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Sample records for factor receptor-specific affibody

  1. In vivo imaging of xenograft tumors using an epidermal growth factor receptor-specific affibody molecule labeled with a near-infrared fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Kovar, Joy; Little, Garrick; Chen, Huaxian; Olive, David Michael

    2010-02-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with many types of cancers. It is of great interest to noninvasively image the EGFR expression in vivo. In this study, we labeled an EGFR-specific Affibody molecule (Eaff) with a near-infrared (NIR) dye IRDye800CW maleimide and tested the binding of this labeled molecule (Eaff800) in cell culture and xenograft mouse tumor models. Unlike EGF, Eaff did not activate the EGFR signaling pathway. Results showed that Eaff800 was bound and taken up specifically by EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. When Eaff800 was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing A431 xenograft tumors, the tumor could be identified 1 hour after injection and it became most prominent after 1 day. Images of dissected tissue sections demonstrated that the accumulation of Eaff800 was highest in the liver, followed by the tumor and kidney. Moreover, in combination with a human EGFR type 2 (HER2)-specific probe Haff682, Eaff800 could be used to distinguish between EGFR- and HER2-overexpressing tumors. Interestingly, the organ distribution pattern and the clearance rate of Eaff800 were different from those of Haff682. In conclusion, Eaff molecule labeled with a NIR fluorophore is a promising molecular imaging agent for EGFR-overexpressing tumors. PMID:20126472

  2. Phage display selection of Affibody molecules with specific binding to the extracellular domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Nordberg, E; Höidén-Guthenberg, I; Brismar, H; Adams, G P; Nilsson, F Y; Carlsson, J; Ståhl, S

    2007-04-01

    Affibody molecules specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been selected by phage display technology from a combinatorial protein library based on the 58-residue, protein A-derived Z domain. EGFR is overexpressed in various malignancies and is frequently associated with poor patient prognosis, and the information provided by targeting this receptor could facilitate both patient diagnostics and treatment. Three selected Affibody variants were shown to selectively bind to the extracellular domain of EGFR (EGFR-ECD). Kinetic biosensor analysis revealed that the three monomeric Affibody molecules bound with similar affinity, ranging from 130 to 185 nM. Head-to-tail dimers of the Affibody molecules were compared for their binding to recombinant EGFR-ECD in biosensor analysis and in human epithelial cancer A431 cells. Although the dimeric Affibody variants were found to bind in a range of 25-50 nM affinities in biosensor analysis, they were found to be low nanomolar binders in the cellular assays. Competition assays using radiolabeled Affibody dimers confirmed specific EGFR-binding and demonstrated that the three Affibody molecules competed for the same epitope. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the selected Affibody dimers were initially binding to EGFR at the cell surface of A431, and confocal microscopy analysis showed that the Affibody dimers could thereafter be internalized. The potential use of the described Affibody molecules as targeting agents for radionuclide based imaging applications in various carcinomas is discussed. PMID:17452435

  3. Directed evolution to low nanomolar affinity of a tumor-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Orlova, Anna; Johansson, Eva; Eriksson, Tove L J; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Nilsson, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) is overexpressed in various malignancies and is associated with a poor patient prognosis. A small, receptor-specific, high-affinity imaging agent would be a useful tool in diagnosing malignant tumors and in deciding upon treatment and assessing the response to treatment. We describe here the affinity maturation procedure for the generation of Affibody molecules binding with high affinity and specificity to EGFR. A library for affinity maturation was constructed by rerandomization of selected positions after the alignment of first-generation binding variants. New binders were selected with phage display technology, using a single oligonucleotide in a single-library effort, and the best second-generation binders had an approximately 30-fold improvement in affinity (K(d)=5-10 nM) for the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR in biospecific interaction analysis using Biacore. The dissociation equilibrium constant, K(d), was also determined for the Affibody with highest affinity using EGFR-expressing A431 cells in flow cytometric analysis (K(d)=2.8 nM). A retained high specificity for EGFR was verified by a dot blot assay showing staining only of EGFR proteins among a panel of serum proteins and other EGFR family member proteins (HER2, HER3, and HER4). The EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were radiolabeled with indium-111, showing specific binding to EGFR-expressing A431 cells and successful targeting of the A431 tumor xenografts with 4-6% injected activity per gram accumulated in the tumor 4 h postinjection. PMID:18207161

  4. Targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing tumor cells with sterically stabilized affibody liposomes (SAL).

    PubMed

    Beuttler, Julia; Rothdiener, Miriam; Müller, Dafne; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Kontermann, Roland E

    2009-06-01

    Affibody molecules are small and stable antigen-binding molecules derived from the B domain of protein A. We applied a bivalent, high-affinity epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-specific affibody molecule for the generation of targeted PEGylated liposomes. These sterically stabilized affibody liposomes (SAL) were produced by chemical coupling of the cysteine-modified affibody molecule to maleimide-PEG(2000)-DSPE and subsequent insertion into PEGylated liposomes. These SAL showed strong and selective binding to EGFR-expressing tumor cell lines. Binding was dependent on the amount of inserted affibody molecule-lipid conjugates and could be blocked by soluble EGF. Approximately 30% of binding activity was still retained after 6 days of incubation in human plasma at 37 degrees C. Binding of SAL to cells led to efficient internalization of the liposomes. Using mitoxantrone-loaded liposomes, we observed for SAL, compared to untargeted liposomes, an enhanced cytotoxicity toward EGFR-expressing cells. In summary, we show that SAL can be easily prepared from affibody molecules and thus may be suitable for the development of carrier systems for targeted delivery of drugs. PMID:19435362

  5. Synthetic and natural consensus design for engineering charge within an affibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Case, Brett A; Hackel, Benjamin J

    2016-08-01

    Protein ligand charge can impact physiological delivery with charge reduction often benefiting performance. Yet neutralizing mutations can be detrimental to protein function. Herein, three approaches are evaluated to introduce charged-to-neutral mutations of three cations and three anions within an affibody engineered to bind epidermal growth factor receptor. These approaches-combinatorial library sorting or consensus design, based on natural homologs or library-sorted mutants-are used to identify mutations with favorable affinity, stability, and recombinant yield. Consensus design, based on 942 affibody homologs, yielded a mutant of modest function (Kd  = 11 ±4 nM, Tm  = 62°C, and yield = 4.0 ± 0.8 mg/L as compared to 5.3 ± 1.7 nM, 71°C, and 3.5 ± 0.3 mg/L for the parental affibody). Extension of consensus design to 10 additional mutants exhibited varied performance including a substantially improved mutant (Kd  = 6.9 ± 1.4 nM, Tm  = 71°C, and 12.7 ± 0.9 mg/L yield). Sorting a homolog-based combinatorial library of 7 × 10(5) mutants generated a distribution of mutants with lower stability and yield, but did identify one strongly binding variant (Kd  = 1.2 ± 0.3 nM, Tm  = 69°C, and 6.0 ± 0.4 mg/L yield). Synthetic consensus design, based on the amino acid distribution in functional library mutants, yielded higher affinities (P = 0.05) with comparable stabilities and yields. The best of four analyzed clones had Kd  = 1.7 ± 0.5 nM, Tm  = 68°C, and 7.0 ± 0.5 mg/L yield. While all three approaches were effective in creating targeted affibodies with six charged-to-neutral mutations, synthetic consensus design proved to be the most robust. Synthetic consensus design provides a valuable tool for ligand engineering, particularly in the context of charge manipulation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1628-1638. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26724421

  6. Molecular imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts with epidermal growth factor receptor targeted affibody probes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Yang, Xiaoyang; Qi, Shibo; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Han; Hoppmann, Susan; Cao, Qizhen; Chua, Mei-Sze; So, Samuel K; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly aggressive and lethal cancer. It is typically asymptomatic at the early stage, with only 10%-20% of HCC patients being diagnosed early enough for appropriate surgical treatment. The delayed diagnosis of HCC is associated with limited treatment options and much lower survival rates. Therefore, the early and accurate detection of HCC is crucial to improve its currently dismal prognosis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been reported to be involved in HCC tumorigenesis and to represent an attractive target for HCC imaging and therapy. In this study, an affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907, targeting the extracellular domain of EGFR, was used for the first time to assess its potential to detect HCC xenografts. By evaluating radio- or fluorescent-labeled Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 as a probe for positron emission tomography (PET) or optical imaging of HCC, subcutaneous EGFR-positive HCC xenografts were found to be successfully imaged by the PET probe. Thus, affibody-based PET imaging of EGFR provides a promising approach for detecting HCC in vivo. PMID:23710458

  7. Improved tumor-to-organ ratios of a novel 67Ga-human epidermal growth factor radionuclide conjugate with preadministered antiepidermal growth factor receptor affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Sandström, Karl; Haylock, Anna-Karin; Velikyan, Irina; Spiegelberg, Diana; Kareem, Heewa; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Lundqvist, Hans; Nestor, Marika

    2011-10-01

    The overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is associated with poor prognosis. Targeted nuclear imaging of the EGFR expression could improve the diagnostics in patients with HNSCC. However, the high expression of EGFR in normal organs may conceal the tumor uptake and therefore limit the use. This study assesses the biodistribution of a novel human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) radionuclide conjugate after preinjection with anti-EGFR affibody molecules. hEGF was conjugated with p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and labeled with (67)Ga. The biodistribution of [(67)Ga]Ga-NOTA-Bn-NCS-hEGF in nude mice with EGFR-expressing xenografts was evaluated either alone or 45 minutes after preinjection with one of the anti-EGFR affibody molecules Z(EGFR:1907), (Z(EGFR:1907))(2), or (Z(EGFR:955))(2). The novel radioimmunoconjugate, [(67)Ga]Ga-NOTA-Bn-NCS-hEGF, demonstrated high stability in vitro and specific binding to hEGF in vitro and in vivo. Preinjection with anti-EGFR affibody molecules improved the tumor-to-organ ratio in the liver, salivary glands, and colon. Overall, the dimeric high-affinity affibody molecule (Z(EGFR:1907))(2) exhibited the best results. These findings show that preblocking with an anti-EGFR affibody molecule is a promising tool that could improve the outcome of radionuclide-based imaging of EGFR-expressing tumors. PMID:21834651

  8. Affibody-functionalized gold-silica nanoparticles for Raman molecular imaging of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Miao, Zheng; Zavaleta, Cristina; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2011-03-01

    The affibody functionalization of fluorescent surface-enhanced Raman scattering gold-silica nanoparticles as multimodal contrast agents for molecular imaging specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is reported. This nanoparticle bioconjugate reports EGFR-positive A431 tumors with a signal nearly 35-fold higher than EGFR-negative MDA-435S tumors. The low-level EGFR expression in adjacent healthy tissue is 7-fold lower than in the positive tumors. Validation via competitive inhibition reduces the signal by a factor of six, and independent measurement of EGFR via flow cytometry correlates at R(2) = 0.92. PMID:21302357

  9. Affibody-mediated retention of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the secretory compartments leads to inhibition of phosphorylation in the kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Vernet, Erik; Lundberg, Emma; Friedman, Mikaela; Rigamonti, Nicolò; Klausing, Sandra; Nygren, Per-Ake; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with various cancer-related processes and motivates the search for strategies that can selectively block EGFR signalling. In this study, functional knockdown of EGFR was achieved through expression of an affibody construct, (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL, with high affinity for EGFR and extended with the amino acids KDEL to make it resident in the secretory compartments. Expression of (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL resulted in 80% reduction ofthe cell surface level of EGFR, and fluorescent staining for EGFR and the (ZEGFR:1907)(2-)KDEL construct showed overlapping intracellular localisation. Immunocapture of EGFR from cell lysates showed that an intracellular complex between EGFR and the affibody construct had been formed, further indicating aspecific interaction between the affibody construct and EGFR. Surface depletion of EGFR led to a dramatic decrease in the amount of kinase domain phosphorylated EGFR, coincident with a significant decrease in the proliferation rate. PMID:19552886

  10. Fluorogen Activating Protein–Affibody Probes: Modular, No-Wash Measurement of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence is essential for dynamic live cell imaging, and affinity reagents are required for quantification of endogenous proteins. Various fluorescent dyes can report on different aspects of biological trafficking, but must be independently conjugated to affinity reagents and characterized for specific biological readouts. Here we present the characterization of a new modular platform for small anti-EGFR affinity probes for studying rapid changes in receptor pools. A protein domain (FAP dL5**) that binds to malachite-green (MG) derivatives for fluorescence activation was expressed as a recombinant fusion to one or two copies of the compact EGFR binding affibody ZEGFR:1907. This is a recombinant and fluorogenic labeling reagent for native EGFR molecules. In vitro fluorescence assays demonstrated that the binding of these dyes to the FAP–affibody fusions produced thousand-fold fluorescence enhancements, with high binding affinity and fast association rates. Flow cytometry assays and fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that these probes label endogenous EGFR on A431 cells without disruption of EGFR function, and low nanomolar surface Kd values were observed with the double-ZEGFR:1907 constructs. The application of light-harvesting fluorogens (dyedrons) significantly improved the detected fluorescence signal. Altering the order of addition of the ligand, probe, and dyes allowed differentiation between surface and endocytotic pools of receptors to reveal the rapid dynamics of endocytic trafficking. Therefore, FAP/affibody coupling provides a new approach to construct compact and modular affinity probes that label endogenous proteins on living cells and can be used for studying rapid changes in receptor pools involved in trafficking. PMID:25490520

  11. Fluorogen activating protein-affibody probes: modular, no-wash measurement of epidermal growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Telmer, Cheryl A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Franke, Josef D; Ort, Stephan; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2015-01-21

    Fluorescence is essential for dynamic live cell imaging, and affinity reagents are required for quantification of endogenous proteins. Various fluorescent dyes can report on different aspects of biological trafficking, but must be independently conjugated to affinity reagents and characterized for specific biological readouts. Here we present the characterization of a new modular platform for small anti-EGFR affinity probes for studying rapid changes in receptor pools. A protein domain (FAP dL5**) that binds to malachite-green (MG) derivatives for fluorescence activation was expressed as a recombinant fusion to one or two copies of the compact EGFR binding affibody ZEGFR:1907. This is a recombinant and fluorogenic labeling reagent for native EGFR molecules. In vitro fluorescence assays demonstrated that the binding of these dyes to the FAP-affibody fusions produced thousand-fold fluorescence enhancements, with high binding affinity and fast association rates. Flow cytometry assays and fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that these probes label endogenous EGFR on A431 cells without disruption of EGFR function, and low nanomolar surface Kd values were observed with the double-ZEGFR:1907 constructs. The application of light-harvesting fluorogens (dyedrons) significantly improved the detected fluorescence signal. Altering the order of addition of the ligand, probe, and dyes allowed differentiation between surface and endocytotic pools of receptors to reveal the rapid dynamics of endocytic trafficking. Therefore, FAP/affibody coupling provides a new approach to construct compact and modular affinity probes that label endogenous proteins on living cells and can be used for studying rapid changes in receptor pools involved in trafficking. PMID:25490520

  12. PET imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in tumours using 89Zr-labelled ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecules

    PubMed Central

    GAROUSI, JAVAD; ANDERSSON, KEN G.; MITRAN, BOGDAN; PICHL, MARIE-LOUISE; STÅHL, STEFAN; ORLOVA, ANNA; LÖFBLOM, JOHN; TOLMACHEV, VLADIMIR

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The use of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors improves significantly survival of patients with colorectal, non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Detection of EGFR overexpression provides important prognostic and predictive information influencing management of the patients. The use of radionuclide molecular imaging would enable non-invasive repeatable determination of EGFR expression in disseminated cancer. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) would provide superior sensitivity and quantitation accuracy in EGFR expression imaging. Affibody molecules are a new type of imaging probes, providing high contrast in molecular imaging. In the present study, an EGFR-binding affibody molecule (ZEGFR:2377) was site-specifically conjugated with a deferoxamine (DFO) chelator and labelled under mild conditions (room temperature and neutral pH) with a positron-emitting radionuclide 89Zr. The 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 tracer demonstrated specific high affinity (160±60 pM) binding to EGFR-expressing A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. In mice bearing A431 xenografts, 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 demonstrated specific uptake in tumours and EGFR-expressing tissues. The tracer provided tumour uptake of 2.6±0.5% ID/g and tumour-to-blood ratio of 3.7±0.6 at 24 h after injection. 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 provides higher tumour-to-organ ratios than anti-EGFR antibody 89Zr-DFO-cetuximab at 48 h after injection. EGFR-expressing tumours were clearly visualized by microPET using 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 at both 3 and 24 h after injection. In conclusion, 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 is a potential probe for PET imaging of EGFR-expression in vivo. PMID:26847636

  13. PET imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in tumours using 89Zr-labelled ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Andersson, Ken G; Mitran, Bogdan; Pichl, Marie-Louise; Ståhl, Stefan; Orlova, Anna; Löfblom, John; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The use of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors improves significantly survival of patients with colorectal, non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Detection of EGFR overexpression provides important prognostic and predictive information influencing management of the patients. The use of radionuclide molecular imaging would enable non-invasive repeatable determination of EGFR expression in disseminated cancer. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) would provide superior sensitivity and quantitation accuracy in EGFR expression imaging. Affibody molecules are a new type of imaging probes, providing high contrast in molecular imaging. In the present study, an EGFR-binding affibody molecule (ZEGFR:2377) was site-specifically conjugated with a deferoxamine (DFO) chelator and labelled under mild conditions (room temperature and neutral pH) with a positron-emitting radionuclide (89)Zr. The (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 tracer demonstrated specific high affinity (160 ± 60 pM) binding to EGFR-expressing A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. In mice bearing A431 xenografts, (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 demonstrated specific uptake in tumours and EGFR-expressing tissues. The tracer provided tumour uptake of 2.6 ± 0.5% ID/g and tumour-to-blood ratio of 3.7 ± 0.6 at 24 h after injection. (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 provides higher tumour-to-organ ratios than anti-EGFR antibody (89)Zr-DFO-cetuximab at 48 h after injection. EGFR‑expressing tumours were clearly visualized by microPET using (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 at both 3 and 24 h after injection. In conclusion, 8(9)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 is a potential probe for PET imaging of EGFR-expression in vivo. PMID:26847636

  14. Cy5.5-labeled Affibody molecule for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-05-01

    Affibody protein is an engineered protein scaffold with a three-helical bundle structure. Affibody molecules of small size (7 kD) have great potential for targeting overexpressed cancer biomarkers in vivo. To develop an Affibody-based molecular probe for in vivo optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors, an anti-EGFR Affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 (7 kD), is site-specifically conjugated with a near-IR fluorescence dye, Cy5.5-mono-maleimide. Using fluorescent microscopy, the binding specificity of the probe Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 is checked by a high-EGFR-expressing A431 cell and low-EGFR-expressing MCF7 cells. The binding affinity of Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 (KD) to EGFR is 43.6+/-8.4 nM, as determined by flow cytometry. For an in vivo imaging study, the probe shows fast tumor targeting and good tumor contrast as early as 0.5 h postinjection (p.i.) for A431 tumors, while MCF7 tumors are barely visible. An ex vivo imaging study also demonstrates that Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 has high tumor, liver, and kidney uptakes at 24 h p.i.. In conclusion, Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907 shows good affinity and high specificity to the EGFR. There is rapid achievement of good tumor-to-normal-tissue contrasts of Cy5.5-ZEGFR:1907, thus demonstrating its potential for EGFR-targeted molecular imaging of cancers.

  15. Cy5.5-labeled Affibody molecule for near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Affibody protein is an engineered protein scaffold with a three-helical bundle structure. Affibody molecules of small size (7 kD) have great potential for targeting overexpressed cancer biomarkers in vivo. To develop an Affibody-based molecular probe for in vivo optical imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors, an anti-EGFR Affibody molecule, Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) (7 kD), is site-specifically conjugated with a near-IR fluorescence dye, Cy5.5-mono-maleimide. Using fluorescent microscopy, the binding specificity of the probe Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) is checked by a high-EGFR-expressing A431 cell and low-EGFR-expressing MCF7 cells. The binding affinity of Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) (K(D)) to EGFR is 43.6+/-8.4 nM, as determined by flow cytometry. For an in vivo imaging study, the probe shows fast tumor targeting and good tumor contrast as early as 0.5 h postinjection (p.i.) for A431 tumors, while MCF7 tumors are barely visible. An ex vivo imaging study also demonstrates that Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) has high tumor, liver, and kidney uptakes at 24 h p.i.. In conclusion, Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907) shows good affinity and high specificity to the EGFR. There is rapid achievement of good tumor-to-normal-tissue contrasts of Cy5.5-Z(EGFR:1907), thus demonstrating its potential for EGFR-targeted molecular imaging of cancers. PMID:20615009

  16. Small-animal PET imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor positive tumor with a 64Cu labeled affibody protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zheng; Ren, Gang; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-05-19

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has become an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Affibody proteins against EGFR have been reported, and thus, we were interested in evaluating their potential for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of EGFR positive cancer. An Affibody analogue (Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907)) binding to EGFR was made through conventional solid phase peptide synthesis. The purified protein was site-specifically coupled with the 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-aceticacid-10-maleimidethylacetamide (maleimido-mono-amide-DOTA) to produce the bioconjugate, DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907). (64)Cu labeled probe (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) displayed a moderate specific activity (5-8 MBq/nmol, 22-35 microCi/microg). Cell uptake assays by pre-incubating without or with 300 times excess unlabeled Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) showed high EGFR-specific uptake (20% applied activity at 0.5 h) in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cancer cells. The affinity (K(D)) of (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) as tested by cell saturation analysis was 20 nM. The serum stability test showed excellent stability of the probe with >95% intact after 4 h of incubation in mouse serum. In vivo small-animal PET imaging showed fast tumor targeting, high tumor accumulation (approximately 10% ID/g at 1 h p.i.), and good tumor-to-normal tissue contrast of (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) spiked with a wide dose range of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907). Bio-distribution studies further demonstrated that the probe had high tumor, blood, liver, and kidney uptakes, while blood radioactivity concentration dropped dramatically at increased spiking doses. Co-injection of the probe with 500 microg of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) for blocking significantly reduced the tumor uptake. Thus, (64)Cu-DOTA-Z(EGFR:1907) showed potential as a high tumor contrast EGFR PET imaging reagent. The probe spiked with 50 microg of Ac-Cys-Z(EGFR:1907) improved tumor imaging contrast which may have important clinical applications. PMID:20402512

  17. Cellular Effects of HER3-Specific Affibody Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John; Gedda, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have led to the recognition of the epidermal growth factor receptor HER3 as a key player in cancer, and consequently this receptor has gained increased interest as a target for cancer therapy. We have previously generated several Affibody molecules with subnanomolar affinity for the HER3 receptor. Here, we investigate the effects of two of these HER3-specific Affibody molecules, Z05416 and Z05417, on different HER3-overexpressing cancer cell lines. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the Affibody molecules were shown to bind to HER3 on three different cell lines. Furthermore, the receptor binding of the natural ligand heregulin (HRG) was blocked by addition of Affibody molecules. In addition, both molecules suppressed HRG-induced HER3 and HER2 phosphorylation in MCF-7 cells, as well as HER3 phosphorylation in constantly HER2-activated SKBR-3 cells. Importantly, Western blot analysis also revealed that HRG-induced downstream signalling through the Ras-MAPK pathway as well as the PI3K-Akt pathway was blocked by the Affibody molecules. Finally, in an in vitro proliferation assay, the two Affibody molecules demonstrated complete inhibition of HRG-induced cancer cell growth. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Z05416 and Z05417 exert an anti-proliferative effect on two breast cancer cell lines by inhibiting HRG-induced phosphorylation of HER3, suggesting that the Affibody molecules are promising candidates for future HER3-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:22768204

  18. Targeted in vivo photodynamic therapy with epidermal growth factor receptor-specific peptide linked nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Narsireddy, Amreddy; Vijayashree, Kurra; Irudayaraj, Joseph; Manorama, Sunkara V; Rao, Nalam M

    2014-08-25

    In targeted photodynamic therapy (tPDT), photosensitizers (PS) are targeted to disease tissue to reduce the dosage of PS and in addition to reduce the photo damage to the non-target tissue. We synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) armored with tumor targeting peptide and PS for targeted PDT. Chitosan covered Fe3O4 NPs (30 nm) were deposited with gold NPs to generate two distinct chemical surfaces. To the gold particles PS was attached with a lipoic acid linker. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (hEGFR)-specific peptide was also attached to the same particles via a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid linker attached to the chitosan. Using these nanoparticles, peptide specific uptake and PDT mediated cell death of the SK-OV-3 cells (Her2(+) positive cells) were demonstrated by confocal microscopy, T2 imaging and viability assays. Peptide mediated preferential distribution of these NPs into tumor tissue was also shown in a xenograft tumor model. After one intravenous injection and one PDT dose, peptide bound NPs retarded tumor growth significantly compared to dark controls or treatments with NPs without peptide. The tumor retardation by targeted NPs was achieved at a PS concentration of 3.9 nmol/animal, whereas similar effect was seen with free PS at 220 nmol/animal. Therapeutic potential of these peptide containing NPs would be a useful in targeted PDT and in imaging the target tissue. PMID:24939618

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Specific Nanoprobe Biodistribution in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher L D; Fashir, Samia B; Castilho, Maiara L; Hupman, Michael A; Raniero, Leandro J; Alwayn, Ian; Hewitt, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers a targeted approach to both imaging and treatment of cancer, the leading cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have found that nanoparticles with a wide variety of coatings initiate an immune response leading to sequestration in the liver and spleen. In an effort to find a nanoparticle platform which does not elicit an immune response, we created 43 nm and 44 nm of gold and silver nanoparticles coated with biomolecules normally produced by the body, α-lipoic acid and the epidermal growth factor (EGF), and have used mass spectroscopy to determine their biodistribution in mouse models, 24 h after tail vein injection. Relative to controls, mouse EGF (mEGF)-coated silver and gold nanoprobes are found at background levels in all organs including the liver and spleen. The lack of sequestration of mEGF-coated nanoprobes in the liver and spleen and the corresponding uptake of control nanoprobes at elevated levels in these organs suggest that the former are not recognized by the immune system. Further studies of cytokine and interleukin levels in the blood are required to confirm avoidance of an immune response. PMID:26852838

  20. Inhibitory effects of H-Ras/Raf-1-binding affibody molecules on synovial cell function.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Nygren, Per-Åke; Sano, Hajime; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Affibody molecules specific for H-Ras and Raf-1 were evaluated for their ability to inhibit synovial cell function. Affibody molecules targeting H-Ras (Zras122, Zras220, and Zras521) or Raf-1 (Zraf322) were introduced into the MH7A synovial cell line using two delivery methods: transfection with plasmids encoding the affibody molecules or direct introduction of affibody protein using a cell-penetrating peptide reagent. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by MH7A cells were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Cell proliferation was also analyzed. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was analyzed by western blot. All affibody molecules could inhibit IL-6 and PGE2 production in TNF-α-stimulated MH7A cells. The inhibitory effect was stronger when affibody molecules were delivered as proteins via a cell-penetrating peptide reagent than when plasmid-DNA encoding the affibody moelcules was transfected into the cells. Plasmid-expressed Zras220 inhibited phosphorylation of ERK in TNF-α-stimulated MH7A cells. Protein-introduced Zraf322 inhibited the production of IL-6 and PGE2 and inhibited cell proliferation in MH7A cells. These findings suggest that affibody molecules specific for H-Ras and Raf-1 can affect intracellular signal transduction through the MAP kinase pathway to inhibit cell proliferation and production of inflammatory mediators by synovial cells. PMID:26267111

  1. Generation and evaluation of bispecific affibody molecules for simultaneous targeting of EGFR and HER2.

    PubMed

    Ekerljung, Lina; Wållberg, Helena; Sohrabian, Azita; Andersson, Karl; Friedman, Mikaela; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan; Gedda, Lars

    2012-09-19

    Coexpression of several ErbB receptors has been found in many cancers and has been linked with increased aggressiveness of tumors and a worse patient prognosis. This makes the simultaneous targeting of two surface receptors by using bispecific constructs an increasingly appreciated strategy. Here, we have generated six such bispecific targeting proteins, each comprising two monomeric affibody molecules with specific binding to either of the two human epidermal growth factor receptors, EGFR and HER2, respectively. The bispecific constructs were designed with (i) alternative positioning (N- or C-terminal) of the different affibody molecules, (ii) two alternative peptide linkers (Gly(4)Ser)(3) or (Ser(4)Gly)(3), and (iii) affibody molecules with different affinity (nanomolar or picomolar) for HER2. Using both Biacore technology and cell binding assays, it was demonstrated that all six constructs could bind simultaneously to both their target proteins. N-terminal positioning of the inherent monomeric affibody molecules was favorable to promote the binding to the respective target. Interestingly, bispecific constructs containing the novel (Ser(4)Gly)(3) linker displayed a higher affinity in cell binding, as compared to constructs containing the more conventional linker, (Gly(4)Ser)(3). It could further be concluded that bispecific constructs (but not the monomeric affibody molecules) induced dimer formation and phosphorylation of EGFR in SKBR3 cells, which express fairly high levels of both receptors. It was also investigated whether the bispecific binding would influence cell growth or sensitize cells for ionizing radiation, but no such effects were observed. PMID:22882002

  2. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future. PMID:25453958

  3. Acetylcholine receptor-specific suppressive T-cell factor from a retrovirally transformed T-cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Sinigaglia, F; Gotti, C; Castagnoli, R; Clementi, F

    1984-01-01

    In both experimental and human myasthenia gravis an impairment in the immune regulation leads to an increased synthesis of antibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). The present work reports the establishment of an AcChoR-specific suppressive T-cell line obtained by viral transformation of AcChoR-enriched murine T lymphocytes. Enriched T cells from Torpedo AcChoR-primed mice, prestimulated in vitro with antigen, were infected with radiation leukemia viruses and injected intravenously in congeneic recipient mice. Six months later lymphomas were observed in 20% of the injected mice and two of them, of donor origin, were established as permanent continuous cell lines in vitro. One of these lines, named LA41, expresses Thy-1.2, Lyt-2, and I-Jb surface markers. Culture supernatants of LA41 cells suppress the antigen-specific in vitro proliferation of Torpedo AcChoR-primed lymphocytes. This suppression is antigen-specific since the response induced by fetal calf AcChoR and by other antigens is not affected by addition of LA41 culture supernatant in the proliferative assay. LA41 culture supernatant injected in vivo at the time of antigen-priming suppresses also significantly the production of anti-AcChoR antibodies but not the synthesis of antibodies against other antigens--i.e., fetal calf AcChoR or alpha-bungarotoxin. These data show that LA41 cells constitutively produce Torpedo AcChoR-specific suppressor factor. PMID:6095305

  4. Engineering and characterization of a bispecific HER2 x EGFR-binding affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Lindström, Sara; Ekerljung, Lina; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Carlsson, Jörgen; Brismar, Hjalmar; Gedda, Lars; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Ståhl, Stefan

    2009-10-01

    HER2 (human epidermal-growth-factor receptor-2; ErbB2) and EGFR (epidermal-growth-factor receptor) are overexpressed in various forms of cancer, and the co-expression of both HER2 and EGFR has been reported in a number of studies. The simultaneous targeting of HER2 and EGFR has been discussed as a strategy with which to potentially increase efficiency and selectivity in molecular imaging and therapy of certain cancers. In an effort to generate a molecule capable of bispecifically targeting HER2 and EGFR, a gene fragment encoding a bivalent HER2-binding affibody molecule was genetically fused in-frame with a bivalent EGFR-binding affibody molecule via a (G4S)3 [(Gly4-Ser)3]-encoding gene fragment. The encoded 30 kDa affibody construct (ZHER2)2-(G4S)3-(ZEGFR)2, with potential for bs (bispecific) binding to HER2 and EGFR, was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized in terms of its binding capabilities. The retained ability to bind HER2 and EGFR separately was demonstrated using both biosensor technology and flow-cytometric analysis, the latter using HER2- and EGFR-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, simultaneous binding to HER2 and EGFR was demonstrated in: (i) a sandwich format employing real-time biospecific interaction analysis where the bs affibody molecule bound immobilized EGFR and soluble HER2; (ii) immunofluorescence microscopy, where the bs affibody molecule bound EGFR-overexpressing cells and soluble HER2; and (iii) a cell-cell interaction analysis where the bs affibody molecule bound HER2-overexpressing SKBR-3 cells and EGFR-overexpressing A-431 cells. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported bs affinity protein with potential ability for the simultaneous targeting of HER2 and EGFR. The potential future use of this and similar constructs, capable of bs targeting of receptors to increase the efficacy and selectivity in imaging and therapy, is discussed. PMID:19492986

  5. Site-Specific Radioiodination of HER2-Targeting Affibody Molecules using 4-Iodophenethylmaleimide Decreases Renal Uptake of Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Joanna; Nordeman, Patrik; Honarvar, Hadis; Altai, Mohamed; Orlova, Anna; Larhed, Mats; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small scaffold-based affinity proteins with promising properties as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. However, a high reabsorption of radiolabeled Affibody molecules in kidneys is an issue. We have shown that the use of 125I-3-iodo-((4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl)maleimide (IHPEM) for site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing Affibody molecules provides high tumor uptake but low radioactivity retention in kidneys. We hypothesized that the use of 4-iodophenethylmaleimide (IPEM) would further reduce renal retention of radioactivity because of higher lipophilicity of radiometabolites. An anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) Affibody molecule (ZHER2:2395) was labeled using 125I-IPEM with an overall yield of 45±3 %. 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 bound specifically to HER2-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV-3 cell line). In NMRI mice, the renal uptake of 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 (24±2 and 5.7±0.3 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively) was significantly lower than uptake of 125I-IHPEM-ZHER2:2395 (50±8 and 12±2 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively). In conclusion, the use of a more lipophilic linker for the radioiodination of Affibody molecules reduces renal radioactivity. PMID:25969816

  6. Effects of an EGFR-binding affibody molecule on intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Ekerljung, L; Sahlberg, S H; Carlsson, J; Lennartsson, J; Glimelius, B

    2010-04-01

    Effects on intracellular signaling were studied in cells treated with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2 that targets the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is overexpressed in many types of cancers and plays a fundamental role in cell signaling and it is of interest to find targeting agents capable of blocking the receptor. The clinically approved antibody cetuximab (Erbitux) and the natural ligand EGF were included as reference molecules. Two EGFR-rich cell lines, A-431 and U-343, were exposed to the three targeting agents and lysed. The cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with the receptors, or directly separated by SDS-Page. Autophosphorylation of the receptors and phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins Erk and Akt, were evaluated by Western blotting. Although the three different agents compete for the same binding site on EGFR, they influenced the signaling differently. The affibody molecule did not induce autophosphorylation of EGFR or any other receptor in the EGFR-family but, in spite of this, induced phosphorylation of Erk in both cell lines and Akt in the A-431 cells. Thus, the results suggest that the signaling pattern induced by (ZEGFR:955)2 is only partly similar to that induced by cetuximab. This makes the affibody molecule a potentially interesting alternative to cetuximab for EGFR-targeted therapy since it might give different therapy-related effects on tumor cells and different side effects on normal tissues. PMID:20198342

  7. Simultaneous targeting of two ligand-binding sites on VEGFR2 using biparatopic Affibody molecules results in dramatically improved affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Klint, Susanne; Hanze, Martin; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and ophthalmic disorders such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and corresponding receptors are regulators of angiogenesis and have been much investigated as therapeutic targets. The aim of this work was to generate antagonistic VEGFR2-specific affinity proteins having adjustable pharmacokinetic properties allowing for either therapy or molecular imaging. Two antagonistic Affibody molecules that were cross-reactive for human and murine VEGFR2 were selected by phage and bacterial display. Surprisingly, although both binders independently blocked VEGF-A binding, competition assays revealed interaction with non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor. Biparatopic molecules, comprising the two Affibody domains, were hence engineered to potentially increase affinity even further through avidity. Moreover, an albumin-binding domain was included for half-life extension in future in vivo experiments. The best-performing of the biparatopic constructs demonstrated up to 180-fold slower dissociation than the monomers. The new Affibody constructs were also able to specifically target VEGFR2 on human cells, while simultaneously binding to albumin, as well as inhibit VEGF-induced signaling. In summary, we have generated small antagonistic biparatopic Affibody molecules with high affinity for VEGFR2, which have potential for both future therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25515662

  8. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Robert W.; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33  mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding. PMID:25652703

  9. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Robert W; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H; Sexton, Kristian J; Gunn, Jason R; Davis, Scott C; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-02-01

    The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33 mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding. PMID:25652703

  10. Tomography of epidermal growth factor receptor binding to fluorescent Affibody in vivo studied with magnetic resonance guided fluorescence recovery in varying orthotopic glioma sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Robert W.; Demers, Jennifer-Lynn H.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-02-01

    The ability to image targeted tracer binding to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was studied in vivo in orthotopically grown glioma tumors of different sizes. The binding potential was quantified using a dual-tracer approach, which employs a fluorescently labeled peptide targeted to EGFR and a reference tracer with similar pharmacokinetic properties but no specific binding, to estimate the relative bound fraction from kinetic compartment modeling. The recovered values of binding potential did not vary significantly as a function of tumor size (1 to 33 mm3), suggesting that binding potential may be consistent in the U251 tumors regardless of size or stage after implantation. However, the fluorescence yield of the targeted fluorescent tracers in the tumor was affected significantly by tumor size, suggesting that dual-tracer imaging helps account for variations in absolute uptake, which plague single-tracer imaging techniques. Ex vivo analysis showed relatively high spatial heterogeneity in each tumor that cannot be resolved by tomographic techniques. Nonetheless, the dual-tracer tomographic technique is a powerful tool for longitudinal bulk estimation of receptor binding.

  11. Update: affibody molecules for molecular imaging and therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Anna; Feldwisch, Joachim; Abrahmsén, Lars; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2007-10-01

    Affibody molecules are scaffold proteins, having a common frame of amino acids determining the overall fold or tertiary structure, but with each member characterized by a unique amino acid composition in an exposed binding surface determining binding specificity and affinity for a certain target. Affibody molecules represent a new class of affinity proteins based on a 58-amino acid residue protein domain, derived from one of the IgG binding domains of staphylococcal protein A. They combine small size ( approximately 6.5 kDa) with high affinity and specificity. Affibody molecules with nanomolar affinities were selected from an initial library (3 x 10(9) members) and, after affinity maturation, picomolar binders were obtained. The small size and simple structure of affibody molecules allow their production by chemical synthesis with homogeneous site-specific incorporation of moieties for further labeling using a wide range of labeling chemistries. The robustness and the refolding properties of affibody molecules make them amenable to labeling conditions that denature most proteins, including incubation at pH 11 at 60 degrees C for up to 60 minutes. Affibody molecules meet the requirements which are key for successful clinical use as imaging agents: high-affinity binding to the chosen target; short plasma half-life time; rapid renal clearance for nonbound drug substance and, high, continuously increasing tumor-to-organ ratios, resulting in high-contrast in vivo images shortly after injection of the diagnostic agent. PMID:17979560

  12. Novel Immunogenic HLA-A*0201-restricted Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-specific T-cell Epitope in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Filho, Pedro A.; López-Albaitero, Andrés; Gooding, William; Ferris, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Therapeutic targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is highly overexpressed and correlated with poor prognosis in colorectal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCCHN), has shown clinical efficacy using the blocking mAbs, cetuximab or panitumumab, but only in 10% to 20% of patients. Clinical responsiveness is correlated with certain Fcγ receptor genotypes, suggesting immune activity may contribute to therapeutic efficacy. In addition, cetuximab-resistant tumor cells exhibit ubiquitination and degradation of EGFR, which would increase its processing as a tumor antigen for cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lysis. Thus, T cell-based immunotherapy might enhance the antitumor efficacy of EGFR-specific mAbs, but CTL epitopes are poorly defined. To permit combinatorial EGFR-targeted immunotherapy, we identified a novel immunogenic wild-type sequence peptide, EGFR853 – 861 and modified its anchor sequence to enhance HLA-A*0201 binding and stimulation of cross-reactive anti-wild–type EGFR853 – 861-specific CTL. Cross-reactivity was also observed with HER2861 – 869. EGFR853 – 861-specific CTL recognition of SCCHN cells was increased by incubation of tumor cells with cetuximab, which led to EGFR degradation. In addition, EGFR853 – 861-specific CTLs were elevated in the circulation of SCCHN patients as compared with healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Thus, a novel, immunogenic EGFR-encoded CTL epitope may be incorporated into vaccines and would be useful for combinatorial immunotherapy with EGFR-specific mAbs in cancer patients. PMID:19952953

  13. Affibody-mediated PET imaging of HER3 expression in malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Rosestedt, Maria; Andersson, Ken G.; Mitran, Bogdan; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Löfblom, John; Orlova, Anna; Ståhl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is involved in the progression of various cancers and in resistance to therapies targeting the HER family. In vivo imaging of HER3 expression would enable patient stratification for anti-HER3 immunotherapy. Key challenges with HER3-targeting are the relatively low expression in HER3-positive tumours and HER3 expression in normal tissues. The use of positron-emission tomography (PET) provides advantages of high resolution, sensitivity and quantification accuracy compared to SPECT. Affibody molecules, imaging probes based on a non-immunoglobulin scaffold, provide high imaging contrast shortly after injection. The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility of PET imaging of HER3 expression using 68Ga-labeled affibody molecules. The anti-HER3 affibody molecule HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was successfully labelled with 68Ga with high yield, purity and stability. The agent bound specifically to HER3-expressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. At 3 h pi, uptake of 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA was significantly higher in xenografts with high HER3 expression (BT474, BxPC-3) than in xenografts with low HER3 expression (A431). In xenografts with high expression, tumour-to-blood ratios were >20, tumour-to-muscle >15, and tumour-to-bone >7. HER3-positive xenografts were visualised using microPET 3 h pi. In conclusion, PET imaging of HER3 expression is feasible using 68Ga-HEHEHE-Z08698-NOTA shortly after administration. PMID:26477646

  14. Influence of molecular design on biodistribution and targeting properties of an Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin.

    PubMed

    Altai, Mohamed; Liu, Hao; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of toxins is a promising way to treat disseminated cancer. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting moiety has provided proof-of-principle for this approach. However, extravasation and tissue penetration rates of antibody-based immunotoxins are limited due to antibody bulkiness. The use of a novel class of targeting probes, Affibody molecules, provides smaller toxin-conjugated constructs, which may improve targeting. Earlier, we have demonstrated that affitoxins containing a HER2-targeting Affibody moiety and a deimmunized and truncated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PE38X8, provide highly selective toxicity to HER2-expressing cancer cells. To evaluate the influence of molecular design on targeting and biodistribution properties, a series of novel affitoxins were labelled with the residualizing radionuclide 111In. In this study, we have shown that the novel conjugates are more rapidly internalized compared with the parental affitoxin. The use of a (HE)3 purification tag instead of a hexahistidine tag enabled significant (p<0.05) reduction of the hepatic uptake of the affitoxin in a murine model. Fusion of the affitoxin with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) caused appreciable extension of the residence time in circulation and several-fold reduction of the renal uptake. The best variant, 111In-(HE)3-ZHER2-ABD-PE38X8, demonstrated receptor-specific accumulation in HER2-expressing SKOV-3 xenografts. In conclusion, a careful molecular design of scaffold protein based anticancer targeted toxins can appreciably improve their biodistribution and targeting properties. PMID:27573289

  15. Comparison of two site-specifically (18)F-labeled affibodies for PET imaging of EGFR positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Su, Xinhui; Cheng, Kai; Jeon, Jongho; Shen, Bin; Venturin, Gianina Teribele; Hu, Xiang; Rao, Jianghong; Chin, Frederick T; Wu, Hua; Cheng, Zhen

    2014-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) serves as an attractive target for cancer molecular imaging and therapy. Our previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the EGFR-targeting affibody molecules (64)Cu-DOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 can discriminate between high and low EGFR-expression tumors and have the potential for patient selection for EGFR-targeted therapy. Compared with (64)Cu, (18)F may improve imaging of EGFR-expression and is more suitable for clinical application, but the labeling reaction of (18)F-FBEM-ZEGFR:1907 requires a long synthesis time. The aim of the present study is to develop a new generation of (18)F labeled affibody probes (Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907) and to determine whether they are suitable agents for imaging of EGFR expression. The first approach consisted of conjugating ZEGFR:1907 with NOTA and radiolabeling with Al(18)F to produce Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907. In a second approach the prosthetic group (18)F-labeled-2-cyanobenzothiazole ((18)F-CBT) was conjugated to Cys-ZEGFR:1907 to produce (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907. Binding affinity and specificity of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 to EGFR were evaluated using A431 cells. Biodistribution and PET studies were conducted on mice bearing A431 xenografts after injection of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 or (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 with or without coinjection of unlabeled affibody proteins. The radiosyntheses of Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 and (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 were completed successfully within 40 and 120 min with a decay-corrected yield of 15% and 41% using a 2-step, 1-pot reaction and 2-step, 2-pot reaction, respectively. Both probes bound to EGFR with low nanomolar affinity in A431 cells. Although (18)F-CBT-ZEGFR:1907 showed instability in vivo, biodistribution studies revealed rapid and high tumor accumulation and quick clearance from normal tissues except the bones. In contrast, Al(18)F-NOTA-ZEGFR:1907 demonstrated high in

  16. Targeting, bio distributive and tumor growth inhibiting characterization of anti-HER2 affibody coupling to liposomal doxorubicin using BALB/c mice bearing TUBO tumors.

    PubMed

    Akhtari, Javad; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Teymouri, Manouchehr; Alavizadeh, Seyedeh Hoda; Gheybi, Fatemeh; Badiee, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-05-30

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 20-30% of breast cancer tumors. In the current investigation, we exploited such a feature and utilized an anti-HER2 affibody (ZHER2:477) in combination with a pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for concurrent passive and active targeting of HER2 overexpressing TUBO tumor, using BALB/c mice. It was determined that the affibody coupled liposomes (affisomes) was capable of increasing doxorubicin (Dox) delivery to HER2+ cells (SK-BR-3 and TUBO cells), while transferring drug similarly as low as naïve PLD to HER2- MDA-MB-231 cells. This also resulted in selectively enhance cytotoxicity. The veracity of targeting was further assessed utilizing DiD lipophilic tracer model liposomes via competition assay. An approximated 10 ligand/liposome integration caused Dox delivery at 50% of maximal delivery capacity (Kd). Such integration did not alter Dox release in vitro, while it affected the serum clearance profile. Affibody integration to PLD increased drug concentration in tumor and led to significantly further augmentation of drug in liver and spleen compared to those of PLD. Overall, such differences led to prolonging the mice life spans as compared to PLD. PMID:27039149

  17. Affibody modified and radiolabeled gold-iron oxide hetero-nanostructures for tumor PET, optical and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Cheng, Kai; Qi, Shibo; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Yuxin; Jiang, Han; Li, Jinbo; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Huimao; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    A highly monodispersed hetero-nanostructure with two different functional nanomaterials (gold (Au) and iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4,) IO)) within one structure was successfully developed as Affibody based trimodality nanoprobe (positron emission tomography, PET; optical imaging; and magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) for imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positive tumors. Unlike other regular nanostructures with a single component, the Au-IO hetero-nanostructures (Au-IONPs) with unique chemical and physical properties have capability to combine several imaging modalities together to provide complementary information. The IO component within hetero-nanostructures serve as a T(2) reporter for MRI; and gold component serve as both optical and PET reporters. Moreover, such hetero-nanoprobes could provide a robust nano-platform for surface-specific modification with both targeting molecules (anti-EGFR Affibody protein) and PET imaging reporters (radiometal (64)Cu chelators) in highly efficient and reliable manner. In vitro and in vivo study showed that the resultant nanoprobe provided high specificity, sensitivity, and excellent tumor contrast for both PET and MRI imaging in the human EGFR-expressing cells and tumors. Our study data also highlighted the EGFR targeting efficiency of hetero-nanoparticles and the feasibility for their further theranostic applications. PMID:23343632

  18. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  19. An affibody in complex with a target protein: Structure and coupled folding

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Elisabet; Lendel, Christofer; Helgstrand, Magnus; Allard, Peter; Dincbas-Renqvist, Vildan; Hedqvist, Anders; Berglund, Helena; Nygren, Per-Åke; Härd, Torleif

    2003-01-01

    Combinatorial protein engineering provides powerful means for functional selection of novel binding proteins. One class of engineered binding proteins, denoted affibodies, is based on the three-helix scaffold of the Z domain derived from staphylococcal protein A. The ZSPA-1 affibody has been selected from a phage-displayed library as a binder to protein A. ZSPA-1 also binds with micromolar affinity to its own ancestor, the Z domain. We have characterized the ZSPA-1 affibody in its uncomplexed state and determined the solution structure of a Z:ZSPA-1 protein–protein complex. Uncomplexed ZSPA-1 behaves as an aggregation-prone molten globule, but folding occurs on binding, and the original (Z) three-helix bundle scaffold is fully formed in the complex. The structural basis for selection and strong binding is a large interaction interface with tight steric and polar/nonpolar complementarity that directly involves 10 of 13 mutated amino acid residues on ZSPA-1. We also note similarities in how the surface of the Z domain responds by induced fit to binding of ZSPA-1 and Ig Fc, respectively, suggesting that the ZSPA-1 affibody is capable of mimicking the morphology of the natural binding partner for the Z domain. PMID:12594333

  20. In vivo and in vitro uptake of 111In, delivered with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2, in EGFR expressing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Orlova, A; Friedman, M; Tolmachev, V; Ståhl, S; Nilsson, F Y; Glimelius, B; Carlsson, J

    2008-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, is overexpressed in many carcinomas. Targeting this receptor with radionuclides is important for imaging and therapy applications in nuclear medicine. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo properties of a new high affinity EGFR binding affibody molecule, (ZEGFR:955)2, when conjugated with CHX-A''-DTPA and labelled with 111In. The binding time patterns and retention studies were performed using cultured squamous carcinoma A431 cells that overexpress EGFR. In the in vivo studies, female BALB/c nu/nu mice carrying tumours from xenografted A431 cells were used. The in vitro studies showed EGFR specific binding, high uptake and good retention of 111In when delivered as [111In](ZEGFR:955)2. The retention after 72 h of incubation was 38.0+/-1.15% of the initial level. The biodistribution study showed a tumour specific 111In uptake of 3.8+/-1.4% of injected dose per gram tumour tissue 4 h post-injection. The tumour to blood ratio was 9.1 and the tumours could easily be visualized with a gamma camera at this time-point. 111In delivered with [111In](ZEGFR:955)2 gave an EGFR specific uptake and the results indicated that the (ZEGFR:955)2 affibody molecule is a candidate for radionuclide-based tumour imaging. Potential therapy applications are discussed. PMID:18357367

  1. In vivo targeting of HER2-positive tumor using 2-helix affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Webster, Jack M; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; Miao, Zheng; Liu, Hongguang; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Syud, Faisal A; Cheng, Zhen

    2012-07-01

    Molecular imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression has drawn significant attention because of the unique role of the HER2 gene in diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of human breast cancer. In our previous research, a novel cyclic 2-helix small protein, MUT-DS, was discovered as an anti-HER2 Affibody analog with high affinity through rational protein design and engineering. MUT-DS was then evaluated for positron emission tomography (PET) of HER2-positive tumor by labeling with two radionuclides, 68Ga and 18F, with relatively short half-life (t1/2<2 h). In order to fully study the in vivo behavior of 2-helix small protein and demonstrate that it could be a robust platform for labeling with a variety of radionuclides for different applications, in this study, MUT-DS was further radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In and evaluated for in vivo targeting of HER2-positive tumor in mice. Design 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated MUT-DS (DOTA-MUT-DS) was chemically synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesizer and I2 oxidation. DOTA-MUT-DS was then radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In to prepare the HER2 imaging probe (64Cu/111In-DOTA-MUT-DS). Both biodistribution and microPET imaging of the probe were evaluated in nude mice bearing subcutaneous HER2-positive SKOV3 tumors. DOTA-MUT-DS could be successfully synthesized and radiolabeled with 64Cu or 111In. Biodistribution study showed that tumor uptake value of 64Cu or 111In-labeled DOTA-MUT-DS was 4.66±0.38 or 2.17±0.15%ID/g, respectively, in nude mice bearing SKOV3 xenografts (n=3) at 1 h post-injection (p.i.). Tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios for 64Cu-DOTA-MUT-DS were attained to be 3.05 and 3.48 at 1 h p.i., respectively, while for 111In-DOTA-MUT-DS, they were 2.04 and 3.19, respectively. Co-injection of the cold Affibody molecule ZHER2:342 with 64Cu-DOTA-MUT-DS specifically reduced the SKOV3 tumor uptake of the probe by 48%. 111In

  2. Feasibility of Affibody Molecule-Based PNA-Mediated Radionuclide Pretargeting of Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Honarvar, Hadis; Westerlund, Kristina; Altai, Mohamed; Sandström, Mattias; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2016-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa), non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a potential as targeting agents for radionuclide imaging of cancer. However, high renal re-absorption of Affibody molecules prevents their use for radionuclide therapy with residualizing radiometals. We hypothesized that the use of Affibody-based peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated pretargeting would enable higher accumulation of radiometals in tumors than in kidneys. To test this hypothesis, we designed an Affibody-PNA chimera ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 containing a 15-mer HP1 PNA recognition tag and a complementary HP2 hybridization probe permitting labeling with both 125I and 111In. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 bound specifically to HER2-expressing BT474 and SKOV-3 cancer cells in vitro, with a KD of 6±2 pM for binding to SKOV-3 cells. Specific high affinity binding of the radiolabeled complementary PNA probe 111In-/125I-HP2 to ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-treated cells was demonstrated. 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 demonstrated specific accumulation in SKOV-3 xenografts in BALB/C nu/nu mice and rapid clearance from blood. Pre-saturation of SKOV-3 with non-labeled anti-HER2 Affibody or the use of HER2-negative Ramos xenografts resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake of 111In-ZHER2:342-SR-HP1. The complementary PNA probe 111In/125I-HP2 accumulated in SKOV-3 xenografts when ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 was injected 4 h earlier. The tumor accumulation of 111In/125I-HP2 was negligible without ZHER2:342-SR-HP1 pre-injection. The uptake of 111In-HP2 in SKOV-3 xenografts was 19±2 %ID/g at 1 h after injection. The uptake in blood and kidneys was approximately 50- and 2-fold lower, respectively. In conclusion, we have shown that the use of Affibody-based PNA-mediated pretargeting enables specific delivery of radiometals to tumors and provides higher radiometal concentration in tumors than in kidneys. PMID:26722376

  3. Radiolabeled Affibody-Albumin Bioconjugates for HER2 Positive Cancer Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hoppmann, Susan; Miao, Zheng; Liu, Shuanglong; Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Bao, Ande; Cheng, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Affibody molecules have received significant attention in the fields of molecular imaging and drug development. However, Affibody scaffolds display an extremely high renal uptake, especially when modified with chelators and then labeled with radiometals. This unfavorable property may impact their use as radiotherapeutic agents in general and as imaging probes for the detection of tumors adjacent to kidneys in particular. Herein, we present a simple and generalizable strategy for reducing the renal uptake of Affibody molecules while maintaining their tumor uptake. Human serum albumin (HSA) was consecutively modified by 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid mono-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (DOTA-NHS ester) and the bifunctional crosslinker sulfosuccinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (Sulfo-SMCC). The HER2 Affibody analog, Ac-Cys-ZHER2:342, was covalently conjugated with HSA, and the resulting bioconjugate DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 was further radiolabeled with 64Cu and 111In and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Radiolabeled DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 conjugates displayed a significant and specific cell uptake into SKOV3 cell cultures. Positron emission tomography (PET) investigations using 64Cu-DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 were performed in SKOV3 tumor-bearing nude mice. High tumor uptake values (> 14% ID/g at 24 h and 48 h) and high liver accumulations but low kidney accumulations were observed. Biodistribution studies and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) investigations using 111In-DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 validated these results. At 24 h post injection, the bio distribution data revealed high tumor (16.26% ID/g) and liver uptake (14.11% ID/g) but relatively low kidney uptake (6.06% ID/g). Blocking studies with co-injected, non-labeled Ac-Cys-ZHER2:342 confirmed the in vivo specificity of HER2. Radiolabeled DOTA-HSA-ZHER2:342 Affibody conjugates are promising SPECT and PET-type probes for the imaging of HER2 positive cancer. More importantly

  4. Quantification of internalization of EGFR-binding Affibody molecules: Methodological aspects.

    PubMed

    Göstring, Lovisa; Chew, Ming Tsuey; Orlova, Anna; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Wennborg, Anders; Carlsson, Jörgen; Frejd, Fredrik Y

    2010-04-01

    Tumor cell internalization of targeting agents is of interest, since internalization influences the local retention time of a radionuclide and thereby imaging quality in PET and SPECT and effects of radionuclide therapy. In cases where nuclear methods are not applicable at the cellular level, quantitative fluorescent techniques are useful as described in this article. Two fluorescence-based methods to study cellular internalization were applied: the CypHer and the Alexa488-quenching methods, both utilized in fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Two EGFR-binding Affibody molecules were analyzed in A431 cells: the monomer Z1907 and the dimer (Z1907)2. EGF, cetuximab and non-specific Affibody molecules were used as controls. For comparison, internalization of 111In-labeled Z1907 was studied with the acid wash internalization assay. The Cypher method is straightforward, but requires equal labeling of all compounds for accurate quantification. The Alexa488-quenching method is preferable since it is independent of the dye-to-protein ratio. According to this method, about 45% of EGF and 19-24% of the bound Affibody molecules and cetuximab were internalized within one hour. Similar results were seen with 111In-Z1907 in the acid wash method, while (Z1907)2 was not removed by acid and thus could not be studied this way. The fluorescence-based Alexa488-quenching method is well suited to quantitatively analyze internalization of targeting agents, also those that resist acid wash. The internalized fraction showed that both the monomeric and dimeric Affibody molecules are expected to give good uptake and thereby good retention of metallic radionuclides which will render good tumor to background values. PMID:20198317

  5. Biodistribution of 211At labeled HER-2 binding affibody molecules in mice.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Almqvist, Ylva; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Lundqvist, Hans; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Wilbur, D Scott; Carlsson, Jörgen

    2007-05-01

    The size of affibody molecules makes them suitable as targeting agents for targeted radiotherapy with the alpha-emitter 211At, since their biokinetic properties match the short physical half-live of 211At. In this study, the potential for this approach was investigated in vivo. Two different HER-2 binding affibody molecules were radiolabeled with 211At using both the linker PAB (N-succinimidyl-para-astatobenzoate) and a decaborate-based linker, and the biodistribution in tumor-bearing nude mice was investigated. The influence of L-lysine and Na-thiocyanate on the 211At uptake in normal tissues was also studied. Based on the biokinetic information obtained, the absorbed dose was calculated for different organs. Compared with a previous biodistribution with 125I, the 211At biodistribution using the PAB linker showed higher uptake in lungs, stomach, thyroid and salivary glands, indicating release of free 211At. When the decaborate-based linker was used, the uptake in those organs was decreased, but instead, high uptake in kidneys and liver was found. The uptake, when using the PAB linker, could be significantly reduced in some organs by the use of L-lysine and/or Na-thiocyanate. In conclusion, affibody molecules have suitable blood-kinetics for targeted radionuclide therapy with 211At. However, the labeling chemistry affects the distribution in normal organs to a high degree and needs to be improved to allow clinical use. PMID:17390057

  6. Dimeric HER2-specific affibody molecules inhibit proliferation of the SKBR-3 breast cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerljung, Lina Lindborg, Malin; Gedda, Lars; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Carlsson, Joergen; Lennartsson, Johan

    2008-12-12

    HER2-specific affibody molecules in different formats have previously been shown to be useful tumor targeting agents for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy applications, but their biological effect on tumor cells is not well known. In this study, two dimeric ((Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2}) and one monomeric (Z{sub HER2:342}) HER2-specific affibody molecules are investigated with respect to biological activity. Both (Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2} were found to decrease the growth rate of SKBR-3 cells to the same extent as the antibody trastuzumab. When the substances were removed, the cells treated with the dimeric affibody molecules continued to be growth suppressed while the cells treated with trastuzumab immediately resumed normal proliferation. The effects of Z{sub HER2:342} were minor on both proliferation and cell signaling. The dimeric (Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2} both reduced growth of SKBR-3 cells and may prove therapeutically useful either by themselves or as carriers of radionuclides or other cytotoxic agents.

  7. Evaluation of maleimide derivative of DOTA for site-specific labeling of recombinant affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Sara; Orlova, Anna; Rosik, Daniel; Sandström, Mattias; Sjöberg, Anna; Baastrup, Barbro; Widmark, Olof; Fant, Gunilla; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Affibody molecules are a new class of small (7 kDa) scaffold affinity proteins, which demonstrate promising properties as agents for in vivo radionuclide targeting. The Affibody scaffold is cysteine-free and therefore independent of disulfide bonds. Thus, a single thiol group can be engineered into the protein by introduction of one cysteine. Coupling of thiol-reactive bifunctional chelators can enable site-specific labeling of recombinantly produced Affibody molecules. In this study, the use of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tris-acetic acid-10-maleimidoethylacetamide (MMA-DOTA) for 111 In-labeling of anti-HER2 Affibody molecules His 6-Z HER2:342-Cys and Z HER2:2395-Cys has been evaluated. The introduction of a cysteine residue did not affect the affinity of the proteins, which was 29 pM for His 6-Z HER2:342-Cys and 27 pM for Z HER2:2395-Cys, comparable with 22 pM for the parental Z HER2:342. MMA-DOTA was conjugated to DTT-reduced Affibody molecules with a coupling efficiency of 93% using a 1:1 molar ratio of chelator to protein. The conjugates were labeled with 111 In to a specific radioactivity of up to 7 GBq/mmol, with preserved binding for the target HER2. In vivo, the non-His-tagged variant 111 In-[MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-Z HER2:2395-Cys demonstrated appreciably lower liver uptake than its His-tag-containing counterpart. In mice bearing HER2-expressing LS174T xenografts, 111 In-[MMA-DOTA-Cys61]-Z HER2:2395-Cys showed specific and rapid tumor localization, and rapid clearance from blood and nonspecific compartments, leading to a tumor-to-blood-ratio of 18 +/- 8 already 1 h p.i. Four hours p.i., the tumor-to-blood ratio was 138 +/- 8. Xenografts were clearly visualized already 1 h p.i. PMID:18163536

  8. The HER2-Binding Affibody Molecule (ZHER2∶342)2 Increases Radiosensitivity in SKBR-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ekerljung, Lina; Lennartsson, Johan; Gedda, Lars

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the HER2-specific affibody molecule (ZHER2∶342)2 inhibits proliferation of SKBR-3 cells. Here, we continue to investigate its biological effects in vitro by studying receptor dimerization and clonogenic survival following irradiation. We found that (ZHER2∶342)2 sensitizes the HER2-overexpressing cell line SKBR-3 to ionizing radiation. The survival after exposure to (ZHER2∶342)2 and 8 Gy (S8Gy 0.006) was decreased by a factor four compared to the untreated (S8Gy 0.023). The low HER2-expressing cell line MCF-7 was more radiosensitive than SKBR-3 but did not respond to (ZHER2∶342)2. Treatment by (ZHER2∶342)2 strongly increased the levels of dimerized and phosphorylated HER2 even after 5 minutes of stimulation. The monomeric ZHER2∶342 does not seem to be able to induce receptor phosphorylation and dimerization or sensitize cells to irradiation. PMID:23166716

  9. EGFR-directed Affibody for fluorescence-guided glioma surgery: time-dose analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro de Souza, Ana Luiza; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason R.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Draney, Daniel R.; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    The key to fluorescence guided surgical oncology is the ability to create specific contrast between normal and glioma tissue. The blood brain barrier that limits the delivery of substances to the normal brain is broken in tumors, allowing accumulation of agents in the tumor interior. However, for a clinical success, imaging agents should be in the infiltrative edges to minimize the resection of normal brain while enable the removal of tumor. The aberrant overexpression and/or activation of EGFR is associated with many types of cancers, including glioblastoma and the injection of a fluorescent molecule targeted to these receptors would improve tumor contrast during fluorescence guided surgery. Affibody molecules have intentional medium affinity and high potential specificity, which are the desirable features of a good surgical imaging agent. The aim of this study was evaluate the brain/glioma uptake of ABY029 labeled with near-infrared dye IRDye800CW after intravenous injection. Rats were either inoculated with orthotopic implantations of U251 human glioma cell line or PBS (shams control) in the brain. The tumors were allowed to grow for 2-3 weeks before carrying out fluorescent tracer experiments. Fluorescent imaging of ex vivo brain slices from rats was acquired at different time points after infection of fluorescently labeled EGFR-specific affibody to verify which time provided maximal contrast tumor to normal brain. Although the tumor was most clearly visualized after 1h of IRDye800CW-labeled ABY029 injection, the tumor location could be identified from the background after 48h. These results suggest that the NIR-labeled affibody examined shows excellent potential to increase surgical visualization for confirmed EGFR positive tumors.

  10. Efficient [(18)F]AlF Radiolabeling of ZHER3:8698 Affibody Molecule for Imaging of HER3 Positive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Da Pieve, Chiara; Allott, Louis; Martins, Carlos D; Vardon, Andrew; Ciobota, Daniela M; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Smith, Graham

    2016-08-17

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is overexpressed in several cancers, being linked to a more resistant phenotype and hence leading to poor patient prognosis. Imaging HER3 is challenging owing to the modest receptor number (<50000 receptors/cell) in overexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, to image HER3 in vivo, high target affinity PET probes need to be developed. This work describes two different [(18)F]AlF radiolabeling strategies of the ZHER3:8698 affibody molecule specifically targeting HER3. The one-pot radiolabeling of ZHER3:8698 performed at 100 °C and using 1,4,7-triazanonane-1,4,7-triacetate (NOTA) as chelator resulted in radiolabeled products with variable purity attributed to radioconjugate thermolysis. An alternative approach based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) reaction between a novel tetrazine functionalized 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate (NODA) chelator and the trans-cyclooctene (TCO) functionalized affibody molecule was also investigated. This method enabled the radiolabeling of the protein at room temperature. The [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-ZHER3:8698 and [(18)F]AlF-NODA-ZHER3:8698 conjugates showed a specific uptake at 1 h after injection in high HER3-expressing MCF-7 tumors of 4.36 ± 0.92% ID/g and 4.96 ± 0.65% ID/g, respectively. The current results are encouraging for further investigation of [(18)F]AlF-NOTA-ZHER3:8698 as a HER3 imaging agent. PMID:27357023

  11. Mammalian neurotrophin-4: structure, chromosomal localization, tissue distribution, and receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Ip, N Y; Ibáñez, C F; Nye, S H; McClain, J; Jones, P F; Gies, D R; Belluscio, L; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Squinto, S P

    1992-01-01

    Nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are the three members of the neurotrophin family known to exist in mammals. Recently, a fourth neurotrophin (designated neurotrophin-4 or NT-4), which shares all of the features found in the mammalian neurotrophins, has been identified in Xenopus and viper. We used sequences specific to the Xenopus/viper NT-4 to isolate a neurotrophin from both human and rat genomic DNA that appears to represent the mammalian counterpart of Xenopus/viper NT-4. Human NT-4 as well as a human NT-4 pseudogene colocalize to chromosome 19 band q13.3. Mammalian NT-4 has many unusual features compared to the previously identified neurotrophins and is less conserved evolutionarily than the other neurotrophins. However, mammalian NT-4 displays bioactivity and trk receptor specificity similar to that of Xenopus NT-4. Images PMID:1313578

  12. An affibody-adalimumab hybrid blocks combined IL-6 and TNF-triggered serum amyloid A secretion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feifan; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Akal, Anastassja; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik; Nygren, Per-Åke

    2014-01-01

    In inflammatory disease conditions, the regulation of the cytokine system is impaired, leading to tissue damages. Here, we used protein engineering to develop biologicals suitable for blocking a combination of inflammation driving cytokines by a single construct. From a set of interleukin (IL)-6-binding affibody molecules selected by phage display, five variants with a capability of blocking the interaction between complexes of soluble IL-6 receptor α (sIL-6Rα) and IL-6 and the co-receptor gp130 were identified. In cell assays designed to analyze any blocking capacity of the classical or the alternative (trans) signaling IL-6 pathways, one variant, ZIL-6_13 with an affinity (KD) for IL-6 of ∼500 pM, showed the best performance. To construct fusion proteins (“AffiMabs”) with dual cytokine specificities, ZIL-6_13 was fused to either the N- or C-terminus of both the heavy and light chains of the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibody adalimumab (Humira®). One AffiMab construct with ZIL-6_13 positioned at the N-terminus of the heavy chain, denoted ZIL-6_13-HCAda, was determined to be the most optimal, and it was subsequently evaluated in an acute Serum Amyloid A (SAA) model in mice. Administration of the AffiMab or adalimumab prior to challenge with a mix of IL-6 and TNF reduced the levels of serum SAA in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the highest dose (70 mg/kg body weight) of adalimumab only resulted in a 50% reduction of SAA-levels, whereas the corresponding dose of the ZIL-6_13-HCAda AffiMab with combined IL-6/TNF specificity, resulted in SAA levels below the detection limit. PMID:25484067

  13. Novel Receptor Specificity of Avian Gammacoronaviruses That Cause Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I. N.; de Vries, R. P.; Weerts, E. A. W. S.; van Beurden, S. J.; Peng, W.; McBride, R.; Ducatez, M.; Guy, J.; Brown, P.; Eterradossi, N.; Gröne, A.; Paulson, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    known, other viruses of the genus Gammacoronavirus, including those causing enteric disease, are hardly studied. In turkey, guineafowl, and quail, coronaviruses have been reported to be the major causative agent of enteric diseases. Specifically, turkey coronavirus outbreaks have been reported in North America, Europe, and Australia for several decades. Recently, a gammacoronavirus was isolated from guineafowl with fulminating disease. To date, it is not clear why these avian coronaviruses are enteropathogenic, whereas other closely related avian coronaviruses like IBV cause respiratory disease. A comprehensive understanding of the tropism and pathogenicity of these viruses explained by their receptor specificity and receptor expression on tissues was therefore needed. Here, we identify a novel glycan receptor for enteric avian coronaviruses, which will further support the development of vaccines. PMID:26063435

  14. Design, Preparation, and Characterization of PNA-Based Hybridization Probes for Affibody-Molecule-Mediated Pretargeting.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie

    2015-08-19

    In radioimmunotherapy, the contrast between tumor and normal tissue can be improved by using a pretargeting strategy with a primary targeting agent, which is conjugated to a recognition tag, and a secondary radiolabeled molecule binding specifically to the recognition tag. The secondary molecule is injected after the targeting agent has accumulated in the tumor and is designed to have a favorable biodistribution profile, with fast clearance from blood and low uptake in normal tissues. In this study, we have designed and evaluated two complementary peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based probes for specific and high-affinity association in vivo. An anti-HER2 Affibody-PNA chimera, Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1, was produced by a semisynthetic approach using sortase A catalyzed ligation of a recombinantly produced Affibody molecule to a PNA-based HP1-probe assembled using solid-phase chemistry. A complementary HP2 probe carrying a DOTA chelator and a tyrosine for dual radiolabeling was prepared by solid-phase synthesis. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and UV thermal melts showed that the probes can hybridize to form a structured duplex with a very high melting temperature (T(m)), both in HP1:HP2 and in Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1:HP2 (T(m) = 86-88 °C), and the high binding affinity between Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1 and HP2 was confirmed in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based binding study. Following a moderately fast association (1.7 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), the dissociation of the probes was extremely slow and <5% dissociation was observed after 17 h. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D)) for Z(HER2:342)-SR-HP1:HP2 binding to HER2 was estimated by SPR to be 212 pM, suggesting that the conjugation to PNA does not impair Affibody binding to HER2. The biodistribution profiles of (111)In- and (125)I-labeled HP2 were measured in NMRI mice, showing very fast blood clearance rates and low accumulation of radioactivity in kidneys and other organs. The measured radioactivity in blood was 0.63

  15. Imaging of CAIX-expressing xenografts in vivo using 99mTc-HEHEHE-ZCAIX:1 Affibody molecule

    PubMed Central

    HONARVAR, HADIS; GAROUSI, JAVAD; GUNNERIUSSON, ELIN; HÖIDÉN-GUTHENBERG, INGMARIE; ALTAI, MOHAMED; WIDSTRÖM, CHARLES; TOLMACHEV, VLADIMIR; FREJD, FREDRIK Y.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme involved in regulation of tissue pH balance. In cancer, CAIX expression is associated with tumor hypoxia. CAIX is also overexpressed in renal cell carcinoma and is a molecular target for the therapeutic antibody cG250 (girentuximab). Radionuclide imaging of CAIX expression might be used for identification of patients who may benefit from cG250 therapy and from treatment strategies for hypoxic tumors. Affibody molecules are small (7 kDa) scaffold proteins having a high potential as probes for radionuclide molecular imaging. The aim of the present study was to evaluate feasibility of in vivo imaging of CAIX-expression using radiolabeled Affibody molecules. A histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate-histidine-glutamate (HE)3-tag-containing CAIX-binding Affibody molecule (HE)3-ZCAIX:1 was labeled with [99mTc(CO)3]+. Its binding properties were evaluated in vitro using CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 renal carcinoma cells. 99mTc-(HE)3-ZCAIX:1 was evaluated in NMRI nu/nu mice bearing SK-RC-52 xenografts. The in vivo specificity test confirmed CAIX-mediated tumor targeting. 99mTc-(HE)3-ZCAIX:1 cleared rapidly from blood and normal tissues except for kidneys. At optimal time-point (4 h p.i.), the tumor uptake was 9.7±0.7% ID/g, and tumor-to-blood ratio was 53±10. Experimental imaging of CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 xenografts at 4 h p.i. provided high contrast images. The use of radioiodine label for ZCAIX:1 enabled the reduction of renal uptake, but resulted in significantly lower tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratio. Results of the present study suggest that radiolabeled Affibody molecules are promising probes for imaging of CAIX-expression in vivo. PMID:25434612

  16. Engineering of bacterial exotoxins for highly efficient and receptor-specific intracellular delivery of diverse cargos.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Jeong-Hyun; Sohn, Yoo-Kyoung; Hwang, Da-Eun; Park, Woo-Yong; Kim, Nury; Heo, Won-Do; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-08-01

    The intracellular delivery of proteins with high efficiency in a receptor-specific manner is of great significance in molecular medicine and biotechnology, but remains a challenge. Herein, we present the development of a highly efficient and receptor-specific delivery platform for protein cargos by combining the receptor binding domain of Escherichia coli Shiga-like toxin and the translocation domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. We demonstrated the utility and efficiency of the delivery platform by showing a cytosolic delivery of diverse proteins both in vitro and in vivo in a receptor-specific manner. In particular, the delivery system was shown to be effective for targeting an intracellular protein and consequently suppressing the tumor growth in xenograft mice. The present platform can be widely used for intracellular delivery of diverse functional macromolecules with high efficiency in a receptor-specific manner. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1639-1646. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773973

  17. HAHAHA, HEHEHE, HIHIHI, or HKHKHK: influence of position and composition of histidine containing tags on biodistribution of [(99m)Tc(CO)3](+)-labeled affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Hofström, Camilla; Altai, Mohamed; Honarvar, Hadis; Strand, Joanna; Malmberg, Jennie; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Orlova, Anna; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2013-06-27

    Engineered affibody molecules can be used for high contrast in vivo molecular imaging. Extending a recombinantly produced HER2 binding affibody molecule with a hexa-histidine tag allows for convenient purification by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and labeling with [(99m)Tc(CO)3](+) but increases radioactivity uptake in the liver. To investigate the impact of charge, lipophilicity, and position on biodistribution, 10 variants of a histidine-based tag was attached to a HER2 binding affibody molecule. The biochemical properties and the HER2 binding affinity appeared to be similar for all variants. In vivo, positive charge promoted liver uptake. For N-terminally placed tags, lipophilicity promoted liver uptake and decreased kidney uptake. Kidney uptake was higher for C-terminally placed tags compared to their N-terminal counterparts. The variant with the amino acid composition HEHEHE placed in the N-terminus gave the lowest nonspecific uptake. PMID:23692562

  18. Receptor specificity in human, avian, and equine H2 and H3 influenza virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Connor, R J; Kawaoka, Y; Webster, R G; Paulson, J C

    1994-11-15

    The receptor specificity of 56 H2 and H3 influenza virus isolates from various animal species has been determined to test the relevance of receptor specificity to the ecology of influenza virus. The results show that the receptor specificity of both H2 and H3 isolates evaluated for sialic acid linkage specificity and inhibition of hemagglutination by horse serum correlates with the species of origin, as postulated earlier for H3 strains based on a limited survey of five human, three avian, and one equine strain. Elucidation of the amino acid sequence of several human H2 receptor variants and analysis of known sequences of H2 and H3 isolates revealed that receptor specificity varies in association with an amino acid change at residues 228 in addition to the change at residue 226 previously documented to affect receptor specificity of H3 but not H1 isolates. Residues 226 and 228 are leucine and serine in human isolates, which preferentially bind sialic acid alpha 2,6-galactose beta 1,4-N-acetyl glucosamine (SA alpha 2,6Gal), and glutamine and glycine in avian and equine isolates, which exhibit specificity for sialic acid alpha-2,3-galactose beta-1,3-N-acetyl galactosamine (SA alpha 2,3Gal). The results demonstrate that the correlation of receptor specificity and species of origin is maintained across both H2 and H3 influenza virus serotypes and provide compelling evidence that influenza virus hosts exert selective pressure to maintain the receptor specificity characteristics of strains isolated from that species. PMID:7975212

  19. Optical Imaging of Ovarian Cancer Using HER-2 Affibody Conjugated Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Minati; Zielinski, Rafal; Lyakhov, Ilya; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT), Ultrasound (US), and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have been the mainstay of clinical imaging regimens for the detection of ovarian cancer. However, without tumor specific contrast enhancement, these imaging modalities lack specificity and sensitivity in the detection of small primary and disseminated tumors in the peritoneal cavity. Herein, we illustrate a fairly new near infrared (NIR) optical imaging approach developed in our laboratory for the noninvasive detection of ovarian tumors using a HER-2 targeted nanoparticle-based imaging agent in an orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer. We used multimodal imaging approaches to detect the disease accurately and rapidly by utilizing a single imaging agent, NIR dye-labeled HER-2 affibody conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles. This agent targets HER-2 receptors, which are overexpressed in ovarian tumors. This chapter outlines materials and methods for the: (1) production of HER-2 targeted nanoparticles; (2) establishment of an orthotopic human ovarian cancer xenograft model; (3) monitoring of tumor growth by bioluminescence imaging; (4) administration of targeted nanoparticles followed by NIR optical imaging for the detection of orthotopic ovarian cancers with targeted accumulation of the nanoparticle imaging probes. PMID:25308269

  20. The synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles conjugated with anti-Her2 affibody and monomethylauristatin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pala, Katarzyna; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Cyranka-Czaja, Anna; Otlewski, Jacek

    2015-04-01

    Conjugation of bioactive xenobiotics with innert particles often improves their efficacy and/or specificity. In this work we designed superparamagnetic ferric oxide nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated with a strong cytotoxic drug, monomethylauristatin E (MMAE), and evaluated their potential against cancer cells. Cytotoxicity tests showed that the conjugate was at least twice as toxic as the free drug. We then studied the cytotoxic potential of the conjugate at an elevated temperature achieved due to the superparamagnetic properties of the NPs, finding no enhancement of cytotoxicity in comparison with that at 37 °C. Next, multifunctional NPs containing MMAE and a targeting agent were synthesized. The targeting agent was the ZHer2:342 affibody specific to Her2 receptor. The selectivity and effectiveness of the conjugates was evaluated using SK-BR3 (Her2-positive) and U-87 MG (a negative control) cell lines. The multifunctional NPs selectively decrease of the viability of the SK-BR3 cells, showing their specificity towards cells overexpressing the Her2 receptor.

  1. Radionuclide therapy of HER2-positive microxenografts using a 177Lu-labeled HER2-specific Affibody molecule.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Pehrson, Rikard; Galli, Joakim; Baastrup, Barbro; Andersson, Karl; Sandström, Mattias; Rosik, Daniel; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lundqvist, Hans; Wennborg, Anders; Nilsson, Fredrik Y

    2007-03-15

    A radiolabeled anti-HER2 Affibody molecule (Z(HER2:342)) targets HER2-expressing xenografts with high selectivity and gives good imaging contrast. However, the small size (approximately 7 kDa) results in rapid glomerular filtration and high renal accumulation of radiometals, thus excluding targeted therapy. Here, we report that reversible binding to albumin efficiently reduces the renal excretion and uptake, enabling radiometal-based nuclide therapy. The dimeric Affibody molecule (Z(HER2:342))(2) was fused with an albumin-binding domain (ABD) conjugated with the isothiocyanate derivative of CHX-A''-DTPA and labeled with the low-energy beta-emitter (177)Lu. The obtained conjugate [CHX-A''-DTPA-ABD-(Z(HER2:342))(2)] had a dissociation constant of 18 pmol/L to HER2 and 8.2 and 31 nmol/L for human and murine albumin, respectively. The radiolabeled conjugate displayed specific binding to HER2-expressing cells and good cellular retention in vitro. In vivo, fusion with ABD enabled a 25-fold reduction of renal uptake in comparison with the nonfused dimer molecule (Z(HER2:342))(2). Furthermore, the biodistribution showed high and specific uptake of the conjugate in HER2-expressing tumors. Treatment of SKOV-3 microxenografts (high HER2 expression) with 17 or 22 MBq (177)Lu-CHX-A''-DTPA-ABD-(Z(HER2:342))(2) completely prevented formation of tumors, in contrast to mice given PBS or 22 MBq of a radiolabeled non-HER2-binding Affibody molecule. In LS174T xenografts (low HER2 expression), this treatment resulted in a small but significant increase of the survival time. Thus, fusion with ABD improved the in vivo biodistribution, and the results highlight (177)Lu-CHX-A''-DTPA-ABD-(Z(HER2:342))(2) as a candidate for treatment of disseminated tumors with a high level of HER2 expression. PMID:17363599

  2. Basis for receptor specificity of nonecotropic murine leukemia virus surface glycoprotein gp70SU.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D; Rein, A

    1992-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) initiate infection of NIH 3T3 cells by binding of the viral envelope (Env) protein to a cell surface receptor. Interference assays have shown that MuLVs can be divided into four groups, each using a distinct receptor: ecotropic, polytropic, amphotropic, and 10A1. In this study, we have attempted to map the determinants within viral Env proteins by constructing chimeric env genes. Chimeras were made in all six pairwise combinations between Moloney MCF (a polytropic MuLV), amphotropic MuLV, and 10A1, using a conserved EcoRI site in the middle of the Env coding region. The receptor specificity of each chimera was determined by using an interference assay. We found that amphotropic receptor specificity of each chimera was determined by using an interference assay. We found that amphotropic receptor specificity seems to map to the N-terminal portion of surface glycoprotein gp70SU. The difference between amphotropic and 10A1 receptor specificity can be attributed to one or more of only six amino acid differences in this region. Nearly all other cases showed evidence of interaction between Env domains in the generation of receptor specificity. Thus, a chimera composed exclusively of MCF and amphotropic sequences was found to exhibit 10A1 receptor specificity. None of the chimeras were able to infect cells by using the MCF receptor; however, two chimeras containing the C-terminal portion of MCF gp70SU could bind to this receptor, while they were able to infect cells via the amphotropic receptor. This result raises the possibility that receptor binding maps to the C-terminal portion of MCF gp70SU but requires MCF N-terminal sequences for a functional interaction with the MCF receptor. Images PMID:1321266

  3. A comparative study of affibody, panitumumab, and EGF for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of EGFR- and EGFRvIII-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haibiao; Kovar, Joy L; Cheung, Lael; Rosenthal, Eben L; Olive, D Michael

    2014-02-01

    Aberrant overexpression and/or activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with many types of cancers. EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) is a common in-frame deletion mutant, which lacks a large part of the extracellular portion (exons 2-7), including components of the ligand-binding domain. Although EGFR has been extensively studied as a molecular imaging target, information about EGFRvIII-targeted molecular imaging is lacking. In this study, the EGFR-specific affibody, therapeutic antibody panitumumab, and ligand EGF were labeled with IRDye 800CW (Ex/Em: 774/789 nm), yielding Aff800, Pan800, and EGF800, respectively. The binding affinities of the labeled agents were compared in cell-based assays using a rat glioma cell line F98 parental (F98-p) lacking EGFR expression, and 2 F98-derived transgenic cell lines expressing EGFR or EGFRvIII (designated as F98-EGFR and F98-vIII, respectively). Results showed that all agents could bind to F98-EGFR, with Pan800 having the highest binding affinity, followed by Aff800 and EGF800. Pan800 and Aff800, but not EGF800, also bound to F98-vIII. In vivo animal imaging demonstrated that compared with F98-p tumors, F98-EGFR tumors generated higher signals with all three agents. However, in the case of F98-vIII, only Pan800 and Aff800 signals were higher. Analysis of tissue lysates showed that a large portion of Pan800 was degraded into small fragments in F98-EGFR and F98-vIII tumors, possibly due to proteolytic digestion after its specific binding and internalization. In conclusion, Pan800 and Aff800 could be used as imaging agents for both wild-type EGFR and EGFRvIII, whereas EGF800 only targets wild-type EGFR. PMID:24100437

  4. Glycan-receptor specificity as a useful tool for characterization and surveillance of influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rahul; Tharakaraman, Kannan; Shriver, Zachary; Jayaraman, Akila; Sasisekharan, V.; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are rapidly evolving pathogens with the potential for novel strains to emerge and result in pandemic outbreaks in humans. Some avian-adapted subtypes have acquired the ability to bind to human glycan receptors and cause severe infections in humans but have yet to adapt to and transmit between humans. The emergence of new avian strains and their ability to infect humans has confounded their distinction from circulating human virus strains through linking receptor specificity to human adaptation. Herein we review the various structural and biochemical analyses of influenza hemagglutinin–glycan receptor interactions. We provide our perspectives on how receptor specificity can be used to monitor evolution of the virus to adapt to human hosts so as to facilitate improved surveillance and pandemic preparedness. PMID:25108746

  5. Changes in H3 influenza A virus receptor specificity during replication in humans.

    PubMed

    Ryan-Poirier, K; Suzuki, Y; Bean, W J; Kobasa, D; Takada, A; Ito, T; Kawaoka, Y

    1998-08-01

    Influenza A viruses of the H3 subtype caused the 1968 Hong Kong pandemic, the hemagglutinin (HA) gene being introduced into humans following a reassortment event with an avian virus. Receptor specificity and serum inhibitor sensitivity of the HA of influenza A viruses are linked to the host species. Human H3 viruses preferentially recognize N-acetyl sialic acid linked to galactose by alpha2,6 linkages (Neu5Acalpha2,6Gal) and are sensitive to serum inhibitors, whereas avian and equine viruses preferentially recognize Neu5Acalpha2,3Gal linkages and are resistant to serum inhibitors. We have examined the receptor specificity and serum inhibitor sensitivity of H3 human influenza A viruses from the time they were introduced into the human population to gain insight into the mechanism of viral molecular evolution and host tropism. All of the viruses were sensitive to neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition by horse serum. Early H3 viruses were resistant to pig and rabbit serum inhibitors. Viruses isolated after 1977 were uniformly sensitive to inhibition by pig and rabbit sera. The recognition of Neu5Acalpha2,3Gal or Neu5Acalpha2,6Gal linkages was not correlated with the serum sensitivity. These data showed that the receptor specificity of HA, measured as inhibitor sensitivity, has changed during replication in humans since its introduction from an avian virus. PMID:9783465

  6. Position for site-specific attachment of a DOTA chelator to synthetic affibody molecules has a different influence on the targeting properties of 68Ga- compared to 111in-labeled conjugates.

    PubMed

    Honarvar, Hadis; Strand, Joanna; Perols, Anna; Orlova, Anna; Selvaraju, Ram Kumar; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Affibody molecules, small (7 kDa) scaffold proteins, are a promising class of probes for radionuclide molecular imaging. Radiolabeling of Affibody molecules with the positron-emitting nuclide 68Ga would permit the use of positron emission tomography (PET), providing better resolution, sensitivity, and quantification accuracy than single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:S1 Affibody molecule was conjugated with DOTA at the N-terminus, in the middle of helix 3, or at the C-terminus. The biodistribution of 68Ga- and 111In-labeled Affibody molecules was directly compared in NMRI nu/nu mice bearing SKOV3 xenografts. The position of the chelator strongly influenced the biodistribution of the tracers, and the influence was more pronounced for 68Ga-labeled Affibody molecules than for the 111In-labeled counterparts. The best 68Ga-labeled variant was 68Ga-[DOTA-A1]-ZHER2:S1, which provided a tumor uptake of 13 ± 1 %ID/g and a tumor to blood ratio of 39 ± 12 at 2 hours after injection. 111In-[DOTA-A1]-ZHER2:S1 and 111In-[DOTA-K58]-ZHER2:S1 were equally good at this time point, providing a tumor uptake of 15 to 16 %ID/g and a tumor to blood ratio in the range of 60 to 80. In conclusion, the selection of the best position for a chelator in Affibody molecules can be used for optimization of their imaging properties. This may be important for the development of Affibody-based and other protein-based imaging probes. PMID:25249017

  7. Inhibiting HER3-Mediated Tumor Cell Growth with Affibody Molecules Engineered to Low Picomolar Affinity by Position-Directed Error-Prone PCR-Like Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Magdalena; Kronqvist, Nina; Lindberg, Hanna; Gudmundsdotter, Lindvi; Bass, Tarek; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Höidén-Guthenberg, Ingmarie; Varasteh, Zohreh; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2013-01-01

    The HER3 receptor is implicated in the progression of various cancers as well as in resistance to several currently used drugs, and is hence a potential target for development of new therapies. We have previously generated Affibody molecules that inhibit heregulin-induced signaling of the HER3 pathways. The aim of this study was to improve the affinity of the binders to hopefully increase receptor inhibition efficacy and enable a high receptor-mediated uptake in tumors. We explored a novel strategy for affinity maturation of Affibody molecules that is based on alanine scanning followed by design of library diversification to mimic the result from an error-prone PCR reaction, but with full control over mutated positions and thus less biases. Using bacterial surface display and flow-cytometric sorting of the maturation library, the affinity for HER3 was improved more than 30-fold down to 21 pM. The affinity is among the higher that has been reported for Affibody molecules and we believe that the maturation strategy should be generally applicable for improvement of affinity proteins. The new binders also demonstrated an improved thermal stability as well as complete refolding after denaturation. Moreover, inhibition of ligand-induced proliferation of HER3-positive breast cancer cells was improved more than two orders of magnitude compared to the previously best-performing clone. Radiolabeled Affibody molecules showed specific targeting of a number of HER3-positive cell lines in vitro as well as targeting of HER3 in in vivo mouse models and represent promising candidates for future development of targeted therapies and diagnostics. PMID:23675426

  8. D2-dopamine receptor specific brain uptake of carbon-11-labeled YM-09151-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, K.; Ishiwata, K.; Kawashima, K.; Hatazawa, J.; Itoh, M.; Ido, T. )

    1989-04-01

    The in vivo D2-receptor specific brain uptake of N-((2RS,3RS)-1-benzyl-2- methyl-3-pyrrolidinyl)-5-chloro-2-methoxy-4-({sup 11}C)methylaminobenzamide (({sup 11}C)YM-09151-2), was investigated. In rat brain the high uptake of ({sup 11}C)YM-09151-2 in striatum was displaced with sulpiride, spiroperidol, and YM-09151-2. SCH-23390 and ritanserin, D1-dopamine and S2-serotonin antagonists, showed no effect on the distribution of ({sup 11}C)YM-09151-2. In the striatum at 60 min, 95% of the radioactivity was detected as ({sup 11}C)YM-09151-2 by high performance liquid chromatography. On the other hand, 41% of {sup 11}C in the plasma at 60 min was observed as metabolites. In vivo autoradiography showed a high uptake of ({sup 11}C)YM-09151-2 in the striatum and in the nucleus accumbens of rat brain. A high uptake of radioactivity was also found in the canine basal ganglia with positron emission tomography. The uptake was reduced by pretreatment with spiroperidol. The present results demonstrate that ({sup 11}C)YM-09151-2 is a D2 receptor specific compound and is a potential in vivo tracer for measuring D2 receptors.

  9. The effect of a dimeric Affibody molecule (ZEGFR:1907)2 targeting EGFR in combination with radiation in colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara; Spiegelberg, Diana; Lennartsson, Johan; Nygren, Peter; Glimelius, Bengt; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in colorectal cancer and is therefore an attractive target for treatment. (ZEGFR:1907)2 is a newly developed dimeric affibody molecule with high affinity to the extracellular part of EGFR. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of (ZEGFR:1907)2 in combination with external radiation and the possible inhibitory effects in the EGFR signalling pathways in the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT116. The effects were compared with an EGFR antibody (cetuximab) and the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (erlotinib and sunitinib). These cell lines are genotypically different with respect to e.g. KRAS and BRAF mutational status, recently shown to be of clinical significance for therapeutic effects. Both cell lines express approximately 100,000-150,000 EGFRs per cell but differ in the radiation response (HCT116, SF2=0.28 and HT-29, SF2=0.70). Exposure to (ZEGFR:1907)2 produced a small, but significant, reduction in survival in HCT116 but did not affect HT-29 cells. Similar results were obtained after exposure to EGF and the EGFR antibody cetuximab. The EGFR tyrosine kinase targeting inhibitor erlotinib and the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib reduced survival in both cell lines. However, none of the drugs had any significant radiosensitizing effects in combination with radiation. Akt and Erk are central proteins in the EGFR downstream signalling and in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. The activation of Akt (Ser 473) and Erk (Thr202/Tyr204) by radiation was both dose- and time-dependent. However the activation of EGFR was not clearly affected by radiation. Neither (ZEGFR:1907)2 nor any of the other drugs were able to completely inactivate Akt or Erk. On the contrary, erlotinib stimulated Akt phosphorylation in both cell lines and in HCT116 cells Erk was activated. Overall the results illustrate the complexity in response to radiation and drugs in cells with differential

  10. Hyperthermia-triggered intracellular delivery of anticancer agent to HER2+ cells by HER2-specific Affibody (ZHER2-GS-Cys)-Conjugated Thermosensitive Liposomes (HER2+ Affisomes)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brandon; Lyakhov, Ilya; Loomis, Kristin; Needle, Danielle; Baxa, Ulrich; Yavlovich, Amichai; Capala, Jacek; Blumenthal, Robert; Puri, Anu

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported the formulation and physical properties of HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2)-specific Affibody (ZHER2:342-Cys) conjugated thermosensitive liposomes (HER2+ Affisomes). Here we examined localized delivery potential of these Affisomes by monitoring cellular interactions, intracellular uptake, and hyperthermia-induced effects on drug delivery. We modified ZHER2:342-Cys by introducing a glycine-serine spacer before the C-terminus cysteine (called ZHER2-GS-Cys) to achieve accessibility to cell-surface expressed HER2. This modification did not affect HER2-specific binding and ZHER2-GS-Cys retained its ability to conjugate to the liposomes containing dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline: DSPE-PEG2000-Malemide, 96:04 mole ratios (HER2+ Affisomes). HER2+ Affisomes were either (i) fluorescently labeled with rhodamine-PE and calcein or (ii) loaded with an anticancer drug Doxorubicin (DOX). Fluorescently labeled HER2+ Affisomes showed at least 10 fold increase in binding to HER2+ cells (SK-BR-3) when compared to HER2− cells (MDA-MB-468) at 37°C. A competition experiment using free ZHER2-GS-Cys blocked HER2+ Affisomes-SK-BR-3 cell associations. Imaging with confocal microscopy showed that HER2+ Affisomes accumulated in the cytosol of SK-BR-3 cells at 37°C. Hyperthermia-induced intracellular release experiments showed that the treatment of HER2+ Affisome/SK-BR-3 cell complexes with a 45°C (±1°C) pre-equilibrated buffer resulted in cytosolic delivery of calcein. Substantial calcein release was observed within 20 minutes at 45°C, with no effect on cell viability under these conditions. Similarly, DOX-loaded HER2+ Affisomes showed at least 2–3 fold higher accumulation of DOX in SK-BR-3 cells as compared to control liposomes. DOX-mediated cytotoxicity was more pronounced in SK-BR-3 cells especially at lower doses of HER2+ Affisomes. Brief exposure of liposome-cell complexes at 45°C prior to the onset of incubations for cell killing assays

  11. A Novel Affibody-Auristatin E Conjugate With a Potent and Selective Activity Against HER2+ Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Sochaj-Gregorczyk, Alicja M; Serwotka-Suszczak, Anna M; Otlewski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a new type of cancer treatment that most often uses biologically active drugs attached to a monoclonal antibody. This so called antibody-drug conjugate strategy allows the use of highly toxic substances that target tumor cells specifically, leaving healthy tissues largely unaffected. Over the last few years, antibody-drug conjugates have become a powerful tool in cancer treatment. We developed and characterized a novel cytotoxic conjugate against HER2 tumors in which the antibody has been substituted with a much smaller molecule: the affibody. The conjugate is composed of the ZHER2:2891 affibody that recognizes HER2 and a highly potent cytotoxic drug auristatin E. The ZHER2:2891 molecule does not contain cysteine(s) in its amino acid sequence. We generated 3 variants of ZHER2:2891, each containing a single cysteine to allow conjugation through the maleimide group that is present in the cytotoxic component. In 2 variants, we introduced single S46C and D53C substitutions. In the third variant, a short Drug Conjugation Sequence (DCS) containing a single cysteine was introduced at the C-terminus of ZHER2:2891, resulting in ZHER2:2891-DCS. The latter variant exhibited a significantly higher conjugation yield, and therefore its cytotoxicity has been studied more thoroughly. The ZHER2:2891-DCS-MMAE conjugate killed the HER2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB-453 cells efficiently (IC50 values of 5.2 and 24.8 nM, respectively). The T-47-D and MDA-MB-231 cells that express normal levels of HER2 were significantly less sensitive to the conjugate (IC50 values of 135.6 and 161.5 nM, respectively). Overall, we have demonstrated for the first time that proteins other than antibodies/antibody fragments can be successfully combined with a linker-drug module, resulting in conjugates that eliminate cancer cells selectively. PMID:27227324

  12. Increasing the Net Negative Charge by Replacement of DOTA Chelator with DOTAGA Improves the Biodistribution of Radiolabeled Second-Generation Synthetic Affibody Molecules.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Norrström, Emily; Strand, Joanna; Mitran, Bogdan; Orlova, Anna; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A promising strategy to enable patient stratification for targeted therapies is to monitor the target expression in a tumor by radionuclide molecular imaging. Affibody molecules (7 kDa) are nonimmunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a 25-fold smaller size than intact antibodies. They have shown an apparent potential as molecular imaging probes both in preclinical and clinical studies. Earlier, we found that hepatic uptake can be reduced by the incorporation of negatively charged purification tags at the N-terminus of Affibody molecules. We hypothesized that liver uptake might similarly be reduced by positioning the chelator at the N-terminus, where the chelator-radionuclide complex will provide negative charges. To test this hypothesis, a second generation synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:2891 Affibody molecule was synthesized and labeled with (111)In and (68)Ga using DOTAGA and DOTA chelators. The chelators were manually coupled to the N-terminus of ZHER2:2891 forming an amide bond. Labeling DOTAGA-ZHER2:2891 and DOTA-ZHER2:2891 with (68)Ga and (111)In resulted in stable radioconjugates. The tumor-targeting and biodistribution properties of the (111)In- and (68)Ga-labeled conjugates were compared in SKOV-3 tumor-bearing nude mice at 2 h postinjection. The HER2-specific binding of the radioconjugates was verified both in vitro and in vivo. Using the DOTAGA chelator gave significantly lower radioactivity in liver and blood for both radionuclides. The (111)In-labeled conjugates showed more rapid blood clearance than the (68)Ga-labeled conjugates. The most pronounced influence of the chelators was found when they were labeled with (68)Ga. The DOTAGA chelator gave significantly higher tumor-to-blood (61 ± 6 vs 23 ± 5, p < 0.05) and tumor-to-liver (10.4 ± 0.6 vs 4.5 ± 0.5, p < 0.05) ratios than the DOTA chelator. This study demonstrated that chelators may be used to alter the uptake of Affibody molecules, and most likely other scaffold-based imaging probes, for improvement

  13. Application of receptor-specific risk distribution in the arsenic contaminated land management.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-chun; Ng, Shane; Wang, Gen-shuh; Ma, Hwong-wen

    2013-11-15

    Concerns over health risks and financial costs have caused difficulties in the management of arsenic contaminated land in Taiwan. Inflexible risk criteria and lack of economic support often result in failure of a brownfields regeneration project. To address the issue of flexible risk criteria, this study is aimed to develop maps with receptor-specific risk distribution to facilitate scenario analysis of contaminated land management. A contaminated site risk map model (ArcGIS for risk assessment and management, abbreviated as Arc-RAM) was constructed by combining the four major steps of risk assessment with Geographic Information Systems. Sampling of contaminated media, survey of exposure attributes, and modeling of multimedia transport were integrated to produce receptor group-specific maps that depicted the probabilistic spatial distribution of risks of various receptor groups. Flexible risk management schemes can then be developed and assessed. In this study, a risk management program that took into account the ratios of various land use types at specified risk levels was explored. A case study of arsenic contaminated land of 6.387 km(2) has found that for a risk value between 1.00E-05 and 1.00E-06, the proposed flexible risk management of agricultural land achieves improved utilization of land. Using this method, the investigated case can reduce costs related to compensation for farmland totaling approximately NTD 5.94 million annually. PMID:22884730

  14. Screening of hormone-like activities in bottled waters available in Southern Spain using receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Real, Macarena; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Jiménez-Díaz, Inmaculada; Arrebola, Juan Pedro; Sáenz, José-María; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Bottled water consumption is a putative source of human exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Research has been conducted on the presence of chemicals with estrogen-like activity in bottled waters and on their estrogenicity, but few data are available on the presence of hormonal activities associated with other nuclear receptors (NRs). The aim of this study was to determine the presence of endocrine activities dependent on the activation of human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and/or androgen receptor (hAR) in water in glass or plastic bottles sold to consumers in Southern Spain. Hormone-like activities were evaluated in 29 bottled waters using receptor-specific bioassays based on reporter gene expression in PALM cells [(anti-)androgenicity] and cell proliferation assessment in MCF-7 cells [(anti-)estrogenicity] after optimized solid phase extraction (SPE). All of the water samples analyzed showed hormonal activity. This was estrogenic in 79.3% and anti-estrogenic in 37.9% of samples and was androgenic in 27.5% and anti-androgenic in 41.3%, with mean concentrations per liter of 0.113pM 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalent units (E2Eq), 11.01pM anti-estrogen (ICI 182780) equivalent units (ICI 182780Eq), 0.33pM methyltrienolone (R1881) equivalent units (R1881Eq), and 0.18nM procymidone equivalent units (ProcEq). Bottled water consumption contributes to EDC exposure. Hormone-like activities observed in waters from both plastic and glass bottles suggest that plastic packaging is not the sole source of contamination and that the source of the water and bottling process may play a role, among other factors. Further research is warranted on the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to low doses of EDCs. PMID:25454229

  15. Receptor specificity of subtype H1 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and humans in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of receptor specificity of classical swine influenza viruses leading to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was analyzed in glycan microarrays. Classical influenza viruses from the alpha, beta, and gamma antigenic clusters isolated between 1945 and 2009 revealed a binding profile very simila...

  16. Measuring HER2-Receptor Expression In Metastatic Breast Cancer Using [68Ga]ABY-025 Affibody PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Jens; Velikyan, Irina; Sandberg, Dan; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sandström, Mattias; Lubberink, Mark; Olofsson, Helena; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of HER2 expression could potentially be used to select patients for HER2-targed therapy, predict response based on uptake and be used for monitoring. In this phase I/II study the HER2-binding Affibody molecule ABY-025 was labeled with 68Ga-gallium ([68Ga]ABY-025) for PET to study effect of peptide mass, test-retest variability and correlation of quantified uptake in tumors to histopathology. Experimental design: Sixteen women with known metastatic breast cancer and on-going treatment were included and underwent FDG PET/CT to identify viable metastases. After iv injection of 212±46 MBq [68Ga]ABY-025 whole-body PET was performed at 1, 2 and 4 h. In the first 10 patients (6 with HER2-positive and 4 with HER2-negative primary tumors), [68Ga]ABY-025 PET/CT with two different doses of injected peptide was performed one week apart. In the last six patients (5 HER2-positive and 1 HER2-negative primary tumors), repeated [68Ga]ABY-025 PET were performed one week apart as a test-retest of uptake in individual lesions. Biopsies from 16 metastases in 12 patients were collected for verification of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Results: Imaging 4h after injection with high peptide content discriminated HER2-positive metastases best (p<0.01). PET SUV correlated with biopsy HER2-scores (r=0.91, p<0.001). Uptake was five times higher in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative lesions with no overlap (p=0.005). The test-retest intra-class correlation was r=0.996. [68Ga]ABY-025 PET correctly identified conversion and mixed expression of HER2 and targeted treatment was changed in 3 of the 16 patients. Conclusion: [68Ga]ABY-025 PET accurately quantifies whole-body HER2-receptor status in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26877784

  17. Linearized method: A new approach for kinetic analysis of central dopamine D{sub 2} receptor specific binding

    SciTech Connect

    Watabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ido, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Iwata, Ren; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Hatano, Kentaro

    1995-12-01

    The authors proposed a new method (Linearized method) to analyze neuroleptic ligand-receptor specific binding in a human brain using positron emission tomography (PET). They derived the linear equation to solve four rate constants, k{sub 3}, k{sub 4}, k{sub 5}, k{sub 6} from PET data. This method does not demand radioactivity curve in plasma as an input function to brain, and can do fast calculations in order to determine rate constants. They also tested Nonlinearized method including nonlinear equations which is conventional analysis using plasma radioactivity corrected for ligand metabolites as an input function. The authors applied these methods to evaluate dopamine D{sub 2} receptor specific binding of [{sup 11}C] YM-09151-2. The value of B{sub max}/K{sub d} = k{sub 3}k{sub 4} obtained by Linearized method was 5.72 {+-} 3.1 which was consistent with the value of 5.78 {+-} 3.4 obtained by Nonlinearized method.

  18. Receptor-specific in vivo desensitization by the G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rockman, H A; Choi, D J; Rahman, N U; Akhter, S A; Lefkowitz, R J; Koch, W J

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated with cardiac-specific overexpression of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5), a serine/threonine kinase most abundantly expressed in the heart compared with other tissues. Animals overexpressing GRK5 showed marked beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization in both the anesthetized and conscious state compared with nontransgenic control mice, while the contractile response to angiotensin II receptor stimulation was unchanged. In contrast, the angiotensin II-induced rise in contractility was significantly attenuated in transgenic mice overexpressing the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase-1, another member of the GRK family. These data suggest that myocardial overexpression of GRK5 results in selective uncoupling of G protein-coupled receptors and demonstrate that receptor specificity of the GRKs may be important in determining the physiological phenotype. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8790438

  19. Active targeting using HER-2-affibody-conjugated nanoparticles enabled sensitive and specific imaging of orthotopic HER-2 positive ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Minati; Wang, Liya; Zielinski, Rafal; Qian, Weiping; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Capala, Jacek; Lee, Gee Young; Xu, Hong; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2014-02-12

    Despite advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment, ovarian cancer remains one of the most fatal cancer types. The development of targeted nanoparticle imaging probes and therapeutics offers promising approaches for early detection and effective treatment of ovarian cancer. In this study, HER-2 targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are developed by conjugating a high affinity and small size HER-2 affibody that is labeled with a unique near infrared dye (NIR-830) to the nanoparticles. Using a clinically relevant orthotopic human ovarian tumor xenograft model, it is shown that HER-2 targeted IONPs are selectively delivered into both primary and disseminated ovarian tumors, enabling non-invasive optical and MR imaging of the tumors as small as 1 mm in the peritoneal cavity. It is determined that HER-2 targeted delivery of the IONPs is essential for specific and sensitive imaging of the HER-2 positive tumor since we are unable to detect the imaging signal in the tumors following systemic delivery of non-targeted IONPs into the mice bearing HER-2 positive SKOV3 tumors. Furthermore, imaging signals and the IONPs are not detected in HER-2 low expressing OVCAR3 tumors after systemic delivery of HER-2 targeted-IONPs. Since HER-2 is expressed in a high percentage of ovarian cancers, the HER-2 targeted dual imaging modality IONPs have potential for the development of novel targeted imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles for ovarian cancer detection, targeted drug delivery, and image-guided therapy and surgery. PMID:24038985

  20. Imaging agents for in vivo molecular profiling of disseminated prostate cancer--targeting EGFR receptors in prostate cancer: comparison of cellular processing of [111In]-labeled affibody molecule Z(EGFR:2377) and cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Jennie; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna

    2011-04-01

    Expression of receptor tyrosine-kinase (RTK) EGFR is low in normal prostate, but increases in prostate cancer. This receptor is significantly up-regulated as tumors progress into higher grade, androgen-insensitive and metastatic lesions. The up-regulated receptors could serve as targets for novel selective anti-cancer drugs, e.g. antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Radionuclide imaging of RTK can facilitate patient stratification and monitoring of anti-RTK therapy of prostate cancer. The goal of the study was to evaluate binding and cellar processing of radiolabeled EGFR-targeting conjugates by prostate cancer cell lines. Receptor expression of EGFR was studied in three prostate cancer cell lines: DU145 (brain metastasis of PC, hormone insensitive), PC3 (bone metastasis of PC) and LNCaP (lymph node metastasis of PC, androgen and estrogen receptor positive). Uptake and internalization of anti-EGFR mAbs (cetuximab) and affibody molecule (Z2377) labeled with indium-111 was investigated. EGFR expression on prostate cancer cell lines was clearly demonstrated. Both labelled conjugates 111In-Z2377 and 111In-cetuximab bound to prostate cancer cells in the receptor mediated model. Expression levels were modest but correlate with degree of hormone independence. Internalization of Affibody molecules was relatively slow in all cell lines. Internalization of mAbs was more rapid. The level of EGFR expression in these cell lines is sufficient for in vivo molecular imaging. Slow internalization indicates possibility of the use of non-residualizing labels for affibody molecules. PMID:21253675

  1. The Conserved RIC-3 Coiled-Coil Domain Mediates Receptor-specific Interactions with Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Biala, Yoav; Liewald, Jana F.; Ben-Ami, Hagit Cohen; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    RIC-3 belongs to a conserved family of proteins influencing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) maturation. RIC-3 proteins are integral membrane proteins residing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and containing a C-terminal coiled-coil domain (CC-I). Conservation of CC-I in all RIC-3 family members indicates its importance; however, previous studies could not show its function. To examine the role of CC-I, we studied effects of its deletion on Caenorhabditis elegans nAChRs in vivo. Presence of CC-I promoted maturation of particular nAChRs expressed in body-wall muscle, whereas it was not required for other nAChR subtypes expressed in neurons or pharyngeal muscles. This effect is receptor-specific, because it could be reproduced after heterologous expression. Consistently, coimmunoprecipitation analysis showed that CC-I enhances the interaction of RIC-3 with a nAChR that requires CC-I in vivo; thus CC-I appears to enhance affinity of RIC-3 to specific nAChRs. However, we found that this function of CC-I is redundant with functions of sequences downstream to CC-I, potentially a second coiled-coil. Alternative splicing in both vertebrates and invertebrates generates RIC-3 transcripts that lack the entire C-terminus, or only CC-I. Thus, our results suggest that RIC-3 alternative splicing enables subtype specific regulation of nAChR maturation. PMID:19116311

  2. The in vivo disposition and in vitro transmembrane transport of two model radiometabolites of DOTA-conjugated receptor-specific peptides labelled with (177) Lu.

    PubMed

    Volková, Marie; Mandíková, Jana; Bárta, Pavel; Navrátilová, Lucie; Lázníčková, Alice; Trejtnar, František

    2015-01-01

    In vivo metabolism of the radiolabelled receptor-specific peptides has been described; however, information regarding the pharmacokinetic behaviour of the degradation products within the body is very scarce. The present study was designed to obtain new knowledge on the disposition and elimination of low-molecular radiometabolites of receptor-specific peptides in the organism and to reveal the potential involvement of selected membrane transport mechanisms in the cellular uptake of radiometabolites, especially in the kidney. The study compared pharmacokinetics of two radiometabolites: a final metabolite of somatostatin analogues, (177)Lu-DOTA-DPhe, and a tripeptide metabolite of (177)Lu-DOTA-minigastrin 11, (177)Lu-DOTA-DGlu-Ala-Tyr. Their pharmacokinetics was compared with that of respective parent (177)Lu-radiopeptide. Both radiometabolites exhibited relative rapid clearing from most body tissues in rats in vivo along with predominant renal excretion. The long-term renal retention of the smaller radiometabolite (177)Lu-DOTA-DPhe was lower than that of (177)Lu-DOTA-DGlu-Ala-Tyr. An uptake of (177)Lu-DOTA-DPhe by human renal influx transporter organic cation transporter 2 was found in vitro in a cellular model. The study brings the first experimental data on the in vivo pharmacokinetics of radiometabolites of receptor-specific somatostatin and gastrin analogues. The found results may indicate a negative correlation between the degree of decomposition of the parent peptide chain and the renal retention of the metabolite. PMID:26526343

  3. Hemagglutinin amino acids related to receptor specificity could affect the protection efficacy of H5N1 and H7N9 avian influenza virus vaccines in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Bao, Linlin; Lau, Siu-Ying; Wu, Wai-Lan; Yuan, Jing; Gu, Songzhi; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Xu, Yanfeng; Pushko, Peter; Chen, Honglin; Qin, Chuan

    2016-05-17

    The continuous and sporadic human transmission of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses illustrates the urgent need for efficacious vaccines. However, all tested vaccines for the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses appear to be poorly immunogenic in mammals. In this study, a series of vaccines was produced using reverse genetic techniques that possess HA and NA genes from the H5N1 virus in the genetic background of the high-yield strain A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). Meanwhile, a group of H7N9 VLP vaccines that contain HA from H7N9 and NA and M1 from A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) was also produced. The HA amino acids of both the H5N1 and H7N9 vaccines differed at residues 226 and 228, both of which are critical for receptor specificity for an avian or mammalian host. Mice received two doses (3μg of HA each) of each vaccine and were challenged with lethal doses of wild type H5N1 or H7N9 viruses. The results showed that a recombinant H5N1 vaccine in which the HA amino acid G228 (avian specificity) was converted to S228 (mammalian specificity) resulted in higher HI titers, a lower viral titer in the lungs, and 100% protection in mice. However, a H7N9 VLP vaccine that contains L226 (mammalian specificity) and G228 (avian specificity) in HA showed better immunogenicity and protection efficacy in mice than VLP containing HA with either L226+S228 or Q226+S228. This observation indicated that specific HA residues could enhance a vaccine's protection efficacy and HA glycoproteins with both avian-type and human-type receptor specificities may produce better pandemic influenza vaccines for humans. PMID:27083426

  4. Reduced secondary cytokine induction by BAY 50-4798, a high-affinity receptor-specific interleukin-2 analog.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Sonja; Eckart, Michael R; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Sternberg, Lawrence R; Greve, Jeffrey M; Cassell, Delanie J

    2006-03-01

    Recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) (aldesleukin, Proleukin, Chiron, Emeryville, CA) is approved for treatment of cancer patients and under investigation in HIV-infected individuals. However, treatment with aldesleukin is associated with toxicity, which may be due to its elicitation of inflammatory mediators from cells that express the intermediate-affinity IL-2 receptor. BAY 50-4798, a novel IL-2 analog, is a selective agonist for the high-affinity receptor. It induces the proliferation of activated T cells with a potency similar to that of aldesleukin but has reduced activity on cells expressing the intermediate-affinity receptor. In the current study, we compared cytokine responses elicited in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures stimulated with BAY 50-4798 or aldesleukin. BAY 50-4798 induced approximately 5-fold lower mean levels of endogenous IL-2 than aldesleukin, and at least 50% lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis fctor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Furthermore, statistically significant reductions in the levels of IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were observed in response to BAY 50-4798. These findings increase our understanding of the biologic action of BAY 50-4798 and suggest a mechanism by which it may exhibit better safety than aldesleukin in humans. PMID:16542139

  5. 1918 Influenza receptor binding domain variants bind and replicate in primary human airway cells regardless of receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Chertow, Daniel S; Kindrachuk, Jason; Qi, Li; Schwartzman, Louis M; Suzich, Jon; Alsaaty, Sara; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2016-06-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic caused ~50 million deaths. Many questions remain regarding the origin, pathogenicity, and mechanisms of human adaptation of this virus. Avian-adapted influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids (Sia) while human-adapted viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked Sia. A change in Sia preference from α2,3 to α2,6 is thought to be a requirement for human adaptation of avian influenza viruses. Autopsy data from 1918 cases, however, suggest that factors other than Sia preference played a role in viral binding and entry to human airway cells. Here, we evaluated binding and entry of five 1918 influenza receptor binding domain variants in a primary human airway cell model along with control avian and human influenza viruses. We observed that all five variants bound and entered cells efficiently and that Sia preference did not predict entry of influenza A virus to primary human airway cells evaluated in this model. PMID:27062579

  6. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason R.; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant, therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry. Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored immunohistochemistry and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot or in vitro flow cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immuno-staining, with implications for use in non-invasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  7. Chemosensory receptor specificity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Ryan P; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2015-07-01

    The senses provide a means by which data on the physical and chemical properties of the environment may be collected and meaningfully interpreted. Sensation begins at the periphery, where a multitude of different sensory cell types are activated by environmental stimuli as different as photons and odorant molecules. Stimulus sensitivity is due to expression of different cell surface sensory receptors, and therefore the receptive field of each sense is defined by the aggregate of expressed receptors in each sensory tissue. Here, we review current understanding on patterns of expression and modes of regulation of sensory receptors. PMID:25938729

  8. Measurement of D2 dopamine receptor-specific carbon-11-YM-09151-2 binding in the canine brain by PET: Importance of partial volume correction

    SciTech Connect

    Hatazawa, J.; Hatano, K.; Ishiwata, K.; Itoh, M.; Ido, T.; Kawashima, K.; Meguro, K.; Watanuki, S.; Seo, S. )

    1991-04-01

    Carbon-11-YM-09151-2 binds highly selectively to D2 dopamine receptors in the brain. Using this ligand, D2 dopamine receptor density (Bmax) and affinity (Kd) in canine striatum were measured. After administering various doses of the ligand in nine experiments, regional uptake was followed by repeated PET scanning for up to 80 min. D2 dopamine receptor specific binding at equilibrium was defined as striatal minus occipital activity after partial volume correction. Bmax and Kd were estimated by Scatchard analysis to be 40.3 pmole/ml of tissue and 22.9 nM, respectively. When a low mass dose of the ligand was administered, the bound-to-free ligand ratio in the striatum at equilibrium was consistent with the Bmax/Kd value obtained from the Scatchard analysis. The present study demonstrates the importance of partial volume correction and the Bmax/Kd measurement in a single PET study with carbon-11-YM-09151-2.

  9. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides ‘proof of principle’ for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  10. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides 'proof of principle' for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  11. Agonist-selective, Receptor-specific Interaction of Human P2Y Receptors with β-Arrestin-1 and -2*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Ziegler, Nicole; Reiner, Susanne; Krasel, Cornelius; Lohse, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction of G-protein-coupled receptors with β-arrestins is an important step in receptor desensitization and in triggering “alternative” signals. By means of confocal microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we have investigated the internalization of the human P2Y receptors 1, 2, 4, 6, 11, and 12 and their interaction with β-arrestin-1 and -2. Co-transfection of each individual P2Y receptor with β-arrestin-1-GFP or β-arrestin-2-YFP into HEK-293 cells and stimulation with the corresponding agonists resulted in a receptor-specific interaction pattern. The P2Y1 receptor stimulated with ADP strongly translocated β-arrestin-2-YFP, whereas only a slight translocation was observed for β-arrestin-1-GFP. The P2Y4 receptor exhibited equally strong translocation for β-arrestin-1-GFP and β-arrestin-2-YFP when stimulated with UTP. The P2Y6, P2Y11, and P2Y12 receptor internalized only when GRK2 was additionally co-transfected, but β-arrestin translocation was only visible for the P2Y6 and P2Y11 receptor. The P2Y2 receptor showed a β-arrestin translocation pattern that was dependent on the agonist used for stimulation. UTP translocated β-arrestin-1-GFP and β-arrestin-2-YFP equally well, whereas ATP translocated β-arrestin-1-GFP to a much lower extent than β-arrestin-2-YFP. The same agonist-dependent pattern was seen in fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments between the fluorescently labeled P2Y2 receptor and β-arrestins. Thus, the P2Y2 receptor would be classified as a class A receptor when stimulated with ATP or as a class B receptor when stimulated with UTP. The ligand-specific recruitment of β-arrestins by ATP and UTP stimulation of P2Y2 receptors was further found to result in differential stimulation of ERK phosphorylation. This suggests that the two different agonists induce distinct active states of this receptor that show differential interactions with β-arrestins. PMID:18703513

  12. Electrophoretic isolation of saponin fractions from Saponinum album and their evaluation in synergistically enhancing the receptor-specific cytotoxicity of targeted toxins.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Mayank; Weng, Alexander; Bachran, Diana; Riese, Sebastian B; Böttger, Stefan; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2011-11-01

    Saponinum album (SA) is a commercial mixture of saponins isolated from Gypsophila species. In the previously published work, we reported that SA dramatically improves the inhibition of tumor growth by targeted toxins in mice in a synergistic way. Here we report a simplified electrophoretic method for the isolation of a highly effective fraction of SA with a relative electrophoretic mobility to the dye front (R(f) ) of 0.63 from the mixture. In total, four different fractions were separated at a preparative scale, and evaluated by ESI-MS, HPLC and TLC analysis. Electrophoretic mobility and electrochemical properties of the different fractions of saponins from SA were set into relation to their ability to enhance the cytotoxicity of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-based targeted toxins. We here treated HER-14 cells, which are NIH-3T3 Swiss mouse embryo cells transfected with the human EGF receptor. Untransfected NIH-3T3 cells served as control. The major bulk of SA (72.3%) (R(f) =0.78) migrated the farthest and was found to be significantly ineffective (p<0.05) in enhancing the cytotoxicity of the targeted toxin, while the second fraction (R(f) =0.63) showed an enhancement of 9800-fold. The third (R(f) =0.56) had an enhancement factor of 3200, the fourth (R(f) =0.08) was again significantly ineffective (p<0.05) in exhibiting any enhancement of cytotoxicity. PMID:21997431

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of the effects of single (S221P) and double (S221P and K216E) mutations in the hemagglutinin protein of influenza A H5N1 virus: a study on host receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Behera, Abhisek Kumar; Chandra, Ishwar; Cherian, Sarah S

    2016-09-01

    Avian influenza viruses of subtype H5N1 circulating in animals continue to pose threats to human health. The binding preference of the viral surface protein hemagglutinin (HA) to sialosaccharides of receptors is an important area for understanding mutations in the receptor binding site that could be the cause for avian-to-human transmission. In the present work, we studied the effect of two receptor binding site mutations, S221P singly and in combination with another mutation K216E in the HA protein of influenza A H5N1 viruses. Docking of sialic acid ligands corresponding to both avian and human receptors and molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes for wild and mutant strains of H5N1 viruses were carried out. The H5N1 strain possessing the S221P mutation indicated decreased binding to α2,3-linked sialic acids (avian receptor, SAα2,3Gal) when compared to the binding of the wild-type strain that did not possess the HA-221 mutation. The binding to α2,6-linked sialic acids (human receptor, SAα2,6Gal) was found to be comparable, indicating that the mutant strain shows limited dual receptor specificity. On the other hand, the S221P mutation in synergism with the K216E mutation in the binding site, resulted in increased binding affinity for SAα2,6Gal when compared to SAα2,3Gal, indicative of enhanced binding to human receptors. The in-depth study of the molecular interactions in the docked complexes could explain how co-occurring mutations in the HA viral protein can aid in providing fitness advantage to the virus, in the context of host receptor specificity in emerging variants of H5N1 influenza viruses. PMID:26457729

  14. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the preparation of new ligands, M4 and M5. The radiolabeling was successful, but the biodistribution of the new MIBG derivatives did not show any improvements in heart uptake. Our effort in this area has met with only limited success. Unfortunately, the new [99mTc]labeled MIBG derivatives showed lower uptake in the heart in biodistribution study.

  15. The SI Strain of Measles Virus Derived from a Patient with Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Possesses Typical Genome Alterations and Unique Amino Acid Changes That Modulate Receptor Specificity and Reduce Membrane Fusion Activity ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Fumio; Yamada, Kentaro; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Okamura, Koji; Yanagi, Yusuke; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Komase, Katsuhiro; Takeda, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal sequela associated with measles and is caused by persistent infection of the brain with measles virus (MV). The SI strain was isolated in 1976 from a patient with SSPE and shows neurovirulence in animals. Genome nucleotide sequence analyses showed that the SI strain genome possesses typical genome alterations for SSPE-derived strains, namely, accumulated amino acid substitutions in the M protein and cytoplasmic tail truncation of the F protein. Through the establishment of an efficient reverse genetics system, a recombinant SI strain expressing a green fluorescent protein (rSI-AcGFP) was generated. The infection of various cell types with rSI-AcGFP was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. rSI-AcGFP exhibited limited syncytium-forming activity and spread poorly in cells. Analyses using a recombinant MV possessing a chimeric genome between those of the SI strain and a wild-type MV strain indicated that the membrane-associated protein genes (M, F, and H) were responsible for the altered growth phenotype of the SI strain. Functional analyses of viral glycoproteins showed that the F protein of the SI strain exhibited reduced fusion activity because of an E300G substitution and that the H protein of the SI strain used CD46 efficiently but used the original MV receptors on immune and epithelial cells poorly because of L482F, S546G, and F555L substitutions. The data obtained in the present study provide a new platform for analyses of SSPE-derived strains as well as a clear example of an SSPE-derived strain that exhibits altered receptor specificity and limited fusion activity. PMID:21917959

  16. A novel aminotetralin-type serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor-specific agonist and 5-HT2A competitive antagonist/5-HT2B inverse agonist with preclinical efficacy for psychoses.

    PubMed

    Canal, Clinton E; Morgan, Drake; Felsing, Daniel; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L; Sakhuja, Rajeev; Booth, Raymond G

    2014-05-01

    Development of 5-HT2C agonists for treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, including psychoses, substance abuse, and obesity, has been fraught with difficulties, because the vast majority of reported 5-HT2C selective agonists also activate 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2B receptors, potentially causing hallucinations and/or cardiac valvulopathy. Herein is described a novel, potent, and efficacious human 5-HT2C receptor agonist, (-)-trans-(2S,4R)-4-(3'[meta]-bromophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine (-)-MBP), that is a competitive antagonist and inverse agonist at human 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. (-)-MBP has efficacy comparable to the prototypical second-generation antipsychotic drug clozapine in three C57Bl/6 mouse models of drug-induced psychoses: the head-twitch response elicited by [2,5]-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine; hyperlocomotion induced by MK-801 [(5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (dizocilpine maleate)]; and hyperlocomotion induced by amphetamine. (-)-MBP, however, does not alter locomotion when administered alone, distinguishing it from clozapine, which suppresses locomotion. Finally, consumption of highly palatable food by mice was not increased by (-)-MBP at a dose that produced at least 50% maximal efficacy in the psychoses models. Compared with (-)-MBP, the enantiomer (+)-MBP was much less active across in vitro affinity and functional assays using mouse and human receptors and also translated in vivo with comparably lower potency and efficacy. Results indicate a 5-HT2C receptor-specific agonist, such as (-)-MBP, may be pharmacotherapeutic for psychoses, without liability for obesity, hallucinations, heart disease, sedation, or motoric disorders. PMID:24563531

  17. A Novel Aminotetralin-Type Serotonin (5-HT) 2C Receptor-Specific Agonist and 5-HT2A Competitive Antagonist/5-HT2B Inverse Agonist with Preclinical Efficacy for Psychoses

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Drake; Felsing, Daniel; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Rowland, Neil E.; Robertson, Kimberly L.; Sakhuja, Rajeev; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-01-01

    Development of 5-HT2C agonists for treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, including psychoses, substance abuse, and obesity, has been fraught with difficulties, because the vast majority of reported 5-HT2C selective agonists also activate 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT2B receptors, potentially causing hallucinations and/or cardiac valvulopathy. Herein is described a novel, potent, and efficacious human 5-HT2C receptor agonist, (−)-trans-(2S,4R)-4-(3′[meta]-bromophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine (−)-MBP), that is a competitive antagonist and inverse agonist at human 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively. (−)-MBP has efficacy comparable to the prototypical second-generation antipsychotic drug clozapine in three C57Bl/6 mouse models of drug-induced psychoses: the head-twitch response elicited by [2,5]-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine; hyperlocomotion induced by MK-801 [(5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (dizocilpine maleate)]; and hyperlocomotion induced by amphetamine. (−)-MBP, however, does not alter locomotion when administered alone, distinguishing it from clozapine, which suppresses locomotion. Finally, consumption of highly palatable food by mice was not increased by (−)-MBP at a dose that produced at least 50% maximal efficacy in the psychoses models. Compared with (−)-MBP, the enantiomer (+)-MBP was much less active across in vitro affinity and functional assays using mouse and human receptors and also translated in vivo with comparably lower potency and efficacy. Results indicate a 5-HT2C receptor-specific agonist, such as (−)-MBP, may be pharmacotherapeutic for psychoses, without liability for obesity, hallucinations, heart disease, sedation, or motoric disorders. PMID:24563531

  18. Effects of somatostatin-14 and the receptor-specific somatostatin analogs on chromogranin A and alpha-subunit (alpha-SU) release from "clinically nonfunctioning" pituitary adenoma cells incubated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Lawnicka, H; Pisarek, H; Kunert-Radek, J; Radek, M; Culler, M D

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of somatostatin (SST) and its analogs on the release of chromogranin A (CgA) and alpha-subunit (alpha-SU) from clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas incubated in vitro. Seven pituitary macroadenomas surgically removed were investigated. All of the tumors were diagnosed before surgery as non-functioning, but they expressed either gonadotropins or their subunits as detected by immunohistochemistry. Two tumors additionally expressed prolactin and growth hormone. All adenomas also expressed chromogranin A (CgA) and at least 3 of 5 subtypes of somatostatin receptors. The cells isolated from the examined tumors were exposed in vitro to either native SST-14 or the following receptor-specific SST analogs: BIM-23926 (agonist of sst1 receptor), BIM-23120 (agonist of sst2 receptor), BIM-23206 (agonist of sst5 receptor) and BIM23A387 (somatostatin/dopamine chimera). The concentration of CgA was measured by means of ELISA method and of alpha-SU was measured by an immunoradiometric method. It was found that the exposure on SST-14 resulted in the decrease of CgA and alpha-SU release from tumor cells in majority of samples, and the effect on CgA was positively correlated with the expression of sst3 and also with the sst2A/sst2B expressions ratio. The inhibitory effect of SST-14 on CgA and alpha-SU seems also to correlate negatively with the expression of sst2B. CgA inhibition also correlates positively with sst5 expression. Among the other compounds studied, only the sst2 agonist decreased the release in all the investigated samples. The remaining substances (agonists of sst1 and sst5 and SST/DA chimera) produced the divergent changes (increased or decreased release, depending on the sample). The data suggest that the inhibition of CgA (and possibly of alpha-SU) release by SST is mediated via subtypes sst2A, sst3 and sst5, whereas sst2B subtype may induce the opposite effect. PMID:17440235

  19. The in vitro influences of epidermal growth factor and heregulin-β1 on the efficacy of trastuzumab used in Her-2 positive breast adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her-2) is over expressed in approximately 25-30% of all primary breast tumors resulting in a distinctive breast cancer subtype associated with a poor prognosis and a decrease in overall survival. Trastuzumab (Herceptin®), an anti-Her-2 monoclonal antibody, has dramatically altered the prognosis of Her-2 positive breast cancer. Trastuzumab is, however, associated with primary and acquired resistance. Aim and methods To investigate the in-vitro effects of trastuzumab on cell viability (tetrazolium conversion assay), cell cycling (propidium iodide staining), apoptosis (executioner caspases and annexin-V) and relative surface Her-2 receptor expression (anti-Her-2 affibody molecule) in Her-2-positive (SK-Br-3) and oestrogen receptor positive (MCF-7) breast adenocarcinoma cells and to determine potential augmentation of these effects by two endogenous ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and heregulin-β1 (HRG- β1). Results Cell viability was decreased in SK-Br-3 cells by exposure to trastuzumab. This was associated with G1 accumulation and decreased relative surface Her-2 receptor density, supporting the cytostatic nature of trastuzumab in vitro. SK-Br-3 cells exposed to EGF and heregulin-β1 produced differential cell responses alone and in combination with trastuzumab, in some instances augmenting cell viability and cell cycling. Relative surface Her-2 receptor density was reduced substantially by trastuzumab, EGF and heregulin-β1. These reductions were amplified when ligands were used in combination with trastuzumab. Conclusion Cell type specific interactions of endogenous ligands appear to be dependent on absolute Her-receptor expression and cross activation of signaling pathways. This supports the notion that receptor density of Her-family members and multiplicity of growth ligands are of mutual importance in breast cancer cell proliferation and therefore also in resistance associated with trastuzumab. PMID

  20. Mapping growth-factor-modulated Akt signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-05-15

    Growth factors alter cellular behavior through shared signaling cascades, raising the question of how specificity is achieved. Here, we have determined how growth factor actions are encoded into Akt signaling dynamics by real-time tracking of a fluorescent sensor. In individual cells, Akt activity was encoded in an analog pattern, with similar latencies (∼2 min) and half-maximal peak response times (range of 5-8 min). Yet, different growth factors promoted dose-dependent and heterogeneous changes in signaling dynamics. Insulin treatment caused sustained Akt activity, whereas EGF or PDGF-AA promoted transient signaling; PDGF-BB produced sustained responses at higher concentrations, but short-term effects at low doses, actions that were independent of the PDGF-α receptor. Transient responses to EGF were caused by negative feedback at the receptor level, as a second treatment yielded minimal responses, whereas parallel exposure to IGF-I caused full Akt activation. Small-molecule inhibitors reduced PDGF-BB signaling to transient responses, but only decreased the magnitude of IGF-I actions. Our observations reveal distinctions among growth factors that use shared components, and allow us to capture the consequences of receptor-specific regulatory mechanisms on Akt signaling. PMID:27044757

  1. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube. Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Exams and Tests Factor XII deficiency is most often found when ...

  2. Quality factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    The quality factor, Q, is a dimensionless modifier used in converting absorbed dose, expressed in rads (or grays), to dose equivalent, expressed in rems (or seiverts). The dose equivalent is used in radiation protection to account for the biological effectiveness of different kinds of radiation. The quality factor is related to both the linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE). The RBE's obtained from biological experiments depend in a complex way on the observed biological effect, the specific test organism, and the experimental conditions. Judgement is involved, therefore, in the choice of the quality factor. Questions regarding the adequacy of current Q values for neutrons were raised first in a 1980 statement by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) and later in a 1985 statement by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In 1980, the NCRP alerted the technical community to possible future increases between a factor of three and ten in the Q for neutrons, and in 1985, the ICRP suggested an increase by a factor of two in Q for neutrons. Both the ICRP and NRCP are now recommending essentially the same guidance with regard to Q for neutrons: an increase by a factor of two. The Q for neutrons is based on a large, albeit unfocused, body of experimental data. In spite of the lack of focus, the data supporting a change in the neutron quality factor are substantial. However, the proposed doubling of Q for neutrons is clouded by other issues regarding its application. 33 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Rethinking Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an exciting exploration-based activity in which students develop an alternative definition of factor that can help them solve problems like the one presented above. Students work in groups to collect data, analyze the data to make conjectures, and then spend a significant amount of time debating and justifying their…

  4. Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Samkoe, Kimberley S; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Gunn, Jason R; Wells, Wendy A; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-12-15

    As receptor-targeted therapeutics become increasingly used in clinical oncology, the ability to quantify protein expression and pharmacokinetics in vivo is imperative to ensure successful individualized treatment plans. Current standards for receptor analysis are performed on extracted tissues. These measurements are static and often physiologically irrelevant; therefore, only a partial picture of available receptors for drug targeting in vivo is provided. Until recently, in vivo measurements were limited by the inability to separate delivery, binding, and retention effects, but this can be circumvented by a dual-tracer approach for referencing the detected signal. We hypothesized that in vivo receptor concentration imaging (RCI) would be superior to ex vivo immunohistochemistry (IHC). Using multiple xenograft tumor models with varying EGFR expression, we determined the EGFR concentration in each model using a novel targeted agent (anti-EGFR affibody-IRDye800CW conjugate) along with a simultaneously delivered reference agent (control affibody-IRDye680RD conjugate). The RCI-calculated in vivo receptor concentration was strongly correlated with ex vivo pathologist-scored IHC and computer-quantified ex vivo immunofluorescence. In contrast, no correlation was observed with ex vivo Western blot analysis or in vitro flow-cytometry assays. Overall, our results argue that in vivo RCI provides a robust measure of receptor expression equivalent to ex vivo immunostaining, with implications for use in noninvasive monitoring of therapy or therapeutic guidance during surgery. PMID:25344226

  5. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  6. Sialic acid receptor specificity on erythrocytes affects detection of antibody to avian influenza haemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, I; Wood, J M; Nicholson, K G; Zambon, M C

    2003-07-01

    Haemagglutination-inhibition tests (HI) are used to detect increases in influenza antibody in serum. However, they are relatively insensitive for the detection of human antibody responses to avian haemagglutinin, even in the presence of high titres of neutralising antibody after confirmed infection or vaccination. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially sialic acid containing N-acetylneuraminic acid alpha2,6-galactose (SAalpha2,6Gal) linkages while avian and equine viruses bind preferentially those containing N-acetylneuraminic acid alpha2,3-galactose (SAalpha2,3Gal) linkages. Increasing the proportion of SAalpha2,3Gal linkages on the erythrocytes used, by enzymatic modification or change of species, improves the ability of erythrocytes to bind to avian influenza strains and thereby improves the sensitivity of detection of antibody to avian and equine HA in a range of mammalian and human sera using HI tests. PMID:12767002

  7. A retinoic acid receptor-specific element controls the retinoic acid receptor-beta promoter.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Lehmann, J M; Zhang, X K; Hermann, T; Husmann, M; Graupner, G; Pfahl, M

    1990-11-01

    The morphogen retinoic acid (RA) regulates gene transcription by interacting with specific nuclear receptors that recognize DNA sequences near responsive promoters. While much has recently been learned about the nuclear receptor proteins, little is known about the genes that are directly regulated by RA and their cis-acting response elements recognized by these receptors. Here we have analyzed the RA receptor-beta (RAR beta) gene promoter that is controlled by RA. We find that a RA-responsive element (RARE) is located adjacent to the TATA box. The RARE shows a direct repeat symmetry which is essential for its function. While thyroid hormone-responsive elements can also function as RAR response elements, we show here that this RARE is activated by endogenous RARs and RAR beta, but cannot be regulated by thyroid hormone receptors and other known nuclear receptors. In addition, we find that RAR gamma is a poor activator of this RARE. However, the response element is bound with high affinity by both RAR beta and RAR gamma as well as by thyroid hormone receptors. Thus, interaction between specific response elements and receptors is insufficient for gene activation. PMID:2177841

  8. Optimization of cell receptor-specific targeting through multivalent surface decoration of polymeric nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    D’Addio, Suzanne M.; Baldassano, Steven; Shi, Lei; Cheung, Lila; Adamson, Douglas H.; Bruzek, Matthew; Anthony, John E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of tuberculosis is impaired by poor drug bioavailability, systemic side effects, patient non-compliance, and pathogen resistance to existing therapies. The mannose receptor (MR) is known to be involved in the recognition and internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a new assembly process to produce nanocarriers with variable surface densities of mannose targeting ligands in a single step, using kinetically-controlled, block copolymer-directed assembly. Nanocarrier association with murine macrophage J774 cells expressing the MR is examined as a function of incubation time and temperature, nanocarrier size, dose, and PEG corona properties. Amphiphilic diblock copolymers are prepared with terminal hydroxyl, methoxy, or mannoside functionality and incorporated into nanocarrier formulations at specific ratios by Flash NanoPrecipitation. Association of nanocarriers protected by a hydroxyl-terminated PEG corona with J774 cells is size dependent, while nanocarriers with methoxy-terminated PEG coronas do not associate with cells, regardless of size. Specific targeting of the MR is investigated using nanocarriers having 0-75% mannoside-terminated PEG chains in the PEG corona. This is a wider range of mannose densities than has been previously studied. Maximum nanocarrier association is attained with 9% mannoside-terminated PEG chains, increasing uptake more than 3-fold compared to non-targeted nanocarriers with a 5 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona. While a 5 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona prevents non-specific uptake, a 1.8 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona does not sufficiently protect the nanocarriers from nonspecific association. There is continuous uptake of MR-targeted nanocarriers at 37°C, but a saturation of association at 4°C. The majority of targeted nanocarriers associate with J774E cells are internalized at 37°C and uptake is receptor-dependent, diminishing with competitive inhibition by dextran. This characterization of nanocarrier uptake and targeting provides promise for optimizing drug delivery to macrophages for TB treatment and establishes a general route for optimizing targeted formulations of nanocarriers for specific delivery at targeted sites. PMID:23419950

  9. Self-compatible B mutants in coprinus with altered pheromone-receptor specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Olesnicky, N S; Brown, A J; Honda, Y; Dyos, S L; Dowell, S J; Casselton, L A

    2000-01-01

    A successful mating in the mushroom Coprinus cinereus brings together a compatible complement of pheromones and G-protein-coupled receptors encoded by multiallelic genes at the B mating-type locus. Rare B gene mutations lead to constitutive activation of B-regulated development without the need for mating. Here we characterize a mutation that arose in the B6 locus and show that it generates a mutant receptor with a single amino acid substitution (R96H) at the intracellular end of transmembrane domain III. Using a heterologous yeast assay and synthetic pheromones we show that the mutation does not make the receptor constitutively active but permits it to respond inappropriately to a normally incompatible pheromone encoded within the same B6 locus. Parallel experiments carried out in Coprinus showed that a F67W substitution in this same pheromone enabled it to activate the normally incompatible wild-type receptor. Together, our experiments show that a single amino acid replacement in either pheromone or receptor can deregulate the specificity of ligand-receptor recognition and confer a self-compatible B phenotype. In addition, we use the yeast assay to demonstrate that different receptors and pheromones found at a single B locus belong to discrete subfamilies within which receptor activation cannot normally occur. PMID:11063682

  10. Caspase-3 serves as an intracellular immune receptor specific for lipopolysaccharide in oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiachao; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Yiqun; Li, Meijia; Cheng, Qi; Zhao, Depeng; Yang, Bin; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death process controlled by a family of cysteine proteases called caspases, which plays a crucial role in the immune system homeostasis. The apoptosis and the detailed regulation mechanism have been well studied in vertebrate, but the information in lower animals, especially invertebrates, is still very limited. In the present study, Caspase-3 in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated CgCaspase-3) was enriched by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affinity chromatography and further identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-mass spectrometry. The binding activity of CgCaspase-3 to LPS was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed its high binding specificity and moderate binding affinity (KD = 1.08 × 10(-6) M) to LPS. The recombinant CgCaspase-3 exhibited high proteolytic activity to substrate Ac-DEVD-pNA and relatively weak activity to substrate Ac-DMQD-pNA and Ac-VDQQD-pNA. The binding of CgCaspase-3 to LPS significantly inhibited its proteolytic activity toward AC-DEVD-pNA in vitro. The over-expression of CgCaspase-3 leaded to the phosphatidylserine exposure on the external plasma membrane and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, which reduced cell viability, and finally induced cell apoptosis. But the cell apoptosis mediated by CgCaspase-3 in vivo was significantly inhibited by the treatment of LPS. These results collectively indicated that CgCaspase-3 could serve as an intracellular LPS receptor, and the interaction of LPS with CgCaspase-3 specifically inhibited the cell apoptosis induced by CgCaspase-3. PMID:26993662

  11. CqsA-CqsS quorum-sensing signal-receptor specificity in Photobacterium angustum.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xiaobo; Miller, Laura C; Ng, Wai-Leung; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2014-02-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of bacterial cell-cell communication that relies on the production, detection and population-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. The QS system commonly found in vibrios and photobacteria consists of the CqsA synthase/CqsS receptor pair. Vibrio cholerae CqsA/S synthesizes and detects (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one (C10-CAI-1), whereas Vibrio harveyi produces and detects a distinct but similar molecule, (Z)-3-aminoundec-2-en-4-one (Ea-C8-CAI-1). To understand the signalling properties of the larger family of CqsA-CqsS pairs, here, we characterize the Photobacterium angustum CqsA/S system. Many photobacterial cqsA genes harbour a conserved frameshift mutation that abolishes CAI-1 production. By contrast, their cqsS genes are intact. Correcting the P. angustum cqsA reading frame restores production of a mixture of CAI-1 moieties, including C8-CAI-1, C10-CAI-1, Ea-C8-CAI-1 and Ea-C10-CAI-1. This signal production profile matches the P. angustum CqsS receptor ligand-detection capability. The receptor exhibits a preference for molecules with 10-carbon tails, and the CqsS Ser(168) residue governs this preference. P. angustum can overcome the cqsA frameshift to produce CAI-1 under particular limiting growth conditions presumably through a ribosome slippage mechanism. Thus, we propose that P. angustum uses CAI-1 signalling for adaptation to stressful environments. PMID:24372841

  12. Structural Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Receptor Specificity from the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-02-13

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral envelope protein that mediates viral attachment to host cells and elicits membrane fusion. The HA receptor-binding specificity is a key determinant for the host range and transmissibility of influenza viruses. In human pandemics of the 20th century, the HA normally has acquired specificity for human-like receptors before widespread infection. Crystal structures of the H1 HA from the 2009 human pandemic (A/California/04/2009 [CA04]) in complex with human and avian receptor analogs reveal conserved recognition of the terminal sialic acid of the glycan ligands. However, favorable interactions beyond the sialic acid are found only for {alpha}2-6-linked glycans and are mediated by Asp190 and Asp225, which hydrogen bond with Gal-2 and GlcNAc-3. For {alpha}2-3-linked glycan receptors, no specific interactions beyond the terminal sialic acid are observed. Our structural and glycan microarray analyses, in the context of other high-resolution HA structures with {alpha}2-6- and {alpha}2-3-linked glycans, now elucidate the structural basis of receptor-binding specificity for H1 HAs in human and avian viruses and provide a structural explanation for the preference for {alpha}2-6 siaylated glycan receptors for the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus.

  13. Interleukin-6 receptor specific RNA aptamers for cargo delivery into target cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Cindy; Eydeler, Katja; Magbanua, Eileen; Zivkovic, Tijana; Piganeau, Nicolas; Lorenzen, Inken; Grötzinger, Joachim; Mayer, Günter; Rose-John, Stefan; Hahn, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Aptamers represent an emerging strategy to deliver cargo molecules, including dyes, drugs, proteins or even genes, into specific target cells. Upon binding to specific cell surface receptors aptamers can be internalized, for example by macropinocytosis or receptor mediated endocytosis. Here we report the in vitro selection and characterization of RNA aptamers with high affinity (Kd = 20 nM) and specificity for the human IL-6 receptor (IL-6R). Importantly, these aptamers trigger uptake without compromising the interaction of IL-6R with its natural ligands the cytokine IL-6 and glycoprotein 130 (gp130). We further optimized the aptamers to obtain a shortened, only 19-nt RNA oligonucleotide retaining all necessary characteristics for high affinity and selective recognition of IL-6R on cell surfaces. Upon incubation with IL-6R presenting cells this aptamer was rapidly internalized. Importantly, we could use our aptamer, to deliver bulky cargos, exemplified by fluorescently labeled streptavidin, into IL-6R presenting cells, thereby setting the stage for an aptamer-mediated escort of drug molecules to diseased cell populations or tissues. PMID:22258147

  14. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π-cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG-W-NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78-85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  15. New England harbor seal H3N8 influenza virus retains avian-like receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Islam T M; Krammer, Florian; Ma, Eric; Estrin, Michael; Viswanathan, Karthik; Stebbins, Nathan W; Quinlan, Devin S; Sasisekharan, Ram; Runstadler, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    An influenza H3N8 virus, carrying mammalian adaptation mutations, was isolated from New England harbor seals in 2011. We sought to assess the risk of its human transmissibility using two complementary approaches. First, we tested the binding of recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) proteins of seal H3N8 and human-adapted H3N2 viruses to respiratory tissues of humans and ferrets. For human tissues, we observed strong tendency of the seal H3 to bind to lung alveoli, which was in direct contrast to the human-adapted H3 that bound mainly to the trachea. This staining pattern was also consistent in ferrets, the primary animal model for human influenza pathogenesis. Second, we compared the binding of the recombinant HAs to a library of 610 glycans. In contrast to the human H3, which bound almost exclusively to α-2,6 sialylated glycans, the seal H3 bound preferentially to α-2,3 sialylated glycans. Additionally, the seal H3N8 virus replicated in human lung carcinoma cells. Our data suggest that the seal H3N8 virus has retained its avian-like receptor binding specificity, but could potentially establish infection in human lungs. PMID:26888262

  16. Sex Pheromone Receptor Specificity in the European Corn Borer Moth, Ostrinia nubilalis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The European corn borer (ECB), Ostrinia nubilalis, exists as two separate sex pheromone races. ECB(Z) females produce a 97:3 blend of Z11- and E11-14:OAc whereas ECB(E) females produce an opposite 1:99 ratio of the Z and E isomers. Males of each race respond specifically to their conspecific female...

  17. EGF receptor specificity for phosphotyrosine-primed substrates provides signal integration with Src

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Michael J; Yun, Cai-hong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Johnson, Jared L; Coyle, Anthony J; Eck, Michael J; Apostolou, Irina; Cantley, Lewis C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) contributes to many human cancers by activating the Ras-MAPK and other pathways. EGFR signaling is augmented by Src-family kinases, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that human EGFR preferentially phosphorylates peptide substrates that are primed by a prior phosphorylation. Utilizing peptides based on the sequence of the adaptor protein Shc1, we show that Src mediates the priming phosphorylation, promoting subsequent phosphorylation by EGFR. Importantly, the doubly phosphorylated Shc1 peptide binds more tightly to the Ras activator Grb2, a key step in activating the Ras-MAPK pathway, than singly phosphorylated peptides. Finally, a crystal structure of EGFR in complex with a primed Shc1 peptide reveals the structural basis for EGFR substrate specificity. These results provide a molecular explanation for the integration of Src and EGFR signaling with downstream effectors such as Ras. PMID:26551075

  18. Receptor-specific positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals: /sup 75/Br-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.; Weinhard, K.; Pawlik, G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1985-11-01

    Cerebral dopaminergic D/sub 2/ receptors are involved in several common disease states, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's chorea. The use of radiolabeled D/sub 2/ receptor-binding ligands with positron emission tomography (PET) to noninvasively quantitate D/sub 2/ receptor densities thus has potential application in medicine. Butyrophenone neuroleptics have a high in vitro and in vivo binding affinity for cerebral D/sub 2/ receptors, and due to the useful chemical and nuclear decay properties of /sup 74/Br (76% ..beta../sup +/, half-life = 1.6 h), the authors have evaluated radiobrominated bromospiperone (BSP), brombenperidol (BBP), and bromperidol (BP) as radiopharmaceuticals for use with PET.

  19. Chemokine Receptor-Specific Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy: Achievements and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Maria; Aris, Mariana; Llorente, Mercedes; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A.; Kremer, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    The 1990s brought a burst of information regarding the structure, expression pattern, and role in leukocyte migration and adhesion of chemokines and their receptors. At that time, the FDA approved the first therapeutic antibodies for cancer treatment. A few years later, it was reported that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 were involved on directing metastases to liver, lung, bone marrow, or lymph nodes, and the over-expression of CCR4, CCR6, and CCR9 by certain tumors. The possibility of inhibiting the interaction of chemokine receptors present on the surface of tumor cells with their ligands emerged as a new therapeutic approach. Therefore, many research groups and companies began to develop small molecule antagonists and specific antibodies, aiming to neutralize signaling from these receptors. Despite great expectations, so far, only one anti-chemokine receptor antibody has been approved for its clinical use, mogamulizumab, an anti-CCR4 antibody, granted in Japan to treat refractory adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. Here, we review the main achievements obtained with anti-chemokine receptor antibodies for cancer immunotherapy, including discovery and clinical studies, proposed mechanisms of action, and therapeutic applications. PMID:25688243

  20. In Vivo Profiling of Estrogen Receptor/Specificity Protein-Dependent Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fei; Xu, Rui; Kim, Kyounghyun; Martin, James; Safe, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) activates the estrogen receptor (ER) through multiple genomic and nongenomic pathways in various tissues/organs. ERα/specificity protein-dependent activation of E2-responsive genes containing GC-rich promoters has been identified in breast and other cancer cell lines, and in this study, we describe transgenic animals overexpressing a transgene containing three tandem GC-rich sites linked to a minimal TATA or thymidine kinase promoter and a luciferase gene. Several mouse lines expressing the transgenes were characterized and, in line 15, E2 induced a 9-fold increase in luciferase activity in the female mouse uterus, and the synthetic estrogens bisphenol A and nonylphenol also induced uterine luciferase activity. The pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 induced luciferase activity in the mouse uterus, and similar results were observed for ICI 182,780 in breast cancer cells transfected with this construct. Differences in the ER agonist and antagonist activities of E2, nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and ICI 182,780 were investigated in the male testis and penis and the male and female stomach in line 15 transgenic mice. All of these tissues were hormone responsive; however, the patterns of induced or repressed luciferase activity were ligand structure, tissue, and sex dependent. These results demonstrate for the first time hormonal activation or repression of a GC-rich promoter in vivo, and the results suggest that the ERα/specificity protein pathway may contribute to E2-dependent induction and repression of genes. PMID:18635651

  1. Interneuron- and GABAA receptor-specific inhibitory synaptic plasticity in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qionger; Duguid, Ian; Clark, Beverley; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Patel, Bijal; Thomas, Philip; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitory synaptic plasticity is important for shaping both neuronal excitability and network activity. Here we investigate the input and GABAA receptor subunit specificity of inhibitory synaptic plasticity by studying cerebellar interneuron-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses. Depolarizing PCs initiated a long-lasting increase in GABA-mediated synaptic currents. By stimulating individual interneurons, this plasticity was observed at somatodendritic basket cell synapses, but not at distal dendritic stellate cell synapses. Basket cell synapses predominantly express β2-subunit-containing GABAA receptors; deletion of the β2-subunit ablates this plasticity, demonstrating its reliance on GABAA receptor subunit composition. The increase in synaptic currents is dependent upon an increase in newly synthesized cell surface synaptic GABAA receptors and is abolished by preventing CaMKII phosphorylation of GABAA receptors. Our results reveal a novel GABAA receptor subunit- and input-specific form of inhibitory synaptic plasticity that regulates the temporal firing pattern of the principal output cells of the cerebellum.

  2. Characterization of putative receptors specific for quercetin on bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.C.; Becker, C.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have reported that tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates (R-BSA), quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells (SMC). To investigate whether there are binding sites or receptors for these polyphenol-containing molecules on SMC, the authors have synthesized /sup 125/I-labeled rutin-bovine serum albumin ((/sup 125/I)R-BSA) of high specific activity (20 Ci/mmol). SMC were isolated from a bovine thoracic aorta and maintained in Eagle's minimum essential medium with 10% calf serum in culture. These SMC at early subpassages were suspended (3-5 x 10/sup 7/ cells/ml) in phosphate-buffered saline and incubated with (/sup 125/I)R-BSA (10 pmol) in the presence or absence of 200-fold unlabeled R-BSA, TGP, BSA, rutin, quercetin or related polyphenols, and catecholamines. Binding of (/sup 125/I)R-BSA to SMC was found to be reproducible and the radioligand was displaced by R-BSA, and also by TGP, rutin, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid, but not by BSA, ellagic acid, naringin, hesperetin, dopamine, epinephrine, or isoproterenol. The binding was saturable, reversible, and pH-dependent. These results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for quercetinon arterial SMC.

  3. A Precise Chemical Strategy To Alter the Receptor Specificity of the Adeno-Associated Virus.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Rachel E; Mukherjee, Raja; Cao, Xiaofu; Erickson, Sarah B; Zheng, Yunan; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-08-26

    The ability to target the adeno-associated virus (AAV) to specific types of cells, by altering the cell-surface receptor it binds, is desirable to generate safe and efficient therapeutic vectors. Chemical attachment of receptor-targeting agents onto the AAV capsid holds potential to alter its tropism, but is limited by the lack of site specificity of available conjugation strategies. The development of an AAV production platform is reported that enables incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) into specific sites on the virus capsid. Incorporation of an azido-UAA enabled site-specific attachment of a cyclic-RGD peptide onto the capsid, retargeting the virus to the αv β3 integrin receptors, which are overexpressed in tumor vasculature. Retargeting ability was site-dependent, underscoring the importance of achieving site-selective capsid modification. This work provides a general chemical approach to introduce various receptor binding agents onto the AAV capsid with site selectivity to generate optimized vectors with engineered infectivity. PMID:27483453

  4. An Engineered Switch in T Cell Receptor Specificity Leads to an Unusual but Functional Binding Geometry.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel T; Singh, Nishant K; Cai, Qi; Smith, Sheena N; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Procko, Erik; Kranz, David M; Baker, Brian M

    2016-07-01

    Utilizing a diverse binding site, T cell receptors (TCRs) specifically recognize a composite ligand comprised of a foreign peptide and a major histocompatibility complex protein (MHC). To help understand the determinants of TCR specificity, we studied a parental and engineered receptor whose peptide specificity had been switched via molecular evolution. Altered specificity was associated with a significant change in TCR-binding geometry, but this did not impact the ability of the TCR to signal in an antigen-specific manner. The determinants of binding and specificity were distributed among contact and non-contact residues in germline and hypervariable loops, and included disruption of key TCR-MHC interactions that bias αβ TCRs toward particular binding modes. Sequence-fitness landscapes identified additional mutations that further enhanced specificity. Our results demonstrate that TCR specificity arises from the distributed action of numerous sites throughout the interface, with significant implications for engineering therapeutic TCRs with novel and functional recognition properties. PMID:27238970

  5. Determinants of Glycan Receptor Specificity of H2N2 Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Aarthi; Pappas, Claudia; Raman, Rahul; Srinivasan, Aravind; Shriver, Zachary; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2010-01-01

    The H2N2 subtype of influenza A virus was responsible for the Asian pandemic of 1957-58. However, unlike other subtypes that have caused pandemics such as H1N1 and H3N2, which continue to circulate among humans, H2N2 stopped circulating in the human population in 1968. Strains of H2 subtype still continue to circulate in birds and occasionally pigs and could be reintroduced into the human population through antigenic drift or shift. Such an event is a potential global health concern because of the waning population immunity to H2 hemagglutinin (HA). The first step in such a cross-species transmission and human adaptation of influenza A virus is the ability for its surface glycoprotein HA to bind to glycan receptors expressed in the human upper respiratory epithelia. Recent structural and biochemical studies have focused on understanding the glycan receptor binding specificity of the 1957-58 pandemic H2N2 HA. However, there has been considerable HA sequence divergence in the recent avian-adapted H2 strains from the pandemic H2N2 strain. Using a combination of structural modeling, quantitative glycan binding and human respiratory tissue binding methods, we systematically identify mutations in the HA from a recent avian-adapted H2N2 strain (A/Chicken/PA/2004) that make its quantitative glycan receptor binding affinity (defined using an apparent binding constant) comparable to that of a prototypic pandemic H2N2 (A/Albany/6/58) HA. PMID:21060797

  6. Profiling of benzophenone derivatives using fish and human estrogen receptor-specific in vitro bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Molina-Molina, Jose-Manuel Escande, Aurelie; Pillon, Arnaud; Gomez, Elena; Pakdel, Farzad; Cavailles, Vincent; Olea, Nicolas; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Balaguer, Patrick

    2008-11-01

    Benzophenone (BP) derivatives, BP1 (2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone), BP2 (2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone), BP3 (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone), and THB (2,4,4'-trihydroxybenzophenone) are UV-absorbing chemicals widely used in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and industrial applications, such as topical sunscreens in lotions and hair sprays to protect skin and hair from UV irradiation. Studies on their endocrine disrupting properties have mostly focused on their interaction with human estrogen receptor alpha (hER{alpha}), and there has been no comprehensive analysis of their potency in a system allowing comparison between hER{alpha} and hER{beta} activities. The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive ER activation profile of BP derivatives using ER from human and fish origin in a battery of in vitro tests, i.e., competitive binding, reporter gene based assays, vitellogenin (Vtg) induction in isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes, and proliferation based assays. The ability to induce human androgen receptor (hAR)-mediated reporter gene expression was also examined. All BP derivatives tested except BP3 were full hER{alpha} and hER{beta} agonists (BP2 > THB > BP1) and displayed a stronger activation of hER{beta} compared with hER{alpha}, the opposite effect to that of estradiol (E{sub 2}). Unlike E{sub 2}, BPs were more active in rainbow trout ER{alpha} (rtER{alpha}) than in hER{alpha} assay. All four BP derivatives showed anti-androgenic activity (THB > BP2 > BP1 > BP3). Overall, the observed anti-androgenic potencies of BP derivatives, together with their proposed greater effect on ER{beta} versus ER{alpha} activation, support further investigation of their role as endocrine disrupters in humans and wildlife.

  7. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  8. New England harbor seal H3N8 influenza virus retains avian-like receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Islam T. M.; Krammer, Florian; Ma, Eric; Estrin, Michael; Viswanathan, Karthik; Stebbins, Nathan W.; Quinlan, Devin S.; Sasisekharan, Ram; Runstadler, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    An influenza H3N8 virus, carrying mammalian adaptation mutations, was isolated from New England harbor seals in 2011. We sought to assess the risk of its human transmissibility using two complementary approaches. First, we tested the binding of recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) proteins of seal H3N8 and human-adapted H3N2 viruses to respiratory tissues of humans and ferrets. For human tissues, we observed strong tendency of the seal H3 to bind to lung alveoli, which was in direct contrast to the human-adapted H3 that bound mainly to the trachea. This staining pattern was also consistent in ferrets, the primary animal model for human influenza pathogenesis. Second, we compared the binding of the recombinant HAs to a library of 610 glycans. In contrast to the human H3, which bound almost exclusively to α-2,6 sialylated glycans, the seal H3 bound preferentially to α-2,3 sialylated glycans. Additionally, the seal H3N8 virus replicated in human lung carcinoma cells. Our data suggest that the seal H3N8 virus has retained its avian-like receptor binding specificity, but could potentially establish infection in human lungs. PMID:26888262

  9. Methotrexate transport mechanisms: the basis for targeted drug delivery and ß-folate-receptor-specific treatment.

    PubMed

    Fiehn, C

    2010-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) plays a pivotal role in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The transport mechanisms with which MTX reaches is target after application are an important part of MTX pharmacology and its concentration in target tissue such as RA synovial membrane might strongly influence the effectiveness of the drug. Physiological plasma protein binding of MTX to albumin is important for the distribution of MTX in the body and relative high concentrations of the drug are found in the liver. However, targeted drug delivery into inflamed joints and increased anti-arthritic efficiency can be obtained by covalent coupling of MTX ex-vivo to human serum albumin (MTX-HSA) or in-vivo to endogenous albumin mediated through the MTX-pro-drug AWO54. High expression of the folate receptor β (FR-β) on synovial macrophages of RA patients and its capacity to mediate binding and uptake of MTX has been demonstrated. To further improve drug treatment of RA, FR-β specific drugs have been developed and were characterised for their therapeutic potency in synovial inflammation. Therefore, different approaches to improve folate inhibitory and FR-β specific therapy of RA beyond MTX are in development and will be described. PMID:21044432

  10. The Fish Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2: Epidemiology, Phylogeny, and Virulence Factors Involved in Warm-Water Vibriosis.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Carmen; Sanjuán, Eva; Fouz, Belén; Pajuelo, David; Lee, Chung-Te; Hor, Lien-I; Barrera, Rodolfo

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 is the etiological agent of warm-water vibriosis, a disease that affects eels and other teleosts, especially in fish farms. Biotype 2 is polyphyletic and probably emerged from aquatic bacteria by acquisition of a transferable virulence plasmid that encodes resistance to innate immunity of eels and other teleosts. Interestingly, biotype 2 comprises a zoonotic clonal complex designated as serovar E that has extended worldwide. One of the most interesting virulence factors produced by serovar E is RtxA13, a multifunctional protein that acts as a lethal factor for fish, an invasion factor for mice, and a survival factor outside the host. Two practically identical copies of rtxA13 are present in all biotype 2 strains regardless of the serovar, one in the virulence plasmid and the other in chromosome II. The plasmid also contains other genes involved in survival and growth in eel blood: vep07, a gene for an outer membrane (OM) lipoprotein involved in resistance to eel serum and vep20, a gene for an OM receptor specific for eel-transferrin and, probably, other related fish transferrins. All the three genes are highly conserved within biotype 2, which suggests that they are under a strong selective pressure. Interestingly, the three genes are related with transferable plasmids, which emphasizes the role of horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of V. vulnificus in nutrient-enriched aquatic environments, such as fish farms. PMID:26185080

  11. Factor X deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Factor X (ten) deficiency is a disorder caused by a lack of a protein called factor X in the blood. It leads to problems with ... or are not functioning like they should. Factor X is one such coagulation factor. Factor X deficiency ...

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-1 stimulates regulatory T cells and suppresses autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Daniel; Luciani, Luisa; Johannesson, Bjarki; Piszczek, Agnieszka; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    The recent precipitous rise in autoimmune diseases is placing an increasing clinical and economic burden on health systems worldwide. Current therapies are only moderately efficacious, often coupled with adverse side effects. Here, we show that recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) stimulates proliferation of both human and mouse regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and when delivered systemically via continuous minipump, it halts autoimmune disease progression in mouse models of type 1 diabetes (STZ and NOD) and multiple sclerosis (EAE) in vivo. rhIGF-1 administration increased Treg cells in affected tissues, maintaining their suppressive properties. Genetically, ablation of the IGF-1 receptor specifically on Treg cell populations abrogated the beneficial effects of rhIGF-1 administration on the progression of multiple sclerotic symptoms in the EAE model, establishing a direct effect of IGF-1 on Treg cell proliferation. These results establish systemically delivered rhIGF-1 as a specific, effective stimulator of Treg cell action, underscoring the clinical feasibility of manipulating natural tolerance mechanisms to suppress autoimmune disease. PMID:25339185

  13. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in inflamed tissue is required for intrinsic peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M; Mousa, S A; Zhang, Q; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1996-01-01

    Immune cell-derived opioid peptides can activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves to inhibit inflammatory pain. The intrinsic mechanisms triggering this neuroimmune interaction are unknown. This study investigates the involvement of endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). A specific stress paradigm, cold water swim (CWS), produces potent opioid receptor-specific antinociception in inflamed paws of rats. This effect is dose-dependently attenuated by intraplantar but not by intravenous alpha-helical CRF. IL-1 receptor antagonist is ineffective. Similarly, local injection of antiserum against CRF, but not to IL-1, dose-dependently reverses this effect. Intravenous anti-CRF is only inhibitory at 10(4)-fold higher concentrations and intravenous CRF does not produce analgesia. Pretreatment of inflamed paws with an 18-mer 3'-3'-end inverted CRF-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide abolishes CWS-induced antinociception. The same treatment significantly reduces the amount of CRF extracted from inflamed paws and the number of CRF-immunostained cells without affecting gross inflammatory signs. A mismatch oligodeoxynucleotide alters neither the CWS effect nor CRF immunoreactivity. These findings identify locally expressed CRF as the predominant agent to trigger opioid release within inflamed tissue. Endogenous IL-1, circulating CRF or antiinflammatory effects, are not involved. Thus, an intact immune system plays an essential role in pain control, which is important for the understanding of pain in immunosuppressed patients with cancer or AIDS. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8650225

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Artur A.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) signal in a paracrine or endocrine fashion to mediate a myriad of biological activities, ranging from issuing developmental cues, maintaining tissue homeostasis, and regulating metabolic processes. FGFs carry out their diverse functions by binding and dimerizing FGF receptors (FGFRs) in a heparan sulfate (HS) cofactor- or Klotho coreceptor-assisted manner. The accumulated wealth of structural and biophysical data in the past decade has transformed our understanding of the mechanism of FGF signaling in human health and development, and has provided novel concepts in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Among these contributions are the elucidation of HS-assisted receptor dimerization, delineation of the molecular determinants of ligand–receptor specificity, tyrosine kinase regulation, receptor cis-autoinhibition, and tyrosine trans-autophosphorylation. These structural studies have also revealed how disease-associated mutations highjack the physiological mechanisms of FGFR regulation to contribute to human diseases. In this paper, we will discuss the structurally and biophysically derived mechanisms of FGF signaling, and how the insights gained may guide the development of therapies for treatment of a diverse array of human diseases. PMID:23732477

  15. Molecular mechanisms of fibroblast growth factor signaling in physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Belov, Artur A; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) signal in a paracrine or endocrine fashion to mediate a myriad of biological activities, ranging from issuing developmental cues, maintaining tissue homeostasis, and regulating metabolic processes. FGFs carry out their diverse functions by binding and dimerizing FGF receptors (FGFRs) in a heparan sulfate (HS) cofactor- or Klotho coreceptor-assisted manner. The accumulated wealth of structural and biophysical data in the past decade has transformed our understanding of the mechanism of FGF signaling in human health and development, and has provided novel concepts in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Among these contributions are the elucidation of HS-assisted receptor dimerization, delineation of the molecular determinants of ligand-receptor specificity, tyrosine kinase regulation, receptor cis-autoinhibition, and tyrosine trans-autophosphorylation. These structural studies have also revealed how disease-associated mutations highjack the physiological mechanisms of FGFR regulation to contribute to human diseases. In this paper, we will discuss the structurally and biophysically derived mechanisms of FGF signaling, and how the insights gained may guide the development of therapies for treatment of a diverse array of human diseases. PMID:23732477

  16. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  17. Factor VII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be done include: Partial thromboplastin time ( PTT ) Plasma factor VII activity Prothrombin time ( PT ) Mixing study ... controlled by getting intravenous (IV) infusions of normal plasma, concentrates of factor VII, or genetically produced (recombinant) ...

  18. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on this ... may help you live a longer, healthier life. Risk Factors You Cannot Change Some of your heart ...

  19. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Blood clotting is a complex process involving as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins ... by a lack of Factor V. When certain blood clotting factors are low or missing, your blood does ...

  20. Factoring Polynomials and Fibonacci.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the factoring of polynomials and Fibonacci numbers, offering several challenges teachers can give students. For example, they can give students a polynomial containing large numbers and challenge them to factor it. (JN)

  1. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor ... You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions ... These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

  2. Mesonic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Frederic D. R. Bonnet; Robert G. Edwards; George T. Fleming; Randal Lewis; David Richards

    2003-07-22

    We have started a program to compute the electromagnetic form factors of mesons. We discuss the techniques used to compute the pion form factor and present preliminary results computed with domain wall valence fermions on MILC asqtad lattices, as well as Wilson fermions on quenched lattices. These methods can easily be extended to rho-to-gamma-pi transition form factors.

  3. Multilevel Mixture Factor Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varriale, Roberta; Vermunt, Jeroen K.

    2012-01-01

    Factor analysis is a statistical method for describing the associations among sets of observed variables in terms of a small number of underlying continuous latent variables. Various authors have proposed multilevel extensions of the factor model for the analysis of data sets with a hierarchical structure. These Multilevel Factor Models (MFMs)…

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression affects the efficacy of the combined application of saponin and a targeted toxin on human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bachran, Diana; Schneider, Stefanie; Bachran, Christopher; Urban, Romy; Weng, Alexander; Melzig, Matthias F; Hoffmann, Corinna; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2010-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a very promising approach since it is overexpressed in about 90% of cervical tumors. Here, we quantified the toxic effect of SE, a targeted toxin consisting of epidermal growth factor (EGF) as targeting moiety and the plant toxin saporin-3, on 3 common human cervical carcinoma cell lines (HeLa, CaSki and SiHa) and recently established lines (PHCC1 and PHCC2) from 2 different individuals. A human melanocytic and a mouse cell line served as negative control. Additionally, we combined SE with saponinum album, a saponin composite from Gypsophila paniculata, which exhibited synergistic properties in previous studies. The cell lines, except for SiHa cells, revealed high sensitivity to SE with 50% cell survival in the range of 5-24.5 nM. The combination with saponin resulted in a remarkable enhancement of cytotoxicity with enhancement factors ranging from 9,000-fold to 2,500,000-fold. The cytotoxicity of SE was clearly target receptor specific since free EGF blocks the effect and saporin-3 alone was considerably less toxic. For all cervical carcinoma cell lines, we evinced a clear correlation between EGFR expression and SE sensitivity. Our data indicate a potential use of targeted toxins for the treatment of cervical cancer. In particular, the combination with saponins is a promising approach since efficacy is drastically improved. PMID:20020492

  5. Bayesian Exploratory Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Gabriella; Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia; Heckman, James J.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops and applies a Bayesian approach to Exploratory Factor Analysis that improves on ad hoc classical approaches. Our framework relies on dedicated factor models and simultaneously determines the number of factors, the allocation of each measurement to a unique factor, and the corresponding factor loadings. Classical identification criteria are applied and integrated into our Bayesian procedure to generate models that are stable and clearly interpretable. A Monte Carlo study confirms the validity of the approach. The method is used to produce interpretable low dimensional aggregates from a high dimensional set of psychological measurements. PMID:25431517

  6. Aerostructural safety factor criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.

    1992-01-01

    The present modification of the conventional safety factor method for aircraft structures evaluation involves the expression of deterministic safety factors in probabilistic tolerance limit ratios; these are found to involve a total of three factors that control the interference of applied and resistive stress distributions. The deterministic expression is extended so that it may furnish a 'relative ultimate safety' index that encompasses all three distribution factors. Operational reliability is developed on the basis of the applied and the yield stress distribution interferences. Industry standards are suggested to be derivable from factor selections that are based on the consequences of failure.

  7. Factor VIII and glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, M; Nilsson, I M

    1975-05-17

    To find out if determination of factor VIII,which most probably is synthetised in the intima of blood-vessesls, is of value for predicting the severity of vessel damge in glomerulonephritis, factor-VIII activity, factor-VIII-related antigen, and glomerular filtration-ratewere esto,ated om 85 patients with early glomerulonephritis on admission, and in 70 of these at follow-up for up to 4 years. The levels of factor-VIII activity and factor-VIII-related antigen on admission were normal in those patients who recovered. Where renal function was impaired on admission or becaome so during follow-up, factor VIII was high. Determination of factor VIII might thus be of prognostic value in early glomerulonephritis. PMID:49471

  8. New scale factor measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2012-07-01

    The computation of probabilities in an eternally inflating universe requires a regulator or “measure.” The scale factor time measure truncates the Universe when a congruence of timelike geodesics has expanded by a fixed volume factor. This definition breaks down if the generating congruence is contracting—a serious limitation that excludes from consideration gravitationally bound regions such as our own. Here we propose a closely related regulator which is well defined in the entire spacetime. The new scale factor cutoff restricts to events with a scale factor below a given value. Since the scale factor vanishes at caustics and crunches, this cutoff always includes an infinite number of disconnected future regions. We show that this does not lead to divergences. The resulting measure combines desirable features of the old scale factor cutoff and of the light-cone time cutoff, while eliminating some of the disadvantages of each.

  9. Analytic Couple Modeling Introducing Device Design Factor, Fin Factor, Thermal Diffusivity Factor, and Inductance Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A set of convenient thermoelectric device solutions have been derived in order to capture a number of factors which are previously only resolved with numerical techniques. The concise conversion efficiency equations derived from governing equations provide intuitive and straight-forward design guidelines. These guidelines allow for better device design without requiring detailed numerical modeling. The analytical modeling accounts for factors such as i) variable temperature boundary conditions, ii) lateral heat transfer, iii) temperature variable material properties, and iv) transient operation. New dimensionless parameters, similar to the figure of merit, are introduced including the device design factor, fin factor, thermal diffusivity factor, and inductance factor. These new device factors allow for the straight-forward description of phenomenon generally only captured with numerical work otherwise. As an example a device design factor of 0.38, which accounts for thermal resistance of the hot and cold shoes, can be used to calculate a conversion efficiency of 2.28 while the ideal conversion efficiency based on figure of merit alone would be 6.15. Likewise an ideal couple with efficiency of 6.15 will be reduced to 5.33 when lateral heat is accounted for with a fin factor of 1.0.

  10. Exploratory Bi-Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennrich, Robert I.; Bentler, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Bi-factor analysis is a form of confirmatory factor analysis originally introduced by Holzinger. The bi-factor model has a general factor and a number of group factors. The purpose of this article is to introduce an exploratory form of bi-factor analysis. An advantage of using exploratory bi-factor analysis is that one need not provide a specific…

  11. Plant transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1995-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression relies on the recognition of promoter elements by transcription factors. In the past several years, a considerable number of (putative) transcription factors have been identified in plants. Some genes coding for these factors were isolated by south-western screening with oligonucleotides as a probe or by homology-based screening, and others were initially isolated by genetic means and subsequently identified as the genes for transcription factors. These transcription factors often form families of structurally related proteins with similar DNA-binding specificities and in addition, they are sometimes involved in related phenomena. Some groups of factors homo- and/or heterodimerize to increase the length and variability of the target sequences. Transcriptional activators, in general, comprise a modular activation domain. The activities of the transcription factors are controlled by post-translational modification, like phosphorylation and glycosylation, as well as at the levels of nuclear transport, oligomerization, etc. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of plant transcription factors to help understand the mechanistic aspects of the transcriptional regulation of genes. PMID:8589926

  12. Factorizing RSA Keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakey, Ed

    Factorization is notoriously difficult. Though the problem is not known to be NP-hard, neither efficient, algorithmic solution nor technologically practicable, quantum-computer solution has been found. This apparent complexity, which renders infeasible the factorization of sufficiently large values, makes secure the RSA cryptographic system.

  13. FACTORS AFFECTING PITCH DISCRIMINATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERGAN, JOHN R.

    EFFECTS OF TONAL MEMORY OF TWO KINDS OF FACTORS WERE STUDIED. THE FACTORS WERE (1) THE CHARACTERISTICS OF STIMULI PRESENTED TO THE SUBJECT IN A PITCH IDENTIFICATION TASK, AND (2) THOSE EFFECTING THE RESPONSE THAT THE SUBJECT MAKES IN SUCH A TASK. FIVE HYPOTHESES WERE ADVANCED FOR STUDY. THE UNDERLYING ASSUMPTION WAS THAT THERE ARE IMPORTANT…

  14. Block LU factorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, James W.; Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the currently popular 'block algorithms' are scalar algorithms in which the operations have been grouped and reordered into matrix operations. One genuine block algorithm in practical use is block LU factorization, and this has recently been shown by Demmel and Higham to be unstable in general. It is shown here that block LU factorization is stable if A is block diagonally dominant by columns. Moreover, for a general matrix the level of instability in block LU factorization can be founded in terms of the condition number kappa(A) and the growth factor for Gaussian elimination without pivoting. A consequence is that block LU factorization is stable for a matrix A that is symmetric positive definite or point diagonally dominant by rows or columns as long as A is well-conditioned.

  15. Growth factors in haemopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Millar, J L

    1989-01-01

    Haemopoietic growth factors have for over two decades allowed experimentalists to grow haemopoietic bone marrow cells in vitro. With refinements in technique and the discovery of novel growth factors, all of the known haemopoietic lineages can now be grown in vitro. This has allowed a much greater understanding of the complex process of haemopoiesis from the haemopoietic stem cell to the mature, functioning end-cell. The in vivo action of these growth factors has been harder to investigate. Although recombinant technology has afforded us the much greater quantities necessary for in vivo work, problems remain with administration because of effects on other tissues. Interpretation of results is difficult because of the complex inter-relationships which exist between factors. Some of these have been defined in vitro and it appears likely that they also operate in vivo. Erythropoietin is a physiological regulator of erythropoiesis. It has been detected in vivo with levels responding appropriately to stress (i.e. elevated in anaemia) and, when administered in pharmacological doses, has been shown to correct anaemia. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been detected in vivo and may influence the production and function of granulocytes and macrophages, although how it is regulated is unknown. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor are ore lineage-specific. Interleukin 3 (IL-3), although it has not been detected in vivo, may act on a primitive marrow precursor by expanding the population and making these cells more susceptible to other growth factors, such as GM-CSF. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) has been detected in vivo, does not appear to have any isolated action on bone marrow (except possibly radioprotection) but probably acts synergistically with other growth factors, such as G-CSF. Interleukins 2, 4, 5 and 6 have not been detected in vivo. All have effects on B-cells. In addition IL-2 is an essential

  16. Environmental Factors in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in communication and social behavior, and by repetitive behaviors. Although genetic factors might be largely responsible for the occurrence of autism they cannot fully account for all cases and it is likely that in addition to a certain combination of autism-related genes, specific environmental factors might act as risk factors triggering the development of autism. Thus, the role of environmental factors in autism is an important area of research and recent data will be discussed in this review. Interestingly, the results show that many environmental risk factors are interrelated and their identification and comparison might unveil a common scheme of alterations on a contextual as well as molecular level. For example, both, disruption in the immune system and in zinc homeostasis may affect synaptic transmission in autism. Thus, here, a model is proposed that interconnects the most important and scientifically recognized environmental factors. Moreover, similarities in how these risk factors impact synapse function are discussed and a possible influence on an already well described genetic pathway leading to the development of autism via zinc homeostasis is proposed. PMID:23346059

  17. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  18. Precipitating factors of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Célyne H; Vallières, Annie; Morin, Charles M

    2004-01-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent health complaint whose onset is precipitated by a variety of factors. There is an important need to identify and describe these factors to improve our understanding of risk factors and the natural history of insomnia. This article is aimed at identifying and describing the types of precipitating factors related to the onset of insomnia. A total of 345 patients evaluated for insomnia at a sleep-disorders clinic completed a sleep survey and underwent a semistructured clinical interview. As part of the evaluation, the specific precipitating events related to the onset of insomnia were identified. Subsequently, these factors were categorized (work-school, family, physical or psychological health, or indeterminate), and their affective valence (negative, positive, or indeterminate) was coded. The most common precipitating factors of insomnia were related to family, health, and work-school events. Sixty-five percent of precipitating events had a negative valence. These events differed with the age of onset of insomnia but not with the gender of participants. These findings are useful to identify potential risk factors for insomnia and improve our understanding of the natural history of insomnia. PMID:15600224

  19. Conundrums with uncertainty factors.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Roger

    2010-03-01

    The practice of uncertainty factors as applied to noncancer endpoints in the IRIS database harkens back to traditional safety factors. In the era before risk quantification, these were used to build in a "margin of safety." As risk quantification takes hold, the safety factor methods yield to quantitative risk calculations to guarantee safety. Many authors believe that uncertainty factors can be given a probabilistic interpretation as ratios of response rates, and that the reference values computed according to the IRIS methodology can thus be converted to random variables whose distributions can be computed with Monte Carlo methods, based on the distributions of the uncertainty factors. Recent proposals from the National Research Council echo this view. Based on probabilistic arguments, several authors claim that the current practice of uncertainty factors is overprotective. When interpreted probabilistically, uncertainty factors entail very strong assumptions on the underlying response rates. For example, the factor for extrapolating from animal to human is the same whether the dosage is chronic or subchronic. Together with independence assumptions, these assumptions entail that the covariance matrix of the logged response rates is singular. In other words, the accumulated assumptions entail a log-linear dependence between the response rates. This in turn means that any uncertainty analysis based on these assumptions is ill-conditioned; it effectively computes uncertainty conditional on a set of zero probability. The practice of uncertainty factors is due for a thorough review. Two directions are briefly sketched, one based on standard regression models, and one based on nonparametric continuous Bayesian belief nets. PMID:20030767

  20. Functional alterations of type I insulin-like growth factor receptor in placenta of diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hauguel-de Mouzon, S; Louizeau, M; Girard, J

    1992-01-01

    The presence of type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptors on placental membranes led to the hypothesis that these receptors might play a critical role in the rapid growth of this organ. Diabetes induces feto-placental overgrowth, but it is not known whether it modifies IGF-I receptor activity in fetal and/or placental tissues. To answer this question, we have partially purified and characterized placental receptors from normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In normal rats, binding of 125I-IGF-I to a 140 kDa protein corresponding to the alpha subunit of the receptor was observed in cross-linking experiments performed under reducing conditions. Stimulation by IGF-I induces the autophosphorylation of a 105 kDa phosphoprotein representing the beta subunit of the receptor. In rats made hyperglycaemic and insulinopenic by streptozotocin injection on day 1 of pregnancy, placental IGF-I receptor-binding parameters were not different from controls on day 20 of pregnancy. In contrast, the autophosphorylation and kinase activity of IGF-I receptors of diabetic rats were increased 2-3-fold in the basal state and after IGF-I stimulation. The present study indicates that the rat placental IGF-I receptor possesses structural characteristics similar to that reported for fetal-rat muscle, and suggests that the high-molecular-mass beta subunit could represent a type of receptor specifically expressed during prenatal development. In addition, it clearly demonstrates that diabetes induces functional alterations in IGF-I receptor kinase activity that may play a major role in the placental overgrowth in diabetic pregnancy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:1445271

  1. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  2. Generation of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre Mice for Gene Expression in an Oxytocin Receptor Specific Manner.

    PubMed

    Hidema, Shizu; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryotaro; Otsuka, Ayano; Suzuki, Shingo; Miyazaki, Shinji; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The neurohypophysial hormone oxytocin (OXT) and its receptor (OXTR) have critical roles in the regulation of pro-social behaviors, including social recognition, pair bonding, parental behavior, and stress-related responses. Supporting this hypothesis, a portion of patients suffering from autism spectrum disorder have mutations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, or epigenetic modifications in their OXTR gene. We previously reported that OXTR-deficient mice exhibit pervasive social deficits, indicating the critical role of OXTR in social behaviors. In the present study, we generated Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice, expressing both OXTR and Cre recombinase under the control of the endogenous Oxtr promoter. Knock-in cassette of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre consisted of Oxtr cDNA tagged with the hemagglutinin epitope at the 3' end (Oxtr cDNA(HA)), internal ribosomal entry site (Ires), and Cre. Cre was expressed in the uterus, mammary gland, kidney, and brain of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice. Furthermore, the distribution of Cre in the brain was similar to that observed in Oxtr-Venus fluorescent protein expressing mice (Oxtr-Venus), another animal model previously generated by our group. Social behavior of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice was similar to that of wild-type animals. We demonstrated that this construct is expressed in OXTR-expressing neurons specifically after an infection with the recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying the flip-excision switch vector. Using this system, we showed the transport of the wheat-germ agglutinin tracing molecule from the OXTR-expressing neurons to the innervated neurons in knock-in mice. This study might contribute to the monosynaptic analysis of neuronal circuits and to the optogenetic analysis of neurons expressing OXTR. PMID:26442453

  3. A critical examination of the numerology of antigen-binding cells: evidence for multiple receptor specificities on single cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, A

    1977-01-01

    The data available from other laboratories as well as our own on the frequency of cells recognizing major histocompatibility antigens or conventional protein and hapten antigens is critically evaluated. The frequency of specific binding for a large number of antigens is sufficiently high to support the idea that at least part of the antigen-binding cell population must have multiple specificities. Our results suggest that these multiple specific cells result from single cells synthesizing and displaying as many as 50-100 species of receptor, each at a frequency of 10(4) per cell. A model involving gene expansion of constant-region genes is suggested and some auxilliary evidence consistent with such C-gene expansion is presented. PMID:68706

  4. Crystal structure of a γδ T-cell receptor specific for the human MHC class I homolog MICA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Pizarro, Juan C.; Holmes, Margaret A.; McBeth, Christine; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; Strong, Roland K.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human γδ T cells of the Vδ1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive Vδ1 γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, αβ, and other γδ TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of Vδ1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on γδ T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of γδ T-cell/target cell interfaces. PMID:21262824

  5. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au(25) nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au(25) clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au(+) ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of approximately 5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f(7/2) approximately 83.97 eV and Au 4f(5/2) approximately 87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size approximately 1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size approximately 8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at approximately 674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 microg ml(-1). Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR(+ve) oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au(25) clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using non-toxic fluorescent Au nanoclusters for the targeted imaging of cancer. PMID:20023317

  6. Crystal structure of a Gammadelta T-cell Receptor Specific for the Human MHC class I Homolog MICA

    SciTech Connect

    B Xu; J Pizarro; M Holmes; C McBeth; V Groh; T Spies; R Strong

    2011-12-31

    {gamma}{delta} T cells play important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, but their recognition mechanisms remain poorly understood. Human {gamma}{delta} T cells of the V{sub {delta}}1 subset predominate in intestinal epithelia and respond to MICA and MICB (MHC class I chain-related, A and B; MIC) self-antigens, mediating responses to tumorigenesis or viral infection. The crystal structure of an MIC-reactive V{sub {delta}}1 {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptor (TCR) showed expected overall structural homology to antibodies, {alpha}{beta}, and other {gamma}{delta} TCRs, but complementary determining region conformations and conservation of V{sub {delta}}1 use revealed an uncharacteristically flat potential binding surface. MIC, likewise, serves as a ligand for the activating immunoreceptor natural killer group 2, D (NKG2D), also expressed on {gamma}{delta} T cells. Although MIC recognition drives both the TCR-dependent stimulatory and NKG2D-dependent costimulatory signals necessary for activation, interaction analyses showed that MIC binding by the two receptors was mutually exclusive. Analysis of relative binding kinetics suggested sequential recognition, defining constraints for the temporal organization of {gamma}{delta} T-cell/target cell interfaces.

  7. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ~5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2~83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2~87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ~1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ~8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ~674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 µg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using non-toxic fluorescent Au nanoclusters for the targeted imaging of cancer.

  8. Selection for a CEACAM receptor-specific binding phenotype during Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection of the human genital tract.

    PubMed

    Sintsova, Anna; Wong, Henry; MacDonald, Kelly S; Kaul, Rupert; Virji, Mumtaz; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2015-04-01

    Infections by Neisseria gonorrhoeae are increasingly common, are often caused by antibiotic-resistant strains, and can result in serious and lasting sequelae, prompting the reemergence of gonococcal disease as a leading global health concern. N. gonorrhoeae is a human-restricted pathogen that primarily colonizes urogenital mucosal surfaces. Disease progression varies greatly between the sexes: men usually present with symptomatic infection characterized by a painful purulent urethral discharge, while in women, the infection is often asymptomatic, with the most severe pathology occurring when the bacteria ascend from the lower genital tract into the uterus and fallopian tubes. Classical clinical studies demonstrated that clinically infectious strains uniformly express Opa adhesins; however, their specificities were unknown at the time. While in vitro studies have since identified CEACAM proteins as the primary target of Opa proteins, the gonococcal specificity for this human family of receptors has not been addressed in the context of natural infection. In this study, we characterize a collection of low-passage-number clinical-specimen-derived N. gonorrhoeae isolates for Opa expression and assess their CEACAM-binding profiles. We report marked in vivo selection for expression of phase-variable Opa proteins that bind CEACAM1 and CEACAM5 but selection against expression of Opa variants that bind to the neutrophil-restricted decoy receptor CEACAM3. This is the first study showing phenotypic selection for distinct CEACAM-binding phenotypes in vivo, and it supports the opposing functions of CEACAMs that facilitate infection versus driving inflammation within the genital tract. PMID:25605771

  9. Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP-EGCg) show efficacy in treating prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, R.; Chanda, N.; Zambre, A.; Upendran, A.; Katti, K.; Kulkarni, R. R.; Nune, S. K.; Casteel, S. W.; Smith, C. J.; Vimal, J.; Boote, E.; Robertson, J. D.; Kan, P.; Engelbrecht, H.; Watkinson, L. D.; Carmack, T. L.; Lever, J. R.; Cutler, C. S.; Caldwell, C.; Kannan, R.; Katti, K. V.

    2012-07-16

    Systemic delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors is hindered by vascular and interstitial barriers. We hypothesized that prostate tumor specific epigallocatechingallate( EGCg) functionalized radioactive gold nanoparticles, when delivered intratumorally (IT), will circumvent transport barriers, resulting in targeted delivery of therapeutic payloads. The results described herein provide unequivocal validation of our hypothesis. We report the development of inherently therapeutic gold nanoparticles derived from Au-198 isotope; the range of 198Au β-particle ( ~ 11 mm in tissue or ~1100 cell diameters) is sufficiently long to provide cross-fire effects of radiation dose delivered to cells within the prostate gland and short enough to minimize radiation dose to critical tissues near the periphery of the capsule. The formulation of biocompatible 198AuNPs utilizes the redox chemistry of prostate tumor specific phytochemical EGCg as it converts gold salt into gold nanoparticles and also selectively binds with excellent affinity to Laminin67R receptors which are over expressed in prostate tumor cells. Pharmacokinetic studies in PC-3 xenograft SCID mice showed ~72% retention of 198AuNP-EGCg in tumors 24 h after intratumoral administration. Therapeutic studies showed 80% reduction of tumor volumes after 28 days demonstrating significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to controls. This innovative “green nanotechnological“approach serves as a basis for designing target specific antineoplastic agents. This novel intratumorally injectable 198AuNP-EGCg nanotherapeutic agent may provide significant advances in oncology for use as an effective treatment for prostate and other solid tumors.

  10. Differences in erythrocyte receptor specificity of different parts of the Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte binding protein homologue 2a.

    PubMed

    Gunalan, Karthigayan; Gao, Xiaohong; Liew, Kingsley J L; Preiser, Peter R

    2011-08-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding-like protein homologue (RH) and erythrocyte binding-like (EBL) protein families play important roles during invasion, though their exact roles are not clear. Both EBL and RH proteins are thought to directly bind different receptors on the surface of the erythrocyte, and the binding properties for a number of EBLs and RHs have been described. While P. falciparum RH1 (PfRH1) and PfRH4 have been shown to act directly in two alternative invasion pathways used by merozoites, the functions of PfRH2a and PfRH2b during invasion are less defined. Here, using monoclonal antibodies raised against a unique region of PfRH2a, we show that PfRH2a moves from the rhoptry neck to the moving junction during merozoite invasion. The movement of PfRH2a to the junction is independent of the invasion pathway used by the merozoite, suggesting an additional function of the protein that is independent of receptor binding. We further show that PfRH2a is processed both in the schizont and during invasion, resulting in proteins with different erythrocyte binding properties. Our findings suggest that PfRH2a and, most likely, the other members of the RH family, depending on their processing stage, can engage different receptors at different stages of the invasion process. PMID:21628513

  11. Combined mitigation of the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic acute radiation syndromes by an LPA2 receptor-specific nonlipid agonist.

    PubMed

    Patil, Renukadevi; Szabó, Erzsébet; Fells, James I; Balogh, Andrea; Lim, Keng G; Fujiwara, Yuko; Norman, Derek D; Lee, Sue-Chin; Balazs, Louisa; Thomas, Fridtjof; Patil, Shivaputra; Emmons-Thompson, Karin; Boler, Alyssa; Strobos, Jur; McCool, Shannon W; Yates, C Ryan; Stabenow, Jennifer; Byrne, Gerrald I; Miller, Duane D; Tigyi, Gábor J

    2015-02-19

    Pharmacological mitigation of injuries caused by high-dose ionizing radiation is an unsolved medical problem. A specific nonlipid agonist of the type 2 G protein coupled receptor for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA2) 2-[4-(1,3-dioxo-1H,3H-benzoisoquinolin-2-yl)butylsulfamoyl]benzoic acid (DBIBB) when administered with a postirradiation delay of up to 72 hr reduced mortality of C57BL/6 mice but not LPA2 knockout mice. DBIBB mitigated the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome, increased intestinal crypt survival and enterocyte proliferation, and reduced apoptosis. DBIBB enhanced DNA repair by augmenting the resolution of γ-H2AX foci, increased clonogenic survival of irradiated IEC-6 cells, attenuated the radiation-induced death of human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors and enhanced the survival of the granulocyte/macrophage lineage. DBIBB also increased the survival of mice suffering from the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome after total-body irradiation. DBIBB represents a drug candidate capable of mitigating acute radiation syndrome caused by high-dose γ-radiation to the hematopoietic and gastrointestinal system. PMID:25619933

  12. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  13. von Willebrand Factor Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platelet Count , Platelet Function Tests , Complete Blood Count , Coagulation Factor VIII , PT , PTT At a Glance Test ... a protein , one of several components of the coagulation system that work together to stop bleeding and ...

  14. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood. It leads to problems with blood clotting (coagulation). Factor II is also known as prothrombin. ... blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation cascade. It involves special proteins called coagulation, or ...

  15. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) is a blood test that measures the amount of the RF antibody in the blood. ... these conditions still have a "normal" or low RF. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ...

  16. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  17. Automated Factor Slice Sampling.

    PubMed

    Tibbits, Matthew M; Groendyke, Chris; Haran, Murali; Liechty, John C

    2014-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms offer a very general approach for sampling from arbitrary distributions. However, designing and tuning MCMC algorithms for each new distribution, can be challenging and time consuming. It is particularly difficult to create an efficient sampler when there is strong dependence among the variables in a multivariate distribution. We describe a two-pronged approach for constructing efficient, automated MCMC algorithms: (1) we propose the "factor slice sampler", a generalization of the univariate slice sampler where we treat the selection of a coordinate basis (factors) as an additional tuning parameter, and (2) we develop an approach for automatically selecting tuning parameters in order to construct an efficient factor slice sampler. In addition to automating the factor slice sampler, our tuning approach also applies to the standard univariate slice samplers. We demonstrate the efficiency and general applicability of our automated MCMC algorithm with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:24955002

  18. Automated Factor Slice Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Tibbits, Matthew M.; Groendyke, Chris; Haran, Murali; Liechty, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms offer a very general approach for sampling from arbitrary distributions. However, designing and tuning MCMC algorithms for each new distribution, can be challenging and time consuming. It is particularly difficult to create an efficient sampler when there is strong dependence among the variables in a multivariate distribution. We describe a two-pronged approach for constructing efficient, automated MCMC algorithms: (1) we propose the “factor slice sampler”, a generalization of the univariate slice sampler where we treat the selection of a coordinate basis (factors) as an additional tuning parameter, and (2) we develop an approach for automatically selecting tuning parameters in order to construct an efficient factor slice sampler. In addition to automating the factor slice sampler, our tuning approach also applies to the standard univariate slice samplers. We demonstrate the efficiency and general applicability of our automated MCMC algorithm with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:24955002

  19. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  20. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  1. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  2. A load factor formula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Roy G

    1927-01-01

    The ultimate test of a load factor formula is experience. The chief advantages of a semi rational formula over arbitrary factors are that it fairs in between points of experience and it differentiates according to variables within a type. Structural failure of an airplane apparently safe according to the formula would call for a specific change in the formula. The best class of airplanes with which to check a load factor formula seems to be those which have experienced structural failure. Table I comprises a list of the airplanes which have experienced failure in flight traceable to the wing structure. The load factor by formula is observed to be greater than the designed strength in each case, without a single exception. Table II comprises the load factor by formula with the designed strength of a number of well-known service types. The formula indicates that by far the majority of these have ample structural strength. One case considered here in deriving a suitable formula is that of a heavy load carrier of large size and practically no reserve power.

  3. Power Factor Controller Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson Engineers, Inc.

    1989-08-01

    The complete report is divided into three parts as follows: (1) This report combines a historical perspective with a current assessment of the use of power factor controllers for three-phase ac motor energy savings. The power factor controller (PFC) is a power electronics device that reduces voltage to a motor during periods of reduced motor torque requirements. (2) A power factor controller (PFC) is a power electronics device that reduces voltage to a motor during periods of reduced motor torque requirements. This report is the DEMONSTRATION phase of the PFC study. The phase report consists of three task reports -- Site Selection, Demonstration Preparation, and Demonstration. The reports explain how three sites were selected for demonstration, describe what was measured at each site and the method of measurement, and compare measured energy savings with calculated predictions of energy savings. The report concludes that PFCs can save energy on carefully selected motor applications. (3) The results of the demonstration task are described in this report. A power factor controller (PFC) is a power electronics device that reduces voltage to a motor during periods of reduced motor torque requirements. The demonstration phase of this study calculates projected energy savings with the use of a PFC and compares measured performance with the calculations. The effect of the PFC on motor power requirements, power factor and energy consumption shall be measured.

  4. Electromagnetic nucleon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.; Roberts, C.D.; Frank, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equation framework is employed to obtain expressions for the electromagnetic nucleon form factor. In generalized impulse approximation the form factor depends on the dressed quark propagator, the dressed quark-photon vertex, which is crucial to ensuring current conservation, and the nucleon Faddeev amplitude. The approach manifestly incorporates the large space-like-q{sup 2} renormalization group properties of QCD and allows a realistic extrapolation to small space-like-q{sup 2}. This extrapolation allows one to relate experimental data to the form of the quark-quark interaction at small space-like-q{sup 2}, which is presently unknown. The approach provides a means of unifying, within a single framework, the treatment of the perturbative and nonperturbative regimes of QCD. The wealth of experimental nucleon form factor data, over a large range of q{sup 2}, ensures that this application will provide an excellent environment to test, improve and extend our approach.

  5. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  6. Psychological Factors in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Asthma has long been considered a condition in which psychological factors have a role. As in many illnesses, psychological variables may affect outcome in asthma via their effects on treatment adherence and symptom reporting. Emerging evidence suggests that the relation between asthma and psychological factors may be more complex than that, however. Central cognitive processes may influence not only the interpretation of asthma symptoms but also the manifestation of measurable changes in immune and physiologic markers of asthma. Furthermore, asthma and major depressive disorder share several risk factors and have similar patterns of dysregulation in key biologic systems, including the neuroendocrine stress response, cytokines, and neuropeptides. Despite the evidence that depression is common in people with asthma and exerts a negative impact on outcome, few treatment studies have examined whether improving symptoms of depression do, in fact, result in better control of asthma symptoms or improved quality of life in patients with asthma. PMID:20525122

  7. DSN human factors project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafin, R. L.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The project plan was to hold focus groups to identify the factors influencing the ease of use characteristics of software and to bond the problem. A questionnaire survey was conducted to evaluate those factors which were more appropriately measured with that method. The performance oriented factors were analyzed and relationships hypothesized. The hypotheses were put to test in the experimental phase of the project. In summary, the initial analysis indicates that there is an initial performance effect favoring computer controlled dialogue but the advantage fades fast as operators become experienced. The user documentation style is seen to have a significant effect on performance. The menu and prompt command formats are preferred by inexperienced operators. The short form mnemonic is least favored. There is no clear best command format but the short form mnemonic is clearly the worst.

  8. Multi-factor authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  9. Anti-nutritional Factors.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Anti-nutritional factors such as trypsin inhibitor, phytic acid and cyanogen are as important as nutritional content of any edible plant part. The anti-nutritional factors can be defined as those substances generated in natural food substances by the normal metabolism of species and by different mechanisms (e.g. inactivation of some nutrients, diminution of the digestive process or metabolic utilization of feed) which exert effects contrary to optimum nutrition. Hence, trypsin inhibitor, phytic acid and cyanogens present in edibles with the methods in the chapter would be helpful. PMID:26939264

  10. WRKY transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  11. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  12. Radiative Gaunt factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Alan; Summers, Hugh P.

    1987-05-01

    Numerical methods for the evaluation of radiative Gaunt factors for complex ions, and for the calculation of the principal integrals over the Gaunt factors relevant to plasma spectroscopy, are presented. The present techniques are suitable for the computation of intermediate accuracy results for large numbers of ions over extended parameter ranges, and they cover bound-bound, bound-free, and free-free cases in both hydrogenic and nonhydrogenic approximations. The results demonstrate the reliability of the numerical methods and their advantages over the methods of Peach (1965, 1967) and Burgess and Seaton (1960). Significant differences from hydrogenic results at low and moderate z values are pointed out.

  13. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  14. Factor D Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The trauma caused by the open heart surgery often triggers massive inflammation because the immune system overreacts. Factor D, the protein which plays a key role in the biological steps that activate this immune response prevents the imune system from inappropriately rurning out of control, allowing the patient to recover more rapidly. Factor D blockers, with their great potential to alleviate the complication of inflammation associated with heart surgery, are now being developed for clinical trials. These new drugs, developed from space research, should be commercially available as soon as year 2001.

  15. Factor Analysis and Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    1970-01-01

    Topics discussed include factor analysis versus cluster analysis, analysis of Q correlation matrices, ipsativity and factor analysis, and tests for the significance of a correlation matrix prior to application of factor analytic techniques. Techniques for factor extraction discussed include principal components, canonical factor analysis, alpha…

  16. Radiation View Factor With Shadowing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-24

    FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors as input data to finite element heat transfer analysis codes.

  17. Recombinant factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Michael G

    2004-01-01

    Human coagulation factor (F) VII is a single chain protease that circulates in the blood as a weakly active zymogen at concentrations of approximately 10 nmol/L. When converted to the active 2 chain form (FVIIa), it is a powerful initiator of haemostasis. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa, eptacog alfa, NovoSeven) is a genetically engineered product that was first introduced in 1988 for the treatment of patients with haemophilia A and B with high inhibitory antibody titres to factors VIII and IX. Recent reports in the form of case studies and series, and early trial data, have suggested a role for rFVIIa across a diverse range of indications including bleeding associated with trauma, surgery, thrombocytopaenia, liver disease and oral anticoagulant toxicity. This review describes the physiology of the coagulation pathway and in particular the role of recombinant factor VIIa. It will also focus on the emerging role of rFVIIa in both trauma and non-trauma bleeding and its potential use in the ED. PMID:15537408

  18. ERYTHROPOIETIC FACTOR PURIFICATION

    DOEpatents

    White, W.F.; Schlueter, R.J.

    1962-05-01

    A method is given for purifying and concentrating the blood plasma erythropoietic factor. Anemic sheep plasma is contacted three times successively with ion exchange resins: an anion exchange resin, a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 5, and a cation exchange resin at a pH of about 6. (AEC)

  19. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and radiation fallout from power plant accidents or nuclear weapons. Having had head or neck radiation treatments in childhood is a risk factor for ... should be done using the lowest dose of radiation that still provides a clear ... from nuclear weapons or power plant accidents. For instance, thyroid ...

  20. Common conversion factors.

    PubMed

    2001-05-01

    This appendix presents tables of some of the more common conversion factors for units of measure used throughout Current Protocols manuals, as well as prefixes indicating powers of ten for SI units. Another table gives conversions between temperatures on the Celsius (Centigrade) and Fahrenheit scales. PMID:18770653

  1. Affective Factors: Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasnimi, Mahshad

    2009-01-01

    Affective factors seem to play a crucial role in success or failure in second language acquisition. Negative attitudes can reduce learners' motivation and harm language learning, while positive attitudes can do the reverse. Discovering students' attitudes about language will help both teacher and student in teaching learning process. Anxiety is…

  2. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  3. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  4. Inelastic Scattering Form Factors

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-01-01

    ATHENA-IV computes form factors for inelastic scattering calculations, using single-particle wave functions that are eigenstates of motion in either a Woods-Saxon potential well or a harmonic oscillator well. Two-body forces of Gauss, Coulomb, Yukawa, and a sum of cut-off Yukawa radial dependences are available.

  5. Peptide growth factors, part B

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: Platelet-Derived Growth Factor;Nerve and Glial Growth Factors;PC12 Pheochromocytoma Cells;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Genetic Approaches and Biological Effects.

  6. Inhibition of Notch Signaling Ameliorates Acute Kidney Failure and Downregulates Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor β in the Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Jan; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Pagel, Horst; Cakiroglu, Figen; Rohwedel, Jürgen; Just, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with high morbidity and frequent complications. Repeated episodes of AKI may lead to end-stage renal failure. The pathobiology of regeneration in AKI is not well understood and there is no effective clinical therapy that improves regeneration. The Notch signaling pathway plays an essential role in kidney development and has been implicated in tissue repair in the adult kidney. Here, we found that kidneys after experimental AKI in mice showed increased expression of Notch receptors, specifically Notch1-3, of the Notch ligands Jagged-1 (Jag1), Jag2 and Delta-like-4 (Dll4) and of the Notch target genes Hes1, Hey2, HeyL, Sox9 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (Pdgfrb). Treatment of ischemic mice with the x03B3;-secretase inhibitor DBZ blocked Notch signaling and specifically downregulated the expression of Notch3 and the Notch target genes Hes1, Hey2, HeyL and Pdgfrb. After DBZ treatment, the mice developed less interstitial edema and displayed altered interstitial inflammation patterns. Furthermore, serum urea and creatinine levels were significantly decreased from 6 h onwards when compared to control mice treated with DMSO only. Our data are consistent with an amelioration of the severity of kidney injury by blocking Notch activation following AKI, and suggest an involvement of Notch-regulated Pdgfrb in AKI pathogenesis. PMID:26939110

  7. Insulin-like growth factor-I is an autocrine regulator for the brain metastatic variant of a human non-small cell lung cell line.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C C; Fang, K; Li, L; Shih, S H

    1995-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) is associated with autocrine and paracrine stimulation for cell growth and development of brain tumor cells. The function of IGF-I in the brain metastatic variant of human lung cancer cells is investigated. The cells used here were derived in vivo with intracarotid injection of human non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H226. The tumor was developed as a cultured cell line, H226Br. Unlike the parental cells, H226Br was tumorigenic in nu/nu nude mice. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed that IGF-I transcript of H226Br is increased compared to that of parental cells. The amount of IGF-I secreted in cultured medium of H226Br is higher than that of cultured parental cells. The IGF-I receptor-specific antibody, alpha IR3, inhibits H226Br growth in serum-free culture. The results established that IGF-I is an autocrine growth regulator for human non-small cell lung cancer cells that progressed to brain. PMID:7634243

  8. Factor structure of nonverbal cognition.

    PubMed

    Ardil, A; Pineda, D A

    2000-01-01

    In order to define the factor structure of nonverbal cognitive processes, 156 twenty to sixty year-old participants were selected in Medellin (Colombia). A neuropsychological test battery for assessing different nonverbal cognitive domains (attention, memory, visuoperceptual and visuoconstructive abilities. executive functions, praxis abilities, and written calculation abilities) was administered. Initially, independent factor analyses were carried out for each domain. Three attention factors (Sustained Attention, Divided Attention, and Processing Speed, 73.1% of the variance); two memory factors (Categorical and Non-Categorical Memory, 59.7% of the variance): two visuoperceptual and visuoconstructive factors (Sequential and Simultaneous, 54.0% of the variance); and two executive function factors (Categorization and Trial Error, 82.0% of the variance) were found. Further, several sequential factor analyses using Varimax orthogonal rotations for noncorrelated variables were performed. The 32 test variables were included, but progressively some variables were removed. This procedure finally selected 13 variables corresponding to five factors accounting for 72.6% of variance. Factor I was an Executive Function factor (30% of variance). Factor 2 corresponded to a Sequential Constructional factor (14.7%). Factor 3 represented a Processing Speed factor and accounted for 10.6% of the variance. Factor 4 was Visuoperceptual factor (9.5% of the variance). Finally, Factor 5 (7.8% of the variance) was a Nonverbal Memory factor. It was concluded that several, different cognitive dimensions are included in nonverbal cognition. PMID:11011978

  9. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  10. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection. PMID:25456681

  11. Factors regulating microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Katrin; Prinz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) that display high functional similarities to other tissue macrophages. However, it is especially important to create and maintain an intact tissue homeostasis to support the neuronal cells, which are very sensitive even to minor changes in their environment. The transition from the “resting” but surveying microglial phenotype to an activated stage is tightly regulated by several intrinsic (e.g., Runx-1, Irf8, and Pu.1) and extrinsic factors (e.g., CD200, CX3CR1, and TREM2). Under physiological conditions, minor changes of those factors are sufficient to cause fatal dysregulation of microglial cell homeostasis and result in severe CNS pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent achievements that gave new insights into mechanisms that ensure microglia quiescence. PMID:23630462

  12. Risk Factors in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mustacchi, Piero

    1985-01-01

    In the United States, stroke accounts for 160,000 annual deaths; only 16% of the 1.8 million stroke survivors are fully independent. The incidence of stroke increases with age. Hemorrhagic strokes outnumber ischemic strokes before age 15. Japanese men in this country have a lower stroke mortality than their age peers in Japan. Excessive stroke mortality for US nonwhites may not be entirely due to the greater prevalence of hypertension among blacks. Hypertension emerges as the single most powerful and reversible risk factor in stroke and for survival after stroke. Impaired cardiac function is the second most important precursor of stroke. The recurrence of stroke in survivors is high. The frequency of completed stroke is high in persons with transient ischemic attacks, but not in those with asymptomatic carotid bruits. Other reversible risk factors are smoking, the use of oral contraceptives, alcoholic excess, a low level of physical activity, blood hyperviscosity and drug abuse. PMID:3898597

  13. Human factors workplace considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Computer workstations assume many different forms and play different functions today. In order for them to assume the effective interface role which they should play they must be properly designed to take into account the ubiguitous human factor. In addition, the entire workplace in which they are used should be properly configured so as to enhance the operational features of the individual workstation where possible. A number of general human factors workplace considerations are presented. This ongoing series of notes covers such topics as achieving comfort and good screen visibility, hardware issues (e.g., mouse maintenance), screen symbology features (e.g., labels, cursors, prompts), and various miscellaneous subjects. These notes are presented here in order to: (1) illustrate how one's workstation can be used to support telescience activities of many other people working within an organization, and (2) provide a single complete set of considerations for future reference.

  14. Growth factors for nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1999-12-01

    Nanobacteria are novel microorganisms recently isolated from fetal bovine serum and blood of cows and humans. These coccoid, gram negative bacteria in alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria grow slowly under mammalian cell culture conditions but not in common media for microbes. Now we have found two different kinds of culture supplement preparations that improve their growth and make them culturable in the classical sense. These are supernatant fractions of conditioned media obtained from 1 - 3 months old nanobacteria cultures and from about a 2 weeks old Bacillus species culture. Both improved multiplication and particle yields and the latter increased their resistance to gentamicin. Nanobacteria cultured with any of the methods shared similar immunological property, structure and protein pattern. The growth supporting factors were heat-stabile and nondialyzable, and dialysis improved the growth promoting action. Nanobacteria formed stony colonies in a bacteriological medium supplemented with the growth factors. This is an implication that nanobacterial growth is influenced by pre-existing bacterial flora.

  15. Power Factor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Frank Nola invented the Power Factor Controller (PFC) at Marshall Space Flight Center more than a decade ago. Nola came up with a way to curb power wastage in AC induction motors. The PFC matches voltage with the motor's actual need by continuously sensing shifts between voltage and current. When it senses a light load it cuts the voltage to the minimum needed. Potential energy savings range from 8 to 65 percent.

  16. Factorization of simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Mortveit, H. S.; Reidys, C. M.

    2001-01-01

    A simulation is collection of agents that, according to some schedule, are making decisions based on information about other agents in that collection. In this paper we present a class of dynamical systems called Sequential Dynamical Systems (SDS) that was developed to capture these key features of computer simulations. Here, as an example of the use of SDS, we demonstrate how one can obtain information about a simulation by a factorization into smaller simulations.

  17. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2004-08-01

    Although nucleons account for nearly all the visible mass in the universe, they have a complicated structure that is still incompletely understood. The first indication that nucleons have an internal structure, was the measurement of the proton magnetic moment by Frisch and Stern (1933) which revealed a large deviation from the value expected for a point-like Dirac particle. The investigation of the spatial structure of the nucleon, resulting in the first quantitative measurement of the proton charge radius, was initiated by the HEPL (Stanford) experiments in the 1950s, for which Hofstadter was awarded the 1961 Nobel prize. The first indication of a non-zero neutron charge distribution was obtained by scattering thermal neutrons off atomic electrons. The recent revival of its experimental study through the operational implementation of novel instrumentation has instigated a strong theoretical interest. Nucleon electro-magnetic form factors (EMFFs) are optimally studied through the exchange of a virtual photon, in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The momentum transferred to the nucleon by the virtual photon can be selected to probe different scales of the nucleon, from integral properties such as the charge radius to scaling properties of its internal constituents. Polarization instrumentation, polarized beams and targets, and the measurement of the polarization of the recoiling nucleon have been essential in the accurate separation of the charge and magnetic form factors and in studies of the elusive neutron charge form factor.

  18. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  19. Fano factor estimation.

    PubMed

    Rajdl, Kamil; Lansky, Petr

    2014-02-01

    Fano factor is one of the most widely used measures of variability of spike trains. Its standard estimator is the ratio of sample variance to sample mean of spike counts observed in a time window and the quality of the estimator strongly depends on the length of the window. We investigate this dependence under the assumption that the spike train behaves as an equilibrium renewal process. It is shown what characteristics of the spike train have large effect on the estimator bias. Namely, the effect of refractory period is analytically evaluated. Next, we create an approximate asymptotic formula for the mean square error of the estimator, which can also be used to find minimum of the error in estimation from single spike trains. The accuracy of the Fano factor estimator is compared with the accuracy of the estimator based on the squared coefficient of variation. All the results are illustrated for spike trains with gamma and inverse Gaussian probability distributions of interspike intervals. Finally, we discuss possibilities of how to select a suitable observation window for the Fano factor estimation. PMID:24245675

  20. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    General guidance for designing field studies to measure bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) is not available. To develop such guidance, a series of modeling simulations were performed to evaluate the underlying factors and principles th...

  1. Tyrosine kinase activity of a chimeric insulin-like-growth-factor-1 receptor containing the insulin receptor C-terminal domain. Comparison with the tyrosine kinase activities of the insulin and insulin-like-growth-factor-1 receptors using a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Mothe, I; Tartare, S; Kowalski-Chauvel, A; Kaliman, P; Van Obberghen, E; Ballotti, R

    1995-03-15

    In a previous study, we showed that a chimeric insulin-like-growth-factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor, with the beta subunit C-terminal part of the insulin receptor was more efficient in stimulating glycogen synthesis and p44mapk activity compared to the wild-type IFG-1 receptor [Tartare, S., Mothe, I., Kowalski-Chauvel, A., Breittmayer, J.-P., Ballotti, R. & Van Obberghen, E. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 11449-11455]. These data indicate that the receptor C-terminal domain plays an important role in the transmission of biological effects. To understand the molecular basis of the differences in receptor specificity, we studied the characteristics of insulin, IGF-1 and chimeric receptor tyrosine kinase activities in a cell-free system. We found that, compared to wild-type insulin and IGF-1 receptors, the chimeric receptor showed a decrease in (a) autophosphorylation, (b) tyrosine kinase activity towards insulin receptor substrate-1 and the insulin receptor-(1142-1158)-peptide, and (c) the ability to activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, for all the effects measured in a cell-free system, the chimeric receptor displayed an increased response to IGF-1 compared to the native IGF-1 receptor. Concerning the cation dependence of the tyrosine kinase activity, we showed that, at 10 mM Mg2+, the ligand-stimulated phosphorylation of poly(Glu80Tyr20) by both insulin receptor and chimeric receptor was increased by Mn2+. Conversely at 50 mM Mg2+, the chimeric receptor behaved like the IGF-1 receptor, since the presence of Mn2+ decreased the stimulatory effect of IGF-1 on their kinase activity. Furthermore, the Km of the chimeric receptor for ATP was increased compared to the wild-type receptors. These data demonstrate that the replacement of the C-terminal tail of the IGF-1 receptor by that of the insulin receptor has changed the receptor characteristics studied in a cell-free system. Our findings indicate that the C-terminal domain of the insulin receptor beta subunit plays a

  2. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  3. Activation of human factor V by factor Xa and thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Monkovic, D.D.; Tracy, P.B. )

    1990-02-06

    The activation of human factor V by factor Xa and thrombin was studied by functional assessment of cofactor activity and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polycarylamide gel electrophoresis followed by either autoradiography of {sup 125}I-labeled factor V activation products or Western blot analyses of unlabeled factor V activation products. Cofactor activity was measured by the ability of the factor V/Va peptides to support the activation of prothrombin. The factor Xa catalyzed cleavage of factor V was observed to be time, phospholipid, and calcium ion dependent, yielding a cofactor with activity equal to that of thrombin-activated factor V (factor Va). The cleavage pattern differed markedly from the one observed in the bovine system. The factor Xa activated factor V subunits expressing cofactor activity were isolated and found to consist of peptides of M{sub r} 220,000 and 105,000. Although thrombin cleaved the M{sub r} 220,000 peptide to yield peptides previously shown to be products of thrombin activation, cofactor activity did not increase. N-Terminal sequence analysis confirmed that both factor Xa and thrombin cleave factor V at the same bond to generate the M{sub r} 220,000 peptide. The factor Xa dependent functional assessment of {sup 125}I-labeled factor V coupled with densitometric analyses of the cleavage products indicated that the cofactor activity of factor Xa activated factor V closely paralleled the appearance of the M{sub r} 220,000 peptide. The data indicate that factor Xa is as efficient an enzyme toward factor V as thrombin.

  4. Milestones and Impact Factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Environmental Health has just received its first Impact Factor by Thomson ISI. At a level of 2.48, this achievement is quite satisfactory and places Environmental Health in the top 25% of environmental science journals. When the journal was launched in 2002, it was still unclear whether the Open Access publishing model could be made into a viable commercial enterprise within the biomedical field. During the past eight years, Open Access journals have become widely available, although still covering only about 15% of journal titles. Major funding agencies and institutions, including prominent US universities, now require that researchers publish in Open Access journals. Because of the profound role of scientific journals for the sharing of results and communication between researchers, the advent of Open Access may be of as much significance as the transition from handwriting to printing via moveable type. As Environmental Health is an electronic Open Access journal, the numbers of downloads at the journal website can be retrieved. The top-20 list of articles most frequently accessed shows that all of them have been downloaded over 10,000 times. Back in 2002, the first article published was accessed only 49 times during the following month. A year later, the server had over 1,000 downloads per month, and now the total number of monthly downloads approaches 50,000. These statistics complement the Impact Factor and confirm the viability of Open Access in our field of research. The advent of digital media and its decentralized mode of distribution - the internet - have dramatically changed the control and financing of scientific information dissemination, while facilitating peer review, accelerating editorial handling, and supporting much needed transparency. Both the meaning and means of "having an impact" are therefore changing, as will the degree and way in which scientific journals remain "factors" in that impact. PMID:20615249

  5. Neutron quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Both the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that the radiation quality weighting factor for neutrons (Q{sub n}, or the corresponding new modifying factor, w{sub R}) be increased by a value of two for most radiation protection practices. This means an increase in the recommended value for Q{sub n} from a nominal value of 10 to a nominal value of 20. This increase may be interpreted to mean that the biological effectiveness of neutrons is two times greater than previously thought. A decision to increase the value of Q{sub n} will have a major impact on the regulations and radiation protection programs of Federal agencies responsible for the protection of radiation workers. Therefore, the purposes of this report are: (1) to examine the general concept of {open_quotes}quality factor{close_quotes} (Q) in radiation protection and the rationale for the selection of specific values of Q{sub n}; and (2) to make such recommendations to the Federal agencies, as appropriate. This report is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the scientific literature on the biological effects of neutrons, with the aim of defending a particular value for Q{sub n}. Rather, the working group examined the technical issues surrounding the current recommendations of scientific advisory bodies on this matter, with the aim of determining if these recommendations should be adopted by the Federal agencies. Ultimately, the group concluded that there was no compelling basis for a change in Q{sub n}. The report was prepared by Federal scientists working under the auspices of the Science Panel of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC).

  6. Nucleon elastic form factors

    SciTech Connect

    D. Day

    2007-03-01

    The nucleon form factors are still the subject of active investigation even after an experimental effort spanning 50 years. This is because they are of critical importance to our understanding of the electromagnetic properties of nuclei and provide a unique testing ground for QCD motivated models of nucleon structure. Progress in polarized beams, polarized targets and recoil polarimetry have allowed an important and precise set of data to be collected over the last decade. I will review the experimental status of elastic electron scattering from the nucleon along with an outlook for future progress.

  7. Psychosocial factors in obesity.

    PubMed

    Mustajoki, P

    1987-01-01

    Obese people as a group have similar mental health as normal weight people, and there are no psychiatric features characteristic of obesity in general. However, small subgroups of obese individuals may have psychiatric abnormalities which are specific for obesity, such as body image disturbance or periodic compulsive overeating (bulimia). Obesity is strongly related to sociocultural factors. In western countries obesity is commoner in lower than in higher social classes. Thus, the development of obesity is influenced by social status. However, also the converse is true: recent observations suggest that obese people lose social status. This is probably due to prejudice and discrimination against obese persons in the modern western society. PMID:3477994

  8. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  9. Stress intensity factors

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan, F.

    1983-12-01

    In this work the concept of the stress intensity factor, the underlying mechanics problem leading to its emergence, and its physical relevance, particularly its relation to fracture mechanics are discussed. The reasons as to why it has become nearly an indispensable tool for studying such important phenomena as brittle fracture and fatigue or corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural solids are considered. A brief discussion of some of the important methods of solution of elastic crack problems is given. Also, a number of related special mechanics problems are described. 24 references.

  10. Electromagnetic pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    A phenomenological Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to QCD, formalized in terms of a QCD-based model field theory, the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the generalized impulse approximation contribution to the electromagnetic pion form factor at space-like q{sup 2} on the domain [0,10] GeV{sup 2}. In effective field theories this form factor is sometimes understood as simply being due to Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) but this does not allow for a simple connection with QCD where the VMD contribution is of higher order than that of the quark core. In the GCM the pion is treated as a composite bound state of a confined quark and antiquark interacting via the exchange of colored vector-bosons. A direct study of the quark core contribution is made, using a quark propagator that manifests the large space-like-q{sup 2} properties of QCD, parameterizes the infrared behavior and incorporates confinement. It is shown that the few parameters which characterize the infrared form of the quark propagator may be chosen so as to yield excellent agreement with the available data. In doing this one directly relates experimental observables to properties of QCD at small space-like-q{sup 2}. The incorporation of confinement eliminates endpoint and pinch singularities in the calculation of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). With asymptotic freedom manifest in the dressed quark propagator the calculation yields q{sup 4}F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) = constant, up to [q{sup 2}]- corrections, for space-like-q{sup 2} {approx_gt} 35 GeV{sup 2}, which indicates that soft, nonperturbative contributions dominate the form factor at presently accessible q{sup 2}. This means that the often-used factorization Ansatz fails in this exclusive process. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication. In addition, these results formed the basis for an invited presentation at a workshop on chiral dynamics and will be published in the proceedings.

  11. From compatible factorization to near-compatible factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiabat, Raja'i.; Ibrahim, Haslinda

    2014-12-01

    A compatible factorization of order ν, is an ν× ν-1/2 array in which the entries in row i form a near-one-factor with focus i, and the triples associated with the rows contain no repetitions. In this paper, we aim to amend this compatible factorization so that we can display ν(ν-1)/2 - 2ν/3 triples with the minimum repeated triples. Throughout this paper we propose a new type of factorization called near-compatible factorization. First, we present the compatible factorization towards developing a near-compatible factorization. Second, we discuss briefly the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of near-compatible factorization. Then, we exemplify the construction for case ν = 9 as a groundwork in developing near-compatible factorization.

  12. Receptors for B cell stimulatory factor 2. Quantitation, specificity, distribution, and regulation of their expression

    SciTech Connect

    Taga, T.; Kawanishi, Y.; Hardy, R.R.; Hirano, T.; Kishimoto, T.

    1987-10-01

    B cell stimulatory factor 2 receptors (BSF-2-R) were studied using radioiodinated recombinant BSF-2 with a specific activity of 6.16 X 10(13) cpm/g. Kinetic studies showed that binding of /sup 125/I-BSF-2 to CESS cells reached maximum level within 150 min at 0 degrees C. There was a single class of receptors with high affinity (Kd 3.4 X 10(-10) M) on CESS, and the number of receptors was 2700 per cell. Binding of /sup 125/I-BSF-2 to CESS was competitively inhibited by unlabeled BSF-2 but not by IL-1, IL-2, IFN-beta, IFN-gamma, and G-CSF, indicating the presence of the receptors specific for BSF-2. EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (CESS, SKW6-CL4, LCL13, and LCL14) expressed BSF-2-R, whereas Burkitt's lines did not. EBV or EBNA2 did not induce the expression of the receptors on Burkitt's cells. The plasma cell lines (ARH-77 and U266) expressed BSF-2-R, fitting the function of BSF-2 as plasma cell growth factor. Several other cell lines, the histiocytic line U937, the promyelocytic line HL60, the astrocytoma line U373 and the glioblastoma line SK-MG-4, in which BSF-2 was inducible with IL-1 or TPA, displayed BSF-2-R with Kd in the range of 1.3-6.4 X 10(-10) M, suggesting the autocrine mechanism in BSF-2 function. The four T cell lines (CEM, HSB, Jurkat, and OM 1) did not express a detectable number of receptors, but normal resting T cells expressed 100-1000 receptors per cell. BSF-2-R were not present on normal resting B cells but expressed on activated B cells with a Kd of 3.6-5.0 X 10(-10) M, fitting the function of BSF-2, which acts on B cells at the final maturation stage to induce immunoglobulin production.

  13. Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP-2) Activates NFATc1 Transcription Factor via an Autoregulatory Loop Involving Smad/Akt/Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chandi C; Das, Falguni; Ganapathy, Suthakar; Harris, Stephen E; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini

    2016-01-15

    Bone remodeling is controlled by dual actions of osteoclasts (OCs) and osteoblasts (OBs). The calcium-sensitive nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 transcription factor, as an OC signature gene, regulates differentiation of OCs downstream of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-stimulated osteoblast-coded factors. To analyze a functional link between BMP-2 and NFATc1, we analyzed bones from OB-specific BMP-2 knock-out mice for NFATc1 expression by immunohistochemical staining and found significant reduction in NFATc1 expression. This indicated a requirement of BMP-2 for NFATc1 expression in OBs. We showed that BMP-2, via the receptor-specific Smad pathway, regulates expression of NFATc1 in OBs. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling acting downstream of BMP-2 also drives NFATc1 expression and transcriptional activation. Under the basal condition, NFATc1 is phosphorylated. Activation of NFAT requires dephosphorylation by the calcium-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin. We examined the role of calcium in BMP-2-stimulated regulation of NFATc1 in osteoblasts. 1,2Bis(2aminophenoxy)ethaneN,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester, an inhibitor of intracellular calcium abundance, blocked BMP-2-induced transcription of NFATc1. Interestingly, BMP-2 induced calcium release from intracellular stores and increased calcineurin phosphatase activity, resulting in NFATc1 nuclear translocation. Cyclosporin A, which inhibits calcineurin upstream of NFATc1, blocked BMP-2-induced NFATc1 mRNA and protein expression. Expression of NFATc1 directly increased its transcription and VIVIT peptide, an inhibitor of NFATc1, suppressed BMP-2-stimulated NFATc1 transcription, confirming its autoregulation. Together, these data show a role of NFATc1 downstream of BMP-2 in mouse bone development and provide novel evidence for the presence of a cross-talk among Smad, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and Ca(2+) signaling for BMP-2-induced NFATc1 expression through

  14. SARSCEST (human factors)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, H. Mcilvaine

    1988-01-01

    People interact with the processes and products of contemporary technology. Individuals are affected by these in various ways and individuals shape them. Such interactions come under the label 'human factors'. To expand the understanding of those to whom the term is relatively unfamiliar, its domain includes both an applied science and applications of knowledge. It means both research and development, with implications of research both for basic science and for development. It encompasses not only design and testing but also training and personnel requirements, even though some unwisely try to split these apart both by name and institutionally. The territory includes more than performance at work, though concentration on that aspect, epitomized in the derivation of the term ergonomics, has overshadowed human factors interest in interactions between technology and the home, health, safety, consumers, children and later life, the handicapped, sports and recreation education, and travel. Two aspects of technology considered most significant for work performance, systems and automation, and several approaches to these, are discussed.

  15. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF).

    PubMed

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26187859

  16. Auxin response factors.

    PubMed

    Chandler, John William

    2016-05-01

    Auxin signalling involves the activation or repression of gene expression by a class of auxin response factor (ARF) proteins that bind to auxin response elements in auxin-responsive gene promoters. The release of ARF repression in the presence of auxin by the degradation of their cognate auxin/indole-3-acetic acid repressors forms a paradigm of transcriptional response to auxin. However, this mechanism only applies to activating ARFs, and further layers of complexity of ARF function and regulation are being revealed, which partly reflect their highly modular domain structure. This review summarizes our knowledge concerning ARF binding site specificity, homodimer and heterodimer multimeric ARF association and cooperative function and how activator ARFs activate target genes via chromatin remodelling and evolutionary information derived from phylogenetic comparisons from ARFs from diverse species. ARFs are regulated in diverse ways, and their importance in non-auxin-regulated pathways is becoming evident. They are also embedded within higher-order transcription factor complexes that integrate signalling pathways from other hormones and in response to the environment. The ways in which new information concerning ARFs on many levels is causing a revision of existing paradigms of auxin response are discussed. PMID:26487015

  17. Enhanced target factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Akram; Abdollahi, Hamid; Maeder, Marcel

    2016-03-10

    Target testing or target factor analysis, TFA, is a well-established soft analysis method. TFA answers the question whether an independent target test vector measured at the same wavelengths as the collection of spectra in a data matrix can be excluded as the spectrum of one of the components in the system under investigation. Essentially, TFA cannot positively prove that a particular test spectrum is the true spectrum of one of the components, it can, only reject a spectrum. However, TFA will not reject, or in other words TFA will accept, many spectra which cannot be component spectra. Enhanced Target Factor Analysis, ETFA addresses the above problem. Compared with traditional TFA, ETFA results in a significantly narrower range of positive results, i.e. the chance of a false positive test result is dramatically reduced. ETFA is based on feasibility testing as described in Refs. [16-19]. The method has been tested and validated with computer generated and real data sets. PMID:26893084

  18. Factors in risk perception

    PubMed

    Sjoberg

    2000-02-01

    Risk perception is a phenomenon in search of an explanation. Several approaches are discussed in this paper. Technical risk estimates are sometimes a potent factor in accounting for perceived risk, but in many important applications it is not. Heuristics and biases, mainly availability, account for only a minor portion of risk perception, and media contents have not been clearly implicated in risk perception. The psychometric model is probably the leading contender in the field, but its explanatory value is only around 20% of the variance of raw data. Adding a factor of "unnatural risk" considerably improves the psychometric model. Cultural Theory, on the other hand, has not been able to explain more than 5-10% of the variance of perceived risk, and other value scales have similarly failed. A model is proposed in which attitude, risk sensitivity, and specific fear are used as explanatory variables; this model seems to explain well over 30-40% of the variance and is thus more promising than previous approaches. The model offers a different type of psychological explanation of risk perception, and it has many implications, e.g., a different approach to the relationship between attitude and perceived risk, as compared with the usual cognitive analysis of attitude. PMID:10795334

  19. Streptococcal serum opacity factor increases the rate of hepatocyte uptake of human plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Baiba K; Rosales, Corina; Pillai, Biju K; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S; Pownall, Henry J

    2010-11-16

    Serum opacity factor (SOF), a virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes, converts plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to three distinct species: lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, neo HDL, a small discoidal HDL-like particle, and a large cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM) that contains the cholesterol esters (CE) of up to ∼400000 HDL particles and apo E as its major protein. Similar SOF reaction products are obtained with HDL, total plasma lipoproteins, and whole plasma. We hypothesized that hepatic uptake of CERM-CE via multiple apo E-dependent receptors would be faster than that of HDL-CE. We tested our hypothesis using human hepatoma cells and lipoprotein receptor-specific Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The uptake of [(3)H]CE by HepG2 and Huh7 cells from HDL after SOF treatment, which transfers >90% of HDL-CE to CERM, was 2.4 and 4.5 times faster, respectively, than from control HDL. CERM-[(3)H]CE uptake was inhibited by LDL and HDL, suggestive of uptake by both the LDL receptor (LDL-R) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Studies in CHO cells specifically expressing LDL-R and SR-BI confirmed CERM-[(3)H]CE uptake by both receptors. RAP and heparin inhibit CERM-[(3)H]CE but not HDL-[(3)H]CE uptake, thereby implicating LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans in this process. These data demonstrate that SOF treatment of HDL increases the rate of CE uptake via multiple hepatic apo E receptors. In so doing, SOF might increase the level of hepatic disposal of plasma cholesterol in a way that is therapeutically useful. PMID:20879789

  20. Neurotrophic factors and neurologic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, D M; Mobley, W C

    1994-01-01

    Discovered only 40 years ago, nerve growth factor is the prototypic neurotrophic factor. By binding to specific receptors on certain neurons in the peripheral nervous system and brain, nerve growth factor acts to enhance their survival, differentiation, and maintenance. In recent years, many additional neurotrophic factors have been discovered; some are structurally related to nerve growth factor while others are distinct from it. The robust actions of neurotrophic factors have suggested their use in preventing or lessening the dysfunction and death of neurons in neurologic disorders. We review the progress in defining neurotrophic factors and their receptors and in characterizing their actions. We also discuss some of the uses of neurotrophic factors in animal models of disease. Finally, we discuss how neurotrophic factors could be implicated in the pathogenesis of neurologic disorders. Images PMID:7975562

  1. Unity power factor converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A unity power factor converter capable of effecting either inversion (dc-to-dc) or rectification (ac-to-dc), and capable of providing bilateral power control from a DC source (or load) through an AC transmission line to a DC load (or source) for power flow in either direction, is comprised of comparators for comparing the AC current i with an AC signal i.sub.ref (or its phase inversion) derived from the AC ports to generate control signals to operate a switch control circuit for high speed switching to shape the AC current waveform to a sine waveform, and synchronize it in phase and frequency with the AC voltage at the AC ports, by selectively switching the connections to a series inductor as required to increase or decrease the current i.

  2. Perioperative allergy: risk factors.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, C; Stringari, G; Pajno, G B; Peroni, D G; Franceschini, F; Dello Iacono, I; Bernardini, R

    2011-01-01

    Perioperative anaphylactic as well as anaphylactoid reactions can be elicited by drugs, diagnostic agents, antiseptics, disinfectants and latex. In some individuals, allergic reactions occur in the absence of any evident risk factor. Previous history of specific safe exposure to a product does not permit to exclude the risk of having a reaction. We have systematically reviewed characteristics in the patient's history or clinical parameters that affect the risk of developing reactions during anesthesia. Evidence shows that patients with previous unexplained reaction during anesthesia are at risk for perioperative allergic reactions. An allergic reaction to an agent is associated with previous reaction to a product that is related with the culprit agent. Multiple surgery procedures, professional exposure to latex and allergy to fruit are associated with an increased frequency of latex allergy. It has been shown that in some instances, allergic perioperative reactions may be more common in atopic patients and in females. PMID:22014923

  3. Pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryong Ji, C.; Pang, A.; Szczepaniak, A.

    1994-04-01

    It is pointed out that the correct criterion to define the legal PQCD contribution to the exclusive processes in the lightcone perturbative expansion should be based on the large off-shellness of the lightcone energy in the intermediate states. In the lightcone perturbative QCD calculation of the pion form factor, the authors find that the legal PQCD contribution defined by the lightcone energy cut saturates in the smaller Q{sup 2} region compared to that defined by the gluon four-momentum square cut. This is due to the contribution by the highly off-energy-shell gluons in the end point regions of the phase space, indicating that the gluon four-momentum-square cut may have cut too much to define the legal PQCD.

  4. Psychosomatic factors in pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Hong Liang; Wallengren, Joanna; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus and psyche are intricately and reciprocally related, with psychophysiological evidence and psychopathological explanations helping us to understand their complex association. Their interaction may be conceptualized and classified into 3 groups: pruritic diseases with psychiatric sequelae, pruritic diseases aggravated by psychosocial factors, and psychiatric disorders causing pruritus. Management of chronic pruritus is directed at treating the underlying causes and adopting a multidisciplinary approach to address the dermatologic, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional aspects. Pharmcotherapeutic agents that are useful for chronic pruritus with comorbid depression and/or anxiety comprise selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and doxepin), and anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin); the role of neurokinin receptor-1 antagonists awaits verification. Antipsychotics are required for treating itch and formication associated with schizophrenia and delusion of parasitosis (including Morgellons disease). PMID:23245971

  5. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  6. Nucleon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2007-10-01

    There has been much activity in the measurement of the elastic electromagnetic proton and neutron form factors in the last decade, and the quality of the data has greatly improved by performing double polarization experiments, in comparison with previous unpolarized data. Here we review the experimental data base in view of the new results for the proton, and neutron, obtained at JLab, MAMI, and MIT-Bates. The rapid evolution of phenomenological models triggered by these high-precision experiments will be discussed, including the recent progress in the determination of the valence quark generalized parton distributions of the nucleon, as well as the steady rate of improvements made in the lattice QCD calculations.

  7. Psychosomatic factors in pruritus.

    PubMed

    Tey, Hong Liang; Wallengren, Joanna; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus and psyche are intricately and reciprocally related, with psychophysiological evidence and psychopathological explanations helping us to understand their complex association. Their interaction may be conceptualized and classified into 3 groups: pruritic diseases with psychiatric sequelae, pruritic diseases aggravated by psychosocial factors, and psychiatric disorders causing pruritus. Management of chronic pruritus is directed at treating the underlying causes and adopting a multidisciplinary approach to address the dermatologic, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional aspects. Pharmcotherapeutic agents that are useful for chronic pruritus with comorbid depression and/or anxiety comprise selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline and doxepin), and anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin); the role of neurokinin receptor-1 antagonists awaits verification. Antipsychotics are required for treating itch and formication associated with schizophrenia and delusion of parasitosis (including Morgellons disease). PMID:23245971

  8. Helicopter Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  9. Factor Rotation and Standard Errors in Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report a surprising phenomenon: Oblique CF-varimax and oblique CF-quartimax rotation produced similar point estimates for rotated factor loadings and factor correlations but different standard error estimates in an empirical example. Influences of factor rotation on asymptotic standard errors are investigated using a numerical…

  10. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.