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Sample records for factor receptor negatively

  1. Positive and negative tissue-specific signaling by a nematode epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lesa, G M; Sternberg, P W

    1997-01-01

    The major determinants of receptor tissue tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling specificity have been proposed to be Src homology 2 (SH2) binding sites, phosphotyrosine-containing oligopeptides in the cytoplasmic domain of the receptor. The Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor homologue LET-23 has multiple functions during development and has eight potential SH2-binding sites in a region carboxyl terminal to its kinase domain. By analyzing transgenic nematodes for three distinct LET-23 functions, we show that six of eight potential sites function in vivo and that they are required for most, but not all, of LET-23 activity. A single site is necessary and sufficient to promote wild-type fertility. Three other sites activate the RAS pathway and are involved only in viability and vulval differentiation. A fifth site is promiscuous and can mediate all three LET-23 functions. An additional site mediates tissue-specific negative regulation. Putative SH2 binding sites are thus key effectors of both cell-specific and negative regulation in an intact organism. We suggest two distinct mechanisms for tissue-specific RTK-mediated signaling. A positive mechanism would promote RTK function through effectors present only in certain cell types. A negative mechanism would inhibit RTK function through tissue-specific negative regulators. Images PMID:9168466

  2. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  3. Reproductive factors and risk of hormone receptor positive and negative breast cancer: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of reproductive factors with hormone receptor (HR)-negative breast tumors remains uncertain. Methods Within the EPIC cohort, Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the relationships of reproductive factors (menarcheal age, time between menarche and first pregnancy, parity, number of children, age at first and last pregnancies, time since last full-term childbirth, breastfeeding, age at menopause, ever having an abortion and use of oral contraceptives [OC]) with risk of ER-PR- (n = 998) and ER+PR+ (n = 3,567) breast tumors. Results A later first full-term childbirth was associated with increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors but not with risk of ER-PR- tumors (≥35 vs. ≤19 years HR: 1.47 [95% CI 1.15-1.88] ptrend < 0.001 for ER+PR+ tumors; ≥35 vs. ≤19 years HR: 0.93 [95% CI 0.53-1.65] ptrend = 0.96 for ER-PR- tumors; P het = 0.03). The risk associations of menarcheal age, and time period between menarche and first full-term childbirth with ER-PR-tumors were in the similar direction with risk of ER+PR+ tumors (phet = 0.50), although weaker in magnitude and statistically only borderline significant. Other parity related factors such as ever a full-term birth, number of births, age- and time since last birth were associated only with ER+PR+ malignancies, however no statistical heterogeneity between breast cancer subtypes was observed. Breastfeeding and OC use were generally not associated with breast cancer subtype risk. Conclusion Our study provides possible evidence that age at menarche, and time between menarche and first full-term childbirth may be associated with the etiology of both HR-negative and HR-positive malignancies, although the associations with HR-negative breast cancer were only borderline significant. PMID:24321460

  4. Role of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor during pulmonary infection with gram negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Soares, A C; Pinho, V S; Souza, D G; Shimizu, T; Ishii, S; Nicoli, J R; Teixeira, M M

    2002-01-01

    The lipid mediator PAF plays an important role in the phagocytosis of particles, including bacteria, and consequent production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-8. Using a PAF receptor antagonist (UK-74,505) and PAF receptor knock-out mice, we have investigated the relevance of PAF for the inflammatory changes and lethality after pulmonary infection with the gram-negative bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. At an inoculum of 3×106 bacteria, there was marked pulmonary (bronchoalveolar lavage and lung) neutrophilia that started early (2.5 h after infection) and peaked at 48 h. All animals were dead by day 4 of infection. The chemokine KC and the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α increased rapidly and persisted for 48 h in the lungs. Pretreatment with UK-74,505 (30 mg kg−1 per day, p.o.) had no significant effects on the number of infiltrating neutrophils in BAL fluid or lung tissue, as assessed by histology and measuring myeloperoxidase, or on the concentrations of KC. In contrast, concentrations of TNF-α and the number of bacteria inside neutrophils were significantly diminished. In order to support a role for the PAF during K. pneumoniae infection, experiments were also carried out in PAFR-deficient mice. In the latter animals, lethality occurred earlier than in wild-type controls. This was associated with greater number of bacteria in lung tissue and diminished percentage of neutrophils containing bacteria in their cytoplasm. Our results suggest that PAF, acting on its receptor, plays a protective role during infection with K. pneumoniae in mice. PMID:12381675

  5. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  6. Dominant-negative effect of truncated mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor species in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kreiling, Jodi L; Montgomery, Michelle A; Wheeler, Joseph R; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Connelly, Christopher M; Zavorka, Megan E; Allison, Jenna L; Macdonald, Richard G

    2012-08-01

    Oligomerization of the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) is important for optimal ligand binding and internalization. M6P/IGF2R is a tumor suppressor gene that exhibits loss of heterozygosity and is mutated in several cancers. We tested the potential dominant-negative effects of two cancer-associated mutations that truncate M6P/IGF2R in ectodomain repeats 9 and 14. Our hypothesis was that co-expression of the truncated receptors with the wild-type/endogenous full-length M6P/IGF2R would interfere with M6P/IGF2R function by heterodimer interference. Immunoprecipitation confirmed formation of heterodimeric complexes between full-length M6P/IGF2Rs and the truncated receptors, termed Rep9F and Rep14F. Remarkably, increasing expression of either Rep9F or Rep14F provoked decreased levels of full-length M6P/IGF2Rs in both cell lysates and plasma membranes, indicating a dominant-negative effect on receptor availability. Loss of full-length M6P/IGF2R was not due to increased proteasomal or lysosomal degradation, but instead arose from increased proteolytic cleavage of cell-surface M6P/IGF2Rs, resulting in ectodomain release, by a mechanism that was inhibited by metal ion chelators. These data suggest that M6P/IGF2R truncation mutants may contribute to the cancer phenotype by decreasing the availability of full-length M6P/IGF2Rs to perform tumor-suppressive functions such as binding/internalization of receptor ligands such as insulin-like growth factor II. PMID:22681933

  7. Tumor biology in estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative breast cancer: Mind the menopausal status

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is not one disease, but can be categorized into four major molecular subtypes according to hormone receptor [estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR)] and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression status. Ki67 labeling index and/or multigene assays are used to classify ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer into luminal A and luminal B (HER2-negative) subtypes. To date, most studies analyzing predictive or prognostic factors in ER-positive breast cancer have been performed in postmenopausal women, mainly using patients and samples in adjuvant aromatase inhibitor trials. In contrast, even the clinical roles of PgR and Ki67 have been little analyzed so far in premenopausal women. PgR is one of the estrogen-responsive genes, and it has been reported that plasma estradiol levels are related to expression levels of estrogen-responsive genes including PGR in ER-positive breast cancer. In this article, biological differences, especially differences in expression of PgR and Ki67 in ER-positive breast cancer between pre- and postmenopausal women are discussed. Clinical roles of PgR and Ki67 in ER-positive breast cancer differ between pre- and postmenopausal women. We suggest that the mechanisms of development and estrogen-dependent growth of ER-positive breast cancer might differ according to menopausal status. PMID:26677435

  8. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  9. Treatment challenges for community oncologists treating postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gradishar, William J

    2016-01-01

    Community-based oncologists are faced with challenges and opportunities when delivering quality patient care, including high patient volumes and diminished resources; however, there may be the potential to deliver increased patient education and subsequently improve outcomes. This review discusses the treatment of postmenopausal women with endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative advanced breast cancer in order to illustrate considerations in the provision of pertinent quality education in the treatment of these patients and the management of therapy-related adverse events. An overview of endocrine-resistant breast cancer and subsequent treatment challenges is also provided. Approved treatment options for endocrine-resistant breast cancer include hormonal therapies and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Compounds under clinical investigation are also discussed. PMID:27468248

  10. Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in triple negative breast cancer: possible implications for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Triple negative breast cancer is associated with poorer prognosis and unresponsiveness to endocrine and anti-HER2 directed agents. Despite emerging data supporting the use of polyADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, complete and durable responses are rare and exploration of additional targeted therapies is needed. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is expressed in triple negative breast cancer and several clinical trials are testing the role of anti-EGFR directed therapy. However, the rate of EGFR mutations is poorly defined. We, therefore, sought to characterize EGFR mutations in triple negative breast cancers. Methods Seventy samples were randomly chosen from a cohort of 653 triple negative breast tumours for EGFR mutation analysis. These samples were immunostained for EGFR protein expression and consisted of negatively stained and positively stained cases. DNA was extracted from paraffin blocks and polymerase chain reaction was performed to amplify exon regions 18 to 21 of the EGFR gene. Direct sequencing of the purified PCR products was performed. Results EGFR mutations were found in 8 of 70 samples (11.4%). Mutations were predominantly exon 19 deletions (4 of 70 samples, 5.7%), which clustered in the region spanning codons 746 to 759 within the kinase domain of EGFR. Two types of exon 19 deletions were seen: a 15 nucleotide deletion (del E746-A750) (2 of 70 samples) and a 24 nucleotide deletion (del S752 - I759) (2 of 70 samples). Other exon 19 mutations observed were the inversion of the complementary strand (1 of 70 samples). Exon 21 mutations included missense substitution, L858R (1 of 70 samples) and T847I (2 of 70 samples). Mutations observed were independent of EGFR protein expression determined by immunohistochemical staining. Conclusions This study is among the first to document the presence and estimate the prevalence of EGFR mutations in triple negative breast cancer. These findings have potential implications for the design of

  11. Transforming growth factor-β, insulin-like growth factor I/insulin-like growth factor I receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor-A: Prognostic and predictive markers in triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    BAHHNASSY, ABEER; MOHANAD, MARWA; SHAARAWY, SABRY; ISMAIL, MANAL F.; EL-BASTAWISY, AHMED; ASHMAWY, ABEER M.; ZEKRI, ABDEL-RAHMAN

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, the prognostic and predictive values of serum transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) were evaluated in triple-negative and non-triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC and non-TNBC). The aim was to identify a group of serological biomarkers and to identify possible candidates for targeted therapy in patients with TNBC and non-TNBC. Protein levels of TGF-β1, IGF-I/IGF-IR and VEGF-A in the serum were measured in 43 TNBC, 53 non-TNBC and 20 normal control participants using quantitative ELISA assays. Results were correlated against standard prognostic factors, response to treatment and survival. TNBC was identified to be associated with poor prognosis and serum levels of VEGF-A and IGF/IGF-IR were significantly higher in the TNBC group compared with the non-TNBC group. IGF-IR and VEGF-A overexpression was observed to be correlated with TGF-β1 expression and all of the markers investigated were associated with metastasis and disease progression. In the multivariate analysis, VEGF-A, IGF-I and IGF-IR were observed to be independent predictors for overall survival, whereas TGF-β1 and lymph node status were identified as independent predictors for disease-free survival. The overall response rate was significantly lower in patients with TNBC and those with high levels of TGF-β1, IGF-I/IGF-IR and VEGF-A. In view of the present results, it was concluded that TGF-β1, IGF-I/IGF-IR and VEGF-A overexpression is associated with the presence of aggressive tumors, which exhibit an increased probability of metastasis, a poor response to treatment and reduced survival rate. This indicates that VEGF-A, IGF-IR and IGF-I have the potential to be used as surrogate biomarkers and are promising candidates for targeted therapy, particularly in patients with TNBC. PMID:25824321

  12. Reproductive risk factors and oestrogen/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Work, M E; John, E M; Andrulis, I L; Knight, J A; Liao, Y; Mulligan, A M; Southey, M C; Giles, G G; Dite, G S; Apicella, C; Hibshoosh, H; Hopper, J L; Terry, M B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oestrogen receptor (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative (ER−PR−) breast cancer is associated with poorer prognosis compared with other breast cancer subtypes. High parity has been associated with an increased risk of ER−PR− cancer, but emerging evidence suggests that breastfeeding may reduce this risk. Whether this potential breastfeeding benefit extends to women at high risk of breast cancer remains critical to understand for prevention. Methods: Using population-based ascertained cases (n=4011) and controls (2997) from the Breast Cancer Family Registry, we examined reproductive risk factors in relation to ER and PR status. Results: High parity (⩾3 live births) without breastfeeding was positively associated only with ER−PR− tumours (odds ratio (OR)=1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10–2.24); there was no association with parity in women who breastfed (OR=0.93, 95% CI 0.71–1.22). Across all race/ethnicities, associations for ER−PR− cancer were higher among women who did not breastfeed than among women who did. Oral contraceptive (OC) use before 1975 was associated with an increased risk of ER−PR− cancer only (OR=1.32, 95% CI 1.04–1.67). For women who began OC use in 1975 or later there was no increased risk. Conclusions: Our findings support that there are modifiable factors for ER−PR− breast cancer and that breastfeeding in particular may mitigate the increased risk of ER−PR− cancers seen from multiparity. PMID:24548865

  13. Effects of CDK4/6 Inhibition in Hormone Receptor-Positive/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Negative Breast Cancer Cells with Acquired Resistance to Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Trapé, Adriana Priscila; Liu, Shuying; Cortes, Andrea Carolina; Ueno, Naoto T.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer, those with residual disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy have a higher risk of relapse and poorer survival than those with a complete response. Previous studies have revealed a correlation between activation of cell cycle-regulating pathways in HR-positive breast cancer, particularly cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6/cyclin D1 signaling, and resistance to standard therapies. Although CDK4/6 inhibition by palbociclib in combination with endocrine therapy has shown potent antiproliferative effects in HR-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer, the potential role of palbociclib in re-sensitizing chemotherapy-resistant HR-positive breast cancer is not well defined. We hypothesized that CDK4/6 inhibition by palbociclib re-sensitizes HR-positive/HER2-negative residual breast cancer to taxane-based adjuvant therapy. Using cell counting, flow cytometry, and western blotting, we evaluated the efficacy of palbociclib alone and in concurrent or sequential combination with paclitaxel in parental and paclitaxel-resistant T47D HR-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer cells. The CDK4/6 pathway was constitutively active in both parental and paclitaxel-resistant T47D cells; thus, both cell types were highly sensitive to the inhibitory effects of single-agent palbociclib on cell growth and cell cycle progression. However, palbociclib did not re-sensitize resistant cells to paclitaxel-induced G2/M arrest and cell death in any of the combinations tested. Our results suggest that CDK4/6 inhibition by palbociclib does not re-sensitize HR-positive/HER2-negative residual breast cancer to chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the fact that CDK4/6 activation remained intact in paclitaxel-resistant cells indicates that patients who have HR-positive/HER2-negative residual disease after taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy may still benefit from palbociclib in combination with other regimens

  14. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-3 alpha (HNF-3{alpha}) negatively regulates androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Hwang, Miok; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, Keesook

    2008-03-07

    The androgen receptor (AR) is involved in the development and progression of prostate cancers. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain incompletely understood. In previous reports, hepatocyte nuclear factor-3{alpha} (HNF-3{alpha}) has been shown to be expressed in the epithelia of the prostate gland, and has been determined to regulate the transcription of prostate-specific genes. In this study, we report that HNF-3{alpha} functions as a novel corepressor of AR in prostatic cells. HNF-3{alpha} represses AR transactivation on target promoters containing the androgen response element (ARE) in a dose-dependent manner. HNF-3{alpha} interacts physically with AR, and negatively regulates AR transactivation via competition with AR coactivators, including GRIP1. Furthermore, HNF-3{alpha} overexpression reduces the androgen-induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in LNCaP cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that HNF-3{alpha} is a novel corepressor of AR, and predict its effects on the proliferation of prostate cancer cells.

  15. Leukemia inhibitory factor receptor negatively regulates the metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ding; Jing, Xiaoqian; Shen, Baiyong; Liu, Xinyu; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Bingrui; Fu, Zhiping; Peng, Chenghong; Qiu, Weihua

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Frequent metastasis and recurrence are the main reasons for the poor prognosis of PC patients. Thus, the discovery of new biomarkers and wider insights into the mechanisms involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis is crucial. In the present study, we report that leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) suppresses tumorigenesis and metastasis of PC cells both in vitro and in vivo. LIFR expression was significantly lower in PC tissues and was associated with local invasion (P=0.047), lymph node metastasis (P=0.014) and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P=0.002). Overexpression of LIFR significantly suppressed PC cell colony formation (P=0.005), migration (P=0.003), invasion (P=0.010) and wound healing ability (P=0.013) in vitro, while opposing results were observed after LIFR was silenced. Furthermore, animal xenograft and metastasis models confirm that the in vivo results were consistent with the outcomes in vitro. Meanwhile, LIFR inhibited the expression of β-catenin, vimentin and slug and induced the expression of E-cadherin, suggesting that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulation pathway may underlie the mechanism. These results indicate that LIFR negatively regulates the metastasis of PC cells. PMID:27375070

  16. Deletion of IL-12p35 induces liver fibrosis in dominant negative transforming growth factor β receptor type II mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Masanobu; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Ando, Yugo; Kawata, Kazuhito; Park, Ogyi; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Ridgway, William M.; Gao, Bin; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Flavell, Richard; He, Xiao-Song; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that mice with a dominant negative transforming growth factor β receptor restricted to T cells (dnTGFβRII mice) develop an inflammatory biliary ductular disease that strongly resembles human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Furthermore, deletion of the gene encoding interleukin (IL)-12p40 resulted in a strain (IL-12p40−/−dnTGFβRII) with dramatically reduced autoimmune cholangitis. To further investigate the role of the IL-12 cytokine family in dnTGFβRII autoimmune biliary disease, we deleted the gene encoding the IL-12p35 subunit from dnTGFβRII mice, resulting in an IL-12p35−/− dnTGFβRII strain which is deficient in two members of the IL-12 family, IL-12 and IL-35. In contrast to IL-12p40−/− mice, the IL-12p35−/− mice developed liver inflammation and bile duct damage with similar severity but delayed onset as the parental dnTGFβRII mice. The p35−/− mice also demonstrated a distinct cytokine profile characterized by a shift from a Th1 to a Th17 response. Strikingly, liver fibrosis was frequently observed in IL-12p35−/− mice. In conclusion, IL-12p35−/− dnTGFβRII mice, histologically and immunologically, reflect key features of PBC, providing a useful generic model to understand the immunopathology of human PBC. PMID:22576253

  17. Loss of BRCA1 leads to an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor expression in mammary epithelial cells, and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition prevents estrogen receptor-negative cancers in BRCA1-mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Women who carry a BRCA1 mutation typically develop "triple-negative" breast cancers (TNBC), defined by the absence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor and Her2/neu. In contrast to ER-positive tumors, TNBCs frequently express high levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Previously, we found a disproportionate fraction of progenitor cells in BRCA1 mutation carriers with EGFR overexpression. Here we examine the role of EGFR in mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in the emergence of BRCA1-related tumors and as a potential target for the prevention of TNBC. Methods Cultures of MECs were used to examine EGFR protein levels and promoter activity in response to BRCA1 suppression with inhibitory RNA. EGFR was assessed by immunoblot and immunofluorescence analysis, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to subpopulations of MECs was examined by Scatchard analysis. The responsiveness of MECs to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib was assessed in vitro in three-dimensional cultures and in vivo. Mouse mammary tumor virus-Cre recombinase (MMTV-Cre) BRCA1flox/flox p53+/- mice were treated daily with erlotinib or vehicle control, and breast cancer-free survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Inhibition of BRCA1 in MECs led to upregulation of EGFR with an inverse correlation of BRCA1 with cellular EGFR protein levels (r2 = 0.87) and to an increase in cell surface-expressed EGFR. EGFR upregulation in response to BRCA1 suppression was mediated by transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1)-positive MECs expressed higher levels of EGFR than ALDH1-negative MECs and were expanded two- to threefold in the BRCA1-inhibited MEC population. All MECs were exquisitely sensitive to EGFR inhibition with erlotinib in vitro. EGFR inhibition in MMTV-Cre BRCA1flox/flox p53+/- female mice starting at age 3 months increased

  18. Silencing of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II by Kruppel-like factor 14 underscores the importance of a negative feedback mechanism in TGFbeta signaling.

    PubMed

    Truty, Mark J; Lomberk, Gwen; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Urrutia, Raul

    2009-03-01

    The role of non-Smad proteins in the regulation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signaling is an emerging line of active investigation. Here, we characterize the role of KLF14, as a TGFbeta-inducible, non-Smad protein that silences the TGFbeta receptor II (TGFbetaRII) promoter. Together with endocytosis, transcriptional silencing is a critical mechanism for down-regulating TGFbeta receptors at the cell surface. However, the mechanisms underlying transcriptional repression of these receptors remain poorly understood. KLF14 has been chosen from a comprehensive screen of 24 members of the Sp/KLF family due to its TGFbeta inducibility, its ability to regulate the TGFbetaRII promoter, and the fact that this protein had yet to be functionally characterized. We find that KLF14 represses the TGFbetaRII, a function that is augmented by TGFbeta treatment. Mapping of the TGFbetaRII promoter, in combination with site-directed mutagenesis, electromobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, have identified distinct GC-rich sequences used by KLF14 to regulate this promoter. Mechanistically, KLF14 represses the TGFbetaRII promoter via a co-repressor complex containing mSin3A and HDAC2. Furthermore, the TGFbeta pathway activation leads to recruitment of a KLF14-mSin3A-HDAC2 repressor complex to the TGFbetaRII promoter, as well as the remodeling of chromatin to increase histone marks that associate with transcriptional silencing. Thus, these results describe a novel negative-feedback mechanism by which TGFbetaRII activation at the cell surface induces the expression of KLF14 to ultimately silence the TGFbetaRII and further expand the network of non-Smad transcription factors that participate in the TGFbeta pathway. PMID:19088080

  19. Transforming growth factor beta receptor type III is a tumor promoter in mesenchymal-stem like triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is a major need to better understand the molecular basis of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies. Using gene expression data from 587 TNBC patients we previously identified six subtypes of the disease, among which a mesenchymal-stem like (MSL) subtype. The MSL subtype has significantly higher expression of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) pathway-associated genes relative to other subtypes, including the TGF-β receptor type III (TβRIII). We hypothesize that TβRIII is tumor promoter in mesenchymal-stem like TNBC cells. Methods Representative MSL cell lines SUM159, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-157 were used to study the roles of TβRIII in the MSL subtype. We stably expressed short hairpin RNAs specific to TβRIII (TβRIII-KD). These cells were then used for xenograft tumor studies in vivo; and migration, invasion, proliferation and three dimensional culture studies in vitro. Furthermore, we utilized human gene expression datasets to examine TβRIII expression patterns across all TNBC subtypes. Results TβRIII was the most differentially expressed TGF-β signaling gene in the MSL subtype. Silencing TβRIII expression in MSL cell lines significantly decreased cell motility and invasion. In addition, when TβRIII-KD cells were grown in a three dimensional (3D) culture system or nude mice, there was a loss of invasive protrusions and a significant decrease in xenograft tumor growth, respectively. In pursuit of the mechanistic underpinnings for the observed TβRIII-dependent phenotypes, we discovered that integrin-α2 was expressed at higher level in MSL cells after TβRIII-KD. Stable knockdown of integrin-α2 in TβRIII-KD MSL cells rescued the ability of the MSL cells to migrate and invade at the same level as MSL control cells. Conclusions We have found that TβRIII is required for migration and invasion in vitro and xenograft growth in vivo. We also show that TβRIII-KD elevates

  20. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  1. Dominant negative and loss of function mutations of the c-kit (mast/stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Giebel, L.B.; Holmes, S.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development and is characterized by congenital white parches of skin and hair from which melanocytes are completely absent. A similar disorder of the mouse, 'dominant white spotting' (W), results from mutations of the c-kit proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular tyrosine kinases receptor for the mast/stem cell growth factor. The authors have identified c-kit gene mutations in three patients with piebaldism. A missense substitution (Phe[r arrow]Leu) at codon 584, within the tyrosine kinases domain, is associated with a severe piebald phenotype, whereas two different frameshifts, within codons 561 and 642, are both associated with a variable and relatively mild piebald phenotype. This is consistent with a possible 'dominant negative' effect of missense c-kit polypeptides on the function of the dimeric receptor.

  2. Mediation of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer by Socioeconomic Position and Reproductive Factors.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Garth H; Campbell, Richard T; Wiley, Elizabeth L; Hoskins, Kent; Stolley, Melinda R; Warnecke, Richard B

    2016-05-15

    Hispanic and non-Hispanic black breast cancer patients are more likely than non-Hispanic white patients to be diagnosed with breast cancer that is negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER/PR-negative). This disparity might be transmitted through socioeconomic and reproductive factors. Data on 746 recently diagnosed breast cancer patients (300 non-Hispanic white, 303 non-Hispanic black, 143 Hispanic) were obtained from the population-based Breast Cancer Care in Chicago Study (Chicago, Illinois, 2005-2008). Income, educational level, and census tract measures of concentrated disadvantage and affluence were combined into a single measure of socioeconomic position (SEP). Parity and age at first birth were combined into a single measure of reproductive factors (RPF). We constructed path models to estimate direct and indirect associations of SEP and RPF, and we estimated average marginal controlled direct associations. Compared with non-Hispanic white patients, non-Hispanic black patients and Hispanic patients were more likely to have ER/PR-negative disease (28% and 20% for non-Hispanic black patients and Hispanic patients, respectively, vs. 12% for non-Hispanic white patients; P ≤ 0.001). The ethnic disparity in ER/PR-negative breast cancer (prevalence difference = 0.13, 95% confidence interval: 0.07, 0.18) was reduced by approximately 60% (prevalence difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval: -0.04, 0.13) after control for SEP and RPF. At least part of the ethnic disparity in the aggressiveness of breast tumors might be transmitted through social influences on tumor biology. PMID:27076668

  3. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis of transgenic mice elicits striking alterations in hair follicle development and skin structure.

    PubMed Central

    Murillas, R; Larcher, F; Conti, C J; Santos, M; Ullrich, A; Jorcano, J L

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key regulator of keratinocyte biology. However, the physiological role of EGFR in vivo has not been well established. To analyze the role of EGFR in skin, we have generated transgenic mice expressing an EGFR dominant negative mutant in the basal layer of epidermis and outer root sheath of hair follicles. Mice expressing the mutant receptor display short and waved pelage hair and curly whiskers during the first weeks of age, but subsequently pelage and vibrissa hairs become progressively sparser and atrophic. Eventually, most mice present severe alopecia. Histological examination of the skin of transgenic mice shows striking alterations in the development of hair follicles, which fail to enter into catagen stage. These alterations eventually lead to necrosis and disappearance of the follicles, accompanied by strong infiltration of the skin with inflammatory elements. The interfollicular epidermis of these mice shows marked hyperplasia, expression of hyperproliferation-associated keratin K6 and increased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation. EGFR function was inhibited in transgenic skin keratinocytes, since in vivo and in vitro autophosphorylation of EGFR was almost completely abolished on EGF stimulation. These results implicate EGFR in the control of hair cycle progression, and provide new information about its role in epidermal growth and differentiation. Images PMID:7489711

  4. Essential Role of TEA Domain Transcription Factors in the Negative Regulation of the MYH 7 Gene by Thyroid Hormone and Its Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Ohba, Kenji; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Ishizuka, Keiko; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    MYH7 (also referred to as cardiac myosin heavy chain β) gene expression is known to be repressed by thyroid hormone (T3). However, the molecular mechanism by which T3 inhibits the transcription of its target genes (negative regulation) remains to be clarified, whereas those of transcriptional activation by T3 (positive regulation) have been elucidated in detail. Two MCAT (muscle C, A, and T) sites and an A/T-rich region in the MYH7 gene have been shown to play a critical role in the expression of this gene and are known to be recognized by the TEAD/TEF family of transcription factors (TEADs). Using a reconstitution system with CV-1 cells, which has been utilized in the analysis of positive as well as negative regulation, we demonstrate that both T3 receptor (TR) β1 and α1 inhibit TEAD-dependent activation of the MYH7 promoter in a T3 dose-dependent manner. TRβ1 bound with GC-1, a TRβ-selective T3 analog, also repressed TEAD-induced activity. Although T3-dependent inhibition required the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of TRβ1, it remained after the putative negative T3-responsive elements were mutated. A co-immunoprecipitation study demonstrated the in vivo association of TRβ1 with TEAD-1, and the interaction surfaces were mapped to the DBD of the TRβ1 and TEA domains of TEAD-1, both of which are highly conserved among TRs and TEADs, respectively. The importance of TEADs in MYH7 expression was also validated with RNA interference using rat embryonic cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells. These results indicate that T3-bound TRs interfere with transactivation by TEADs via protein-protein interactions, resulting in the negative regulation of MYH7 promoter activity. PMID:24781449

  5. Factors identified for negative appendicectomies.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M R; Habib, L; Jaleel, F

    2009-07-01

    The study was done, to determine the factors for negative appendicectomies. This prospective descriptive study includes patients managed at four non teaching and a teaching hospital of Karachi from March 2006 to February 2008. One hundred and sixty eight patients underwent appendicectomy during the study period. Details of clinical presentations, investigations, operative findings and histopathology were entered and analyzed. Literature search was aimed to see the negative appendicectomy rate (NAR) in last ten years despite using diagnostic tools (clinical scoring, diagnostic imaging and laparoscopy). In this study a total number of 168 patients under went appendicectomy. Normal appendices were found in 31 patients (negative appendicectomy rate was 18.45%) and associated pathology was seen in 13 patients, an incidental finding of Meckel's diverticulum in 5 patients and no other pathology was seen in 13 patients. The different factors which we identified for negative appendicectomies in our practice were non teaching hospitals where diagnostic scoring system was difficult to apply, female gender, selective use of imaging modality, other pathologies presenting with pain in right lower quadrant (RLQ) and requiring surgical intervention, and non-availability of CT scan and laparoscopy. Despite many advances in diagnostic system, acute appendicitis is still a diagnostic dilemma at times. Although there is no substitute for clinical judgment but in sub groups of patients in whom the possibility of negative appendicectomy is high, diagnostic modalities should be used judiciously to decrease the negative exploration. PMID:19623147

  6. Endogenous interleukin-22 protects against inflammatory bowel disease but not autoimmune cholangitis in dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, G-X; Sun, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Zhang, W; Leung, P S C; He, X-S; Ansari, A A; Bowlus, C; Ridgway, W M; Gershwin, M E

    2016-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, interleukin (IL)-22 expression is up-regulated in both CD4 and CD8 T cells, exerting a protective role in infections. However, in autoimmunity, IL-22 appears to have either a protective or a pathogenic role in a variety of murine models of autoimmunity and, by extrapolation, in humans. It is not clear whether IL-22 itself mediates inflammation or is a by-product of inflammation. We have taken advantage of the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice that develop both inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune cholangitis and studied the role and the biological function of IL-22 by generating IL-22(-/-) dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data suggest that the influence of IL-22 on autoimmunity is determined in part by the local microenvironment. In particular, IL-22 deficiency exacerbates tissue injury in inflammatory bowel disease, but has no influence on either the hepatocytes or cholangiocytes in the same model. These data take on particular significance in the previously defined effects of IL-17A, IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 deficiency and emphasize that, in colitis, there is a dominant role of IL-23/T helper type 17 (Th17) signalling. Furthermore, the levels of IL-22 are IL-23-dependent. The use of cytokine therapy in patients with autoimmune disease has significant potential, but must take into account the overlapping and often promiscuous effects that can theoretically exacerbate inflammation. PMID:27148790

  7. Phase I study of weekly nab-paclitaxel combined with S-1 in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsurutani, Junji; Kuroi, Katsumasa; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Miyazaki, Masaki; Nishina, Shinichi; Makimura, Chihiro; Tanizaki, Junko; Okamoto, Kunio; Yamashita, Toshinari; Aruga, Tomoyuki; Shigekawa, Takashi; Komoike, Yoshifumi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a phase I study of a weekly nab-paclitaxel and S-1 combination therapy in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The primary objective was to estimate the maximum tolerated and recommended doses. Each treatment was repeated every 21 days. Levels 1, 2a, 2b, and 3 were set depending on the S-1 dose (65 or 80 mg/m2) and nab-paclitaxel infusion schedule (days 1 and 8 or days 1, 8, and 15). Fifteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in one patient at Level 3 (100 mg/m2 nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8, and 15 with 80 mg/m2 S-1 daily for 14 days, followed by 7 days of rest). Although the maximum tolerated dose was not reached, the recommended dose was determined to be Level 3. Neutropenia was the most frequent grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse event. For patients with measurable lesions, the response rate was 50.0% and the median time to treatment failure and median progression-free survival was 13.2 and 21.0 months, respectively. The present results show the feasibility and potential for long-term administration of this combination therapy. PMID:25786335

  8. PM2.5 source apportionment in a French urban coastal site under steelworks emission influences using constrained non-negative matrix factorization receptor model.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Adib; Ledoux, Frédéric; Roche, Cloé; Delmaire, Gilles; Roussel, Gilles; Courcot, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The constrained weighted-non-negative matrix factorization (CW-NMF) hybrid receptor model was applied to study the influence of steelmaking activities on PM2.5 (particulate matter with equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) composition in Dunkerque, Northern France. Semi-diurnal PM2.5 samples were collected using a high volume sampler in winter 2010 and spring 2011 and were analyzed for trace metals, water-soluble ions, and total carbon using inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), ICP--mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), ionic chromatography and micro elemental carbon analyzer. The elemental composition shows that NO3(-), SO4(2-), NH4(+) and total carbon are the main PM2.5 constituents. Trace metals data were interpreted using concentration roses and both influences of integrated steelworks and electric steel plant were evidenced. The distinction between the two sources is made possible by the use Zn/Fe and Zn/Mn diagnostic ratios. Moreover Rb/Cr, Pb/Cr and Cu/Cd combination ratio are proposed to distinguish the ISW-sintering stack from the ISW-fugitive emissions. The a priori knowledge on the influencing source was introduced in the CW-NMF to guide the calculation. Eleven source profiles with various contributions were identified: 8 are characteristics of coastal urban background site profiles and 3 are related to the steelmaking activities. Between them, secondary nitrates, secondary sulfates and combustion profiles give the highest contributions and account for 93% of the PM2.5 concentration. The steelwork facilities contribute in about 2% of the total PM2.5 concentration and appear to be the main source of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn. PMID:26969551

  9. Impact of palbociclib plus letrozole on pain severity and pain interference with daily activities in patients with estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced breast cancer as first-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Bell, T; Crown, J P; Lang, I; Bhattacharyya, H; Zanotti, G; Randolph, S; Kim, S; Huang, X; Huang Bartlett, C; Finn, R S; Slamon, D

    2016-05-01

    Background Palbociclib is a recently approved drug for use in combination with letrozole as initial endocrine-based therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER+/HER2-) breast cancer. This report assesses the impact of palbociclib in combination with letrozole versus letrozole alone on patient-reported outcomes of pain. Methods Palbociclib was evaluated in an open-label, randomized, phase II study (PALOMA-1/TRIO-18) among postmenopausal women with advanced ER+/HER2- breast cancer who had not received prior systemic treatment for their advanced disease. Patients received continuous oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily alone or the same letrozole dose and schedule plus oral palbociclib 125 mg, given once daily for 3 weeks followed by 1 week off over repeated 28-day cycles. The primary study endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival in the intent-to-treat population, and these results have recently been published (Finn et al., Lancet Oncol 2015;16:25-35). One of the key secondary endpoints was the evaluation of pain, as measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) patient-reported outcome tool. The BPI was administered at baseline and on day 1 of every cycle thereafter until disease progression and/or treatment discontinuation. Clinical trial registration This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00721409). Results There were no statistically significant differences in Pain Severity or Pain Interference scores of the BPI between the two treatment groups for the overall population or among those with any bone disease at baseline. A limitation of the study is that results were not adjusted for the concomitant use of opioids or other medications used to control pain. Conclusions The addition of palbociclib to letrozole was associated with increased efficacy without negatively impacting pain severity or pain interference with daily activities

  10. Canadian Cancer Trials Group IND197: a phase II study of foretinib in patients with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rayson, Daniel; Lupichuk, Sasha; Potvin, Kylea; Dent, Susan; Shenkier, Tamara; Dhesy-Thind, Sukhbinder; Ellard, Susan L; Prady, Catherine; Salim, Muhammad; Farmer, Patricia; Allo, Ghasson; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Allan, Alison; Ludkovski, Olga; Bonomi, Maria; Tu, Dongsheng; Hagerman, Linda; Goodwin, Rachel; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Bradbury, Penelope

    2016-05-01

    In murine models, overexpression of the MET receptor transgene induces tumors with human basal gene expression characteristics supporting MET inhibition as a treatment strategy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Foretinib is an oral multi-kinase inhibitor of MET, RON, AXL, TIE-2, and VEGF receptors with anti-tumor activity in advanced HCC and papillary renal cell cancer. Patients with centrally reviewed primary TNBC and 0-1 prior regimens for metastatic disease received daily foretinib 60 mg po in a 2-stage single-arm trial. Primary endpoints were objective response and early progression rates per RECIST 1.1. In stage 2, correlative studies of MET, PTEN, EGFR, and p53 on archival and fresh tumor specimens were performed along with enumeration of CTCs. 45 patients were enrolled with 37 patients having response evaluable and centrally confirmed primary TNBC (cTNBC). There were 2 partial responses (ITT 4.7 % response evaluable cTNBC 5.4 %) with a median duration of 4.4 months (range 3.7-5 m) and 15 patients had stable disease (ITT 33 %, response evaluable cTNBC 40.5 %) with a median duration of 5.4 months (range 2.3-9.7 m). The most common toxicities (all grades/grade 3) were nausea (64/4 %), fatigue (60/4 %), hypertension (58/49 %), and diarrhea (40/7 %). Six serious adverse events were considered possibly related to foretinib and 4 patients went off study due to adverse events. There was no correlation between MET positivity and response nor between response and PTEN, EGFR, p53, or MET expression in CTCs. Although CCTG IND 197 did not meet its primary endpoint, the observation of a clinical benefit rate of 46 % in this cTNBC population suggests that foretinib may have clinical activity as a single, non-cytotoxic agent in TNBC (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01147484). PMID:27116183

  11. Treatment strategies for advanced hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancer: the role of treatment order.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith A

    2016-01-01

    Although survival rates among patients with breast cancer have improved in recent years, those diagnosed with advanced disease with distant metastasis face a 5-year survival rate of less than 25%, making the management of these patients an area still in significant need of continued research. Selecting the optimal treatment order from among the variety of currently available therapy options presents a relevant challenge for medical oncologists. With the understanding that the majority of patients with breast cancer and those who succumb to this disease have HR-positive disease, this review will focus on treatment options and treatment order in patients with HR-positive advanced breast cancer. While endocrine therapy is considered the preferred treatment for first-line therapy in HR-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer, selection of the specific agent depends on the menopausal status of the patient. Palbociclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor, is also recommended as first-line treatment in patients with ER-positive/HER2-negative disease. In patients with endocrine therapy-resistant disease, specific strategies include sequencing of other antiestrogen receptor agents, or agents that target other molecular pathways. Future treatment strategies for patients with primary or secondary resistance to endocrine therapy for advanced disease are discussed. These strategies include first-line therapy with high-dose fulvestrant or everolimus (in combination with exemestane or letrozole or with other endocrine therapies), use of the PI3K inhibitors (e.g., buparlisib, alpelisib, pictilisib, taselisib), entinostat, CDK 4/6 inhibitors (e.g., palbociclib, ribociclib, abemaciclib), and novel selective estrogen receptor degradation agents that may enhance the targeting of acquired mutations in the ESR1 gene. PMID:26830312

  12. Cell surface interaction of annexin A2 and galectin-3 modulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in Her-2 negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Praveenkumar; Bargale, Anil; Patil, Basavraj R; Mohan, Rajashekar; Dinesh, U S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Gai, Pramod B; Patil, Vidya S; Amsavardani, T S

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression and activation of tyrosine kinase receptors like EGFR and Src regulate the progression and metastasis of Her-2 negative breast cancer. Recently we have reported the role of cell membrane interaction of phospholipid-binding protein annexin A2 (AnxA2) and EGFR in regulating cellular signaling in the activation of angiogenesis, matrix degradation, invasion, and cancer metastasis. Beta-galactoside-specific animal lectin galectin-3 is an apoptosis inhibitor, and cell surface-associated extracellular galectin-3 also has a role in cell migration, cancer progression, and metastasis. Similar expression pattern and membrane co-localization of these two proteins made us to hypothesize in the current study that galectin-3 and AnxA2 interaction is critical for Her-2 negative breast cancer progression. By various experimental analyses, we confirm that glycosylated AnxA2 at the membrane surface interacts with galectin-3. N-linked glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin treatment convincingly blocked AnxA2 membrane translocation and its association with galectin-3. To analyze whether this interaction has any functional relevance, we tried to dissociate this interaction with purified plant lectin from chickpea (Cicer arietinum agglutinin). This highly specific 30 kDa plant lectin could dissociate AnxA2 from endogenous lectin galectin-3 interaction at the cell surface. This dissociation could down-regulate Bcl-2 family proteins, cell proliferation, and migration simultaneously triggering cell apoptosis. Targeting this interaction of membrane surface glycoprotein and its animal lectin in Her-2 negative breast cancer may be of therapeutic value. PMID:26438086

  13. Delaying Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Hormone Receptor–Positive, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brufsky, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Global guidelines for the management of locally advanced or metastatic hormone receptor–positive (HR-positive), human epidermal growth factor 2–negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer recommend endocrine therapy as first-line treatment for all patients, regardless of age or postmenopausal status. However, current practice patterns in the United States and Europe suggest that these modes of therapy are not being used as recommended, and many patients with advanced HR-positive, HER2-negative disease are being treated first-line with chemotherapy or switched to chemotherapy after a single endocrine therapy. Given that chemotherapy is associated with increased toxicity and reduced quality of life (QOL) compared with endocrine therapy, prolonging the duration of response obtained with endocrine therapy may help delay chemotherapy and its attendant toxicities. Several strategies to delay or overcome endocrine resistance and thereby postpone chemotherapy have been explored, including the use of second-line endocrine agents with different mechanisms of action, adding targeted agents that inhibit specific resistance pathways, and adding agents that act in complementary or synergistic ways to inhibit tumor cell proliferation. This review analyzes the different therapy options available to HR-positive, HER2-negative patients with advanced breast cancer that can be used to delay chemotherapy and enhance QOL. PMID:26793013

  14. Prognostic value of Ki67 and p53 in patients with estrogen receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer: Validation of the cut-off value of the Ki67 labeling index as a predictive factor

    PubMed Central

    OHARA, MASAHIRO; MATSUURA, KAZUO; AKIMOTO, ETSUSHI; NOMA, MIDORI; DOI, MIHOKO; NISHIZAKA, TAKASHI; KAGAWA, NAOKI; ITAMOTO, TOSHIYUKI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of the Ki67 labeling index and p53 status as prognostic and predictive indicators of operable estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer. Among 697 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2002 and 2013, 308 patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer were assessed. The results of the multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that a high Ki67 labeling index was significantly associated with a short recurrence-free interval (RFI) (p=0.004) and was marginally associated with a worse overall survival (p=0.074). A positive p53 status was not associated with worse outcomes. To validate the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for identifying patients who may benefit from additional chemotherapy, prognostic factors were investigated in breast cancer patients treated postoperatively with endocrine therapy alone. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated that a Ki67 labeling index cut-off of 20.0% was optimal for predicting recurrence among patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year RFIs for patients with Ki67 <20 and ≥20% were 97.2 and 86.6%, respectively (p=0.0244). A high Ki67 labeling index (≥20%) was significantly associated with large tumors (p<0.01), lymph node metastasis (p=0.0236) and positive p53 status (p<0.001). The univariate analysis demonstrated that Ki67 labeling index ≥20%, lymph node metastasis and progesterone receptor negativity were significant worse prognostic factors for RFI (p=0.0333, 0.0116 and 0.0573, respectively). The Ki67 labeling index was found to be a useful prognostic factor in patients with ER-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer and the cut-off values of the Ki67 labeling index for making a decision regarding adjuvant treatment were validated. PMID:27073684

  15. P53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer upregulate endosomal recycling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) increasing its oncogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Iuliana; Lee, Annette; Vora, Reena; Budman, Daniel R

    2013-11-01

    There is no available targeted therapy for triple-negative or its more aggressive subtype, basal-like breast cancer. Multiple therapeutic strategies based on translational knowledge have not improved the treatment options for triple negative patients. As understanding of molecular pathways that drive tumor development is rapidly increasing, it is imperative to adapt our treatment strategies to perturbations in molecular pathways driving the malignant process. Basal-like breast cancers over-express EGFR (without mutations or EGFR gene amplifications) and have p53 mutations. While EGFR drives the malignant behavior in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), anti-EGFR therapies have fallen short of the expected results in clinical trials. Here we bring evidence that the less than optimal results of the anti-EGFR therapies may be explained in part by the increased potency of the EGFR signaling due to increased endosomal recycling. The functional connection between EGFR and endosomal trafficking in TNBC is mutant p53 found in the most aggressive forms of TNBC. Mutant p53 acquires oncogenic functions and binds p63 protein, a member of p53 family with tumor suppressor activities. In the absence of functional p63 there is an upregulation of endosomal recycling EGFR and integrin to the membrane with increased proinvasive abilities of cancer cells. Blocking endosomal trafficking combined with anti-EGFR treatments may result in better clinical outcomes in TNBC. PMID:23755891

  16. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  17. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  18. Effects of a green tea extract, Polyphenon E, on systemic biomarkers of growth factor signalling in women with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crew, K. D.; Ho, K. A.; Brown, P.; Greenlee, H.; Bevers, T. B.; Arun, B.; Sneige, N.; Hudis, C.; McArthur, H. L.; Chang, J.; Rimawi, M.; Cornelison, T. L.; Cardelli, J.; Santella, R. M.; Wang, A.; Lippman, S. M.; Hershman, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational and experimental data support a potential breast cancer chemopreventive effect of green tea. Methods We conducted an ancillary study using archived blood/urine from a phase IB randomised, placebo-controlled dose escalation trial of an oral green tea extract, Polyphenon E (Poly E), in breast cancer patients. Using an adaptive trial design, women with stage I–III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment were randomised to Poly E 400 mg (n = 16), 600 mg (n = 11) and 800 mg (n = 3) twice daily or matching placebo (n = 10) for 6 months. Blood and urine collection occurred at baseline, and at 2, 4 and 6 months. Biological endpoints included growth factor [serum hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)], lipid (serum cholesterol, triglycerides), oxidative damage and inflammatory biomarkers. Results From July 2007-August 2009, 40 women were enrolled and 34 (26 Poly E, eight placebo) were evaluable for biomarker endpoints. At 2 months, the Poly E group (all dose levels combined) compared to placebo had a significant decrease in mean serum HGF levels (−12.7% versus +6.3%, P = 0.04). This trend persisted at 4 and 6 months but was no longer statistically significant. For the Poly E group, serum VEGF decreased by 11.5% at 2 months (P = 0.02) and 13.9% at 4 months (P = 0.05) but did not differ compared to placebo. At 2 months, there was a trend toward a decrease in serum cholesterol with Poly E (P = 0.08). No significant differences were observed for other biomarkers. Conclusions Our findings suggest potential mechanistic actions of tea polyphenols in growth factor signalling, angiogenesis and lipid metabolism. PMID:24646362

  19. Implications of epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced egf receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Lund, K; Wiley, H S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the role of receptor aggregation in EGF binding, we construct a mathematical model describing receptor dimerization (and higher levels of aggregation) that permits an analysis of the influence of receptor aggregation on ligand binding. We answer two questions: (a) Can Scatchard plots of EGF binding data be analyzed productively in terms of two noninteracting receptor populations with different affinities if EGF induced receptor aggregation occurs? No. If two affinities characterize aggregated and monomeric EGF receptors, we show that the Scatchard plot should have curvature characteristic of positively cooperative binding, the opposite of that observed. Thus, the interpretation that the high affinity population represents aggregated receptors and the low affinity population nonaggregated receptors is wrong. If the two populations are interpreted without reference to receptor aggregation, an important determinant of Scatchard plot shape is ignored. (b) Can a model for EGF receptor aggregation and EGF binding be consistent with the "negative curvature" (i.e., curvature characteristic of negatively cooperative binding) observed in most Scatchard plots of EGF binding data? Yes. In addition, the restrictions on the model parameters required to obtain negatively curved Scatchard plots provide new information about binding and aggregation. In particular, EGF binding to aggregated receptors must be negatively cooperative, i.e., binding to a receptor in a dimer (or higher oligomer) having one receptor already bound occurs with lower affinity than the initial binding event. A third question we consider is whether the model we present can be used to detect the presence of mechanisms other than receptor aggregation that are contributing to Scatchard plot curvature. For the membrane and cell binding data we analyzed, the best least squares fits of the model to each of the four data sets deviate systematically from the data, indicating that additional factors are

  20. Open-Label, Phase II, Multicenter, Randomized Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Two Dose Levels of Pertuzumab, a Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Dimerization Inhibitor, in Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gianni, Luca; Lladó, Anna; Bianchi, Giulia; Cortes, Javier; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Cameron, David A.; Miles, David; Salvagni, Stefania; Wardley, Andrew; Goeminne, Jean-Charles; Hersberger, Veronica; Baselga, José

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pertuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody inhibiting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) dimerization. The aim of this phase II trial was to assess the antitumor activity and safety profile of pertuzumab monotherapy in patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The utility of biomarkers detected in paraffin-embedded tissue as predictors of response was also explored. Patients and Methods This was an international, multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II study. Patients (n = 79) with centrally confirmed HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive pertuzumab once every 3 weeks with a loading dose of 840 mg followed thereafter by either 420 mg (arm A) or 1,050 mg (arm B). Patients were stratified by country and prior taxane therapy. Results Of 79 patients who were randomly assigned, 78 were included in the intent-to-treat population. In arm A (n = 41), two patients had partial responses, and 18 patients (44%) experienced stable disease (SD) lasting ≥ 12 weeks. In arm B (n = 37), SD was observed in 14 patients (38%). Overall, six of 78 patients responded or had SD ≥ 6 months. Pertuzumab was generally well tolerated, and most adverse events were mild to moderate. Decline in left ventricular ejection fraction of ≥ 10% and/or to less than 50% was observed in eight patients, with one case of congestive heart failure in arm A. Pharmacokinetic data supported a fixed dose of pertuzumab once every 3 weeks. Conclusion The limited efficacy observed in this study, generally SD of relatively short duration, suggested little benefit of further investigation of single-agent pertuzumab in unselected patients with HER2-negative disease. PMID:20124183

  1. Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guowei; Gelsomino, Luca; Covington, Kyle R.; Beyer, Amanda R.; Wang, John; Rechoum, Yassine; Huffman, Kenneth; Carstens, Ryan; Ando, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discover novel nuclear receptor targets in triple negative breast cancer Methods Expression microarray, western blot, qRT-PCR, MTT growth assay, soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, TRE reporter transactivation assay, statistical analysis. Results We performed microarray analysis using 227 triple negative breast tumors, and clustered the tumors into five groups according to their nuclear receptor expression. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ) was one of the most differentially expressed nuclear receptors in group 5 compared to other groups. TRβ low expressing patients were associated with poor outcome. We evaluated the role of TRβ in triple negative breast cancer cell lines representing group 5 tumors. Knockdown of TRβ increased soft agar colony and reduced sensitivity to docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. Docetaxel or doxorubicin long-term cultured cell lines also expressed decreased TRβ protein. Microarray analysis revealed cAMP/PKA signaling was the only KEGG pathways upregulated in TRβ knockdown cells. Inhibitors of cAMP or PKA, in combination with doxorubicin further enhanced cell apoptosis and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. TRβ-specific agonists enhanced TRβ expression, and further sensitized cells to both docetaxel and doxorubicin. Sensitization was mediated by increased apoptosis with elevated cleaved PARP and caspase 3. Conclusions TRβ represents a novel nuclear receptor target in triple negative breast cancer; low TRβ levels were associated with enhanced resistance to both docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. TRβ-specific agonists enhance chemosensitivity to these two agents. Mechanistically enhanced cAMP/PKA signaling was associated with TRβ’s effects on response to chemotherapy. PMID:25820519

  2. TBCRC 008: Early Change in 18F-FDG Uptake on PET Predicts Response to Preoperative Systemic Therapy in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Negative Primary Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Roisin M.; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Xian C.; Jacobs, Lisa K.; Mhlanga, Joyce; Joo, H O; Carpenter, John; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Watkins, Stanley; Fetting, John H.; Miller, Robert S.; Sideras, Kostandinos; Jeter, Stacie C.; Walsh, Bridget; Powers, Penny; Zorzi, Jane; Boughey, Judy C.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Carey, Lisa A.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Khouri, Nagi; Gabrielson, Edward; Wahl, Richard L.; Stearns, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifiers, including the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat, may sensitize tumors to chemotherapy and enhance outcomes. We conducted a multicenter randomized phase II neo-adjuvant trial of carboplatin and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (CP) with vorinostat or placebo in women with stage II/III, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–negative breast cancer, in which we also examined whether change in maximum standardized uptake values corrected for lean body mass (SULmax) on 18F-FDG PET predicted pathologic complete response (pCR) in breast and axillary lymph nodes. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to 12 wk of preoperative carboplatin (area under the curve of 2, weekly) and nab-paclitaxel (100 mg/m2 weekly) with vorinostat (400 mg orally daily, days 1–3 of every 7-d period) or placebo. All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET and research biopsy at baseline and on cycle 1 day 15. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate. Secondary objectives included correlation of change in tumor SULmax on 18F-FDG PET by cycle 1 day 15 with pCR and correlation of baseline and change in Ki-67 with pCR. Results In an intent-to-treat analysis (n = 62), overall pCR was 27.4% (vorinostat, 25.8%; placebo, 29.0%). In a pooled analysis (n = 59), we observed a significant difference in median change in SULmax 15 d after initiating preoperative therapy between those achieving pCR versus not (percentage reduction, 63.0% vs. 32.9%; P = 0.003). Patients with 50% or greater reduction in SULmax were more likely to achieve pCR, which remained statistically significant in multivariable analysis including estrogen receptor status (odds ratio, 5.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–22.7; P = 0.023). Differences in baseline and change in Ki-67 were not significantly different between those achieving pCR versus not. Conclusion Preoperative CP with vorinostat or placebo is associated with similar pCR rates. Early change in SULmax on 18F-FDG PET 15 d after the

  3. Elevated Resistin Gene Expression in African American Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallega, Karin A.; Liu, NingNing; Myers, Jennifer S.; Yu, Kaixian; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction African American (AA) women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to have aggressive subtypes. Investigating differentially expressed genes between patient populations may help explain racial health disparities. Resistin, one such gene, is linked to inflammation, obesity, and breast cancer risk. Previous studies indicated that resistin expression is higher in serum and tissue of AA breast cancer patients compared to Caucasian American (CA) patients. However, resistin expression levels have not been compared between AA and CA patients in a stage- and subtype-specific context. Breast cancer prognosis and treatments vary by subtype. This work investigates differential resistin gene expression in human breast cancer tissues of specific stages, receptor subtypes, and menopause statuses in AA and CA women. Methods Differential gene expression analysis was performed using human breast cancer gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We performed inter-race resistin gene expression level comparisons looking at receptor status and stage-specific data between AA and CA samples. DESeq was run to test for differentially expressed resistin values. Results Resistin RNA was higher in AA women overall, with highest values in receptor negative subtypes. Estrogen-, progesterone-, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- negative groups showed statistically significant elevated resistin levels in Stage I and II AA women compared to CA women. In inter-racial comparisons, AA women had significantly higher levels of resistin regardless of menopause status. In whole population comparisons, resistin expression was higher among Stage I and III estrogen receptor negative cases. In comparisons of molecular subtypes, resistin levels were significant higher in triple negative than in luminal A breast cancer. Conclusion Resistin gene expression levels were significantly higher in receptor negative subtypes, especially estrogen receptor negative cases in AA

  4. [Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor signalling].

    PubMed

    Antosz, Halina; Choroszyńska, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of innate immunity is based on the pattern recognition receptors (PRR) that recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens (PAMPs). Among PRR receptors Toll-like receptors (TLR) are distinguished. As a result of contact with pathogens, TLRs activate specific intracellular signaling pathways. It happens through proteins such as adaptor molecules, e.g. MyD88, TIRAP, TRIF, TRAM, and IPS-1, which participate in the cascade activation of kinases (IKK, MAP, RIP-1, TBK-1) as well as transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1) and regulatory factor (IRF3). The result of this activation is the production of active proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, interferons and enzymes. The PRR pathways are controlled by extra- and intracellular molecules to prevent overexpression of PRR. They include soluble receptors (sTLR), transmembrane proteins (ST2, SIGIRR, RP105, TRAIL-R) and intracellular inhibitors (SOCS-1, SOCS-3, sMyD88, TOLLIP, IRAK-M, SARM, A20, β-arrestin, CYLD, SHP). These molecules maintain the balance between activation and inhibition and ensure balancing of the beneficial and adverse effects of antigen recognition. PMID:23619234

  5. How to target estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Rochefort, H; Glondu, M; Sahla, M E; Platet, N; Garcia, M

    2003-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers generally have a better prognosis and are often responsive to anti-estrogen therapy, which is the first example of a successful therapy targeted on a specific protein, the ER. Unfortunately ER-negative breast cancers are more aggressive and unresponsive to anti-estrogens. Other targeted therapies are thus urgently needed, based on breast cancer oncogene inhibition or suppressor gene activation as far as molecular studies have demonstrated the alteration of expression, or structure of these genes in human breast cancer. Using the MDA-MB.231 human breast cancer cell line as a model of ER-negative breast cancers, we are investigating two of these approaches in our laboratory. Our first approach was to transfect the ER or various ER-deleted variants into an ER-negative cell line in an attempt to recover anti-estrogen responsiveness. The unliganded receptor, and surprisingly estradiol, were both found to inhibit tumor growth and invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms of these inhibitions in ER-negative cancer cells are being studied, in an attempt to target the ER sequence responsible for such inhibition in these cancer cells. Another strategy is trying to inhibit the activity or expression of an oncogene specifically overexpressed in most breast cancers. This approach was recently shown by others to be efficient in breast cancer therapy with HER2-Neu oncogene amplification using Herceptin. Without excluding other molecular putative targets, we have focused our research on cathepsin D as a potential target, since it is often overexpressed in aggressive human breast cancers, including ER-negative tumors, and rarely associated with HER2-Neu amplification. Our first results obtained in vitro on cell lines and in vivo in tumor xenografts in nude mice, illustrate that the mode of action of cathepsin D in breast cancer is useful to guide the development of these therapies. In the past 20 years we have learned that the

  6. Inhibition of Receptor Dimerization as a Novel Negative Feedback Mechanism of EGFR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kluba, Malgorzata; Engelborghs, Yves; Hofkens, Johan; Mizuno, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is crucial for initiating signal transduction. We employed raster image correlation spectroscopy to continuously monitor the EGFR monomer-dimer equilibrium in living cells. EGFR dimer formation upon addition of EGF showed oscillatory behavior with a periodicity of about 2.5 min, suggesting the presence of a negative feedback loop to monomerize the receptor. We demonstrated that monomerization of EGFR relies on phospholipase Cγ, protein kinase C, and protein kinase D (PKD), while being independent of Ca2+ signaling and endocytosis. Phosphorylation of the juxtamembrane threonine residues of EGFR (T654/T669) by PKD was identified as the factor that shifts the monomer-dimer equilibrium of ligand bound EGFR towards the monomeric state. The dimerization state of the receptor correlated with the activity of an extracellular signal-regulated kinase, downstream of the EGFR. Based on these observations, we propose a novel, negative feedback mechanism that regulates EGFR signaling via receptor monomerization. PMID:26465157

  7. The Ubiquitin-like Protein PLIC-2 Is a Negative Regulator of G Protein-coupled Receptor Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    N'Diaye, Elsa-Noah; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C.; Kajihara, Kimberly K.; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Wu, Ping; von Zastrow, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The activity of many signaling receptors is regulated by their endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), recruitment of the adaptor protein arrestin to activated receptors is thought to be sufficient to drive GPCR clustering in CCPs and subsequent endocytosis. We have identified an unprecedented role for the ubiquitin-like protein PLIC-2 as a negative regulator of GPCR endocytosis. Protein Linking IAP to Cytoskeleton (PLIC)-2 overexpression delayed ligand-induced endocytosis of two GPCRs: the V2 vasopressin receptor and β-2 adrenergic receptor, without affecting endocytosis of the transferrin or epidermal growth factor receptor. The closely related isoform PLIC-1 did not affect receptor endocytosis. PLIC-2 specifically inhibited GPCR concentration in CCPs, without affecting membrane recruitment of arrestin-3 to activated receptors or its cellular levels. Depletion of cellular PLIC-2 accelerated GPCR endocytosis, confirming its regulatory function at endogenous levels. The ubiquitin-like domain of PLIC-2, a ligand for ubiquitin-interacting motifs (UIMs), was required for endocytic inhibition. Interestingly, the UIM-containing endocytic adaptors epidermal growth factor receptor protein substrate 15 and Epsin exhibited preferential binding to PLIC-2 over PLIC-1. This differential interaction may underlie PLIC-2 specific effect on GPCR endocytosis. Identification of a negative regulator of GPCR clustering reveals a new function of ubiquitin-like proteins and highlights a cellular requirement for exquisite regulation of receptor dynamics. PMID:18199683

  8. Delineating the molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen's oncolytic actions in estrogen receptor-negative cancers.

    PubMed

    Radin, Daniel P; Patel, Parth

    2016-06-15

    Since its clinical inception, tamoxifen (TAM) has proved to be a powerful tool in treating estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers while exhibiting manageable side effects. Although TAM was synthesized as an estrogen receptor antagonist, reports have found that a significant fraction of women with estrogen receptor-negative cancers have benefitted from TAM treatment, suggesting the possibility of an alternate anti-cancer mechanism. In this paper, we present a review of recent and past literature in an attempt to clarify how TAM inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in cells lacking the estrogen receptor. Our analysis indicates that micromolar concentrations of TAM selectively elevate intracellular calcium concentrations in malignant cells, possibly by inversely agonizing cannabinoid receptors, producing considerable mitochondrial distress followed by the rapid production of reactive oxygen species. In response, cytoplasmic proteins such as JNK1 are activated, which mediates the activation of caspase-8. Fyn kinase auto phosphorylates in response to increased reactive oxygen species and directs the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl to tag growth factor receptors for ubiquitination, potentially abrogating constitutively active survival pathways that are hallmarks of cancer progression. We attempt to differentiate the effect that TAM has on purified Protein Kinase C (PKC) compared to that in an intact cell, suggesting that low micromolar concentrations of TAM indirectly inhibit PKC by inducing EGFR destruction and high micromolar concentrations of TAM inhibits PKC through a direct binding mechanism. PMID:27083550

  9. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  10. Activation of Estrogen Receptor Transfected into a Receptor-Negative Brest Cancer Cell Line Decreases the Metastatic and Invasive Potential of the Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marcel; Derocq, Danielle; Freiss, Gilles; Rochefort, Henri

    1992-12-01

    Breast cancers containing estrogen receptors are responsive to antiestrogen treatment and have a better prognosis than estrogen receptor-negative tumors. The loss of estrogen and progesterone receptors appears to be associated with a progression to less-differentiated tumors. We transfected the human estrogen receptor into the estrogen receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in an attempt to restore their sensitivity to antiestrogens. Two stable sublines of MDA-MB-231 cells (HC1 and HE5) expressing functional estrogen receptors were studied for their ability to grow and invade in vitro and to metastasize in athymic nude mice. The number and size of lung metastases developed by these two sublines in ovariectomized nude mice was not markedly altered by tamoxifen but was inhibited 3-fold by estradiol. Estradiol also significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation of these sublines and their invasiveness in Matrigel, a reconstituted basement membrane, whereas the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 reversed these effects. These results show that estradiol inhibits the metastatic ability of estrogen receptornegative breast cancer cells following transfection with the estrogen receptor, whereas estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers are stimulated by estrogen, indicating that factors other than the estrogen receptor are involved in progression toward hormone independence. Reactivation or transfer of the estrogen receptor gene can therefore be considered as therapeutic approaches to hormone-independent cancers

  11. Positive and negative regulation of odor receptor gene choice in Drosophila by acj6.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lei; Goldman, Aaron L; Carlson, John R

    2009-10-14

    Little is known about how individual olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) select, from among many odor receptor genes, which genes to express. Abnormal chemosensory jump 6 (Acj6) is a POU domain transcription factor essential for the specification of ORN identity and odor receptor (Or) gene expression in the Drosophila maxillary palp, one of the two adult olfactory organs. However, the mechanism by which Acj6 functions in this process has not been investigated. Here, we systematically examine the role of Acj6 in the maxillary palp and in a major subset of antennal ORNs. We define an Acj6 binding site by a reiterative in vitro selection process. The site is found upstream of Or genes regulated by Acj6, and Acj6 binds to the site in Or promoters. Mutational analysis shows that the site is essential for Or regulation in vivo. Surprisingly, a novel ORN class in acj6 adults is found to arise from ectopic expression of a larval Or gene, which is repressed in wild type via an Acj6 binding site. Thus, Acj6 acts directly in the process of receptor gene choice; it plays a dual role, positive and negative, in the logic of the process, and acts in partitioning the larval and adult receptor repertoires. PMID:19828808

  12. LGR4 is a receptor for RANKL and negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Yang, Zhengfeng; Ma, Yu; Yue, Zhiying; Lin, Hongyu; Qu, Guojun; Huang, Jinping; Dai, Wentao; Li, Chenghai; Zheng, Chunbing; Xu, Leqin; Chen, Huaqing; Wang, Jiqiu; Li, Dali; Siwko, Stefan; Penninger, Josef M; Ning, Guang; Xiao, Jianru; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11, also known as RANKL) regulates multiple physiological or pathological functions, including osteoclast differentiation and osteoporosis. TNFRSF11A (also called RANK) is considered to be the sole receptor for RANKL. Herein we report that leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4, also called GPR48) is another receptor for RANKL. LGR4 competes with RANK to bind RANKL and suppresses canonical RANK signaling during osteoclast differentiation. RANKL binding to LGR4 activates the Gαq and GSK3-β signaling pathway, an action that suppresses the expression and activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATC1) during osteoclastogenesis. Both whole-body (Lgr4(-/-)) and monocyte conditional knockout mice of Lgr4 (Lgr4 CKO) exhibit osteoclast hyperactivation (including elevation of osteoclast number, surface area, and size) and increased bone erosion. The soluble LGR4 extracellular domain (ECD) binds RANKL and inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vivo. Moreover, LGR4-ECD therapeutically abrogated RANKL-induced bone loss in three mouse models of osteoporosis. Therefore, LGR4 acts as a second RANKL receptor that negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. PMID:27064449

  13. Evaluating Serum Markers for Hormone Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, Michèl; Thorpe, Jason; Giraldez, Maria; Bergan, Lindsay; Tewari, Muneesh; Urban, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in females worldwide. Death rates have been declining, largely as a result of early detection through mammography and improved treatment, but mammographic screening is controversial because of over-diagnosis of breast disease that might not require treatment, and under-diagnosis of cancer in women with dense breasts. Breast cancer screening could be improved by pairing mammography with a tumor circulating marker, of which there are currently none. Given genomic similarities between the basal breast cancer subtype and serous ovarian cancer, and given our success in identifying circulating markers for ovarian cancer, we investigated the performance in hormone receptor-negative breast cancer detection of both previously identified ovarian serum markers and circulating markers associated with transcripts that were differentially expressed in breast cancer tissue compared to healthy breast tissue from reduction mammaplasties. Methods We evaluated a total of 15 analytes (13 proteins, 1 miRNA, 1 autoantibody) in sera drawn at or before breast cancer surgery from 43 breast cancer cases (28 triple-negative—TN—and 15 hormone receptor-negative—HRN—/ HER2-positive) and 87 matched controls. Results In the analysis of our whole cohort of breast cancer cases, autoantibodies to TP53 performed significantly better than the other selected 14 analytes showing 25.6% and 34.9% sensitivity at 95% and 90% specificity respectively with AUC: 0.7 (p<0.001). The subset of 28 TN cancers showed very similar results. We observed no correlation between anti-TP53 and the 14 other markers; however, anti-TP53 expression correlated with Body-Mass-Index. It did not correlate with tumor size, positive lymph nodes, tumor stage, the presence of metastases or recurrence. Conclusion None of the 13 serum proteins nor miRNA 135b identified women with HRN or TN breast cancer. TP53 autoantibodies

  14. Negative elongation factor controls energy homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haihui; Qin, Kunhua; Guo, Zhanyong; Ma, Yonggang; April, Craig; Gao, Xiaoli; Andrews, Thomas G; Bokov, Alex; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yidong; Weintraub, Susan T; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Degeng; Hu, Yanfen; Aune, Gregory J; Lindsey, Merry L; Li, Rong

    2014-04-10

    Negative elongation factor (NELF) is known to enforce promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), a pervasive phenomenon observed across multicellular genomes. However, the physiological impact of NELF on tissue homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that whole-body conditional deletion of the B subunit of NELF (NELF-B) in adult mice results in cardiomyopathy and impaired response to cardiac stress. Tissue-specific knockout of NELF-B confirms its cell-autonomous function in cardiomyocytes. NELF directly supports transcription of those genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. NELF also shares extensively transcriptional target genes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of energy metabolism in the myocardium. Mechanistically, NELF helps stabilize the transcription initiation complex at the metabolism-related genes. Our findings strongly indicate that NELF is part of the PPARα-mediated transcription regulatory network that maintains metabolic homeostasis in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24656816

  15. Outcomes of Estrogen Receptor Negative and Progesterone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Melissa; Chang, Martin C.; González, Rosa; Lategan, Belinda; del Barco, Elvira; Vera-Badillo, Francisco; Quesada, Paula; Goldstein, Robyn; Cruz, Ignacio; Ocana, Alberto; Cruz, Juan J.; Amir, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical features and outcomes of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and progesterone receptor positive (PgR+) breast cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a well-characterized database of sequential patients diagnosed with early stage invasive breast carcinoma. Outcomes of interest were time to relapse (TTR) and overall survival (OS). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted to assess the association of ER-/PgR+ with TTR and OS in comparison to ER+ and to ER- and PgR negative (ER-/PgR-) tumors irrespective of HER2 status. ER and PgR expression was conservatively defined as 10% or greater staining of cancer cells. Results 815 patients were followed for a median of 40.5 months; 56 patients (7%) had ER-/PgR+, 624 (77%) had ER+ and 136 (17%) had ER-/PgR- phenotypes. Compared with ER+ tumors, ER-/PgR+ tumors were associated with younger age (50 versus 59 years, p=0.03), high grade (50% versus 24%, p<0.001) and more frequent HER2 overexpression/amplification (43% versus 14%, p<0.001). TTR for ER-/PgR+ was intermediate between ER+ and ER-/PgR- tumors, but was not significantly different from ER+ tumors. Recurrences in the ER-/PgR+ and ER-/PgR- groups occurred early in follow-up while in ER+ tumors recurrences continued to occur over the duration of follow-up. OS of ER-/PgR+ was similar to ER+ tumors and better than that of ER-/PgR- tumors. Conclusions The ER-/PgR+ phenotype is associated with higher grade with HER2 overexpression/amplification and occurs more commonly in younger women. Risk of relapse and death more closely resembles ER+ than ER-/PgR- tumors suggesting this phenotype represents a group of more aggressive hormone receptor positive tumors. PMID:26161666

  16. Effect of lapatinib on the development of estrogen receptor-negative mammary tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Tracy E; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Yun; Hill, Jamal L; Li, Yuxin; Wang, Chunyu; Kim, Hee-Tae; Gilmer, Tona M; Sexton, Krystal R; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Osborne, C Kent; Brown, Powel H

    2009-01-21

    Lapatinib, a selective orally available inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinases, is a promising agent for the treatment of breast cancer. We examined the effect of lapatinib on the development of mammary tumors in MMTV-erbB2 transgenic mice, which express wild-type ErbB2 under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and spontaneously develop estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ErbB2-positive mammary tumors by 14 months of age. Mice were treated from age 3 months to age 15 months with vehicle (n = 17) or lapatinib (30 or 75 mg/kg body weight; n = 16 mice per group) by oral gavage twice daily (6 d/wk). All statistical tests were two-sided. By 328 days after the start of treatment, all 17 (100%) of the vehicle-treated mice vs five (31%) of the 16 mice treated with high-dose lapatinib developed mammary tumors (P < .001). Among MMTV-erbB2 mice treated for 5 months (n = 20 mice per group), those treated with lapatinib had fewer premalignant lesions and noninvasive cancers in their mammary glands than those treated with vehicle (P = .02). Lapatinib also effectively blocked epidermal growth factor-induced signaling through the EGFR and ErbB2 receptors, suppressed cyclin D1 and epiregulin mRNA expression, and stimulated p27 mRNA expression in human mammary epithelial cells and in mammary epithelial cells from mice treated for 5 months with high-dose lapatinib. Thus, cyclin D1, epiregulin, and p27 may represent useful biomarkers of lapatinib response in patients. These data suggest that lapatinib is a promising agent for the prevention of ER-negative breast cancer. PMID:19141783

  17. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: a zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C K; D'Souza, U M; Eisch, A J; Yajima, S; Lammers, C H; Yang, Y; Lee, S H; Kim, Y M; Nestler, E J; Mouradian, M M

    2001-06-19

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in brain with a specific regional distribution including olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and frontal cortex. Many of these brain regions also express abundant levels of various dopamine receptors. In vivo, DRRF itself can be regulated by manipulations of dopaminergic transmission. Mice treated with drugs that increase extracellular striatal dopamine levels (cocaine), block dopamine receptors (haloperidol), or destroy dopamine terminals (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) show significant alterations in DRRF mRNA. The latter observations provide a basis for dopamine receptor regulation after these manipulations. We conclude that DRRF is important for modulating dopaminergic transmission in the brain. PMID:11390978

  18. Muscarinic receptors mediate negative and positive inotropic effects in mammalian ventricular myocardium: differentiation by agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Korth, M.; Kühlkamp, V.

    1987-01-01

    , and did not cause an increase in intracellular Na+ activity in the quiescent papillary muscle. The results show that muscarinic receptors of the ventricular myocardium mediate two inotropic effects, which are opposite in direction and differ in their concentration-dependence by a factor of 100. Although agonists differentiate between both inotropic effects, it is unknown whether the receptors involved represent receptor states or separate receptor subpopulations. The negative inotropic effect of choline esters and of oxotremorine can be best explained by adenylate cyclase inhibition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2434180

  19. The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma negatively regulates BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Lee, Yong-Soo; Park, Yun-Yong; Bae, In-Ho; Kim, Don-Kyu; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hong-Ran; Kim, Sun-Hun; Franceschi, Renny T; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-05-22

    Estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma/ERR3/NR3B3) is a member of the orphan nuclear receptor with important functions in development and homeostasis. Recently it has been reported that ERRalpha is involved in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. In the present study we examined the role of ERRgamma in osteoblast differentiation. Here, we showed that ERRgamma is expressed in osteoblast progenitors and primary osteoblasts, and its expression is increased temporarily by BMP2. Overexpression of ERRgamma reduced BMP2-induced alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production as well as calcified nodule formation, whereas inhibition of ERRgamma expression significantly enhanced BMP2-induced osteogenic differentiation and mineralization, suggesting that endogenous ERRgamma plays an important role in osteoblast differentiation. In addition, ERRgamma significantly repressed Runx2 transactivity on osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein promoters. We also observed that ERRgamma physically interacts with Runx2 in vitro and in vivo and competes with p300 to repress Runx2 transactivity. Notably, intramuscular injection of ERRgamma strongly inhibited BMP2-induced ectopic bone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that ERRgamma is a novel negative regulator of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation via its regulation of Runx2 transactivity. PMID:19324883

  20. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor γ Negatively Regulates BMP2-induced Osteoblast Differentiation and Bone Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Lee, Yong-Soo; Park, Yun-Yong; Bae, In-Ho; Kim, Don-Kyu; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hong-Ran; Kim, Sun-Hun; Franceschi, Renny T.; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-related receptor γ (ERRγ/ERR3/NR3B3) is a member of the orphan nuclear receptor with important functions in development and homeostasis. Recently it has been reported that ERRα is involved in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. In the present study we examined the role of ERRγ in osteoblast differentiation. Here, we showed that ERRγ is expressed in osteoblast progenitors and primary osteoblasts, and its expression is increased temporarily by BMP2. Overexpression of ERRγ reduced BMP2-induced alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production as well as calcified nodule formation, whereas inhibition of ERRγ expression significantly enhanced BMP2-induced osteogenic differentiation and mineralization, suggesting that endogenous ERRγ plays an important role in osteoblast differentiation. In addition, ERRγ significantly repressed Runx2 transactivity on osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein promoters. We also observed that ERRγ physically interacts with Runx2 in vitro and in vivo and competes with p300 to repress Runx2 transactivity. Notably, intramuscular injection of ERRγ strongly inhibited BMP2-induced ectopic bone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that ERRγ is a novel negative regulator of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation via its regulation of Runx2 transactivity. PMID:19324883

  1. A model of spontaneous mouse mammary tumor for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LIXIANG; ZHOU, BUGAO; MENG, XIANMING; ZHU, WEIFENG; ZUO, AIREN; WANG, XIAOMIN; JIANG, RUNDE; YU, SHIPING

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequently malignancy in women. Therefore, establishment of an animal model for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for tumors is required. A novel heterogeneous spontaneous mammary tumor animal model of Kunming mice was generated. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spontaneous mammary tumor model. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and muscle tissue. Metastatic spread through blood vessel into liver and lungs was observed by hematoxylin eosin staining. No estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) immunoreactivity was detected in their associated malignant tumors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) protein weak expression was found by immunohistochemistry. High expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), moderate or high expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 were observed in tumor sections at different stages (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after cancer being found) when compared with that of the normal mammary glands. The result showed that the model is of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Remarkably in the mouse model, ER and PR-negative and HER2 weak positivity are observed. The high or moderate expressions of breast cancer markers (VEGF, c-Myc and cyclin D1) in mammary cancer tissue change at different stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous mammary model displaying colony-strain, outbred mice. This model will be an attractive tool to understand the biology of anti-hormonal breast cancer in women. PMID:25230850

  2. CD45 negatively regulates tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6 production in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Piercy, Jenny; Petrova, Svetla; Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-06-01

    CD45 is known to regulate signalling through many different surface receptors in diverse haemopoietic cell types. Here we report for the first time that CD45-/- bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) are more activated than CD45+/+ cells and that tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by BMDC and splenic dendritic cells (sDC), is increased following stimulation via Toll-like receptor (TLR)3 and TLR9. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation, an important downstream consequence of TLR3 and TLR9 signalling, is also increased in CD45-/- BMDC. BMDC of CD45-/- mice also produce more TNF and IL-6 following stimulation with the cytokines TNF and interferon-alpha. These results show that TLR signalling is increased in CD45-/- dendritic cells and imply that CD45 is a negative regulator of TLR and cytokine receptor signalling in dendritic cells. PMID:16771860

  3. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-1 Contributes to Progression in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Malathi; Speyer, Cecilia L.; Semma, Sara N.; Osuala, Kingsley O.; Kounalakis, Nicole; Torres Torres, Keila E.; Barnard, Nicola J.; Kim, Hyunjin J.; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Miller, Fred R.; Goydos, James S.; Gorski, David H.

    2014-01-01

    TNBC is an aggressive breast cancer subtype that does not express hormone receptors (estrogen and progesterone receptors, ER and PR) or amplified human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and there currently exist no targeted therapies effective against it. Consequently, finding new molecular targets in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is critical to improving patient outcomes. Previously, we have detected the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (gene: GRM1; protein: mGluR1) in TNBC and observed that targeting glutamatergic signaling inhibits TNBC growth both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we explored how mGluR1 contributes to TNBC progression, using the isogenic MCF10 progression series, which models breast carcinogenesis from nontransformed epithelium to malignant basal-like breast cancer. We observed that mGluR1 is expressed in human breast cancer and that in MCF10A cells, which model nontransformed mammary epithelium, but not in MCF10AT1 cells, which model atypical ductal hyperplasia, mGluR1 overexpression results in increased proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness. In contrast, mGluR1 knockdown results in a decrease in these activities in malignant MCF10CA1d cells. Similarly, pharmacologic inhibition of glutamatergic signaling in MCF10CA1d cells results in a decrease in proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Finally, transduction of MCF10AT1 cells, which express c-Ha-ras, using a lentiviral construct expressing GRM1 results in transformation to carcinoma in 90% of resultant xenografts. We conclude that mGluR1 cooperates with other factors in hyperplastic mammary epithelium to contribute to TNBC progression and therefore propose that glutamatergic signaling represents a promising new molecular target for TNBC therapy. PMID:24404125

  4. Mammary Adipose Tissue-Derived Lysophospholipids Promote Estrogen Receptor-Negative Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Skor, Maxwell N; Johnson, Marianna B; Singh, Puneet; Patel, Feenalie N; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2016-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion through G protein-coupled receptors, has been implicated in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cancer. LPA is converted from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by the secreted phospholipase autotaxin (ATX). Although various cell types can produce ATX, adipocyte-derived ATX is believed to be the major source of circulating ATX and also to be the major regulator of plasma LPA levels. In addition to ATX, adipocytes secrete numerous other factors (adipokines); although several adipokines have been implicated in breast cancer biology, the contribution of mammary adipose tissue-derived LPC/ATX/LPA (LPA axis) signaling to breast cancer is poorly understood. Using murine mammary fat-conditioned medium, we investigated the contribution of LPA signaling to mammary epithelial cancer cell biology and identified LPA signaling as a significant contributor to the oncogenic effects of the mammary adipose tissue secretome. To interrogate the role of mammary fat in the LPA axis during breast cancer progression, we exposed mammary adipose tissue to secreted factors from estrogen receptor-negative mammary epithelial cell lines and monitored changes in the mammary fat pad LPA axis. Our data indicate that bidirectional interactions between mammary cancer cells and mammary adipocytes alter the local LPA axis and increase ATX expression in the mammary fat pad during breast cancer progression. Thus, the LPC/ATX/LPA axis may be a useful target for prevention in patients at risk of ER-negative breast cancer. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 367-78. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862086

  5. Modern reproductive patterns associated with estrogen receptor positive but not negative breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Aktipis, C. Athena; Ellis, Bruce J.; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Hiatt, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been accepted that modern reproductive patterns are likely contributors to breast cancer susceptibility because of their influence on hormones such as estrogen and the importance of these hormones in breast cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess whether this ‘evolutionary mismatch hypothesis’ can explain susceptibility to both estrogen receptor positive (ER-positive) and estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) cancer. Our meta-analysis includes a total of 33 studies and examines parity, age of first birth and age of menarche broken down by estrogen receptor status. We found that modern reproductive patterns are more closely linked to ER-positive than ER-negative breast cancer. Thus, the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis for breast cancer can account for ER-positive breast cancer susceptibility but not ER-negative breast cancer. PMID:25389105

  6. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression. PMID:25639875

  7. Transcription factor interactions: Selectors of positive or negative regulation from a single DNA element

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, M.I.; Miner, J.N.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Yamamoto, K.R. )

    1990-09-14

    The mechanism by which a single factor evokes opposite regulatory effects from a specific DNA sequence is not well understood. In this study, a 25-base pair element that resides upstream of the mouse proliferin gene was examined; it conferred on linked promoters either positive or negative glucocorticoid regulation, depending upon physiological context. This sequence, denoted a composite glucocorticoid response element (GRE), was bound selective in vitro both by the glucocorticoid receptor and by c-Jun and c-Fos, components of the phorbol ester-activated AP-1 transcription factor. Indeed, c-Jun and c-Fos served as selectors of hormone responsiveness: the composite GRE was inactive in the absence of c-Jun, whereas it conferred a positive glucocorticoid effect in the presence of c-Jun, and a negative glucocorticoid effect in the presence of c-Jun and relatively high levels of c-Fos. The receptor also interacted selectively with c-Jun in vitro. A general model for composite GRE action is proposed that invokes both DNA binding and protein-protein interactions by receptor and nonreceptor factors.

  8. Development of indole sulfonamides as cannabinoid receptor negative allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Greig, Iain R; Baillie, Gemma L; Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Trembleau, Laurent; Ross, Ruth A

    2016-09-15

    Existing CB1 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) fall into a limited range of structural classes. In spite of the theoretical potential of CB1 NAMs, published in vivo studies have generally not been able to demonstrate the expected therapeutically-relevant CB1-mediated effects. Thus, a greater range of molecular tools are required to allow definitive elucidation of the effects of CB1 allosteric modulation. In this study, we show a novel series of indole sulfonamides. Compounds 5e and 6c (ABD1075) had potencies of 4 and 3nM respectively, and showed good oral exposure and CNS penetration, making them highly versatile tools for investigating the therapeutic potential of allosteric modulation of the cannabinoid system. PMID:27542310

  9. Chlamydophila psittaci-negative ocular adnexal marginal zone lymphomas express self polyreactive B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D; Bhatt, S; Lu, X; Guo, F; Veelken, H; Hsu, D K; Liu, F-T; Alvarez Cubela, S; Kunkalla, K; Vega, F; Chapman-Fredricks, J R; Lossos, I S

    2015-07-01

    The pathogenesis of Chlamydophila psittaci-negative ocular adnexal extranodal marginal zone lymphomas (OAEMZLs) is poorly understood. OAEMZLs are monoclonal tumors expressing a biased repertoire of mutated surface immunoglobulins. Antigenic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) may have a role in the pathogenesis of these lymphomas. We have analyzed the reactivity of recombinant OAEMZL immunoglobulins. OAEMZL antibodies reacted with self-human antigens, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, HEp-2 immunofluorescence and human protein microarrays. All the analyzed recombinant antibodies (rAbs) exhibited polyreactivity by comprehensive protein array antibody reactivity and some rAbs also demonstrated rheumatoid factor activity. The identity of several reactive antigens was confirmed by microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The tested rAbs frequently reacted with shared intracellular and extracellular self-antigens (for example, galectin-3). Furthermore, these self-antigens induced BCR signaling in B cells expressing cognate surface immunoglobulins derived from OAEMZLs. These findings indicate that interactions between self-antigens and cognate OAEMZL tumor-derived BCRs are functional, inducing intracellular signaling. Overall, our findings suggest that self-antigen-induced BCR stimulation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of C. psittaci-negative OAEMZLs. PMID:25676418

  10. Results With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Terms of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor, and Human Growth Factor Receptor 2 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Curcio, Lisa D.; Khanijou, Rajesh K.; Eisner, Martin E.; Kakkis, Jane L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Mesa, Albert V.; Macedo, Jorge C.; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To report our results with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in terms of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) status. Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and June 2009, 209 women with early-stage breast carcinomas were treated with APBI using multicatheter, MammoSite, or Contura brachytherapy to 34 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5-7 days. Three patient groups were defined by receptor status: Group 1: ER or PR (+) and HER-2/neu (-) (n = 180), Group 2: ER and PR (-) and HER-2/neu (+) (n = 10), and Group 3: ER, PR, and HER-2/neu (-) (triple negative breast cancer, n = 19). Median follow-up was 22 months. Results: Group 3 patients had significantly higher Scarff-Bloom-Richardson scores (p < 0.001). The 3-year ipsilateral breast tumor control rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 99%, 100%, and 100%, respectively (p = 0.15). Group 3 patients tended to experience relapse in distant sites earlier than did non-Group 3 patients. The 3-year relapse-free survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 81%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 3-year cause-specific and overall survival rates for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 100%, 100%, and 89%, respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Triple negative breast cancer patients typically have high-grade tumors with significantly worse relapse-free, cause-specific, and overall survival. Longer follow-up will help to determine whether these patients also have a higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor relapse.

  11. Manifold regularized non-negative matrix factorization with label information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huirong; Zhang, Jiangshe; Wang, Changpeng; Liu, Junmin

    2016-03-01

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) as a popular technique for finding parts-based, linear representations of non-negative data has been successfully applied in a wide range of applications, such as feature learning, dictionary learning, and dimensionality reduction. However, both the local manifold regularization of data and the discriminative information of the available label have not been taken into account together in NMF. We propose a new semisupervised matrix decomposition method, called manifold regularized non-negative matrix factorization (MRNMF) with label information, which incorporates the manifold regularization and the label information into the NMF to improve the performance of NMF in clustering tasks. We encode the local geometrical structure of the data space by constructing a nearest neighbor graph and enhance the discriminative ability of different classes by effectively using the label information. Experimental comparisons with the state-of-the-art methods on theCOIL20, PIE, Extended Yale B, and MNIST databases demonstrate the effectiveness of MRNMF.

  12. Insulin Receptor Substrate 2 Is a Negative Regulator of Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Elaine E.; Drinkwater, Laura; Radwanska, Kasia; Al-Qassab, Hind; Smith, Mark A.; O'Brien, Melissa; Kielar, Catherine; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Krauss, Stefan; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Withers, Dominic J.; Giese, Karl Peter

    2011-01-01

    Insulin has been shown to impact on learning and memory in both humans and animals, but the downstream signaling mechanisms involved are poorly characterized. Insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) is an adaptor protein that couples activation of insulin- and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors to downstream signaling pathways. Here, we have…

  13. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is critical for the growth of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stein, Rebecca A; Chang, Ching-Yi; Kazmin, Dmitri A; Way, James; Schroeder, Thies; Wergin, Melanie; Dewhirst, Mark W; McDonnell, Donald P

    2008-11-01

    Expression of estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) has recently been shown to carry negative prognostic significance in breast and ovarian cancers. The specific role of this orphan nuclear receptor in tumor growth and progression, however, is yet to be fully understood. The significant homology between estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and ERRalpha initially suggested that these receptors may have similar transcriptional targets. Using the well-characterized ERalpha-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, we sought to gain a genome-wide picture of ERalpha-ERRalpha cross-talk using an unbiased microarray approach. In addition to generating a host of novel ERRalpha target genes, this study yielded the surprising result that most ERRalpha-regulated genes are unrelated to estrogen signaling. The relatively small number of genes regulated by both ERalpha and ERRalpha led us to expand our study to the more aggressive and less clinically treatable ERalpha-negative class of breast cancers. In this setting, we found that ERRalpha expression is required for the basal level of expression of many known and novel ERRalpha target genes. Introduction of a small interfering RNA directed to ERRalpha into the highly aggressive breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cell line dramatically reduced the migratory potential of these cells. Although stable knockdown of ERRalpha expression in MDA-MB-231 cells had no effect on in vitro cell proliferation, a significant reduction of tumor growth rate was observed when these cells were implanted as xenografts. Our results confirm a role for ERRalpha in breast cancer growth and highlight it as a potential therapeutic target for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer. PMID:18974123

  14. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  15. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  16. Biology of FGFRL1, the fifth fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Trueb, Beat

    2011-03-01

    FGFRL1 (fibroblast growth factor receptor like 1) is the most recently discovered member of the FGFR family. It contains three extracellular Ig-like domains similar to the classical FGFRs, but it lacks the protein tyrosine kinase domain and instead contains a short intracellular tail with a peculiar histidine-rich motif. The gene for FGFRL1 is found in all metazoans from sea anemone to mammals. FGFRL1 binds to FGF ligands and heparin with high affinity. It exerts a negative effect on cell proliferation, but a positive effect on cell differentiation. Mice with a targeted deletion of the Fgfrl1 gene die perinatally due to alterations in their diaphragm. These mice also show bilateral kidney agenesis, suggesting an essential role for Fgfrl1 in kidney development. A human patient with a frameshift mutation exhibits craniosynostosis, arguing for an additional role of FGFRL1 during bone formation. FGFRL1 contributes to the complexity of the FGF signaling system. PMID:21080029

  17. A Two-Factor Model Better Explains Heterogeneity in Negative Symptoms: Evidence from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seon-Kyeong; Choi, Hye-Im; Park, Soohyun; Jaekal, Eunju; Lee, Ga-Young; Cho, Young Il; Choi, Kee-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Acknowledging separable factors underlying negative symptoms may lead to better understanding and treatment of negative symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia. The current study aimed to test whether the negative symptoms factor (NSF) of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) would be better represented by expressive and experiential deficit factors, rather than by a single factor model, using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Two hundred and twenty individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders completed the PANSS; subsamples additionally completed the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) and the Motivation and Pleasure Scale—Self-Report (MAP-SR). CFA results indicated that the two-factor model fit the data better than the one-factor model; however, latent variables were closely correlated. The two-factor model’s fit was significantly improved by accounting for correlated residuals between N2 (emotional withdrawal) and N6 (lack of spontaneity and flow of conversation), and between N4 (passive social withdrawal) and G16 (active social avoidance), possibly reflecting common method variance. The two NSF factors exhibited differential patterns of correlation with subdomains of the BNSS and MAP-SR. These results suggest that the PANSS NSF would be better represented by a two-factor model than by a single-factor one, and support the two-factor model’s adequate criterion-related validity. Common method variance among several items may be a potential source of measurement error under a two-factor model of the PANSS NSF. PMID:27242619

  18. Medical image fusion based on non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daoming; Zhang, Xianda

    2009-10-01

    Medical image fusion is a process of obtaining a new composite image from two or more source images which are from different modalities. In this paper, we proposed a novel medical image fusion scheme based on the non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm, the only resulted basis image is just the fused image. Since the CT and MRI images have a lot of pixels which are zeros, the NMF algorithm can not be employed directly. To overcome this difficulty, we first add a positive bias to the original data matrix and remove the bias from the resulted fusion image after the NMF procedure. The experiment results show that the proposed approach outperforms the existing wavelet-based methods and Laplacian pyramid-based methods.

  19. Binding of the Ah receptor to receptor binding factors in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R T; Ruh, T S; Ruh, M F

    1993-03-01

    Dioxin induces biological responses through interaction with a specific intracellular receptor, the Ah receptor, and the subsequent interaction of the Ah receptor with chromatin. We report the binding of the Ah receptor, partially purified from rabbit liver, to receptor binding factors in chromatin. Rabbit liver chromatin proteins (CP) were isolated by adsorption of chromatin to hydroxylapatite followed by sequential extraction with 1-8 M GdnHCl. To assay for receptor binding a portion of each CP fraction was reconstituted to rabbit double-stranded DNA using a reverse gradient dialysis of 7.5 to 0 M GdnHCl. These reconstituted nucleoacidic proteins were then examined for binding to [3H]-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([3H]TCDD)-receptor complexes by the streptomycin filter assay. Prior to the binding assay, [3H]TCDD-receptor complexes were partially purified by step elution from DEAE-cellulose columns. CP fractions 2, 5, and 7 were found to bind to the Ah receptor with high affinity. Scatchard analysis yielded Kd values in the nanomolar range. Competition with 2-fold excess unlabeled TCDD-receptor complexes was demonstrated, and binding was reduced markedly when the receptor was prepared in the presence of 10 mM molybdate. Such chromatin receptor binding factors (RBFs) may participate in the interaction of receptor with specific DNA sequences resulting in modulation of specific gene expression. PMID:8384852

  20. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets. PMID:26686064

  1. Identification and Quantification of a New Family of Peptide Endocannabinoids (Pepcans) Showing Negative Allosteric Modulation at CB1 Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Mark; Chicca, Andrea; Tamborrini, Marco; Eisen, David; Lerner, Raissa; Lutz, Beat; Poetz, Oliver; Pluschke, Gerd; Gertsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The α-hemoglobin-derived dodecapeptide RVD-hemopressin (RVDPVNFKLLSH) has been proposed to be an endogenous agonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). To study this peptide, we have raised mAbs against its C-terminal part. Using an immunoaffinity mass spectrometry approach, a whole family of N-terminally extended peptides in addition to RVD-Hpα were identified in rodent brain extracts and human and mouse plasma. We designated these peptides Pepcan-12 (RVDPVNFKLLSH) to Pepcan-23 (SALSDLHAHKLRVDPVNFKLLSH), referring to peptide length. The most abundant Pepcans found in the brain were tested for CB1 receptor binding. In the classical radioligand displacement assay, Pepcan-12 was the most efficacious ligand but only partially displaced both [3H]CP55,940 and [3H]WIN55,212-2. The data were fitted with the allosteric ternary complex model, revealing a cooperativity factor value α < 1, thus indicating a negative allosteric modulation. Dissociation kinetic studies of [3H]CP55,940 in the absence and presence of Pepcan-12 confirmed these results by showing increased dissociation rate constants induced by Pepcan-12. A fluorescently labeled Pepcan-12 analog was synthesized to investigate the binding to CB1 receptors. Competition binding studies revealed Ki values of several Pepcans in the nanomolar range. Accordingly, using competitive ELISA, we found low nanomolar concentrations of Pepcans in human plasma and ∼100 pmol/g in mouse brain. Surprisingly, Pepcan-12 exhibited potent negative allosteric modulation of the orthosteric agonist-induced cAMP accumulation, [35S]GTPγS binding, and CB1 receptor internalization. Pepcans are the first endogenous allosteric modulators identified for CB1 receptors. Given their abundance in the brain, Pepcans could play an important physiological role in modulating endocannabinoid signaling. PMID:22952224

  2. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  3. The Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated protein phosphatase calcineurin negatively regulates EGF receptor signaling in Drosophila development.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kathleen M C; Rubin, Gerald M

    2002-01-01

    Calcineurin is a Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated, Ser-Thr protein phosphatase that is essential for the translation of Ca(2+) signals into changes in cell function and development. We carried out a dominant modifier screen in the Drosophila eye using an activated form of the catalytic subunit to identify new targets, regulators, and functions of calcineurin. An examination of 70,000 mutagenized flies yielded nine specific complementation groups, four that enhanced and five that suppressed the activated calcineurin phenotype. The gene canB2, which encodes the essential regulatory subunit of calcineurin, was identified as a suppressor group, demonstrating that the screen was capable of identifying genes relevant to calcineurin function. We demonstrated that a second suppressor group was sprouty, a negative regulator of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Wing and eye phenotypes of ectopic activated calcineurin and genetic interactions with components of signaling pathways suggested a role for calcineurin in repressing Egf receptor/Ras signal transduction. On the basis of our results, we propose that calcineurin, upon activation by Ca(2+)-calmodulin, cooperates with other factors to negatively regulate Egf receptor signaling at the level of sprouty and the GTPase-activating protein Gap1. PMID:12019233

  4. Selenoprotein W controls epidermal growth factor receptor surface expression, activation and degradation via receptor ubiquitination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) is the founding member of the ErbB family of growth factor receptors that modulate a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways controlling growth, proliferation and differentiation. Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a diet-regulated, highly conserved...

  5. The protein kinase LKB1 negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erna; Edlund, Karolina; Kahata, Kaoru; Zieba, Agata; Morén, Anita; Watanabe, Yukihide; Voytyuk, Iryna; Botling, Johan; Söderberg, Ola; Micke, Patrick; Pyrowolakis, George; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase LKB1 regulates cell metabolism and growth and is implicated in intestinal and lung cancer. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates cell differentiation during development and tissue homeostasis. We demonstrate that LKB1 physically interacts with BMP type I receptors and requires Smad7 to promote downregulation of the receptor. Accordingly, LKB1 suppresses BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation and affects BMP signaling in Drosophila wing longitudinal vein morphogenesis. LKB1 protein expression and Smad1 phosphorylation analysis in a cohort of non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrated a negative correlation predominantly in a subset enriched in adenocarcinomas. Lung cancer patient data analysis indicated strong correlation between LKB1 loss-of-function mutations and high BMP2 expression, and these two events further correlated with expression of a gene subset functionally linked to apoptosis and migration. This new mechanism of BMP receptor regulation by LKB1 has ramifications in physiological organogenesis and disease. PMID:26701726

  6. Hyaluronidase 2 negatively regulates RON receptor tyrosine kinase and mediates transformation of epithelial cells by jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Danilkovitch-Miagkova, Alla; Duh, Fuh-Mei; Kuzmin, Igor; Angeloni, Debora; Liu, Shan-Lu; Miller, A. Dusty; Lerman, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    The candidate tumor-suppressor gene hyaluronidase 2 (HYAL2) encodes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell-surface protein that serves as an entry receptor for jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus, a virus that causes contagious lung cancer in sheep that is morphologically similar to human bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The viral envelope (Env) protein alone can transform cultured cells, and we hypothesized that Env could bind and sequester the HYAL2 receptor and thus liberate a potential oncogenic factor bound and negatively controlled by HYAL2. Here we show that the HYAL2 receptor protein is associated with the RON receptor tyrosine kinase (also called MST1R or Stk in the mouse), rendering it functionally silent. In human cells expressing a jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus Env transgene, the Env protein physically associates with HYAL2. RON liberated from the association with HYAL2 becomes functionally active and consequently activates the Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways leading to oncogenic transformation of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. We find activated RON in a subset of human bronchioloalveolar carcinoma tumors, suggesting RON involvement in this type of human lung cancer. PMID:12676986

  7. Outcomes of Breast Cancer Patients With Triple Negative Receptor Status Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, J. Ben; Reid, Robert E.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Chen, Peter Y.; Mitchell, Christine K.; Wallace, Michelle F.; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Grills, Inga S.; Margolis, Jeffrey M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Triple negative receptor status (TNRS) of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy treated with whole-breast irradiation has been associated with increased distant metastasis and decreased disease-free and overall survival. This paper reports the outcomes of TNRS patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: We studied 455 patients who received APBI at our institution, using interstitial, intracavitary, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. TNRS was assigned if a patient tested negative for all three (ER [estrogen receptor], PR [progesterone receptor], and HER2/neu) receptors. Of 202 patients with all receptor results available, 20 patients were designated TNRS, and 182 patients had at least one receptor positive (RP). We analyzed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). Results: Mean follow-up was 4.1 years for the TNRS group and 5.1 years for the RP cohort (p = 0.11). TNRS patients had a higher histologic grade (59% TNRS vs. 13% RP; p < 0.001). Mean tumor size, stage N1 disease, and margin status were similar. Based on a 5-year actuarial analysis, the TNRS cohort experienced no IBTR, RNF, or DM, with an OS of 100% versus rates of 1.4% IBTR, 1.5% RNF, and 2.8% DM in the RP cohort (p > 0.52). OS for the RP cohort was 93% at 5 years (p > 0.28). Conclusions: In our patient population, TNRS conferred a clinical outcome similar to that of patients with RP disease treated with APBI. Further investigation with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods is warranted to confirm that APBI is a safe and effective treatment for patients with localized TNRS breast cancer.

  8. Wnt-5a signaling restores tamoxifen sensitivity in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Caroline E.; Ekström, Elin J.; Andersson, Tommy

    2009-01-01

    One third of all breast cancers are estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) negative, carry a poor overall prognosis, and do not respond well to currently available endocrine therapies. New treatment strategies are therefore required. Loss of Wnt-5a has previously been correlated with loss of ERα in clinical breast cancer samples, and we sought to investigate this association further. Three breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and 4T1) lacking expression of ERα and Wnt-5a, and one breast cancer cell line (T47D) expressing both proteins were used in this study. Wnt-5a signaling was generated in ERα-negative cell lines via stimulation with either recombinant Wnt-5a protein or a Wnt-5a-derived hexapeptide (Foxy-5) possessing Wnt-5a signaling properties. ERα expression was restored at both mRNA and protein level, after treatment with recombinant Wnt-5a or Foxy-5. This restoration of expression occurred in parallel with a reduction in methylation of the ERα promoter. Up-regulated ERα could be activated, initiate transcription of progesterone receptor and pS2, and activate an estrogen response element reporter construct. Significantly, breast cancer cells re-expressing ERα responded to treatment with the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen, as measured by induction of apoptosis and cell growth inhibition. Finally, Foxy-5 also increased ERα expression in an in vivo model of ERα-negative breast cancer. This represents the first evidence that Wnt-5a signaling acts to re-establish ERα expression in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. Our data suggest that combinatorial therapy with Foxy-5 and tamoxifen should be considered as a future treatment possibility for ERα-negative breast cancer patients. PMID:19237581

  9. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Role of Androgen Receptors as Targets for Therapy of Pre-treated Post-menopausal Patients With ER/PgR-negative/AR-positive or ER and/or PgRpositive/ AR-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer (ARTT)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-30

    Metastatic Breastcancer; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Progesterone Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Androgen Receptor Gene Overexpression

  10. Lrig2 Negatively Regulates Ectodomain Shedding of Axon Guidance Receptors by ADAM Proteases.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Susan; van den Heuvel, Dianne M A; Fujita, Yuki; Robinson, Ross A; Hellemons, Anita J C G M; Adolfs, Youri; Van Battum, Eljo Y; Blokhuis, Anna M; Kuijpers, Marijn; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Hedman, Håkan; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Siebold, Christian; Yamashita, Toshihide; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2015-12-01

    Many guidance receptors are proteolytically cleaved by membrane-associated metalloproteases of the ADAM family, leading to the shedding of their ectodomains. Ectodomain shedding is crucial for receptor signaling and function, but how this process is controlled in neurons remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the transmembrane protein Lrig2 negatively regulates ADAM-mediated guidance receptor proteolysis in neurons. Lrig2 binds Neogenin, a receptor for repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs), and prevents premature Neogenin shedding by ADAM17 (TACE). RGMa reduces Lrig2-Neogenin interactions, providing ADAM17 access to Neogenin and allowing this protease to induce ectodomain shedding. Regulation of ADAM17-mediated Neogenin cleavage by Lrig2 is required for neurite growth inhibition by RGMa in vitro and for cortical neuron migration in vivo. Furthermore, knockdown of Lrig2 significantly improves CNS axon regeneration. Together, our data identify a unique ligand-gated mechanism to control receptor shedding by ADAMs and reveal functions for Lrigs in neuron migration and regenerative failure. PMID:26651291

  11. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  12. Architecture and RNA binding of the human negative elongation factor

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Seychelle M; Pöllmann, David; Caizzi, Livia; Hofmann, Katharina B; Rombaut, Pascaline; Zimniak, Tomasz; Herzog, Franz; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Transcription regulation in metazoans often involves promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase (Pol) II, which requires the 4-subunit negative elongation factor (NELF). Here we discern the functional architecture of human NELF through X-ray crystallography, protein crosslinking, biochemical assays, and RNA crosslinking in cells. We identify a NELF core subcomplex formed by conserved regions in subunits NELF-A and NELF-C, and resolve its crystal structure. The NELF-AC subcomplex binds single-stranded nucleic acids in vitro, and NELF-C associates with RNA in vivo. A positively charged face of NELF-AC is involved in RNA binding, whereas the opposite face of the NELF-AC subcomplex binds NELF-B. NELF-B is predicted to form a HEAT repeat fold, also binds RNA in vivo, and anchors the subunit NELF-E, which is confirmed to bind RNA in vivo. These results reveal the three-dimensional architecture and three RNA-binding faces of NELF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14981.001 PMID:27282391

  13. A negative allosteric modulator modulates GABAB-receptor signalling through GB2 subunits.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Chen, Linhai; Liu, Lei; Xia, Zhixiong; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Nan, Fajun; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-03-15

    An γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB)-receptor mediates slow and prolonged synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system, which represents an interesting target for the treatment of various diseases and disorders of the central nervous system. To date, only one activator of the GABAB-receptor, baclofen, is on the market for the treatment of spasticity. Inhibitors of the GABAB-receptor, such as antagonists, show anti-absence seizure activity and pro-cognitive properties. In a search for allosteric compounds of the GABAB-receptor, although several positive allosteric modulators have been developed, it is only recently that the first negative allosteric modulator (NAM), CLH304a (also named Compound 14), has been reported. In the present study, we provide further information on the mechanism of action of CLH304a, and also show the possibility of designing more NAMs, such as CLH391 and CLH393, based on the structure of CLH304a. First we show that CLH304a inhibits native GABAB-receptor activity in cultured cerebellar granular neurons. We then show that CLH304a has inverse agonist properties and non-competitively inhibits the effect of agonists, indicating that it binds at a different site to GABA. The GABAB-receptor is a mandatory heterodimer made of GB1 subunits, in which agonists bind, and GB2 subunits, which activate G-proteins. By using various combinations made up of wild-type and/or mutated GB1 and GB2 subunits, we show that CLH304a acts on the heptahelical domain of GB2 subunits. These data revealed the possibility of designing innovative NAMs acting in the heptahelical domain of the GB2 subunits, offering novel possibilities for therapeutic intervention based on GABAB-receptor inhibition. PMID:26772870

  14. A genome-wide association scan on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and may be characterized on the basis of whether estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in the tumour cells. ER status of breast cancer is important clinically, and is used both as a prognostic indicator and treatment predictor. In this study, we focused on identifying genetic markers associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk. Methods We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 285,984 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 617 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 4,583 controls. We also conducted a genome-wide pathway analysis on the discovery dataset using permutation-based tests on pre-defined pathways. The extent of shared polygenic variation between ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancers was assessed by relating risk scores, derived using ER-positive breast cancer samples, to disease state in independent, ER-negative breast cancer cases. Results Association with ER-negative breast cancer was not validated for any of the five most strongly associated SNPs followed up in independent studies (1,011 ER-negative breast cancer cases, 7,604 controls). However, an excess of small P-values for SNPs with known regulatory functions in cancer-related pathways was found (global P = 0.052). We found no evidence to suggest that ER-negative breast cancer shares a polygenic basis to disease with ER-positive breast cancer. Conclusions ER-negative breast cancer is a distinct breast cancer subtype that merits independent analyses. Given the clinical importance of this phenotype and the likelihood that genetic effect sizes are small, greater sample sizes and further studies are required to understand the etiology of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:21062454

  15. The receptor AXL diversifies EGFR signaling and limits the response to EGFR-targeted inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Aaron S; Miller, Miles A; Gertler, Frank B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2013-08-01

    The relationship between drug resistance, changes in signaling, and emergence of an invasive phenotype is well appreciated, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Using machine learning analysis applied to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia database, we identified expression of AXL, the gene that encodes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) AXL, as exceptionally predictive of lack of response to ErbB family receptor-targeted inhibitors. Activation of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) transactivated AXL, and this ligand-independent AXL activity diversified EGFR-induced signaling into additional downstream pathways beyond those triggered by EGFR alone. AXL-mediated signaling diversification was required for EGF (epidermal growth factor)-elicited motility responses in AXL-positive TNBC (triple-negative breast cancer) cells. Using cross-linking coimmunoprecipitation assays, we determined that AXL associated with EGFR, other ErbB receptor family members, MET (hepatocyte growth factor receptor), and PDGFR (platelet-derived growth factor receptor) but not IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor) or INSR (insulin receptor). From these AXL interaction data, we predicted AXL-mediated signaling synergy for additional RTKs and validated these predictions in cells. This alternative mechanism of receptor activation limits the use of ligand-blocking therapies and indicates against therapy withdrawal after acquired resistance. Further, subadditive interaction between EGFR- and AXL-targeted inhibitors across all AXL-positive TNBC cell lines may indicate that increased abundance of EGFR is principally a means to transactivation-mediated signaling. PMID:23921085

  16. Negative feedback confers mutational robustness in yeast transcription factor regulation

    PubMed Central

    Denby, Charles M.; Im, Joo Hyun; Yu, Richard C.; Pesce, C. Gustavo; Brem, Rachel B.

    2012-01-01

    Organismal fitness depends on the ability of gene networks to function robustly in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. Understanding the mechanisms of this stability is one of the key aims of modern systems biology. Dissecting the basis of robustness to mutation has proven a particular challenge, with most experimental models relying on artificial DNA sequence variants engineered in the laboratory. In this work, we hypothesized that negative regulatory feedback could stabilize gene expression against the disruptions that arise from natural genetic variation. We screened yeast transcription factors for feedback and used the results to establish ROX1 (Repressor of hypOXia) as a model system for the study of feedback in circuit behaviors and its impact across genetically heterogeneous populations. Mutagenesis experiments revealed the mechanism of Rox1 as a direct transcriptional repressor at its own gene, enabling a regulatory program of rapid induction during environmental change that reached a plateau of moderate steady-state expression. Additionally, in a given environmental condition, Rox1 levels varied widely across genetically distinct strains; the ROX1 feedback loop regulated this variation, in that the range of expression levels across genetic backgrounds showed greater spread in ROX1 feedback mutants than among strains with the ROX1 feedback loop intact. Our findings indicate that the ROX1 feedback circuit is tuned to respond to perturbations arising from natural genetic variation in addition to its role in induction behavior. We suggest that regulatory feedback may be an important element of the network architectures that confer mutational robustness across biology. PMID:22355134

  17. The biology of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Penuel, E; Sliwkowski, M X

    1999-09-01

    Our understanding of the normal signaling mechanisms and functions of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and other members of the HER family, namely epidermal growth factor receptor, HER3, and HER4, is growing rapidly. Activation of these receptors results in a diverse array of signals through the formation of homodimeric and heterodimeric receptor complexes; HER2 is the preferred dimerization partner for the other HERs. These oligomeric receptor complexes activate distinct signaling pathways, such as the Ras-MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways. These, in turn, affect various cellular processes. Recent gene deletion experiments in mice point to an important role for HER2 in cardiac and neural development, and evidence from other studies indicates that HER2 is involved in normal breast growth and development. Thus, HER2 is a key component of a complex signaling network that plays a critical role in the regulation of tissue development, growth, and differentiation. PMID:11122793

  18. Vitamin D and androgen receptor-targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, A; Wang, B; Picon-Ruiz, M; Buchwald, P; Ince, Tan A

    2016-05-01

    Anti-estrogen and anti-HER2 treatments have been among the first and most successful examples of targeted therapy for breast cancer (BC). However, the treatment of triple-negative BC (TNBC) that lack estrogen receptor expression or HER2 amplification remains a major challenge. We previously discovered that approximately two-thirds of TNBCs express vitamin D receptor (VDR) and/or androgen receptor (AR) and hypothesized that TNBCs co-expressing AR and VDR (HR2-av TNBC) could be treated by targeting both of these hormone receptors. To evaluate the feasibility of VDR/AR-targeted therapy in TNBC, we characterized 15 different BC lines and identified 2 HR2-av TNBC lines and examined the changes in their phenotype, viability, and proliferation after VDR and AR-targeted treatment. Treatment of BC cell lines with VDR or AR agonists inhibited cell viability in a receptor-dependent manner, and their combination appeared to inhibit cell viability additively. Moreover, cell viability was further decreased when AR/VDR agonist hormones were combined with chemotherapeutic drugs. The mechanisms of inhibition by AR/VDR agonist hormones included cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in TNBC cell lines. In addition, AR/VDR agonist hormones induced differentiation and inhibited cancer stem cells (CSCs) measured by reduction in tumorsphere formation efficiency, high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and CSC markers. Surprisingly, we found that AR antagonists inhibited proliferation of most BC cell lines in an AR-independent manner, raising questions regarding their mechanism of action. In summary, AR/VDR-targeted agonist hormone therapy can inhibit HR2-av TNBC through multiple mechanisms in a receptor-dependent manner and can be combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27120467

  19. CLAVATA1 Dominant-Negative Alleles Reveal Functional Overlap between Multiple Receptor Kinases That Regulate Meristem and Organ Development

    PubMed Central

    Diévart, Anne; Dalal, Monica; Tax, Frans E.; Lacey, Alexzandria D.; Huttly, Alison; Li, Jianming; Clark, Steven E.

    2003-01-01

    The CLAVATA1 (CLV1) receptor kinase controls stem cell number and differentiation at the Arabidopsis shoot and flower meristems. Other components of the CLV1 signaling pathway include the secreted putative ligand CLV3 and the receptor-like protein CLV2. We report evidence indicating that all intermediate and strong clv1 alleles are dominant negative and likely interfere with the activity of unknown receptor kinase(s) that have functional overlap with CLV1. clv1 dominant-negative alleles show major differences from dominant-negative alleles characterized to date in animal receptor kinase signaling systems, including the lack of a dominant-negative effect of kinase domain truncation and the ability of missense mutations in the extracellular domain to act in a dominant-negative manner. We analyzed chimeric receptor kinases by fusing CLV1 and BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) coding sequences and expressing these in clv1 null backgrounds. Constructs containing the CLV1 extracellular domain and the BRI1 kinase domain were strongly dominant negative in the regulation of meristem development. Furthermore, we show that CLV1 expressed within the pedicel can partially replace the function of the ERECTA receptor kinase. We propose the presence of multiple receptors that regulate meristem development in a functionally related manner whose interactions are driven by the extracellular domains and whose activation requires the kinase domain. PMID:12724544

  20. Increased serum levels of circulating exosomal microRNA-373 in receptor-negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eichelser, Corinna; Stückrath, Isabel; Müller, Volkmar; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Wikman, Harriet; Pantel, Klaus; Schwarzenbach, Heidi

    2014-10-30

    In this study, we compared the blood serum levels of circulating cell-free and exosomal microRNAs, and their involvement in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer patients. Our analyses on cell-free miR-101, miR-372 and miR-373 were performed in preoperative blood serum of 168 patients with invasive breast cancer, 19 patients with benign breast diseases and 28 healthy women. MicroRNAs were additionally quantified in exosomes of 50 cancer patients and 12 healthy women from the same cohort. Relative concentrations were measured by quantitative TaqMan MicroRNA assays and correlated to clinicopathological risk factors. The concentrations of cell-free miR-101 (p=0.013) and miR-373 (p=0.024) were significantly different between patients with breast cancer and benign tumors. A prevalence of miR-101, miR-372 and miR-373 were found in exosomes. The levels of circulating exosomal (but not cell-free) miR-373 were higher in triple negative than luminal carcinomas (p=0.027). Also, estrogen-negative (p=0.021) and progesterone-negative (p=0.01) tumors displayed higher concentrations of exosomal miR-373 than patients with hormone-receptor positive tumors. Overexpression of miR-373 by transfection of MCF-7 cells showed downregulated protein expression of the estrogen receptor, and inhibition of apoptosis induced by camptothecin. Our data indicate that serum levels of exosomal miR-373 are linked to triple negative and more aggressive breast carcinomas. PMID:25333260

  1. Homozygosity for a dominant negative thyroid hormone receptor gene responsible for generalized resistance to thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Schwartz, I D; Mueller, O T; Root, A W; Usala, S J; Bercu, B B

    1991-11-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormones (GRTH) commonly results from mutations in the T3-binding domain of the c-erbA beta thyroid hormone receptor gene. We have reported on a novel deletion mutation in c-erbA beta in a kindred, S, with GRTH. One patient from this kindred was the product of a consanguineous union from two affected members and was homozygous for the beta-receptor defect. This patient at 3.5 weeks of age had unprecedented elevations of TSH, free T4, and free T3 (TSH, 389 mU/L; free T4, 330.8 pmol/L; free T3, 82,719 fmol/L). He displayed a complex mixture of tissue-specific hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. He had delayed growth (height age, 1 3/12 yr at chronological age 2 9/12 yr) and skeletal maturation (bone age, 4 months), and developmental delay (developmental age, 8 months), but he was quite tachycardic. The homozygous patient of kindred S is markedly different from a recently reported patient with no c-erbA beta-receptor. This difference indicates that a dominant negative form of c-erbA beta in man can inhibit at least some thyroid hormone action mediated by the c-erbA alpha-receptors. PMID:1682340

  2. FOXP3 Transcription Factor: A Candidate Marker for Susceptibility and Prognosis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiori Lopes, Leandra; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Guembarovski, Alda Losi; Okuyama Kishima, Marina; Campos, Clodoaldo Zago; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Ariza, Carolina Batista; de Oliveira, Karen Brajão; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a relevant subgroup of neoplasia which presents negative phenotype of estrogen and progesterone receptors and has no overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2). FOXP3 (forkhead transcription factor 3) is a marker of regulatory T cells (Tregs), whose expression may be increased in tumor cells. This study aimed to investigate a polymorphism (rs3761548) and the protein expression of FOXP3 for a possible involvement in TNBC susceptibility and prognosis. Genetic polymorphism was evaluated in 50 patients and in 115 controls by allele-specific PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Protein expression was evaluated in 38 patients by immunohistochemistry. It was observed a positive association for homozygous AA (OR = 3.78; 95% CI = 1.02–14.06) in relation to TNBC susceptibility. Most of the patients (83%) showed a strong staining for FOXP3 protein in the tumor cells. In relation to FOXP3-positive infiltrate, 47% and 58% of patients had a moderate or intense intratumoral and peritumoral mononuclear infiltrate cells, respectively. Tumor size was positively correlated to intratumoral FOXP3-positive infiltrate (P = 0.026). In conclusion, since FOXP3 was positively associated with TNBC susceptibility and prognosis, it seems to be a promising candidate for further investigation in larger TNBC samples. PMID:24877082

  3. Usefulness of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Huang, Zhou; Wang, Qiusheng; Sun, Bing; Ding, Lijuan; Meng, Xiangying; Wu, Shikai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the relationship between pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)/platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and the estimation of hormone-receptor-negative (HR−) breast cancer patients’ survival in a Chinese cohort. Patients and methods Of 434 consecutive HR− nonmetastatic breast cancer patients treated between 2004 and 2010 in the Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences, 318 eligible cases with complete data were included in the present study. Kaplan–Meier analysis was performed to determine the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to test the usefulness of NLR and PLR. Results Univariate analysis indicated that both elevated NLR and PLR (both P<0.001) were associated with poor OS. The utility of NLR remained in the multivariate analysis (P<0.001), but not PLR (P=0.104). The analysis results for DFS were almost the same as OS. Subgroup analysis revealed a significant association between increased NLR and PLR (P<0.001 and P=0.011) and poor survival in triple-negative breast cancer. However, for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer, only NLR was significantly associated with OS in the multivariate analysis (P=0.001). Conclusion The present study indicates that both increased NLR and PLR are associated with poor survival in HR−breast cancer patients. Meanwhile, NLR is independently correlated with OS and DFS, but PLR is not. PMID:27536129

  4. Placental Kisspeptins Differentially Modulate Vital Parameters of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Ghods, Roya; Kazemi, Tohid; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim; Rezania, Simin; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Arefi, Soheila; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs) are major regulators of trophoblast and cancer invasion. Thus far, limited and conflicting data are available on KP-mediated modulation of breast cancer (BC) metastasis; mostly based on synthetic KP-10, the most active fragment of KP. Here, we report for the first time comprehensive functional effects of term placental KPs on proliferation, adhesion, Matrigel invasion, motility, MMP activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive). KPs were expressed at high level by term placental syncytiotrophoblasts and released in soluble form. Placental explant conditioned medium containing KPs (CM) significantly reduced proliferation of both cell types compared to CM without (w/o) KP (CM-w/o KP) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, placental KPs significantly reduced adhesive properties, while increased MMP9 and MMP2 activity and stimulated invasion. Increased invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells after CM treatment was inhibited by KP receptor antagonist, P-234. CM significantly reduced motility of MCF-7 cells at all time points (2-30 hr), while it stimulated motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. These effects were reversed by P-234. Co-treatment with selective ER modulators, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, inhibited the effect of CM on motility of MCF-7 cells. The level of IL-6 in supernatant of MCF-7 cells treated with CM was higher compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Both cell types produced more IL-8 after treatment with CM compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Taken together, our observations suggest that placental KPs differentially modulate vital parameters of estrogen receptor-positive and -negative BC cells possibly through modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27101408

  5. Placental Kisspeptins Differentially Modulate Vital Parameters of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Ghods, Roya; Kazemi, Tohid; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim; Rezania, Simin; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Arefi, Soheila; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs) are major regulators of trophoblast and cancer invasion. Thus far, limited and conflicting data are available on KP-mediated modulation of breast cancer (BC) metastasis; mostly based on synthetic KP-10, the most active fragment of KP. Here, we report for the first time comprehensive functional effects of term placental KPs on proliferation, adhesion, Matrigel invasion, motility, MMP activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive). KPs were expressed at high level by term placental syncytiotrophoblasts and released in soluble form. Placental explant conditioned medium containing KPs (CM) significantly reduced proliferation of both cell types compared to CM without (w/o) KP (CM-w/o KP) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, placental KPs significantly reduced adhesive properties, while increased MMP9 and MMP2 activity and stimulated invasion. Increased invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells after CM treatment was inhibited by KP receptor antagonist, P-234. CM significantly reduced motility of MCF-7 cells at all time points (2–30 hr), while it stimulated motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. These effects were reversed by P-234. Co-treatment with selective ER modulators, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, inhibited the effect of CM on motility of MCF-7 cells. The level of IL-6 in supernatant of MCF-7 cells treated with CM was higher compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Both cell types produced more IL-8 after treatment with CM compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Taken together, our observations suggest that placental KPs differentially modulate vital parameters of estrogen receptor-positive and -negative BC cells possibly through modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27101408

  6. alpha1B-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization induced by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Avila, M Teresa; Flores-Jasso, C Fabián; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induced alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation in Rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing these adrenoceptors. This effect of TGF-beta was rapid, reaching a maximum within 30 min and decreasing thereafter, and concentration-dependent (EC(50) 0.3 pM). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, and the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine, Ro 318220 and bisindolylmaleimide, blocked the effect of this growth factor. alpha(1B)-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation was associated with desensitization, as indicated by a reduction in the adrenergic-mediated production of [(3)H]inositol phosphates. Phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors by TGF-beta was also observed in Cos-1 cells transfected with the receptor. Co-transfection of the dominant-negative mutant of the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Deltap85) inhibited the phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors induced by TGF-beta. Our results indicate that activation of TGF-beta receptors induces alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. The data suggest that phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C play key roles in this effect of TGF-beta. PMID:12234252

  7. alpha1B-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization induced by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Romero-Avila, M Teresa; Flores-Jasso, C Fabián; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2002-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induced alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation in Rat-1 fibroblasts stably expressing these adrenoceptors. This effect of TGF-beta was rapid, reaching a maximum within 30 min and decreasing thereafter, and concentration-dependent (EC(50) 0.3 pM). The phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002, and the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine, Ro 318220 and bisindolylmaleimide, blocked the effect of this growth factor. alpha(1B)-Adrenergic receptor phosphorylation was associated with desensitization, as indicated by a reduction in the adrenergic-mediated production of [(3)H]inositol phosphates. Phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors by TGF-beta was also observed in Cos-1 cells transfected with the receptor. Co-transfection of the dominant-negative mutant of the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Deltap85) inhibited the phosphorylation of alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors induced by TGF-beta. Our results indicate that activation of TGF-beta receptors induces alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and desensitization. The data suggest that phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C play key roles in this effect of TGF-beta. PMID:12234252

  8. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  9. Dissociation of peripheral T cell responses from thymocyte negative selection by weak agonists supports a spare receptor model of T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Lisa K.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    We have focused on stability of the peptide-MHC complex as a determining factor of ligand potency for thymocytes and peripheral CD4+ T cell responses. MHC variant peptides that have low affinities and fast dissociation rates are different in that they stimulate proliferation and cytolysis of mature T cells (classifying the variant peptides as weak agonists) but do not induce thymocyte negative selection. The MHC variant weak agonists require significant receptor reserve, because decreasing the level of T cell receptor on mature T cells blocks the proliferative response. These results demonstrate that peripheral T cells are more sensitive to MHC variant ligands by virtue of increased T cell receptor expression; in addition, the data support a T cell model of the spare receptor theory. PMID:11904393

  10. Enriched transcription factor signatures in triple negative breast cancer indicates possible targeted therapies with existing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Scooter; De, Pradip; Dey, Nandini; Long, Bradley; Young, Brandon; Sparano, Joseph A.; Wang, Victoria; Davidson, Nancy E.; Leyland-Jones, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Triple negative (TN) breast cancers which lack expression of the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptors convey a poor prognosis due in part to a lack of targeted therapies. Methods To identify viable targets for the treatment of TN disease, we have conducted a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on seven different breast cancer whole genome gene expression cohorts comparing TN vs. ER + HER2 − to identify consistently enriched genes that share a common promoter motif. The seven cohorts were profiled on three different genome expression platforms (Affymetrix, Illumina and RNAseq) consisting in total of 2088 samples with IHC metadata. Results GSEA identified enriched gene expression patterns in TN samples that share common promoter motifs associated with SOX9, E2F1, HIF1A, HMGA1, MYC BACH2, CEBPB, and GCNF/NR6A1. Unexpectedly, NR6A1 an orphan nuclear receptor normally expressed in germ cells of gonads is highly expressed in TN and ER + HER2 − samples making it an ideal drug target. Conclusion With the increasing number of large sample size breast cancer cohorts, an exploratory analysis of genes that are consistently enriched in TN sharing common promoter motifs allows for the identification of possible therapeutic targets with extensive validation in patient derived data sets. PMID:26005638

  11. The role of tumour necrosis factor alpha and soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptors in the symptomatology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Levent; Batmaz, Sedat; Kocbiyik, Sibel; Soygur, Arif Haldun

    2016-07-01

    Background Immunological mechanisms may be responsible for the development and maintenance of schizophrenia symptoms. Aim The aim of this study is to measure tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor I (sTNF-αRI), and soluble tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor II (sTNF-αRII) levels in patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals, and to determine their relationship with the symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods Serum TNF-α, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were measured. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered for patients with schizophrenia (n = 35), and the results were compared with healthy controls (n = 30). Hierarchical regression analyses were undertaken to predict the levels of TNF-α, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII. Results No significant difference was observed in TNF-α levels, but sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were lower in patients with schizophrenia. Serum sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels were found to be negatively correlated with the negative subscale score of the PANSS, and sTNF-αRI levels were also negatively correlated with the total score of the PANSS. Smoking, gender, body mass index were not correlated with TNF-α and sTNF-α receptor levels. Conclusions These results suggest that there may be a change in anti-inflammatory response in patients with schizophrenia due to sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII levels. The study also supports low levels of TNF activity in schizophrenia patients with negative symptoms. PMID:26754110

  12. Cutaneous adverse reactions specific to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, I; Voiculescu, VM; Bacalbasa, N; Prie, BE; Cojocaru, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Classical antineoplastic therapy is encumbered by extensively studied adverse reactions, most often of systemic nature. The emergence of new generations of anticancer treatments, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, besides improving the response to treatment and the survival rate, is accompanied by the occurrence of new specific side effects, incompletely studied. These side effects are most often cutaneous (hand foot syndrome, acneiform reactions), and in some cases are extremely severe, requiring dose reduction or drug discontinuation. The prevention of the cutaneous adverse effects and their treatment require a close collaboration between the oncologist and the dermatologist. The occurrence of some of these skin adverse effects may be a favorable prognostic factor for the response to the cancer treatment and the overall survival. Abbreviations: EGFR = epidermal growth factor receptors; EGFRI = epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors PMID:26361513

  13. A negatively charged transmembrane aspartate residue controls activation of the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Meng-Jun; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-08-15

    Relaxin-3 is an insulin/relaxin superfamily neuropeptide involved in the regulation of food intake and stress response via activation of its cognate receptor RXFP3, an A-class G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In recent studies, a highly conserved ExxxD motif essential for binding of relaxin-3 has been identified at extracellular end of the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of RXFP3. For most of the A-class GPCRs, a highly conserved negatively charged Asp residue (Asp(2.50) using Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering and Asp128 in human RXFP3) is present at the middle of TMD2. To elucidate function of the conserved transmembrane Asp128, in the present work we replaced it with other residues and the resultant RXFP3 mutants all retained quite high ligand-binding potency, but their activation and agonist-induced internalization were abolished or drastically decreased. Thus, the negatively charged transmembrane Asp128 controlled transduction of agonist-binding information from the extracellular region to the intracellular region through maintaining RXFP3 in a metastable state for efficient conformational change induced by binding of an agonist. PMID:27353281

  14. Clickable Photoaffinity Ligands for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Based on Select Acetylenic Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Karen J; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Thal, David M; Brady, Ryan M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lapinsky, David J

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of current drug targets. In particular, small-molecule allosteric modulators offer substantial potential for selectively "tuning" GPCR activity. However, there remains a critical need for experimental strategies that unambiguously determine direct allosteric ligand-GPCR interactions, to facilitate both chemical biology studies and rational structure-based drug design. We now report the development and use of first-in-class clickable allosteric photoprobes for a GPCR based on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) negative allosteric modulator (NAM) chemotypes. Select acetylenic mGlu5 NAM lead compounds were rationally modified to contain either a benzophenone or an aryl azide as a photoreactive functional group, enabling irreversible covalent attachment to mGlu5 via photoactivation. Additionally, a terminal alkyne or an aliphatic azide was incorporated as a click chemistry handle, allowing chemoselective attachment of fluorescent moieties to the irreversibly mGlu5-bound probe via tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation. These clickable photoprobes retained submicromolar affinity for mGlu5 and negative cooperativity with glutamate, interacted with the "common allosteric-binding site," displayed slow binding kinetics, and could irreversibly label mGlu5 following UV exposure. We depleted the number of functional mGlu5 receptors using an irreversibly bound NAM to elucidate and delineate orthosteric agonist affinity and efficacy. Finally, successful conjugation of fluorescent dyes via click chemistry was demonstrated for each photoprobe. In the future, these clickable photoprobes are expected to aid our understanding of the structural basis of mGlu5 allosteric modulation. Furthermore, tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation is expected to be a broadly applicable experimental strategy across the entire GPCR superfamily. PMID:27115427

  15. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  16. Peroxisome proliferators and fatty acids negatively regulate liver X receptor-mediated activity and sterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T E; Ledwith, B J

    2001-04-01

    Peroxisome proliferators (PPs) are potent tumor promoters in rodents. The mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis requires the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha), but might also involve the PPARalpha independent alteration of signaling pathways that regulate cell growth. Here, we studied the effects of PPs on the mevalonate pathway, a critical pathway that controls cell proliferation. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that act as sterol sensors in the mevalonate pathway. In gene reporter assays in COS-7 cells, the basal activity of the LXR responsive reporter gene (LXRE-luc) was suppressed by 10 microM lovastatin and zaragozic acid A, suggesting that this activity was attributed to the activation of native LXRs, by endogenously produced mevalonate products. The potent PP and rodent tumor promoter, pirinixic acid (WY-14643) also inhibited LXR-mediated transcription in a dose related manner (approximate IC(50) of 100 microM). As did several other PPs including ciprofibric acid and mono-ethylhexylphthalate. Polyunsaturated and medium to long chain fatty acids at 100 microM were also potent inhibitors; the arachidonic acid analogue eicosatetraynoic acid being the most active (approximate IC(50) of 10 microM). Of the PPs and fatty acids tested, there was a strong correlation between the ability of these agents to suppress de novo sterol synthesis in a rat hepatoma cell line, H4IIEC3, and inhibit LXR-mediated transcription in COS-7 cells, but a discordance between these endpoints and PPARalpha activation and fatty acid acyl-CoA oxidase induction. Taken together, these results suggest that PPs and fatty acids negatively regulate the mevalonate pathway through a mechanism that is not entirely dependent on PPARalpha activation. Because of the importance of the mevalonate pathway in regulating cell proliferation, the modulation of this pathway by PPs and fatty acids might contribute to their actions on cell growth

  17. Bayesian non-negative factor analysis for reconstructing transcription factor mediated regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation by transcription factor (TF) controls the time and abundance of mRNA transcription. Due to the limitation of current proteomics technologies, large scale measurements of protein level activities of TFs is usually infeasible, making computational reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory network a difficult task. Results We proposed here a novel Bayesian non-negative factor model for TF mediated regulatory networks. Particularly, the non-negative TF activities and sample clustering effect are modeled as the factors from a Dirichlet process mixture of rectified Gaussian distributions, and the sparse regulatory coefficients are modeled as the loadings from a sparse distribution that constrains its sparsity using knowledge from database; meantime, a Gibbs sampling solution was developed to infer the underlying network structure and the unknown TF activities simultaneously. The developed approach has been applied to simulated system and breast cancer gene expression data. Result shows that, the proposed method was able to systematically uncover TF mediated transcriptional regulatory network structure, the regulatory coefficients, the TF protein level activities and the sample clustering effect. The regulation target prediction result is highly coordinated with the prior knowledge, and sample clustering result shows superior performance over previous molecular based clustering method. Conclusions The results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach in reconstructing transcriptional networks mediated by TFs through simulated systems and real data. PMID:22166063

  18. Modulation of the NMDA Receptor Through Secreted Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Waldo; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a critical determinant in the formation and development of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). The excitatory current is produced and regulated by several ionotropic receptors, including those that respond to glutamate. These channels are in turn regulated through several secreted factors that function as synaptic organizers. Specifically, Wnt, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) particularly regulate the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glutamatergic channel. These factors likely regulate early embryonic development and directly control key proteins in the function of important glutamatergic channels. Here, we review the secreted molecules that participate in synaptic organization and discuss the cell signaling behind of this fine regulation. Additionally, we discuss how these factors are dysregulated in some neuropathologies associated with glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the CNS. PMID:25429903

  19. Pathological complete response rate in hormone receptor-negative breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant FEC, followed by weekly paclitaxel administration: A retrospective study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    KIBA, TAKAYOSHI; MORII, NAO; TAKAHASHI, HIROTOSHI; OZAKI, SHINJI; ATSUMI, MISAO; MASUMOTO, FUMI; YAMASHIRO, HIROYASU

    2016-01-01

    While tumor size, the presence of inflammatory carcinoma and lymph node involvement are the main prognostic factors of women with locally advanced breast cancer, the prognostic value of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status has not been fully clarified. The present study examined the therapeutic efficacy of a neoadjuvant fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide regimen (FEC), followed by weekly paclitaxel and/or trastuzumab administration, in the treatment of hormone receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Between April 2012 and February 2014, 14 patients with hormone receptor-negative local breast cancer (triple-negative type, 9 patients; HER2 type, 5 patients) were included in the study. In all cases, the histological type of the primary cancer was invasive ductal carcinoma. Among the 14 women who received the regimen, 5 presented with stage I cancer (35.7%), 3 with stage IIA (21.4%), 3 with stage IIB (21.4%), 1 with stage IIIB (7.1%) and 2 with stage IIIC (14.3%), according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system. With regard to the tumor-node-metastasis classification, 5 patients were T1N0M0 (35.7%), 3 were T2N0M0 (21.4%), 3 were T2N1M0 (21.4%), 2 were T3N3M0 (14.3%) and 1 was T4N1M0 (7.1%). The pathological response was evaluated using resected tissue following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, according to the criteria established by the Japanese Breast Cancer Society. Patients were classified into pathological responders (grades 2 and 3, 71.4% of all patients) and non-responders (grade 1, 28.6% of all patients). A pathological complete response (pCR) was achieved in 50.0% of all cases (7/14); 44.4% of triple-negative-type cases (4/9) and 60.0% of HER2-type cases (3/5). Hematological and non-hematological toxicity was reversible and manageable. No patients withdrew from treatment, and favorable compliance was achieved. The present study demonstrated that neoadjuvant FEC followed

  20. Toll-like receptor genetic variants are associated with Gram-negative infections in VLBW infants

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Venkatesh; Mulrooney, Neil P.; Garland, Jeffery S.; He, Jie; Patel, Aloka L.; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hines, Ronald N.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes alter susceptibility to bacterial infections and modulate WBC counts during infections in very low birth-weight infants (birth weight <1500g, VLBW). STUDY DESIGN VLBW infants recruited in a multi-center study were genotyped for 9 functional TLR SNPs and associations between SNPs and infection rates examined. WBC counts obtained during infections were compared among infants with and without SNPs. RESULTS In our cohort (n=408), 90 infants developed bacterial infections. Presence of TLR4 (rs4986790 & 4986791) variants were associated with Gram-negative infections. Female infants heterozygous for the X-linked IRAK1 (rs1059703) SNP had less Gram-negative infections. In regression models controlling for confounders, the TLR4 (rs4986790) SNP was associated with increased Gram-negative infections. The TLR5 (rs5744105) variant was associated with elevated WBC counts during infections. CONCLUSION TLR genetic variants can contribute to increased risk of bacterial infections and altered immune responses in VLBW infants. PMID:23867959

  1. Motivational factors and negative affectivity as predictors of alcohol craving.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Samuel; Luísa Figueira, M; Walter, Henriette; Lesch, Otto

    2016-09-30

    Craving is thought to play an important role in alcohol use disorders. The recent inclusion of "craving" as a formal diagnostic symptom calls for further investigation of this subjective phenomenon with multiple dimensions. Considering that alcohol-dependent patients compensate negative physical/emotional states with alcohol, the aim of this study is to investigate alcohol craving and its correlation with drinking measures and affective personality dimensions. A sample of 135 alcohol-dependent patients (104 males and 31 females) was collected from a clinical setting. Subjects self-rated their cravings (Penn Alcohol Craving Scale) and the stage of change. Several personality scales were also administered. Craving was related to drinking status, abstinence time, age, and taking steps. After controlling for these conditions, psychological characteristics related to low self-concept, neuroticism, cyclothymic affective temperament, depression, and hostility were found to be predictors of craving in sober alcohol-dependent patients. Our results support craving as a component of the phenomenology of alcohol dependence and highlight the presence of unpleasant feelings as predictors of craving in sober alcohol-dependent patients without co-occurring psychiatric conditions. The predisposition to experience negative emotions may induce a stronger craving response and increase the likelihood of a first drink and a subsequent loss of control. PMID:27367491

  2. Expression profiling of nuclear receptors in breast cancer identifies TLX as a mediator of growth and invasion in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Remenyi, Judit; Banerji, Christopher R.S.; Lai, Chun-Fui; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lombardo, Ylenia; Busonero, Claudia; Ottaviani, Silvia; Passey, Alun; Quinlan, Philip R.; Purdie, Colin A.; Jordan, Lee B.; Thompson, Alastair M.; Finn, Richard S.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Caldas, Carlos; Gil, Jesus; Coombes, R. Charles; Fuller-Pace, Frances V.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Buluwela, Laki; Ali, Simak

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors comprises 48 members, several of which have been implicated in breast cancer. Most important is estrogen receptor-α (ERα), which is a key therapeutic target. ERα action is facilitated by co-operativity with other NR and there is evidence that ERα function may be recapitulated by other NRs in ERα-negative breast cancer. In order to examine the inter-relationships between nuclear receptors, and to obtain evidence for previously unsuspected roles for any NRs, we undertook quantitative RT-PCR and bioinformatics analysis to examine their expression in breast cancer. While most NRs were expressed, bioinformatic analyses differentiated tumours into distinct prognostic groups that were validated by analyzing public microarray data sets. Although ERα and progesterone receptor were dominant in distinguishing prognostic groups, other NR strengthened these groups. Clustering analysis identified several family members with potential importance in breast cancer. Specifically, RORγ is identified as being co-expressed with ERα, whilst several NRs are preferentially expressed in ERα-negative disease, with TLX expression being prognostic in this subtype. Functional studies demonstrated the importance of TLX in regulating growth and invasion in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:26280373

  3. Vascular growth factors and receptors in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Böhling, T.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Persico, M. G.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas are highly vascular central nervous system tumors of controversial origin. Of interest in their pathogenesis are mechanisms regulating endothelial cell growth. The endothelial cell mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis, and together with its two receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-1(FLT1) and VEGFR-2(KDR), is up-regulated during the malignant progression of gliomas. We have analyzed the expression of VEGF and its receptors, the related placental growth factor (PlGF) and the endothelial receptors FLT4 and Tie by in situ hybridization in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in all of the hemangiopericytomas studied and highly expressed in the stromal cells of hemangioblastomas. In addition, some hemangioblastoma tumor cells expressed high levels of PlGF. Significantly elevated levels of Tie mRNA, Tie protein, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 but not FLT4 mRNAs were observed in the endothelia of both tumor types. In hemangioblastomas, however, the receptors were also highly expressed by a subpopulation of stromal cells. Consistent results were obtained for a human hemangioblastoma cell line in culture. Up-regulation of the endothelial growth factors and receptors may result in autocrine or paracrine stimulation of endothelial cells and their precursors involved in the genesis of these two vascular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774132

  4. PreImplantation factor (PIF*) promotes embryotrophic and neuroprotective decidual genes: effect negated by epidermal growth factor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate embryo-maternal interaction is paramount for pregnancy success post-implantation. The embryo follows a specific developmental timeline starting with neural system, dependent on endogenous and decidual factors. Beyond altered genetics/epigenetics, post-natal diseases may initiate at prenatal/neonatal, post-natal period, or through a continuum. Preimplantation factor (PIF) secreted by viable embryos promotes implantation and trophoblast invasion. Synthetic PIF reverses neuroinflammation in non-pregnant models. PIF targets embryo proteins that protect against oxidative stress and protein misfolding. We report of PIF’s embryotrophic role and potential to prevent developmental disorders by regulating uterine milieu at implantation and first trimester. Methods PIF’s effect on human implantation (human endometrial stromal cells (HESC)) and first-trimester decidua cultures (FTDC) was examined, by global gene expression (Affymetrix), disease-biomarkers ranking (GeneGo), neuro-specific genes (Ingenuity) and proteins (mass-spectrometry). PIF co-cultured epidermal growth factor (EGF) in both HESC and FTDC (Affymetrix) was evaluated. Results In HESC, PIF promotes neural differentiation and transmission genes (TLX2, EPHA10) while inhibiting retinoic acid receptor gene, which arrests growth. PIF promotes axon guidance and downregulates EGF-dependent neuroregulin signaling. In FTDC, PIF promotes bone morphogenetic protein pathway (SMAD1, 53-fold) and axonal guidance genes (EPH5) while inhibiting PPP2R2C, negative cell-growth regulator, involved in Alzheimer’s and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In HESC, PIF affects angiotensin via beta-arrestin, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), notch, BMP, and wingless-int (WNT) signaling pathways that promote neurogenesis involved in childhood neurodevelopmental diseases—autism and also affected epithelial-mesenchymal transition involved in neuromuscular disorders. In FTDC, PIF upregulates neural development

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the hepatocyte growth factor gene by the nuclear receptors chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor and estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J G; Bell, A; Liu, Y; Zarnegar, R

    1997-02-14

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a multifunctional cytokine that controls the growth and differentiation of various tissues. Previously, we described the existence of a negative cis-acting regulatory element(s) within the -1- to -0.7-kilobase pair (kb) portion of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse HGF promoter. In the present study, we show that the repressor element is located at position -872 to -860 base pairs and comprises an imperfect estrogen-responsive element 5'-AGGTCAGAAAGACCA-3'. We demonstrate that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF), a nuclear orphan receptor belonging to the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily, through binding to this site effectively silences the transcriptional activity of the HGF promoter. We show that estrogen receptor, on the other hand, relieves the repressive action of COUP-TF, resulting in the induction of the HGF promoter. Using mice transgenic for either 2.7 or 0.7 kb of the HGF promoter region linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, we found that injection of estradiol stimulates HGF promoter activity in tissues such as the mammary gland and ovary of mice harboring 2.7 but not 0.7 kb of the mouse HGF promoter region. Potential involvement of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors in the regulation of HGF gene expression is also discussed. PMID:9020096

  6. Dominant negative actions of human prostacyclin receptor variant through dimerization: implications for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Salam; Tetruashvily, Mazell; Frey, Alex J; Wilson, Stephen J; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Smyth, Emer M

    2010-01-01

    Objective Prostacyclin and thromboxane mediate opposing cardiovascular effects through their receptors, the IP and TP, respectively. Individuals heterozygous for an IP variant, IPR212C, displayed exaggerated loss of platelet IP responsiveness and accelerated cardiovascular disease. We examined association of IPR212C into homo- and hetero- dimeric receptor complexes and the impact on prostacyclin and thromboxane biology. Methods and Results Dimerization of the IP, IPR212C and TPα and was examined by Bioluminescent Resonance Energy Transfer in transfected HEK293 cells. We observed an equal propensity for formation of IPIP homo- and IPTPα hetero- dimers. Compared to the IP alone, IPR212C displayed reduced cAMP generation and increased ER localization, but underwent normal homo- and hetero- dimerization. When the IPR212C and IP were co-expressed a dominant negative action of variant was evident with enhanced wild type IP localization to the ER and reduced agonist-dependent signaling. Further, the TPα activation response, which was shifted from inositol phosphate to cAMP generation following IPTPα heterodimerization, was normalized when the TPα instead dimerized with IPR212C. Conclusions IPR212C exerts a dominant action on the wild type IP and TPα through dimerization. This likely contributes to accelerated cardiovascular disease in individuals carrying one copy of the variant allele. PMID:20522800

  7. The role of CD4-Lck in T-cell receptor antagonism: evidence for negative signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Racioppi, L; Matarese, G; D'Oro, U; De Pascale, M; Masci, A M; Fontana, S; Zappacosta, S

    1996-01-01

    Small changes in the complex between a peptide and a molecule of the major histocompatibility complex generate ligands able to partially activate (partial agonist) or even inhibit (antagonist) T-cell functions. T-cell receptor engagement of antagonist complex results in a partial zeta chain phosphorylation without activation of the associated ZAP-70 kinase. Herein we show that, despite a strong inhibition of both inositol phospholipid hydrolysis and extracellular increasing antagonist concentrations increased the activity of the CD4-Lck kinase. Addition of anti-CD4 antibody to culture medium prevented inhibitory effects induced by antagonist ligand. We propose that CD4-Lck activation triggered by antagonist complexes may act in a dominant negative mode, thus overriding stimulatory signals coming from agonist ligand. These findings identify a new T-cell signaling profile that may explain the ability of some T-cell receptor variant ligands to inhibit specific biological activities or trigger alternative activation programs. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816805

  8. Characterization of macrophage - cancer cell crosstalk in estrogen receptor positive and triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Roudnicky, Filip; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity may broadly influence the activation of tumor-associated macrophages. We aimed to dissect how breast cancer cells of different molecular characteristics contribute to macrophage phenotype and function. Therefore, we performed whole transcriptome sequencing of human monocytes that were co-cultured with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) or triple-negative (TNBC) breast cancer cell lines and studied the biological responses related to the differential gene activation in both monocytes and cancer cells by pathway analysis. ER+ and TNBC cancer cell lines induced distinctly different macrophage phenotypes with different biological functions, cytokine and chemokine secretion, and morphology. Conversely, ER+ and TNBC breast cancer cell lines were distinctly influenced by the presence of macrophages. ER+ cells demonstrated up-regulation of an acute phase inflammatory response, IL-17 signaling and antigen presentation pathway, whereas thioredoxin and vitamin D3 receptor pathways were down-regulated in the respective macrophages. The TNBC educated macrophages down-regulated citrulline metabolism and differentiated into M2-like macrophages with increased MMR protein expression and CCL2 secretion. These data demonstrate how different cancer cells educate the host cells to support tumor growth and might explain why high infiltration of macrophages in TNBC tumors associates with poor prognosis. PMID:25776849

  9. Liver X Receptor (LXR) activation negatively regulates visfatin expression in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mayi, Therese Hervee; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, Francois; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin expression in human macrophages. {yields} LXR activation leads to a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration. {yields} LXR activation decreased PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin in human macrophages. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are the major source of visfatin, a visceral fat adipokine upregulated during obesity. Also known to play a role in B cell differentiation (pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF)) and NAD biosynthesis (nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)), visfatin has been suggested to play a role in inflammation. Liver X Receptor (LXR) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR){gamma} are nuclear receptors expressed in macrophages controlling the inflammatory response. Recently, we reported visfatin as a PPAR{gamma} target gene in human macrophages. In this study, we examined whether LXR regulates macrophage visfatin expression. Synthetic LXR ligands decreased visfatin gene expression in a LXR-dependent manner in human and murine macrophages. The decrease of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by a decrease of protein secretion. Consequently, a modest and transient decrease of NAD{sup +} concentration was observed. Interestingly, LXR activation decreased the PPAR{gamma}-induced visfatin gene and protein secretion in human macrophages. Our results identify visfatin as a gene oppositely regulated by the LXR and PPAR{gamma} pathways in human macrophages.

  10. Effect of adding gefitinib to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in estrogen receptor negative early breast cancer in a randomized phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Bernsdorf, Mogens; Ingvar, Christian; Jörgensen, Leif; Tuxen, Malgorzata K; Jakobsen, Erik H; Saetersdal, Anna; Kimper-Karl, Marie Louise; Kroman, Niels; Balslev, Eva; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2011-04-01

    Gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown both anti-proliferative and anti-tumoral activity in breast cancer. This study was designed to determine the effect of adding gefitinib to neoadjuvant epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) on tumor response rates. Women with unilateral, primary operable, estrogen receptor negative invasive breast cancer ≥ 2 cm were eligible for inclusion. Randomized patients were to receive four cycles of neoadjuvant EC plus 12 weeks of either gefitinib (250 mg daily) or placebo. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR), and secondary endpoints were complete response (CR) and overall objective response (OR). 181 patients were randomized. A pCR was observed in 17% (12/71) of patients treated with gefitinib and in 12% (9/73) of patients treated with placebo (4.57% difference, 95% CI -7.19 to 6.33; P = 0.44). CR was observed in 10% of patients in both the gefitinib (7/71) and the placebo group (7/73) (0.27% difference, 95% CI -9.6 to 10.2; P = 0.96). There was no significant difference in OR (5.96%; 95% CI -9.9 to 21.9; P = 0.45) between the two groups. Post hoc subgroup analysis showed a significant difference in pCR between triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) and non-TNBC tumors (P = 0.03). More patients in the gefitinib arm had hematological toxicity (P = 0.15) and discontinued treatment (9/94 vs. 2/86) because of adverse events (AE). Tumor response rates were similar in the two groups. A significantly higher pCR rate was observed post hoc in TNBC versus non-TNBC independent of treatment. More patients in the gefitinib group discontinued treatment because of AE. PMID:21234672

  11. The prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA expression in primary ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J. M.; Langdon, S. P.; Simpson, B. J.; Stewart, M.; Katsaros, D.; Sismondi, P.; Love, S.; Scott, W. N.; Williams, A. R.; Lessells, A. M.; Macleod, K. G.; Smyth, J. F.; Miller, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of mRNA for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, EGF and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) was determined in 76 malignant, six borderline and 15 benign primary ovarian tumours using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and related to clinical and pathological parameters. Of the malignant tumours, 70% (53/76) expressed EGF receptor mRNA, 31% (23/75) expressed EGF mRNA and 35% (26/75) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA. For the borderline tumours, four of six (67%) expressed EGF receptor mRNA, 1/6 (17%) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA and none expressed EGF mRNA. Finally, 33% (5/15) of the benign tumours expressed EGF receptor mRNA, whereas 40% (6/15) expressed EGF mRNA and 7% (1/15) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA. The presence of the EGF receptor in malignant tumours was associated with that of TGF-alpha (P = 0.0015) but not with EGF (P = 1.00), whereas there was no relationship between the presence of EGF and TGF-alpha (P = 1.00). EGF receptor mRNA expression was significantly and positively associated with serous histology (P = 0.006) but not with stage or grade. Neither EGF nor TGF-alpha showed any link with histological subtype or stage. The survival of patients with malignant tumours possessing EGF receptor mRNA was significantly reduced compared with that of patients whose tumours were negative (P = 0.030 for all malignant tumours; P = 0.007 for malignant epithelial tumours only). In contrast, neither the expression of TGF-alpha nor EGF was related to survival. These data suggest that the presence of EGF receptor mRNA is associated with poor prognosis in primary ovarian cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8562334

  12. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  13. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason R.; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant, therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry. Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored immunohistochemistry and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot or in vitro flow cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immuno-staining, with implications for use in non-invasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  14. Visualization of growth factor receptor sites in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Araujo, D.; Nair, N.P.; Chabot, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    It is now known that various growth factors may also act in the central nervous system. Among them, it has recently been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) may possess trophic effects in the mammalian brain. We report here on the respective autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 125/I)EGF and (/sup 125/I)IGF-I receptor binding sites in the rat brain, both during ontogeny and in adulthood. It appears that (/sup 125/I)EGF sites are mostly found in the rat forebrain during brain development. On the other hand, (/sup 125/I)IGF-I sites are more widely distributed both during ontogeny and in adulthood. These results reveal the plasticity of the expression of EGF and IGF-I receptor sites in the mammalian brain. This could be relevant for the respective role of these two growth factors in the development and maintenance of neuronal function.

  15. Differential Effect of Phosphorylation-Defective Survivin on Radiation Response in Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Larson, Richard; Xu, Wei; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Survivin is a key member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, and is considered a promising therapeutic target due to its universal overexpression in cancers. Survivin is implicated in cellular radiation response through its role in apoptosis, cell division, and DNA damage response. In the present study, analysis of publically available data sets showed that survivin gene expression increased with breast cancer stage (p < 0.00001) and was significantly higher in estrogen receptor-negative cancers as compared to estrogen receptor-positive cancers (p = 9e-46). However, survivin was prognostic in estrogen receptor-positive tumors (p = 0.03) but not in estrogen receptor-negative tumors (p = 0.28). We assessed the effect of a survivin dominant-negative mutant on colony-formation (2D) and mammosphere-formation (3D) efficiency, and radiation response in the estrogen receptor-positive MCF7 and estrogen receptor-negative SUM149 breast cancer cell lines. The colony-formation efficiency was significantly lower in the dominant-negative survivin-transduced cells versus control MCF7 cells (0.42 vs. 0.58, p < 0.01), but it was significantly higher in dominant-negative population versus control-transduced SUM149 cells (0.29 vs. 0.20, p < 0.01). A similar, non-significant, trend in mammosphere-formation efficiency was observed. We compared the radiosensitivity of cells stably expressing dominant-negative survivin with their controls in both cell lines under 2D and 3D culture conditions following exposure to increasing doses of radiation. We found that the dominant-negative populations were radioprotective in MCF7 cells but radiosensitive in SUM149 cells compared to the control-transduced population; further, Taxol was synergistic with the survivin mutant in SUM149 but not MCF7. Our data suggests that survivin modulation influences radiation response differently in estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes, warranting further

  16. The ontogeny of epidermal growth factor receptors during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E.D.; Meek, J.

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the role(s) of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in vivo during murine development, we have examined the /sup 125/I-EGF binding characteristics of EGF-receptors in membrane preparations of tissues from the 12th day of gestation to parturition. Using autoradiography, the earliest time that we could detect EGF-receptors was on trophoblast cells cultured for 3 days as blastocyst outgrowths. Trophoblast eventually forms a large portion of the placenta, where EGF-receptors have long been recognized. We measured the number and affinity of EGF-receptors on tissues dissected from conceptuses from the 12th day of gestation in order to identify a stage when tissues may be most sensitive to EGF. Whereas the number of EGF receptors increases during gestation for all tissues examined, the affinity of the receptors declines for carcass and placenta and remains relatively unchanged for brain and liver. This suggests that EGF may function differently throughout development. Our hypothesis is that EGF (or its embryonic equivalent) initially stimulates proliferation in embryonic cells and then stimulates differentiation as the tissues mature. In the adult, its main role could be to stimulate tissue repair after damage.

  17. Biochemical and biological properties of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have utilized a monoclonal antibody (192-IgG) to study the rat nerve growth factor receptor. After intraocular injection, {sup 125}I-192-IgG was retrogradely transported in sympathetic neuronal axons to the superior cervical ganglion. When the sciatic nerve was ligated to induce the accumulation of axonally transported materials, 192-IgG immunostaining was observed on both sides of the ligature, indicating that NGF receptors are transported in both orthograde and retrograde directions. By using {sup 125}I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG immunoprecipitation, we detected receptor molecules throughout the rat brain, thereby supporting the hypothesis that NGF is active in the central nervous system. We also discovered that sciatic nerve transection leads to a dramatic increase in the amount of NGF receptor found in the distal portion of the nerve. Immunostaining revealed that all Schwann cells in the distal axotomized nerve were expressing NGF receptors. We examined phosphorylation of NGF receptor in cultured sympathetic neurons and PC12 cells. We also examined pharmacological effects of 192-IgG. Systemic injection of 192-IgG into neonatal rats caused a permanent partial sympathectomy in a dose-dependent manner; a maximum of 50% of the cells were killed.

  18. Fibroblast growth factor receptors, developmental corruption and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; O'Sullivan, Hazel; Smyth, Elizabeth; McDermott, Ray; Viterbo, Antonella

    2013-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) are a family of ligands that bind to four different types of cell surface receptor entitled, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. These receptors differ in their ligand binding affinity and tissue distribution. The prototypical receptor structure is that of an extracellular region comprising three immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, a hydrophobic transmembrane segment and a split intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Alternative gene splicing affecting the extracellular third Ig loop also creates different receptor isoforms entitled FGFRIIIb and FGFRIIIc. Somatic fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutations are implicated in different types of cancer and germline FGFR mutations occur in developmental syndromes particularly those in which craniosynostosis is a feature. The mutations found in both conditions are often identical. Many somatic FGFR mutations in cancer are gain-of-function mutations of established preclinical oncogenic potential. Gene amplification can also occur with 19-22% of squamous cell lung cancers for example having amplification of FGFR1. Ontologic comparators can be informative such as aberrant spermatogenesis being implicated in both spermatocytic seminomas and Apert syndrome. The former arises from somatic FGFR3 mutations and Apert syndrome arises from germline FGFR2 mutations. Finally, therapeutics directed at inhibiting the FGF/FGFR interaction are a promising subject for clinical trials. PMID:23880303

  19. Angiotensin II regulates phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt cascade via a negative crosstalk between AT1 and AT2 receptors in skin fibroblasts of human hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Wei; Cheng, Biao; Yu, Wen-Lin; Sun, Rui-Xia; Zeng, Dong; Wang, Jie; Liao, Yuan-Xing; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2006-06-27

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulation has been shown to regulate proliferation of skin fibroblasts and production of extracellular matrix, which are very important process in skin wound healing and scarring; however, the signaling pathways involved in this process, especially in humans, are less explored. In the present study, we used skin fibroblasts of human hypertrophic scar, which expressed both AT1 and AT2 receptors, and observed that Ang II increased Akt phosphorylation and phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI 3-K) activity. In addition, the Ang II-induced Akt phosphorylation was blocked by wortmannin, a PI 3-K inhibitor. This Ang II-activated PI 3-K/Akt cascade was markedly inhibited by valsartan, an AT(1) receptor-specific blocker, whereas it was enhanced by PD123319, an AT(2) receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the Ang II- or EGF-induced activation of PI 3-K/Akt was strongly attenuated by AG1478, an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase. Moreover, Ang II stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of EGF receptor and p85alpha subunit of PI 3-K accompanied by an increase in their association, which was inhibited by valsartan, and enhanced by PD123319. The Ang II-induced transactivation of EGF receptor resulted in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) that was also inhibited by valsartan, and enhanced by PD123319. Taken together, our results showed that AT(1) receptor-mediated activation of PI 3-K/Akt cascades occurs at least partially via the transactivation of EGF receptor, which is under a negative control by AT(2) receptor in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. These findings contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of human hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:16522324

  20. Cardioselective Dominant-negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor (Δ337T) Modulates Myocardial Metabolism and Contractile Dfficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Olson, Aaron; Ge, Ming; Ning, Xue-Han; Buroker, Norman E.; Chung, Youngran; Jue, Thomas; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-06-03

    Dominant- negative thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) show elevated expression relative to ligand-binding TRs during cardiac hypertrophy. We tested the hypothesis that overexpression of a dominant-negative TR alters cardiac metabolism and contractile efficiency (CE). We used mice expressing the cardioselective dominant-negative TRβ1 mutation Δ337T. Isolated working Δ337T hearts and nontransgenic control (Con) hearts were perfused with 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate (ACAC), lactate, and glucose at physiological concentrations for 30 min. 13C NMR spectroscopy and isotopomer analyses were used to determine substrate flux and fractional contributions (Fc) of acetyl-CoA to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Δ337T hearts exhibited rate depression but higher developed pressure and CE, defined as work per oxygen consumption (MV˙ O2). Unlabeled substrate Fc from endogenous sources was higher in Δ337T, but ACAC Fc was lower. Fluxes through CAC, lactate, ACAC, and FFA were reduced in Δ337T. CE and Fc differences were reversed by pacing Δ337T to Con rates, accompanied by an increase in FFA Fc. Δ337T hearts lacked the ability to increase MV˙ O2. Decreases in protein expression for glucose transporter-4 and hexokinase-2 and increases in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 and -4 suggest that these hearts are unable to increase carbohydrate oxidation in response to stress. These data show that Δ337T alters the metabolic phenotype in murine heart by reducing substrate flux for multiple pathways. Some of these changes are heart rate dependent, indicating that the substrate shift may represent an accommodation to altered contractile protein kinetics, which can be disrupted by pacing stress.

  1. [Resistant gram-negative bacteria. Therapeutic approach and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Salgado, P; Gilsanz, F; Maseda, E

    2016-09-01

    The rapid spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has become a serious threat, especially in critical care units, thereby prolonging the hospital stay. Enterobacteriaceae have a high capacity to adapt to any environment. Plasmids are the reason behind their expansion. The choice of empiric therapy for intra-abdominal or urinary infections requires knowledge of the intrinsic microbiological variability of each hospital or critical care unit, as well as the source of infection, safety or antibiotic toxicity, interaction with other drugs, the dosage regimen and the presence of risk factors. Carbapenems are the drug of choice in the case of suspected infection by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The new ceftazidime/avibactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam drugs are opening up promising new horizons in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27608309

  2. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling networks in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Frank B.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    As tumours evolve, the daughter cells of the initiating cell often become molecularly heterogeneous and develop different functional properties and therapeutic vulnerabilities. In glioblastoma (GBM), a lethal form of brain cancer, the heterogeneous expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) poses a substantial challenge for the effective use of EGFR-targeted therapies. Understanding the mechanisms that cause EGFR heterogeneity in GBM should provide better insights into how they, and possibly other amplified receptor tyrosine kinases, affect cellular signalling, metabolism and drug resistance. PMID:25855404

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor family in lung cancer and premalignancy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wilbur A; Veve, Robert; Hirsch, Fred R; Helfrich, Barbara A; Bunn, Paul A

    2002-02-01

    Lung cancer, like many other epithelial malignancies, is thought to be the outcome of genetic and epigenetic changes that result in a constellation of phenotypic abnormalities in bronchial epithelium. These include morphologic epithelial dysplasia, angiogenesis, increased proliferative rate, and changes in expression of cell surface proteins, particularly overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family proteins. The EFGR family is a group of four structurally similar tyrosine kinases (EGFR, HER2/neu, ErbB-3, and ErbB-4) that dimerize on binding with a number of ligands, including EGF and transforming growth factor alpha. Epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression is pronounced in virtually all squamous carcinomas and is also found in > or = 65% of large cell and adenocarcinomas. It is not expressed in situ by small cell lung carcinoma. Overexpression of EGFR is one of the earliest and most consistent abnormalities in bronchial epithelium of high-risk smokers. It is present at the stage of basal cell hyperplasia and persists through squamous metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. Recent studies of the effect of inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases suggest that patterns of coexpression of multiple members of the EGFR family could be important in determining response. Intermediate endpoints of such trials could include monitoring of phosphorylation levels in signal transduction molecules downstream of the receptor dimers. These trials represent a new targeted approach to lung cancer treatment and chemoprevention that will require greater attention to molecular endpoints than required in past trials. PMID:11894009

  4. Non-negative matrix factorization and term structure of interest rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Hellinton H.; Stern, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF) is a technique for dimensionality reduction with a wide variety of applications from text mining to identification of concentrations in chemistry. NNMF deals with non-negative data and results in non-negative factors and factor loadings. Consequently, it is a natural choice when studying the term structure of interest rates. In this paper, NNMF is applied to obtain factors from the term structure of interest rates and the procedure is compared with other very popular techniques: principal component analysis and Nelson-Siegel model. The NNMF approximation for the term structure of interest rates is better in terms of fitting. From a practitioner point of view, the NNMF factors and factor loadings obtained possess straightforward financial interpretations due to their non-negativeness.

  5. Drosophila Vps4 promotes Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling independently of its role in receptor degradation

    PubMed Central

    Legent, Kevin; Liu, Hui Hua; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking of signaling receptors is an important mechanism for limiting signal duration. Components of the Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT), which target ubiquitylated receptors to intra-lumenal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies, are thought to terminate signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and direct it for lysosomal degradation. In a genetic screen for mutations that affect Drosophila eye development, we identified an allele of Vacuolar protein sorting 4 (Vps4), which encodes an AAA ATPase that interacts with the ESCRT-III complex to drive the final step of ILV formation. Photoreceptors are largely absent from Vps4 mutant clones in the eye disc, and even when cell death is genetically prevented, the mutant R8 photoreceptors that develop fail to recruit surrounding cells to differentiate as R1-R7 photoreceptors. This recruitment requires EGFR signaling, suggesting that loss of Vps4 disrupts the EGFR pathway. In imaginal disc cells mutant for Vps4, EGFR and other receptors accumulate in endosomes and EGFR target genes are not expressed; epistasis experiments place the function of Vps4 at the level of the receptor. Surprisingly, Vps4 is required for EGFR signaling even in the absence of Shibire, the Dynamin that internalizes EGFR from the plasma membrane. In ovarian follicle cells, in contrast, Vps4 does not affect EGFR signaling, although it is still essential for receptor degradation. Taken together, these findings indicate that Vps4 can promote EGFR activity through an endocytosis-independent mechanism. PMID:25790850

  6. Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor Negativity and HER2 Positivity Predict Locoregional Recurrence in Patients With T1a,bN0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Guray, Merih; Sahin, Aysegul

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Data have suggested that the molecular features of breast cancer are important determinants of outcome; however, few studies have correlated these features with locoregional recurrence (LRR). In the present study, we evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as predictors of LRR in patients with lymph node-negative disease and tumors {<=}1 cm, because these patients often do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy or trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: The data from 911 patients with stage T1a,bN0 breast cancer who had received definitive treatment at our institution between 1997 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. We prospectively analyzed ER/PR/HER2 expression from the archival tissue blocks of 756 patients. These 756 patients represented the cohort for the present study. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.0 years, the 5- and 8-year Kaplan-Meier LRR rate was 1.6% and 5.9%, respectively, with no difference noted in those who underwent breast conservation therapy vs. mastectomy (p = .347). The 8-year LRR rates were greater in the patients with ER-negative (10.6% vs. 4.2%, p = .016), PR-negative (9.0% vs. 4.2%, p = .009), or HER2-positive (17.5% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.009) tumors. On multivariate analysis, ER-negative and PR-negative disease (hazard ratio, 2.37; p = .046) and HER2-positive disease (hazard ratio, 3.13, p = .016) independently predicted for LRR. Conclusion: Patients with ER/PR-negative or HER2-positive T1a,bN0 breast cancer had a greater risk of LRR. Therapeutic strategies, such as the use of chemotherapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, should be considered for future clinical trials for these patients.

  7. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Hauger, R.L.; Catt, K.J.; Aguilera, G.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution and properties of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) were analyzed in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys. Binding of (/sup 125/I)tyrosine-labeled ovine CRF to frontal cortex and amygdala membrane-rich fractions was saturable, specific, and time- and temperature-dependent, reaching equilibrium in 30 min at 23/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated one class of high-affinity sites with a K/sub d/ of 1 nM and a concentration of 125 fmol/mg. As in the rat pituitary and brain, CRF receptors in monkey cerebral cortex and amygdala were coupled to adenylate cyclase. Autoradiographic analysis of specific CRF binding in brain sections revealed that the receptors were widely distributed in the cerebral cortex and limbic system. Receptor density was highest in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary and throughout the cerebral cortex, specifically in the prefrontal, frontal, orbital, cingulate, insular, and temporal areas, and in the cerebellar cortex. A low binding density was present in the superior colliculus, locus coeruleus, substantia gelatinosa, preoptic area, septal area, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These data demonstrate that receptors for CRF are present within the primate brain at areas related to the central control of visceral function and behavior, suggesting that brain CRF may serve as a neurotransmitter in the coordination of endocrine and neural mechanisms involved in the response to stress.

  8. A candidate targeting molecule of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor for gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hirokazu; Endo, Takao; Carbone, David P; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Advances in molecular research in cancer have brought new therapeutic strategies into clinical usage. One new group of targets is tyrosine kinase receptors, which can be treated by several strategies, including small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Aberrant activation of growth factors/receptors and their signal pathways are required for malignant transformation and progression in gastrointestinal (GI) carcinomas. The concept of targeting specific carcinogenic receptors has been validated by successful clinical application of many new drugs. Type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGF-IR) signaling potently stimulates tumor progression and cellular differentiation, and is a promising new molecular target in human malignancies. In this review, we focus on this promising therapeutic target, IGF-IR. The IGF/IGF-IR axis is an important modifier of tumor cell proliferation, survival, growth, and treatment sensitivity in many malignant diseases, including human GI cancers. Preclinical studies demonstrated that downregulation of IGF-IR signals reversed the neoplastic phenotype and sensitized cells to anticancer treatments. These results were mainly obtained through our strategy of adenoviruses expressing dominant negative IGF-IR (IGF-IR/dn) against gastrointestinal cancers, including esophagus, stomach, colon, and pancreas. We also summarize a variety of strategies to interrupt the IGFs/IGF-IR axis and their preclinical experiences. Several mAbs and TKIs targeting IGF-IR have entered clinical trials, and early results have suggested that these agents have generally acceptable safety profiles as single agents. We summarize the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy and discuss the merits/demerits of dual targeting of IGF-IR and other growth factor receptors, including Her2 and the insulin receptor, as well as other alternatives and possible drug combinations. Thus, IGF-IR might be a candidate for a molecular

  9. Purification of the endogenous glucocorticoid receptor stabilizing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Meshinchi, S.; Stancato, L.F.; Pratt, W.B. ); Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W. )

    1991-09-03

    A ubiquitous, low molecular weight, heat-stable component of cytosol stabilizes the glucocorticoid receptor in its untransformed state in association with hsp90. This heat-stable factor mimics molybdate in its effects on receptor function, and it has the heat stability, charge, and chelation properties of a metal oxyanion. In this paper, the authors describe the further purification of the endogenous factor from rat liver cytosol by anion-exchange HPCL (Ion-110) after prepurification by molecular sieving, cation absorption, and charcoal absorption. Elution of the factor with an isocratic gradient of ammonium bicarbonate results in recovery of all of the bioactivity in a single peak which coelutes with inorganic phosphate and contains all of the endogenous molybdenum. The bioactivity can be separated from inorganic phosphate by chromatography of the partially purified endogenous factor on a metal-chelating column of Chelex-100. The chelating procedure results in complete loss of bioactivity with recovery of 98% of the inorganic phosphate in both the column drop-through and a subsequent 1 M NaCl wash. These observations support the proposal that an endogenous metal can stabilize the binding of hsp90 to the receptor but it is likely that other cytosolic components that are not present in the immunopurified complex must contribute to the stability of the soluble protein-protein complex in cytosol.

  10. Functional polymorphisms in the gene encoding macrophage migration inhibitory factor are associated with Gram-negative bacteremia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Das, Rituparna; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Yang, Ivana V; van Duin, David; Levy, Rebecca; Piecychna, Marta; Leng, Lin; Montgomery, Ruth R; Shaw, Albert; Schwartz, David A; Bucala, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an immune mediator encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus. We found the genotype conferring low expression of MIF to be enriched in a cohort of 180 patients with gram-negative bacteremia, compared with 229 healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; P = .04), an association that was more pronounced in older adults (OR, 4.6; P = .01). Among older subjects, those with low expression of MIF demonstrated 20% reduced MIF production from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood monocytes and 30% lower monocyte surface Toll-like receptor 4, compared with those with high expression. Our work suggests that older adults with low expression of MIF may be predisposed to hyporesponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and gram-negative bacterial infection. PMID:24158957

  11. Functional Polymorphisms in the Gene Encoding Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Are Associated With Gram-Negative Bacteremia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rituparna; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Yang, Ivana V.; van Duin, David; Levy, Rebecca; Piecychna, Marta; Leng, Lin; Montgomery, Ruth R.; Shaw, Albert; Schwartz, David A.; Bucala, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an immune mediator encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus. We found the genotype conferring low expression of MIF to be enriched in a cohort of 180 patients with gram-negative bacteremia, compared with 229 healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; P = .04), an association that was more pronounced in older adults (OR, 4.6; P = .01). Among older subjects, those with low expression of MIF demonstrated 20% reduced MIF production from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood monocytes and 30% lower monocyte surface Toll-like receptor 4, compared with those with high expression. Our work suggests that older adults with low expression of MIF may be predisposed to hyporesponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide and gram-negative bacterial infection. PMID:24158957

  12. What are the roles of substance P and neurokinin-1 receptors in the control of negative chronotropic or negative dromotropic vagal motoneurons? A physiological and ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Massari, V J; Johnson, T A; Gillis, R A; Gatti, P J

    1996-04-01

    Recent data indicate that there is a cardiotopic organization of negative chronotropic and negative dromotropic neurons in the nucleus ambiguus (NA). Negative dromotropic neurons are found in the rostral ventrolateral NA (rNA-VL), negative chronotropic neurons are found in the caudal ventrolateral NA (cNA-VL), and both types of neurons are found in an intermediate level of the ventrolateral NA (iNA-VL). Substance P (SP) immunoreactive nerve terminals synapse upon negative chronotropic vagal motoneurons in the iNA-VL, and SP microinjections in the NA cause bradycardia. In the present report we have attempted to: (1) define the type of tachykinin receptor which mediates the negative chronotropic effect of SP microinjections into the iNA-VL; (2) define the physiological effect of microinjections of a selective SP agonist into the rNA-VL on atrioventricular (AV) conduction: and (3) find ultrastructural evidence for synaptic interactions of SP-immunoreactive nerve terminals with negative dromotropic vagal motoneurons in the rNA-VL. Microinjections of the excitatory amino acid glutamate (Glu) into the iNA-VL to activate all local vagal preganglionic neurons caused both bradycardia and a decrease in the rate of AV conduction. Injections of the selective neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor agonist drug GR-73632 also caused bradycardia, however the rapid onset of agonist induced desensitization prevented an evaluation of potential effects on AV conduction in the iNA-VL. These data suggest that the SP-induced bradycardia which can be elicited from the NA is mediated, at least in part, by NK-1 receptors. Microinjections of Glu into the rNA-VL caused a decrease in AV conduction without an effect on cardiac rate. On the other hand, GR-73632 microinjections into rNA-VL did not affect AV conduction. Following injections of the beta subunit of cholera toxin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (CTB-HRP) into the left atrial fat pad ganglion which selectively mediates changes in AV

  13. Factor analysis of positive and negative syndrome scale in schizophrenia: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Khess, C. R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Controversy persists with regard to how best we can categorize symptomatic dimension of Schizophrenia. Aim of the study was to compute factorial dimensions in Indian subset of schizophrenic patients and to compare them with five factor pentagonal model extracted in western studies. Materials and Methods: 150 inpatients of Schizophrenia with acute exacerbation were subjected to PANSS rating within one week of admission and statistical calculation done based on exploratory factor analysis. Results: Five factors namely negative, autistic, activation, positive and depression were extracted wherein negative factors showed highest percentage of total variance supporting five factor modal of western literature Conclusion: A consensus is gradually emerging regarding symptomatic dimensions of Schizophrenia. PMID:23226846

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism as a novel therapy for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skor, Maxwell N.; Wonder, Erin L.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Goyal, Anju; Hall, Ben A.; Cai, Yi; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 10-20% of newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer. Finding effective targets for chemotherapy-resistant TNBC has proven difficult in part because of TNBC’s molecular heterogeneity. We have previously reported that, likely because of GR’s anti-apoptotic activity in ER-negative breast epithelial and cancer cells, high glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression/activity in early-stage TNBC significantly correlates with chemotherapy-resistance and increased recurrence. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with mifepristone, a (GR)-antagonist, would potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapy in GR+ TNBC by inhibiting GR’s anti-apoptotic signaling pathways and increasing the cytotoxic efficiency of chemotherapy. Experimental Design: TNBC cell apoptosis was examined in the context of physiological glucocorticoid concentrations, chemotherapy, and/or pharmacologic concentrations of mifepristone. We used high-throughput live microscopy with continuous recording to measure apoptotic cells stained with a fluorescent dye, and Western analysis to detect caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. The effect of mifepristone on GR-mediated gene expression was also measured. TNBC xenograft studies were performed in female severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and tumors were measured following treatment with vehicle, paclitaxel or mifepristone/paclitaxel. Results: We found that although mifepristone treatment alone had no significant effect on TNBC cell viability or clonogenicity in the absence of chemotherapy, the addition of mifepristone to dexamethasone/paclitaxel treatment significantly increased cytotoxicity and caspase-3/PARP cleavage. Mifepristone also antagonized GR-induced SGK1 and MKP1/DUSP1 gene expression, while significantly augmenting paclitaxel-induced GR+ MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumor shrinkage in vivo. Conclusions: These results suggest that mifepristone pre-treatment could be a useful strategy for increasing tumor cell

  15. Calcium-dependent regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor signalling by copine.

    PubMed Central

    Tomsig, Jose Luis; Sohma, Hitoshi; Creutz, Carl E

    2004-01-01

    The role of copines in regulating signalling from the TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) receptor was probed by the expression of a copine dominant-negative construct in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells. The construct was found to reduce activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) by TNF-alpha. The introduction of calcium into HEK293 cells either through the activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors or through the application of the ionophore A23187 was found to enhance TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappaB. This effect of calcium was completely blocked by the copine dominant-negative construct. TNF-alpha was found to greatly enhance the expression of endogenous copine I, and the responsiveness of the TNF-alpha signalling pathway to muscarinic stimulation increased in parallel with the increased copine I expression. The copine dominant-negative construct also inhibited the TNF-alpha-dependent degradation of IkappaB, a regulator of NF-kappaB. All of the effects of the dominant-negative construct could be reversed by overexpression of full-length copine I, suggesting that the construct acts specifically through competitive inhibition of copine. One of the identified targets of copine I is the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme UBC12 (ubiquitin C12), that promotes the degradation of IkappaB through the ubiquitin ligase enzyme complex SCF(betaTrCP). Therefore the copine dominant-negative construct might inhibit TNF-alpha signalling by dysregulation or mislocalization of UBC12. Based on these results, a hypothesis is presented for possible roles of copines in regulating other signalling pathways in animals, plants and protozoa. PMID:14674885

  16. Regulation of surface expression of the granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor in normal human myeloid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cannistra, S.A.; Groshek, P.; Griffin, J.D. ); Garlick, R.; Miller, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) exerts stimulatory effects on hematopoietic cells through binding to specific, high-affinity receptors. By using radiolabeled GM-CSF with high specific activity, the authors have investigated the factors and mechanisms that regulate GM-CSF receptor expression in normal human neutrophils, monocytes, and partially purified bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells. The neutrophil GM-CSF receptor was found to rapidly internalize in the presence of ligand through a mechanism that required endocytosis. Out of a large panel of naturally occurring humoral factors tested, only GM-CSF itself, tumor necrosis factor, and formyl-Met-Leu-Phe were found to down-regulate neutrophil GM-CSF receptor expression after a 2-hr exposure at biologically active concentrations. Since formyl-Met-Leu-Phe is known to stimulate neutrophil protein kinase C activity, they also tested the ability of protein kinase C agonists to modulate GM-CSF receptor expression. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, bryostatin-1, and 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol were found to induce rapid down-regulation of the GM-CSF receptor in neutrophils, monocytes, and partially purified myeloid progenitor cells, suggesting that this effect may be at least partially mediated by protein kinase C. These data suggest that certain activators of neutrophil function may negatively regulate their biological effects by inducing down-regulation of the GM-CSF receptor.

  17. Genes related to growth regulation, DNA repair and apoptosis in an oestrogen receptor-negative (MDA-231) versus an oestrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) breast tumour cell line.

    PubMed

    Skog, Sven; He, Qimin; Khoshnoud, Reza; Fornander, Tommy; Rutqvist, Lars-Erik

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) behind the development of endocrine resistance in breast cancer remains controversial. Here, we compare the capability of oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative cells (MDA-231) versus ER-positive tamoxifen-sensitive cells (MCF-7) to handle DNA repair, transmit signals from damaged DNA, initiate cell death via apoptosis, and then to control transmitted signals from the cell cycle and to synthesize growth factors and receptors. Genes related to these events were studied by cDNA micro-array. Normal human breast cells (H2F) and human lymphoblastoid tumour cells (CEM) were used as controls. Of the 18 genes investigated, 10 genes showed differences in their expression between the cell types. The ER-negative cells showed higher expressions of BRCA1, BRCA2, cdc2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, cyclin E, IGFBP-3, TGF-alpha, TGF beta 2 and a lower expression of TGF beta R1. No differences in the expressions of bax, bcl-2, p53, p21 and GADD45 were found between the two cell lines. We found that the ER-negative cells were characterized by: (1) a stimulated expression of growth factors and cell cycle regulation compounds, (2) improved DNA repair capacity, but (3) no change in DNA damage signals and apoptotic pathways. Improved DNA repair capacity of ER-negative cells would have a growth advantage over ER-positive tumours when receiving antitumour therapy. PMID:15192311

  18. Both clathrin-positive and -negative coats are involved in endosomal sorting of the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Myromslien, Froydis D.; Grovdal, Lene Melsaether; Raiborg, Camilla; Stenmark, Harald; Madshus, Inger Helene; Stang, Espen . E-mail: espen.stang@medisin.uio.no

    2006-10-01

    Sorting of endocytosed EGF receptor (EGFR) to internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) depends on sustained activation and ubiquitination of the EGFR. Ubiquitination of EGFR is mediated by the ubiquitin ligase Cbl, being recruited to the EGFR both directly and indirectly through association with Grb2. Endosomal sorting of ubiquitinated proteins further depends on interaction with ubiquitin binding adaptors like Hrs. Hrs localizes to flat, clathrin-coated domains on the limiting membrane of endosomes. In the present study, we have investigated the localization of EGFR, Cbl and Grb2 with respect to coated and non-coated domains of the endosomal membrane and to vesicles within MVBs. Both EGFR, Grb2, and Cbl were concentrated in coated domains of the limiting membrane before translocation to inner vesicles of MVBs. While almost all Hrs was in clathrin-positive coats, EGFR and Grb2 in coated domains only partially colocalized with Hrs and clathrin. The extent of colocalization of EGFR and Grb2 with Hrs and clathrin varied with time of incubation with EGF. These results demonstrate that both clathrin-positive and clathrin-negative electron dense coats exist on endosomes and are involved in endosomal sorting of the EGFR.

  19. Ligand-dependent genomic function of glucocorticoid receptor in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Wu, Dayong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Ye, Zhenqing; Huang, Jiaoti; Liu, Zhihua; Clinton, Steven K; Jin, Victor X; Wang, Qianben

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been widely used as coadjuvants in the treatment of solid tumours, but GC treatment may be associated with poor pharmacotherapeutic response or prognosis. The genomic action of GC in these tumours is largely unknown. Here we find that dexamethasone (Dex, a synthetic GC)-regulated genes in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells are associated with drug resistance. Importantly, these GC-regulated genes are aberrantly expressed in TNBC patients and are associated with unfavourable clinical outcomes. Interestingly, in TNBC cells, Compound A (CpdA, a selective GR modulator) only regulates a small number of genes not involved in carcinogenesis and therapy resistance. Mechanistic studies using a ChIP-exo approach reveal that Dex- but not CpdA-liganded glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds to a single glucocorticoid response element (GRE), which drives the expression of pro-tumorigenic genes. Our data suggest that development of safe coadjuvant therapy should consider the distinct genomic function between Dex- and CpdA-liganded GR. PMID:26374485

  20. Ligand-dependent genomic function of glucocorticoid receptor in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Wu, Dayong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Ye, Zhenqing; Huang, Jiaoti; Liu, Zhihua; Clinton, Steven K.; Jin, Victor X.; Wang, Qianben

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been widely used as coadjuvants in the treatment of solid tumours, but GC treatment may be associated with poor pharmacotherapeutic response or prognosis. The genomic action of GC in these tumours is largely unknown. Here we find that dexamethasone (Dex, a synthetic GC)-regulated genes in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells are associated with drug resistance. Importantly, these GC-regulated genes are aberrantly expressed in TNBC patients and are associated with unfavourable clinical outcomes. Interestingly, in TNBC cells, Compound A (CpdA, a selective GR modulator) only regulates a small number of genes not involved in carcinogenesis and therapy resistance. Mechanistic studies using a ChIP-exo approach reveal that Dex- but not CpdA-liganded glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds to a single glucocorticoid response element (GRE), which drives the expression of pro-tumorigenic genes. Our data suggest that development of safe coadjuvant therapy should consider the distinct genomic function between Dex- and CpdA-liganded GR. PMID:26374485

  1. Nigrostriatal alterations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor II dominant negative mice

    PubMed Central

    Chou, J.; Harvey, B. K.; Ebendal, T.; Hoffer, B.; Wang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background We previously demonstrated that exogenous application of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) reduced 6-hydroxydopamine-mediated neurodegeneration in a rodent model of Parkinson’s disease. The purpose of this study is to examine the endogenous neurotrophic properties of BMP Receptor II in dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. Methods Adult male BMPRII dominant negative (BMPRIIDN) mice and their wild type controls (WT) were placed in the activity chambers for 3 days to monitor locomotor activity. Animals were sacrificed for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining. A subgroup of BMPRIIDN and WT mice were injected with high doses of methamphetamine (MA) and were sacrificed for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) histochemistry at 4 days after injection. Results BMPRIIDN mice had lower locomotor activity than the WT. There is a significant decrease in TH neuronal number in substantia nigra compacta, TH fiber density in the substantia nigra reticulata, and TH immunoreactivity in striatum in the BMPRIIDN mice, suggesting that deficiency in endogenous BMP signaling reduces dopaminergic innervation and motor function in the nigrostriatal pathway. Administration of MA increased TUNEL labeling in the substantia nigra in the BMPRIIDN mice. Conclusions Endogenous BMPs have trophic effects on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Deficiency in BMP signaling increases vulnerability to insults induced by high doses of MA. PMID:18642641

  2. Tamoxifen stimulates in vivo growth of drug-resistant estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maenpaa, J; Wiebe, V; Koester, S; Wurz, G; Emshoff, V; Seymour, R; Sipila, P; DeGregorio, M

    1993-01-01

    An estrogen receptor-negative, multidrug-resistant MDA-MB-A1 human breast cancer cell line was grown in culture with and without a noninhibitory concentration (0.5 microM) of tamoxifen for 122 days. Tamoxifen-treated and control cells were inoculated into opposite flanks of nine nude mice, where they produced measurable tumors in every case. Six of the animals were treated with tamoxifen at 500 micrograms/day for 22 days. Although no inhibitory nor stimulatory effect of tamoxifen was seen in vitro, tamoxifen had a clear tumor-growth-stimulating effect in mice. The most pronounced stimulatory effects were observed in the cells that had been cultured with tamoxifen. Within 3 weeks of the start of tamoxifen therapy, the cells grown in the presence of tamoxifen produced tumors with a mean size of 380 mm2, whereas the cells not pretreated with tamoxifen had tumors of 220 mm2. In contrast, in mice not receiving tamoxifen, the sizes of the tumors were 190 and 140 mm2, respectively. These preliminary results suggest that prolonged in vitro tamoxifen exposure induces cellular changes that result in tumors that are stimulated to grow faster in mice following tamoxifen treatment. PMID:8339392

  3. Multilevel factor analysis of smokers' real-time negative affect ratings while quitting.

    PubMed

    Bold, Krysten W; Witkiewitz, Katie; McCarthy, Danielle E

    2016-09-01

    Smoking is a serious public health problem, and accurate real-time assessment of risk factors associated with smoking is critical to understanding smoking relapse. Negative affect is often described as a critical risk factor related to smoking relapse, and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods have been widely used to study real-time relations between negative affect and smoking. However, the factor structure of momentary negative affect ratings is unknown. The current investigation examined the multilevel factor structure and internal consistency of an EMA measure of negative affect. Daily assessments were collected for 1 week prequit and 3 weeks postquit from 113 adult daily smokers receiving nicotine replacement therapy and counseling to quit smoking. Results supported a 2-factor model with correlated but distinct agitation and distress factors, rather than a single-factor model of negative affect. The agitation factor was indicated by these items: impatient, tense/anxious, restless. The distress factor was indicated by these items: sad/depressed, upset, distressed. The 2-factor model had acceptable model fit and consistent factor loadings across 3 separate cessation phases: prequit, postquit with recent smoking, and postquit without recent smoking. The 2 factors were highly correlated, showed good internal consistency, and showed strong associations with theoretically relevant smoking and affect variables. Agitation was more strongly related to urge to smoke, and distress was more strongly related to recent stress. This study provides support for a 2-factor model of an EMA measure of negative affect and highlights distinct facets that may be useful for future investigations of affect and smoking. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27536999

  4. Factor Structure and Construct Validity of the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayers, Steven L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the underlying structure of negative symptoms of schizophrenia as measured by the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). CFA results from the assessment of 401 patients were largely supported by CFA results from a second assessment of 345 patients. (SLD)

  5. Nerve growth factor binding domain of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Welcher, A.A.; Bitler, C.M.; Radeke, M.J.; Shooter, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A structural analysis of the rat low-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor was undertaken to define the NGF binding domain. Mutant NGF receptor DNA constructs were expressed in mouse fibroblasts or COS cells, and the ability of the mutant receptors to bind NGF was assayed. In the first mutant, all but 16 amino acid residues of the intracellular domain of the receptor were removed. This receptor bound NGF with a K{sub d} comparable to that of the wild-type receptor. A second mutant contained only the four cysteine-rich sequences from the extracellular portion of the protein. This mutant was expressed in COS cells and the resultant protein was a secreted soluble form of the receptor that was able to bind NGF. Two N-terminal deletions, in which either the first cystein-rich sequence or the first and part of the second cystein-rich sequences were removed, bound NGF. However, a mutant lacking all four cysteine-rich sequences was unable to bind NGF. These results show that the four cysteine-rich sequences of the NGF receptor contain the NGF binding domain.

  6. A natural kinase-deficient variant of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, L Y; Edenson, S P; Yu, Y L; Senderowicz, L; Turck, C W

    1996-08-01

    A fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant missing 37 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal tyrosine kinase catalytic domain was discovered in human lung fibroblasts and several other human cell lines. The receptor variant binds specifically to acidic fibroblast growth factor but has no tyrosine kinase activity. It was found that cellular transfectants expressing the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant are mitogenically inactive and ligand binding to the receptor causes neither receptor autophosphorylation nor phospholipase C-gamma transphosphorylation. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant therefore represents an inactive receptor for acidic fibroblast growth factor. Since both kinase and kinase-deficient receptor forms are expressed in cells, it is conceivable that the kinase-deficient receptor plays an important role in regulating cellular responses elicited by acidic fibroblast growth factor stimulation. PMID:8756477

  7. Up-Regulation of Soluble Axl and Mer Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Negatively Correlates with Gas6 in Established Multiple Sclerosis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Omari, Kakuri M.; Marsden, Kurt; Raine, Cedric S.; Shafit-Zagardo, Bridget

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease that is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage; it ultimately forms gliotic scars and lesions that severely compromise the function of the central nervous system. Evidence has shown previously that altered growth factor receptor signaling contributes to lesion formation, impedes recovery, and plays a role in disease progression. Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6), the ligand for the TAM receptor tyrosine kinase family, consisting of Tyro3, Axl, and Mer, is important for cell growth, survival, and clearance of debris. In this study, we show that levels of membrane-bound Mer (205 kd), soluble Mer (∼150 kd), and soluble Axl (80 kd) were all significantly elevated in homogenates from established multiple sclerosis lesions comprised of both chronic active and chronic silent lesions. Whereas in normal tissue Gas6 positively correlated with soluble Axl and Mer, there was a negative correlation between Gas6 and soluble Axl and Mer in established multiple sclerosis lesions. In addition, increased levels of soluble Axl and Mer were associated with increased levels of mature ADAM17, mature ADAM10, and Furin, proteins that are associated with Axl and Mer solubilization. Soluble Axl and Mer are both known to act as decoy receptors and block Gas6 binding to membrane-bound receptors. These data suggest that in multiple sclerosis lesions, dysregulation of protective Gas6 receptor signaling may prolong lesion activity. PMID:19541935

  8. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by alanine mutagenesis. Substitution of either F152 or K155 with alanine was found to specifically inhibit cytokine interaction with LIFR without affecting binding to CNTFR alpha or gp130. The resulting variants behaved as partial agonists with varying degrees of residual bioactivity in different cell-based assays. Simultaneous alanine substitution of both F152 and K155 totally abolished biological activity. Combining these mutations with amino acid substitutions in the D-helix, which enhance binding affinity for the CNTFR alpha, gave rise to a potent competitive CNTF receptor antagonist. This protein constitutes a new tool for studies of CNTF function in normal physiology and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 PMID:8799186

  9. A negative feedback loop controls NMDA receptor function in cortical interneurons via neuregulin 2/ErbB4 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Vullhorst, Detlef; Mitchell, Robert M.; Keating, Carolyn; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Karavanova, Irina; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Buonanno, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The neuregulin receptor ErbB4 is an important modulator of GABAergic interneurons and neural network synchronization. However, little is known about the endogenous ligands that engage ErbB4, the neural processes that activate them or their direct downstream targets. Here we demonstrate, in cultured neurons and in acute slices, that the NMDA receptor is both effector and target of neuregulin 2 (NRG2)/ErbB4 signalling in cortical interneurons. Interneurons co-express ErbB4 and NRG2, and pro-NRG2 accumulates on cell bodies atop subsurface cisternae. NMDA receptor activation rapidly triggers shedding of the signalling-competent NRG2 extracellular domain. In turn, NRG2 promotes ErbB4 association with GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, followed by rapid internalization of surface receptors and potent downregulation of NMDA but not AMPA receptor currents. These effects occur selectively in ErbB4-positive interneurons and not in ErbB4-negative pyramidal neurons. Our findings reveal an intimate reciprocal relationship between ErbB4 and NMDA receptors with possible implications for the modulation of cortical microcircuits associated with cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26027736

  10. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  11. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor -2 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Colbert, Laronna S.; Fuller, Miles; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations over the last decade have established the essential role of growth factors and their receptors during angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) family in mammals contains three members, VEGFR-1 (Flt-1), VEGFR-2 (KDR/Flk-1) and VEGFR-3 (Flt-4), which are transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors that regulate the formation of blood and lymphatic vessels. In the early 1990s, the above VEGFR were structurally characterized by cDNA cloning. Among these three receptors, VEGFR-2 is generally recognized to have a principal role in mediating VEGF-induced responses. VEGFR-2 is considered as the earliest marker for endothelial cell development. Importantly, VEGFR-2 directly regulates tumor angiogenesis. Therefore, several inhibitors of VEGFR-2 have been developed and many of them are now in clinical trials. In addition to targeting endothelial cells, the VEGF/VEGFR-2 system works as an essential autocrine/paracrine process for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies mark the continuous and increased interest in this related, but distinct, function of VEGF/VEGFR-2 in cancer cells: the autocrine/paracrine loop. Several mechanisms regulate VEGFR-2 levels and modulate its role in tumor angiogenesis and physiologic functions, i.e.: cellular localization/trafficking, regulation of cis-elements of promoter, epigenetic regulation and signaling from Notch, cytokines/growth factors and estrogen, etc. In this review, we will focus on updated information regarding VEGFR-2 research with respect to the molecular mechanisms of VEGFR-2 regulation in human breast cancer. Investigations in the activation, function, and regulation of VEGFR-2 in breast cancer will allow the development of new pharmacological strategies aimed at directly targeting cancer cell proliferation and survival. PMID:20462514

  13. Amylin Receptor Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Negatively Modulates μ-opioid-Driven Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Baisley, Sarah K; Baldo, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a peptide co-secreted with insulin that penetrates into the brain, and produces satiation-like effects via actions in the brainstem, hypothalamus, and mesencephalon. Little is known, however, about the effects of amylin in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), where a circumscribed zone of intense amylin receptor (AMY-R) binding overlaps reported mappings of a ‘hotspot' for μ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) amplification of food reward. Here, the ability of intra-AcbSh AMY-R signaling to modulate μ-OR-driven feeding was explored. Amylin (1–30 ng) was administered with the μ-OR agonist, D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25 μg), directly into the AcbSh of ad libitum-maintained rats. Amylin dose-dependently reversed DAMGO-induced hyperphagia; 3 ng of amylin reduced DAMGO-mediated feeding by nearly 50%. This dose was, however, completely ineffective at altering DAMGO-induced feeding in the anterior dorsal striatum. Intra-AcbSh amylin alone (3–30 ng) modestly suppressed 10% sucrose intake in ad libitum-maintained rats, and chow in food-deprived rats, but only at the 30-ng dose. This result indicates that reversal of AcbSh DAMGO-induced feeding at a 10-fold lower dose was neither due to malaise nor motoric impairment. Finally, intra-AcbSh infusion of the AMY-R antagonist, AC187 (20 μg), significantly attenuated the ability of prefeeding to suppress DAMGO-induced food intake, with no effects in non-prefed rats. Hence, AMY-R signaling negatively modulates μ-OR-mediated appetitive responses at the level of the AcbSh. The results with AC187 indicate that endogenous AMY-R transmission in the AcbSh curtails opioid function in the postprandial period, suggesting a novel pathway for peripheral-central integration in the control of appetitive motivation and opioid reward. PMID:24957819

  14. Negative allosteric modulation of mGlu5 receptor rescues striatal D2 dopamine receptor dysfunction in rodent models of DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, G; Ponterio, G; Tassone, A; Maltese, M; Madeo, G; Martella, G; Poli, S; Schirinzi, T; Bonsi, P; Pisani, A

    2014-10-01

    Early onset torsion dystonia (DYT1) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by deletion in TOR1A gene. Evidence suggests that TOR1A mutation produces dystonia through an aberrant neuronal signalling within the striatum, where D2 dopamine receptors (D2R) produce an abnormal excitatory response in cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in different models of DYT1 dystonia. The excitability of ChIs may be modulated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes (mGlu1 and 5). We performed electrophysiological and calcium imaging recordings from ChIs of both knock-in mice heterozygous for Δ-torsinA (Tor1a(+/Δgag) mice) and transgenic mice overexpressing human torsinA (hMT1). We demonstrate that the novel negative allosteric modulator (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu) receptor, dipraglurant (ADX48621) counteracts the abnormal membrane responses and calcium rise induced either by the D2R agonist quinpirole or by caged dopamine (NPEC-Dopamine) in both models. These inhibitory effects were mimicked by two other well-characterized mGlu5 receptor antagonists, SIB1757 and MPEP, but not by mGlu1 antagonism. D2R and mGlu5 post-receptor signalling may converge on PI3K/Akt pathway. Interestingly, we found that the abnormal D2R response was prevented by the selective PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, whereas PLC and PKC inhibitors were both ineffective. Currently, no satisfactory pharmacological treatment is available for DYT1 dystonia patients. Our data show that negative modulation of mGlu5 receptors may counteract abnormal D2R responses, normalizing cholinergic cell excitability, by modulating the PI3K/Akt post-receptor pathway, thereby representing a novel potential treatment of DYT1 dystonia. PMID:24951854

  15. Inverse regulation of human ERBB2 and epidermal growth factor receptors by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kalthoff, H; Roeder, C; Gieseking, J; Humburg, I; Schmiegel, W

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha decreased the expression of ERBB2 mRNA by stimulating p55 TNF receptors of pancreatic tumor cells. This decrease contrasts with an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA. Both effects were selectively achieved by TNF-alpha or -beta, whereas interferon alpha or gamma or transforming growth factor beta showed no such effects. The inverse regulatory effects of TNF on ERBB2 and EGFR mRNA levels were evoked by different signaling pathways of p55 TNF receptors. The TNF-mediated ERBB2 mRNA decrease was followed by a reduction in protein. Four of five pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibited this down-regulation. This decrease of ERBB2 is a singular example of a modulation of this growth factor receptor by TNF. Overexpression of ERBB2 has been reported to cause resistance to TNF and other cytotoxic cytokines. In our study we show that the TNF-mediated down-regulation of ERBB2 in pancreatic tumor cells is accompanied by an increase in growth inhibition at low doses of TNF. The simultaneous alteration of the ERBB2/EGFR balance by TNF represents a striking model of cytokine receptor transregulation in the growth control of malignant pancreatic epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8105469

  16. Negative feedback regulation of reactive oxygen species on AT1 receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nickenig, Georg; Strehlow, Kerstin; Bäumer, Anselm T; Baudler, Stefanie; Waßmann, Sven; Sauer, Heinrich; Böhm, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Free radicals as well as the AT1 receptor are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Both the intracellular mechanisms of AT1 receptor regulation and the effect of free radicals on AT1 receptor expression are currently unknown. This study investigates the role of free radicals in the modulation of AT1 receptor expression and in the angiotensin II-induced AT1 receptor regulation. AT1 receptor mRNA was assessed by Northern blotting and AT1 receptor density by radioligand binding assays, respectively, in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Free radical release was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. AT1 receptor mRNA transcription rate was determined by nuclear run-on assays and AT1 receptor mRNA half-life was measured under transcriptional blockade. Angiotensin II caused a time-dependent decrease of AT1 receptor mRNA expression in rat VSMC in culture (30±6% at 4 h with 100 nM angiotensin II). This was followed by a consistent decrease in AT1 receptor density. Angiotensin II caused release of reactive oxygen species in VSMC which was abolished by preincubation with 100 μM diphenylene iodonium (DPI). DPI inhibited partially the down-regulating effect of angiotensin II on the AT1 receptor. Incubation of VSMC with either hydrogen peroxide or xanthine/xanthine oxidase caused a dose-dependent decrease in AT1 receptor mRNA expression which was not mediated by a decreased rate of transcription but rather through destabilization of AT1 receptor mRNA. Experiments which included preincubation of VSMC with various intracellular inhibitors suggested that free radicals caused AT1 receptor downregulation through activation of p38-MAP kinase and intracellular release of calcium. However, angiotensin II-induced AT1 receptor expression was not inhibited by blockade of p38-MAP kinase activation or intracellular calcium release. Free radicals may at least in part mediate angiotensin II-induced AT1 receptor regulation through direct post

  17. Upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor 4 in oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Kenichi; Gotoh, Akito; Eguchi, Takanori; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the expression profile of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, which comprises EGFR/ErbB1, HER2/ErbB2, HER3/ErbB3 and HER4/ErbB4 in oral leukoplakia (LP). The expression of four epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family genes and their ligands were measured in LP tissues from 14 patients and compared with levels in 10 patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and normal oral mucosa (NOM) from 14 healthy donors by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Synchronous mRNA coexpression of ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 was detected in LP lesions. Out of the receptors, only ErbB4 mRNA and protein was more highly expressed in LP compared with NOM tissues. These were strongly expressed by epithelial keratinocytes in LP lesions, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Regarding the ligands, the mRNA of Neuregulin2 and 4 were more highly expressed in OLP compared with NOM tissues. Therefore, enhanced ErbB4 on the keratinocytes and synchronous modulation of EGFR family genes may contribute to the pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of LP. PMID:23492901

  18. Early signaling dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raven J; Gajadhar, Aaron S; Swenson, Eric J; Rothenberg, Daniel A; Curran, Timothy G; White, Forest M

    2016-03-15

    Despite extensive study of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling network, the immediate posttranslational changes that occur in response to growth factor stimulation remain poorly characterized; as a result, the biological mechanisms underlying signaling initiation remain obscured. To address this deficiency, we have used a mass spectrometry-based approach to measure system-wide phosphorylation changes throughout the network with 10-s resolution in the 80 s after stimulation in response to a range of eight growth factor concentrations. Significant changes were observed on proteins far downstream in the network as early as 10 s after stimulation, indicating a system capable of transmitting information quickly. Meanwhile, canonical members of the EGFR signaling network fall into clusters with distinct activation patterns. Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein (Shc) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) phosphorylation levels increase rapidly, but equilibrate within 20 s, whereas proteins such as Grb2-associated binder-1 (Gab1) and SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2) show slower, sustained increases. Proximity ligation assays reveal that Shc and Gab1 phosphorylation patterns are representative of separate timescales for physical association with the receptor. Inhibition of phosphatases with vanadate reveals site-specific regulatory mechanisms and also uncovers primed activating components in the network, including Src family kinases, whose inhibition affects only a subset of proteins within the network. The results presented highlight the complexity of signaling initiation and provide a window into exploring mechanistic hypotheses about receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) biology. PMID:26929352

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  20. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Alternatively Spliced Isoform Negatively Regulates TLR9 Signaling in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nai-Yu; Nagarajan, Govindarajulu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes and binds unmethylated CpG motifs in DNA, which are found in the genomes of bacteria and DNA viruses. In fish, Tlr9 is highly diverse, with the number of introns ranging from 0 to 4. A fish Tlr9 gene containing two introns has been reported to express two alternatively spliced isoforms, namely gTLR9A (full-length) and gTLR9B (with a truncated Cʹ-terminal signal transducing domain), whose regulation and function remain unclear. Here, we report a unique regulatory mechanism of gTLR9 signaling in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), whose gTlr9 sequence also contains two introns. We demonstrated that the grouper gTlr9 gene indeed has the capacity to produce two gTLR9 isoforms via alternative RNA splicing. We found that gTLR9B could function as a negative regulator to suppress gTLR9 signaling as demonstrated by the suppression of downstream gene expression. Following stimulation with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), gTLR9A and gTLR9B were observed to translocate into endosomes and co-localize with ODN and the adaptor protein gMyD88. Both gTLR9A and gTLR9B could interact with gMyD88; however, gTLR9B could not interact with downstream IRAK4 and TRAF6. Further analysis of the expression profile of gTlr9A and gTlr9B upon immune-stimulation revealed that the two isoforms were differentially regulated in a time-dependent manner. Overall, these data suggest that fish TLR9B functions as a negative regulator, and that its temporal expression is mediated by alternative RNA splicing. This has not been observed in mammalian TLR9s and might have been acquired relatively recently in the evolution of fish. PMID:25955250

  1. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Chenodeoxycholic acid-mediated activation of the farnesoid X receptor negatively regulates hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Matsuda, Yoshiki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kitada, Hirotaka; Akase, Takanori; Shimada, Miki; Nagata, Kiyoshi; Gonzalez, Frank J; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2006-08-01

    Hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase catalyzing bile acid sulfation plays an essential role in protection against lithocholic acid (LCA)-induced liver toxicity. Hepatic levels of Sult2a is up to 8-fold higher in farnesoid X receptor-null mice than in the wild-type mice. Thus, the influence of FXR ligand (chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and LCA) feeding on hepatic Sult2a expression was examined in FXR-null and wild-type mice. Hepatic Sult2a protein content was elevated in FXR-null and wild-type mice fed a LCA (1% and 0.5%) diet. Treatment with 0.5% CDCA diet decreased hepatic Sult2a to 20% of the control in wild-type mice, but increased the content in FXR-null mice. Liver Sult2a1 (St2a4) mRNA levels were reduced to 26% in wild-type mice after feeding of a CDCA diet, while no decrease was observed on Sult2a1 mRNA levels in FXR-null mice after CDCA feeding. A significant inverse relationship (r(2)=0.523) was found between hepatic Sult2a protein content and small heterodimer partner (SHP) mRNA level. PCN-mediated increase in Sult2a protein levels were attenuated by CDCA feeding in wild-type mice, but not in FXR-null mice. Human SULT2A1 protein and mRNA levels were decreased in HepG2 cells treated with the FXR agonists, CDCA or GW4064 in dose-dependent manners, although SHP mRNA levels were increased. These results suggest that SULT2A is negatively regulated through CDCA-mediated FXR activation in mice and humans. PMID:16946559

  3. Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Subtype 5 in Addiction: a Therapeutic Window

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abundant evidence at the anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular levels implicates metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) in addiction. Consistently, the effects of a wide range of doses of different mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) have been tested in various animal models of addiction. Here, these studies were subjected to a systematic review to find out if mGluR5 NAMs have a therapeutic potential that can be translated to the clinic. Methods: Literature on consumption/self-administration and reinstatement of drug seeking as outcomes of interest published up to April 2015 was retrieved via PubMed. The review focused on the effects of systemic (i.p., i.v., s.c.) administration of the mGluR5 NAMs 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) and 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) on paradigms with cocaine, ethanol, nicotine, and food in rats. Results: MTEP and MPEP were found to reduce self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine at doses ≥1mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Dose-response relationship resembled a sigmoidal curve, with low doses not reaching statistical significance and high doses reliably inhibiting self-administration of drugs of abuse. Importantly, self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine, but not food, was reduced by MTEP and MPEP in the dose range of 1 to 2mg/kg and 2.5 to 3.2mg/kg, respectively. This dose range corresponds to approximately 50% to 80% mGluR5 occupancy. Interestingly, the limited data found in mice and monkeys showed a similar therapeutic window. Conclusion: Altogether, this review suggests a therapeutic window for mGluR5 NAMs that can be translated to the treatment of substance-related and addictive disorders. PMID:26802568

  4. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  5. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  6. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, David E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  7. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, David E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  8. Orexin–Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Heteromers in the Ventral Tegmental Area as Targets for Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A.; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I.

    2015-01-01

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R–OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R–OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R–CRF1R–OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A–CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking. PMID:25926444

  9. 5-HT(1A) receptors transactivate the platelet-derived growth factor receptor type beta in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of ligand, certain growth factor receptors can be activated via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation in a process termed transactivation. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can transactivate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors in smooth muscle cells, but it is not known if similar pathways occur in neuronal cells. Here we show that 5-HT can transiently increase the phosphorylation of PDGFβ receptors through 5-HT(1A) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. 5-HT also transactivates PDGFβ receptors in primary cortical neurons. This transactivation pathway is pertussis-toxin sensitive and Src tyrosine kinase-dependent. This pathway is also dependent on phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium signaling. Several studies involving PDGFβ receptor transactivation by GPCRs have also demonstrated a PDGFβ receptor-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Yet in SH-SY5Y cells, 5-HT treatment causes a PDGFβ receptor-independent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This crosstalk between 5-HT and PDGFβ receptors identifies a potentially important signaling link between the serotonergic system and growth factor signaling in neurons. PMID:23006663

  10. The Internal Structure of Positive and Negative Affect: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PANAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuccitto, Daniel E.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Leite, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested five confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) models of the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to provide validity evidence based on its internal structure. A sample of 223 club sport athletes indicated their emotions during the past week. Results revealed that an orthogonal two-factor CFA model, specifying error…

  11. Reliability and factor validity of a Farsi version of The Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale.

    PubMed

    Besharat, Mohammad Ali

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated reliability and factor validity of a Farsi version of the Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale in 606 undergraduate students (257 men, 349 women) from the University of Tehran. All participants were asked to complete the scale, along with the General Health Questionnaire (Goldberg, 1972) and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (Coopersmith, 1967). Findings indicated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the two-factor structure of the Farsi version of the Positive and Negative Perfectionism Scale. These factors were similar to the factors found in previous studies and were accordingly labeled Positive Perfectionism and Negative Perfectionism. The results provide evidence for applicability of the scale and its cross-cultural validity. PMID:19810437

  12. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Occur at Postsynaptic Densities of AMPA Receptor-Positive and -Negative Excitatory Synapses in Rat Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Robert B.; Aoki, Chiye

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation requires concurrent membrane depolarization, and glutamatergic synapses lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are often considered “silent” in the absence of another source of membrane depolarization. During the second postnatal week, NMDA currents can be enhanced in rat auditory cortex through activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Electrophysiological results support a mainly presynaptic role for α7nAChR at these synapses. However, immunocytochemical evidence that α7nAChR is prevalent at postsynaptic sites of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampus and neocortex, along with emerging electrophysiological evidence for postsynaptic nicotinic currents in neocortex and hippocampus, has prompted speculation that α7nAChR allows for activation of NMDAR postsynaptically at synapses lacking AMPAR. Here we used dual immunolabeling and electron microscopy to examine the distribution of α7nAChR relative to AMPAR (GluR1, GluR2, and GluR3 subunits combined) at excitatory synapses in somatosensory cortex of adult and 1-week-old rats. α7nAChR occurred discretely over most of the thick postsynaptic densities in all cortical layers of both age groups. AMPAR immunoreactivity was also detectable at most synapses; its distribution was independent of that of α7nAChR. In both age groups, approximately one-quarter of asymmetrical synapses were α7nAChR positive and AMPAR negative. The variability of postsynaptic α7nAChR labeling density was greater at postnatal day (PD) 7 than in adulthood, and PD 7 neuropil contained a subset of small AMPA receptor-negative synapses with a high density of α7nAChR immunoreactivity. These observations support the idea that acetylcholine receptors can aid in activating glutamatergic synapses and work together with AMPA receptors to mediate postsynaptic excitation throughout life. PMID:12077196

  13. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology - as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development. PMID:26636629

  14. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors: Immune checkpoint proteins and tumor sustaining factors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xunlei; Kim, Jaehyup; Deng, Mi; John, Samuel; Chen, Heyu; Wu, Guojin; Phan, Hiep; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRBs 1-5) transduce signals via intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) that recruit protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6 or SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11 or SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP), leading to negative regulation of immune cell activation. Certain of these receptors also play regulatory roles in neuronal activity and osteoclast development. The activation of LILRBs on immune cells by their ligands may contribute to immune evasion by tumors. Recent studies found that several members of LILRB family are expressed by tumor cells, notably hematopoietic cancer cells, and may directly regulate cancer development and relapse as well as the activity of cancer stem cells. LILRBs thus have dual concordant roles in tumor biology – as immune checkpoint molecules and as tumor-sustaining factors. Importantly, the study of knockout mice indicated that LILRBs do not affect hematopoiesis and normal development. Therefore LILRBs may represent ideal targets for tumor treatment. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on expression patterns, ligands, signaling, and functions of LILRB family members in the context of cancer development. PMID:26636629

  15. Multiple phosphorylation events control chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor I orphan nuclear receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Gay, Frédérique; Baráth, Peter; Desbois-Le Péron, Christine; Métivier, Raphaël; Le Guével, Rémy; Birse, Darcy; Salbert, Gilles

    2002-06-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor I (COUP-TFI) is an orphan member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that comprises key regulators of many biological functions, such as embryonic development, metabolism, homeostasis, and reproduction. Although COUP-TFI can both actively silence gene transcription and antagonize the functions of various other nuclear receptors, the COUP-TFI orphan receptor also acts as a transcriptional activator in certain contexts. Moreover, COUP-TFI has recently been shown to serve as an accessory factor for some ligand-bound nuclear receptors, suggesting that it may modulate, both negatively and positively, a wide range of hormonal responses. In the absence of any identified cognate ligand, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of COUP-TFI activity remain unclear. The elucidation of several putative phosphorylation sites for MAPKs, PKC, and casein kinase II within the sequence of this orphan receptor led us to investigate phosphorylation events regulating the various COUP-TFI functions. After showing that COUP-TFI is phosphorylated in vivo, we provide evidence that in vivo inhibition of either MAPK or PKC signaling pathway leads to a specific and pronounced decrease in COUP-TFI-dependent transcriptional activation of the vitronectin gene promoter. Focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying the MAPK- and PKC-mediated regulation of COUP-TFI activity, we show that COUP-TFI can be directly targeted by PKC and MAPK. These phosphorylation events differentially modulate COUP-TFI functions: PKC-mediated phosphorylation enhances COUP-TFI affinity for DNA and MAPK-mediated phosphorylation positively regulates the transactivation function of COUP-TFI, possibly through enhancing specific coactivator recruitment. These data provide evidence that COUP-TFI is likely to integrate distinct signaling pathways and raise the possibility that multiple extracellular signals influence biological processes controlled by COUP

  16. Characterization of adult ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice under positive and negative energy balance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin and the ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor, GHS-R) are believed to have important roles in energy homeostasis. We describe results from the first studies to be conducted in congenic (N10) adult ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice under conditions of both positive (high-fat diet) and nega...

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in lung cancer: status 2012.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Fred R; Jänne, Pasi A; Eberhardt, Wilfried E; Cappuzzo, Federico; Thatcher, Nick; Pirker, Robert; Choy, Hak; Kim, Edward S; Paz-Ares, Luis; Gandara, David R; Wu, Yi-Long; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Shepherd, Frances A; Mok, Tony S

    2013-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths. Most patients present with advanced-stage disease, and the prognosis is generally poor. However, with the understanding of lung cancer biology, and development of molecular targeted agents, there have been improvements in treatment outcomes for selected subsets of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have demonstrated significantly improved tumor responses and progression-free survival in subsets of patients with advanced NSCLC, particularly those with tumors harboring activating EGFR mutations. Testing for EGFR mutations is a standard procedure for identification of patients who will benefit from first-line EGFR TKIs. For patients with advanced NSCLC and no activating EGFR mutations (EGFR wild-type) or no other driving oncogenes such as ALK-gene rearrangement, chemotherapy is still the standard of care. A new generation of EGFR TKIs, targeting multiple receptors and with irreversible bindings to the receptors, are in clinical trials and have shown encouraging effects. Research on primary and acquired resistant mechanisms to EGFR TKIs are ongoing. Monoclonal antibodies (e.g. cetuximab), in combination with chemotherapy, have demonstrated improved outcomes, particularly for subsets of NSCLC patients, but further validations are needed. Novel monoclonal antibodies are combined with chemotherapy, and randomized comparative studies are ongoing. This review summarizes the current status of EGFR inhibitors in NSCLC in 2012 and some of the major challenges we are facing. PMID:23370315

  18. Negative thinking: a key factor in depressive symptoms in Thai adolescents.

    PubMed

    Charoensuk, Sukjai

    2007-01-01

    Negative thinking, self-esteem, parental bonding, and everyday stressors are factors related to depressive symptoms in studies conducted in the United States, but they have been rarely explored in Thailand. An understanding of factors influencing depressive symptoms in Thai youth will lead to the development of interventions to decrease depressive symptoms among this age group. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of parental bonding, everyday stressors, self-esteem, and negative thinking on depressive symptoms among Thai adolescents. A random sample of 812 high school students in Chon Buri, Thailand, participated in the study. The prevalence of depressive symptoms varied from 20-21% depending on the measures used. Negative thinking was the best predictor of depressive symptoms in Thai adolescents. Negative thinking also mediated the effects of parental bonding, everyday stressors, and self-esteem on depressive symptoms. PMID:17130007

  19. Vandetanib (ZD6474), a dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Alessandro; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Falasconi, Fabiano; De Feo, Gianfranco; Del Giudice, Antonia; Bryce, Jane; Di Maio, Massimo; De Maio, Ermelinda; Normanno, Nicola; Perrone, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Vandetanib is a novel, orally available inhibitor of different intracellular signaling pathways involved in tumor growth, progression, and angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, epidermal growth factor receptor, and REarranged during Transfection tyrosine kinase activity. Phase I clinical trials have shown that vandetanib is well tolerated as a single agent at daily doses < or =300 mg. In the phase II setting, negative results were observed with vandetanib in small cell lung cancer, metastatic breast cancer, and multiple myeloma. In contrast, three randomized phase II studies showed that vandetanib prolonged the progression-free survival (PFS) time of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a single agent when compared with gefitinib or when added to chemotherapy. Rash, diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue, and asymptomatic QTc prolongation were the most common adverse events. Antitumor activity was also observed in medullary thyroid cancer. Four randomized phase III clinical trials in NSCLC are exploring the efficacy of vandetanib in combination with docetaxel, the Zactima in cOmbination with Docetaxel In non-small cell lung Cancer (ZODIAC) trial, or with pemetrexed, the Zactima Efficacy with Alimta in Lung cancer (ZEAL) trial, or as a single agent, the Zactima Efficacy when Studied versus Tarceva (ZEST) and the Zactima Efficacy trial for NSCLC Patients with History of EGFR-TKI chemo-Resistance (ZEPHYR) trials. Based on a press release by the sponsor of these trials, the PFS time was longer with vandetanib in the ZODIAC and ZEAL trials; the ZEST trial was negative for its primary superiority analysis, but was successful according to a preplanned noninferiority analysis of PFS. Ongoing phase II and III clinical trials will better define the appropriate schedule, the optimal setting of evaluation, and the safety of long-term use of vandetanib. PMID:19349511

  20. Coregulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) Levels and Locations: Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Overexpression Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-03-01

    Elevated expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is know to alter cell signalilng and behavioral responses implicated in tumor progression. However, multiple diverse mechanisms may be involved in these overall effects, including signaling by HER2 itself, modulation of signalilng by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and modification of trafficking dynamics for both EGFR and HER2. Continued....

  1. Structural and Functional Properties of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lennartsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) are members of the type III class of PTK receptors, which are characterized by five Ig-like domains extracellularly and a split kinase domain intracellularly. The receptors are activated by ligand-induced dimerization, leading to autophosphorylation on specific tyrosine residues. Thereby the kinase activities of the receptors are activated and docking sites for downstream SH2 domain signal transduction molecules are created; activation of these pathways promotes cell growth, survival, and migration. These receptors mediate important signals during the embryonal development, and control tissue homeostasis in the adult. Their overactivity is seen in malignancies and other diseases involving excessive cell proliferation, such as atherosclerosis and fibrotic diseases. In cancer, mutations of PDGF and SCF receptors—including gene fusions, point mutations, and amplifications—drive subpopulations of certain malignancies, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, hypereosinophilic syndrome, glioblastoma, acute myeloid leukemia, mastocytosis, and melanoma. PMID:23906712

  2. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  3. Pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors as emerging players in cancer precision medicine.

    PubMed

    De Mattia, Elena; Cecchin, Erika; Roncato, Rossana; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Great research effort has been focused on elucidating the contribution of host genetic variability on pharmacological outcomes in cancer. Nuclear receptors have emerged as mediators between environmental stimuli and drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factors have been reported to regulate transcription of genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Altered nuclear receptor expression has been shown to affect the metabolism and pharmacological profile of traditional chemotherapeutics and targeted agents. Accordingly, polymorphic variants in these genes have been studied as pharmacogenetic markers of outcome variability. This review summarizes the state of knowledge about the roles played by pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor and hepatocyte nuclear factor expression and genetics as predictive markers of anticancer drug toxicity and efficacy, which can improve cancer precision medicine. PMID:27561454

  4. HSCARG Negatively Regulates the Cellular Antiviral RIG-I Like Receptor Signaling Pathway by Inhibiting TRAF3 Ubiquitination via Recruiting OTUB1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yanyan; Xu, Ruidan; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) recognize cytosolic viral RNA and initiate innate immunity; they increase the production of type I interferon (IFN) and the transcription of a series of antiviral genes to protect the host organism. Accurate regulation of the RLR pathway is important for avoiding tissue injury induced by excessive immune response. HSCARG is a newly reported negative regulator of NF-κB. Here we demonstrated that HSCARG participates in innate immunity. HSCARG inhibited the cellular antiviral response in an NF-κB independent manner, whereas deficiency of HSCARG had an opposite effect. After viral infection, HSCARG interacted with tumor necrosis receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and inhibited its ubiquitination by promoting the recruitment of OTUB1 to TRAF3. Knockout of HSCARG attenuated the de-ubiquitination of TRAF3 by OTUB1, and knockdown of OTUB1 abolished the effect of HSCARG. HSCARG also interacted with Ikappa-B kinase epsilon (IKKε) after viral infection and impaired the association between TRAF3 and IKKε, which further decreased the phosphorylation of IKKε and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3), thus suppressed the dimerization and nuclear translocation of IRF3. Moreover, knockdown of TRAF3 dampened the inhibitory effect of IFN-β transcription by HSCARG, suggesting that TRAF3 is necessary for HSCARG to down-regulate RLR pathway. This study demonstrated that HSCARG is a negative regulator that enables balanced antiviral innate immunity. PMID:24763515

  5. Attribution to Heterogeneous Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Subtypes Based on Hormone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Receptor Expression in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Boyoung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Sung, Ho Kyung; Ahn, Choonghyun; Hwang, Yunji; Jang, Jieun; Lee, Juyeon; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Park, Sohee; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Kang, Daehee; Park, Sue K

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a heterogeneous risk assessment of breast cancer based on the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) calculating the risks and population-based attributable fractions (PAFs) for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors.Using matched case-control study design from the Seoul Breast Cancer Study and the national prevalence of exposure, the risks and PAFs for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors were estimated for total breast cancers and subtypes.The attribution to modifiable factors was different for each subtype (luminal A, PAF = 61.4% [95% confidence interval, CI = 54.3%-69.8%]; luminal B, 21.4% [95% CI = 18.6-24.9%]; HER2-overexpression, 59.4% [95% CI = 47.8%-74.3%], and triple negative tumors [TNs], 27.1% [95% CI = 22.9%-32.4%)], and the attribution to the modifiable factors for the luminal A and HER2-overexpression subtypes was higher than that of the luminal B and TN subtypes (P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). The contribution of modifiable reproductive factors to luminal A type in premenopausal women was higher than that of the other subtypes (18.2% for luminal A; 3.1%, 8.1%, and -3.1% for luminal B, HER2-overexpression, and TN subtypes, respectively; P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). Physical activity had the highest impact preventing 32.6% of luminal A, 14.5% of luminal B, 38.0% of HER2-overexpression, and 26.9% of TN subtypes (P heterogeneity = 0.014). Total reproductive factors were also heterogeneously attributed to each breast cancer subtype (luminal A, 65.4%; luminal B, 24.1%; HER2-overexpression, 57.9%, and TN subtypes, -3.1%; P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001).Each pathological subtype of breast cancer by HRs and HER2 status may be associated with heterogeneous risk factors and their attributable risk, suggesting a different etiology. The luminal B and TN subtypes seemed to be less preventable despite intervention for alleged risk factors, even though physical activity had a high preventable

  6. Sparse factors for the positive and negative syndrome scale: which symptoms and stage of illness?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ariana; Wilcox, Marsha; Savitz, Adam; Chung, Hearee; Li, Qingqin; Salvadore, Giacomo; Wang, Dai; Nuamah, Isaac; Riese, Steven P; Bilder, Robert M

    2015-02-28

    The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) is frequently described with five latent factors, yet published factor models consistently fail to replicate across samples and related disorders. We hypothesize that (1) a subset of the PANSS, instead of the entire PANSS scale, would produce the most replicable five-factor models across samples, and that (2) the PANSS factor structure may be different depending on the treatment phase, influenced by the responsiveness of the positive symptoms to treatment. Using exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and cross validation on baseline and post-treatment observations from 3647 schizophrenia patients, we show that five-factor models fit best across samples when substantial subsets of the PANSS items are removed. The optimal model at baseline (five factors) omits 12 items: Motor Retardation, Grandiosity, Somatic Concern, Lack of Judgment and Insight, Difficulty in Abstract Thinking, Mannerisms and Posturing, Disturbance of Volition, Preoccupation, Disorientation, Excitement, Guilt Feelings and Depression. The PANSS factor models fit differently before and after patients have been treated. Patients with larger treatment response in positive symptoms have larger variations in factor structure across treatment stage than the less responsive patients. Negative symptom scores better predict the positive symptoms scores after treatment than before treatment. We conclude that sparse factor models replicate better on new samples, and the underlying disease structure of Schizophrenia changes upon treatment. PMID:25613662

  7. Blocking Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Inhibits Tumor Growth, Lymphangiogenesis, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu-Lahargue, Frédéric; Welm, Alana L.; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Alitalo, Kari; Li, Dean Y.; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor (FGFR) activity plays crucial roles in tumor growth and patient survival. However, FGF (Fibroblast Growth Factor) signaling as a target for cancer therapy has been under-investigated compared to other receptor tyrosine kinases. Here, we studied the effect of FGFR signaling inhibition on tumor growth, metastasis and lymphangiogenesis by expressing a dominant negative FGFR (FGFR-2DN) in an orthotopic mouse mammary 66c14 carcinoma model. We show that FGFR-2DN-expressing 66c14 cells proliferate in vitro slower than controls. 66c14 tumor outgrowth and lung metastatic foci are reduced in mice implanted with FGFR-2DN-expressing cells, which also exhibited better overall survival. We found 66c14 cells in the lumen of tumor lymphatic vessels and in lymph nodes. FGFR-2DN-expressing tumors exhibited a decrease in VEGFR-3 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3) or podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels, an increase in isolated intratumoral lymphatic endothelial cells and a reduction in VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C) mRNA expression. FGFs may act in an autocrine manner as the inhibition of FGFR signaling in tumor cells suppresses VEGF-C expression in a COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) or HIF1-α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α) independent manner. FGFs may also act in a paracrine manner on tumor lymphatics by inducing expression of pro-lymphangiogenic molecules such as VEGFR-3, integrin α9, prox1 and netrin-1. Finally, in vitro lymphangiogenesis is impeded in the presence of FGFR-2DN 66c14 cells. These data confirm that both FGF and VEGF signaling are necessary for the maintenance of vascular morphogenesis and provide evidence that targeting FGFR signaling may be an interesting approach to inhibit tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastatic spread. PMID:22761819

  8. The σ1 Receptor Engages the Redox-Regulated HINT1 Protein to Bring Opioid Analgesia Under NMDA Receptor Negative Control

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Herrero-Labrador, Raquel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Merlos, Manuel; Vela, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The in vivo pharmacology of the sigma 1 receptor (σ1R) is certainly complex; however, σ1R antagonists are of therapeutic interest, because they enhance mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-mediated antinociception and reduce neuropathic pain. Thus, we investigated whether the σ1R is involved in the negative control that glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate acid receptors (NMDARs) exert on opioid antinociception. Results: The MOR C terminus carries the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) coupled to the regulator of G-protein signaling RGSZ2-neural nitric oxide synthase assembly. Activated MORs stimulate the production of nitric oxide (NO), and the redox zinc switch RGSZ2 converts this signal into free zinc ions that are required to recruit the redox sensor PKCγ to HINT1 proteins. Then, PKCγ impairs HINT1-RGSZ2 association and enables σ1R-NR1 interaction with MOR-HINT1 complexes to restrain opioid signaling. The inhibition of NOS or the absence of σ1Rs prevents HINT1-PKCγ interaction, and MOR-NMDAR cross-regulation fails. The σ1R antagonists transitorily remove the binding of σ1Rs to NR1 subunits, facilitate the entrance of negative regulators of NMDARs, likely Ca2+-CaM, and prevent NR1 interaction with HINT1, thereby impairing the negative feedback of glutamate on opioid analgesia. Innovation: A redox-regulated process situates MOR signaling under NMDAR control, and in this context, the σ1R binds to the cytosolic C terminal region of the NMDAR NR1 subunit. Conclusion: The σ1R antagonists enhance opioid analgesia in naïve mice by releasing MORs from the negative influence of NMDARs, and they also reset antinociception in morphine tolerant animals. Moreover, σ1R antagonists alleviate neuropathic pain, probably by driving the inhibition of up-regulated NMDARs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 799–818. PMID:25557043

  9. Kinetic Characterization of an Intestinal Trefoil Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Zhang; Lin, Wang; Yong, Sun; Guang-ping, Liang; Dan, Wu; Shang-jun, Lv; Wei, Wu; Xi, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether intestinal epithelial cells have a receptor for intestinal trefoil factor and characterize receptor-ligand binding kinetics. Methods Radioligand binding assays were performed to characterize the binding kinetics between [125I]-labeled ITF and IEC-6, HT-29, Caco2 and HaCaT cells. The Kd, Bmax and other kinetic variables describing the interaction between ITF and its potential receptors were determined. Results Radioligand binding assays performed at 4°C showed that the Kd value for the association between [125I]-ITF and IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells were 1.99±0.12×10−9 M, 3.89±0.42×10−9 M, and 2.04±0.17×10−9 M, respectively. Bmax values were 1.17±0.04×1011, 3.97±0.29×1011, and 2.03±0.08×1011 sites/cell, respectively. The Ki values for the interaction between IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells and non-labeled ITF were 20.98±0.57 nM, 36.87±3.35 nM, and 21.38±0.93 nM, respectively, and the IC50 values were 25.21±0.39 nM, 40.68±0.27 nM, and 23.61±0.25 nM, respectively. Radioligand binding kinetic results showed the association rate constants (k+1) for IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco2 cells were 0.22±0.04 min−1, 0.29±0.04 min−1, and 0.26±0.05 min−1, respectively, and the dissociation rate constants (k-1) were 0.06±0.02 min−1, 0.03±0.01 min−1, and 0.04±0.01 min−1, respectively. For the HaCaT cells, the Kd was 4.86±0.28×10−8 M and Bmax was 5.81±0.15×108 sites/cell, the very low specific binding between [125I]-ITF and these cells made it impossible to calculate binding kinetic parameters. Conclusions An ITF-specific receptor appears to be present on the three types of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6, HT-29, and Caco-2), and there may be no ITF receptor on epidermal cells. PMID:24086361

  10. The TRAIL receptor agonist drozitumab targets basal B triple-negative breast cancer cells that express vimentin and Axl.

    PubMed

    Dine, Jennifer L; O'Sullivan, Ciara C; Voeller, Donna; Greer, Yoshimi E; Chavez, Kathryn J; Conway, Catherine M; Sinclair, Sarah; Stone, Brandon; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Merchant, Anand S; Hewitt, Stephen M; Steinberg, Seth M; Swain, Sandra M; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that GST-tagged tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand preferentially killed triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells with a mesenchymal phenotype by activating death receptor 5 (DR5). The purpose of this study was to explore the sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to drozitumab, a clinically tested DR5-specific agonist; identify potential biomarkers of drozitumab-sensitive breast cancer cells; and determine if those biomarkers were present in tumors from patients with TNBC. We evaluated viability, caspase activity, and sub-G1 DNA content in drozitumab-treated breast cancer cell lines and we characterized expression of potential biomarkers by immunoblot. Expression levels of vimentin and Axl were then explored in 177 TNBC samples from a publically available cDNA microarray dataset and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tumor tissue samples obtained from 53 African-American women with TNBC. Drozitumab-induced apoptosis in mesenchymal TNBC cell lines but not in cell lines from other breast cancer subtypes. The drozitumab-sensitive TNBC cell lines expressed the mesenchymal markers vimentin and Axl. Vimentin and Axl mRNA and protein were expressed in a subset of human TNBC tumors. By IHC, ~15 % of TNBC tumors had vimentin and Axl expression in the top quartile for both. These findings indicate that drozitumab-sensitive mesenchymal TNBC cells express vimentin and Axl, which can be identified in a subset of human TNBC tumors. Thus, vimentin and Axl may be useful to identify TNBC patients who would be most likely to benefit from a DR5 agonist. PMID:26759246

  11. Common genetic influences on negative emotionality and a general psychopathology factor in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Lahey, Benjamin B; van Hulle, Carol; Waldman, Irwin; Krueger, Robert F; Rathouz, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Previous research using confirmatory factor analysis to model psychopathology comorbidity has supported the hypothesis of a broad general factor (i.e., a "bifactor"; Holzinger & Swineford, 1937) of psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults, with more specific higher order internalizing and externalizing factors reflecting additional shared variance in symptoms (Lahey et al., 2012; Lahey, van Hulle, Singh, Waldman, & Rathouz, 2011). The psychological nature of this general factor has not been explored, however. The current study tested a prediction, derived from the spectrum hypothesis of personality and psychopathology, that variance in a general psychopathology bifactor overlaps substantially-at both phenotypic and genetic levels-with the dispositional trait of negative emotionality. Data on psychopathology symptoms and dispositional traits were collected from both parents and youth in a representative sample of 1,569 twin pairs (ages 9-17 years) from Tennessee. Predictions based on the spectrum hypothesis were supported, with variance in negative emotionality and the general factor overlapping substantially at both phenotypic and etiologic levels. Furthermore, stronger correlations were found between negative emotionality and the general psychopathology factor than among other dispositions and other psychopathology factors. PMID:24364617

  12. Dynamic Regulation of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor α Expression in Alveolar Fibroblasts during Realveolarization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leiling; Acciani, Thomas; Le Cras, Tim; Lutzko, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Although the importance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α signaling during normal alveogenesis is known, it is unclear whether this signaling pathway can regulate realveolarization in the adult lung. During alveolar development, PDGFR-α–expressing cells induce α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and differentiate to interstitial myofibroblasts. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling regulates myofibroblast differentiation during alveolarization, whereas peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activation antagonizes myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibrosis. Using left lung pneumonectomy, the roles of FGF and PPAR-γ signaling in differentiation of myofibroblasts from PDGFR-α–positive precursors during compensatory lung growth were assessed. FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling was inhibited by conditionally activating a soluble dominant-negative FGFR2 transgene. PPAR-γ signaling was activated by administration of rosiglitazone. Changes in α-SMA and PDGFR-α protein expression were assessed in PDGFR-α–green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter mice using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry demonstrated that the cell ratio and expression levels of PDGFR-α–GFP changed dynamically during alveolar regeneration and that α-SMA expression was induced in a subset of PDGFR-α–GFP cells. Expression of a dominant-negative FGFR2 and administration of rosiglitazone inhibited induction of α-SMA in PDGFR-α–positive fibroblasts and formation of new septae. Changes in gene expression of epithelial and mesenchymal signaling molecules were assessed after left lobe pneumonectomy, and results demonstrated that inhibition of FGFR2 signaling and increase in PPAR-γ signaling altered the expression of Shh, FGF, Wnt, and Bmp4, genes that are also important for epithelial–mesenchymal crosstalk during early lung development. Our data demonstrate for the first time that a comparable

  13. Learning the parts of objects by non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel D.; Seung, H. Sebastian

    1999-10-01

    Is perception of the whole based on perception of its parts? There is psychological and physiological evidence for parts-based representations in the brain, and certain computational theories of object recognition rely on such representations. But little is known about how brains or computers might learn the parts of objects. Here we demonstrate an algorithm for non-negative matrix factorization that is able to learn parts of faces and semantic features of text. This is in contrast to other methods, such as principal components analysis and vector quantization, that learn holistic, not parts-based, representations. Non-negative matrix factorization is distinguished from the other methods by its use of non-negativity constraints. These constraints lead to a parts-based representation because they allow only additive, not subtractive, combinations. When non-negative matrix factorization is implemented as a neural network, parts-based representations emerge by virtue of two properties: the firing rates of neurons are never negative and synaptic strengths do not change sign.

  14. Progestin-mediated activation of MAPK and AKT in nuclear progesterone receptor negative breast epithelial cells: The role of membrane progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Monica; Lerma-Ortiz, Alejandra; Hooks, Grace M; Ashley, Amanda K; Ashley, Ryan L

    2016-10-10

    Progesterone (P4), a steroid produced during estrous cycles and gestation for maintenance of pregnancy, also plays key roles in breast development to allow lactation post-parturition. Progestins (P4 and related steroids) are also implicated in breast cancer etiology. Hormone replacement therapy containing both estrogen and progestins increases breast cancer incidence while estrogen hormone therapy lowers breast cancer risk. P4 signaling via nuclear P4 receptors (PRs) has been extensively studied in breast cancer, however, progestin signaling via non-classical membrane bound progestin receptors (MPRs and PGRMC1) remains unclear. Moreover, P4 metabolites and synthetic progestins may bind membrane progestin receptors. We hypothesized that PR-negative breast epithelial cells express non-classical progestin receptors, which activate intracellular signaling pathways differently depending on nature of progestin. Therefore, our objectives for the current study were to determine expression of MPRs and PGRMC1 in two PR-negative non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cell lines, assess progestin-mediated signaling and biological functions. We determined five MPR isoforms and PGRMC1 were present in MCF10A cells and all progestin receptors but MPRβ in MCF12A cells. MCF10A and MCF12A cells were treated with P4, select P4 metabolites (5αP and 3αHP), medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), or a specific MPR-Agonist (MPR-Ag) and phosphorylation of ERK, p38, JNK, and AKT was characterized following treatment. To our knowledge this is the first report of ERK and JNK activation in MCF10A and MCF12A cells with P4, P4 metabolites, MPA, and MPR-Ag. Activation of ERK and JNK in cells treated with MPR-Ag implicates MPRs may serve as the receptors responsible for their activation. In contrast, p38 activation varied with cell type and with progestin treatment. P4 and MPA promoted AKT phosphorylation in the MCF12A cell line only whereas no activation was observed in MCF10A cells. Interestingly

  15. Leptin receptor-positive and leptin receptor-negative proopiomelanocortin neurons innervate an identical set of brain structures.

    PubMed

    Lima, Leandro B; Metzger, Martin; Furigo, Isadora C; Donato, J

    2016-09-01

    Neurons that express the prohormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc) are engaged in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Additionally, POMC neurons are considered key first-order cells regulated by leptin. Interestingly, in the Arc, POMC cells that express the leptin receptor (POMC/LepR+ cells) are found side by side with POMC cells not directly responsive to leptin (POMC/LepR- cells). However, it remains unknown whether these distinct populations innervate different target regions. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to compare the projections of POMC/LepR+ and POMC/LepR- neurons. Using genetically modified LepR-reporter mice to identify leptin receptor-expressing cells and immunohistochemistry to stain POMC-derived peptides (α-MSH or β-endorphin) we confirmed that approximately 80% of Arc β-endorphin-positive neurons co-expressed leptin receptors. POMC/LepR+ and POMC/LepR- axons were intermingled in all of their target regions. As revealed by confocal microscopy, we found an elevated degree of co-localization between α-MSH+ axons and the reporter protein (tdTomato) in all brain regions analyzed, with co-localization coefficients ranging from 0.889 to 0.701. Thus, these two populations of POMC neurons seem to project to the same set of brain structures, although one of the two subtypes of POMC axons was sometimes found to be more abundant than the other in distinct subregions of the same nucleus. Therefore, POMC/LepR+ and POMC/LepR- cells may target separate neuronal populations and consequently activate distinct neuronal circuits within some target nuclei. These findings contribute to unravel the neuronal circuits involved in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. PMID:27321158

  16. Co-Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and c-MET Defines a Distinct Subset of Lung Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Sachiko, Oguni; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Niki, Toshiro

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and MET are molecular targets for lung cancer treatment. The relationships between expression, activation, and gene abnormalities of these two targets are currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a panel of 40 lung cancer cell lines could be classified into two groups. Group I was characterized by (1) high phosphorylations of MET and EGFR, (2) frequent mutation or amplification of EGFR, MET, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), (3) high expressions of bronchial epithelial markers (thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), MUC1, and Cytokeratin 7 (CK7)); and (4) high expressions of MET, human epidermal growth factor receptor-3, E-cadherin, cyclooxygenase-2, and laminin gamma2. In contrast, Group II exhibited little or no phosphorylation of MET and EGFR; no mutation or amplification of EGFR, MET, and HER2; were triple-negative for TTF-1, MUC1, and CK7; and showed high expressions of vimentin, fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, and transcription factor 8. Importantly, Group I was more sensitive to gefitinib and more resistant to cisplatin and paclitaxel than Group II. The clinical relevance was confirmed in publicly available data on 442 primary lung adenocarcinoma patients; survival benefits by postoperative chemotherapy were seen in only patients with tumors corresponding to Group II. Overall, co-activation of EGFR and MET defines a distinct subgroup of lung carcinoma with characteristic genetic abnormalities, gene expression pattern, and response to chemotherapeutic reagents. PMID:20934974

  17. T1-Weighted Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI as a Noninvasive Biomarker of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor vIII Status

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo-Perez, J.; Thomas, A.A.; Kaley, T.; Lyo, J.; Peck, K.K.; Holodny, A.I.; Mellinghoff, I.K.; Shi, W.; Zhang, Z.; Young, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III is a common mutation in glioblastoma, found in approximately 25% of tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III may accelerate angiogenesis in malignant gliomas. We correlated T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion parameters with epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighty-two consecutive patients with glioblastoma and known epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status who had dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging before surgery were evaluated. Volumes of interest were drawn around the entire enhancing tumor on contrast T1-weighted images and then were transferred onto coregistered dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion maps. Histogram analysis with normalization was performed to determine the relative mean, 75th percentile, and 90th percentile values for plasma volume and contrast transfer coefficient. A Wilcoxon rank sum test was applied to assess the relationship between baseline perfusion parameters and positive epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. The receiver operating characteristic method was used to select the cutoffs of the dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging perfusion parameters. RESULTS Increased relative plasma volume and increased relative contrast transfer coefficient parameters were both significantly associated with positive epidermal growth factor receptor variant III status. For epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–positive tumors, relative plasma volume mean was 9.3 and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean was 6.5; for epidermal growth factor receptor variant III–negative tumors, relative plasma volume mean was 3.6 and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean was 3.7 (relative plasma volume mean, P < .001, and relative contrast transfer coefficient mean, P = .008). The predictive powers of relative plasma volume histogram metrics outperformed those of the

  18. A divergent role for estrogen receptor-beta in node-positive and node-negative breast cancer classified according to molecular subtypes: an observational prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Flavia; Milella, Michele; Melucci, Elisa; Di Benedetto, Anna; Sperduti, Isabella; Perrone-Donnorso, Raffaele; Perracchio, Letizia; Venturo, Irene; Nisticò, Cecilia; Fabi, Alessandra; Buglioni, Simonetta; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Mottolese, Marcella

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) and progesterone receptor (PgR) are consolidated predictors of response to hormonal therapy (HT). In contrast, little information regarding the role of estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β) in various breast cancer risk groups treated with different therapeutic regimens is available. In particular, there are no data concerning ER-β distribution within the novel molecular breast cancer subtypes luminal A (LA) and luminal B (LB), HER2 (HS), and triple-negative (TN). Methods We conducted an observational prospective study using immunohistochemistry to evaluate ER-β expression in 936 breast carcinomas. Associations with conventional biopathological factors and with molecular subtypes were analyzed by multiple correspondence analysis (MCA), while univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree analysis were applied to determine the impact of ER-β on disease-free survival in the 728 patients with complete follow-up data. Results ER-β evenly distributes (55.5%) across the four molecular breast cancer subtypes, confirming the lack of correlation between ER-β and classical prognosticators. However, the relationships among the biopathological factors, analyzed by MCA, showed that ER-β positivity is located in the quadrant containing more aggressive phenotypes such as HER2 and TN or ER-α/PgR/Bcl2- tumors. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis identified ER-β as a significant discriminating factor for disease-free survival both in the node-negative LA (P = 0.02) subgroup, where it is predictive of response to HT, and in the node-positive LB (P = 0.04) group, where, in association with PgR negativity, it conveys a higher risk of relapse. Conclusion Our data indicated that, in contrast to node-negative patients, in node-positive breast cancer patients, ER-β positivity appears to be a biomarker related to a more aggressive clinical course. In this context, further investigations

  19. Negative School Factors and Their Influence on Math and Science Achievement in TIMSS 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perse, Tina Vrsnik; Kozina, Ana; Leban, Tina Rutar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct an analysis of TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) 2003 database and to determine how negative school factors, such as aggression, are associated to the mathematical and science achievement of students. The analyses were conducted separately for national and international data.…

  20. A Prospective Study Investigating the Impact of School Belonging Factors on Negative Affect in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.; Furlong, Michael J.; Homel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    School belonging, measured as a unidimensional construct, is an important predictor of negative affective problems in adolescents, including depression and anxiety symptoms. A recent study found that one such measure, the Psychological Sense of School Membership scale, actually comprises three factors: Caring Relations, Acceptance, and Rejection.…

  1. Factors Influencing Pronunciation Accuracy: L1 Negative Transfer, Task Variables and Individual Aptitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of three factors on pronunciation accuracy of Chinese adult foreign language learners. Ten target sounds including phonemes and syllables are included in the pre-test, an analysis of which shows that the mispronunciation of the randomly chosen target sounds mainly results from L1 negative transfer. It is…

  2. Factors Negatively Affect Speaking Skills at Saudi Colleges for Girls in the South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamad, Mona M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated factors negatively affect English language speaking skills in Saudi colleges for girls in the South in terms of: a) Instructors. b) Students. c) Curriculum and textbook. d) English Language teaching methods and exercises. e) Teaching and learning environment. To collect data for the study, a questionnaire papers were…

  3. [Negative effects of anti-nutritional factors from soybeans in Salmonidae].

    PubMed

    van den Ingh, T S; Krogdahl, A

    1990-10-15

    Soya bean products are used with increasing frequency in diets for salmonids. Soya beans however contain antinutritional factors (ANF), like protease inhibitors and lectins, which may decrease growth performance and even cause disease. The paper reviews the literature and adds some recent developments to the knowledge on the negative effects of ANF from soya beans in salmonids. PMID:2281471

  4. Negative Intrusive Thoughts and Dissociation as Risk Factors for Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batey, Helen; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between self-harm and vulnerability factors were studied in a general population of 432 participants, of whom 30% reported some experience of self-harm. This group scored higher on dissociation and childhood trauma, had lower self-worth, and reported more negative intrusive thoughts. Among the non-harming group, 10% scored similarly…

  5. Socioeconomic status, negative affect, and modifiable cancer risk factors in African-American smokers.

    PubMed

    Kendzor, Darla E; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila M; Mazas, Carlos A; Li, Yisheng; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Reitzel, Lorraine R; Costello, Tracy J; Businelle, Michael S; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Cinciripini, Paul M; Wetter, David W

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the prevalence, patterns, and predictors of cooccurring modifiable cancer risk factors among African-Americans seeking smoking cessation treatment and to evaluate previously hypothesized models of the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and health behavior. Overweight/obesity, at-risk alcohol consumption, and insufficient physical activity were measured in 399 African-American smokers. Analyses indicated that 92.8% of participants had at least one cancer risk factor in addition to smoking. Univariate ordinal logistic regression analyses revealed that female gender, unemployment, lower positive affect, and greater negative affect were associated with having a greater number of cancer risk factors. Multivariate analyses yielded similar findings. A structural equation modeling approach indicated that stress/negative affect may function as one pathway linking SES and modifiable cancer risk factors among African-American smokers and that gender has a direct effect on modifiable cancer risk factors. Thus, risk patterns identified within each gender group may guide the development of multiple risk factor interventions for African-American smokers. Stress and negative affect may be an important treatment target within behavioral interventions for African-American smokers of low SES. PMID:18842995

  6. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Laura R; Gansevoort, Ron T; van Goor, Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy, chronic allograft nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease through the promotion of renal cell proliferation, fibrosis and inflammation. In the oncological setting, compounds that target the EGFR pathway are already in clinical use or have been evaluated in clinical trials; in the renal setting, therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway by decreasing ligand availability with disintegrin and metalloproteinase inhibitors or with ligand-neutralizing antibodies, or by inhibiting receptor activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies are only just starting to be explored in animal models of chronic kidney disease and in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In this Review we focus on the role of the EGFR signalling pathway in the kidney under physiological conditions and during the pathophysiology of chronic kidney diseases and explore the clinical potential of interventions in this pathway to treat chronic renal diseases. PMID:27374915

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Prostate Cancer Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kharmate, Geetanjali; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Caradec, Josselin; Chin, Mei Yieng; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes proteins and microRNAs have gained much attention as diagnostic tools and biomarker potential in various malignancies including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the role of exosomes and membrane-associated receptors, particularly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as mediators of cell proliferation and invasion in PCa progression remains unexplored. EGFR is frequently overexpressed and has been associated with aggressive forms of PCa. While PCa cells and tissues express EGFR, it is unknown whether exosomes derived from PCa cells or PCa patient serum contains EGFR. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize EGFR in exosomes derived from PCa cells, LNCaP xenograft and PCa patient serum. Exosomes were isolated from conditioned media of different PCa cell lines; LNCaP xenograft serum as well as patient plasma/serum by differential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. Exosomes were confirmed by electron microscopy, expression of exosomal markers and NanoSight™ analysis. EGFR expression was determined by western blot analysis and ELISA. This study demonstrates that exosomes may easily be derived from PCa cell lines, serum obtained from PCa xenograft bearing mice and clinical samples derived from PCa patients. Presence of exosomal EGFR in PCa patient exosomes may present a novel approach for measuring of the disease state. Our work will allow to build on this finding for future understanding of PCa exosomes and their potential role in PCa progression and as minimal invasive biomarkers for PCa. PMID:27152724

  8. Gram-negative diabetic foot osteomyelitis: risk factors and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose L

    2013-03-01

    Osteomyelitis frequently complicates infections in the feet of patients with diabetes. Gram-positive cocci, especially Staphylococcus aureus, are the most commonly isolated pathogens, but gram-negative bacteria also cause some cases of diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO). These gram-negatives require different antibiotic regimens than those commonly directed at gram-positives. There are, however, few data on factors related to their presence and how they influence the clinical picture. We conducted a retrospective study to determine the variables associated with the isolation of gram-negative bacteria from bone samples in cases of DFO and the clinical presentation of these infections. Among 341 cases of DFO, 150 had a gram-negative isolate (alone or combined with a gram-positive isolate) comprising 44.0% of all patients and 50.8% of those with a positive bone culture. Compared with gram-positive infections, wounds with gram-negative organisms more often had a fetid odor, necrotic tissue, signs of soft tissue infection accompanying osteomyelitis, and clinically severe infection. By multivariate analysis, the predictive variables related to an increased likelihood of isolating gram-negatives from bone samples were glycated hemoglobin <7% (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-3.5) and a wound caused by traumatic injury (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.0-3.9). Overall, patients whose bone samples contained gram-negatives had a statistically significantly higher prevalence of leukocytosis and higher white blood cell counts than those without gram-negatives. In conclusion, gram-negative organisms were isolated in nearly half of our cases of DFO and were associated with more severe infections, higher white blood cell counts, lower glycated hemoglobin levels, and wounds of traumatic etiology. PMID:23446368

  9. Central histamine H3 receptor signaling negatively regulates susceptibility to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Teuscher, Cory; Subramanian, Meena; Noubade, Rajkumar; Gao, Jian Feng; Offner, Halina; Zachary, James F.; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.

    2007-01-01

    Histamine (HA), a biogenic amine with a broad spectrum of activities in both physiological and pathological settings, plays a key regulatory role in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, the autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis. HA exerts its effect through four G protein-coupled receptors designated HA receptor H1, H2, H3, and H4. We report here that, compared with wild-type animals, mice with a disrupted HA H3 receptor (H3RKO), the expression of which is normally confined to cells of the nervous system, develop more severe disease and neuroinflammation. We show that this effect is associated with dysregulation of blood–brain barrier permeability and increased expression of MIP-2, IP-10, and CXCR3 by peripheral T cells. Our data suggest that pharmacological targeting of the H3R may be useful in preventing the development and formation of new lesions in multiple sclerosis, thereby significantly limiting the progression of the disease. PMID:17548817

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in combination with expression of MIG6 alters gefitinib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, metastasis, and invasion in various tumors. Earlier studies showed that the EGFR is frequently overexpressed in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and EGFR mutations at specific amino acid residues in the kinase domain induce altered responsiveness to gefitinib, a small molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, the mechanism underlying the drug response modulated by EGFR mutation is still largely unknown. To elucidate drug response in EGFR signal transduction pathway in which complex dynamics of multiple molecules involved, a systematic approach is necessary. In this paper, we performed experimental and computational analyses to clarify the underlying mechanism of EGFR signaling and cell-specific gefitinib responsiveness in three H1299-derived NSCLC cell lines; H1299 wild type (H1299WT), H1299 with an overexpressed wild type EGFR (H1299EGFR-WT), and H1299 with an overexpressed mutant EGFR L858R (H1299L858R; gefitinib sensitive mutant). Results We predicted and experimentally verified that Mig6, which is a known negative regulator of EGFR and specifically expressed in H1299L858R cells, synergized with gefitinib to suppress cellular growth. Computational analyses indicated that this inhibitory effect is amplified at the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation steps of MEK and ERK. Conclusions Thus, we showed that L858R receptor mutation in combination with expression of its negative regulator, Mig6, alters signaling outcomes and results in variable drug sensitivity. PMID:21333004

  11. Nicotinic receptor activation negatively modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Reale, Marcella; Di Bari, Maria; Di Nicola, Marta; D'Angelo, Chiara; De Angelis, Federica; Velluto, Lucia; Tata, Ada Maria

    2015-11-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) and its receptors of muscarinic and nicotinic types are involved in the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. In present work we have characterized the nicotinic receptors expression in PBMC of RR-MS patients and healthy donors (HD) and their ability to modulate pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here we report that the IL-1β e IL-17 levels are significantly increased in serum of RR-MS patients in respect to HD and that the PBMC stimulation with PHA caused a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels both in RR-MS and HD subjects, with higher increase of protein release in RR-MS patients than in HD. The PBMC treatment with PHA plus nicotine produced a significant decrease of IL-1β e IL-17 both as transcript and as protein, confirming that the PBMC of the patients respond to the cholinergic stimulation more than PBMC of HD. By real time PCR and western blot analysis we have also demonstrated that in particular α7 receptor subtype appeared expressed at comparable levels both in RR-MS patients and HD. The PHA stimulation results to inhibit the α7 subunit expression while the nicotine causes a significant increase in α7 transcripts but only in MS patients. The data obtained highlight the role of α7 receptor subtype in the modulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines also in MS. Moreover the ability of nicotine to up-regulate the expression of α7 receptor subtype in RR-MS patients, indicates that nicotinic receptor stimulation may contribute to down-modulate the inflammation occurred in MS by a positive feedback control of its expression. PMID:26209886

  12. NK Cell Proliferation Induced by IL-15 Transpresentation Is Negatively Regulated by Inhibitory Receptors.

    PubMed

    Anton, Olga M; Vielkind, Susina; Peterson, Mary E; Tagaya, Yutaka; Long, Eric O

    2015-11-15

    IL-15 bound to the IL-15Rα-chain (IL-15Rα) is presented in trans to cells bearing the IL-2Rβ-chain and common γ-chain. As IL-15 transpresentation occurs in the context of cell-to-cell contacts, it has the potential for regulation by and of other receptor-ligand interactions. In this study, human NK cells were tested for the sensitivity of IL-15 transpresentation to inhibitory receptors. Human cells expressing HLA class I ligands for inhibitory receptors KIR2DL1, KIR2DL2/3, or CD94-NKG2A were transfected with IL-15Rα. Proliferation of primary NK cells in response to transpresented IL-15 was reduced by engagement of either KIR2DL1 or KIR2DL2/3 by cognate HLA-C ligands. Inhibitory KIR-HLA-C interactions did not reduce the proliferation induced by soluble IL-15. Therefore, transpresentation of IL-15 is subject to downregulation by MHC class I-specific inhibitory receptors. Similarly, proliferation of the NKG2A(+) cell line NKL induced by IL-15 transpresentation was inhibited by HLA-E. Coengagement of inhibitory receptors, either KIR2DL1 or CD94-NKG2A, did not inhibit phosphorylation of Stat5 but inhibited selectively phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein. IL-15Rα was not excluded from, but was evenly distributed across, inhibitory synapses. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism to attenuate IL-15-dependent NK cell proliferation and suggest that inhibitory NK cell receptors contribute to NK cell homeostasis. PMID:26453750

  13. Interaction of TaqI polymorphism at exon 9 of the vitamin D receptor gene with the negative lepromin response may favor the occurrence of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Ferreira, Frederico Rogério; Goulart, Isabela Maria Bernardes

    2006-10-01

    Controversies over the vitamin D receptor (VDR) acting as a susceptibility factor in Mycobacterium sp. infections may be the result of incorrect population stratification. The risk of leprosy occurrence conditioned by VDR polymorphism was investigated by stratifying the population of a highly endemic Brazilian region into negative and positive Mitsuda responses. Leprosy patients (102) and a group of healthy nonconsanguineous household contacts (68) were genotyped for the VDR TaqI polymorphism (T/t). TT and Tt genotypes were not considered to be risk factors as their odds ratios (OR) were not different from those presented by the negative Mitsuda response individuals. The combination of the tt genotype and the negative Mitsuda test provided an occurrence rate 13 times higher in leprosy patients than in controls with positive Mitsuda responses. This suggests that there is a higher risk of leprosy development when individuals carry this unfavorable combination, and demonstrates a possible synergistic role of these two variables in leprosy susceptibility via effects on cellular immunity. PMID:16965356

  14. Transforming growth factor receptor type II (ec-TβR II) behaves as a halophile.

    PubMed

    Saini, Komal; Khan, M Ashhar I; Chakrapani, Sumit; Deep, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The members of transforming growth factor β family (TGF-β) are multifunctional proteins but their main role is to control cell proliferation and differentiation. Polypeptides of TGF-β family function by binding to two related, functionally distinct transmembrane receptor kinases, first to the type II (TβR II) followed by type I receptor (TβR I). The paper describes, in details, the stability of wt-ec-TβR II under different conditions. The stability of wt-ec-TβR II was observed at different pH and salt concentration using fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability of ec-TβR II decreases with decrease in pH. Interestingly, the addition of salt increases the stability of the TβRII at pH 5.0 as observed for halophiles. Computational analysis using DELPHI suggests that this is probably due to the decrease in repulsion between negatively charged residues at surface on the addition of salt. This is further confirmed by the change in the stability of receptor on mutation of some of the residues (D32A) at surface. PMID:25316422

  15. Role of the fibroblast growth factor receptor axis in cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ang, Celina

    2015-07-01

    Advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly lethal disease with limited therapeutic options beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy. Molecular profiling of CCA has provided insights into the pathogenesis of this disease and identified potential therapeutic targets. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) axis is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis. Aberrations in FGFR activity have been implicated in the development and progression of CCA and other malignancies, which has generated significant interest in exploring FGFR's therapeutic potential. FGFR2 fusion events are present in up to 17% of intrahepatic CCAs and appear to predict sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors even after progression on chemotherapy. These observations have led to a clinical trial evaluating FGFR inhibition in patients with CCA enriched for FGFR alterations. This review summarizes current knowledge about the role of the FGFR pathway in cholangiocarcinogenesis and ongoing work in developing FGFR-directed therapies as an antineoplastic strategy for CCA. PMID:25678238

  16. Interdependent epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sylwia; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signalling regulates diverse cellular functions, promoting cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell growth and survival. EGFR signalling is critical during embryogenesis, in particular in epithelial development, and disruption of the EGFR gene results in epithelial immaturity and perinatal death. EGFR signalling also functions during wound healing responses through accelerating wound re-epithelialisation, inducing cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. Upregulation of EGFR signalling is often observed in carcinomas and has been shown to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore aberrant EGFR signalling is a common target for anticancer therapies. Various reports indicate that EGFR signalling primarily occurs at the plasma membrane and EGFR degradation following endocytosis greatly attenuates signalling. Other studies argue that EGFR internalisation is essential for complete activation of downstream signalling cascades and that endosomes can serve as signalling platforms. The aim of this review is to discuss current understanding of intersection between EGFR signalling and trafficking. PMID:24681003

  17. Development of a Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor and Insulin Receptor Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Clare A; Rowzee, Anne M; Choe, Gina H; Saleh, Farrah L; Radford, Caitlin C; Taylor, Hugh S; Wood, Teresa L

    2016-04-01

    The biological activity of insulin and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) ligands, IGF-I and IGF-II, is based in part on the relative abundance and distribution of their target receptors: the insulin receptor (IR) splice variants A (IR-A) and B (IR-B) and IGF 1 receptor (IGF-1R). However, the relative quantity of all three receptors in human tissues has never been measured together on the same scale. Due to the high homology between insulin receptor (IR)-A and IR-B proteins and lack of antibodies that discern the two IR splice variants, their mRNA sequence is the most reliable means of distinguishing between the receptors. Hence, highly specific primers for IR-A, IR-B, and IGF-1R mRNA were designed to accurately detect all three receptors by quantitative RT-PCR and enable direct quantification of relative receptor expression levels. A standard concentration curve of cDNA from each receptor was performed. Assay specificity was tested using competition assays and postamplification analysis by gel electrophoresis and cloning. Forward and reverse primer concentrations were optimized to ensure equal efficiencies across primer pairs. This assay enables a specific molecular signature of IGF/insulin signaling receptors to be assayed in different tissues, cell types, or cancers. PMID:26862994

  18. Hepatic Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Attenuates Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Expression.

    PubMed

    Girer, Nathaniel G; Murray, Iain A; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-07-15

    The Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in many physiological processes. Several studies indicate that AHR is also involved in energy homeostasis. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an important regulator of the fasting and feeding responses. When administered to various genetic and diet-induced mouse models of obesity, FGF21 can attenuate obesity-associated morbidities. Here, we explore the role of AHR in hepatic Fgf21 expression through the use of a conditional, hepatocyte-targeted AHR knock-out mouse model (Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx)). Compared with the congenic parental strain (Ahr(Fx/Fx)), non-fasted Cre(Alb)Ahr(Fx/Fx) mice exhibit a 4-fold increase in hepatic Fgf21 expression, as well as elevated expression of the FGF21-target gene Igfbp1 Furthermore, in vivo agonist activation of AHR reduces hepatic Fgf21 expression during a fast. The Fgf21 promoter contains several putative dioxin response elements (DREs). Using EMSA, we demonstrate that the AHR-ARNT heterodimer binds to a specific DRE that overlaps binding sequences for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), and cAMP response element-binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH). In addition, we reveal that agonist-activated AHR impairs PPARα-, ChREBP-, and CREBH-mediated promoter activity in Hepa-1 cells. Accordingly, agonist treatment in Hepa-1 cells ablates potent ER stress-driven Fgf21 expression, and pre-treatment with AHR antagonist blocks this effect. Finally, we show that pre-treatment of primary human hepatocytes with AHR agonist diminishes PPARα-, glucose-, and ER stress-driven induction of FGF21 expression, indicating the effect is not mouse-specific. Together, our data show that AHR contributes to hepatic energy homeostasis, partly through the regulation of FGF21 expression and signaling. PMID:27226639

  19. Loss of nuclear receptor SHP impairs but does not eliminate negative feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Thomas A; Saeki, Shigeru; Schneider, Manfred; Schaefer, Karen; Berdy, Sara; Redder, Thadd; Shan, Bei; Russell, David W; Schwarz, Margrit

    2002-06-01

    The in vivo role of the nuclear receptor SHP in feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis was examined. Loss of SHP in mice caused abnormal accumulation and increased synthesis of bile acids due to derepression of rate-limiting CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 hydroxylase enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway. Dietary bile acids induced liver damage and restored feedback regulation. A synthetic agonist of the nuclear receptor FXR was not hepatotoxic and had no regulatory effects. Reduction of the bile acid pool with cholestyramine enhanced CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 expression. We conclude that input from three negative regulatory pathways controls bile acid synthesis. One is mediated by SHP, and two are SHP independent and invoked by liver damage and changes in bile acid pool size. PMID:12062084

  20. Life history theory and breast cancer risk: methodological and theoretical challenges: Response to "Is estrogen receptor negative breast cancer risk associated with a fast life history strategy?".

    PubMed

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    In a meta-analysis published by myself and co-authors, we report differences in the life history risk factors for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers. Our meta-analysis did not find the association of ER- breast cancer risk with fast life history characteristics that Hidaka and Boddy suggest in their response to our article. There are a number of possible explanations for the differences between their conclusions and the conclusions we drew from our meta-analysis, including limitations of our meta-analysis and methodological challenges in measuring and categorizing estrogen receptor status. These challenges, along with the association of ER+ breast cancer with slow life history characteristics, may make it challenging to find a clear signal of ER- breast cancer with fast life history characteristics, even if that relationship does exist. The contradictory results regarding breast cancer risk and life history characteristics illustrate a more general challenge in evolutionary medicine: often different sub-theories in evolutionary biology make contradictory predictions about disease risk. In this case, life history models predict that breast cancer risk should increase with faster life history characteristics, while the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis predicts that breast cancer risk should increase with delayed reproduction. Whether life history tradeoffs contribute to ER- breast cancer is still an open question, but current models and several lines of evidence suggest that it is a possibility. PMID:26874356

  1. Neurotrophic factors and their receptors in human sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors may play key roles in pathophysiological mechanisms of human neuropathies. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is trophic to small-diameter sensory fibers and regulates nociception. This review focuses on sensory dysfunction and the potential of neurotrophic treatments. Genetic neuropathy. Mutations of the NGF high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase A (Trk A) have been found in congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis; these are likely to be partial loss-of-function mutations, as axon-reflex vasodilatation and sweating can be elicited albeit reduced, suggesting rhNGF could restore nociception in some patients. Leprous neuropathy. Decreased NGF in leprosy skin may explain cutaneous hypoalgesia even with inflammation and rhNGF may restore sensation, as spared nerve fibers show Trk A-staining. Diabetic neuropathy. NGF is depleted in early human diabetic neuropathy skin, in correlation with dysfunction of nociceptor fibers. We proposed rhNGF prophylaxis may prevent diabetic foot ulceration. Clinical trials have been disappointed, probably related to difficulty delivering adequate doses and need for multiple trophic factors. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are both produced by basal keratinocytes and neurotrophin (NT-3) by suprabasal keratinocytes: relative mRNA expression was significantly lower in early diabetic neuropathy skin compared to controls, for NGF (P < 0.02), BDNF (P < 0.05), NT-3 (P < 0.05), GDNF (< 0.02), but not NT4/5, Trk A or p75 neurotrophin receptor (all P > 0.05). Posttranslational modifications of mature and pro-NGF may also affect bioactivity and immunoreactivity. A 53 kD band that could correspond to a prepro-NGF-like molecule was reduced in diabetic skin. Traumatic neuropathy and pain. While NGF levels are acutely reduced in injured nerve trunks, neuropathic patients with chronic skin hyperalgesia and allodynia show marked local increases of NGF levels; here anti-NGF agents may provide analgesia

  2. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB-mediated phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Coats, S R; Love, H D; Pledger, W J

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates the proliferation of Balb/c-3T3 fibroblasts through binding and subsequent activation of PDGF receptors. Activation of the PDGF receptors has been proposed to involve receptor dimerization. PDGF-AB has been shown to bind PDGF alpha and beta receptor subunits to form PDGF alpha beta and alpha alpha receptor dimers. In this paper we demonstrate that, following the down-regulation of PDGF alpha receptors, the binding of PDGF-AB to beta receptors occurred at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. PDGF-AB stimulated the phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptor monomers in cells depleted of PDGF alpha receptors by prior exposure to PDGF-AA. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8297345

  4. Male infertility caused by epididymal dysfunction in transgenic mice expressing a dominant negative mutation of retinoic acid receptor alpha 1.

    PubMed

    Costa, S L; Boekelheide, K; Vanderhyden, B C; Seth, R; McBurney, M W

    1997-04-01

    Retinoids are thought to be required for the normal development and maturation of a number of tissues, including most epithelia. The action of retinoids appears to be mediated through the binding to retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in the nucleus. The activity of retinoic acid can be inhibited in cells carrying dominant negative mutations of RAR alpha. We created transgenic mice expressing a dominant negative mutant of RAR alpha driven by the murine mammary tumor virus promoter. Expression of the transgene was evident in the epididymis and vas deferens in transgenic males. These males were either infertile or had reduced fertility, and the epithelium lining the ducts of the epididymis and vas deferens had undergone squamous metaplasia. Sperm developed normally in the testis but degenerated in the epididymis and vas deferens because inspissated ductal fluid blocked the normal passage of the sperm. PMID:9096882

  5. Involvement of Toll-like receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in epithelial expression of airway remodeling factors.

    PubMed

    Homma, Tetsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E; Suh, Lydia A; Carter, Roderick G; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti-TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti-TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α-dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  6. Involvement of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Epithelial Expression of Airway Remodeling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Atsushi; Sakashita, Masafumi; Norton, James E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick G.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) colonization and infection is common, and may promote allergic or inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic rhinosinusitis by interacting with airway epithelial cells. Airway epithelial cells not only comprise a physical barrier, but also play key roles in immune, inflammatory, repair, and remodeling responses upon encounters with pathogens. To elucidate the impact of SA on epithelial-mediated remodeling of allergic airways, we tested the hypothesis that SA can enhance the remodeling process. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were stimulated with heat-killed SA (HKSA) or transforming growth factor (TGF) α. Cell extracts were collected to measure mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and signaling molecules (Western blot); supernatants were collected to measure protein (ELISA) after 24 hours of stimulation. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling inhibition experiments were performed using a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor (AG1478) and TGF-α was blocked with an anti–TGF-α antibody. HKSA induced both mRNA and protein for TGF-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 from NHBE cells by a Toll-like receptor 2–dependent mechanism. Recombinant human TGF-α also induced mRNA and protein for MMP-1 from NHBE cells; anti–TGF-α antibody inhibited HKSA-induced MMP-1, suggesting that endogenous TGF-α mediates the MMP-1 induction by HKSA. HKSA-induced MMP-1 expression was suppressed when a specific EGFR kinase inhibitor was added, suggesting that EGFR signaling was mediating the HKSA-induced MMP-1 release. Exposure or colonization by SA in the airway may enhance the remodeling of tissue through a TGF-α–dependent induction of MMP-1 expression, and may thereby promote remodeling in airway diseases in which SA is implicated, such as asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25180535

  7. [Protein a production in coagulase-negative or clumping factor (CF)-negative isolates of Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Lidia; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Wisniewska, Katarzyna; Dajnowska-Stanczewa, Agata; Galiński, Janusz

    2005-01-01

    The aim of study was to determine a production of proteinA in coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (CNSA) or CF-negative S. aureus (CFNSA) strains. 59 CNSA and 18 CFNSA strains were isolated between 1997 and 2003 from different clinical specimens. The Protein A production was determined by immunoblotting method. The presence of protein A gene (spa) was investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two sets of phages and RFLP (Restriction Fragment Lenth Polymorphism) of coa gene method were used for typing strains. The results proved that the lack of ability of protein A production occurs more frequently in protein A-negative CFNSA strains with compare to the CNSA, which are protein A-positive for the majority of strains. Deficiencies of protein A, doesn't seem to be caused by the loss of spa gene. Protein A-negative CFNSA strains have phagotypes, RFLP and antibiotic resistant patterns which differ them from protein A-negative CNSA strains. Almost all of protein A-negative CFNSA and CNSA strains are resistant to methicillin. PMID:16494201

  8. miR-466 is putative negative regulator of Coxsackie virus and Adenovirus Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lam, W Y; Cheung, Ariel C Y; Tung, Christine K C; Yeung, Apple C M; Ngai, Karry L K; Lui, Vivian W Y; Chan, Paul K S; Tsui, Stephen K W

    2015-01-16

    This study aimed at elucidating how Coxsackie B virus (CVB) perturbs the host's microRNA (miRNA) regulatory pathways that lead to antiviral events. The results of miRNA profiling in rat pancreatic cells infection models revealed that rat rno-miR-466d was up-regulated in CVB infection. Furthermore, in silico studies showed that Coxsackie virus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR), a cellular receptor, was one of the rno-miR-466d targets involved in viral entry. Subsequent experiments also proved that both the rno-miR-466d and the human hsa-miR-466, which are orthologs of the miR-467 gene family, could effectively down-regulate the levels of rat and human CAR protein expression, respectively. PMID:25497012

  9. A functional receptor for B-cell activating factor is expressed on human acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Muschen, Markus; Kim, Yong-mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2010-01-01

    B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arises by transformation of a progenitor (pre-B) cell. Cure rates in adults remain low and treatment is complicated by support provided by the microenvironment to the leukemic cells, indicating an urgent need to better understand the factors that promote their survival. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and its receptor BAFF-R are important for survival and growth of mature normal and malignant B-cells but are not expressed on pre-B cells. Unexpectedly, all cells in the primary Philadelphia-chromosome positive and negative ALL samples tested were positive for high BAFF-R cell surface expression. The BAFF-R was fully competent to bind BAFF and stimulation of the receptor activated both the classical and the non-canonical NFκB pathways. Recombinant BAFF supported survival of the ALL cells in the absence of stroma, and it significantly attenuated the rate of apoptosis caused by exposure to nilotinib, a drug used therapeutically to treat Philadelphia-chromosome positive ALLs. Surprisingly, BAFF mRNA and protein were also expressed in the same cells but BAFF was not shed into the medium. Our report is the first showing universal expression of the BAFF-R by pre-B ALL cells and opens the possibility of blocking its function as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy. PMID:20460528

  10. Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor skin toxicity: a matter of topical hydration.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Daris; Codecà, Carla; Bocci, Barbara; Crepaldi, Francesca; Violati, Martina; Viale, Giulia; Careri, Carmela; Caldiera, Sarah; Bordin, Veronica; Luciani, Andrea; Zonato, Sabrina; Cassinelli, Gabriela; Foa, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Skin toxicity is a frequent complication of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy, which can be an obstacle in maintaining the dose intensity and may negatively impact on the clinical outcome of cancer patients. Skin lesions depend on the disruption of the keratinocyte development pathways and no treatment is clearly effective in resolving the cutaneous alterations frequently found during anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. Among systemic treatments, oral tetracycline proved to be useful in preventing skin manifestations. We describe the case of a patient affected by metastatic colorectal cancer, for whom a combination of chemotherapy and cetuximab was used as second-line treatment. The patient developed a symptomatic papulopustular skin rash that disappeared completely after a twice-daily application of a hydrating and moisturizing cream, mainly consisting of a mixture of paraffin, silicone compounds, and macrogol. The marked cutaneous amelioration allowed the patient to continue cetuximab without any further symptoms and was associated with a partial radiological response. PMID:26469836