. To determine the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and its binding characteristics, we carried out studies on the plasma cell membrane fraction of seven human corpora lutea (days 16 to 25) of the menstrual cycle. Specific epidermal growth factor receptors were present in human corpus luteum. Insulin, nerve growth factor, and human chorionic gonadotropin did not competitively displace epidermal growth factor binding. The optimal conditions for corpus luteum-epidermal growth factor receptor binding were found to be incubation for 2 hours at 4 degrees C with 500 micrograms plasma membrane protein and 140 femtomol /sup 125/I-epidermal growth factor per incubate. The number (mean +/- SEM) of epidermal growth factor binding sites was 12.34 +/- 2.99 X 10(-19) mol/micrograms protein; the dissociation constant was 2.26 +/- 0.56 X 10(-9) mol/L; the association constant was 0.59 +/- 0.12 X 10(9) L/mol. In two regressing corpora lutea obtained on days 2 and 3 of the menstrual cycle, there was no detectable specific epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity. Similarly no epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity could be detected in ovarian stromal tissue. Our findings demonstrate that specific receptors for epidermal growth factor are present in the human corpus luteum. The physiologic significance of epidermal growth factor receptors in human corpus luteum is unknown, but epidermal growth factor may be involved in intragonadal regulation of luteal function.

  19. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Prevents Retinal Cell Death via PEDF Receptor (PEDF-R)

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Preeti; Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Kenealey, Jason; DesJardin, Jacqueline; Notari, Luigi; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) displays retina survival activity by interacting with receptor proteins on cell surfaces. We have previously reported that PEDF binds and stimulates PEDF receptor (PEDF-R), a transmembrane phospholipase. However, the PEDF binding site of PEDF-R and its involvement in survival activity have not been identified. The purpose of this work is to identify a biologically relevant ligand-binding site on PEDF-R. PEDF bound the PEDF-R ectodomain L4 (Leu159–Met325) with affinity similar to the full-length PEDF-R (Met1–Leu504). Binding assays using synthetic peptides spanning L4 showed that PEDF selectively bound E5b (Ile193–Leu232) and P1 (Thr210–Leu249) peptides. Recombinant C-terminal truncated PEDF-R4 (Met1–Leu232) and internally truncated PEDF-R and PEDF-R4 (ΔHis203–Leu232) retained phospholipase activity of the full-length PEDF-R. However, PEDF-R polypeptides without the His203–Leu232 region lost the PEDF affinity that stimulated their enzymatic activity. Cell surface labeling showed that PEDF-R is present in the plasma membranes of retina cells. Using siRNA to selectively knock down PEDF-R in retina cells, we demonstrated that PEDF-R is essential for PEDF-mediated cell survival and antiapoptotic activities. Furthermore, preincubation of PEDF with P1 and E5b peptides blocked the PEDF·PEDF-R-mediated retina cell survival activity, implying that peptide binding to PEDF excluded ligand-receptor interactions on the cell surface. Our findings establish that PEDF-R is required for the survival and antiapoptotic effects of PEDF on retina cells and has determinants for PEDF binding within its L4 ectodomain that are critical for enzymatic stimulation. PMID:23818523

  20. Adverse Reaction to Cetuximab, an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Štulhofer Buzina, Daška; Martinac, Ivana; Ledić Drvar, Daniela; Čeović, Romana; Bilić, Ivan; Marinović, Branka

    2016-04-01

    Dear Editor, Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a new strategy in treatment of a variety of solid tumors, such as colorectal carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and pancreatic cancer (1). Cetuximab is a chimeric human-murine monoclonal antibody against EGFR. Cutaneous side effects are the most common adverse reactions occurring during epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRI) therapy. Papulopustular rash (acne like rash) develop with 80-86% patients receiving cetuximab, while xerosis, eczema, fissures, teleangiectasiae, hyperpigmentations, and nail and hair changes occur less frequently (2). The mechanism underlying these skin changes has not been established and understood. It seems EGFRI alter cell growth and differentiation, leading to impaired stratum corneum and cell apoptosis (3-5). An abdominoperineal resection of the rectal adenocarcinoma (Dukes C) was performed on a 43-year-old female patient. Following surgery, adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy was applied. After two years, the patient suffered a metastatic relapse. Abdominal lymphadenopathy was detected on multi-slice computer tomography (MSCT) images, with an increased value of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tumor marker (maximal value 57 ng/mL). Hematological and biochemical tests were within normal limits, so first-line chemotherapy with oxaliplatin and a 5-fluorouracil (FOLFOX4) protocol was introduced. A wild type of the KRAS gene was confirmed in tumor tissue (diagnostic prerequisite for the introduction of EGFRI) and cetuximab (250 mg per m2 of body surface) was added to the treatment protocol. The patient responded well to the treatment with confirmed partial regression of the tumor formations. Three months after the patient started using cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, the patient presented with a papulopustular eruption in the seborrhoeic areas (Figure 1) and eczematoid reactions on the extremities

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in metastatic anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jane E; Ohinata, Aki; Silva, Ninoska N; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Eng, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) anal cancer is relatively rare. With limited data, cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil has traditionally been utilized in the first-line setting. Treatment beyond front-line cisplatin progression is not well defined. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly overexpressed in SCCA anal cancer and EGFR inhibition may represent a potential treatment target for this population in need. Our case series evaluated metastatic SCCA anal cancer patients who received an EGFR monoclonal antibody as second-line or third-line therapy. Data collected consisted of demographics, previous treatment, metastatic disease sites, localized therapy received, regimen received, first radiographic result, progression-free survival, and overall survival. A total of 17 patients were included, with most (76%) patients receiving an EGFR monoclonal antibody in the second-line setting. Common regimens identified combined cetuximab or panitumumab with a fluoropyrimidine plus platinum (35%), carboplatin plus paclitaxel (29%), or cisplatin plus vinorelbine (18%). Thirty-five percent of patients achieved a response and 24% had stable disease. The overall median progression-free survival and overall survival were 7.3 and 24.7 months, respectively. Compared with our large retrospective study in the front-line metastatic anal cancer setting, our study suggests that anti-EGFR therapy in combination with certain chemotherapy derived additional benefit in the refractory setting. In the metastatic setting, there is a need to discover effective therapies. We present a diverse metastatic SCCA anal cancer patient population who received cetuximab or panitumumab with chemotherapy in the second-line or third-line setting. Our case series strengthens the concept of EGFR inhibition in metastatic SCCA anal cancer. PMID:27272412

  2. Assessment of epidermal growth factor receptor status in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui-Jun; Ogawa, Mikako; Magata, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Masahiko; Ohmomo, Yoshiro; Namba, Hiroki; Sakahara, Harumi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Our previous study showed that a newly designed tracer radioiodinated 6-(3-morpholinopropoxy)-7-ethoxy-4-(3’-iodophenoxy)quinazoline ([125I]PYK) is promising for the evaluation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) status and prediction of gefitinib treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. EGFR is over-expressed and mutated also in glioblastoma. In the present study, the expressions and mutation of EGFR were tested with [125I] PYK in glioblastoma in vitro and in vivo to determine whether this could be used to predict the sensitivity of glioblastoma to gefitinib treatment. Methods: Glioblastoma cell lines with different expression of EGFR were tested. Growth inhibition of cell lines by gefitinib was assessed by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. Uptake levels of [125I]PYK were evaluated in cell lines in vitro. Tumor targeting of [125I]PYK was examined by a biodistribution study and imaging by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Results: High concentrations of gefitinib were needed to suppress EGFR-mediated proliferation. The uptake of [125I] PYK in cell lines in vitro was low, and showed no correlation with EGFR expression or mutation status. Biodistribution study and SPECT imaging with [125I]PYK for xenografts showed no [125I]PYK uptake. Conclusion: The results showed prediction of gefitinib effectiveness was difficult in glioblastoma by [125I]PYK, which might be due to the complicated expression of EGFR status in glioblastoma. Thus, new tracers for sites downstream of the mutant EGFR should be investigated in further studies.

  3. A third distinct tumor necrosis factor receptor of orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Loparev, V N; Parsons, J M; Knight, J C; Panus, J F; Ray, C A; Buller, R M; Pickup, D J; Esposito, J J

    1998-03-31

    Cowpox virus Brighton red strain (CPV) contains a gene, crmD, which encodes a 320-aa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) of 44% and 22% identity, respectively, to the CPV TNFR-like proteins, cytokine response modifiers (crm) CrmB and CrmC. The crmD gene was interrupted in three other cowpox strains examined and absent in various other orthopoxviruses; however, four strains of ectromelia virus (ECT) examined contained an intact crmD (97% identity to CPV crmD) and lacked cognates of crmB and crmC. The protein, CrmD, contains a transport signal; a 151-aa cysteine-rich region with 21 cysteines that align with human TNFRII ligand-binding region cysteines; and C-terminal region sequences that are highly diverged from cellular TNFR C-terminal region sequences involved in signal transduction. Bacterial maltose-binding proteins containing the CPV or ECT CrmD cysteine-rich region bound TNF and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTalpha) and blocked their in vitro cytolytic activity. Secreted viral CrmD bound TNF and LTalpha and was detectable after the early stage of replication, using nonreducing conditions, as 60- to 70-kDa predominant and 90- to 250-kDa minor disulfide-linked complexes that were able to be reduced to a 46-kDa form and deglycosylated to a 38-kDa protein. Cells infected with CPV produced extremely low amounts of CrmD compared with ECT. Possessing up to three TNFRs, including CrmD, which is secreted as disulfide-linked complexes in varied amounts by CPV and ECT, likely enhances the dynamics of the immune modulating mechanisms of orthopoxviruses. PMID:9520445

  4. DEPENDENCE OF PPAR LIGAND-INDUCED MAPK SIGNALING ON EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TRANSACTIVATION HEPARIN-BINDING EGF CLEAVAGE MEDIATES ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that function as ligand-activated transcription factors regulating lipid metabolism and homeostasis. In addition to their ability to regulate PPAR-mediated gene transcription, PPARalpha and gamma li...

  5. Theoretical investigation of interaction between the set of ligands and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are neuron receptor proteins that provide a transmission of nerve impulse through the synapses. They are composed of a pentametric assembly of five homologous subunits (5 α7 subunits for α7nAChR, for example), oriented around the central pore. These receptors might be found in the chemical synapses of central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the neuromuscular synapses. Transmembrane domain of the one of such receptors constitutes ion channel. The conductive properties of ion channel strongly depend on the receptor conformation changes in the response of binding with some molecule, f.e. acetylcholine. Investigation of interaction between ligands and acetylcholine receptor is important for drug design. In this work we investigate theoretically the interaction between the set of different ligands (such as vanillin, thymoquinone, etc.) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (primarily with subunit of the α7nAChR) by different methods and packages (AutodockVina, GROMACS, KVAZAR, HARLEM, VMD). We calculate interaction energy between different ligands in the subunit using molecular dynamics. On the base of obtained calculation results and using molecular docking we found an optimal location of different ligands in the subunit.

  6. DAPK1 Interaction with NMDA Receptor NR2B Subunits Mediates Brain Damage in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Weihong; Xu, Xin; Peng, Lisheng; Zhong, Xiaofen; Zhang, Wenfeng; Soundarapandian, Mangala M.; Balel, Cherine; Wang, Manqi; Jia, Nali; Zhang, Wen; Lew, Frank; Chan, Sic Lung; Chen, Yanfang; Lu, Youming

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors constitute a major subtype of glutamate receptors at extra-synaptic sites that link multiple intracellular catabolic processes responsible for irreversible neuronal death. Here, we report that cerebral ischemia recruits death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) into the NMDA receptor NR2B protein complex in the cortex of adult mice. DAPK1 directly binds with the NMDA receptor NR2B C-terminal tail consisting of amino acid 1292–1304 (NR2BCT). A constitutively active DAPK1 phosphorylates NR2B subunit at Ser-1303 and in turn enhances the NR1/NR2B receptor channel conductance. Genetic deletion of DAPK1 or administration of NR2BCT that uncouples an activated DAPK1 from an NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in vivo in mice blocks injurious Ca2+ influx through NMDA receptor channels at extrasynaptic sites and protects neurons against cerebral ischemic insults. Thus, DAPK1 physically and functionally interacts with the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit at extra-synaptic sites and this interaction acts as a central mediator for stroke damage. PMID:20141836

  7. Transcription factor interactions: Selectors of positive or negative regulation from a single DNA element

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, M.I.; Miner, J.N.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Yamamoto, K.R. )

    1990-09-14

    The mechanism by which a single factor evokes opposite regulatory effects from a specific DNA sequence is not well understood. In this study, a 25-base pair element that resides upstream of the mouse proliferin gene was examined; it conferred on linked promoters either positive or negative glucocorticoid regulation, depending upon physiological context. This sequence, denoted a composite glucocorticoid response element (GRE), was bound selective in vitro both by the glucocorticoid receptor and by c-Jun and c-Fos, components of the phorbol ester-activated AP-1 transcription factor. Indeed, c-Jun and c-Fos served as selectors of hormone responsiveness: the composite GRE was inactive in the absence of c-Jun, whereas it conferred a positive glucocorticoid effect in the presence of c-Jun, and a negative glucocorticoid effect in the presence of c-Jun and relatively high levels of c-Fos. The receptor also interacted selectively with c-Jun in vitro. A general model for composite GRE action is proposed that invokes both DNA binding and protein-protein interactions by receptor and nonreceptor factors.

  8. Factor VIIa binding to endothelial cell protein C receptor protects vascular barrier integrity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    SUNDARAM, J.; KESHAVA, S.; GOPALAKRISHNAN, R.; ESMON, C. T.; PENDURTHI, U. R.; RAO, L . V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Recent studies have shown that factor VIIa binds to endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR), a cellular receptor for protein C and activated protein C. At present, the physiologic significance of FVIIa interaction with EPCR in vivo remains unclear. Objective: To investigate whether exogenously administered FVIIa, by binding to EPCR, induces a barrier protective effect in vivo. Methods Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular leakage in the lung and kidney, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular leakage in the skin, were used to evaluate the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Wild-type, EPCR-deficient, EPCR-overexpressing and hemophilia A mice were used in the studies. Results Administration of FVIIa reduced LPS-induced vascular leakage in the lung and kidney; the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect was attenuated in EPCR-deficient mice. The extent of VEGF-induced vascular leakage in the skin was highly dependent on EPCR expression levels. Therapeutic concentrations of FVIIa attenuated VEGF-induced vascular leakage in control mice but not in EPCR-deficient mice. Blockade of FVIIa binding to EPCR with a blocking mAb completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Similarly, administration of protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist blocked the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Hemophilic mice showed increased vascular permeability, and administration of therapeutic concentrations of FVIIa improved barrier integrity in these mice. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that FVIIa binding to EPCR leads to a barrier protective effect in vivo. This finding may have clinical relevance, as it indicates additional advantages of using FVIIa in treating hemophilic patients. PMID:24977291

  9. Muscle Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Promotes Axonal Regeneration and Functional Recovery Following Peripheral Nerve Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy; Spearry, Rachel P.; Leahy, Kendra M.; Robitz, Rachel; Trinh, Dennis S.; Mason, Carter O.; Zurbrugg, Rebekah J.; Batt, Myra K.; Paul, Richard J.; Maclennan, A. John

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration maintains, protects, and promotes the regeneration of both motor neurons (MNs) and skeletal muscle in a wide variety of models. Expression of CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα), an essential CNTF receptor component, is greatly increased in skeletal muscle following neuromuscular insult. Together the data suggest that muscle CNTFRα may contribute to neuromuscular maintenance, protection, and/or regeneration in vivo. To directly address the role of muscle CNTFRα, we selectively-depleted it in vivo by using a “floxed” CNTFRα mouse line and a gene construct (mlc1f-Cre) that drives the expression of Cre specifically in skeletal muscle. The resulting mice were challenged with sciatic nerve crush. Counting of nerve axons and retrograde tracing of MNs indicated that muscle CNTFRα contributes to MN axonal regeneration across the lesion site. Walking track analysis indicated that muscle CNTFRα is also required for normal recovery of motor function. However, the same muscle CNTFRα depletion unexpectedly had no detected effect on the maintenance or regeneration of the muscle itself, even though exogenous CNTF has been shown to affect these functions. Similarly, MN survival and lesion-induced terminal sprouting were unaffected. Therefore, muscle CNTFRα is an interesting new example of a muscle growth factor receptor that, in vivo under physiological conditions, contributes much more to neuronal regeneration than to the maintenance or regeneration of the muscle itself. This novel form of muscle–neuron interaction also has implications in the therapeutic targeting of the neuromuscular system in MN disorders and following nerve injury. PMID:23504871

  10. Cloning of a factor required for activity of the Ah (dioxin) receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.C.; Reyes, H.; Chu, Fongfong; Sander, F.; Conley, L.H.; Brooks, B.A.; Hankinson, O. )

    1991-05-17

    The aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor binds various environmental pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines, and polychlorinated aromatic compounds (dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls), and mediates the carcinogenic effects of these agents. The complementary DNA and part of the gene for an 87-kilodalton human protein that is necessary for Ah receptor function have been cloned. The protein is not the ligand-binding subunit of the receptor but is a factor that is required for the ligand-binding subunit to translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus after binding ligand. The requirement for this factor distinguishes the Ah receptor from the glucocorticoid receptor, to which the Ah receptor has been presumed to be similar. Two portions of the 87-kilodalton protein share sequence similarities with two Drosophila proteins, Per and Sim. Another segment of the protein shows conformity to the consensus sequence for the basic helix-loop-helix motif found in proteins that bind DNA as homodimers or heterodimers.

  11. Counteracting Interactions between Lipopolysaccharide Molecules with Differential Activation of Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Schifferle, Robert E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated counteracting interactions between the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli (Ec-LPS) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg-LPS), which induce cellular activation through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2, respectively. We found that Ec-LPS induced tolerance in THP-1 cells to subsequent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induction by Pg-LPS, though the reverse was not true, and looked for explanatory differential effects on the signal transduction pathway. Cells exposed to Pg-LPS, but not to Ec-LPS, displayed persisting expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase without apparent degradation, presumably allowing prolonged relay of downstream signals. Accordingly, cells pretreated with Pg-LPS, but not with Ec-LPS, were effectively activated in response to subsequent exposure to either LPS molecule, as evidenced by assessing nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity. In fact, Pg-LPS primed THP-1 cells for enhanced NF-κB activation and TNF-α release upon restimulation with the same LPS. This was a dose-dependent effect and correlated with upregulation of surface TLR2 expression. Furthermore, we observed inhibition of NF-κB-dependent transcription in a reporter cell line pretreated with Ec-LPS and restimulated with Pg-LPS (compared to cells pretreated with medium only and restimulated with Pg-LPS), but not when the reverse treatment was made. Although Pg-LPS could not make cells tolerant to subsequent activation by Ec-LPS, Pg-LPS inhibited Ec-LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 release when the two molecules were added simultaneously into THP-1 cell cultures. Pg-LPS also suppressed P. gingivalis FimA protein-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription in the 3E10/huTLR4 reporter cell line, which does not express TLR2. This rules out competition for common signaling intermediates, suggesting that Pg-LPS may block component(s) of the TLR4 receptor complex. Interactions between TLR2 and TLR4 agonists may be important in the

  12. Toll-Like Receptor Interactions Measured by Microscopic and Flow Cytometric FRET.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabor L; Langhoff, Pia; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions regulate biological networks. The most proximal events that initiate signal transduction frequently are receptor dimerization or conformational changes in receptor complexes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane receptors that are activated by a number of exogenous and endogenous ligands. Most TLRs can respond to multiple ligands and the different TLRs recognize structurally diverse molecules ranging from proteins, sugars, lipids, and nucleic acids. TLRs can be expressed on the plasma membrane or in endosomal compartments and ligand recognition thus proceeds in different microenvironments. Not surprisingly, distinctive mechanisms of TLR receptor activation have evolved. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of TLR activation is important for the development of novel synthetic TLR activators or pharmacological inhibitors of TLRs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with GFP technology allows the direct visualization of TLR expression in living cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements between two differentially tagged proteins permit the study of TLR interaction, and distances between receptors in the range of molecular interactions can be measured and visualized. Additionally, FRET measurements combined with confocal microscopy provide detailed information about molecular interactions in different subcellular localizations. These techniques permit the dynamic visualization of early signaling events in living cells and can be utilized in pharmacological or genetic screens. PMID:26803621

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in Brazilian lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Carlos E.; Ciol, Heloísa; Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Benine, Lucimara C.; Silva, Luciana H.; Ojopi, Elida B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer and has recently emerged as an important target for molecular therapeutics. The KRAS oncogene also plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a population of Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: A total of 207 specimens from Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer were analyzed for activating epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS somatic mutations, and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics (including age, gender, ethnicity, smoking habits, and histological subtype) were examined. RESULTS: We identified 63 cases (30.4%) with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and 30 cases (14.6%) with KRAS mutations. The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor mutation we detected was a deletion in exon 19 (60.3%, 38 patients), followed by an L858R amino acid substitution in exon 21 (27%, 17 patients). The most common types of KRAS mutations were found in codon 12. There were no significant differences in epidermal growth factor receptor or KRAS mutations by gender or primary versus metastatic lung cancer. There was a higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in the non-Asian patients. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were more prevalent in adenocarcinomas than in non-adenocarcinoma histological types. Being a non-smoker was significantly associated with the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations, but the prevalence of KRAS mutations was significantly associated with smoking. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to examine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a Brazilian population sample with non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:22666783

  14. Optical spectroscopic approach as a rapid tool to characterize the interactions of retinoids with human nuclear receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morjani, Hamid; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Manfait, Michel

    1998-04-01

    Retinoids are potent molecules that can affect a variety of fundamental biological processes including cell differentiation and proliferation and apoptosis. These molecules elicit their biological effects by activating a family of nuclear receptors which act as ligand-inducible transcription factors belonging to the steroid/thyroid receptor superfamily. Retinoic acid receptors form heterodimers in which response to ligand binding, both partners contribute to transactivation and/or DNA binding in vivo. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Fourier transform-SERS (FT-SERS), fluorescence and circular dichroism are proposed to rapidly give information on the interaction of the different RARs and RXRs with their specific ligands at physiological concentrations. FT-SERS data reveal a significant attenuation in intensity of the bands originating from the retinoic polyenic chain upon complexation. The spectrum is dominantly of the (Beta) - ionone ring. Fluorescence measurements supported the hydrophobic character of the ligand binding pocket and the circular dichroic data indicate that the protein helices extend upon ligand binding. These novel spectroscopic information are fully consistent with published x-ray crystallographic results and suggest that these techniques may be valuable additional tools to characterize the interactions of agonists and antagonists with residues of the ligand binding pocket retinoid receptor homo- and hetero-dimers.

  15. Lipo-chitooligosaccharidic nodulation factors and their perception by plant receptors.

    PubMed

    Fliegmann, Judith; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2015-10-01

    Lipo-chitooligosaccharides produced by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are signaling molecules involved in the establishment of an important agronomical and ecological symbiosis with plants. These compounds, known as Nod factors, are biologically active on plant roots at very low concentrations indicating that they are perceived by specific receptors. This article summarizes the main strategies developed for the syntheses of bioactive Nod factors and their derivatives in order to better understand their mode of perception. Different Nod factor receptors and LCO-binding proteins identified by genetic or biochemical approaches are also presented, indicating perception mechanisms that seem to be more complicated than expected, probably involving multi-component receptor complexes. PMID:26233756

  16. Interacting factors in the control of the crustacean molt cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    In order to account for the known phenomena of the crustacean molt cycle, at least six factors must be postulated: a molting hormone (20-OH-ecdysone), a molt inhibiting hormone (MIH), an anecdysial limb autotomy factor, a proecdysial limb autotomy factor, a limb growth inhibiting factor and an exuviation factor. Only the molting hormone and its derivatives have been chemically well defined. The various factors interact in complex ways to maintain not only a coordinated proecdysial period in preparation for exuviation but also a proecdysial period with the flexibility to respond to such interim hazards as the loss of partially regenerated limbs. 78 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  17. Interacting factors in the control of the crustacean molt cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    In order to account for the known phenomena of the crustacean molt cycle, at least six factors must be postulated: a molting hormone (20-OH-ecdysone), a molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH), an anecdysial limb autotomy factor, a proecdysial limb-autotomy factor, a limb growth-inhibiting factor and an exuviation factor. Only the molting hormone and its derivatives have been chemically well defined. The various factors interact in complex ways to maintain not only a coordinated proecdysial period in preparation for exuviation but also a proecdysial period with the flexibility to respond to such interim hazards as the loss of partially regenerated limbs. 79 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  18. Structures of a platelet-derived growth factor/propeptide complex and a platelet-derived growth factor/receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Lin, P. Charles; He, Xiaolin

    2010-07-13

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their receptors (PDGFRs) are prototypic growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases which have critical functions in development. We show that PDGFs share a conserved region in their prodomain sequences which can remain noncovalently associated with the mature cystine-knot growth factor domain after processing. The structure of the PDGF-A/propeptide complex reveals this conserved, hydrophobic association mode. We also present the structure of the complex between PDGF-B and the first three Ig domains of PDGFR{beta}, showing that two PDGF-B protomers clamp PDGFR{beta} at their dimerization seam. The PDGF-B:PDGFR{beta} interface is predominantly hydrophobic, and PDGFRs and the PDGF propeptides occupy overlapping positions on mature PDGFs, rationalizing the need of propeptides by PDGFs to cover functionally important hydrophobic surfaces during secretion. A large-scale structural organization and rearrangement is observed for PDGF-B upon receptor binding, in which the PDGF-B L1 loop, disordered in the structure of the free form, adopts a highly specific conformation to form hydrophobic interactions with the third Ig domain of PDGFR{beta}. Calorimetric data also shows that the membrane-proximal homotypic PDGFR{alpha} interaction, albeit required for activation, contributes negatively to ligand binding. The structural and biochemical data together offer insights into PDGF-PDGFR signaling, as well as strategies for PDGF-antagonism.

  19. EFFECT OF GROWTH FACTOR-FIBRONECTIN MATRIX INTERACTION ON RAT TYPE II CELL ADHESION AND DNA SYTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Type II cells attach, migrate and proliferate on a provisional fibronectin-rich matrix during alveolar wall repair after lung injury. The combination of cell-substratum interactions via integrin receptors and exposure to local growth factors are likely to initiat...

  20. ERECTA and BAK1 Receptor Like Kinases Interact to Regulate Immune Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jordá, Lucía; Sopeña-Torres, Sara; Escudero, Viviana; Nuñez-Corcuera, Beatriz; Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; Torii, Keiko U; Molina, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ERECTA (ER) receptor-like kinase (RLK) regulates Arabidopsis thaliana organ growth, and inflorescence and stomatal development by interacting with the ERECTA-family genes (ERf) paralogs, ER-like 1 (ERL1) and ERL2, and the receptor-like protein (RLP) TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). ER also controls immune responses and resistance to pathogens such as the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto) and the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina BMM (PcBMM). We found that er null-mutant plants overexpressing an ER dominant-negative version lacking the cytoplasmic kinase domain (ERΔK) showed an enhanced susceptibility to PcBMM, suggesting that ERΔK associates and forms inactive complexes with additional RLKs/RLPs required for PcBMM resistance. Genetic analyses demonstrated that ER acts in a combinatorial specific manner with ERL1, ERL2, and TMM to control PcBMM resistance. Moreover, BAK1 (BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1-associated kinase 1) RLK, which together with ERf/TMM regulates stomatal patterning and resistance to Pto, was also found to have an unequal contribution with ER in regulating immune responses and resistance to PcBMM. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments in Nicotiana benthamiana further demonstrated BAK1-ER protein interaction. The secreted epidermal pattern factor peptides (EPF1 and EPF2), which are perceived by ERf members to specify stomatal patterning, do not seem to regulate ER-mediated immunity to PcBMM, since their inducible overexpression in A. thaliana did not impact on PcBMM resistance. Our results indicate that the multiproteic receptorsome formed by ERf, TMM and BAK1 modulates A. thaliana resistance to PcBMM, and suggest that the cues underlying ERf/TMM/BAK1-mediated immune responses are distinct from those regulating stomatal pattering. PMID:27446127

  1. ERECTA and BAK1 Receptor Like Kinases Interact to Regulate Immune Responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jordá, Lucía; Sopeña-Torres, Sara; Escudero, Viviana; Nuñez-Corcuera, Beatriz; Delgado-Cerezo, Magdalena; Torii, Keiko U.; Molina, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ERECTA (ER) receptor-like kinase (RLK) regulates Arabidopsis thaliana organ growth, and inflorescence and stomatal development by interacting with the ERECTA-family genes (ERf) paralogs, ER-like 1 (ERL1) and ERL2, and the receptor-like protein (RLP) TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). ER also controls immune responses and resistance to pathogens such as the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto) and the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina BMM (PcBMM). We found that er null-mutant plants overexpressing an ER dominant-negative version lacking the cytoplasmic kinase domain (ERΔK) showed an enhanced susceptibility to PcBMM, suggesting that ERΔK associates and forms inactive complexes with additional RLKs/RLPs required for PcBMM resistance. Genetic analyses demonstrated that ER acts in a combinatorial specific manner with ERL1, ERL2, and TMM to control PcBMM resistance. Moreover, BAK1 (BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1-associated kinase 1) RLK, which together with ERf/TMM regulates stomatal patterning and resistance to Pto, was also found to have an unequal contribution with ER in regulating immune responses and resistance to PcBMM. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments in Nicotiana benthamiana further demonstrated BAK1-ER protein interaction. The secreted epidermal pattern factor peptides (EPF1 and EPF2), which are perceived by ERf members to specify stomatal patterning, do not seem to regulate ER-mediated immunity to PcBMM, since their inducible overexpression in A. thaliana did not impact on PcBMM resistance. Our results indicate that the multiproteic receptorsome formed by ERf, TMM and BAK1 modulates A. thaliana resistance to PcBMM, and suggest that the cues underlying ERf/TMM/BAK1-mediated immune responses are distinct from those regulating stomatal pattering. PMID:27446127

  2. Effects of radiation on the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Sharma, Sunil K.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Corry, Peter M.; Tripathi, Preeti; Lieblong, Benjamin J.; Guha, Chandan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a serious side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway is essential for the function and survival of cardiomyocytes. Hence, agents that target the EGFR pathway are cardiotoxic. Tocotrienols protect from radiation injury, but may also enhance the therapeutic effects of EGFR pathway inhibitors in cancer treatment. This study investigates the effects of local irradiation on the EGFR pathway in the heart and tests whether tocotrienols may modify radiation-induced changes in this pathway. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats received image-guided localized heart irradiation with 21 Gy. Twenty four hours before irradiation, rats received a single dose of tocotrienol-enriched formulation or vehicle by oral gavage. At time points from 2 hours to 9 months after irradiation, left ventricular expression of EGFR pathway mediators was studied. Results Irradiation caused a decrease in the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and neuregulin-1 (Nrg-1) mRNA from 6 hours up to 10 weeks, followed by an upregulation of these ligands and the receptor erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog (ErbB)4 at 6 months. In addition, the upregulation of Nrg-1 was statistically significant up to 9 months after irradiation. A long-term upregulation of ErbB2 protein did not coincide with changes in transcription or post-translational interaction with the chaperone heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Pretreatment with tocotrienols prevented radiation-induced changes at 2 weeks. Conclusions Local heart irradiation causes long-term changes in the EGFR pathway. Studies have to address how radiation may interact with cardiotoxic effects of EGFR inhibitors. PMID:23488537

  3. Factor Content of the Hill Interaction Matrix--Form B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Robert J.; McIntire, Walter G.

    1976-01-01

    Investigates the construct validity of the Hill Interaction Matrix--Form B, a 64-item instrument designed to assess preferred modes of interaction in group settings. A factor analysis was performed by using 134 subjects. Results indicate that the items and the conceptual format are appropriate. (Author)

  4. Dissecting the chemistry of nicotinic receptor-ligand interactions with infrared difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Stephen E; Hill, Danny G; Baenziger, John E

    2002-03-22

    The physical interactions that occur between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo and the agonists carbamylcholine and tetramethylamine have been studied using both conventional infrared difference spectroscopy and a novel double-ligand difference technique. The latter was developed to isolate vibrational bands from residues in a membrane receptor that interact with individual functional groups on a small molecule ligand. The binding of either agonist leads to an increase in vibrational intensity at frequencies centered near 1663, 1655, 1547, 1430, and 1059 cm(-1) indicating that both induce a conformational change from the resting to the desensitized state. Vibrational shifts near 1580, 1516, 1455, 1334, and between 1300 and 1400 cm(-1) are assigned to structural perturbations of tyrosine and possibly both tryptophan and charged carboxylic acid residues upon the formation of receptor-quaternary amine interactions, with the relatively intense feature near 1516 cm(-1) indicating a key role for tyrosine. Other vibrational bands suggest the involvement of additional side chains in agonist binding. Two side-chain vibrational shifts from 1668 and 1605 cm(-1) to 1690 and 1620 cm(-1), respectively, could reflect the formation of a hydrogen bond between the ester carbonyl of carbamylcholine and an arginine residue. The results demonstrate the potential of the double-ligand difference technique for dissecting the chemistry of membrane receptor-ligand interactions and provide new insight into the nature of nicotinic receptor-agonist interactions. PMID:11782459

  5. Glycyl-histidyl-lysine interacts with the angiotensin II AT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    García-Sáinz, J A; Olivares-Reyes, J A

    1995-01-01

    Gly-His-Lys, a tripeptide isolated from human plasma that increases the growth rate of many cells, stimulated in dose-dependent fashion the activity of phosphorylase a in isolated rat hepatocytes. Such effect was associated to increases in both IP3 production and [Ca++]i. Interestingly, these effects of Gly-His-Lys were antagonized by losartan, a nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonist (AT1 selective), which suggested that these receptors were involved in its effect. Binding competition experiments using the radioligand [125I][Sar1-Ile8]angiotensin II clearly indicated that Gly-His-Lys interacts with AT1 receptors. It was also observed that other histidine-containing tripeptides were also capable of interacting with these receptors. PMID:8545239

  6. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    PubMed

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  7. Acetylcholine receptor-inducing factor from chicken brain increases the level of mRNA encoding the receptor. alpha. subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; Falls, D.L.; Dill-Devor, R.M.; Fischbach, G.D. )

    1988-03-01

    A 42-kDa glycoprotein isolated from chicken brain, referred to as acetylcholine receptor-inducing activity (ARIA), that stimulates the rate of incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the surface of chicken myotubes may play a role in the nerve-induced accumulation of receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses. Using nuclease-protection assays, the authors have found that ARIA causes a 2- to 16-fold increase in the level of mRNA encoding the {alpha} subunit of the receptor, with little or no change in the levels of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit messengers. ARIA also increases the amount of a putative nuclear precursor of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, consistent with an activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the concentration of {alpha} subunit may limit the rate of biosynthesis of the acetylcholine receptors in chicken myotubes. They also indicate that neuronal factors can regulate the expression of receptor subunit genes in a selective manner. Tetrodotoxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, and forskolin also increase the amount of {alpha}-subunit mRNA, with little change in the amount of {gamma}- and {delta}-subunit mRNAs. Unlike ARIA, however, these agents have little effect on the concentration of the {alpha}-subunit nuclear precursor.

  8. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  9. Interaction of vault particles with estrogen receptor in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Abbondanza, C; Rossi, V; Roscigno, A; Gallo, L; Belsito, A; Piluso, G; Medici, N; Nigro, V; Molinari, A M; Moncharmont, B; Puca, G A

    1998-06-15

    A 104-kD protein was coimmunoprecipitated with the estrogen receptor from the flowtrough of a phosphocellulose chromatography of MCF-7 cell nuclear extract. mAbs to this protein identified several cDNA clones coding for the human 104-kD major vault protein. Vaults are large ribonucleoprotein particles of unknown function present in all eukaryotic cells. They have a complex morphology, including several small molecules of RNA, but a single protein species, the major vault protein, accounts for >70% of their mass. Their shape is reminiscent of the nucleopore central plug, but no proteins of known function have been described to interact with them. Western blot analysis of vaults purified on sucrose gradient showed the presence of estrogen receptor co-migrating with the vault peak. The AER317 antibody to estrogen receptor coimmunoprecipitated the major vault protein and the vault RNA also in the 20,000 g supernatant fraction. Reconstitution experiments of estrogen receptor fragments with the major vault protein mapped the site of the interaction between amino acids 241 and 280 of human estrogen receptor, where the nuclear localization signal sequences are located. Estradiol treatment of cells increased the amount of major vault protein present in the nuclear extract and coimmunoprecipitated with estrogen receptor, whereas the anti-estrogen ICI182,780 had no effect. The hormone-dependent interaction of vaults with estrogen receptor was reproducible in vitro and was prevented by sodium molybdate. Antibodies to progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were able to coimmunoprecipitate the major vault protein. The association of nuclear receptors with vaults could be related to their intracellular traffic. PMID:9628887

  10. Interaction of Vault Particles with Estrogen Receptor in the MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell

    PubMed Central

    Abbondanza, Ciro; Rossi, Valentina; Roscigno, Annarita; Gallo, Luigi; Belsito, Angela; Piluso, Giulio; Medici, Nicola; Nigro, Vincenzo; Molinari, Anna Maria; Moncharmont, Bruno; Puca, Giovanni A.

    1998-01-01

    A 104-kD protein was coimmunoprecipitated with the estrogen receptor from the flowtrough of a phosphocellulose chromatography of MCF-7 cell nuclear extract. mAbs to this protein identified several cDNA clones coding for the human 104-kD major vault protein. Vaults are large ribonucleoprotein particles of unknown function present in all eukaryotic cells. They have a complex morphology, including several small molecules of RNA, but a single protein species, the major vault protein, accounts for >70% of their mass. Their shape is reminiscent of the nucleopore central plug, but no proteins of known function have been described to interact with them. Western blot analysis of vaults purified on sucrose gradient showed the presence of estrogen receptor co-migrating with the vault peak. The AER317 antibody to estrogen receptor coimmunoprecipitated the major vault protein and the vault RNA also in the 20,000 g supernatant fraction. Reconstitution experiments of estrogen receptor fragments with the major vault protein mapped the site of the interaction between amino acids 241 and 280 of human estrogen receptor, where the nuclear localization signal sequences are located. Estradiol treatment of cells increased the amount of major vault protein present in the nuclear extract and coimmunoprecipitated with estrogen receptor, whereas the anti-estrogen ICI182,780 had no effect. The hormone-dependent interaction of vaults with estrogen receptor was reproducible in vitro and was prevented by sodium molybdate. Antibodies to progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were able to coimmunoprecipitate the major vault protein. The association of nuclear receptors with vaults could be related to their intracellular traffic. PMID:9628887

  11. Interaction of new antidepressants with sigma-1 receptor chaperones and their potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Tamaki; Fujita, Yuko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-03-15

    The sigma-1 receptor chaperone located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may be implicated in the mechanistic action of some antidepressants. The present study was undertaken to examine whether new antidepressant drugs interact with the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. First, we examined the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram), serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran), and mirtazapine, a noradrenaline and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), on [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to rat brain membranes. Then, we examined the effects of these drugs on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The order of potency for drugs at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone was as follows: fluvoxamine>sertraline>fluoxetine>escitalopram>citalopram>paroxetine>duoxetine. Venlafaxine, milnacipran, and mirtazapine showed very weak affinity for this chaperone. Furthermore, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and mirtazapine significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in cell assays, and the effects of all these drugs, excluding mirtazapine, were antagonized by NE-100, a selective antagonist of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. Moreover, the effects of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine on neurite outgrowth were also antagonized by sertraline, indicating that sertraline may be an antagonist at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. The effect of mirtazapine on neurite outgrowth was antagonized by the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. These findings suggest that activation at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may be involved in the action of some SSRIs, such as fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and escitalopram. In contrast, mirtazapine independently potentiated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, indicating that this beneficial effect may mediate its pharmacological effect. PMID:24508523

  12. Semaphorins and their receptors in immune cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Kikutani, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    Semaphorins are newcomers to the growing panoply of immunoregulatory proteins. Members of this family were originally identified as proteins that provide axonal guidance cues during neuronal development. However, accumulating evidence indicates that several semaphorins, called 'immune semaphorins', are crucial to various phases of the immune response, from initiation to terminal inflammatory processes. Extensive studies of immune semaphorins have shown not only differences but also parallels in semaphorin functions among physiologically distinct systems, providing unexpected but meaningful insights into the biological activities of this protein family. Here we review the present knowledge of the function of semaphorins and their receptors in the immune system, including the most recent advances in this field. PMID:18087252

  13. Crystallographic Identification and Functional Characterization of Phospholipids as Ligands for the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Steroidogenic Factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Choi, Mihwa; Cavey, Greg; Daugherty, Jennifer; Suino, Kelly; Kovach, Amanda; Bingham, Nathan C.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Xu, H.Eric

    2010-11-10

    The orphan nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) regulates the differentiation and function of endocrine glands. Although SF-1 is constitutively active in cell-based assays, it is not known whether this transcriptional activity is modulated by ligands. Here, we describe the 1.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of the SF-1 ligand binding domain in complex with an LXXLL motif from a coregulator protein. The structure reveals the presence of a phospholipid ligand in a surprisingly large pocket ({approx}1600 {angstrom}{sup 3}), with the receptor adopting the canonical active conformation. The bound phospholipid is readily exchanged and modulates SF-1 interactions with coactivators. Mutations designed to reduce the size of the SF-1 pocket or to disrupt hydrogen bonds with the phospholipid abolish SF-1/coactivator interactions and significantly reduce SF-1 transcriptional activity. These findings provide evidence that SF-1 is regulated by endogenous ligands and suggest an unexpected relationship between phospholipids and endocrine development and function.

  14. Selectivity of Ligand-Receptor Interactions between Nanoparticle and Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2012-12-01

    Selectivity of interactions between nanoparticles functionalized by tethered ligands and cell surfaces with different densities of receptors plays an essential role in biorecognition and its implementation in nanobiomedicine. We show that the onset of nanoparticle adsorption has a universal character for a range of nanoparticles: the onset receptor density decreases exponentially with the energy of ligand-receptor binding and inversely with the ligand density. We demonstrate that a bimodal tether distribution, which permits shielding ligands by longer nonfunctional tethers, leads to extra loss of entropy at the adsorption onset, enhancing the selectivity.

  15. Solid Phase Synthesis and Application of Labeled Peptide Derivatives: Probes of Receptor-Opioid Peptide Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Jane V.; Kumar, Vivek; Dattachowdhury, Bhaswati; Peck, Angela M.; Wang, Xin; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Solid phase synthetic methodology has been developed in our laboratory to incorporate an affinity label (a reactive functionality such as isothiocyanate or bromoacetamide) into peptides (Leelasvatanakij, L. and Aldrich, J. V. (2000) J. Peptide Res. 56, 80), and we have used this synthetic strategy to prepare affinity label derivatives of a variety of opioid peptides. To date side reactions have been detected only in two cases, both involving intramolecular cyclization. We have identified several peptide-based affinity labels for δ opioid receptors that exhibit wash-resistant inhibition of binding to these receptors and are valuable pharmacological tools to study opioid receptors. Even in cases where the peptide derivatives do not bind covalently to their target receptor, studying their binding has revealed subtle differences in receptor interactions with particular opioid peptide residues, especially Phe residues in the N-terminal “message” sequences. Solid phase synthetic methodology for the incorporation of other labels (e.g. biotin) into the C-terminus of peptides has also been developed in our laboratory (Kumar, V. and Aldrich, J. V. (2003) Org. Lett. 5, 613). These two synthetic approaches have been combined to prepare peptides containing multiple labels that can be used as tools to study peptide ligand-receptor interactions. These solid phase synthetic methodologies are versatile strategies that are applicable to the preparation of labeled peptides for a variety of targets in addition to opioid receptors. PMID:19956785

  16. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them. PMID:27597805

  17. The mitochondrial receptor complex: Mom22 is essential for cell viability and directly interacts with preproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hönlinger, A; Kübrich, M; Moczko, M; Gärtner, F; Mallet, L; Bussereau, F; Eckerskorn, C; Lottspeich, F; Dietmeier, K; Jacquet, M

    1995-01-01

    A multisubunit complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane is responsible for targeting and membrane translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins. This receptor complex contains two import receptors, a general insertion pore and the protein Mom22. It was unknown if Mom22 directly interacts with preproteins, and two views existed about the possible functions of Mom22: a central role in transfer of preproteins from both receptors to the general insertion pore or a more limited function dependent on the presence of the receptor Mom19. For this report, we identified and cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae MOM22 and investigated whether it plays a direct role in targeting of preproteins. A preprotein accumulated at the mitochondrial outer membrane was cross-linked to Mom22. The cross-linking depended on the import stage of the preprotein. Overexpression of Mom22 suppressed the respiratory defect of yeast cells lacking Mom19 and increased preprotein import into mom19 delta mitochondria, demonstrating that Mom22 can function independently of Mom19. Overexpression of Mom22 even suppressed the lethal phenotype of a double deletion of the two import receptors known so far (mom19 delta mom72 delta). Deletion of the MOM22 gene was lethal for yeast cells, identifying Mom22 as one of the few mitochondrial membrane proteins essential for fermentative growth. These results suggest that Mom22 plays an essential role in the mitochondrial receptor complex. It directly interacts with preproteins in transit and can perform receptor-like activities. PMID:7760834

  18. A biophysical approach to IL-2 and IL-15 receptor function: localization, conformation and interactions.

    PubMed

    Bodnár, Andrea; Nizsalóczki, Eniko; Mocsár, Gábor; Szalóki, Nikoletta; Waldmann, Thomas A; Damjanovich, Sándor; Vámosi, György

    2008-03-15

    Interleukin-2 and interleukin-15 (IL-2, IL-15) are key participants in T and NK cell activation and function. Sharing the beta and gamma receptor subunits results in several common functions: e.g. the promotion of T cell proliferation. On the other hand, due to their distinct alpha receptor subunits, they also play opposing roles in immune processes such as activation induced cell death and immunological memory. Divergence of signaling pathways must ensue already at the plasma membrane where the cytokines interact with their receptors. Therefore understanding molecular details of receptor organization and mapping interactions with other membrane proteins that might influence receptor conformation and function, are of key importance. Biophysical/advanced microscopic methods (fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence crosscorrelation spectroscopy (FCCS), near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, NMR spectroscopy) have been instrumental in clarifying the details of receptor structure and organization from the atomic level to the assembly and dynamics of supramolecular clusters. In this short review some important contributions shaping our current view of IL-2 and IL-15 receptors are presented. PMID:18280585

  19. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Kathleen L

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them. PMID:27597805

  20. Modeling of cell adhesion and deformation mediated by receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Golestaneh, Amirreza F; Nadler, Ben

    2016-04-01

    The current work is devoted to studying adhesion and deformation of biological cells mediated by receptors and ligands in order to enhance the existing models. Due to the sufficient in-plane continuity and fluidity of the phospholipid molecules, an isotropic continuum fluid membrane is proposed for modeling the cell membrane. The developed constitutive model accounts for the influence of the presence of receptors on the deformation and adhesion of the cell membrane through the introduction of spontaneous area dilation. Motivated by physics, a nonlinear receptor-ligand binding force is introduced based on charge-induced dipole interaction. Diffusion of the receptors on the membrane is governed by the receptor-ligand interaction via Fick's Law and receptor-ligand interaction. The developed model is then applied to study the deformation and adhesion of a biological cell. The proposed model is used to study the role of the material, binding, spontaneous area dilation and environmental properties on the deformation and adhesion of the cell. PMID:26093646

  1. Interaction of structural analogs of dopamine, chlorpromazine and sulpiride with striatal dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of these studies were to determine if the nitrogen atom of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists drugs is required for interaction with the D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors and whether the positively charged or uncharged molecular species interacts with these receptors. To address these issues, permanently charged analogs of dopamine, chlorpromazine and sulpiride were synthesized in which a dimethylsulfonium, dimethylselenonium or quaternary ammonium group replaced the amine group. Permanently uncharged analogs which contained a methylsulfide, methylselenide and sulfoxide group instead of an amine group were also synthesized. The interactions of these compounds with striatal dopamine receptors were studied. We found that the permanently charged dopamine analogs bound to the D-2 receptor of striatal membranes like conventional dopaminergic agonists and displayed agonist activity at the D-2 receptor regulating potassium-evoked (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine release. In contrast, the permanently uncharged analogs bound only to the high affinity state of the D-2 receptor and had neither agonist or antagonist activity.

  2. Interactive association of dopamine receptor (DRD4) genotype and ADHD on alcohol expectancies in children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Steve S.; Humphreys, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Positive and negative alcohol expectancies (AE) are beliefs about the consequences of alcohol use (e.g., happy, sad, lazy) and they predict patterns of adolescent and adult alcohol engagement in clinical and non-clinical samples. However, significantly less is known about predictors of AE in children, despite significant variability in AE early in and across development. To identify temporally-ordered risk factors that precede AE, we evaluated the independent and interactive association of the functional 7-repeat polymorphism of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) genotype and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with respect to individual differences in positive-social, negative-arousal, sedative/impaired, and wild/crazy AE in school-age children (N = 149) followed prospectively from 6-9 years to 8-13 years. Controlling for age, sex, and wave, DRD4 7+ carriers reported more wild/crazy AE, but DRD4 was unrelated to the remaining AE domains. ADHD symptoms independently predicted higher negative-arousal, sedative/impaired, and wild/crazy AE, but not positive-social. We also observed a significant interaction where ADHD symptoms positively predicted wild/crazy AE only in youth with the 7-repeat DRD4 genotype; the same interaction marginally predicted sedative/impaired AE. No interactive effects were observed for the remaining AE domains. These preliminary results suggest that among 7+ DRD4 youth, early ADHD symptoms predicted children's expectations that alcohol would have wild/crazy effects. We consider these results within a developmental framework to better understand pathways to and from youth alcohol problems. PMID:24611835

  3. Interaction of the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT and Its Host Cell Receptor, Lipolysis-stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor (LSR)*

    PubMed Central

    Hemmasi, Sarah; Czulkies, Bernd A.; Schorch, Björn; Veit, Antonia; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase) is a binary, actin ADP-ribosylating toxin frequently associated with hypervirulent strains of the human enteric pathogen C. difficile, the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. CDT leads to the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and, eventually, to cell death. Low doses of CDT result in the formation of microtubule-based protrusions on the cell surface that increase the adherence and colonization of C. difficile. The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host cell receptor for CDT, and our aim was to gain a deeper insight into the interplay between both proteins. We show that CDT interacts with the extracellular, Ig-like domain of LSR with an affinity in the nanomolar range. We identified LSR splice variants in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 and disrupted the LSR gene in these cells by applying the CRISPR-Cas9 technology. LSR truncations ectopically expressed in LSR knock-out cells indicated that intracellular parts of LSR are not essential for plasma membrane targeting of the receptor and cellular uptake of CDT. By generating a series of N- and C-terminal truncations of the binding component of CDT (CDTb), we found that amino acids 757–866 of CDTb are sufficient for binding to LSR. With a transposon-based, random mutagenesis approach, we identified potential LSR-interacting epitopes in CDTb. This study increases our understanding about the interaction between CDT and its receptor LSR, which is key to the development of anti-toxin strategies for preventing cell entry of the toxin. PMID:25882847

  4. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Samkoe, Kimberley S; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Gunn, Jason R; Wells, Wendy A; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-12-15

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant; therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects, but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry (IHC). Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying EGFR expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored IHC and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot analysis or in vitro flow-cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immunostaining, with implications for use in noninvasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  5. Interaction model of steviol glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) with sweet taste receptors: A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Mayank; Jaitak, Vikas

    2015-08-01

    Docking studies were performed on natural sweeteners from Stevia rebaudiana by constructing homology models of T1R2 and T1R3 subunits of human sweet taste receptors. Ramachandran plot, PROCHECK results and ERRAT overall quality factor were used to validate the quality of models. Furthermore, docking results of steviol glycosides (SG's) were correlated significantly with data available in the literature which enabled to predict the exact sweetness rank order of SG's. The binding pattern indicated that Asn 44, Ans 52, Ala 345, Pro 343, Ile 352, Gly 346, Gly 47, Ala 354, Ser 336, Thr 326 and Ser 329 are the main interacting amino acid residues in case of T1R2 and Arg 56, Glu 105, Asp 215, Asp 216, Glu 148, Asp 258, Lys 255, Ser 104, Glu 217, Leu 51, Arg 52 for T1R3, respectively. Amino acids interact with SG's mainly by forming hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl group of glucose moieties. Significant variation in docked poses of all the SG's were found. In this study, we have proposed the mechanism of the sweetness of the SG's in the form of multiple point stimulation model by considering the diverse binding patterns of various SG's, as well as their structural features. It will give further insight in understanding the differences in the quality of taste and will be used to improve the taste of SG's using semi-synthetic approaches. PMID:26021732

  6. The Dopamine Receptor D4 7-Repeat Allele and Prenatal Smoking in ADHD-Affected Children and Their Unaffected Siblings: No Gene-Environment Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altink, Marieke E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Franke, Barbara; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine I. E.; Buschgens, Cathelijne J. M.; Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Fliers, Ellen A.; Anney, Richard; Brookes, Keeley-Joanne; Chen, Wai; Gill, Michael; Mulligan, Aisling; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Thompson, Margaret; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The dopamine receptor D4 ("DRD4") 7-repeat allele and maternal smoking during pregnancy are both considered as risk factors in the aetiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but few studies have been conducted on their interactive effects in causing ADHD. The purpose of this study is to examine the gene by…

  7. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in bladder cancer and their relationship to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, J. K.; Cook, S.; Chambers, P.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in neoplastic and non-neoplastic bladder tissue using a standard radioimmunoassay technique. Tumour samples had much higher TGF-alpha levels compared with EGF and TGF-alpha levels in malignant tissue were significantly higher than in benign bladder samples. There was, in addition, a difference in mean EGF levels from 'normal' bladder samples from non-tumour bearing areas of bladder in patients with bladder cancer compared with 'normal' bladder tissue obtained at the time of organ retrieval surgery. Levels of EGF and TGF-alpha did not correlate with levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) as determined by a radioligand binding method but levels of TGF-alpha > 10 ng gm-1 of tumour tissue did correlate with EGFR positivity defined using immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that TGF-alpha is the likely ligand for EGFR in bladder tumours. PMID:8605103

  8. Characterization of insulin-like growth factor I and epidermal growth factor receptors in meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, M.; Tokunaga, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Shigematsu, K.; Niwa, M.; Mori, K. )

    1989-10-01

    Receptors for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were localized and characterized in eight samples of human meningioma (four fibrous, two meningothelial, and two angioblastic types), using quantitative autoradiographic techniques. Effects of both growth factors on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in the cultured meningioma cells were examined. High numbers of specific binding sites for both IGF-I and EGF were homogeneously present in tissue sections derived from fibrous and meningothelial types of meningiomas, whereas binding sites for these growth factors were not detectable in adjacent leptomeninges. While relatively large numbers of IGF-I binding sites were located in the wall of the intratumoral vasculature, the number of binding sites in the stromal component was lower in angioblastic-type meningiomas, including a low number of EGF binding sites detected only in the stromal portion. Scatchard analysis revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites for both IGF-I and EGF in the meningiomas examined (dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.6 to 2.9 nM, and the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) = 16 to 80 fmol/mg for IGF-I; and Kd = 0.6 to 4.0 nM, Bmax = 3 to 39 fmol/mg for EGF). Both growth factors increased the synthesis of DNA, in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation. The combination of IGF-I and EGF synergistically stimulated the synthesis of DNA, and the effects seen with 10% fetal bovine serum could be reproduced at a concentration of 10(-10) M. These observations can be interpreted to mean that both IGF-I and EGF may be involved in the growth modulation of meningiomas, possibly through paracrine or autocrine mechanisms.

  9. Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors interact in the rat nucleus accumbens to influence locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    David, Hélène N; Abraini, Jacques H

    2002-03-01

    Evidence for functional interactions between metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors and dopamine (DA) neurotransmission is now clearly established. In the present study, we investigated interactions between group III mGlu receptors and D1- and D2-like receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Administration, into the NAcc, of the selective group III mGlu receptor agonist, AP4, resulted in an increase in locomotor activity, which was blocked by pretreatment with the group III mGlu receptor antagonist, MPPG. In addition, pretreatment with AP4 further blocked the increase in motor activity induced by the D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 38393, but potentiated the locomotor responses induced by either the D2-like receptor agonist, quinpirole, or coinfusion of SKF 38393 and quinpirole. MPPG reversed the effects of AP4 on the motor responses induced by D1-like and/or D2-like receptor activation. These results confirm that glutamate transmission may control DA-dependent locomotor function through mGlu receptors and further indicate that group III mGlu receptors oppose the behavioural response produced by D1-like receptor activation and favour those produced by D2-like receptor activation. PMID:11906529

  10. The influence of adnectin binding on the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:25223306

  11. Insulin and insulin like growth factor II endocytosis and signaling via insulin receptor B

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) act on tetrameric tyrosine kinase receptors controlling essential functions including growth, metabolism, reproduction and longevity. The insulin receptor (IR) binds insulin and IGFs with different affinities triggering different cell responses. Results We showed that IGF-II induces cell proliferation and gene transcription when IR-B is over-expressed. We combined biotinylated ligands with streptavidin conjugated quantum dots and visible fluorescent proteins to visualize the binding of IGF-II and insulin to IR-B and their ensuing internalization. By confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in living cells, we studied the internalization kinetic through the IR-B of both IGF-II, known to elicit proliferative responses, and insulin, a regulator of metabolism. Conclusions IGF-II promotes a faster internalization of IR-B than insulin. We propose that IGF-II differentially activates mitogenic responses through endosomes, while insulin-activated IR-B remains at the plasma membrane. This fact could facilitate the interaction with key effector molecules involved in metabolism regulation. PMID:23497114

  12. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  13. Estrogen receptor coregulators and pioneer factors: the orchestrators of mammary gland cell fate and development

    PubMed Central

    Manavathi, Bramanandam; Samanthapudi, Venkata S. K.; Gajulapalli, Vijay Narasimha Reddy

    2014-01-01

    The steroid hormone, 17β-estradiol (E2), plays critical role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis, and is essential for reproduction and mammary gland development. E2 actions are mediated by two classical nuclear hormone receptors, estrogen receptor α and β (ERs). The activity of ERs depends on the coordinated activity of ligand binding, post-translational modifications (PTMs), and importantly the interaction with their partner proteins called “coregulators.” Because coregulators are proved to be crucial for ER transcriptional activity, and majority of breast cancers are ERα positive, an increased interest in the field has led to the identification of a large number of coregulators. In the last decade, gene knockout studies using mouse models provided impetus to our further understanding of the role of these coregulators in mammary gland development. Several coregulators appear to be critical for terminal end bud (TEB) formation, ductal branching and alveologenesis during mammary gland development. The emerging studies support that, coregulators along with the other ER partner proteins called “pioneer factors” together contribute significantly to E2 signaling and mammary cell fate. This review discusses emerging themes in coregulator and pioneer factor mediated action on ER functions, in particular their role in mammary gland cell fate and development. PMID:25364741

  14. Transforming growth factor-beta. Murine glomerular receptors and responses of isolated glomerular cells.

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, K; Striker, L J; Stauffer, J W; Doi, T; Agodoa, L Y; Striker, G E

    1989-01-01

    Proliferation of resident glomerular cells and the accumulation of mesangial matrix are histologic abnormalities which are observed in the course of many progressive glomerular diseases. We explored the potential regulatory effects of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) on these processes. We found that cultured mouse glomerular endothelial, mesangial, and epithelial cells as well as isolated intact rat glomeruli possess high-affinity receptors for TGF-beta. We also found that, although TGF-beta consistently inhibited the proliferation of glomerular endothelial and epithelial cells, it acted as a bifunctional regulator of mesangial cell proliferation. TGF-beta significantly increased the production of collagen and fibronectin by glomerular mesangial cells whereas only fibronectin production was augmented in glomerular epithelial cells. The presence of TGF-beta receptors on intact glomeruli and on each glomerular cell type and the demonstrated responsiveness of these cells to TGF-beta combine to suggest that potentially important interactions may occur between resident glomerular cells and TGF-beta in vivo. Images PMID:2539392

  15. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor signaling in the central nervous system: new molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Richard L; Risbrough, Victoria; Brauns, Olaf; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2006-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related urocortin peptides mediate behavioral, cognitive, autonomic, neuroendocrine and immunologic responses to aversive stimuli by activating CRF(1) or CRF(2) receptors in the central nervous system and anterior pituitary. Markers of hyperactive central CRF systems, including CRF hypersecretion and abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, have been identified in subpopulations of patients with anxiety, stress and depressive disorders. Because CRF receptors are rapidly desensitized in the presence of high agonist concentrations, CRF hypersecretion alone may be insufficient to account for the enhanced CRF neurotransmission observed in these patients. Concomitant dysregulation of mechanisms stringently controlling magnitude and duration of CRF receptor signaling also may contribute to this phenomenon. While it is well established that the CRF(1) receptor mediates many anxiety- and depression-like behaviors as well as HPA axis stress responses, CRF(2) receptor functions are not well understood at present. One hypothesis holds that CRF(1) receptor activation initiates fear and anxiety-like responses, while CRF(2) receptor activation re-establishes homeostasis by counteracting the aversive effects of CRF(1) receptor signaling. An alternative hypothesis posits that CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors contribute to opposite defensive modes, with CRF(1) receptors mediating active defensive responses triggered by escapable stressors, and CRF(2) receptors mediating anxiety- and depression-like responses induced by inescapable, uncontrollable stressors. CRF(1) receptor antagonists are being developed as novel treatments for affective and stress disorders. If it is confirmed that the CRF(2) receptor contributes importantly to anxiety and depression, the development of small molecule CRF(2) receptor antagonists would be therapeutically useful. PMID:16918397

  16. Cholinergic ligand interactions with acetylcholine receptor proteins and solvent interactions with N,N-dialkylnicotinamides

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A dual-chambered flow dialysis nuclear counting apparatus was used to monitor cholinergic ligand induced displacement of {sup 155}Eu{sup 3+} from acetylcholine receptor proteins. Acetylcholine, nicotine and carbamylcholine induced similar rates of displacement of {sup 155}Eu{sup 3+} probes of calcium binding sites in receptor proteins from wild type Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. The receptor isolated from a nicotine resistant strain of Drosophila melanogaster displayed an altered dependency of cholinergic ligand induced cation displacement with respect to the other two receptor proteins. Both Drosophila strains' solubilized receptor proteins migrated as three bands of molecular weights 68,000, 66,000, and 60,000 on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Carbon-13 NMR techniques were employed to examine the effects of solvent environment on rotational energy barriers in a series of molecules related to the analeptic, nikethamide: N,N-dimethylnicotinamide, 1-nicotinoyl piperidine, and N,N-dipropylnicotinamide.

  17. Investigation of Interactions at the Extracellular Loops of the Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 (RXFP1)*

    PubMed Central

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A.; Petrie, Emma J.; Chen, Catherine Z.; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  18. Investigation of interactions at the extracellular loops of the relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1).

    PubMed

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Petrie, Emma J; Chen, Catherine Z; Wang, Amy; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Bathgate, Ross A D; Gooley, Paul R

    2014-12-12

    Relaxin, an emerging pharmaceutical treatment for acute heart failure, activates the relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP1), which is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. In addition to the classic transmembrane (TM) domain, RXFP1 possesses a large extracellular domain consisting of 10 leucine-rich repeats and an N-terminal low density lipoprotein class A (LDLa) module. Relaxin-mediated activation of RXFP1 requires multiple coordinated interactions between the ligand and various receptor domains including a high affinity interaction involving the leucine-rich repeats and a predicted lower affinity interaction involving the extracellular loops (ELs). The LDLa is essential for signal activation; therefore the ELs/TM may additionally present an interaction site to facilitate this LDLa-mediated signaling. To overcome the many challenges of investigating relaxin and the LDLa module interactions with the ELs, we engineered the EL1 and EL2 loops onto a soluble protein scaffold, mapping specific ligand and loop interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Key EL residues were subsequently mutated in RXFP1, and changes in function and relaxin binding were assessed alongside the RXFP1 agonist ML290 to monitor the functional integrity of the TM domain of these mutant receptors. The outcomes of this work make an important contribution to understanding the mechanism of RXFP1 activation and will aid future development of small molecule RXFP1 agonists/antagonists. PMID:25352603

  19. Gene Expression of Growth Factors and Growth Factor Receptors for Potential Targeted Therapy of Canine Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    IIDA, Gentoku; ASANO, Kazushi; SEKI, Mamiko; SAKAI, Manabu; KUTARA, Kenji; ISHIGAKI, Kumiko; KAGAWA, Yumiko; YOSHIDA, Orie; TESHIMA, Kenji; EDAMURA, Kazuya; WATARI, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors of primary hepatic masses, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and nodular hyperplasia (NH), in dogs. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the expression of 18 genes in 18 HCCs, 10 NHs, 11 surrounding non-cancerous liver tissues and 4 healthy control liver tissues. Platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B), transforming growth factor-α, epidermal growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor were found to be differentially expressed in HCC compared with NH and the surrounding non-cancerous and healthy control liver tissues. PDGF-B is suggested to have the potential to become a valuable ancillary target for the treatment of canine HCC. PMID:24189579

  20. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  1. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  2. Unique, polyfucosylated glycan-receptor interactions are essential for regeneration of Hydra magnipapillata.

    PubMed

    Sahadevan, Sonu; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Ramaswamy, Subramanian; Babu, Ponnusamy

    2014-01-17

    Cell-cell communications, cell-matrix interactions, and cell migrations play a major role in regeneration. However, little is known about the molecular players involved in these critical events, especially cell surface molecules. Here, we demonstrate the role of specific glycan-receptor interactions in the regenerative process using Hydra magnipapillata as a model system. Global characterization of the N- and O-glycans expressed by H. magnipapillata using ultrasensitive mass spectrometry revealed mainly polyfucosylated LacdiNAc antennary structures. Affinity purification showed that a putative C-type lectin (accession number Q6SIX6) is a likely endogenous receptor for the novel polyfucosylated glycans. Disruption of glycan-receptor interactions led to complete shutdown of the regeneration machinery in live Hydra. A time-dependent, lack-of-regeneration phenotype observed upon incubation with exogenous fuco-lectins suggests the involvement of a polyfucose receptor-mediated signaling mechanism during regeneration. Thus, for the first time, the results presented here provide direct evidence for the role of polyfucosylated glycan-receptor interactions in the regeneration of H. magnipapillata. PMID:23972202

  3. Interactions of verapamil, D 600, flunarizine and nifedipine with cerebral histamine-receptors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J E; Defeudis, F V

    1986-01-01

    Experiments conducted on membrane fractions of guinea-pig brain using ligand-binding techniques have shown that certain Ca(2+)-antagonists interact with histamine (H(1) or H(2)) receptors. Flunarizine (inhibition constant, K(i) ? 86 nM) was nearly as potent as diphenhydramine (K(i) ? 44 nM) in inhibiting [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to cerebellar H(1)-receptors, whereas verapamil, D 600 and nifedipine did not interact with this site. Regarding [(3)H]tiotidine binding to H(2)-receptors of cerebral cortex, verapamil (K(i) ? 1400 nM) and D 600 (K(i) ? 1240 nM) were nearly as potent as cimetidine (K(i) ? 910 nM) whereas flunarizine and nifedipine were inactive. The interaction of flunarizine with H(1)-receptors might explain, in part, its sedative side-effect. The interaction of verapamil with H(2)-receptors, demonstrated here for the first time, might be involved in the anti-arrhythmic action of this agent. PMID:20493137

  4. Progesterone-induced blocking factor activates STAT6 via binding to a novel IL-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Noemi; Halasz, Melinda; Polgar, Beata; Poehlmann, Tobias G; Markert, Udo R; Palkovics, Tamas; Keszei, Marton; Par, Gabriella; Kiss, Katalin; Szeberenyi, Jozsef; Grama, Laszlo; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2006-01-15

    Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) induces Th2-dominant cytokine production. Western blotting and EMSA revealed phosphorylation as well as nuclear translocation of STAT6 and inhibition of STAT4 phosphorylation in PIBF-treated cells. The silencing of STAT6 by small interfering RNA reduced the cytokine effects. Because the activation of the STAT6 pathway depends on the ligation of IL-4R, we tested the involvement of IL-4R in PIBF-induced STAT6 activation. Although PIBF does not bind to IL-4R, the blocking of the latter with an Ab abolished PIBF-induced STAT6 activation, whereas the blocking of the IL-13R had no effect. PIBF activated suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 and inhibited IL-12-induced suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 activation. The blocking of IL-4R counteracted all the described effects, suggesting that the PIBF receptor interacts with IL-4R alpha-chain, allowing PIBF to activate the STAT6 pathway. PIBF did not phosphorylate Jak3, suggesting that the gamma-chain is not needed for PIBF signaling. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed a colocalization and at 37 degrees C a cocapping of the FITC PIBF-activated PIBF receptor and PE anti-IL-4R-labeled IL-4R. After the digestion of the cells with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, the STAT6-activating effect of PIBF was lost, whereas that of IL-4 remained unaltered. These data suggest the existence of a novel type of IL-4R composed of the IL-4R alpha-chain and the GPI-anchored PIBF receptor. PMID:16393965

  5. Sex- and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2- dependent actions of urocortin 1 during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Burcu; Mhaske, Pallavi; Paruthiyil, Sreenivasan; Garnett, Elizabeth A; Heyman, Melvin B; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Bhargava, Aditi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated whether corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF2) and its high-affinity agonist urocortin 1 (Ucn1) mediate sex-specific signaling and immune responses. Intrarectal trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid was used to induce experimental colitis in wild-type, CRF2 knockout (CRF2KO), and heterozygous (CRF2Ht) mice of both sexes. Changes in plasma extravasation, organ weight, survival, immune cell numbers, inflammatory cytokines, and the MAPK signaling pathway were assessed. Stored intestinal biopsies from patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and age- and sex-matched individuals without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy to characterize Ucn1 and CRF receptor expression. CRF2Ht mice of both sexes showed decreased survival during colitis compared with other genotypes. Ucn1 improved survival in male mice alone. Ucn1 restored colon length and spleen and adrenal weight and decreased colonic TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in male CRF2Ht mice alone. CRF2Ht mice of both sexes showed decreased phosphorylation of MAPK p38 and heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) levels. Ucn1 restored p-Hsp27 levels in male CRF2Ht mice alone. Expression of the chaperone protein Hsp90 decreased during colitis, except in male CRF2Ht mice. Taken together, our data indicate that sex shows significant interaction with genotype and Ucn1 during colitis. Human duodenal and colonic biopsies revealed that sex-specific differences exist in levels of CRF receptors and Ucn1 expression in patients with CD compared with the matched non-IBD subjects. To conclude, Ucn1 mediates sex-specific immune and cellular signaling responses via CRF2, emphasizing the need for inclusion of females in preclinical studies. PMID:27053649

  6. Inferring the Interactions of Risk Factors from EHRs.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Travis; Harabagiu, Sanda M

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of clinical information provided by the advent of electronic health records offers an exciting opportunity to improve the quality of patient care. Of particular importance are the risk factors, which indicate possible diagnoses, and the medications which treat them. By analysing which risk factors and medications were mentioned at different times in patients' EHRs, we are able to construct a patient's clinical chronology. This chronology enables us to not only predict how new patient's risk factors may progress, but also to discover patterns of interactions between risk factors and medications. We present a novel probabilistic model of patients' clinical chronologies and demonstrate how this model can be used to (1) predict the way a new patient's risk factors may evolve over time, (2) identify patients with irregular chronologies, and (3) discovering the interactions between pairs of risk factors, and between risk factors and medications over time. Moreover, the model proposed in this paper does not rely on (nor specify) any prior knowledge about any interactions between the risk factors and medications it represents. Thus, our model can be easily applied to any arbitrary set of risk factors and medications derived from a new dataset. PMID:27595044

  7. Inferring the Interactions of Risk Factors from EHRs

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Travis; Harabagiu, Sanda M.

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of clinical information provided by the advent of electronic health records offers an exciting opportunity to improve the quality of patient care. Of particular importance are the risk factors, which indicate possible diagnoses, and the medications which treat them. By analysing which risk factors and medications were mentioned at different times in patients’ EHRs, we are able to construct a patient’s clinical chronology. This chronology enables us to not only predict how new patient’s risk factors may progress, but also to discover patterns of interactions between risk factors and medications. We present a novel probabilistic model of patients’ clinical chronologies and demonstrate how this model can be used to (1) predict the way a new patient’s risk factors may evolve over time, (2) identify patients with irregular chronologies, and (3) discovering the interactions between pairs of risk factors, and between risk factors and medications over time. Moreover, the model proposed in this paper does not rely on (nor specify) any prior knowledge about any interactions between the risk factors and medications it represents. Thus, our model can be easily applied to any arbitrary set of risk factors and medications derived from a new dataset. PMID:27595044

  8. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection. PMID:26008702

  9. What Makes Sports Fans Interactive? Identifying Factors Affecting Chat Interactions in Online Sports Viewing

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Jaeryong; Lee, Juyeong

    2016-01-01

    Sports fans are able to watch games from many locations using TV services while interacting with other fans online. In this paper, we identify the factors that affect sports viewers’ online interactions. Using a large-scale dataset of more than 25 million chat messages from a popular social TV site for baseball, we extract various game-related factors, and investigate the relationships between these factors and fans’ interactions using a series of multiple regression analyses. As a result, we identify several factors that are significantly related to viewer interactions. In addition, we determine that the influence of these factors varies according to the user group; i.e., active vs. less active users, and loyal vs. non-loyal users. PMID:26849568

  10. What Makes Sports Fans Interactive? Identifying Factors Affecting Chat Interactions in Online Sports Viewing.

    PubMed

    Ko, Minsam; Yeo, Jaeryong; Lee, Juyeong; Lee, Uichin; Jang, Young Jae

    2016-01-01

    Sports fans are able to watch games from many locations using TV services while interacting with other fans online. In this paper, we identify the factors that affect sports viewers' online interactions. Using a large-scale dataset of more than 25 million chat messages from a popular social TV site for baseball, we extract various game-related factors, and investigate the relationships between these factors and fans' interactions using a series of multiple regression analyses. As a result, we identify several factors that are significantly related to viewer interactions. In addition, we determine that the influence of these factors varies according to the user group; i.e., active vs. less active users, and loyal vs. non-loyal users. PMID:26849568

  11. Phenytoin enhances the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and fibroblast growth factor receptor in the subventricular zone and promotes the proliferation of neural precursor cells and oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y; Gonzalez-Castaneda, Rocio E; Campos-Ordonez, Tania; Luquin, Sonia; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin is a widely used antiepileptic drug that induces cell proliferation in several tissues, such as heart, bone, skin, oral mucosa and neural precursors. Some of these effects are mediated via fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). These receptors are strongly expressed in the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), the main neurogenic niche in the adult brain. The aim of this study was to determine the cell lineage and cell fate of V-SVZ neural progenitors expanded by phenytoin, as well as the effects of this drug on EGFR/FGFR phosphorylation. Male BALB/C mice received 10 mg/kg phenytoin by oral cannula for 30 days. We analysed the proliferation of V-SVZ neural progenitors by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Our findings indicate that phenytoin enhanced twofold the phosphorylation of EGFR and FGFR in the V-SVZ, increased the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)+/Sox2+ and BrdU+/doublecortin+ cells in the V-SVZ, and expanded the population of Olig2-expressing cells around the lateral ventricles. After phenytoin removal, a large number of BrdU+/Receptor interacting protein (RIP)+ cells were observed in the olfactory bulb. In conclusion, phenytoin enhanced the phosphorylation of FGFR and EGFR, and promoted the expression of neural precursor markers in the V-SVZ. In parallel, the number of oligodendrocytes increased significantly after phenytoin removal. PMID:26370587

  12. Synthesis and characterization of N-parinaroyl analogs of ganglioside GM3 and de-N-acetyl GM3. Interactions with the EGF receptor kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, W.; Welti, R.; Hafner-Strauss, S.; Rintoul, D. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A specific plasma membrane glycosphingolipid, known as ganglioside GM3, can regulate the intrinsic tyrosyl kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor; this modulation is not associated with alterations in hormone binding to the receptor. GM3 inhibits EGF receptor tyrosyl kinase activity in detergent micelles, in plasma membrane vesicles, and in whole cells. In addition, immunoaffinity-purified EGF receptor preparations contain ganglioside GM3 (Hanai et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 10915-10921), implying that the glycosphingolipid is intimately associated with the receptor kinase in cell membranes. Both the nature of this association and the molecular mechanism of kinase inhibition remain to be elucidated. In this report, we describe the synthesis of a fluorescent analog of ganglioside GM3, in which the native fatty acid was replaced with trans-parinaric acid. This glycosphingolipid inhibited the receptor kinase activity in a manner similar to that of the native ganglioside. A modified fluorescent glycosphingolipid, N-trans-parinaroyl de-N-acetyl ganglioside GM3, was also prepared. This analog, like the nonfluorescent de-N-acetyl ganglioside GM3, had no effect on receptor kinase activity. Results from tryptophan fluorescence quenching and steady-state anisotropy measurements in membranes containing these fluorescent probes and the human EGF receptor were consistent with the notion that GM3, but not de-N-acetyl GM3, interacts specifically with the receptor in intact membranes.

  13. Interaction of insulin-like growth factor I with porcine thyroid cells cultured in monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Saji, M.; Tsushima, T.; Isozaki, O.; Murakami, H.; Ohba, Y.; Sato, K.; Arai, M.; Mariko, A.; Shizume, K.

    1987-08-01

    The interaction of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) with porcine thyroid cells cultured in monolayer was studied. Specific binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I to thyroid cells was a reversible process dependent on the time and temperature of incubation. A steady state was achieved in 18 h at 4 C and averaged 14.2 +/- 2% (mean +/- SD)/10(6) cells. Binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I was inhibited by unlabeled IGF-I; half-maximal inhibition occurred at concentrations of 2-5 ng/ml. Multiplication-stimulating activity (rat IGF-II) and pork insulin had relative potencies of 1:20 and 1:300 compared with IGF-I. Scatchard analysis of binding data revealed a single class of IGF-I receptors with a Ka of 4.3 X 10(10) M-1, 49,000 binding sites were estimated per cell. Affinity cross-linking and autoradiography demonstrated the presence of type I IGF receptors. Thyroid cells also had specific receptors for insulin, but specific binding of (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin was much lower than that of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I. Preincubation of thyroid cells with IGF-I or insulin caused a concentration-dependent decrease in (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I binding due to an apparent loss of receptors. Preincubation with epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or TSH did not alter subsequent binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I. Low concentrations of IGF-I stimulated DNA synthesis and proliferation of thyroid cells and acted synergistically with epidermal growth factor. Multiplication-stimulating activity and insulin had relative potencies in stimulating DNA synthesis comparable to their abilities to inhibit the binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I to thyroid cells.

  14. Nectin-Like Interactions between Poliovirus and Its Receptor Trigger Conformational Changes Associated with Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Belnap, David M.; Cheng, Naiqian; Noel, Roane T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliovirus infection is initiated by attachment to a receptor on the cell surface called Pvr or CD155. At physiological temperatures, the receptor catalyzes an irreversible expansion of the virus to form an expanded form of the capsid called the 135S particle. This expansion results in the externalization of the myristoylated capsid protein VP4 and the N-terminal extension of the capsid protein VP1, both of which become inserted into the cell membrane. Structures of the expanded forms of poliovirus and of several related viruses have recently been reported. However, until now, it has been unclear how receptor binding triggers viral expansion at physiological temperature. Here, we report poliovirus in complex with an enzymatically partially deglycosylated form of the 3-domain ectodomain of Pvr at a 4-Å resolution, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The interaction of the receptor with the virus in this structure is reminiscent of the interactions of Pvr with its natural ligands. At a low temperature, the receptor induces very few changes in the structure of the virus, with the largest changes occurring within the footprint of the receptor, and in a loop of the internal protein VP4. Changes in the vicinity of the receptor include the displacement of a natural lipid ligand (called “pocket factor”), demonstrating that the loss of this ligand, alone, is not sufficient to induce particle expansion. Finally, analogies with naturally occurring ligand binding in the nectin family suggest which specific structural rearrangements in the virus-receptor complex could help to trigger the irreversible expansion of the capsid. IMPORTANCE The cell-surface receptor (Pvr) catalyzes a large structural change in the virus that exposes membrane-binding protein chains. We fitted known atomic models of the virus and Pvr into three-dimensional experimental maps of the receptor-virus complex. The molecular interactions we see between poliovirus and its receptor are

  15. Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Tomás J; Emes, Richard D; Grant, Seth GN; Komiyama, Noboru H

    2008-01-01

    Background Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity Results The vertebrate NMDA receptor was found to have subunits with C-terminal domains up to 500 amino acids longer than invertebrates. This extension was specific to the NR2 subunit and occurred before the duplication and subsequent divergence of NR2 in the vertebrate lineage. The shorter invertebrate C-terminus lacked vertebrate protein interaction motifs involved with forming a signaling complex although the terminal PDZ interaction domain was conserved. The vertebrate NR2 C-terminal domain was predicted to be intrinsically disordered but with a conserved secondary structure. Conclusion We highlight an evolutionary adaptation specific to vertebrate NMDA receptor NR2 subunits. Using in silico methods we find that evolution has shaped the NMDA receptor C-terminus into an unstructured but modular intracellular domain that parallels the expansion in complexity of an NMDA receptor signalling complex in the vertebrate lineage. We propose the NR2 C-terminus has evolved to be a natively unstructured yet flexible hub organising postsynaptic signalling. The evolution of the NR2 C-terminus and its

  16. Contributions of conserved serine residues to the interactions of ligands with dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Cox, B A; Henningsen, R A; Spanoyannis, A; Neve, R L; Neve, K A

    1992-08-01

    Four dopamine D2 receptor mutants were constructed, in each of which an alanine residue was substituted for one of four conserved serine residues, i.e., Ser-193, Ser-194, Ser-197, and Ser-391. Wild-type and mutant receptors were expressed transiently in COS-7 cells and stably in C6 glioma cells for analysis of ligand-receptor interactions. In radioligand binding assays, the affinity of D2 receptors for dopamine was decreased 50-fold by substitution of alanine for Ser-193, implicating this residue in the binding of dopamine. Each mutant had smaller decreases in affinity for one or more of the ligands tested, with no apparent relationship between the class of ligand and the pattern of mutation-induced changes in affinity, except that the potency of agonists was decreased by substitution for Ser-193. The potency of dopamine for inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was reduced substantially by substitution of alanine for Ser-193 or Ser-197. Mutation of Ser-194 led to a complete loss of efficacy for dopamine and p-tyramine, which would be consistent with an interaction between Ser-194 and the p-hydroxyl substituent of dopamine that is necessary for activation of the receptors to occur. Because mutation of the corresponding residues of beta 2-adrenergic receptors has very different consequences, we conclude that although the position of these serine residues is highly conserved among catecholamine receptors, and the residues as a group are important in ligand binding and activation of receptors by agonists, the function of each of the residues considered separately varies among catecholamine receptors. PMID:1321233

  17. Use of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to study hCG-receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Although the glycoprotein hormones lutropin (LH), follitropin (FSH), and thyrotropin (TSH) bind to different receptors, each contains an identical alpha subunit. Specificity is somehow endowed by theta subunits which are distinct for each hormone. Human choriogonadotropin (hCG) is a natural LH analog that contains a beta subunit nearly identical to that of LH. The roles of these subunits in the recognition and high affinity binding of hCG to receptor was examined. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the individual subunits of hCG were used to probe the hormone-receptor interaction. Conformation-specific and sequence-specific antibodies were examined for their abilities to bind Triton X-100-solubilized /sup 125/I-hCG-receptor complex and to inhibit hormone binding to crude rat ovarian membranes containing receptor. Even though the immunoreactive sites are not located on the receptor binding surface of the beta subunit, most, but not all, of these polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were able to inhibit /sup 125/I-hCG binding to receptor. Although the inhibition of binding may be due to steric interference due to the size of the antibody molecules, a two-step model for hCG binding to receptor is presented that also explains these results. In this model, the beta subunit initially binds with the receptor with a highly specific but low affinity interaction. This activates a site for the high affinity binding of the alpha subunit and stabilization of the complex. This is an attractive model as it may be applied to other glycoprotein hormones sharing an alpha subunit.

  18. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  19. Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Recent Progress, Challenges and Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Both G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor-tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate large signaling networks, control multiple cell functions and are implicated in many diseases including various cancers. Both of them are also the top therapeutic targets for disease treatment. The discovery of the cross-talk between GPCRs and RTKs connects these two vast signaling networks and complicates the already complicated signaling networks that regulate cell signaling and function. In this review, we focus on the transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a subfamily of RTKs, by GPCRs. Since the first report of EGFR transactivation by GPCR, significant progress has been made including the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the transactivation. Here, we first provide a basic picture for GPCR, EGFR and EGFR transactivation by GPCR. We then discuss the progress made in the last five years and finally provided our view of the future challenge and future researches needed to overcome these challenges. PMID:26771606

  20. Receptor-purified, Bolton-Hunter radioiodinated, recombinant, human epidermal growth factor: An improved radioligand for receptor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kermode, J.C.; Tritton, T.R. )

    1990-01-01

    We report an assessment of the applicability of the Bolton-Hunter method to the radioiodination of epidermal growth factor (EGF). Recombinant human EGF (hEGF) could be radioiodinated successfully by this method, whereas murine EGF could not. Bolton-Hunter {sup 125}I-labeled hEGF was compared with commercial 125I-labeled hEGF prepared by the chloramine-T radioiodination method. Neither radioligand was sufficiently pure for a detailed characterization of the purportedly heterogeneous pattern of binding of EGF to its receptors. A procedure based on receptor adsorption was thus developed for repurification of the Bolton-Hunter 125I-labeled hEGF. This provided a much purer radioligand suitable for detailed studies of receptor-binding heterogeneity.

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Dimerization and Activation Require Ligand-Induced Conformational Changes in the Dimer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jessica P.; Berger, Mitchell B.; Lin, Chun-Chi; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lemmon, Mark A.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies have shown that ligand-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) dimerization involves major domain rearrangements that expose a critical dimerization arm. However, simply exposing this arm is not sufficient for receptor dimerization, suggesting that additional ligand-induced dimer contacts are required. To map these contributions to the dimer interface, we individually mutated each contact suggested by crystallographic studies and analyzed the effects on receptor dimerization, activation, and ligand binding. We find that domain II contributes >90% of the driving energy for dimerization of the extracellular region, with domain IV adding little. Within domain II, the dimerization arm forms much of the dimer interface, as expected. However, a loop from the sixth disulfide-bonded module (immediately C-terminal to the dimerization arm) also makes a critical contribution. Specific ligand-induced conformational changes in domain II are required for this loop to contribute to receptor dimerization, and we identify a set of ligand-induced intramolecular interactions that appear to be important in driving these changes, effectively “buttressing” the dimer interface. Our data also suggest that similar conformational changes may determine the specificity of ErbB receptor homo- versus heterodimerization. PMID:16107719

  2. Structure of macrophage colony stimulating factor bound to FMS: Diverse signaling assemblies of class III receptor tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; He, Xiaolin

    2009-06-12

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), through binding to its receptor FMS, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), regulates the development and function of mononuclear phagocytes, and plays important roles in innate immunity, cancer and inflammation. We report a 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of M-CSF bound to the first 3 domains (D1-D3) of FMS. The ligand binding mode of FMS is surprisingly different from KIT, another class III RTK, in which the major ligand-binding domain of FMS, D2, uses the CD and EF loops, but not the {beta}-sheet on the opposite side of the Ig domain as in KIT, to bind ligand. Calorimetric data indicate that M-CSF cannot dimerize FMS without receptor-receptor interactions mediated by FMS domains D4 and D5. Consistently, the structure contains only 1 FMS-D1-D3 molecule bound to a M-CSF dimer, due to a weak, hydrophilic M-CSF:FMS interface, and probably a conformational change of the M-CSF dimer in which binding to the second site is rendered unfavorable by FMS binding at the first site. The partial, intermediate complex suggests that FMS may be activated in two steps, with the initial engagement step distinct from the subsequent dimerization/activation step. Hence, the formation of signaling class III RTK complexes can be diverse, engaging various modes of ligand recognition and various mechanistic steps for dimerizing and activating receptors.

  3. A Suppressive Antagonism Evidences Progesterone and Estrogen Receptor Pathway Interaction with Concomitant Regulation of Hand2, Bmp2 and ERK during Early Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Mestre-Citrinovitz, Ana C.; Kleff, Veronika; Vallejo, Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Progesterone receptor and estrogen receptor participate in growth and differentiation of the different rat decidual regions. Steroid hormone receptor antagonists were used to study steroid regulation of decidualization. Here we describe a suppressive interaction between progesterone receptor (onapristone) and estrogen receptor (ICI182780) antagonists and their relation to a rescue phenomenon with concomitant regulation of Hand2, Bmp2 and p-ERK1/2 during the early decidualization steps. Phenotypes of decidua development produced by antagonist treatments were characterized by morphology, proliferation, differentiation, angiogenesis and expression of signaling molecules. We found that suppression of progesterone receptor activity by onapristone treatment resulted in resorption of the implantation sites with concomitant decrease in progesterone and estrogen receptors, PCNA, KI67 antigen, DESMIN, CCND3, CX43, Prl8a2, and signaling players such as transcription factor Hand2, Bmp2 mRNAs and p-ERK1/2. Moreover, FGF-2 and Vegfa increased as a consequence of onapristone treatment. Implantation sites from antagonist of estrogen receptor treated rats developed all decidual regions, but showed an anomalous blood vessel formation at the mesometrial part of the decidua. The deleterious effect of onapristone was partially counteracted by the impairment of estrogen receptor activity with rescue of expression levels of hormone steroid receptors, proliferation and differentiation markers, and the induction of a probably compensatory increase in signaling molecules Hand2, Bmp2 and ERK1/2 activation compared to oil treated controls. This novel drug interaction during decidualization could be applied to pathological endometrial cell proliferation processes to improve therapies using steroid hormone receptor targets. PMID:25897495

  4. Role of receptor interaction in the mode of action of insecticidal Cry and Cyt toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Gómez, I; Pardo-López, L; Muñoz-Garay, C; Fernandez, L E; Pérez, C; Sánchez, J; Soberón, M; Bravo, A

    2007-01-01

    Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis are used for insect control. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells. In this review we will summarize recent findings on the Cry toxin-receptor interaction and the role of receptor recognition in their mode of action. Cry toxins interact sequentially with multiple receptors. In lepidopteran insects, Cry1A monomeric toxins interact with the first receptor and this interaction triggers oligomerization of the toxins. The oligomer then interacts with second receptor inducing insertion into membrane microdomains and larval death. In the case of mosquitocidal toxins, Cry and Cyt toxins play a part. These toxins have a synergistic effect and Cyt1Aa overcomes Cry toxin resistance. Recently, it was proposed that Cyt1Aa synergizes or suppresses resistance to Cry toxins by functioning as a membrane-bound receptor for Cry toxin. PMID:17145116

  5. Receptor/Ligand Interactions at an Oil/Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Daniel; Chao, Chi-Yang; Shull, Kenneth

    2006-03-01

    The strength of the interaction between biotin and avidin has sparked major research interests as the system serves as a vehicle for both targeted drug delivery and the simulation of surface recognition processes. Interfacial tension measurements (IFT) using R-PEO-biotin^1 were used to obtain dynamic information on the avidin-biotin interaction. Real time IFT data was gathered from the liquid-liquid interface by monitoring the shape of the drop via a drop shape analysis (DSA) instrument. A drop, containing dissolved R-PEO-biotin block copolymers in an ``oil like'' phase, was formed in an immiscible embedding ``water like'' phase. The block copolymers were specially designed to segregate to the liquid-liquid interface and cover the drop surface. By adding avidin to the surrounding water phase, changes in the drop shape provided dynamic data on the avidin-biotin interaction, as avidin binds to biotin only at the drop surface. This is the first study to show that DSA can be applied to the dynamic study of the interaction between avidin and biotin. ^1Biotin-functionalized block copolymers with a hydrophobic aliphatic block and a hydrophilic PEO block

  6. Illuminating epidermal growth factor receptor densities on filopodia through plasmon coupling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Wang, Hongyun; Reinhard, Björn M

    2011-08-23

    Filopodia have been hypothesized to act as remote sensors of the cell environment, but many details of the sensor function remain unclear. We investigated the distribution of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) density on filopodia and on the dorsal cell membrane of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells using a nanoplasmonic enabled imaging tool. We targeted cell surface EGFR with 40 nm diameter Au nanoparticles (NPs) using a high affinity multivalent labeling strategy and determined relative NP binding affinities spatially resolved through plasmon coupling. Distance-dependent near-field interactions between the labels generated a NP density (ρ)-dependent spectral response that facilitated a spatial mapping of the EGFR density distribution on subcellular length scales in an optical microscope in solution. The measured ρ values were significantly higher on filopodia than on the cellular surface, which is indicative of an enrichment of EGFR on filopodia. A detailed characterization of the spatial distribution of the NP immunolabels through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the findings of the all-optical plasmon coupling studies and provided additional structural details. The NPs exhibited a preferential association with the sides of the filopodia. We calibrated the ρ-dependent spectral response of the Au immunolabels through correlation of optical spectroscopy and SEM. The experimental dependence of the measured plasmon resonance wavelength (λ(res)) of the interacting immunolabels on ρ was well described by the fit λ(res) = 595.0 nm - 46.36 nm exp(-ρ/51.48) for ρ ≤ 476 NPs/μm(2). The performed correlated spectroscopic/SEM studies pave the way toward quantitative immunolabeling studies of EGFR and other important cell surface receptors in an optical microscope. PMID:21761914

  7. Differential interactions of dimethyltryptamine (DMT) with 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Deliganis, A V; Pierce, P A; Peroutka, S J

    1991-06-01

    The interactions of the indolealkylamine N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) with 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2 receptors in rat brain were analyzed using radioligand binding techniques and biochemical functional assays. The affinity of DMT for 5-HT1A sites labeled by [3H]-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin ([3H]-8-OH-DPAT) was decreased in the presence of 10(-4) M GTP, suggesting agonist activity of DMT at this receptor. Adenylate cyclase studies in rat hippocampi showed that DMT inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclase activity, a 5-HT1A agonist effect. DMT displayed full agonist activity with an EC50 of 4 x 10(-6) M in the cyclase assay. In contrast to the agonist actions of DMT at 5-HT1A receptors, DMT appeared to have antagonistic properties at 5-HT2 receptors. The ability of DMT to compete for [3H]-ketanserin-labeled 5-HT2 receptors was not affected by the presence of 10(-4) M GTP, suggesting antagonist activity of DMT at 5-HT2 receptors. In addition, DMT antagonized 5-HT2-receptor-mediated phosphatidylinositol (PI) turnover in rat cortex at concentrations above 10(-7) M, with 70% of the 5-HT-induced PI response inhibited at 10(-4) M DMT. Micromolar concentrations of DMT produced a slight PI stimulation that was not blocked by the 5-HT2 antagonist ketanserin. These studies suggest that DMT has opposing actions on 5-HT receptor subtypes, displaying agonist activity at 5-HT1A receptors and antagonist activity at 5-HT2 receptors. PMID:1828347

  8. Interaction of cannabinoid receptor 2 and social environment modulates chronic alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Pradier, Bruno; Erxlebe, Edda; Markert, Astrid; Rácz, Ildikó

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute nearly in equal power to the development of alcoholism. Environmental factors, such as negative life events or emotionally disruptive conditions, initiate and promote alcohol drinking and relapse. The endocannabinoid system is involved in hedonic control and modulates stress reactivity. Furthermore, chronic alcohol drinking alters endocannabinoid signalling, which in turn influences the stress reactivity. Recently, it has been shown that CB2 receptor activity influences stress sensitivity and alcohol drinking. We hypothesized that CB2 receptors influence the impact of environmental risk factors on alcohol preference and consumption. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the alcohol-drinking pattern of wild-type and CB2-deficient animals under single- and group-housing conditions using different alcohol-drinking models, such as forced drinking, intermittent forced drinking and two-bottle choice paradigms. Our data showed that CB2 receptor modulates alcohol consumption and reward. Interestingly, we detected that lack of CB2 receptors led to increased alcohol drinking in the intermittent forced drinking paradigm under group-housing conditions. Furthermore, we found that CB2 knockout mice consumed more food and that their body weight gain was modulated by social environment. On the basis of these data, we conclude that social environment critically affects the modulatory function of CB2 receptors, especially in alcohol intake. These findings suggest that a treatment strategy targeting CB2 receptors may have a beneficial effect on pathological drinking, particularly in situations of social stress and discomfort. PMID:25827923

  9. Syndecans as Cell Surface Receptors in Cancer Biology. A Focus on their Interaction with PDZ Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bill; Montmasson, Marine; Terradot, Laurent; Rousselle, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane receptors with ectodomains that are modified by glycosaminoglycan chains. The ectodomains can interact with a wide variety of molecules, including growth factors, cytokines, proteinases, adhesion receptors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The four syndecans in mammals are expressed in a development-, cell-type-, and tissue-specific manner and can function either as co-receptors with other cell surface receptors or as independent adhesion receptors that mediate cell signaling. They help regulate cell proliferation and migration, angiogenesis, cell/cell and cell/ECM adhesion, and they may participate in several key tumorigenesis processes. In some cancers, syndecan expression regulates tumor cell proliferation, adhesion, motility, and other functions, and may be a prognostic marker for tumor progression and patient survival. The short cytoplasmic tail is likely to be involved in these events through recruitment of signaling partners. In particular, the conserved carboxyl-terminal EFYA tetrapeptide sequence that is present in all syndecans binds to some PDZ domain-containing proteins that may function as scaffold proteins that recruit signaling and cytoskeletal proteins to the plasma membrane. There is growing interest in understanding these interactions at both the structural and biological levels, and recent findings show their high degree of complexity. Parameters that influence the recruitment of PDZ domain proteins by syndecans, such as binding specificity and affinity, are the focus of active investigations and are important for understanding regulatory mechanisms. Recent studies show that binding may be affected by post-translational events that influence regulatory mechanisms, such as phosphorylation within the syndecan cytoplasmic tail. PMID:26869927

  10. Interaction of nicotinic receptor affinity reagents with central nervous system. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin-binding entities

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas, R.J.; Bennett, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Membrane-bound ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin-binding entities derived from rat brain are found to interact specifically with the affinity reagents maleimidobenzyltrimethylammonium (MBTA) and bromoacetylcholine (BAC), originally designed to label nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from electroplax and skeletal muscle. Following treatment of membranes with dithiothreitol, all specific toxin binding sites are irreversibly blocked by reaction with MBTA or BAC. Affinity reagent labeling of dithiothreitol-reduced membranes is prevented (toxin binding sites are not blocked) by prior alkylaction with N-ethylmaleimide, by prior oxidation with dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), or by incubation with neurotoxin. Reversibly associating cholinergic agonists and antagonists retard the rate of affinity reagent interaction with toxin receptors. The apparent rates of affinity reagent alkylation of toxin receptors, and the influences of other sulfhydryl/disulfide reagents on affinity labeling are comparable to those observed for reaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the periphery. The results provide further evidence that central nervous system ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin receptors share a remarkable number of biochemical properties with nicotinic receptors from the periphery.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and retinoic acid receptors differentially control the interactions of retinoid X receptor heterodimers with ligands, coactivators, and corepressors.

    PubMed Central

    DiRenzo, J; Söderstrom, M; Kurokawa, R; Ogliastro, M H; Ricote, M; Ingrey, S; Hörlein, A; Rosenfeld, M G; Glass, C K

    1997-01-01

    As the obligate member of most nuclear receptor heterodimers, retinoid X receptors (RXRs) can potentially perform two functions: cooperative binding to hormone response elements and coordinate regulation of target genes by RXR ligands. In this paper we describe allosteric interactions between RXR and two heterodimeric partners, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs); RARs and PPARs prevent and permit activation by RXR-specific ligands, respectively. By competing for dimerization with RXR on response elements consisting of direct-repeat half-sites spaced by 1 bp (DR1 elements), the relative abundance of RAR and PPAR determines whether the RXR signaling pathway will be functional. In contrast to RAR, which prevents the binding of RXR ligands and recruits the nuclear receptor corepressor N-CoR, PPAR permits the binding of SRC-1 in response to both RXR and PPAR ligands. Overexpression of SRC-1 markedly potentiates ligand-dependent transcription by PPARgamma, suggesting that SRC-1 serves as a coactivator in vivo. Remarkably, the ability of RAR to both block the binding of ligands to RXR and interact with corepressors requires the CoR box, a structural motif residing in the N-terminal region of the RAR ligand binding domain. Mutations in the CoR box convert RAR from a nonpermissive to a permissive partner of RXR signaling on DR1 elements. We suggest that the differential recruitment of coactivators and corepressors by RAR-RXR and PPAR-RXR heterodimers provides the basis for a transcriptional switch that may be important in controlling complex programs of gene expression, such as adipocyte differentiation. PMID:9121466

  12. Interaction of urokinase with specific receptors stimulates mobilization of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Ziche, M.; Morbidelli, L. ); Magnelli, L.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1988-12-01

    On the basis of {sup 125}I-labeled plasminogen activator binding analysis the authors have found that bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells have specific receptors for human urinary-type plasminogen activator on the cell membrane. Each cell exposes about 37,000 free receptors with a K{sub d} of 0.8958{times}10{sup {minus}12} M. A monoclonal antibody against the 17,500 proteolytic fragment of the A chain of the plasminogen activator, not containing the catalytic site of the enzyme, impaired the specific binding, thus suggesting the involvement of a sequence present on the A chain in the interaction with the receptor, as previously shown in other cell model systems. Both the native molecule and the A chain are able to stimulate endothelial cell motility in the Boyden chamber, when used at nanomolar concentrations. The use of the same monoclonal antibody that can inhibit ligand-receptor interaction can impair the plasminogen activator and A-chain-induced endothelial cell motility, suggesting that under the conditions used in this in vitro model system, the motility of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells depends on the specific interaction of the ligand with free receptors on the surface of endothelial cells.

  13. Lectin-Glycan Interaction Network-Based Identification of Host Receptors of Microbial Pathogenic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Ielasi, Francesco S.; Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Donohue, Dagmara; Claes, Sandra; Sahli, Hichem; Schols, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first step in the infection of humans by microbial pathogens is their adherence to host tissue cells, which is frequently based on the binding of carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectin-like adhesins) to human cell receptors that expose glycans. In only a few cases have the human receptors of pathogenic adhesins been described. A novel strategy—based on the construction of a lectin-glycan interaction (LGI) network—to identify the potential human binding receptors for pathogenic adhesins with lectin activity was developed. The new approach is based on linking glycan array screening results of these adhesins to a human glycoprotein database via the construction of an LGI network. This strategy was used to detect human receptors for virulent Escherichia coli (FimH adhesin), and the fungal pathogens Candida albicans (Als1p and Als3p adhesins) and C. glabrata (Epa1, Epa6, and Epa7 adhesins), which cause candidiasis. This LGI network strategy allows the profiling of potential adhesin binding receptors in the host with prioritization, based on experimental binding data, of the most relevant interactions. New potential targets for the selected adhesins were predicted and experimentally confirmed. This methodology was also used to predict lectin interactions with envelope glycoproteins of human-pathogenic viruses. It was shown that this strategy was successful in revealing that the FimH adhesin has anti-HIV activity. PMID:27406561

  14. Individual variation of human S1P₁ coding sequence leads to heterogeneity in receptor function and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Obinata, Hideru; Gutkind, Sarah; Stitham, Jeremiah; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Hwa, John; Hla, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P₁), an abundantly-expressed G protein-coupled receptor which regulates key vascular and immune responses, is a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases. Fingolimod/Gilenya (FTY720), an oral medication for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, targets S1P₁ receptors on immune and neural cells to suppress neuroinflammation. However, suppression of endothelial S1P₁ receptors is associated with cardiac and vascular adverse effects. Here we report the genetic variations of the S1P₁ coding region from exon sequencing of >12,000 individuals and their functional consequences. We conducted functional analyses of 14 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the S1PR1 gene. One SNP mutant (Arg¹²⁰ to Pro) failed to transmit sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-induced intracellular signals such as calcium increase and activation of p44/42 MAPK and Akt. Two other mutants (Ile⁴⁵ to Thr and Gly³⁰⁵ to Cys) showed normal intracellular signals but impaired S1P-induced endocytosis, which made the receptor resistant to FTY720-induced degradation. Another SNP mutant (Arg¹³ to Gly) demonstrated protection from coronary artery disease in a high cardiovascular risk population. Individuals with this mutation showed a significantly lower percentage of multi-vessel coronary obstruction in a risk factor-matched case-control study. This study suggests that individual genetic variations of S1P₁ can influence receptor function and, therefore, infer differential disease risks and interaction with S1P₁-targeted therapeutics. PMID:25293589

  15. Altered (/sup 125/I)epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Nanney, L.B.; Stoscheck, C.M.; Magid, M.; King, L.E. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    Stimulation of growth and differentiation of human epidermis by epidermal growth factor (EGF) is mediated by its binding to specific receptors. Whether EGF receptors primarily mediate cell division or differentiation in hyperproliferative disease such as psoriasis vulgaris is unclear. To study the pathogenesis of psoriasis, 4-mm2 punch biopsy specimens of normal, uninvolved, and involved psoriatic skin were assayed for EGF receptors by autoradiographic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical methods. Using autoradiographic and immunohistochemical methods, basal keratinocytes were found to contain the greatest number of EGF binding sites and immunoreactive receptors as compared to the upper layers of the epidermis in both normal epidermis and psoriatic skin. No EGF receptor differences between normal and psoriatic epidermis were observed in this layer. In the upper layers of the epidermis, a 2-fold increase in EGF binding capacity was observed in psoriatic skin as compared with normal thin or thick skin. Biochemical methods indicated that (/sup 125/I)EGF binding was increased in psoriatic epidermis as compared with similar thickness normal epidermis when measured on a protein basis. Epidermal growth factor was shown to increase phosphorylation of the EGF receptor in skin. EGF receptors retained in the nonmitotic stratum spinosum and parakeratotic stratum corneum may reflect the incomplete, abnormal differentiation that occurs in active psoriatic lesions. Alternatively, retained EGF receptors may play a direct role in inhibiting cellular differentiation in the suprabasal layers.

  16. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  17. Receptor-coupled effector systems and their interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the modulation of intracellular signal generation by receptor-coupled effector systems in B lymphocytes, and whether these alterations are consistent with the effects of prostaglandins. TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate) and sn-1,2,-dioctanoylglycerol (diC{sub 8}) substitute for lipid derived signals which activate protein kinase C. Pretreating splenocytes from athymic nude mice with 100nM TPA or 5 {mu}M diC{sub 8} potentiated the forskolin-induced increased in cAMP (measured by radioimmunoassay) 2.5 and 3.0 times (respectively), but they decreased the PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP rise 48% and 35% (respectively). Goat anti-mouse IgM, which activates diacylglycerol production, potentiated the forskolin-induced cAMP increase by 76%, but reduced that of PGE{sub 1} by 30%. Rabbit anti-mouse IgG, its F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragment, or goat anti-mouse IGM induced increases in the cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}), (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}, which TPA inhibited. In contrast, TPA potential antibody-induced {sup 3}H-thymidine (85x) and {sup 3}H-uridine (30x) uptake in B lymphocytes.

  18. Regulation of cell surface receptors for different hematopoietic growth factors on myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, J; Sachs, L

    1986-01-01

    There are clones of myeloid leukemic cells which are different from normal myeloid cells in that they have become independent of hematopoietic growth factor for cell viability and growth. The ability of these clones to bind three types of hematopoietic growth factors (MGI-1GM = GM-CSF, IL-3 = multi-CSF and MGI-1M = M-CSF = CSF-1) was measured using the method of quantitative absorption at 1 degree C and low pH elution of cell-bound biological activity. Results of binding to normal myeloid and lymphoid cells were similar to those obtained by radioreceptor assays. The results indicate that the number of receptors on different clones of these leukemic cells varied from 0 to 1,300 per cell. The receptors have a high binding affinity. Receptors for different growth factors can be independently expressed in different clones. There was no relationship between expression of receptors for these growth factors and the phenotype of the leukemic cells regarding their ability to be induced to differentiate. The number of receptors on the leukemic cells was lower than on normal mature macrophages. Myeloid leukemic cells induced to differentiate by normal myeloid cell differentiation factor MGI-2 (= DF), or by low doses of actinomycin D or cytosine arabinoside, showed an up-regulation of the number of MGI-1GM and IL-3 receptors. Induction of differentiation of leukemic cells by MGI-2 also induced production and secretion of the growth factor MGI-1GM, and this induced MGI-1GM saturated the up-regulated MGI-1GM receptors. It is suggested that up-regulation of these receptors during differentiation is required for the functioning of differentiated cells. PMID:3023059

  19. The COP9 Signalosome Interacts with and Regulates Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Korczeniewska, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) exerts crucial functions in the regulation of host immunity against extracellular pathogens, DNA damage-induced apoptosis, death receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. Tight regulation of IRF5 is thus warranted for an efficient response toward extracellular stressors and for limiting autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Here we report that the COP9 signalosome (CSN), a general modulator of diverse cellular and developmental processes, associates constitutively with IRF5 and promotes its protein stability. The constitutive CSN/IRF5 interaction was identified using proteomics and confirmed by endogenous immunoprecipitations. The CSN/IRF5 interaction occurred on the carboxyl and amino termini of IRF5; a single internal deletion from amino acids 455 to 466 (Δ455-466) was found to significantly reduce IRF5 protein stability. CSN subunit 3 (CSN3) was identified as a direct interacting partner of IRF5, and knockdown of this subunit with small interfering RNAs resulted in enhanced degradation. Degradation was further augmented by knockdown of CSN1 and CSN3 together. The ubiquitin E1 inhibitor UBEI-41 or the proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented IRF5 degradation, supporting the idea that its stability is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Importantly, activation of IRF5 by the death receptor ligand tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) resulted in enhanced degradation via loss of the CSN/IRF5 interaction. This study defines CSN to be a new interacting partner of IRF5 that controls its stability. PMID:23275442

  20. Interactions of signaling proteins, growth factors and other proteins with heparan sulfate: mechanisms and mysteries.

    PubMed

    Billings, Paul C; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans (HSPGs) that, collectively, play crucial roles in many physiologic processes including cell differentiation, organ morphogenesis and cancer. A key function of HS is to bind and interact with signaling proteins, growth factors, plasma proteins, immune-modulators and other factors. In doing so, the HS chains and HSPGs are able to regulate protein distribution, bio-availability and action on target cells and can also serve as cell surface co-receptors, facilitating ligand-receptor interactions. These proteins contain an HS/heparin-binding domain (HBD) that mediates their association and contacts with HS. HBDs are highly diverse in sequence and predicted structure, contain clusters of basic amino acids (Lys and Arg) and possess an overall net positive charge, most often within a consensus Cardin-Weintraub (CW) motif. Interestingly, other domains and residues are now known to influence protein-HS interactions, as well as interactions with other glycosaminoglycans, such as chondroitin sulfate. In this review, we provide a description and analysis of HBDs in proteins including amphiregulin, fibroblast growth factor family members, heparanase, sclerostin and hedgehog protein family members. We discuss HBD structural and functional features and important roles carried out by other protein domains, and also provide novel conformational insights into the diversity of CW motifs present in Sonic, Indian and Desert hedgehogs. Finally, we review progress in understanding the pathogenesis of a rare pediatric skeletal disorder, Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME), characterized by HS deficiency and cartilage tumor formation. Advances in understanding protein-HS interactions will have broad implications for basic biology and translational medicine as well as for the development of HS-based therapeutics. PMID:26076122

  1. Human ketosteroid receptors interact with hazardous phthalate plasticizers and their metabolites: an in silico study.

    PubMed

    Sarath Josh, M K; Pradeep, S; Vijayalekshmy Amma, K S; Sudha Devi, R; Balachandran, S; Sreejith, M N; Benjamin, Sailas

    2016-06-01

    Phthalic acid esters or phthalates are ubiquitous environmental pollutants known for their adverse health effects in test animals and, of late, in humans. Thus, in this molecular docking study - using Glide (Schrödinger) - the molecular interactions of 31 ligands, including 12 diphthalates, their monophthalates and phthalic acid with selected human ketosteroid receptors, i.e., androgen (hAR), progesterone (hPR) and glucocorticoid (hGR) receptors were explored and their binding affinities were compared with that of corresponding natural steroids and a known endocrine disrupting xenobiotic, bisphenol A (BPA). Mostly, diphthalates and monophthalates showed the potential for antisteroidal activity by interacting with hAR, hPR and hGR. Of them, diphenyl phthalate showed the highest G score (-7.70 kcal mol(-1) ) with hAR, and the crucial amino acid (aa) residues in the ligand binding domain (LBD) of this receptor involved in the molecular interactions were Phe 764, Leu 704, Asn 705 and Thr 877. The mono-iso-decyl phthalate showed the highest G score (-8.36) with the hPR, and the crucial aa residues in the LBD interactions were Arg 766 Gln 725 and Phe 778. The mono-iso-decyl phthalate also showed more affinity (-8.44) towards hGR than the natural ligand, and the aa residues in the LBD interactions were Gln 570 and Met 604. In addition to these, some other phthalates established comparable interactions with certain aa residues located in the LBD of these receptors, which resulted in higher G scores. Contrastingly, BPA and some natural ligands tested in this study showed lower G scores with these receptors than certain phthalates reported herein, i.e., certain phthalates are more toxic than the proven toxic BPA. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26304264

  2. Receptor- and age-selective effects of dopamine oxidation on receptor-G protein interactions in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J A; Erat, S; Denisova, N; Villalobos-Molina, R

    1998-03-15

    The striatum contains a high concentration of oxidizable dopamine (DA), and the aged organism shows a decreased ability to respond to oxidative stress (OS), making this area extremely vulnerable to free radical insult. To determine the receptor specificity of this putative increase in OS sensitivity, striatal slices from 6- and 24-month-old animals were incubated (30 min, 37 degrees C) in a modified Krebs medium containing 0 to 500 microM DA with or without a preincubation (15 min) in a nitrone trapping agent, 1 or 5 mM alpha-phenyl-n-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), and changes in low Km GTPase activity (an index of receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling) assessed in muscarinic, 5-HT1A D1, and D2 receptors stimulated with carbachol, 8 OH-DPAT-HBr, SKF 38393, or quinelorane, respectively. DA exposure induced selective decreases in the stimulated activity in all of these receptor systems, and an overall increase in conjugated dienes (56%) of the young. In the case of carbachol and 8 OH-DPAT-HBr, the DA-induced deficits in GTPase stimulation were seen primarily in the young (61 and 32%, respectively), while DA-induced deficits in quinelorane (D2) stimulation were seen in both age groups. In the case of SKF 38393-stimulation (D1) the DA-induced deficits were higher in the striatal tissue from the old. The DA-induced decreases in carbachol stimulated GTPase activity in the tissue from the young could be prevented by pretreatment with PBN or the DA uptake inhibitor, nomifensin. No effect of nomifensin was seen in the old, because their DA uptake mechanisms were already compromised. These results suggest that although age-related declines in DA uptake may provide some protection against the OS effects in muscarinic or 5-HT1A receptors, other factors may increase the vulnerability of DA neurons to OS, even with reductions in DA uptake. PMID:9586813

  3. Domain interaction between NMDA receptor subunits and the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Kornau, H C; Schenker, L T; Kennedy, M B; Seeburg, P H

    1995-09-22

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subserves synaptic glutamate-induced transmission and plasticity in central neurons. The yeast two-hybrid system was used to show that the cytoplasmic tails of NMDA receptor subunits interact with a prominent postsynaptic density protein PSD-95. The second PDZ domain in PSD-95 binds to the seven-amino acid, COOH-terminal domain containing the terminal tSXV motif (where S is serine, X is any amino acid, and V is valine) common to NR2 subunits and certain NR1 splice forms. Transcripts encoding PSD-95 are expressed in a pattern similar to that of NMDA receptors, and the NR2B subunit co-localizes with PSD-95 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The interaction of these proteins may affect the plasticity of excitatory synapses. PMID:7569905

  4. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  5. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand–receptor design

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand–receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand–receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:26350224

  6. Genetic Interactions Between Transcription Factors Cause Natural Variation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Justin; Lorenz, Kim; Cohen, Barak

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity is limited by the paucity of examples in which multiple, interacting loci have been identified. We show that natural variation in the efficiency of sporulation, the program in yeast that initiates the sexual phase of the life cycle, between oak tree and vineyard strains is due to allelic variation between four nucleotide changes in three transcription factors: IME1, RME1, and RSF1. Furthermore, we identified that selection has shaped quantitative variation in yeast sporulation between strains. These results illustrate how genetic interactions between transcription factors are a major source of phenotypic diversity within species. PMID:19164747

  7. Detection of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) ligand-c-MET receptor activation in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded specimens by a novel proximity assay.

    PubMed

    Dua, Rajiv; Zhang, Jianhuan; Parry, Gordon; Penuel, Elicia

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of membrane receptors frequently occurs in human carcinomas. Detection of phosphorylated receptors is commonly used as an indicator of receptor activation in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor specimens. FFPE is a standard method of specimen preparation used in the histological analysis of solid tumors. Due to variability in FFPE preparations and the labile nature of protein phosphorylation, measurements of phospho-proteins are unreliable and create ambiguities in clinical interpretation. Here, we describe an alternative, novel approach to measure receptor activation by detecting and quantifying ligand-receptor complexes in FFPE specimens. We used hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-c-MET as our model ligand-receptor system. HGF is the only known ligand of the c-MET tyrosine kinase receptor and HGF binding triggers c-MET phosphorylation. Novel antibody proximity-based assays were developed and used to detect and quantify total c-MET, total HGF, and HGF-c-MET ligand-receptor interactions in FFPE cell line and tumor tissue. In glioma cells, autocrine activation of c-MET by HGF-c-MET increased basal levels of c-MET phosphorylation at tyrosine (Tyr) 1003. Furthermore, HGF-c-MET activation in glioma cell lines was verified by Surface Protein-Protein Interaction by Crosslinking ELISA (SPPICE) assay in corresponding soluble cell lysates. Finally, we profiled levels ofc-MET, HGF, and HGF-c-MET complexes in FFPE specimens of human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), Gastric Cancer, Head and Neck Squamous Cell, and Head and Neck Non-Squamous Cell carcinomas. This report describes a novel approach for the detection and quantification of ligand-receptor interactions that can be widely applied to measure receptor activation in FFPE preclinical models and archived FFPE human tissue specimens. PMID:21283737

  8. Detection of Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) Ligand-c-MET Receptor Activation in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded Specimens by a Novel Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Rajiv; Zhang, Jianhuan; Parry, Gordon; Penuel, Elicia

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of membrane receptors frequently occurs in human carcinomas. Detection of phosphorylated receptors is commonly used as an indicator of receptor activation in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor specimens. FFPE is a standard method of specimen preparation used in the histological analysis of solid tumors. Due to variability in FFPE preparations and the labile nature of protein phosphorylation, measurements of phospho-proteins are unreliable and create ambiguities in clinical interpretation. Here, we describe an alternative, novel approach to measure receptor activation by detecting and quantifying ligand-receptor complexes in FFPE specimens. We used hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-c-MET as our model ligand-receptor system. HGF is the only known ligand of the c-MET tyrosine kinase receptor and HGF binding triggers c-MET phosphorylation. Novel antibody proximity-based assays were developed and used to detect and quantify total c-MET, total HGF, and HGF-c-MET ligand-receptor interactions in FFPE cell line and tumor tissue. In glioma cells, autocrine activation of c-MET by HGF-c-MET increased basal levels of c-MET phosphorylation at tyrosine (Tyr) 1003. Furthermore, HGF-c-MET activation in glioma cell lines was verified by Surface Protein-Protein Interaction by Crosslinking ELISA (SPPICE) assay in corresponding soluble cell lysates. Finally, we profiled levels of c-MET, HGF, and HGF-c-MET complexes in FFPE specimens of human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), Gastric Cancer, Head and Neck Squamous Cell, and Head and Neck Non-Squamous Cell carcinomas. This report describes a novel approach for the detection and quantification of ligand-receptor interactions that can be widely applied to measure receptor activation in FFPE preclinical models and archived FFPE human tissue specimens. PMID:21283737

  9. PRIC295, a Nuclear Receptor Coactivator, Identified from PPARα-Interacting Cofactor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pyper, Sean R.; Viswakarma, Navin; Jia, Yuzhi; Zhu, Yi-Jun; Fondell, Joseph D.; Reddy, Janardan K.

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) plays a key role in lipid metabolism and energy combustion. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents leads to the development of hepatocellular carcinomas. The ability of PPARα to induce expression of its target genes depends on Mediator, an evolutionarily conserved complex of cofactors and, in particular, the subunit 1 (Med1) of this complex. Here, we report the identification and characterization of PPARα-interacting cofactor (PRIC)-295 (PRIC295), a novel coactivator protein, and show that it interacts with the Med1 and Med24 subunits of the Mediator complex. PRIC295 contains 10 LXXLL signature motifs that facilitate nuclear receptor binding and interacts with PPARα and five other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily in a ligand-dependent manner. PRIC295 enhances the transactivation function of PPARα, PPARγ, and ERα. These data demonstrate that PRIC295 interacts with nuclear receptors such as PPARα and functions as a transcription coactivator under in vitro conditions and may play an important role in mediating the effects in vivo as a member of the PRIC complex with Med1 and Med24. PMID:20885938

  10. Problem-Solving Test: Vitellogenin and Vitellogenin-Receptor Recognition: An Example of Protein Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Cortes, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is a lipid transfer protein that carries yolk to the ovary. The vitellogenin receptor (VtgR) mediates the uptake of Vtg into the oocyte of oviparous animals; its structure includes eight ligand-binding repeats (LBR). The binding site of VtgR and Vtg and the location of the interaction within the molecules are at these LBR.…

  11. NATURE OF BINDING INTERACTION OF SELECTED CHEMICALS WITH RAT ESTROGEN RECEPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA is currently validating a rat uterine estrogen receptor (ER) binding assay as part of the Tier 1 Screening Battery for the Endocrine Disruptor Program. An eventual goal is to use interactive data to create computerized structure-activity models. However, more informati...

  12. Baculovirus display for discovery of low-affinity extracellular receptor-ligand interactions using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tom, Irene; Estevez, Alberto; Bowman, Krista; Gonzalez, Lino C

    2015-06-15

    When used in conjunction with multivalent protein probes, protein microarrays offer a robust technology for discovery of low-affinity extracellular protein-protein interactions. Probes for receptor-matching screens generally consist of purified extracellular domains fused to affinity tags. Given that approximately two-thirds of extracellular proteins are transmembrane domain-containing proteins, it would be desirable to develop a system to express and display probe receptors in a native-like membrane environment. Toward this end, we evaluated baculovirus display as a platform for generating multivalent probes for protein microarray screens. Virion particles were generated displaying single-transmembrane domain receptors BTLA, CD200, and EFNB2, representing a range of affinities for their interacting partners. Virions directly labeled with Cy5 fluorophore were screened against a microarray containing more than 600 extracellular proteins, and the results were compared with data derived from soluble Fc protein or probe-coated protein A microbeads. An optimized protocol employing a blocking step with a nonrelated probe-expressing control baculovirus allowed identification of the expected interactions with a signal-to-noise ratio similar to or higher than those obtained with the other formats. Our results demonstrate that baculovirus display is suitable for detection of high- and low-affinity extracellular protein-protein interactions on protein microarrays. This platform eliminates the need for protein purification and provides a native-like lipid environment for membrane-associated receptors. PMID:25797350

  13. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2008-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the launch external tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation, the data used was obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated.

  14. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Complex Material Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2008-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from the launch external tanks. The multi-factor has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points, the initial and final points. The exponent describes a monotonic path from the initial condition to the final. The exponent values are selected so that the described path makes sense in the absence of experimental data. In the present investigation the data used was obtained by testing simulated specimens in launching conditions. Results show that the MFIM is an effective method of describing the divot weight ejected under the conditions investigated.

  15. Interaction of ICT receptor with serum albumins in aqueous buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fang-Ying; Ji, Zhao-Jun; Wu, Yu-Mei; Wan, Xiao-Fen

    2006-06-01

    A novel compound, p-(dimethylamino)benzamido-thiosemicarbazide ( 1), based on intramolecular charge transfer fluorescence was synthesized. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer, the emission intensity of 1 increased upon the addition of HSA or BSA due to the energy transfer from the protein to 1 and also the hydrophobic microenvironment provided by HSA or BSA. The binding constants between 1 and proteins were 1.41 × 10 5 mol -1 L for HSA and 8.68 × 10 4 mol -1 L for BSA, respectively. There is only one binding site. The interaction between 1 and proteins was further investigated by synchronous fluorescence.

  16. The P2Y2 Receptor Interacts with VE-Cadherin and VEGF Receptor-2 to Regulate Rac1 Activity in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhongji; Cao, Chen; Wang, Jianjie; Huxley, Virginia H.; Baker, Olga; Weisman, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) mediates homophylic adhesion between endothelial cells and is an important regulator of angiogenesis, blood vessel permeability and leukocyte trafficking. Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, controls VE-cadherin adhesion by acting downstream of several growth factors, including angiopoietin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Here we show that UTP-induced activation of the Gq protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) activated Rac1 and caused a transient complex to form between P2Y2R, VE-cadherin and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Knockdown of VE-cadherin expression with siRNA did not affect UTP-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) but led to a loss of UTP-induced Rac1 activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin, a cytoplasmic protein known to interact with VE-cadherin. Activation of the P2Y2R by UTP also caused a prolonged interaction between p120 catenin and vav2 (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac) that correlated with the kinetics of UTP-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin and VE-cadherin. Inhibitors of VEGFR-2 (SU1498) or Src (PP2) significantly diminished UTP-induced Rac1 activation, tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin and VE-cadherin, and association of the P2Y2R with VE-cadherin and p120 catenin with vav2. These findings suggest that the P2Y2R uses Src and VEGFR-2 to mediate association of the P2Y2R with VE-cadherin complexes in endothelial adherens junctions to activate Rac1. PMID:25657827

  17. Compartmentalization of androgen receptor protein–protein interactions in living cells

    PubMed Central

    van Royen, Martin E.; Cunha, Sónia M.; Brink, Maartje C.; Mattern, Karin A.; Nigg, Alex L.; Dubbink, Hendrikus J.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Trapman, Jan; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.

    2007-01-01

    Steroid receptors regulate gene expression in a ligand-dependent manner by binding specific DNA sequences. Ligand binding also changes the conformation of the ligand binding domain (LBD), allowing interaction with coregulators via LxxLL motifs. Androgen receptors (ARs) preferentially interact with coregulators containing LxxLL-related FxxLF motifs. The AR is regulated at an extra level by interaction of an FQNLF motif in the N-terminal domain with the C-terminal LBD (N/C interaction). Although it is generally recognized that AR coregulator and N/C interactions are essential for transcription regulation, their spatiotemporal organization is largely unknown. We performed simultaneous fluorescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching measurements in living cells expressing ARs double tagged with yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins. We provide evidence that AR N/C interactions occur predominantly when ARs are mobile, possibly to prevent unfavorable or untimely cofactor interactions. N/C interactions are largely lost when AR transiently binds to DNA, predominantly in foci partly overlapping transcription sites. AR coregulator interactions occur preferentially when ARs are bound to DNA. PMID:17420290

  18. Avidity-based extracellular interaction screening (AVEXIS) for the scalable detection of low-affinity extracellular receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jason S; Wright, Gavin J

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular protein:protein interactions between secreted or membrane-tethered proteins are critical for both initiating intercellular communication and ensuring cohesion within multicellular organisms. Proteins predicted to form extracellular interactions are encoded by approximately a quarter of human genes, but despite their importance and abundance, the majority of these proteins have no documented binding partner. Primarily, this is due to their biochemical intractability: membrane-embedded proteins are difficult to solubilise in their native conformation and contain structurally-important posttranslational modifications. Also, the interaction affinities between receptor proteins are often characterised by extremely low interaction strengths (half-lives < 1 second) precluding their detection with many commonly-used high throughput methods. Here, we describe an assay, AVEXIS (AVidity-based EXtracellular Interaction Screen) that overcomes these technical challenges enabling the detection of very weak protein interactions (t(1/2) ≤ 0.1 sec) with a low false positive rate. The assay is usually implemented in a high throughput format to enable the systematic screening of many thousands of interactions in a convenient microtitre plate format (Fig. 1). It relies on the production of soluble recombinant protein libraries that contain the ectodomain fragments of cell surface receptors or secreted proteins within which to screen for interactions; therefore, this approach is suitable for type I, type II, GPI-linked cell surface receptors and secreted proteins but not for multipass membrane proteins such as ion channels or transporters. The recombinant protein libraries are produced using a convenient and high-level mammalian expression system, to ensure that important posttranslational modifications such as glycosylation and disulphide bonds are added. Expressed recombinant proteins are secreted into the medium and produced in two forms: a biotinylated bait which can

  19. Kit receptor dimerization is driven by bivalent binding of stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, M A; Pinchasi, D; Zhou, M; Lax, I; Schlessinger, J

    1997-03-01

    Most growth factors and cytokines activate their receptors by inducing dimerization upon binding. We have studied binding of the dimeric cytokine stem cell factor (SCF) to the extracellular domain of its receptor Kit, which is a receptor tyrosine kinase similar to the receptors for platelet-derived growth factor and colony-stimulating factor-1. Calorimetric studies show that one SCF dimer binds simultaneously to two molecules of the Kit extracellular domain. Gel filtration and other methods show that this results in Kit dimerization. It has been proposed that SCF-induced Kit dimerization proceeds via a conformational change that exposes a key receptor dimerization site in the fourth of the five immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in Kit. We show that a form of Kit containing just the first three Ig domains (Kit-123) binds to SCF with precisely the same thermodynamic parameters as does Kit-12345. Analytical ultracentrifugation, light scattering, and gel filtration show that Kit-123 dimerizes upon SCF binding in a manner indistinguishable from that seen with Kit-12345. These data argue that the fourth Ig-like domain of Kit is not required for SCF-induced receptor dimerization and provide additional support for a model in which bivalent binding of the SCF dimer provides the driving force for Kit dimerization. PMID:9045650

  20. Prostacyclin receptor/thromboxane receptor interactions and cellular responses in human atherothrombotic disease.

    PubMed

    Gleim, Scott; Kasza, Zsolt; Martin, Kathleen; Hwa, John

    2009-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since Vane and colleagues proposed a prostacyclin and thromboxane balance as critical to cardiovascular homeostasis. Prostacyclin prevents platelet aggregation and promotes vasodilatation, opposing the effects of thromboxane. Possible compensation by redundant functions, such as nitric oxide, long prevented appreciation of this balance. Effective use of low-dose aspirin in the secondary prevention of atherothrombosis suggested a clinical importance for the balance. However, it was not until the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib was withdrawn because of increased cardiovascular events that this critical balance was confirmed in humans. Moreover, clinical observations are supported by elegant animal receptor knockout experiments and subsequent human genetic variant studies. Combined, these findings provide valuable insight into the roles of these prostanoids in the development of atherothrombosis, emphasizing the need to reevaluate the use of selective prostacyclin- and thromboxane-based therapies in cardiovascular disease. PMID:19361355

  1. Treadmill exercise alleviates stress-induced impairment of social interaction through 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Lim, Baek-Vin; Kim, Kijeong; Seo, Jin-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors tyrosine kinase B (trkB), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) have been suggested as the neurobiological risk factors causing depressive disorder. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. We in-vestigated the effect of treadmill exercise on social interaction in relation with BDNF and 5-HT expressions following stress in rats. Stress was induced by applying inescapable 0.2 mA electric foot shock to the rats for 7 days. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks. Social interaction test and western blot for BDNF, TrkB, pCREB, and 5-HT1A in the hippocampus were performed. The results indicate that the spend time with unfamiliar partner was decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise increased the spending time in the stress-induced rats. Expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB were decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB in the stress-induced rats. In addition, 5-HT1A receptor expression was de-creased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced 5-HT1A expression in the stress-induced rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise alleviated stress-induced social interaction impairment through enhancing hippocampal plasticity and serotonergic function in the hippocampus. These effects of treadmill exercise are achieved through 5-HT1A receptor activation. PMID:26331133

  2. Treadmill exercise alleviates stress-induced impairment of social interaction through 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Lim, Baek-Vin; Kim, Kijeong; Seo, Jin-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors tyrosine kinase B (trkB), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) have been suggested as the neurobiological risk factors causing depressive disorder. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. We in-vestigated the effect of treadmill exercise on social interaction in relation with BDNF and 5-HT expressions following stress in rats. Stress was induced by applying inescapable 0.2 mA electric foot shock to the rats for 7 days. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks. Social interaction test and western blot for BDNF, TrkB, pCREB, and 5-HT1A in the hippocampus were performed. The results indicate that the spend time with unfamiliar partner was decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise increased the spending time in the stress-induced rats. Expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB were decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB in the stress-induced rats. In addition, 5-HT1A receptor expression was de-creased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced 5-HT1A expression in the stress-induced rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise alleviated stress-induced social interaction impairment through enhancing hippocampal plasticity and serotonergic function in the hippocampus. These effects of treadmill exercise are achieved through 5-HT1A receptor activation. PMID:26331133

  3. Suppression of estrogen receptor-alpha transactivation by thyroid transcription factor-2 in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunsook; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Lee, Keesook

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 was expressed in mammary glands and breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 repressed ER{alpha} transactivation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TTF-2 inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERs), which mediate estrogen actio